family life course
Family Life Course
”Other things may change us, but we start and end with the family”
Anthony Brandt
www.kent.gov.uk
Contents
Introduction ..................................................................................................... 4
• Welcome to the Family Life Course.............................................................. 4
• What is the Family Life Course for?.............................................................. 4
• How does it work?......................................................................................... 4
• Who can facilitate a Family Life Course?...................................................... 4
• How is Family Life different from other parent courses and programmes?... 4
• What does the course look like?................................................................... 5
• Setting up a parent group.............................................................................. 6
• How to use the manual................................................................................. 7
• Be Prepared.................................................................................................. 7
• Managing a group......................................................................................... 8
• Ice Breakers.................................................................................................. 9
• Welcome/Close Session............................................................................... 9
• Discussions................................................................................................... 10
• Evaluation..................................................................................................... 11
• Risky Areas................................................................................................... 12
Quotes about Family Life ............................................................................... 13
Session One ................................................................................................... 14
Session Two ................................................................................................... 23
Session Three ................................................................................................ 31
Session Four .................................................................................................. 39
Forms ............................................................................................................. 44
• Register......................................................................................................... 46
• Start and End Evaluations............................................................................. 47
• Equality & Diversity Monitoring Form............................................................ 50
Resource List ................................................................................................. 52
Kent County Council
3
Welcome to the Family Life course
Family Life is a resource that can be used to run a four session parent course. All the
information, factsheets, worksheets, activity guides and quizzes needed to run the course
are provided in this manual. Throughout the manual the term parent is used to represent
all carers of children, and the term ‘children’ is used to represent both children and young
people.
Please read through the whole manual before you set up a course.
What is the Family Life course for?
The aim of Family Life is to raise awareness of the importance of talking to children about
growing up. When children are given accurate information and positive guidance from their
parents, they develop the confidence to actively make informed and positive choices in their
own lives. Open parental communication can significantly reduce risk taking behaviour in young
people. It is difficult to open the doors of communication once a child has become an adolescent,
whereas if communication is already taking place between child and parent, it is easier to keep
the doors open. Family Life encourages parents to open those doors and maintain communication
with their child while they are growing up.
How does it work?
The group explores the issues of Family Life in a relaxed, humorous and non-threatening
environment. Development takes place through guided discussions, activities and worksheets.
Each session is supported with relevant factsheets and recommended resources.
Who can facilitate a Family Life course?
Family Life is not an educational course and the core sessions do not need to be facilitated by
professionals. Facilitators are ideally those working in Family Support with parents, whose work is
overseen and managed by an organisation that can provide the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Supervision
Safe and appropriate venue
Refreshments
Risk Assessment
Child Protection training and support
Equality and Diversity awareness training
How is Family Life different from other parent courses and programmes?
Family Life is an informal, non-teaching course. Parents gain knowledge, confidence and new
ideas through discussion with each other, and use of the worksheets. For input on parenting and
dealing with childhood issues, parents should access a registered programme e.g. Incredible
Years, Strengthening Families Strengthening Communities, Solihull, Freedom Programme or
other.
4
Family Life Course
What does the course look like?
The course is designed to be delivered in 4 sessions of 2 hours each. Ideally these would be held
once a week giving time for those taking part to absorb the topics discussed, although different
structures of the course are also fine.
It is often helpful to invite people along for a pre-course session, so that they can find out more
about the course, get to know you and each other, and become familiar with the venue.
Session
Topic
Pre-Course Welcome and Introduce the Family Life Course
1
Puberty & Growing Up
2
Talking to Children and Young People
3
Influences Pressures on Family Life
4
SRE in schools and at home
Different elements of Family Life are explored and discussed in each session. It may be decided
by the group that more information on Sexual Health would be useful. There are experts in the
County who are willing to visit parent groups to talk about:
•
•
•
•
Contraception
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Young People’s Sexual Health services
Delaying Early Sexual Activity
If the group would like this input, consider inviting a Sexual Health expert to the group. Parents
welcome the opportunity to speak openly with a professional about issues that concern them, and
Sexual Health experts have an abundance of resources and literature to demonstrate and share
along with their knowledge and humour on this often difficult subject.
Family Life has been designed as a 4 session course with each session complementing each
other.
However, individual sessions and resources can be pulled out and used in other contexts eg
supporting a relevant topic within another group.
Kent County Council
5
Setting up a parent group
Things to consider before you begin:
TIME: It takes time to prepare and run a course. If you are planning to run a weekly course during
a school term, you will need to do your preparation, recruitment and sometimes your welcome
session in the preceding term. This will allow the four sessions to fit comfortably within a school
term. It is often hard to maintain a course that runs over a holiday.
VENUE: You need a room that will be comfortable, welcoming and large enough for the group.
Privacy is also important as parents may feel uncomfortable if there are interruptions (or children
peering in at the window!). Consider any additional needs your parents may have, eg: disability.
TIMING: A group needs to be held at a time accessible by the parents. This should be discussed
with them.
NUMBERS: Decide on the maximum number you can accommodate in your group. Also consider
the minimum number you would need to deem the use of your time as viable. A guideline would be
4-10 if you are delivering alone and 6-12 if you have a co-facilitator.
CO-FACILITATOR: Many facilitators feel more confident when delivering in pairs. It eases the
pressure of being the only one in charge of a group and having to manage all the group dynamics
alone. It can also be of huge benefit if issues arise in the group which require simultaneous
attention, eg: small group work, coffee breaks, extra support for individuals. This is something that
needs to be decided upon early in the planning.
REFRESHMENTS: Adults attending courses expect a cup of tea or coffee at the very minimum.
If more is offered it is usually welcomed with enthusiasm. A budget needs to be agreed to ensure
facilitators are not out of pocket.
ADVERTISING: If you are sending flyers to parents, these need to be approved by a manager to
ensure they are acceptable to the organisation hosting the course.
RECRUITMENT: Getting parents to come to a parenting course is always a challenge. Often once
you have delivered a course, word gets around and future courses are easier to fill. Targeting
individuals can be a successful ploy, parents who are enthusiastic and turn up for a variety of
events can usually motivate others to join. Small sessions or coffee mornings can be used as
introductions for courses, giving people a chance to discuss the course and get to know each
other in advance. Extending the welcome to friends and neighbours of parents can also help those
who feel shy of attending alone.
MEN: Male role models are of vital importance to children and provide valuable support and
information about growing up. Parenting courses tend to be largely attended by women, which
can create an unwelcoming and even hostile environment for men. Facilitators need to make
particular effort to encourage men to attend and ensure that the group treats them with warmth
and equality. Try not to allow the group to make negative comments about men, this is nonproductive to Family Life and the facilitator could be seen to be condoning this attitude.
6
Family Life Course
INCLUSIVITY: Family Life courses should be equally available to all carers of children,
and the facilitator should ensure that the group are equally welcoming and accepting of
foster parents, adoptive parents, grandparents, step-parents and partners. The facilitator
should also make sure that all those who attend feel equally accepted in the group
regardless of race, colour, language, disability or academic ability.
HOW TO USE THE MANUAL
It is important facilitators:
• Read through the entire manual before starting
• Are familiar with the session plans and resources
• Are clear on the aims of each session
Each session is designed to last for two hours (if you plan to include a break your sessions
will be longer) and is laid out in the following way.
SESSION AIMS: These detail what you are aiming to achieve during the session.
SESSION PLAN: A timed plan of how to deliver the session. Each section details the
topic, the method of delivering it and equipment suggestions.
APPENDIX: This provides more detailed information for some of the activities mentioned
in the session plan.
WORKSHEETS/FACTSHEETS/QUIZZES: These are provided to support each session.
They need to be photocopied either for use during the session or to be given as handouts.
All factsheets include the web address from where they were sourced.
RECOMMENDED RESOURCES: This is a list of resources that support the Family Life
course.
BE PREPARED:
“Failing to prepare is preparing to fail” - Benjamin Franklin
Being well prepared before the course starts will ensure several vital things:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Facilitator knows what to do
Arrangements go smoothly
Facilitator has all resources to hand
Parents feel comfortable and welcome
Facilitator feels confident to deliver
Parents feel secure that facilitator is in control
Mishaps are more easily dealt with
Less stress all round
Kent County Council
7
Managing a group
It can be stressful managing a group whether you have done it lots of times before or are setting
one up for the first time (it can also be a lot of fun). Being well prepared will reduce a lot of the
stress, but there are some things that only get easier with practise.
Similarly those attending the group are often nervous. For some it may be the first group
that they have attended, or they may have attended others that have made them feel
uncomfortable or embarrassed.
ENVIRONMENT: Make your room look as inviting and welcoming as possible. Think about
placement of tables and chairs. Ensure parents know how to find the room and receptionists are
aware of the group and its location.
RESOURCES: These can be books, leaflets, DVDs, posters, local information, etc. There is
frequent reference to these throughout the course. Try to gather some of these together and set
them out for people to browse at leisure. Most people choose their own time to browse and some
prefer to do so whilst others are arriving and leaving.
GROUP AGREEMENT: It is important that all members feel safe within the group. In order to do
so, an agreement should be made by all members and the facilitator of the code of conduct that
will be adhered to by the group. As many of the topics that will be discussed are of a sensitive
nature, and often quite personal, members need to feel secure that they are treated with respect.
Use a piece of flipchart to note down the suggestions and encourage members to create their own
group agreement.
Try to adhere to what is suggested, but offer alternative wording if negative words are being used,
eg: “Don’t gossip” could become “Respect others privacy”.
The group agreement should be displayed throughout each session and referred to when
necessary. If new members join the group they should be made aware of the agreement, as they
may wish to add things themselves.
Ensure that the following are included on the agreement in some form:
• CONFIDENTIALITY – This means that the things discussed within the group that
are personal, should not be discussed outside the group. It does not include the
new ideas and learning, which are intended to be taken away. Encouraging people
to “Tell the story, not the people” can help to remove the personal element, but
when talking about Family Life, there will be a lot of personal exchange.
Facilitators need to make group members aware, that if anything is discussed
that causes concern that someone is either being hurt or threatened, or is at
risk of being hurt or threatened, the facilitator has an obligation to take that
further, but will not do so without discussing it with the individual first.
• RESPECT - For each others differences and opinions. Everyone has had different
experiences and upbringing and it is important to recognise that ‘difference’ does
not mean ‘wrong’. It also means allowing each person time to speak and to express
themselves.
8
Family Life Course
• AGREE TO DISAGREE - The purpose of a discussion is to voice own views, hear
others, broaden perspectives and develop ideas and opinions. These are not
always going to match those of others and the group needs to acknowledge this
and know that it is OK.
• ONLY SHARE WHAT YOU FEEL COMFORTABLE SHARING - In a group
setting where everyone is drawing on their own experiences, some people may feel
under pressure to share more than they feel comfortable. Make sure they know
that this is not expected of them.
• NO SUCH THING AS A SILLY QUESTION - No-one knows everything and no-one
likes to feel silly. Everyone can learn from each other.
• ICE BREAKERS / WARM UPS - There are many different types of Ice Breakers that can
be used to help people get to know each other and feel more relaxed in an unfamiliar
environment. Most people find it hard mixing with strangers, so breaking the ice is useful,
but can make people nervous if they feel they are being asked to do anything
embarrassing. Later in the course, when the group is established, people are more willing
to do livelier activities that take them outside their comfort zones, but in the early stages it
is more important to make people feel comfortable.
For each session a couple of ideas will be offered, but be creative and think of new ones.
Typing ‘ice breaker’ or ‘party games’ into a search engine will provide you with a wealth of
ideas that can be used or adapted.
• WELCOME/CLOSE SESSION - Facilitators should be very clear when defining the
beginning and end of a session. Allowing chatter to blur the edges will lose the credibility
of the facilitator as a leader. Members should be welcomed at the beginning, a verbal
outline of the session given, and a reminder of the group agreement. This will focus the
group in readiness for the session.
At the end the facilitator should summarise the key points covered in the session to help
consolidate it. A reminder can be given about any factsheets or quizzes given out during
the session. A brief verbal outline of the following session should also be given and
parents should be thanked for attending.
Kent County Council
9
Discussions
Holding a discussion does not mean allowing people to just chat! A guided discussion has
a purpose to it. By offering people some information, asking them to discuss it and then
using leading questions to direct the flow of the discussion means that people are able to
broaden their views and form ideas and thoughts with the new information they are
receiving from each other.
This can be challenging for facilitators who need to be aware of their role as a guide and
not a participant in the discussion. If facilitators get involved in discussions, particularly
when they start to offer their own ideas and opinions, they will be seen by group members
to be taking sides. This will create dissension within the group.
It is important, however, that facilitators challenge some of the views that are offered
during the discussion as this also enables people to explore issues further e.g. when a
group appears to be in agreement that all Year 3 children should be in bed by 7pm, offer
the dilemma of parents who work shift patterns.
Challenging discussions should not be done aggressively, or to prove that someone has a
weak argument, eg: “Why would you refuse to talk to your children about ……?” could be
changed to “Have you thought how you would talk to your children if they came home and
asked about …..?”
Allowing a discussion to develop gives opportunities for the participants to explore the
topics more widely. When they start to develop into arguments, however, the facilitator
needs to draw the discussion away, as there is little to be gained from acrimony.
Tips for drawing discussions away:
Questions: Asking a question that is related, but different can refocus the direction of the
discussion .
Intervention: Drawing the discussion away from the group and onto the facts can diffuse
some situations. There are fact sheets for each session and these can be referred to
during discussions.
Summary: Facilitator steps in and makes a brief summary of the key points of the
discussion and moves it on to the next topic.
Distraction: Changing the activity will distract people and give them something new to
think about.
Acknowledgement: If people feel their views are not being acknowledged they can
become resentful and unwilling to move on to the next activity. Acknowledge that the
discussion has been challenging and has generated strong feelings, thank people for their
input but firmly establish that it is time to move on.
Group Agreement: Always refer back to the agreement if members are not complying
with their own code of conduct.
10
Family Life Course
Breaks: These can freshen the atmosphere if they are taken in good humour. Do not
take a break if there are unresolved issues causing the group dissension.
Individual Support: Occasionally people have issues that cannot be resolved within the
group. It may be appropriate to offer them the opportunity to discuss them with you or
another person outside the group.
Evaluation: If your organisation requires evidence of engagement and outcomes of
your course you need to keep a register of those attending. Asking people to complete a
short questionnaire at the beginning and end of the course can also be used as evidence
of development. These are provided in the manual but can be adapted or re-written to
meet the needs of your organisation.
Equality and diversity: It is important that the Family Life course is equally available
to all parents and carers. To monitor this there is an optional form that can be used at the
same time as evaluation to gather data on who is accessing the course across the County,
ensuring that it is an equal opportunity. Names are not required on this form.
Additional needs: Parenting courses should be equally accessible to all parents. If
parents have any additional needs, or a disability, discuss with them their needs to ensure
that they can attend the course and feel comfortable within the group.
Kent County Council
11
Risky areas
There are some topics that will always cause more challenge to any group discussion
because they generate powerful reactions and feelings in people.
These are often:
•
•
•
•
Religion
Culture
Sexuality
Abuse
But can be any other topic to do with Family Life too.
The most important thing for facilitators to remember is:
Guide the topic - do not participate
This is not an easy concept, but vitally important when facilitating. It does not mean
having no views, but simply that this is not the right environment to express them. A group
needs to feel confident in the facilitator that they are in control of the discussion, and this is
not possible if the facilitator’s personal points of view are known to the group.
All members of the group will have different opinions ranging across the spectrum.
Totally OK
OK
Don’t mind
Don’t Care
Mind a bit
Not OK
Totally Against
As a facilitator, wherever you personally sit on the spectrum, you will be seen to be siding
with some group members and conflicting with others. This can be used by group
members to gain ground in a discussion, or to undermine your leadership.
Remember – discuss your own views with your friends and family, keep them out of the
group.
12
Family Life Course
Quotes about Family Life
The family - that dear octopus from whose
tentacles we never quite escape, nor, in our
inmost hearts, ever quite wish to.
Dodie Smith
It is not flesh and blood but the
heart which makes us fathers
and sons. Johann Schiller
Families are like fudge - mostly
sweet with a few nuts.
Author Unknown
When you look at your life, the
greatest happinesses are family
happinesses.
Joyce Brothers
Family: A social unit where the
father is concerned with parking
space, the children with outer
space, and the mother with
closet space.
Evan Esar
Call it a clan, call it a network, call
it a tribe, call it a family. Whatever
you call it, whoever you are, you
need one. Jane Howard
When our relatives are at home,
we have to think of all their good
points or it would be impossible
to endure them.
George Bernard Shaw
Other things may change us, but we
start and end with the family.
Anthony Brandt
Kent County Council
13
SESSION 1 - PUBERTY & GROWING UP
AIMS: To recognise and consider:
• The physical and emotional changes that take place in boys and girls during
puberty
• The impact that puberty has on the whole family
• The positive aspects of children
SESSION PLAN
Timing Topic
Method
30
mins
Welcome and
Introduction
Whole Group
10
mins
Finding Out
about Sex
Discussion - group or pairs
Welcome everyone and outline
course
Introduce facilitators
Use an ice breaker to get to know
group members
Create a Group Agreement
Ask people to discuss how they
first heard about sex / puberty /
changes.
Who did they hear it from?
How much was fact / how much
was myth?
5 mins
30
mins
What is
Puberty?
Brainstorm
Physical &
Emotional
Changes in
Boys & Girls
during Puberty
Activity
Ask group to define Puberty.
Ensure they include ages,
growth, hormones
Ice breaker
(appendix 1a)
Flipchart & pens
(appendix 1b)
Flipchart to note
questions
Flipchart & pens
(appendix 1c)
Draw a large outline of a boy &
girl and ask group to label it with
the changes
Encourage them to produce as
many labels as possible before
looking at the factsheet
Offer worksheets of boy & girl
outlines for parents to complete
for own use
Have a selection of books /
resources for parents to look at
that they may find useful
when talking to their children
14
Equipment Ideas
Family Life Course
Paper, pens
Puberty factsheet
Photocopied worksheets
See recommended
resource list
Timing Topic
Method
20
mins
Group / groups discussion
Puberty and
Family Life
Equipment Ideas
What are the effects on a family
when someone is going through
puberty?
Why does it affect the family?
Can the refreshed knowledge
of the physical, emotional,
developmental changes that the
child goes through change our
responses to them?
Flipchart & pens
How can the family work together
to reduce stress during this time?
20
mins
Positive
Aspects of
Children
Activity
Give parents a copy of the
gingerbread child. Ask them to
think of the good things
about their child and mark them
on the sheet
Copies of the
gingerbread child
& pens (appendix 1d)
Encourage them to take the
sheets home to show their
children
5 mins
Close Session
Summarise what has been
covered
Next session – talking to children
/ young people about growing up
Thank parents for attending
NOTE: You may choose to use a start evaluation form so that you can measure impact of
the course. This can be offered at the beginning, or during the welcome session prior to
this.
Kent County Council
15
SESSION 1 - PUBERTY & GROWING UP (appendix)
1a. ICE BREAKER IDEAS FOR FIRST SESSION
1. Introducing self with a themed letter repetition
Eg: Theme - Puberty
Acne Amanda, Booby Bethany, Confused Chloe
Can choose any theme – toys, parenting, school, sex, local area,
2. Introducing neighbour
Find out a few key things about the person sitting next to you and then introduce them
to the group.
Eg: Name, ages of children, favourite colour, least favourite food, a happy memory
3. Moving around the room
This is useful for breaking up small groups and including those on their own.
Ask people to sort themselves into an order.
Eg:
Birthdays – January one end of room, December other end
Ages of children added up – smallest one end, highest other end
(2 children aged 3 + 6 = 9)
People have to talk to each other to find out where they belong. If people then sit
down in that order you have a natural introduction into the next exercise.
1b. GROUP AGREEMENT
Getting a group agreement in place at the beginning of the course ensures that
everyone knows and understands the code of conduct, which will hopefully help them
to feel safe within the group. It also gives the facilitator the authority to manage the
group when things start to lose focus.
Encourage the group to create their own agreement; provide gentle direction to
ensure all necessary points are covered.
Some groups like to have each member sign the agreement. Do not forget to
introduce new group members to the agreement. They may have further ideas they
wish to add.
16
Family Life Course
1c. PUBERTY
Everyone has been through puberty and has memories of certain aspects of it. Not only
have certain memories been buried, some also get changed through time. One thing is
definite – it looks very different from a parental point of view.
Facilitators should make sure they are familiar with the changes that take place in
puberty. These can be found on the fact sheet. There are also excellent books and
leaflets that give plenty of information .
1d. POSITIVE ASPECTS ACTIVITY
It is easy to think of the negative aspects of our children, regardless of their age. This
activity is designed to remind parents of the good things about their children which make
them special.
Try to encourage them to focus on qualities rather than achievements or looks.
Eg: ‘kind to baby next door’ or ‘infectious smile’ rather than ‘wins lots of cricket trophies’
or ‘has blond hair’
Look at ways of turning negative statements into positive.
Eg: Inflexible could be determined, focused
• Lazy could be thoughtful, careful
• Clingy could be cuddly, affectionate
• Add a dream bubble and ask parents to think about what they would like for their children
in the future, eg: in 20 years from now. Encourage positive thoughts that do not contain a
• sting in the tail, eg: “He could get a good job if he worked harder” could become “I would
like him to have a job he enjoys”
• Parents may like to take home blank sheets and get their children to complete one,
• thinking about their own good points and what they like about themselves. The parents
could then show them the one they made and see how they compare.
• Evidence that a parent has been thinking of a child in his / her absence, builds self-esteem.
• If the parent has been having positive thoughts about the child the effect is especially powerful.
Kent County Council
17
WHAT CHANGES TAKE PLACE FOR
GIRLS DURING PUBERTY?
hopes and dreams
Emotions
Think about the changes that take place for girls during puberty and mark them on the
diagram. Also consider the emotional changes, and the hopes and dreams they may
experience.
18
Family Life Course
WHAT CHANGES TAKE PLACE FOR
BOYS DURING PUBERTY?
hopes and dreams
Emotions
Think about the changes that take place for boys during puberty and mark them on the
diagram. Also consider the emotional changes, and the hopes and dreams they may
experience.
Kent County Council
19
Puberty changes for girls
The female body produces the hormones progesterone and oestrogen,
which start the change of puberty. Sexual development can start
anywhere between the ages of 8–14.
The changes a girl’s body goes through during puberty:
• Whole body growth
• Breasts form
• Nipples become larger and fuller and they may become darker in
colour
• Face shape changes and becomes less childlike
• Voice becomes slightly deeper, although not as noticeable as with
boys
• Body shape changes as hips widen
• Lengthening of arms and legs
• Weight gain
• Hands and feet grow bigger
• Hair grows under arms and on legs
• Hair on arms and legs may become darker
• Pubic hair grows on vulva
• Vagina discharges a clear or slightly milky discharge – this is
normal and helps to keep the vagina healthy
• Ovaries release an egg which, if not fertilised by sperm, is broken
down and shed with the lining of the womb. (This is known as
menstruation or a period.)
• Hormonal changes can lead to girls’ mood swings including
irritability, tearfulness, overwhelming happiness and confusion
• May feel intense emotions of love, low self-esteem, frustration and
apathy
• They may become argumentative and bad tempered, and
challenge authority
• May be physically attracted to others (male or female)
• Begin to want more independence from parents
20
Family Life Course
Puberty changes for boys
The male body produces the hormone testosterone, which starts off
the changes of puberty. Sexual development can happen at any time
between 10 and 18, but usually happens around 13 or 14.
The changes a boy’s body goes through during puberty:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Whole body growth
Spurts of growth, particularly arms, legs and feet
Testicles grow larger and fuller
Penis grows longer and wider
Pubic hair grows around the base of the penis
Testicles start to produce sperm which mixes with fluid to make
semen which boys ejaculate
Spontaneous erections and wet dreams begin
Scrotum sac becomes darker in colour
More hair grows on the body which may become darker on the arms
and legs
Body shape changes as boys develop broader shoulders and chest
and become more muscular
Face shape changes and becomes less childlike
Voice box grows which makes the Adam’s apple look bigger, and the
voice breaks and becomes deeper
Hair and skin become more oily, which may lead to spots and acne
Body sweats more
Growth of facial hair
Hormonal changes can lead to mood swings including irritability,
tearfulness, overwhelming happiness and confusion
May become argumentative and bad tempered, and challenge
authority
May be physically attracted to others (male or female)
Begin to want more independence from parents
May feel intense emotions of love, low self-esteem, frustration and
apathy
Kent County Council
21
WHAT I LIKE ABOUT
22
Family Life Course
SESSION 2 - TALKING TO CHILDREN/YOUNG PEOPLE
AIMS: To recognise and consider:
• The importance of talking to children and young people about growing up
• Whose responsibility it is to talk about sex and relationships
• Ways to answer questions confidently, honestly and age appropriately.
SESSION PLAN
Timing Topic
15
mins
Welcome and
Introduction
Method
Equipment Ideas
Whole Group
Welcome everyone back, outline
session
Refresh the Group Agreement
(appendix 2a)
Warm Up Activity
30
mins
Talking about
Growing Up
Discussion - group or pairs
Discussion
What are the reasons that
parents find it hard to talk to their
children about sex, relationships
and growing up?
Then consider:
Who has a responsibility to talk to
children / young people about
growing up?
Note the reasons
on flipchart
What roles do different people
have in children’s lives?
Where else do children get
information?
Activity
(appendix 2b)
Stick the picture of the child in
the centre of a large circle.
Ask parents to identify significant
people in their child’s life who
they may choose to talk to.
Kent County Council
23
SESSION PLAN
Timing Topic
40
mins
Welcome and
Introduction
Method
Equipment Ideas
Activity
Draw an age-line and discuss at
what age it would be appropriate
to start talking with children about
different topics and mark them on
the age-line.
Challenge where topics are
placed, broaden the topics,
explore ways of describing topics
to younger children.
30
mins
Talking about
Growing Up
Whole group
What questions are difficult for
parents to answer? Form a list.
Smaller groups
Divide up the questions on the
list
Think of a good and a bad
response to each question
Feedback to group
Input
Parents feeling empowered to
manage their children’s questions
5 mins
Resources
Have a selection of resources
available for parents to look at
Close Session
Summarise what has been
covered
Encourage parents to look at
resources
Next session – Influences and
Pressures on Family Life
Thank parents for attending
24
Family Life Course
Recommended
resource list
SESSION 2 - TALKING TO CHILDREN / YOUNG PEOPLE (APPENDIX)
2a. WARM UP ACTIVITY FOR SECOND SESSION
Art Attack
Have some cut out figures of children (gingerbread men cutters are good templates) and
a selection of pens, pencils and other craft stuff depending on how creative you like to be.
Have the group decorate the figures to represent their child/ren. This can then be used in
the group work in the next session.
2b. ACTIVITY
The aim of this activity is for parents to recognise who some of the significant people are
in their child’s life and how these play different roles at different times.
The finished piece should look like a segmented circle with the child in the centre. Each
segment should be labelled with a significant person.
2c. AGE-LINE
This can be done in several ways. Drawn on a piece of flipchart paper. Words printed on
separate cards and laid out on the floor, or pegged to a washing line with age markers.
0 5 10 15->
Ensure the line does not end with 15 but is obviously continued.
Offer the parents different topics and ask them to consider where on the age line they
would want to talk to their children about it. Parents may prefer to do this with a number
of topics in groups. This activity should generate plenty of discussion.
AGE LINE TOPICS
Penis
Vagina
Periods
Masturbation
Wet Dreams
Oral Sex
Contraception
Sexual Intercourse
Personal Hygiene
Gay Relationships
Rape
Orgasms
Abortion
Sexually Transmitted Infections Condoms
Domestic Violence
Divorce
Marriage
Erections
Attraction
Pregnancy
Kent County Council
25
Facilitators should encourage parents to think more broadly about the topics, challenging
where they place them. They should also be aware of the discussions and intervene if
they become heated.
Not all have to be resolved, move on rather than allowing ill feeling to develop and refer to
the Group Agreement if necessary.
The underlying message that parents need to take away with them is that children build
on existing knowledge all the time and the best way to help them is to ‘drip feed’ it to them
a bit at a time, so that they can understand it and develop their understanding as they get
older.
2d. CHILDREN’S QUESTIONS
All parents have experienced occasions where they have been asked a question and
either not been able to answer, or have given a poor response that they have since
regretted. This is about providing examples, not judging parenthood. Once the question
has been added to the list, it is then owned by the group and not the parent and the
answers discussed should be general and not directed at anyone. Do not allow requests
for further information, or long discussions about the occasion.
If the group is struggling for ideas, throw in a few examples:
•
•
•
•
•
•
What is this for? (5 yr old holding up a tampon)
Why does no-one like me? (8 year old boy)
Everyone says George in my class is gay, what does it mean? (10 yr old boy)
I haven’t had a period for 2 months now, what should I do? (15 yr old girl)
What is snogging? (7 year old)
I’m never going to get a boyfriend, am I? (12 year old girl)
Try different ages for different discussions.
26
Family Life Course
Where does this young person get their information?
Kent County Council
27
Where does this young person get their information? (Example)
School
Mum & Dad
Magazines
Social Networking
Nurse
Friends
Youth workers
Doctor
Internet
Extended Family
TV
28
Family Life Course
ANSWERING CHILDREN’S QUESTIONS
YOUNG PEOPLE WANT TO KNOW ABOUT SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS
Young people often report that the Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) they receive happens
too late – after they have begun puberty, experienced sexual desire, or started having sex. It
makes sense to ensure that children have all the information they need in plenty of time for them
to look after themselves and deal with the challenges of growing up.
Some young people believe that the SRE they receive in school focuses too much on biological
aspects, such as reproduction and they would like the opportunity to discuss feelings,
relationships and what leads on to sex.
Young people also report that they would like to hear about sex and relationships from
their parents, even though they think their parents find it embarrassing.
REACTIONS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT SEX
Remember, learning is not just about what is told. Reactions and body language play a
huge role in the process and will often determine whether the same person is approached
again or not.
Many people find that they get embarrassed when they talk about sex and relationships.
It’s OK to have feelings of embarrassment, but if you react to those feelings by avoiding
the subject, giving false information or by not answering the question, the child will pick up
the message that sex is not something you want to talk about - and – if you don’t tell
them, someone else will!
Messages about sex are everywhere and can be inaccurate, misleading and confusing.
By talking to children you can help them to make sense of the information they pick up,
put them right, help them to form their own views and provide significant guidance in their
journey towards adulthood.
Kent County Council
29
TOP TIPS FOR ANSWERING QUESTIONS
CONTEXT: What is behind the question and what do they really want to know?
Spending a few moments probing the root of the question can spare you a lot of
misunderstanding later:
Example – “Where did I come from?” may simply mean “Which town?”
TIME TO THINK: You do not have to answer every question at the moment it is asked. If
the place is not appropriate, or you need a few moments to collect your thoughts, be clear
about this:
“That’s a good question. Let’s talk about it when we are . . .” and ensure that you
do.
WHAT IS NEEDED TO ANSWER THE QUESTION: Brushing up your own knowledge
will make you feel more equipped to deal with questions; flick through a book about
puberty to see what changes they are about to go through/are in middle of; skim through
a teenager’s magazine to see what are ‘hot topics’. If you are asked something you do
not know the answer to or are not sure about, do not be afraid to tell them that you need
to check first.
GIVING ANSWERS: Answers should always be honest, children get very confused with
made up stories; it is important that they trust the information that you give them. They
also need to be appropriate to their age, which can be quite difficult.
Give short answers and take your lead from the child:
• If they accept the answer and move on, they are probably happy with it
• If they ask the same question one of you has not understood correctly
• If they lead on to further questions they are ready for more information
Don’t ever expect to answer everything in one sitting. Allow time for information to be
absorbed and built upon.
LOOKING AROUND THE QUESTION: Treat questions as opportunities. Most subjects
can be broken into many topics, giving you the chance to choose the angle you want to
take.
RESOURCES: There are a number of excellent books and leaflets available to help
those talking to children and young people of all ages. It can be useful to have something
in readiness. Choose something suitable for your child’s age and then look at it together
for answers to their questions.
GETTING IT WRONG: There are always times when we know we’ve got it wrong and
we shouldn’t beat ourselves up over it. Neither should we ignore it. Go back to questions
– “When you asked me ****, I don’t think I gave you a very good answer. I’ve been
thinking about it, let’s look at it again.” Children will appreciate both your honesty, and
your fallibility.
30
Family Life Course
SESSION 3 - INFLUENCES & PRESSURES ON FAMILY LIFE
AIMS: To recognise and consider:
• Influences from outside the home that affect Family Life
• Strategies for families to deal with outside influences
• The importance of developing self esteem in children.
SESSION PLAN
Timing
20
mins
Topic
Welcome and
Introduction
30
mins
Identifying
Outside
Influences &
Pressures
45
mins
Strategies for
dealing with
Outside
Influences
Method
Whole Group
Welcome everyone
back, outline session
Refresh the Group
Agreement
Warm Up Activity
Activity
Draw a house in the
middle of large
paper.
Ask the parents to
think about the things
that can influence
children from outside
of the home. Label,
draw or stick magazine
pictures around the
house.
Activity
Discuss each label/
picture and decide if it
is:
a) Something we have
control over
b) Something we could
take some control over
c) Something outside
of our control
Mark each one like a
traffic light
eg a) green b) orange
c) red Worksheet
In pairs / small groups
discuss one of
each colour and
consider ways that
families can manage
Kent County Council
Equipment Ideas
(appendix 3a)
Large paper &
pens
Various
magazines,
scissors, glue
(appendix 3b)
Red, orange,
green pens
Outside
Influences
worksheet
31
SESSION PLAN
Timing
20
mins
Topic
Developing Self
Esteem in
Children
5 mins
Close Session
Method
Read through the
factsheet and allow a
few minutes for
discussion.
Give out quiz and
discuss ways it could
be used within the
family.
Summarise what has
been covered
Next session – PSHE
in schools and at
home
Thank parents for
attending
Equipment Ideas
(appendix 3c)
Self confidence
factsheet
Family Fun Quiz
*Self-Esteem or Self-Respect: confidence in your own merit as an individual
Encarta ® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1998-2004 Microsoft Corporation. All rights
reserved.
32
Family Life Course
SESSION 3 - INFLUENCES & PRESSURES (appendix)
3a. WARM UP FOR THIRD SESSION
Media Madness
Have a look at a selection of magazines that children may come across in the home. Try
to include some of the young teen magazines. Asking parents to bring some along can be
very successful (not top shelf mags!). Ask parents to look at the magazines through the
eyes of their children.
You may also wish to play a couple of songs or bring in lyrics from some that contain
aggressive, sexual or disrespectful language.
3b. ACTIVITY
The purpose of this activity is for parents to recognise that they cannot control everything
that affects their children, to acknowledge the feelings that this generates and to develop
some coping strategies.
People often feel lack of control over external influences, but may not always recognise
that they have little or no control over some of their domestic arrangements eg: parental
contact with estranged partners, neighbours, in-laws, redundancy, etc.
Prompts for discussion:
• How do we feel about the things that influence our children?
• How do we respond when influences are out of our control?
• Who do we direct our feelings at?
• What are the effects of our feelings on our children?
• Do our feelings affect the choices our children make?
• Are there things that we can do to support our children when things feel out of our
control?
• If we cannot control whole issues, are there parts we can do things about?
• How does creating a plan of how to manage various aspects make us feel?
Encourage parents to be creative; you will find that focussing on a creative activity can
generate deep and meaningful discussions different from those when sitting in a group.
The traffic light evaluation of your collage will make a very visual effect that parents should
remember for some time to come.
3c. DISCUSSION
Children need to feel that their beliefs and opinions are valued. Often in day to day life
there is little time to hear what our children think about different matters and what
impressions they are forming of the world around them. By spending time with them and
finding out what they think, not only do we make them feel valued, but we also give them
the opportunity to ask us for more information, or our views. This way we can play a part
in the development of their thoughts and opinions.
Kent County Council
33
The factsheet from the BBC gives some useful tips about developing self confidence in
children. Ensure that you are familiar with the contents before taking it to the group. You
may wish to condense it or pull out some of the key points to make it easier to read.
The Family Fun Quiz can be used in many ways. The purpose is to create a safe
environment for parents and children to get to know each other better and allow children to
explore and develop their thoughts and opinions. The questions are not particularly
serious, but if children are allowed to use their own words without being modified,
corrected or laughed at, they can be quite philosophical.
Encourage parents to think about the different ways they could use the quiz with their
children, rather than telling them, but make sure they come up with:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
34
Asking the child the questions in interview style
Child completing quiz fully before sharing it
Have the child ask the parent the questions
Siblings asking each other the questions
Answering the questions as a whole family
Members of the family answering how they think others would answer
Writing different questions
Try quiz with extended family members
Family Life Course
Kent County Council
35
Orange
(can take some
control)
Example:
Neighbours children allowed out at all hours
to play anywhere they like. My children think
it’s really cool; they are hard done by and I
am old fashioned.
Red
(have little or no control)
Orange
(can take some
control)
Green
(have control)
Traffic Light
Situation
• Explain why I put boundaries in place (I love
my children and want them to be safe)
• Talk about how they can build up my trust to
extend their play area/time
• Ask my children how others may view children
with boundaries and those without
• Find alternative activities for my children so
that they are busy and meet other children
whose parents have similar expectations eg
Brownies, Scouts, Athletics etc
• When I invite other children to my house,
explain the boundaries to them too
Strategies for Managing Pressure
DEALING WITH PRESSURE
Building confidence in children
“A child with good self-esteem has the confidence to try new things and make friends, and
has stronger relationships with you and others”
Parenting expert Eileen Hayes wrote this article in February 2004. This article was last
reviewed by Heather Welford in September 2008.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/child_development/primary_confidenc
e.shtml
School life and friends may give confidence a knock.
Help give your child a boost with these ideas:
• Believe in your child and show it - let her know she’s a worthwhile, lovable
individual.
• Give praise and positive feedback - your child measures her worth and
achievements by what you think of her. “Well done, that was hard, and you
managed it” is music to young ears. Reassure your child that it’s OK to make
mistakes and that it’s all part of growing up.
• Practise active, reflective listening - listen carefully, repeat what you’ve heard to
make sure you understand and give positive prompts to encourage your child to
continue.
• Acknowledge your child’s feelings - and help her express them verbally.
• Criticise behaviour, not your child - it’s very easy to fall into this trap, but too much
criticism tells your child she’s a bad person and is causing things to happen
because of her own stupidity. This is very damaging if it goes on for a long time. Be
clear that it’s an action you’re angry about or behaviour you don’t like.
• Respect your child’s interests, even if they seem boring to you - take a genuine
interest in your child’s friends, and what’s happening at school, and comment to
show you’re listening.
• Accept any fears or insecurities your child expresses as genuine - even if they
seem trivial to you, don’t just brush them aside. If your child says, “I’m useless at
maths” say “You’re obviously finding maths a struggle, how can I help you?”.
• Encourage independence - encourage your child to take chances and try new
things. Succeeding gives a huge boost to confidence, and sometimes your child will
need to learn by her mistakes.
• Laugh with your child - never at her.
• Focus on your child’s successes - swimming, music, whatever she can succeed at.
36
Family Life Course
Are you helping or hindering?
You’ve warned your child she shouldn’t walk across the carpet carrying a cup full of milk
and her dinner. She does it anyway, but trips and spills it. It’s tempting to say: “Now look
what you’ve done. I told you that you couldn’t do it.”
Comments such as this make your child feel even worse than she does already for failing
at something. Instead, try to give support by saying something like: “Oh no, you tried, but it
didn’t work. Never mind. Next time you could carry them one at a time.”
It’s not only the critical things said directly to your children that can undermine confidence.
If your child overhears you tell someone that “she’s got two left feet” or “she’s so clumsy”
they might think you really believe this and feel it can’t be changed.
Things you say about yourself can damage your child’s self-esteem. Children learn a great
deal from copying adults close to them. If you overreact to situations or pressure, your
child may worry you really can’t handle life’s challenges. This won’t set your child an
example of a positive, optimistic attitude to life and how to handle problems.
Think before you speak and choose your words with care - it’s very easy to say something
without thinking, and then wish you hadn’t. “You’re so clumsy” or “Don’t be stupid” can be
said in an irritated moment when the cereal is spilled or an innocent question is asked. Too
many negative remarks like this can result in children believing they’re useless or stupid.
All the following can damage a child’s confidence:
• Saying you don’t love them
• Saying you wish they’d never been born
• Insults or unkind remarks
• Deliberately ridiculing things your child does or feels
• Cruel teasing and sarcasm
• Endless nagging
• Aggressive shouting and swearing
Disclaimer
All content within BBC Health is provided for general information only, and should
not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other
health care professional. The BBC is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis
made by a user based on the content of the BBC Health website. The BBC is not
liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any
commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. See our
Links Policy for more information. Always consult your own GP if you’re in any way
concerned about your health.
Kent County Council
37
FAMILY FUN QUIZ
38
1.
What is your favourite colour?
2.
If you could choose what the family did for a free day
out together, what would you choose?
3.
If you could choose what the family did for an evening
in together, what would you choose?
4.
What are your 3 favourite foods?
5.
If you were stranded on a desert island, who would you
want to be stranded with?
6.
What is the most important thing you want for yourself
in 5 years time?
7.
What do you think happens to people / animals when
they die?
8.
If you were a pizza topping which one would you be
and why?
Family Life Course
SESSION 4 - SRE IN SCHOOLS AND AT HOME
(Sex and Relationship Education)
AIMS: To recognise and consider:
• The SRE topics that children are taught in school
• Ways that parents can support and build on school SRE
• How parents can get more involved in what their children are learning children.
SESSION PLAN
Timing
15
mins
Topic
Welcome and
Introduction
60
mins
School SRE
15
mins
Getting Involved
with Education
Method
Whole Group
Equipment Ideas
(appendix 4a)
Welcome everyone
back, outline session
Refresh the Group
Agreement
Warm Up Game
(appendix 4b)
Discussion
What do schools
SRE game
cover?
Is it enough / too
much? What does
statutory / nonstatutory
mean?
What does SRE
stand for (Sex
and Relationship
Education)?
SRE Game
Use the game to
demonstrate which
topics of SRE are
statutory / nonstatutory.
Group Discussion
Why should parents
be more involved with
what their children do
at school?
Do children benefit?
How do schools
respond when parents
get involved?
In what ways can
parents involve
themselves?
Kent County Council
39
SESSION PLAN
Timing
Topic
Building on SRE
within the home
Method
Activity
In small groups ask
parents to consider
some examples of
everyday situations
which could be used to
create an
opportunity for a
discussion with their
children.
Feedback to group.
Close Session
Summarise what has
been covered
Complete end
Evaluation Forms
Thank parents for
attending the Family
Life Course
40
Family Life Course
Equipment Ideas
Worksheet
(appendix 4c)
SESSION 4 - Sex and Relationship Education (appendix)
4a. WARM UP FOR FOURTH SESSION
Print out and cut up the statements from children and teachers about SRE. Ask the group
to divide in half, one half teachers and the others the children. Give them each a
statement.
The 2 groups should be facing each other and standing up. Explain that it is time for the
SRE lesson and ask alternate teachers and children to make their statement about the
class, and those who are not going to take part can sit back down. Get facilitators to join
in too, the more statements, the more effective the exercise.
4b. SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION
Playing the SRE game is an effective and visual way of identifying what takes place in
schools.
There are many of the games within the County. Ask Senior Family Liaison Officers, or
Speakeasy Facilitators to locate one. Alternatively they can be purchased from the fpa.
http://www.fpa.org.uk/professionals/publicationsandresources
SRE GAME
The ABC of SRE resource is a game that clearly defines which of the SRE topics are
statutory and therefore have to be taught to all children, and which are non-statutory, and
are recommended to be taught through PSHE (Physical, social and health education).
The game is most effective when played with a good sized group and to get the most out
of it, there needs to be sufficient time for participants to discuss each card. (45 – 60mins)
Try to keep the colour coding from the participants as this makes the effect more dramatic
at the end.
To Play the ABC of SRE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Place the Key Stage cards out in order with Statutory at the top and the matching
Non-Statutory below it.
Divide the cards between all the participants.
A card is read out, ask participants to decide as a group at which age or key stage
they think this topic should be taught.
Once the key stage is decided, they should then agree whether it is a statutory or
non-statutory topic and place it on the correct key stage card.
Move onto the next card. Once people get the hang of it, it can be moved on a bit
quicker, but still allowing time for discussion of each card.
Following discussion, in the event of dispute, the card holder gets to choose the
placement of the card.
Kent County Council
41
7.
8.
9.
10.
At some point participants become aware of the colour coding on the back of the
cards. Encourage them to play along, not peeking, or allowing others to see the
backs of their cards.
Once all the cards have been placed, ask the group to turn them over so that they
can see the colours.
With the colour side up, ask the group to move the cards onto the correct key stage card
Once all in place, ask the group to turn over the cards. Ask them to give their immediate
reactions to the placing of the cards. Allow them time to see where the cards are placed
and to make observations.
It is useful at this point to consider the approach to statutory and non-statutory topics within local
schools.
Discuss the results as a group. The game is very visual and parents are usually quite
shocked when they realise what is statutory and non-statutory. It shows that most of the
statutory topics are the science based ones.
There is an alternative set of cards which show the colour, which can be more useful for
some groups.
4c. BUILDING ON SRE WITHIN THE HOME
Parents can use everyday opportunities as prompts or starting points to talk to their
children. Use the worksheet to aid discussion in small groups.
There is a two fold purpose to this exercise. The first is to get parents to think about how
many topics can be found when looking at a subject to broaden discussion with their
children, but it also gives them some options when they are dealing with questions that
they do not feel ready to answer. Encourage parents to use this strategy when they are
asked questions that are difficult to answer.
Example
Question
“What is a blow job?”
Subject
Topics we could talk about
Oral Sex
Sex Love Relationships
Masturbation
Sexual orientation
Slang
Petting
Respect
Personal Hygiene
Safe sex
Condoms
If the subject makes a parent feel uncomfortable, or they feel their child is not ready for the
information, they can think of the different topics that this could bring up, and select which
they want to use to answer the child’s question.
42
Family Life Course
Boy 15
I’ve already had sex, I know
everything there is to know.
You don’t need to teach me.
TEACHER
I teach Geography, I think this
should be done by someone else.
I’m not going to teach it.
Girl 13
I am so embarrassed, I am never
going to take my clothes off in
front of anyone, let alone have ***
you know. I’m not going to listen.
You don’t need to teach me.
TEACHER
Children should not learn about this
stuff, it gives them ideas about
things that they should not be
thinking about in school.
I’m not going to teach it.
Girl 11
Who? What? I’ve no idea what you
are talking about, but I’m sure it
has nothing to do with me.
You don’t need to teach me.
TEACHER
If I start teaching and they ask me
questions I won’t know what to say.
It’s all so embarrassing.
I’m not going to teach it.
Girl 12
I really want to know more, but
everyone else seems to know
already and I don’t want them to
laugh at me.
You don’t need to teach me.
TEACHER
Well it probably is a good idea…. I
mean…. someone should…… but I’m
not sure how to do it….. I probably
won’t ……hmm…..no……
I’m not going to teach it.
BOY 14
Focus days are so boring, I’m going
to bunk off and hang out instead.
You don’t need to teach me.
TEACHER
What happens if a parent complains
that I am encouraging their child to
have sex?
I’m not going to teach it.
BOY 13
It’s a bit weird isn’t it, talking
about it in school with Mr Brown
just before he gives us our Maths
test.
You don’t need to teach me.
HEAD TEACHER
We have a packed curriculum and
our staff are stretched to
maximum capacity. It is not our
job.
I’m not going to teach it.
Kent County Council
43
44
Family Life Course
Situation
Example:
Celebrity story of cheating on partner
BUILDING ON SRE WITHIN THE HOME
Subject
Infidelity
Topics we could talk about
Relationships
Marriage
Love
Trust
Sex
Intimacy
Loyalty
Pregnancy
Contraception
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Divorce
Step families
Feelings
Attraction
Kent County Council
45
Welcome Session*
* Write date of each session held
Number attending
each session
Name
Session 1*
Session 2*
Session 3*
Session 4*
Venue………………………………………………………………………… Start Date……………………………….End Date …………………….
Name of
Facilitators………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
Family Life COURSE REGISTER
46
Family Life Course
TOTALS
Flipchart, pens etc
Photocopying handouts etc
Refreshments
Creche
Room Hire
Costs
Per Week
Course
Venue………………………………………………………………………… Start Date……………………………….End Date …………………….
Name of
Facilitators………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
Family Life COST SHEET
EVALUATION FORM (start)
Name……………………………………………………………………………
Name optional, but please submit the start and end forms together.
Please tick the box that applies.
1. How do you feel about talking to your children about growing up?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
2. How do you feel about talking to your children about puberty?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
3. How do you feel about talking to your children about sex and relationships?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
4. Do you feel that your children are under pressure to grow up too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average amount
No - not really
No - not at all
5. Do you, as a parent, feel pressured by your children to allow them to grow up
too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average month
No - not really
No - not at all
6. Do you, as a parent, feel pressured by outside influences, to allow your
children to grow up too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average month
No - not really
No - not at all
7. How much do you know about the Sex and Relationship Education your
children receive at School?
Nothing at all
Not sure
Informed when it
takes place
Kent County Council
Partly aware of
content
Fully informed of all
aspects
47
EVALUATION FORM (end)
Name……………………………………………………………………………
Name optional, but please submit the start and end forms together.
Please tick the box that applies.
1. How do you feel about talking to your children about growing up?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
2. How do you feel about talking to your children about puberty?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
3. How do you feel about talking to your children about sex and relationships?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
4. Do you feel that your children are under pressure to grow up too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average amount
No - not really
No - not at all
5. Do you, as a parent, feel pressured by your children to allow them to grow up
too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average month
No - not really
No - not at all
6. Do you, as a parent, feel pressured by outside influences, to allow your
children to grow up too quickly?
Yes - a lot
Yes - a bit
An average month
No - not really
No - not at all
7. How much do you know about the Sex and Relationship Education your
children receive at School?
Nothing at all
48
Not sure
Informed when it
takes place
Family Life Course
Partly aware of
content
Fully informed of all
aspects
8. How much do you think the course has increased your confidence when
talking to your children about the different aspects of growing up?
Prefer not to
Lack confidence
OK
Quite confident
Very confident
9. Which session of the Family Life course did you find the most useful?
10. Which aspects of the Family Life Course did you enjoy the most?
11. Is there anything about the course that you did not enjoy?
12. Is this the first parent course you have attended?
YES 
NO

13. Would you be interested in attending another parent course?
YES 
NO

14. Which topics interest you for further parent courses?
Sexual Health
Behaviour
Transition
Smoking Cessation
Self Esteem
Adult Education
Alcohol Awareness
Creative Play
Supporting schools
Drugs Awareness
Youth Crime
Healthy Eating
Thank you for your attendance and for taking the time to complete this evaluation form.
Kent County Council
49
EQUALITY & DIVERSITY MONITORING FORM
The Family Life course is available to all parents and carers of children. Please use and return this
optional form so for monitoring of equal opportunity purposes.
1. Are you  Male

Female
2.

consider myself to have a learning difficulty and/or disability

do not consider myself to have a learning difficulty and/or disability

do not wish to state

Registered as unemployed (seeking work)

Unwaged (not seeking work, including retired)

Employed part-time (including self-employed)

Employed full-time (including self-employed)

Full-time student

I do not wish to state
4. Are you
5. Details of all children in your home
Sex
50
Age
Sex
Male / female
Male / female
Male / female
Male / female
Male / female
Male / female
Family Life Course
Age
5. Ethnicity - please tick one box to signify which broad ethnic group or origin you feel you
belong to.





ASIAN/ASIAN BRITISH
Bangladeshi
Chinese
Indian
Pakistani
Any other Asian background
(specify if you wish)
BLACK
BRITISH/BLACK/
AFRICAN/CARIBBEAN
African
Caribbean
Any other Black/African/
Caribbean background
(specify if you wish)



MIXED/MULTIPLE
ETHNIC GROUPS
Asian and White
Black African and White
Black Caribbean and White
Any other Mixed/multiple
ethnic background (specify if
you wish)




WHITE
British
English
Northern Irish
Scottish
Welsh
Irish
Gypsy or Irish Traveller
WHITE
Any other White background
(specify if you wish)








OTHER ETHNIC
GROUP
Any other ethnic background
(specify if you
wish)

NON-DISCLOSURE
I do not wish to disclose my
ethnicity

THANK YOU FOR TAKING THE TIME TO
COMPLETE AND RETURN THIS FORM
Kent County Council
51
Family Life - RECOMMENDED RESOURCES LIST
These are resources that can help when talking to children and young people about growing up.
Kent Libraries have purchased several copies of the books so that parents can access
them easily. The copies are spread across the County, but can be requested in any
branch. For more information visit http://www.kent.gov.uk/leisure_and_culture/libraries
The books are all available to purchase from various bookshops and on-line sellers. All
the authors named are worth looking at for further titles.
These are just a few titles, there are many more available. Browse for resources
that you and your family will find useful.
52
Family Life Course
Approx
Age
Title
Publisher
Summary
Let’s Talk about
Where Babies
Come From
Walker
Books
7+
An imaginative and family friendly book
introducing children to the birds and the
bees through pictures and easy to read
information. Ideal for reading together,
safe for reading alone.
Let’s Talk about
Sex
Walker
Books
10+
As above, for the slightly older child.
Biologically accurate. Both books have a
sensible and sensitive approach to the
wider issues.
Where Willy
Went
Red Fox
4+
A fun yet accurate life story of a sperm.
Simply told and accompanied by superb
drawings.
What’s
Happening to
me Girls / Boys
Usborne
(Susan
Meredith)
11+
Straightforward explanations and
diagrams of the process of puberty both
physical and emotional. Ideal for young
adolescents to look at on their own.
Living with a
Willy
Macmillen
(Nick
Fisher)
12+
Frank, humorous and realistic book about
everyday concerns boys may have.
Everything you
wanted to know
about Periods
Picadilly
Press
(Tricia
Kreitman)
12+
An easy to read book answering girls
questions and everyday concerns about
how to mange periods and associated
emotions and complications.
The Sex Book
Icon (Jane
Pavanel)
15+
A no nonsense guide for teenagers,
written in dictionary format, using both
medical and street words that
youngsters are likely to come across and
described in language that is easily
understood. Cover very discreet.
Mummy Laid an
Egg
Red Fox
(Babette
Cole)
6+
A mini book in cartoon form. Children
fed up with the myths their parents tell
them, set out to give them the facts!
Blame my Brain
Walker
Books
(Nicola
Morgan)
Parents
A humorous explanation of how the brain
develops during adolescence and why
this results in behaviours that make
teens seem like alien creatures!
Kent County Council
53
Final Note
The Family Life Course is available to download from the Kent County Council website
http://www.kenttrustweb.org.uk/community/parents_home
This link takes you to the Supporting Parents Home Page where you will find the course
manual and other information about delivering Family Life on the ‘Family Life’ link.
Included are several other resources that can be used in any parent course or programme.
There are factsheets about a number of issues that arise in everyday Family Life, and these
can be downloaded or printed off to support parents. There are also some single page
discussion guides, so that if your group is looking to explore a particular topic, you can
support them to do so through discussion.
On the Supporting Parents pages you will find information about other parenting courses
and programmes which your parents may be interested in attending. There is also
information about training available, and contact details for the Supporting Parents team
and other supporting networks.
54
Family Life Course
The Family Life Course was written for KCC by
Catherine Collingwood – Speakeasy Coordinator for Kent
pj/9/12/2011
This publication is available in other formats and languages,
call 08458 247 100 for more information.
www.kent.gov.uk
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement