User Manual
Allen-Bradley
Enhanced
DeviceNet™
Communications
Module
Cat. Nos. 1203-GU6
or 1336-GM6
Firmware 1.xx
User Manual
Important User Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this
publication, those responsible for the application and use of this
control equipment must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps
have been taken to assure that each application and use meets all
performance and safety requirements, including any applicable laws,
regulations, codes and standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples
shown in this guide are intended solely for purposes of example.
Since there are many variables and requirements associated with any
particular installation, Rockwell Automation does not assume
responsibility or liability (to include intellectual property liability) for
actual use based upon the examples shown in this publication.
Rockwell Automation publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the
Application, Installation, and Maintenance of Solid-State Control
(available from your local Rockwell Automation office), describes
some important differences between solid-state equipment and
electromechanical devices that should be taken into consideration
when applying products such as those described in this publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in
whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell
Automation, is prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety
considerations:
!
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices
or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or
death, property damage or economic loss.
Attention statements help you to:
•
Identify a hazard.
•
Avoid the hazard.
•
Recognize the consequences.
Important: Identifies information that is critical for successful
application and understanding of the product.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes
The information below summarizes the changes made to the company
wide templates since the last release.
Updated Information
No changes have been made to this manual.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Summary of Changes
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Table of Contents
Using this Manual
Preface
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-1
Who Should Use this Manual? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-1
Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-1
Contents of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-2
Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-2
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-3
Terms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-3
Conventions Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-4
Rockwell Automation Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-4
Local Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-4
Technical Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P-4
Overview
Chapter 1
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Overview of the Communications Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Features of the Communications Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
SCANport Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Hardware and Parts Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
1203-GU6 Module Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
1336-GM6 Board Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Overview of Setting Up the Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Required Tools and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
1203-GU6 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
1336-GM6 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Installation
Chapter 2
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Installing a 1203-GU6 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Required Tools and Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Selecting Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Installing the 1203-GU6 Communications Module . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Removing the 1203-GU6 Communications Module . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Installing a 1336-GM6 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Required Tools and Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Selecting Cables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
DeviceNet Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Electrostatic Discharge Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Installing the 1336-GM6 Communications Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Removing the 1336-GM6 Communications Board . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
ii
Table of Contents
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced
DeviceNet Module Using a Serial
Connection
Chapter 3
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Factory Default Settings for the 1203-GU6 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Required Tools and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Using a PC Running Terminal Emulation Software . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Using a VT100-Compatible Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Navigation Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Editing the Module’s Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Displaying and Clearing the Module’s Event Queue . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Viewing I/O Data Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Viewing DF-1 Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13
Viewing Your Module’s Serial Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-14
Performing a Flash Upgrade to the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet
Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
Chapter 4
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Factory Default Settings for the 1203-GU6 Module and
1336-GM6 Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
What is DeviceNet Manager? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Required Equipment and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Using DeviceNet Manager to Edit Your Adapter’s Parameters . . . . 4-3
Configuring a Scanner to
Communicate with the Adapter
Chapter 5
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
What is DeviceNet Manager? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Required Equipment and Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Getting Started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Using Online Mode in DeviceNet Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Creating an EDS File for Your SCANport Product. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Configuring a PLC Scanner (1771-SDN) to Communicate
with the Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Configuring a PLC Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Mapping the Adapter to the PLC Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
Configuring an SLC Scanner (1747-SDN) to Communicate
with the Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Configuring an SLC Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17
Mapping the Adapter to the SLC Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22
Ladder Logic Programming
Chapter 6
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Required Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
What is RSLogix? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
What are Ladder Logic Programs? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Example Ladder Logic Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
PLC Ladder Logic Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
SLC Ladder Logic Program Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
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Table of Contents
iii
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Chapter 7
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Required Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Message Translations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1
Messaging for the 1771-SDN Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Messaging for the 1747-SDN Scanner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-6
PLC Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-6
SLC Messaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-9
Using Messages to Control SCANport Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
Writing to Register Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-12
Troubleshooting
Chapter 8
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
LEDs on the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1
DeviceNet Network Status LED States. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Module Status LED States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
SCANport Status LED States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Product Specifications
Appendix A
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
1203-GU6 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
1336-GM6 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-2
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters
Appendix B
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-1
Setting the Node Address. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-1
Setting the Data Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Using Datalinks and Command I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-2
Using Master-Slave Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-4
Polled Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-4
COS (Change of State) Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-6
Cyclic Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-7
Polled and COS Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-9
Polled and Cyclic Allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-10
Using Peer-to-Peer Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-11
Enabling the Adapter to Receive Peer I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-11
Enabling the Adapter to Transmit Peer I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-13
Using Fault Configurable Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-14
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-15
M-S Input Parameter Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-21
M-S Output Parameter Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .B-23
DeviceNet Objects
Appendix C
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Object Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
iv
Table of Contents
Class Code 0x01 — Identity Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
Get_Attribute_All Response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
Class Code 0x02 — Message Router Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-4
Class Code 0x03 — DeviceNet Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5
Class Code 0x05 — Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-6
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-7
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-7
Class Code 0x07 — Register Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9
Class Code 0x0F — Parameter Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-10
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-11
Bit Definitions for Instance Attribute 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-12
Data Types for Instance Attribute 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-13
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-14
Get_Attribute_All Response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-14
Object Specific Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-15
Class Code 0x10 — Parameter Group Object. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-16
Class Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-16
Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-16
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-16
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-17
Get_Attribute_All Response. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-17
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Table of Contents
Class Code 0x93 — SCANport Pass-Through
Parameter Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Object-Specific Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Code 0x97 — SCANport Pass-Through Fault Object. . . . .
Class Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Code 0x98 — SCANport Pass-Through
Warning Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Code 0x99 — SCANport Pass-Through Link Object . . . . .
Class Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instance Attributes¿ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Object-Specific Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Code 0x67 — PCCC Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Instance Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Object Specific Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Structure for Execute_PCCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Message Structure for Execute_Local_PCCC . . . . . . . . . . . . .
More Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported PCCC Messages
v
C-18
C-18
C-18
C-18
C-18
C-19
C-19
C-19
C-20
C-21
C-21
C-21
C-22
C-23
C-23
C-23
C-23
C-23
C-25
C-25
C-25
C-25
C-25
C-25
C-26
C-26
Appendix D
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DF-1/PCCC Support (1203-GU6 Only). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported PCCC Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
D-1
D-2
D-2
N-File Addresses
Appendix E
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E-1
N-File Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E-1
Supported Emulated Block Transfer
Commands
Appendix F
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F-1
What is Emulated Block Transfer? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F-1
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F-1
Emulated Block Transfer Status Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F-2
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
vi
Table of Contents
Parameter Value Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-3
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-3
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-3
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-3
Parameter Value Write. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4
Parameter Read Full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-5
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-5
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-6
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-6
Product ID Number Read. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-8
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-8
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-9
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-9
Scattered Parameter Value Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-10
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-11
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-11
Scattered Parameter Value Write . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-12
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-12
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-13
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-13
NVS Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-14
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-14
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-14
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-14
Fault Command Write . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-15
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-15
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-15
Fault Queue Entry Read Full . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-16
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-16
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-17
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-17
Fault Queue Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-18
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-18
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-18
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-18
Trip Fault Queue Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-19
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-19
Message Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-19
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-19
Event Queue Messages
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Appendix G
Appendix Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
Event Queue Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G-1
Preface
Using this Manual
Objectives
Who Should Use this Manual?
Read this preface to become familiar with the organization of the
manual. In this preface, you will read about the following:
•
Who should use this manual.
•
An overview of the Enhanced DeviceNet™ communications
adapter.
•
The purpose of this manual.
•
Terms and abbreviations.
•
Conventions used in this manual.
•
Rockwell Automation support.
Use this manual if you are responsible for installing, wiring,
programming, or troubleshooting control systems that use the
Enhanced DeviceNet communications adapter.
This manual is intended for qualified service personnel responsible
for setting up and servicing the Enhanced DeviceNet communications
adapter. You must have previous experience with and a basic
understanding of electrical terminology, programming procedures,
networking, required equipment and software, and safety precautions.
Purpose of this Manual
This manual is a learning and reference guide for the Enhanced
DeviceNet communications adapter. It describes the procedures
needed to install, configure, and troubleshoot the adapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
P-2
Using this Manual
Contents of this Manual
This manual contains the following information:
Chapter
Title
Contents
Using this Manual
Describes the purpose, background, and scope of this manual. Also provides information on
safety precautions and technical support.
1
Overview
Provides an overview of the communications adapter, DeviceNet, and SCANport.
2
Installation
Provides procedures for installing the 1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board.
3
Configuring the 1203-GU6
Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using
a Serial Connection
Provides procedures for configuring the 1203-GU6 using a serial connection. Topics include
how to set up a serial connection to the 1203-GU6, how to navigate the module’s software, edit
parameters, perform a flash upgrade to its firmware, and view its event queue.
4
Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using
DeviceNet Manager
Provides procedures for configuring the 1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board over DeviceNet
using DeviceNet Manager. Topics include using DeviceNet Manager and editing parameters.
5
Configuring a Scanner to
Communicate with the Adapter
Provides procedures for using DeviceNet Manager to configure scanners to communicate with
devices such as the 1203-GU6 module and 1336-GM6 board.
6
Ladder Logic Programming
Provides an example ladder logic program for a PLC and an example ladder logic program for
an SLC.
7
Using DeviceNet Explicit
Messaging
Provides information about explicit messaging, including messaging with PLCs, messaging with
SLCs, and using messages to control the SCANport product.
8
Troubleshooting
Provides information on the various states of the adapter’s LEDs, including Network Status,
Module Status, and SCANport Status.
A
Product Specifications
Provides the specifications for the 1203-GU6 module and 1336-GM6 board.
B
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters
Provides information on the adapter’s parameters and how to use them to configure the
adapter.
C
DeviceNet Objects
Defines the DeviceNet object classes, class services, and attributes that are supported by the
Enhanced DeviceNet adapter.
D
Supported PCCC Messages
Provides a reference list of PCCC messages supported by the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter.
E
N-File Addresses
Lists the N-files to which messages can be written.
F
Supported Emulated Block Transfer
Commands
Provides a reference list of emulated block transfer commands.
G
Event Queue Messages
Provides a list of messages you may see in the event queue.
Preface
Related Publications
Title
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Publication Number
DeviceNet Manager Software User Manual
1787-6.5.3
1771-SDN Scanner Configuration Manual
1771-6.5.118
DeviceNet Scanner Configuration Manual
1747-6.5.2
DeviceNet Cable System Planning and Installation Manual
DN-6.7.2
Using this Manual
Safety Precautions
Please read the following safety precautions carefully.
!
!
Terms and Abbreviations
P-3
ATTENTION: Only personnel familiar with
SCANport products and associated machinery should
plan or implement the installation, start-up,
configuration, and subsequent maintenance of the
Enhanced DeviceNet communications adapter. Failure
to comply may result in personal injury and/or
equipment damage.
ATTENTION: Remove all power from the SCANport
product before installing the 1336-GM6 board. Failure
to disconnect power may result in death or serious injury.
Verify all power is removed before installing the
1336-GM6 board.
The following terms and abbreviations are specific to this product.
For a complete listing of Allen-Bradley terminology, refer to the
Allen-Bradley Industrial Automation Glossary, Publication AG-7.1.
Terms
Definition
DeviceNet
An open network that provides probabilistic I/O control through a
managed bit-wise non-destructive multiplexing scheme.
SCANport
A standard peripheral communications interface for various Allen-Bradley
drives and power products.
SCANport
Peripheral
A device that provides an interface between SCANport and a network. It is
often referred to as an adapter. For example, the Enhanced DeviceNet
adapter is a SCANport peripheral.
SCANport
Product
A device that uses the SCANport communications interface to
communicate with one or more peripheral devices. For example, a motor
drive such as a 1336 PLUS is a SCANport product.
Enhanced
DeviceNet
adapter
Both the 1203-GU6 module and the 1336-GM6 board are enhanced
DeviceNet adapters. In this manual, the term “adapter” is used when both
the module and the board are referred to.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
P-4
Using this Manual
Conventions Used in this Manual
The following conventions are used throughout this manual:
•
Bulleted lists provide information, not procedural steps.
•
Numbered lists provide sequential steps or hierarchical
information.
•
Italic type is used for chapter names and for parameter names.
•
Bold type is used for names of menus, menu options, screens, and
dialog boxes.
Important: This type of paragraph contains tips or notes that have
been added to call attention to useful information.
Rockwell Automation Support
Rockwell Automation offers support services worldwide, with more
than 75 sales/support offices, more than 500 authorized distributors,
and more than 250 authorized systems integrators located throughout
the United States alone. In addition, Rockwell Automation
representatives are in every major country in the world.
Local Product Support
Contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for:
•
Sales and order support.
•
Product technical training.
•
Warranty support.
•
Support service agreements.
Technical Product Support
If you need to contact Rockwell Automation for technical assistance,
please call your local Rockwell Automation representative.
Refer to http://www.ab.com for updates and supporting
documentation.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
1
Overview
Chapter Objectives
Overview of the Communications
Adapter
Chapter 1 provides an overview of your Enhanced DeviceNet
communications adapter. In this chapter, you will read about the
following:
•
Function of the 1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board.
•
Features of the 1203-GU6 module and 1336-GM6 board.
•
SCANport products.
•
Parts and hardware of the 1203-GU6 module and 1336-GM6
board.
•
Steps for setting up the adapter.
•
Required tools and equipment.
There are two types of Enhanced DeviceNet adapters: the 1203-GU6
module and 1336-GM6 board.
Figure 1.1
1203-GU6 Module and 1336-GM6 Board
1203-GU6 Module
1336-GM6 Board
The 1203-GU6 module mounts on a DIN rail and connects to the
SCANport product via a SCANport cable. The 1336-GM6 board is
mounted directly onto selected SCANport products so it connects to
the SCANport product via an internal SCANport connector.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
1-2
Overview
Both types of Enhanced DeviceNet communications adapter provide
an electronic communications interface between a DeviceNet
network and any single SCANport product.
Figure 1.2
Example of 1203-GU6 Modules Connecting SCANport Products to DeviceNet
1336 PLUS
1305
SMC
DeviceNet
In Figure 1.2, a SCANport cable connects a 1203-GU6 module to a
SCANport product through a port on the SCANport product. A
DeviceNet cable connects the module to the DeviceNet network. The
module then translates the DeviceNet messages into SCANport
messages that can be understood by the connected product.
Features of the Communications
Adapter
The DeviceNet network is an open, global industry-standard
communication network designed to provide an interface through a
single cable from a programmable controller directly to “smart”
devices such as sensors, push buttons, motor starters, simple operator
interfaces and drives.
The 1203-GU6 module and 1336-GM6 board let you connect your
SCANport products to a DeviceNet network. These adapters feature
the following:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
•
Flash upgradeability allows for field updates in the event of
changes to the adapter’s firmware.
•
COS (Change of State) capability lets you customize this device’s
activity on the network by configuring the adapter to report only
new data.
•
Cyclic operation lets you customize the devices’s activity on the
network by configuring the adapter to report its data at specific
intervals.
Overview
1-3
•
Peer I/O capabilities let the drive’s I/O (logic command,
reference, logic status, feedback and datalinks) be broadcast to or
received from other drives connected via 1203-GU6 or
1336-GM6 adapters.
•
Software configuration lets you configure the adapter using
DeviceNet Manager, RSNetWorx for DeviceNet, or
HyperTerminal (a standard Windows 95 program).
•
Faulted Node Recovery lets you change items, such as a node
address, of a device even when it is faulted on the network. (This
feature requires the support of proper PC software tools.)
•
User-configurable fault response provides the ability to customize
the adapter’s actions to communication errors.
•
A miniature RS-232 port on the front of the 1203-GU6 (not
available on the 1336-GM6) provides access for your PC to
change parameters in the module using HyperTerminal. It also
provides a DF1 connection for DriveTools32. (You must
configure DriveTools32 and RSLinx for DF1 communications
and then connect to the module using a 1203-SFC cable [sold
separately].)
•
A new Module Status LED helps to diagnose network, module,
and SCANport product health.
•
Re-designed power supply receives its operating power from the
connected drive product. Only minimal DeviceNet-side
transceiver power is consumed by the user-supplied 24V DC
power source.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
1-4
Overview
SCANport Products
Some SCANport products support one peripheral; others support up
to six peripherals. The table below lists SCANport products, the
number of peripherals each supports, the minimum and maximum I/O
words, and the type of adapter that can be used.
I/O Words
Adapter Use
Number of
Peripherals
Supported
Minimum
Maximum
1203-GU6
1336-GM6
1305 AC MICRO Drive
5
0
10
Yes
No
1336 IMPACT™ Drive
6➀
0
10
Yes
Yes➁
1336 PLUS AC Drive
6➀
0
10
Yes
Yes➁
1336 PLUS II Drive
6➀
0
10
Yes
Yes
1336 FORCE™ Drive
6➀
0
10
Yes
Yes➂
1394 AC Mult-Axis Motion Control
System
5
0
10
Yes
No
SMC Dialog Plus
1
0
2
Yes
No
SMP-3 Smart Motor Protector
2
0
2
Yes
No
1397 Digital DC Drive
5
0
10
Yes
No
1557 Medium Voltage Drive
5
0
10
Yes
No
Product
➀
Lower horsepower products may not support a sixth peripheral. Refer to your user manual to verify that your product
supports a sixth peripheral.
➁
Drive must be 30 hp or above.
➂
Drive must be 30 hp or above, and it must use a standard adapter board.
Important: To connect multiple peripherals to a SCANport product, a
port expander may be required. Refer to your product’s
documentation for more information.
Important: If you intend to use datalinks to communicate with and
control your SCANport product, verify that your SCANport product
supports datalinks before enabling them in the adapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Overview
Hardware and Parts Description
1-5
The hardware included with the adapter depends on the adapter that
you have.
1203-GU6 Module Hardware
Figure 1.3 illustrates and the following table lists the main parts of the
1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet communications module:
Figure 1.3
Parts of the 1203-GU6 Module
1
2
4
5
3
Number
Part
Description
1
DIN Rail Mount
Securely attaches and electronically grounds the module to the DIN rail.
2
SCANport Connection
Provides a standard SCANport 8-pin circular mini-DIN connector for the SCANport cable.
3
RS-232 Serial Port
Provides a connection for terminals capable of RS-232 serial communications. This port can
be used to edit the module’s parameters, download a file needed to perform a flash to the
module’s operating code, and support devices that monitor and test the module. A 1203-SFC
serial cable and a PC running a terminal emulation program or a VT100-compatible terminal
are required to use this port.
4
Bi-Color LEDs
Indicate the status of the DeviceNet media channel, of the SCANport connection, and of the
module. For more information, refer to Chapter 8, Troubleshooting.
5
DeviceNet Connection
Provides a 5-pin Phoenix connector to attach the module to the network.
Not
shown
5-Pin Plug-In
Connector
This part is supplied with the module. The 5-pin plug-in connector (P/N 22112-215-01) is a
connector to attach to the cable.
Not
shown
10-Pin Plug-In
Connector
This part is supplied with the module. The 10-pin plug-in connector (P/N 94220605) is a
connector to attach to the cable.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
1-6
Overview
1336-GM6 Board Hardware
Figure 1.4 illustrates and the following table lists the main parts of the
1336-GM6 Enhanced DeviceNet communications board:
Figure 1.4
Parts of the 1336-GM6 Board
1336-GM6 Board
1
3
2
Number
Part
1
DeviceNet Connection
Provides a 5-pin Phoenix connector to attach the module to the DeviceNet network.
2
Bi-Color LEDs
Indicate the status of the DeviceNet media channel, of the SCANport connection, and of the
module. For more information, refer to Chapter 8, Troubleshooting.
3
SCANport Connection
Provides a 14-pin connector containing power and SCANport communication circuitry.
Kit
Provides the necessary materials for mounting the board to the SCANport product. These
materials include one grounding wrist strap (P/N 22803-016-01), four Phillips mounting
screws (P/N 28159-036-26), four stand-off nylon headers (P/N 22805-030-01), one 5-pin
connector (P/N 22112-215-01), and one snap-in comm housing (P/N 188578) with mounting
instructions (P/N 189572).
Not
Shown
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
Overview
Overview of Setting Up the Adapter
1-7
To set up the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter, you must perform the
following tasks:
1. Install the module or mount the board. Refer to Chapter 2,
Installation.
2. Set the adapter’s node address and configure the adapter’s
parameters. Refer to the following table:
If using:
Then refer to:
1203-GU6 module’s serial connection
Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6
Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a
Serial Connection
1203-GU6 module’s DeviceNet connection
Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet
Manager
1336-GM board
Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet
Manager
3. Configure a scanner (either PLC or SLC) to communicate with
the Adapter. Refer to Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to
Communicate with the Adapter.
4. If necessary, create a ladder logic program to control the
SCANport product. Refer to Chapter 6, Ladder Logic
Programming.
Required Tools and Equipment
The tools and equipment required, depend on if you are using a
1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board.
1203-GU6 Module
To install and configure a 1203-GU6 module, you need the following:
•
Enhanced DeviceNet communications module (1203-GU6).
•
5-pin or 10-pin plug-in connector (supplied with module).
•
35 x 7.5 mm DIN rail A (Allen-Bradley part number 199-DR1;
46277-3; EN 50022).
•
1/8" flathead screwdriver.
•
Appropriate cables for SCANport and DeviceNet connections.
Refer to the Selecting Cables section in Chapter 2, Installation.
•
A 1203-SFC serial cable.
•
A PC running either a Windows terminal emulation program
(e.g., HyperTerminal) or a VT100-compatible terminal.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
1-8
Overview
•
A PC that is:
–
Running DeviceNet Manager.
–
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet
network using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KFD adapter.
–
Running RS Linx.
–
Running RSLogix5 (if using PLC) or RSLogix500 (if using
SLC).
Important: Refer to http://www.software.rockwell.com for more
information on these software products.
1336-GM6 Board
To install and configure a 1336-GM6 board, you need the following:
•
Enhanced DeviceNet communications board (1336-GM6).
•
A kit that includes one grounding wrist strap, four Phillips
mounting screws, four stand-off nylon headers, one 5-pin
connector and one snap-in comm housing with mounting
instructions (supplied with board).
•
#1 Phillips screwdriver.
•
Appropriate cable for the DeviceNet connection. Refer to the
Selecting Cables section in Chapter 2, Installation.
•
A PC that is:
–
Running DeviceNet Manager.
–
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet
network using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KFD adapter.
–
Running RS Linx.
–
Running RSLogix5 (if using PLC) or RSLogix500 (if using
SLC).
Important: Refer to http://www.software.rockwell.com for more
information on these software products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
2
Installation
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 2 provides the information that you need to install the
1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board. In this chapter, you will read
about the following:
•
Required tools and equipment.
•
Selecting cables.
•
Installing the adapter.
•
Removing the adapter.
How you install the adapter depends on whether you are installing a
1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board. Refer to the following table
for information:
If installing:
Installing a 1203-GU6 Module
Then refer to:
1203-GU6 module
“Installing a 1203-GU6 Module” on page 1
1336-GM6 board
“Installing a 1336-GM6 Board” on page 6
Follow these procedures to install a 1203-GU6 module.
Required Tools and Equipment
To install your 1203-GU6 module, you will need the following tools
and equipment:
•
Enhanced DeviceNet communications module (1203-GU6).
•
Either a 5-pin or 10-pin plug-in connector (supplied with
module).
•
35 x 7.5 mm DIN rail A (Allen-Bradley part number 199-DR1;
46277-3; EN 50022).
•
1/8" flathead screwdriver.
•
Appropriate cables for SCANport and DeviceNet connections.
Refer to the “Selecting Cables” section in this chapter.
Selecting Cables
To connect the 1203-GU6 to the SCANport product and the
DeviceNet network, you must select an appropriate DeviceNet cable
and Allen-Bradley SCANport cable. Use the following information to
select appropriate cables for each connection.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
2-2
Installation
SCANport Cables
When selecting the SCANport cable to connect the 1203-GU6
module to the SCANport product, you need to:
•
Use an Allen-Bradley SCANport cable. Refer to the table below.
Male to Male Connection
Male to Female Connection
Length
Catalog Number
Length
Catalog Number
1/3 m
1202-C03
1/3 m
1202-H03
1m
1202-C10
1m
1202-H10
3m
1202-C30
3m
1202-H30
9m
1202-C90
9m
1202-H90
•
Use less than 10 meters (33 feet) of cable between the SCANport
product and adapter.
•
Keep SCANport cables away from high power cables to guard
against introducing noise into your system.
DeviceNet Cables
The 1203-GU6 module comes with either one 5-pin connector or a
5-pin and 10-pin connector. A drop line connects a node, such as an
adapter, on the DeviceNet cable system to the DeviceNet trunk. When
selecting a drop line, you need to:
•
•
Select either a 5-pin connector or a 10-pin connector for the
cable. (Both are included with the 1203-GU6 module).
–
Use the 5-pin connector if you are using a DeviceNet drop
cable configuration.
–
Use the 10-pin connector if you are using a daisy-chaining
configuration.
Determine limitations of the trunk and drop cables. Refer to the
following table.
Data Rates
125 Kbps
250 Kbps
500 Kbps
Thick Trunk Line
500 m (1,640 ft)
250 m (820 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
Thin Trunk Lengths
100 m (328 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
100 m ((328 ft)
Maximum Drop Length
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
Cumulative Drop Budget
156 m (512 ft)
78 m (256 ft)
39 m (128 ft)
For more information on DeviceNet cables and cable systems, refer to
the DeviceNet Cable System Planning and Installation Manual,
Publication DN-6.7.2.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Installation
2-3
Installing the 1203-GU6 Communications Module
The following instructions explain how to physically install your
Enhanced DeviceNet 1203-GU6 communications module.
1. Hook the top lip of the module’s DIN rail mount onto the top of
the DIN rail and then rotate the module onto the DIN rail. You
will hear the module snap into a locked position.
Figure 2.1
Mounting the Module onto the DIN Rail
2. Remove power from the network.
3. Insert the DeviceNet cable wires into the desired connector. Make
sure you follow the color key next to the connector receptacle on
the module.
!
ATTENTION: If you wire the 5-pin or 10-pin header
after you’ve connected it to the module, static control
precautions are required. Device malfunction may occur
if you do not follow ESD control procedures. If you are
not familiar with static control procedures, refer to
Allen-Bradley Publication 8000-4.5.2, Guarding
Against Electrostatic Damage, or other applicable ESD
protection handbook.
Figure 2.2
Inserting DeviceNet Cable Wires into the Connector
SP
Mod
Net
SCANport
Color Key
1-Red- V+
2-White-CAN_H
3-Shield
4-Blue-CAN_L
5-Black- V-
Serial
DeviceNet
Allen-Bradley
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
2-4
Installation
4. Plug the connector into the module.
Figure 2.3
Inserting a 5-pin or 10-pin Phoenix Connector
5. Use a 1/8" flathead screwdriver to screw the connector firmly into
place.
6. Connect the SCANport cable to the communications adapter and
then to the SCANport product.
Important: Because the adapter’s power comes from the SCANport
product, the adapter will not function if the SCANport product is not
powered.
Figure 2.4
Inserting the SCANport Cable
7. Reapply power to the network.
8. If necessary, apply power to the connected SCANport product.
Your 1203-GU6 module is now installed. The SCANport LED is
green. The network and module LEDs are blinking green. If your
module’s LEDs are different, refer to Chapter 8, Troubleshooting, for
more information.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Installation
2-5
You must now edit the adapter’s node address, and you may want to
edit some of its other parameters. Refer to the following table for
information:
If using:
Then refer to:
1203-GU6 module’s serial connection
Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6
Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a
Serial Connection
1203-GU6 module’s DeviceNet connection
Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet
Manager
Removing the 1203-GU6 Communications Module
To remove the 1203-GU6 communications module, you need to:
1. If necessary, remove any serial connections from the DF-1 serial
port.
2. Remove the SCANport cable from the SCANport product and
then from the module. This will power down the module if the
SCANport product is powered.
3. Unscrew (using a 1/8" flathead screwdriver) and then unplug the
5-pin or 10-pin connector from the module.
4. Insert a flathead screwdriver into the module’s DIN rail tab
release and gently push the handle toward the module to release
the connection tab. Then pull the module up and off the DIN rail.
Figure 2.5
Mounting the Module onto the DIN Rail
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
2-6
Installation
Installing a 1336-GM6 Board
Follow these procedures to install a 1336-GM6 board.
Required Tools and Equipment
To install your 1336-GM6 board, you will need the following tools
and equipment:
•
Enhanced DeviceNet communications board (1336-GM6).
•
A kit that includes one grounding wrist strap, four Phillips
mounting screws, four stand-off nylon headers, one 5-pin
connector and one snap-in comm housing with mounting
instructions (supplied with board).
•
#1 Phillips screwdriver.
•
Appropriate cable for the DeviceNet connection. Refer to the
Selecting Cables section below.
Selecting Cables
To connect the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter to the SCANport
product and the DeviceNet network, you must select an appropriate
DeviceNet cable. Use the following information to select appropriate
cables for each connection.
DeviceNet Cables
The 1336-GM6 board comes with one 5-pin connector. A drop line
connects a node, such as an adapter, on the DeviceNet cable system to
the DeviceNet trunk. When selecting a drop line, you need to:
•
Use the 5-pin connector for the cable if you are using a
DeviceNet drop cable configuration.
•
Determine limitations of the trunk and drop cables. Refer to the
following table.
Data Rates
125 Kbps
250 Kbps
500 Kbps
Thick Trunk Line
500 m (1,640 ft)
250 m (820 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
Thin Trunk Lengths
100 m (328 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
100 m ((328 ft)
Maximum Drop Length
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
Cumulative Drop Budget
156 m (512 ft)
78 m (256 ft)
39 m (128 ft)
For more information on DeviceNet cables and cable systems, refer to
the DeviceNet Cable System Planning and Installation Manual,
Publication DN-6.7.2.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Installation
2-7
Electrostatic Discharge Precautions
Please read the following safety precaution carefully before installing
the 1336-GM6 communications board.
!
ATTENTION: The 1336-GM6 communications board
contains ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) sensitive parts.
Static control precautions are required when installing,
testing, or servicing this board. Device malfunction may
occur if you do not follow ESD control procedures. If
you are not familiar with static control procedures, refer
to Allen-Bradley Publication 8000-4.5.2, Guarding
Against Electrostatic Damage, or other applicable ESD
protection handbook.
Installing the 1336-GM6 Communications Board
The following instructions explain how to physically install an
Enhanced DeviceNet 1336-GM6 communications board.
Important: If you are attaching the communications board to a 1336
PLUS II, refer to the one-page insert included with the kit for
mounting instructions.
Important: To prevent damage to the board, you must wear a
grounding wrist strap when handling the 1336-GM6 communications
board.
!
ATTENTION: Remove all power from the SCANport
product before installing the 1336-GM6 board. Failure
to disconnect power may result in death or serious injury.
Verify all power is removed before installing the
1336-GM6 board.
1. Make sure you’ve turned off the power supply to the SCANport
product and DeviceNet network and verified the drive is not
receiving power.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
2-8
Installation
2. Screw the four stand-off nylon headers into the appropriate
spaces on the drive’s main control board.
Figure 2.6
Mounting the Open Style Communications Board
DeviceNet
Connector
Black - V Blue - CAN_L
Bare - Shield
White - CAN_H
Red - V+
DeviceNet Status
Module Status
SCANport Status
Internal SCANport
Connector
3. Insert the pins located on the 1336-GM6 into the 14-pin
SCANport header on the drive. The board should sit squarely on
the stand-offs.
4. Using a #1 Phillips screwdriver and the four supplied mounting
screws, screw the board securely into place, being careful not to
overtighten.
5. Attach the wires to the supplied DeviceNet connector.
Important: Refer to Figure 2.6 to verify you’ve wired the connector
correctly to the board. Failure to wire the board correctly may damage
the circuitry or cause the device to not function.
!
ATTENTION: Static control precautions are required
if you wire the connector when it is already connected
to the adapter. It is not recommended that you do this.
Device malfunction may occur if you do not follow ESD
control procedures. If you are not familiar with static
control procedures, refer to Allen-Bradley Publication
8000-4.5.2, Guarding Against Electrostatic Damage, or
other applicable ESD protection handbooks.
6. Plug the connector into the board receptacle and screw the two
screws into place using a 1/8" flathead screwdriver.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Installation
2-9
7. Reapply power to the SCANport product.
8. Reapply power to the DeviceNet network.
Your 1336-GM6 board is now installed. The SCANport LED is
green. The network and module LEDs are blinking green. If your
module’s LEDs are different, refer to Chapter 8, Troubleshooting, for
more information.
You must now edit the adapter’s node address, and you may want to
edit some of its other parameters. Refer to Chapter 4, Configuring the
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Removing the 1336-GM6 Communications Board
To remove the 1336-GM6 communications board, you need to:
Important: To prevent damage to the board, you must wear a
grounding wrist strap when handling the 1336-GM6 communications
board.
Important: If you are removing the communications board from a
1336 PLUS II, refer to the one-page insert included with the kit for
special mounting instructions.
!
ATTENTION: Remove all power from the SCANport
product before removing the 1336-GM6 board. Failure
to disconnect power may result in death or serious injury.
Verify all power is removed before installing the
1336-GM6 board.
1. Turn off the power supply to the drive and DeviceNet network.
2. Unscrew (using a 1/8" flathead screwdriver) and then unplug the
DeviceNet connector from the communications board.
3. Unscrew and remove the board’s four mounting screws with a #1
Phillips screwdriver.
4. Making sure not to bend the pins as they slide out of the 14-pin
SCANport header, gently pull the communications board away
from the main control board.
5. Unscrew and remove the four stand-offs from the main control
board.
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2-10
Installation
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
3
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced
DeviceNet Module Using a Serial
Connection
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 3 provides information that you need to configure the
1203-GU6 module using a serial connection. In this chapter, you will
read about the following:
•
Factory-default settings for the module.
•
Equipment necessary to make a serial connection to the
1203-GU6 module.
•
Connecting either a PC running terminal emulation software or
VT100-compatible terminal to the 1203-GU6 module.
•
Using Windows 95 HyperTerminal to configure or edit the
module’s parameters, display its event queue, view its I/O data,
view DF-1 statistics or serial number, and perform a flash
upgrade.
Important: To configure a 1203-GU6 module over the DeviceNet
network or to configure a 1336-GM6 board, refer to Chapter 4,
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet
Manager.
Factory Default Settings for the
1203-GU6 Module
The factory-default settings of the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter
include the following:
•
16-bit Logic Command/Status enabled for polling.
•
16-bit Reference/Feedback enabled for polling.
•
If the scanner is put into program mode or the network fails, the
SCANport product will be faulted by the module.
•
A node address of 63.
•
DeviceNet autobaud detection enabled.
•
Serial baud rate of 9600.
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
You should change the node address by editing the DN Node Address
(2) parameter. You must change the autobaud detection if no other
devices on your DeviceNet network have a fixed data rate by editing
DN Data Rate (3) parameter in the module.
Important: Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters, for more information on changing the node address or
data rate.
If you wish to change other functions (e.g., Fault Configurable inputs)
or add more functions (e.g., datalinks), you must edit the adapter’s
parameters. To do so, refer to:
Required Tools and Equipment
Establishing a Serial Connection to
the Module
•
Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters, for
detailed information about the adapter’s parameters.
•
Instructions in this chapter on establishing a serial connection.
•
Instructions in this chapter on editing parameters.
To make a serial connection to the module, you need the following:
•
A 1203-SFC serial cable.
•
Either PC running a Windows terminal emulation program
(e.g., HyperTerminal) or a VT100-compatible terminal.
The 1203-GU6 module’s software lets you do the following:
•
Edit its parameters.
•
View its event queue.
•
View its I/O data values.
•
View DF1 statistics.
•
View its serial number.
•
Perform a flash upgrade.
To access this software, you must make a serial connection to the
module from a PC running terminal emulation software or from a
VT100-compatible terminal. Refer to the following table:
If using:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Refer to page:
PC running terminal emulation software
3-3
VT100-compatible terminal
3-8
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3-3
Using a PC Running Terminal Emulation Software
A variety of terminal emulation programs can be used to establish a
serial connection to the module. The following instructions describe
how to establish the initial serial connection to the module using a PC
running Windows 95 HyperTerminal software. Future connections to
the module can use this same configuration by clicking the icon added
to the initial screen when the configuration is saved.
Important: If you are not using Windows 95 HyperTerminal, steps to
establish a serial connection may vary from the following steps.
1. Connect a 1203-SFC serial cable to your PC’s RS-232 serial port
and then to the serial port on the module.
Figure 3.1
Connecting the 1203-SFC Serial Cable to the Module’s Serial Port
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3-4
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
2. In Windows 95, click the Start button and then select Programs,
Accessories, and HyperTerminal.
Important: A HyperTerminal dialog box appears in either List or
Icon mode. Figure 3.2 shows the dialog box in List mode. To change
from Icon mode to List mode, select View, then List.
Figure 3.2
Example HyperTerminal Dialog Box
3. Double-click HyperTrm.exe. The Connection Description
dialog box appears.
Figure 3.3
Example Connection Dialog Box
4. Enter a name in the Name field and select any icon from the Icon
field.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3-5
5. Click OK. The Phone Number dialog box appears.
Figure 3.4
Example Phone Number Dialog Box
6. In the Connect Using field, select the appropriate
communications port (usually COM1 or COM2).
7. Click OK. The Comm Properties dialog box appears.
Figure 3.5
Example Comm Properties Dialog Box
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3-6
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
8. Select the following settings:
•
9600 in the Bits per second field.
If you have previously set the module’s Serial Port Rate
parameter to enable 19200 bps, set the bps to 19200 in this
field.
•
8 in the Data bits field.
•
None in the Parity field.
•
1 in the Stop bits field.
•
None in the Flow control field.
9. Click OK. The HyperTerminal screen appears.
10. From the File menu, select Properties. The Properties dialog
box appears.
Figure 3.6
Properties Dialog Box
11. Click the Settings tab.
12. In the Function, arrow, and ctrl keys act as field, verify
Terminal keys is selected.
13. In the Emulation field, verify VT100 is selected.
14. Click OK.
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3-7
15. From the File menu, select Save. The configuration is saved and
the icon you selected will appear in the HyperTerminal window
the next time you make a connection to the module.
16. Press the Enter key. The main menu of the Enhanced DeviceNet
application appears.
Figure 3.7
Main Menu
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
3-8
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
Using a VT100-Compatible Terminal
The following instructions describe how to establish a serial
connection to the module using a VT100-compatible terminal.
1. Connect a 1203-SFC serial cable to your terminal and then to the
serial port on the module. See Figure 3.1.
2. Start your terminal.
3. Select the following settings:
•
9600 in the Bits per second field.
If you’ve already set the module’s Serial Port Rate parameter
to enable 19200 bps, set the bps to 19200 in this field.
•
8 in the Data bits field.
•
None in the Parity field.
•
1 in the Stop bits field.
•
None in the Flow Control field.
4. Press the Enter key. The main menu of the Enhanced DeviceNet
application appears.
Figure 3.8
Main Menu
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
Navigation Techniques
To perform any of the functions of the module’s software (e.g.,
editing parameters), you need to know the following navigation
techniques:
Press:
To
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0
Select an option in the Main Menu (1 – 6) or enter a value
for a parameter in the parameter screen (0 – 9).
Escape
Return to Main Menu or abort changes to a parameter.
Down Arrow
View the next parameter.
Up Arrow
View the previous parameter.
Right Arrow
View the next value for a parameter.➀
Left Arrow
View the previous value for a parameter.➀
Enter
Save a value for a parameter.
➀
Editing the Module’s Parameters
3-9
In some parameters the right and left arrow keys let you navigate through the bits.
If you do not want to use the module’s default settings, you must edit
its parameters. Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters, for a detailed list of parameters and how to configure
them.
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module
section earlier in this chapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
2. Press 1 to select 1> Edit Setup Parameters. The first parameter
appears on the bottom of the screen.
Figure 3.9
Edit Parameters
3. If necessary, scroll through the list of parameters by pressing the
Up arrow key or Down arrow key.
4. Edit parameters as necessary using the left arrow and right
arrow keys. Refer to the “Navigation Techniques” section earlier
in this chapter for information on changing parameter values.
Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters, for acceptable values for each parameter.
5. If necessary, reset the module by enabling the Reset Adapter
parameter (22). Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet
Adapter’s Parameters, to see if the parameter you changed
requires the module to be reset in order to take effect.
Displaying and Clearing the
Module’s Event Queue
If an unexpected problem occurs with the module, you may need to
check the event queue to view events that have happened in the
module. Follow these instructions:
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the “Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module”
section earlier in this chapter.
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3-11
2. Press 2 to select 2> Display Event Queue. The event queue
appears.
Figure 3.10
The Event Queue
3. Scroll through the list of Event Queue parameters by pressing the
Up Arrow or Down Arrow key. Refer to Appendix G, Event
Queue Messages, for a list of faults.
Number
1
2–7
8
Name
Description
Clr Event Queue
Enable = Clears the event queue.
Ready = Leaves the event queue as is.
Event Queue 1 — Event Queue 6
Event in the event queue. Most recent event is listed in Event Queue 1.
Flash Upgrades
Number of times the adapter has been flash upgraded.
4. If desired, clear the current fault in the adapter by setting Clr
Event Queue (1) to Enable and pressing the Enter key.
Important: The Fault is cleared in the module and a “Clear Fault”
event is added to the Event Queue.
5. Press the Escape key to return to the main menu.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
Viewing I/O Data Values
If you need to verify that a command you’ve sent to a drive is actually
passing through the module or to diagnose similar I/O concerns, you
can view the I/O data values. To view I/O data values, follow these
instructions:
Important: You must understand the configuration of the SCANport
product to interpret the I/O data values.
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the “Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module”
section earlier in this chapter.
2. Press 3 to select 3> Display I/O Data Values. The I/O Data
Screen appears.
Figure 3.11
I/O Data Values
3. Scroll through the list of I/O Data parameters by pressing the Up
Arrow or Down Arrow key.
Number
Name
Description
1
Logic Command
Buffer for Logic Command data
2
Logic Status
Buffer for Logic Status data
3
Reference Data
Buffer for Reference data
4
Feedback Data
Buffer for Feedback data
Data A1 In Val — Data D2 Out Val
Data going to (Input) or coming from (Output) the SCANport device
5 – 20
4. Press Escape to return to the Main Menu.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
Viewing DF-1 Statistics
3-13
If you want to check for bad packets or perform other serial port
debugging procedures, you can view DF-1 statistics. You may also
want to use the DF-1 statistics if you are developing your own DF-1
driver. To view DF-1 statistics, follow these instructions:
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the “Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module”
section earlier in this chapter.
2. Press 4 to select 4> Display DF1 Statistics. The first parameter
appears.
Figure 3.12
DF1 Statistics
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3. Scroll through the list of DF1 Statistics by pressing the Up
Arrow or Down Arrow key.
Number
Name
Description
1
Clear DF1 Counts
Ready = Leaves status parameters as they are
Enable = Reset all status parameters
2
DF1 Packets Sent
Total number of DF1 packets sent by the module
3
DF1 Packets Rcvd
Total number of DF1 packets received by the module
4
Undelivered Msgs
Total number of messages sent that were not acknowledged
5
ENQ Sent
Total number of inquiries sent by the module
6
ENQ Rcvd
Total number of inquiries received by the module
7
NAKs Received
Total number of NAKs received by the module
8
NAK Bad Packet
Total number of NAKs sent by the module because of corrupt data
9
NAK No Memory
Total number of NAKs sent by the module because the previous command did not yet
complete and there was no place to save the new command
10
Duplicate Msgs
Total number of messages received by the module with the same TNS number as the
previous message
4. If desired, reset the current DF1 protocol statistics by setting
Clear DF1 Counts to Enable and pressing the Enter key.
5. Press Escape to return to the Main Menu.
Viewing Your Module’s Serial
Number
Each Enhanced DeviceNet module has a unique serial number. To
view the serial number, follow these instructions:
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module
section earlier in this chapter.
2. Press 5 to select 5> Display Serial Number. The serial number
for your communications module appears.
3. Press Escape to return to the Main Menu.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
Performing a Flash Upgrade to the
Module
3-15
You can upgrade the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter’s firmware using
the module’s serial port. To ensure a successful flash, we recommend
the following:
•
If using a laptop, turn off the FIFO buffers in HyperTerminal. In
Windows 95, select File and then Properties. In the Properties
dialog box, click Configure and then click Advanced. Uncheck
Use FIFO buffers.
•
Flash the upgrade file from a local hard disk (not a network drive
or floppy disk).
•
Run only your terminal emulation software while performing the
flash.
•
Disable the screen saver.
Important: To perform a flash upgrade to your module’s firmware
through the serial port, you must use a PC running terminal emulation
software that supports an X-modem CRC binary transfer.
Important: When you request a flash upgrade, the SCANport product
may fault and stop. To exit the flash upgrade option before the
download has completed, simultaneously press the Control and X
keys.
To perform a flash upgrade, you need to:
1. Establish a serial connection to access the module’s software.
Refer to the “Establishing a Serial Connection to the Module”
section earlier in this chapter.
2. Obtain the software file that contains the upgrade and record its
location. Note the firmware/revision number above the Main
Menu options in order to verify the upgrade later.
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3. Press 6 to select 6> Update Flash Program. The following
screen appears in terminal mode.
!
ATTENTION: Hazard of personal injury or death
exists when stopping a drive to perform a flash upgrade.
When you perform a flash upgrade, the drive will fault
and stop the motor if the drive is receiving control data
from the 1203-GU6 module. Make sure the motor will
stop safely or the drive will receive control data from an
alternate source before beginning a flash upgrade.
Figure 3.13
Initial Update Flash Program Screen
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
3-17
4. Press Y to verify that you want to perform a flash upgrade when
prompted.
5. From the Transfer menu, select Send File. The Send File dialog
box appears.
Figure 3.14
Send File Dialog Box
6. In the Filename field, select the file that contains the flash
upgrade.
Important: You can click the Browse button to locate the file that
contains the flash upgrade.
7. In the Protocol field, select Xmodem.
8. Click Send. A dialog box appears to report the flash is in
progress.
Figure 3.15
Flash In Progress Dialog Box
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Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection
When the flash is complete, a message appears to tell you the
download is complete.
Figure 3.16
Message Reporting the Flash is Complete
9. Press Enter to return to the main menu.
10. Verify that the new main menu displays the new revision data.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
4
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet
Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 4 provides information that you need to configure the
1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board over the DeviceNet network.
In this chapter, you will read about the following:
•
Factory-default settings for the module.
•
DeviceNet Manager software.
•
Equipment necessary to use DeviceNet Manager software.
•
Editing the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 adapter’s parameters using
DeviceNet Manager.
Important: You must use DeviceNet Manager to configure the
1336-GM6 board. The 1203-GU6 module may be configured using
either DeviceNet Manager or terminal emulation software. To
configure a 1203-GU6 module using a serial connection refer to
Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module
Using a Serial Connection.
This section assumes you have experience using DeviceNet Manager
to configure a DeviceNet network.
Factory Default Settings for the
1203-GU6 Module and 1336-GM6
Board
The factory-default settings of the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter
include the following:
•
16-bit Logic Command/Status enabled for polling.
•
16-bit Reference/Feedback enabled for polling.
•
If the scanner is put into program mode or the network faults, the
SCANport product will be faulted by the module.
•
A node address of 63.
•
DeviceNet autobaud detection enabled.
•
Serial baud rate of 9600.
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Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
You should change the node address by editing the DN Node Address
(2) parameter. You must change the autobaud detection if no other
devices on your DeviceNet network have a fixed data rate by editing
DN Data Rate (3) parameter in the module.
Important: Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters, for information on changing the node address or data
rate.
If you wish to change other functions (e.g., Fault Configurable inputs)
or add more functions (e.g., datalinks), you must edit the adapter’s
parameters. To do so, refer to:
What is DeviceNet Manager?
•
Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters, for
detailed information about the adapter’s parameters.
•
Instructions in this chapter on using DeviceNet Manager to edit
parameters.
DeviceNet Manager is a Windows application that lets you configure
DeviceNet networks. Using a graphical representation of your
network, you can configure network-wide parameters and the
network-wide schedule.
After installing or mounting the adapter, you can use DeviceNet
Manager to configure or edit the adapter’s parameters.
Required Equipment and Software
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Before configuring or editing your adapter’s parameters, your PC
must be:
•
Running DeviceNet Manager. Refer to
http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on this
product.
•
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet network
using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KFD adapter.
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
Using DeviceNet Manager to Edit
Your Adapter’s Parameters
4-3
The following instructions describe how to use DeviceNet Manager in
online mode to edit your adapter’s parameters.
1. Start DeviceNet Manager. The DeviceNet Manager screen
appears.
Figure 4.1
DeviceNet Manager Screen
2. In the Utilities menu, select Set Up Online Connection. The
DeviceNet Driver Selection dialog box appears.
Figure 4.2
DeviceNet Driver Selection Dialog Box
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4-4
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
3. Choose an available driver and click OK. The Driver
Configuration dialog box appears.
Figure 4.3
Driver Configuration Dialog Box
4. Select settings for the following:
•
port setting
•
baud rate
Important: Be sure to select a baud rate that your computer is able to
support.
•
node address
Important: This is the PC’s node address, not the module’s. Select a
unique node address for the PC. Do not use node address 63 because
it is the default address for devices configured at the factory.
•
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
data rate
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
4-5
5. Click OK to go online. The DeviceNet Manager screen appears.
Figure 4.4
DeviceNet Manager Screen Showing Online Data in Comm Box
6
6. Verify that the DeviceNet Manager screen displays online data
in the Comm section at the lower right of the screen.
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Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
7. In the Who menu, select Network Who. The Network Who
screen appears and scans the network for devices.
Important: To stop the scan, click Stop. You can click Stop at any
time.
Figure 4.5
Network Who Screen
In Figure 4.5, Node 0 is the scanner, Node 62 is the PC, and Node 63
is the module we are configuring.
Your module appears as Node 63 by default. If you changed its node
address parameter and reset the module, its node address is what you
set it.
Important: If the module does not appear:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
•
Verify there is an EDS file for the device.
•
Verify it is a unique node address. Check the network LED on
the module. If it is red, it is not a unique address. You must
configure the module in a point-to-point connection.
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
4-7
8. Double-click the icon for either the 1336-GM6 or 1203-GU6
adapter. (In our example, it is node 63 in Figure 4.5.)
If:
Then:
A prompt appears asking you to create an
EDS file
Refer to the “Creating an EDS File for Your
SCANport Product” section in Chapter 5,
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate
with the Adapter.
The Device Configuration — Enhanced
Mode dialog box appears.
Go to step 9.
Figure 4.6
Device Configuration — Enhanced Mode Screen
9
9. Click on the Parameter Group pull-down menu and select
DeviceNet Module to edit the adapter parameters. The adapter’s
parameters appear in the parameter’s list box.
Figure 4.7
Device Configuration — Enhanced Mode
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4-8
Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager
10. Double-click the parameter(s) you want to edit. A dialog box
similar to the following appears. Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters, for acceptable values for each
parameter.
Figure 4.8
Example Device Configuration Dialog Box
11. Edit configuration values as necessary.
12. Click Save to Device to save your changes.
13. Click OK to close the Device Configuration dialog box.
14. If necessary, reset the module by enabling the Reset Adapter
parameter. Refer to Appendix B, Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s
Parameters, to see if the parameter you changed requires the
module to be reset in order to take effect.
Important: When you reset the module, a prompt may appear. Click
OK and go to the next step.
15. Click Close to close the Device Configuration — Enhanced
Mode dialog box
Important: If you changed the node address, click Rescan in the
Network Who screen to see the change displayed.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
5
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate
with the Adapter
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 5 provides instructions for configuring your scanner to
communicate with either the 1203-GU6 module or 1336-GM6 board.
This allows the product connected to the adapter to be an active node
on the DeviceNet network. In this chapter, you will read about the
following:
•
DeviceNet Manager software.
•
Equipment and software needed for the configuration.
•
Configuring either a PLC or SLC scanner to communicate with
the adapter.
This chapter assumes you have experience using DeviceNet Manager
to configure a DeviceNet network.
What is DeviceNet Manager?
DeviceNet Manager is a Windows application that lets you configure
DeviceNet networks. Using a graphical representation of your
network, you can configure network-wide parameters and the
network-wide schedule.
After installing and configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter, you
can use DeviceNet Manager to configure the scanner to recognize and
communicate with it.
For more information on DeviceNet Manager, refer to the DeviceNet
Manager online help.
Required Equipment and Software
Before configuring the scanner, your PC must be:
•
Running DeviceNet Manager. Refer to
http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on this
product.
•
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet network
using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KFD adapter.
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5-2
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
Getting Started
For the scanner on the DeviceNet network to transmit control I/O
and/or messages to the adapter, you must first configure it to
recognize and communicate with the adapter.
The following instructions describe how to use DeviceNet Manager to
configure a new DeviceNet network in online mode. The main steps
in the configuration are:
Using Online Mode in DeviceNet
Manager
•
Using online mode in DeviceNet Manager.
•
Creating an EDS file for your SCANport product (if necessary).
•
Configuring the PLC scanner or SLC scanner.
Although you can configure the DeviceNet network offline, it is
easier to configure the network online because you can see a
graphical representation of your network in DeviceNet Manager. The
following directions explain how to use online mode.
1. Start DeviceNet Manager. The DeviceNet Manager screen
appears.
Figure 5.1
DeviceNet Manager Screen
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-3
2. In the Utilities menu, select Set Up Online Connection. The
DeviceNet Driver Selection dialog box appears.
Figure 5.2
DeviceNet Driver Selection Dialog Box
3. Choose an available driver and click OK. The Driver
Configuration dialog box appears.
Figure 5.3
Driver Configuration Dialog Box
4. Select the appropriate
•
port setting
•
baud rate
Important: This is the PC’s node address, not the module’s. Be sure
to select a baud rate that your computer is able to support.
•
node address
Important: This is the PC’s node address, not the module’s. Select a
unique node address do not use node address 63, because that is the
default for devices configured at the factory.
•
data rate
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
5-4
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5. Click OK to go online. The DeviceNet Manager screen appears.
Figure 5.4
DeviceNet Manager Screen Showing Online Data in Comm Section
6
6. Verify that the DeviceNet Manager screen displays online data
in the Comm section at the lower right of the screen.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-5
7. In the Who menu, select Network Who. The Network Who
screen appears and scans for devices on the network.
Important: To stop the scan, click Stop. You can click Stop at any
time.
Figure 5.5
Network Who Screen
Important: In our example, our module is Node 3. It has a generic
product icon, so we will need to create an EDS file for it.
You are now in online mode. You must check and see if you need an
EDS file for the device you are adding. Refer to the “Creating an EDS
File for Your SCANport Product” section in this chapter.
Creating an EDS File for Your
SCANport Product
EDS (Electronic Data Sheet) files are specially formatted ASCII files
that provide all of the information necessary for a configuration tool
such as DeviceNet Manager to access and alter the parameters of a
device. Information about each parameter (e.g., parameter min, max,
and default values, parameter data format and scaling, and the
parameter name and units) is contained in this file.
DeviceNet Manager can upload any SCANport device’s EDS file over
the DeviceNet network. This is the quickest and most convenient way
to obtain the necessary file.
To upload an EDS file, you need to:
1. Double-click the icon for your product. It may be a generic icon
(Node 3 in Figure 5.5) as in our example.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
2. Use the following table to determine if you need an EDS file.
If:
Then:
A DeviceNet Manager prompt asking you
to create an EDS file appears.
You must create an EDS file (go to step 3).
The Device Configuration — Enhanced
Mode dialog box appears.
You do not need an EDS file. Click Close
and refer to “Configuring a PLC Scanner”
on page 5-11 or “Configuring an SLC
Scanner” on page 17.
3. Click Yes.
If:
Then:
A DeviceNet Manager prompt asking for a
device type appears.
Go to step 4.
The Create EDS Stub dialog box appears.
Go to step 6.
Figure 5.6
Device Type Definition Dialog Box
4. Click Yes. The Add Device Type dialog box appears.
Figure 5.7
EDS File Description Dialog Box
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-7
5. Enter a description in the Device Type field (In our example,
“Enh. SCANport.”) and click OK. The Create EDS Stub dialog
box appears.
Important: If prompted to add the new information, click OK.
Figure 5.8
Create EDS Stub Dialog Box
6
6. Click the Load from Device button. The Load Description from
Device dialog box appears.
Figure 5.9
Load Description from Device Dialog Box
7. In the Device Node Address field, enter the curent node address
for your module and click OK. The Loading Device Description
dialog box appears and shows you the loading status.
Figure 5.10
Loading Device Description Dialog Box
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5-8
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
When the device description has completed loading, the Create EDS
Stub dialog box appears.
Figure 5.11
Create EDS Stub Dialog Box
10
11
8
9
8. In the Select Bitmap for this Device field, select a bitmap icon.
In our example, we selected 1305AC.BMP because this is the
drive we are using.
Important: Click the Browse button to browse for icons. During the
installation of the software, icons are put in the C:\DNETMGR\RES
directory.
9. In the Select Bitmap for Enh. SCANport type field, select a
bitmap icon. In our example, we selected SCANPORT.BMP. This
will become the default icon for future 1203-GU6 modules and
1336-GM6 boards.
Important: Click the Browse button to browse for icons.
10. In the Polled Connection section, select Enable. An “X”
appears.
11. Enter 4 in the Input Size and Output Size fields. These are the
default I/O conditions for products using a 1203-GU6 module or
1336-GM6 board.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-9
12. Click OK. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.12
DeviceNet Manager Confirmation Dialog Box
13. Click Yes. An EDS File Description dialog box appears.
Figure 5.13
EDS File Description Dialog Box
14. Enter a description (optional) and Click OK. The Network Who
screen appears.
15. Click Rescan. The screen displays the correct icon for your
device. (In our example, it is Node 3.)
Figure 5.14
Network Who Screen
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5-10
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
16. Double-click the device icon. The Device Configuration
Enhanced Mode dialog box appears.
Figure 5.15
Device Configuration — Enhanced Mode Dialog Box
Important: This screen allows you to edit any of the parameters in the
drive or in the adapter itself. Refer to Chapter 4, Configuring a
Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter, for information on editing
parameters.
17. Click Close. The Network Who screen appears.
Your device now has an EDS file for DriveManager to use. Do one of
the following:
If Using:
Configuring a PLC Scanner
(1771-SDN) to Communicate with
the Adapter
Then:
PLC Scanner (1771-SDN)
Go to Configuring a PLC Scanner (1771-SDN)
to Communicate with the Adapter on
page 5-10.
SLC Scanner (1747-SDN)
Go to Configuring an SLC Scanner
(1747-SDN) to Communicate with the Adapter
on page 5-17.
DeviceNet Manager to edit parameters.
Return to Chapter 4, Configuring the
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using
DeviceNet Manager.
The following instructions describe how to configure a PLC scanner
on a DeviceNet network.
Important: If you are using an SLC scanner (1747-SDN), skip this
section and refer to the “Configuring an SLC Scanner (1747-SDN) to
Communicate with the Adapter” section on page 5-17.
For the PLC to recognize your device, you must do the following:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
•
Configure the PLC Scanner.
•
Map your adapter to the PLC scanner (1771-SDN).
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-11
Configuring a PLC Scanner
To configure the scanner, you verify its properties, add devices on the
network to its scan list, and determine how the scanner will
communicate (e.g., polling) with each device. Follow these
directions:
1. In the Network Who screen, double-click on the scanner icon.
The 1771-SDN Module and Channel Configuration dialog box
appears.
Figure 5.16
Module and Channel Configuration Dialog Box
3
2. Verify the default values. Edit as necessary. Refer to DeviceNet
Manager’s online help for more information.
3. Click the Edit Scan List button. The 1771-SDN Scan List
Editor: Both Channels dialog box appears.
Figure 5.17
1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels configuration Dialog Box
4
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5-12
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
4. In the Add Devices From section, click the Who button. The
Network Who dialog box appears.
Figure 5.18
Network WHO Dialog Box
4
5. Drag the device you want to add to the scanner and drop it onto
the scanner icon. The device you add will be outlined in red.
6. Click OK. The 1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels
dialog box appears and displays your device.
Figure 5.19
1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels Dialog Box
7
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-13
7. Click your device’s row to highlight it.
Figure 5.20
1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels
8
8. Click the Edit I/O Parameters button. The Edit Device I/O
Parameters dialog box appears.
Figure 5.21
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box
9. Make changes as necessary. You must configure your PLC based
on how your adapter’s parameters are configured and how you
want your module to send and receive data from the network.
Refer to the following table:
If Using:
Refer To:
Polled
“Polled Allocation” on page B-4.
COS (Change of State)
“COS (Change of State) Allocation” on page B-6.
Cyclic
“Cyclic Allocation” on page B-7.
Polled and COS
“Polled and COS Allocation” on page B-9.
Polled and Cyclic
“Polled and Cyclic Allocation” on page B-10.
10. Click OK. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
5-14
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
11. Click Yes. The 1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels
dialog box appears.
You must now map the adapter to the PLC scanner. Refer to the
“Mapping the Adapter to the PLC Scanner” section in this chapter.
Mapping the Adapter to the PLC Scanner
After configuring the scanner, you must map the adapter to the
scanner, download the configuration to the scanner and save the
configuration. Follow these directions:
Important: You may want to retrieve existing mappings in the
scanner before adding the module to those mappings.
1. In the 1771-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels dialog box,
click the Auto Map button. The Auto Map Options dialog box
appears.
Figure 5.22
Auto Map Options Dialog Box
2. Select the following:
•
In the Input Block Xfer field, select the input mapping.
•
In the Output Block Xfer field, select the output mapping.
•
In the Mapping Method field, select the mapping method.
Refer to DeviceNet Manager’s online help for more information.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-15
3. Click the Map button. The Scan List Editor: Both Channels
dialog box appears and Yes/Yes appears in the Mapped field.
Figure 5.23
Scan List Editor: Both Channels Dialog Box
4
4. In the Save To section, click SDN. The 1771-SDN Scan List
Editor — Download dialog box appears.
Figure 5.24
Scan List Editor Download Dialog Box
5. Select the records to download and click OK. A DeviceNet
Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.25
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
6. Click OK. When the download is complete, the 1771-SDN Scan
List Editor: Both Channels dialog box appears.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
7. Click Close. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
8. Click Yes. The Save As dialog box appears.
Figure 5.26
Save As Dialog Box
9. In the File name field, enter a name for the file with a .SL7
extension.
10. Click OK. The 1771-SDN Module and Channel Configuration
dialog box appears.
11. Click Close to close the Module and Channel Configuration
dialog box. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.27
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
12. Click Yes. A Save As dialog box appears.
Figure 5.28
Save As Dialog Box
13. In the File name field, enter a name for the file with a .SM7
extension.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-17
14. Click OK. The Network WHO screen appears.
15. Click Close.
16. Exit DeviceNet Manager.
Your device is now configured on the DeviceNet network. The
network LED on the module is solid green. If it is not, refer to
Chapter 8, Troubleshooting, for more information.
Refer to Chapter 6, Ladder Logic Programming, for information on
creating a PLC Ladder Logic Program.
Configuring an SLC Scanner
(1747-SDN) to Communicate with
the Adapter
The following instructions describe how to configure an SLC scanner
on a DeviceNet network.
Important: If you are using a PLC scanner (1771-SDN), skip this
section and refer to the “Configuring a PLC Scanner (1771-SDN) to
Communicate with the Adapter” section on page 5-10.
For the SLC to recognize your device, you must do the following:
•
Configure the SLC Scanner.
•
Map your adapter to the SLC (1747-SDN).
Configuring an SLC Scanner
To configure the scanner, you verify its properties, add devices on the
network to its scan list, and determine how the scanner will
communicate (e.g., polling) with each device. Follow these
directions:
1. In the Network Who screen, double-click on the scanner icon.
The 1747-SDN Module Configuration dialog box appears.
Figure 5.29
1747-SDN Module Configuration Dialog Box
3
2. Verify the default values. Edit as necessary. Refer to DeviceNet
Manager’s online help for more information.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
3. Click the Edit Scan List button. The 1747-SDN Scan List
Editor dialog box appears.
Figure 5.30
1747-SDN Scan List Editor Dialog Box
4
4. In the Add Devices From section, click the Who button. The
Add Devices to Scan List dialog box appears.
Figure 5.31
Add Devices to Scan List Dialog Box
5. Drag the device you want to add to the scanner and drop it onto
the scanner icon. The device you added will be outlined in red.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-19
6. Click OK. A dialog box similar to the following appears.
Figure 5.32
Example Dialog Box
7. Click your device’s row to highlight it.
Figure 5.33
Example Dialog Box
7
8
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5-20
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
8. Click the Edit I/O Parameters button. The Edit Device I/O
Parameters dialog box appears.
Figure 5.34
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box
9. Make changes as necessary. You must configure your SLC based
on how your adapter’s parameters are configured and how you
want your module to send and receive data from the network.
Refer to the following table:
If Using:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Refer To:
Polled
Polled Allocation on page B-7.
COS (Change of State)
COS (Change of State) Allocation on page B-6.
Cyclic
Cyclic Allocation on page B-7.
Polled and COS
Polled and COS Allocation on page B-9.
Polled and Cyclic
Polled and Cyclic Allocation on page B-10.
Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-21
10. Click OK. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.35
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
11. Click Yes. A dialog box similar to the following appears.
Figure 5.36
Example Dialog Box
You must now map the adapter to the SLC scanner. Refer to the
“Mapping the Adapter to the SLC Scanner” section in this chapter.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
Mapping the Adapter to the SLC Scanner
After configuring the scanner, you must map the adapter to the
scanner, download the configuration to the scanner, and save the
configuration. Follow these directions:
1. In the 1747-SDN Scan List Editor: Both Channels dialog box,
click the Auto Map button. The Auto Map Options dialog box
appears.
Figure 5.37
1747-SDN Auto Map Options Dialog Box
2. Select the following:
•
In the Input File field, select the input mapping.
•
In the Output File field, select the output mapping.
•
In the Mapping Method section, select the mapping method.
Refer to DeviceNet Manager’s online help for more information.
Figure 5.38
1747-SDN Auto Map Options Dialog Box
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-23
3. Click the Map button. A dialog box similar to the following
appears.
Figure 5.39
Example Dialog Box
4
4. In the Save To section, click SDN. The 1747-SDN Scan List
Editor — Download dialog box appears
Figure 5.40
1747-SDN Scan List Editor — Download Dialog Box
5. Select the records to download and click OK. A DeviceNet
Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.41
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
6. Click OK.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
7. Click Close. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.42
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
8. Click Yes. A Save As dialog box appears.
Figure 5.43
Save As Dialog Box
9. In the File name field, enter a name for the file with a .SL4
extension.
10. Click OK. The 1747-SDN Module Configuration dialog box
appears.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
5-25
11. Click Close. A DeviceNet Manager prompt appears.
Figure 5.44
DeviceNet Manager Prompt
12. Click Yes. A Save As dialog box appears.
Figure 5.45
Save As Dialog Box
13. In the File name field, enter a name for the file with a .SM4
extension.
14. Click OK. The Network WHO screen appears.
15. Click Close.
16. Exit DeviceNet Manager.
Your device is now configured on the DeviceNet network. The
network LED on the module is solid green. If it is not, refer to
Chapter 8, Troubleshooting, for more information.
Refer to Chapter 6, Ladder Logic Programming, for information on
creating an SLC Ladder Logic program.
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Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
6
Ladder Logic Programming
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 6 provides information needed to create the PLC or SLC
Ladder Logic program that the controller will use to transmit control
I/O and messages to and from the SCANport product. In this chapter,
you will read about the following:
•
Equipment and software needed to create either a PLC or SLC
ladder logic program.
•
PLC and SLC ladder logic programs.
•
Creating a PLC or SLC ladder logic program.
•
Example PLC and SLC ladder logic programs to control the
drive.
This chapter assumes you are familiar with the hardware components
and programming procedures necessary to operate DeviceNet and
SCANport devices, including the following:
•
PLC-5 or SLC-5/03.
•
1771-SDN or 1747-SDN scanner.
•
Ladder programming.
•
RSLogix5 or RSLogix500.
You may need to refer to the documentation associated with these
products to create a ladder logic program.
Required Equipment
What is RSLogix?
Before creating a ladder logic program for the PLC or SLC, your PC
must be:
•
Running RSLogix5 and RSLinx if using a PLC. Refer to
http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on these
products.
•
Running RSLogix500 and RSLinx if using an SLC. Refer to
http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on these
products.
•
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet network
using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KF10 adapter.
RSLogix5 (for the PLC-5) and RSLogix500 (for the SLC-5/03)
software let you create the ladder logic programs you need and
download them to the PLC or SLC. They also let you monitor the
program as the PLC or SLC is using it.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
6-2
Ladder Logic Programming
For more information on RSLogix5 or RSLogix500, consult the
respective software’s documentation.
What are Ladder Logic Programs?
A PLC or SLC ladder logic program lets you control the drive and the
messaging from the PLC or SLC to the drive. Figure 6.1 shows how
the I/O image table for a DeviceNet scanner relates to the 1336 PLUS
drive when an Enhanced DeviceNet communications adapter is used.
Figure 6.1
I/O Image Table
DeviceNet
PLC,
SLC,
PC
Scanner
Output
Mapping
(Write)
Input
Mapping
(Read)
Message
Handller
SCANport
1203-Gx6/1336-GM6
Enhanced DeviceNet
1336 PLUS Drive
Word 0
Word 1
Word 2
Word 3
Word 4
Word 5
Word 6
Word 7
Word 8
Word 9
Logic Command
Reference
Datalink A1
Datalink A2
Datalink B1
Datalink B2
Datalink C1
Datalink C2
Datalink D1
Datalink D2
Logic Evaluation Block
SP An In2 Sel
Data In A1
Data In A2
Data In B1
Data In B2
Data In C1
Data In C2
Data In D1
Data In D2
Word 0
Word 1
Word 2
Word 3
Word 4
Word 5
Word 6
Word 7
Word 8
Word 9
Logic Status
Feedback
Datalink A1
Datalink A2
Datalink B1
Datalink B2
Datalink C1
Datalink C2
Datalink D1
Datalink D2
Drive/Inv Status
SP An Out
Data Out A1
Data Out A2
Data Out B1
Data Out B2
Data Out C1
Data Out C2
Data Out D1
Data Out D2
Message
Buffers
Message Handler
Important: Datalinks are optionally enabled in the adapter and configured in the product. Refer to
Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection or
Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager and your
product’s user manual for more information.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Ladder Logic Programming
Example Ladder Logic Programs
6-3
The following are example ladder logic programs for a 1305, 1336
PLUS, or 1336 PLUS II drive.
!
ATTENTION: The example ladder logic program
shown in this manual is intended solely for purpose of
example. Because there are many variables and
requirements associated with any particular installation,
Rockwell Automation does not assume responsibility or
liability (to include intellectual property liability) for
actual use based upon the example shown in this
publication.
Important: Refer to the user manual for your SCANport product for
specific I/O definitions. Different SCANport products have different
Logic Command, Logic Status, Reference and Feedback I/O
interpretations.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
6-4
Ladder Logic Programming
The 1305, 1336 PLUS, or 1336 PLUS II drive in this example accepts
the following Logic Command Data from the controller.
Logic Status Bits
Function
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
X Stop
1=Stop, 0=No Operation
Start
1=Start, 0=No Operation
Jog
1=Jog, 0=No Operation
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Description
0
X
X
X
X
Clear Faults
1=Clear, 0=No Operation
Direction
00=No Operation, 01=Forward, 10=Reverse
Local
1=Local, 0=Multiplexed
MOP Increment
1=Increment MOP, 0=No Operation
Accel Rate Select
00=No Operation, 01=Rate 1, 10=Rate 2
Decel Rate Select
00=No Operation, 01=Rate 1, 10=Rate 2
Reference
Selection
000=No Operation
001=External Reference 1 (Par 5)
010=External Reference 2 (Par 6)
011=Preset 3
100=Preset 4
101=Preset 5
110=Preset 6
111=Preset 7
MOP Decrement
1=Decrement MOP, 0=No Operation
The 1305, 1336 PLUS, or 1336 PLUS II drive in this example sends
the following Logic Status Data to the PLC.
Logic Status Bits
Function
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
X
X
Description
0
X Enabled
1=Enabled, 0=Not Enabled
Running
1=Running, 0=Not Running
Command Direction 1=Forward, 0=Reverse
Rotating Direction
1=Forward, 0=Reverse
Acceleration
1=Accelerating, 0=Not
Deceleration
1=Decelerating, 0=Not
Warning
1=Warning Present, 0=Not
Fault
1=Faulted, 0=Not Faulted
At Reference
1=At Speed, 0=Not At Speed
Local
000=Terminal I/O has Local
001=Port 1 has Local
010=Port 2 has Local
011=Port 3 has Local
100=Port 4 has Local
101=Port 5 has Local
110=Port 6 has Local
111=Multiplexed Control
Reference Source
0000=External Reference 1
0001 – 0111=Presets 1 – 7
1000=External Reference 2
1001 – 1110=Port 1 – 6 Direction
1111=Jog
Ladder Logic Programming
6-5
PLC Ladder Logic Example
The following example uses a PLC-5, a 1771-SDN DeviceNet
scanner, and a 1203-GU6 to control a 1305, 1336 PLUS, or 1336
PLUS II drive.
The example program shows how to obtain status information from
the drive and how to control it (e.g., starting the drive, stopping the
drive, jogging the drive, sending reference, and clearing faults). When
you understand this example, you should be able to customize the
program to fit you application needs.
The example assumes that there is an operator’s station wired to an
I/O module in slot zero of module group zero of rack zero.
Important: You may want to verify a device has not failed using word
0 of block transfer 62 before sending control data. If a device has
failed, use block transfer 52 to find out which device failed. Refer to
the 1771-SDN DeviceNet Scanner Module Manual, Publication
1771-5.14, for more information.
Figure 6.2
Example PLC Ladder Logic Program
0000
The scanner gathers drive status information via DeviceNet.
The Block Transfer Read in this rung then moves the drive status data from the scanner to the PLC’s N9 data file.
BT20:0
BTR
Block Transfer Read
EN
Module Type Generic Block Transfer
Rack
000
Group
0
Module
0
Control Block
BT20:0
Data File
N9:0
Length
62
Continuous
No
EN
DN
ER
Rungs 0001 through 0003 move the drive status from the Block Transfer Read data file to an operator display.
1305 Drive
Operator Display
RUNNING
Drive Running
Status Bit
Status Bit
O:000
N9:1
0001
10
1
1305 Drive
FAULTED
Status Bit
N9:1
Operator Display
Drive Faulted
Status Bit
O:000
0002
11
7
0003
Operator Display
Drive Feedback
Status Word
MOV
Move
Source
Dest
N9:2
0<
N21:1
0<
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
6-6
Ladder Logic Programming
Figure 6.2
Example PLC Ladder Logic Program (Continued)
This rung enables the scanner.
1771-SDN Scanner
Port A Enable
N10:0
0004
0
Rungs 0005 through 0009 move the operator’s inputs from the operator station to the Block Transfer Write data file
where they will be sent to the scanner and out to the drive via DeviceNet.
1305 Drive
Operator Input
START
Drive Start
Command Bit
Command Bit
N10:1
I:000
0005
10
1
Operator Input
Drive Stop
Command Bit
I:000
1305 Drive
STOP
Command Bit
N10:1
11
0
0006
Operator Input
Drive Jog
Command Bit
I:000
1305 Drive
JOG
Command Bit
N10:1
12
2
0007
1305 Drive
CLEAR FAULT
Command Bit
N10:1
Operator Input
Drive Clear Faults
Command Bit
I:000
0008
3
13
1305 Drive
REFERENCE
Command Word
MOV
Move
Source
0009
Dest
0010
N21:0
0<
N10:2
0<
The Block Transfer Write in this rung send the drive command data to the scanner and out to the drive via DeviceNet.
BT20:0
BTW
EN
Block Transfer Write
EN
Module Type Generic Block Transfer
DN
Rack
000
Group
0
ER
Module
0
Control Block
BT20:1
Data File
N10:0
Length
62
Continuous
No
END
0011
The following table represents the control file for the block transfers.
Offset
EN
ST
DN
ER
CO
EW
NR
TO
RW
RLEN
DLEN
FILE
ELEM
R
G
S
BT20:0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
62
0
9
0
00
0
0
BT20:1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
62
0
10
0
00
0
0
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Ladder Logic Programming
6-7
SLC Ladder Logic Program Example
The following example uses a SLC-5/03, a 1747-SDN DeviceNet
scanner, and a 1203-GU6 to control a 1336 PLUS, 1336 PLUS II or
1305 drive.
The example assumes that there is an operator’s station wired to an
I/O module in slot one of module group zero of rack zero.
Important: You may want to verify a device has not failed using word
I:S.0. If a device has failed, read the appropriate M1 File to find out
which device failed. Refer to the 1747-SDN DeviceNet Scanner
Module Manual, Publication 1747-5.8, for more information.
Figure 6.3
Example SLC Ladder Logic Program
The scanner gathers drive status information via DeviceNet.
The M-File is copied into the SLC’s N9 data file to move the drive status information into a convenient location.
COP
Copy File
Source
Dest
Length
0000
Rungs 0001 through 0003 move the drive status from the N9 data file to an operator display.
1336PLUS
RUNNING
Status Bit
N9:0
#M1:1.0
#N9:0
128
Operator Display
Drive Running
Status Bit
O:3.0
0001
1
0
1746-O*8
Operator Display
Drive Faulted
Status Bit
O:3.0
1336PLUS
FAULTED
Status Bit
N9:0
0002
7
0003
1
1746-O*8
Operator Display
Drive Feedback
Status Word
MOV
Move
Source
Dest
N9:2
0<
N21:1
0<
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
6-8
Ladder Logic Programming
Figure 6.3
Example SLC Ladder Logic Program (Continued)
Rungs 0004 through 0008 move the operator’s inputs from the operator station to the N9 data file where they will be sent to the scanner
and out to the drive via DeviceNet.
Operator Input
1336PLUS
Drive Start
START
Command Bit
Command Bit
N10:0
I:2.0
0004
1
0
1746-I*16
Operator Input
Drive Stop
Command Bit
I:2.0
1336PLUS
STOP
Command Bit
N10:0
0005
0
1
1746-I*16
Operator Input
Drive Jog
Command Bit
I:2.0
1336PLUS
JOG
Command Bit
N10:0
0006
2
2
1746-I*16
Operator Input
Drive Clear Faults
Command Bit
I:2.0
1336PLUS
CLEAR FAULTS
Command Bit
N10:0
0007
3
3
1746-I*16
1336PLUS
REFERENCE
Command Word
MOV
Move
Source
0008
Dest
N21:0
0<
N10:1
0<
This rung enables the scanner. (Changes the scanner into RUN mode)
1747-SDN
Scanner
Enable
Bit
O:1.0
0009
0
1747-SDN
This rung copies the drive command data to the scanner and out to the drive via DeviceNet.
0010
0011
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
COP
Copy File
Source
Dest
Length
#N10:0
#M0:1.0
128
END
Chapter
7
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Chapter Objectives
Chapter 7 provides information you need to monitor and configure
the SCANport device using explicit messaging on DeviceNet. In this
chapter, you will read about the following:
•
Required equipment.
•
Message translations.
•
Messaging guidelines for the 1771-SDN scanner.
•
Messaging guidelines for the 1747-SDN scanner.
•
Example messages.
•
Using messages to control SCANport products.
•
Writing to register objects.
Refer to Appendix C, DeviceNet Objects, for information on object
data support.
Required Equipment
Message Translations
Before using messaging, your PC must be:
•
Running Logix5 and RSLinx if you are using a PLC. Refer to
http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on these
products.
•
Running RSLogix500 and RSLinx if you are using an SLC. Refer
to http://www.software.rockwell.com for more information on
these products.
•
Connected to and communicating with the DeviceNet network
using a 1784-PCD card or a 1770-KFIO adapter.
The communications adapter provides electronic translations of
DeviceNet explicit messages into SCANport messages and back. The
format of all DeviceNet explicit messages supported by the adapter is
8:16: within an explicit message, the class field is 8 bits long, and the
instance field is 16 bits long.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-2
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Messaging for the 1771-SDN
Scanner
The PLC uses a 64-word Block Transfer Write (BTW) to copy an
Explicit Message into the 1771-SDN scanner. Ten explicit message
buffers are available within the 1771-SDN scanner. When the BTW
completes, the scanner executes the message. The PLC must then poll
the scanner by performing a 64-word Block Transfer Read (BTR) to
complete the message. (Note that the PLC can transfer two Explicit
Messages per BTW or BTR and the scanner can have up to 10
Explicit Messages active at any time.)
When the BTR completes, the data received by the PLC will contain
information about the status of the current Explicit Message being
processed by the scanner. If an Explicit Message has completed, the
STATUS code in the Explicit Message Response is set to 1 and the
response message contains the data requested.
If the message status indicates that it is not completed, the BTR
should be repeated until the message is complete.
The format of Request and Response messages is in Figure 7.1.
Figure 7.1
Format of DeviceNet Messages
Format of 64-word Block Transfer
Write for Explicit Message Request
15
Transaction #1
Header (3 words)
Transaction #2
Header (3 words)
Format of 64-word Block Transfer
Read for Explicit Message Response
0
15
0
TXID
COMMAND
TXID
STATUS
PORT
SIZE
PORT
SIZE
SERVICE
MAC ID
SERVICE
MAC ID
CLASS
SERVICE RESPONSE DATA
INSTANCE
"
ATTRIBUTE
"
SERVICE DATA
"
"
"
word 31
TXID
COMMAND
TXID
STATUS
PORT
SIZE
PORT
SIZE
SERVICE
MAC ID
SERVICE
MAC ID
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
word 0
CLASS
SERVICE RESPONSE DATA
INSTANCE
"
ATTRIBUTE
"
SERVICE DATA
"
"
"
word 32
word 63
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
7-3
Transaction Blocks are divided into two parts:
•
Transaction header — contains information that identifies the
transaction to the scanner and processor.
•
Transaction body — in a request, this contains the DeviceNet
Class, Instance, Attribute and Service Data portion of the
transaction. In a response, this contains the Service Data only.
Each of the data attributes in the transaction header are one byte in
length:
Data Field
Description
TXID
Transaction ID — when the processor creates and downloads a request to the scanner, the
processor’s ladder logic program assigns a TXID to the transaction. This is a one-byte integer in word
31 the range of 1 to 255. The scanner uses this value to track the transaction to completion, and
returns the value with the response that matches the request downloaded by the processor.
COMMAND
STATUS
In each message request, a command code instructs the scanner how to administer the request:
0 = Ignore transaction block (block empty)
1 = Execute this transaction block
2 = Get status of transaction TXID
3 = Reset all client/server transactions
4-255 = Reserved
In each message response, the status code provides the processor with status on the device and its
response:
0 = Ignore transaction block (block empty)
1 = Transaction completed successfully
2 = Transaction in progress (not ready)
3 = Error — slave not in scan list
4 = Error — slave off-line
5 = Error — DeviceNet port disabled or off-line
6 = Error — transaction TXID unknown
7 = Unused
8 = Error — Invalid command code
9 = Error — Scanner out of buffers
10 = Error — Other client/server transaction in progress
11 = Error — could not connect to slave device
12 = Error — response data too large for block
13 = Error — invalid port
14 = Error — invalid size specified
15 = Error — connection busy
16-255 = Reserved
Port
The DeviceNet port where the transaction is routed. The port can be zero (Channel A) or one
(Channel B) on a 1771-SDN scanner.
Size
The size of the transaction body in bytes. The transaction body can be up to 29 words (58 bytes) in
length. If the size exceeds 29 words, an error code will be returned.
SERVICE
MAC ID
The service attribute contains the DeviceNet service request and response codes that match the
corresponding request for the TXID.
The DeviceNet network address of the slave device where the transaction is sent. This value can
range from 0 to 63. The port and MAC ID attributes coupled together identify the target slave device.
The slave device must be listed in the scanner module’s scan list and be on-line for the Explicit
Message transaction to be completed.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-4
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Messaging for the 1747-SDN
Scanner
The SLC copies an Explicit Message into the scanner’s M0-file.
When the copy is completed the scanner moves the message into a
queue for processing. Up to 10 Explicit Messages can be in this
queue.
When the scanner receives a response message it is placed into a
queue. The first response in the queue is available from the M1-file.
When the message delete command is copied into the scanner the
message is complete and the next available response will appear in
the M1-file.
The format of Request and Response messages is in Figure 7.2.
Figure 7.2
Format of DeviceNet Messages
Format of 32-word M0-file
Write of Explicit Message Request
Format of 32-word M1-file
Read of Explicit Message Response
15
Transaction
Header (3 words)
0
15
0
TXID
COMMAND
TXID
STATUS
PORT
SIZE
PORT
SIZE
SERVICE
MAC ID
SERVICE
MAC ID
Transaction Data
(up to 29 words)
CLASS
SERVICE RESPONSE DATA
INSTANCE
"
ATTRIBUTE
"
SERVICE DATA
"
"
"
word 0
word 31
For information on M-File locations, refer to the 1747-SDN
DeviceNet Scanner Module Manual, Publication 1747-5.8.
The message buffer is composed of two sections:
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
•
Transaction header — three words that contain information
identifying the message transaction.
•
Transaction body — in a request, this contains the DeviceNet
Class, Instance, Attribute and Service Data portions of the
transaction. In a response, this contains the Service Data only.
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
7-5
Each of the data fields in the transaction header are one byte in length:
Data Field
Description
TXID
Transaction ID — when the processor creates and downloads a request to the scanner, the
processor’s ladder logic program assigns a TXID to the transaction. This is a one-byte integer
in word 31 the range of 1 to 255. The scanner uses this value to track the transaction to
completion, and returns the value with the response that matches the request downloaded by
the processor.
COMMAND
For each download, a command code instructs the scanner how to administer the request:
0 = Ignore transaction block (block empty)
1 = Execute this transaction block
2 = Get status of transaction TXID
3 = Reset all client/server transactions
4 = Delete this transaction block
5-255 = Reserved
STATUS
For each upload, the status code provides the processor with status on the device and its
response:
0 = Ignore transaction block (block empty)
1 = Transaction completed successfully
2 = Transaction in progress (not ready)
3 = Error — Slave not in scan list
4 = Error — Slave off-line
5 = Error — DeviceNet port disabled or off-line
6 = Error — Transaction TXID unknown
7 = Unused
8 = Error — Invalid command code
9 = Error — Scanner out of buffers
10 = Error — Other client/server transaction in progress
11 = Error — Could not connect to slave device
12 = Error — Response data too large for block
13 = Error — Invalid port
14 = Error — Invalid size specified
15 = Error — Connection busy
16-255 = Reserved
PORT
The DeviceNet port used by this message. The port must be zero (Channel A) on a 1747SDN scanner.
SIZE
The size of the transaction body in bytes. The transaction body can be up to 29 words (58
bytes) in length. If the size exceeds 29 words, an error code will be returned.
SERVICE
The service attribute contains the DeviceNet service request and response codes that match
the corresponding request for the TXID.
MAC ID
The DeviceNet network address of the slave device where the transaction is sent. This value
can range from 0 to 63. The port and MAC ID uniquely identify the target slave device. The
slave device must be listed in the scanner module’s scan list and be on-line for the Explicit
Message transaction to be completed.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-6
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Examples
The following examples show messages used with the ladder logic
programs begun in Chapter 6, Ladder Logic Programming.
!
ATTENTION: The example ladder logic program
shown in this manual is intended solely for purpose of
example. Because there are many variables and
requirements associated with any particular installation,
Rockwell Automation does not assume responsibility or
liability (to include intellectual property liability) for
actual use based upon the example shown in this
publication.
PLC Messaging
Figure 7.3, started in Chapter 6, Ladder Logic Programming, shows
an example PLC ladder logic program that sends an explicit message.
The message sent is contained in N30, beginning at word 0. The
response data will appear in N30 starting at word 70.
Figure 7.3
PLC Messaging Example
I:000
0000
17
B3:0
ONS
0
BTW
Block Transfer Write
Module Type 1771-SDN DeviceNet Scanner Module
Rack
000
Group
0
Module
0
Control Block
BT20:2
Data File
N30:0
Length
64
Continuous
No
MOV
Move
Source
Dest
BT20:2
0001
DN
CMP
Comparison
Expression N30:70 <> N30:0
EN
DN
ER
0
0<
N30:70
257<
BT20:3
EN
BTR
Block Transfer Read
Module Type 1771-SDN DeviceNet Scanner Module
Rack
000
Group
0
Module
0
Control Block
BT20:3
Data File
N30:70
Length
64
Continuous
No
0002
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
EN
DN
ER
END
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
7-7
I:000/17: When you set this instruction to the true state, the next
instruction, a one-shot block transfer write, sends data to the scanner.
The Move instruction then initializes the first word of the data file that
is used by the block transfer read instruction in the next rung.
Instruction BT20:2.DN: This instruction will be true when the block
transfer write has completed. The compare instruction that follows
compares the first word of data sent from the scanner to the first word
of data you send to the scanner. When the messaging function has
completed, these two words will be equal.
Instruction BT20:3.EN: Any time the block transfer read is not
enabled, this instruction causes the block transfer read to be enabled if
the two earlier conditions are true.
BTR: Reads 64 words of data from the scanner.
The following table displays data sent to and received from the
scanner. Values are in hexadecimal.
Offset
N30:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
201
6
E03
97
0
1
0
0
0
0
N30:10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:30
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:40
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:50
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:60
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:70
201
6
8E03
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:80
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:90
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:100
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:110
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:120
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N30:130
0
0
0
0
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-8
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
In this example, there were four entries in the fault queue. Notice the
following about the data:
Location
Value
Meaning
N30:0
0x0201
TXID of 2. Command 1 (Execute)
N30:1
0x0006
Port 0. Size = 6 bytes (N30:3 – 5)
N30:2
0x0E03
Service E (Get Attribute Single) Node 3
N30:3
0x0097
SCANport Pass-Through Fault Object
N30:4
0x0000
Instance 0 (Class Access)
N30:5
0x0001
Attribute 1 (Number of Fault Queues)
N30:70
0x0201
TXID of 2. Status 1 (Success)
N30:71
0x0006
Port 0. Size = 6 bytes (N30:3 – 5)
N30:72
0x8E03
Service 8E (Get Attribute Single Response)
N30:73
0x0004
4 fault queues
Refer to Appendix C, DeviceNet Objects, for more information on
object descriptions.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
7-9
SLC Messaging
Figure 7.4 shows an example message in the SLC ladder logic
program started in Chapter 6, Ladder Logic Programming.
Figure 7.4
SLC Messaging Example
When B3:0/0 is set true, this rung will copy the 32 words of the Esplicit Message from the buffer at N20:10 to the M0-File Explicit
Message buffer.
The 1747-SDN will send the message out over DeviceNet.
Initiate
Explicit
Message
B3:0
Explicit
Message
COP
Copy File
Source
#N20:10
Dest
#M0:1.224
Length
32
0000
0
Initiate
Explicit
Message
B3:0
U
0
When I:1.0/15 is true, and the Explicit Message response has been received and is in the M1-File, this rung:
1) Copies the response message into N10:50
2) Copies a command byte of 4 into the M1-File (commands the 1747-SDN scanner to discard the response data so
that the buffer can be used for the next available response message)
Explicit
Message
Response
Available
I:1.0
Explicit
Message
Response
COP
Copy File
Source
#M1:1.224
Dest
#N20:50
Length
32
0001
15
1747-SDN
Explicit
Message
EQU
Equal
Source A
Source B
N20:10
257 <
N20:50
257 <
MVM
Masked Move
Source
Mask
Dest
0002
N20:0
4<
00FFh
255 <
M0:1.224
?<
END
Important: To originate a scanner transaction, you must use a copy
operation to M0:[slot number]:224. Then, use a copy operation to
read M1:1.224 for the results. If you have more than one message
enabled, you will have to use the TXID to determine which message
you are reading.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-10
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
The following table display data sent to and received from the
scanner. Values are in hexadecimal.
Offset
0
N20:0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:10
201
6
E02
97
0
1
0
0
0
0
N20:20
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:30
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:40
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:50
201
6
8E02
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:60
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:70
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N20:80
0
0
In this example, there were four entries in the fault queue. Notice the
following about the data:
Location
Value
Meaning
N20:10
0x0201
TXID of 2. Command 1 (Execute)
N20:11
0x0006
Port 0. Size = 6 bytes (N30:3 – 5)
N20:12
0x0E03
Service E (Get Attribute Single) Node 3
N20:13
0x0097
SCANport Pass-Through Fault Object
N20:14
0x0000
Instance 0 (Class Access)
N20:15
0x0001
Attribute 1 (Number of Fault Queues)
N20:50
0x0201
TXID of 2. Status 1 (Success)
N20:51
0x0006
Port 0. Size = 6 bytes (N30:3 – 5)
N20:52
0x8E03
Service 8E (Get Attribute Single Response)
N20:53
0x0004
4 fault queues
Refer to Appendix C, DeviceNet Objects, for more information on
object descriptions.
Using Messages to Control
SCANport Products
Explicit messages provide multi-purpose, point-to-point
communication paths between two devices. It is possible to control
SCANport devices through explicit messaging on DeviceNet by
following particular guidelines and by writing to various register
objects that are buffering the I/O data. The guidelines are as follows:
•
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
The adapter cannot be allocated by a master/scanner in order to
allow explicit writes to the register object.
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
7-11
•
Write access to any register object within the adapter will not be
allowed if the message is passed through a connection whose
expected packet rate (EPR) is zero.
•
The adapter is required to mark any explicit connection after
allowing a write to a register object through it.
•
If a marked explicit connection times out based on the EPR, then
the I/O fault action will be that configured for Communication
Loss over the I/O connection.
•
If a marked explicit connection is deleted, then the I/O fault
action will be that configured for Idle over the I/O connection.
•
Multiple explicit connections can write/overwrite the control I/O
if they meet the guidelines specified. Each connection will need
to be marked individually within the adapter.
•
If the adapter gets allocated/re-allocated by a controller such that
valid I/O data is being sent to the adapter, or if an Idle condition
from the allocating controller is transitioned back to valid data,
then all marked explicit connections will be reset to unmarked
and future writes blocked.
•
If a marked connection has its EPR value reset to zero (0) after
being marked, then the connection will become unmarked.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
7-12
Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging
Writing to Register Objects
Within the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter, various register objects
buffer I/O in the following fashion (RO=Read Only,
R/PW=Read/Write Protected):
Instance
Access
Size
Function
1
RO
See M-S Output
Poll Response I/O data to controller
2
R/PW
See M-S Output
Buffered Poll I/O data from controller
3
RO
32 bits
Logic Status & Feedback
4
R/PW
32 bits
Datalink A from SCANport Device (if enabled)
5
RO
32 bits
Datalink A to SCANport Device (if enabled)
6
R/PW
32 bits
Datalink A from SCANport Device (if enabled)
7
RO
32 bits
Datalink B to SCANport Device (if enabled)
8
R/PW
32 bits
Datalink B from SCANport Device (if enabled)
9
RO
32 bits
Datalink C to SCANport Device (if enabled)
10
R/PW
32 bits
Datalink C from SCANport Device (if enabled)
11
RO
32 bits
Datalink D to SCANport Device (if enabled)
12
R/PW
32 bits
Datalink D from SCANport Device (if enabled)
13
RO
32 bits
Logic Status and Feedback
14
R/PW
32 bits
Logic Command (Last Logic Command is ANDed with the first word in this
command and ORed with the second word in the command. The reference is not
modified. This command allows bit changes to the logic command without
affecting the speed reference or other control bits.)
Refer to the “Class Code 0x07 — Register Object” section in
Appendix C, DeviceNet Objects for more information on the Register
Object.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Chapter
8
Troubleshooting
Chapter Objectives
LEDs on the Enhanced DeviceNet
Adapter
Chapter 8 provides information about the adapter’s LEDs and basic
troubleshooting procedures. In this chapter, you will read about the
following:
•
Locating the LEDs.
•
Using the LEDs to troubleshoot the adapter.
Your communications adapter has three LED status indicators. The
LEDs provide status information about the DeviceNet network,
SCANport connection, and the adapter itself. Refer to Figure 8.1.
Figure 8.1
LED Status Indicators
SCANport Status
Module Status
DeviceNet Status
1203-GU6
DeviceNet Status
Module Status
SCANport Status
1336-GM6
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
8-2
Troubleshooting
DeviceNet Network Status LED
States
LED Viewed:
If:
The LED closest to the DeviceNet connector is the DeviceNet Status
LED, labeled “NET.” It functions as follows:
State:
Not powered/Not
online
No power/Duplicate ID
not completed
1. Verify that the network supply is connected and that
power is reaching the adapter through the connector.
2. Make sure one or more nodes are communicating on
the network.
3. Make sure at least one other node on the network is
operational at the same time and data rate as the
adapter.
LED is flashing
green
Online/Not connected
Passed duplicate
ID/No connection
established
No action needed. The LED is flashing to signify that
there are no open communication connections between
the adapter and any other device. Any connection (I/O or
explicit message) made to the adapter over DeviceNet
will cause the LED to stop flashing and remain steady on
for the duration of any open connection.
LED is steady green
Online/Connected
One or more
connections
established
No action needed.
LED is flashing red
Online/Time-out
I/O connection timed
out
1. Bring controller back onto the network.
2. Reduce traffic or errors on the network so that
messages can get through within the necessary time
frame.
LED is steady red
Network failure
Failed Duplicate ID or
Bus-off
1. Ensure that all nodes have unique addresses.
2. If all node addresses are unique, examine network for
correct media installation.
Module Status LED States
Module
Status LED
Action:
LED is off
Network
Status LED
LED Viewed:
Indicates
If:
The middle LED, labeled “MOD,” is the Module Status LED. It
indicates the operation of the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter and
functions as follows:
State:
Indicates:
Action:
LED is off
Not powered
No power
Ensure that the connected SCANport product is
powered and connected to the adapter.
LED is flashing
green
Waiting for I/O data
Normal operation —
No I/O, or PLC in
program
No action needed. Adapter has passed all operational
tests and is waiting to pass I/O data between the
DeviceNet and SCANport interfaces.
LED is solid green
Operational
Normal operation —
I/O operational
No action needed.
LED is flashing red
Configuration
problem
Bad CRC of Adapter
parameters or flash
program
1. Power cycle the adapter to reset it.
2. Enable an adapter reset via the adapter’s
configuration parameter.
3. Re-flash the adapter.
LED is steady red
Hardware failure
Failed internal or
external RAM test
Replace unit.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Troubleshooting
SCANport Status LED States
LED Viewed:
SCANport
Status LED
If:
8-3
The LED furthest from the DeviceNet connector is the SCANport
Status LED, and is labeled “SP.” It indicates the status of the
SCANport connection, and functions as follows:
State:
Indicates
Action:
LED is off
Not powered
No power
Ensure that the connected SCANport device is powered
and that the product is connected to the adapter.
LED is flashing
green
Online/ I/O
connecting
Requesting I/O
connections or no I/O
is selected
No action needed. Adapter is establishing one or more of
the I/O connections with the SCANport device.
LED is steady green
I/O operational
One or more
connections
established
No action needed.
LED is flashing red
Configuration fault
SCANport problem:
No communications
seen from the
SCANport device to
request connections
1. Reseat cable properly.
2. Replace cable.
LED is steady red
Link failure
SCANport failure:
Poor cable connection
does not allow proper
port identification or
the SCANport device
isn’t allowing the
configured I/O
connections.
1. Check all SCANport cables and connections to the
SCANport device.
2. Ensure datalinks are not enabled on a product that
doesn’t support datalinks. Or, ensure that a particular
datalink is not already being used by another adapter on
the same SCANport device.
LED is steady
orange
Failed SCANport
compatibility test
In either case, the adapter must be properly configured
and power cycled after the problem is fixed.
Call Rockwell Automation support.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
8-4
Troubleshooting
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Appendix
A
Product Specifications
Appendix Objectives
Appendix A provides the specifications that you may need to install
or use either the 1203-GU6 module or the 1336-GM6 board. These
adapters are non-repairable units. If they are broken, you must replace
them.
1203-GU6 Specifications
The following table gives the specifications for the 1203-GU6
Enhanced DeviceNet communications module.
Category
Specifications
Dimensions
1.8" W x 3.0" H x 5.0" D
(4.57 cm x 7.62 cm x 12.7 cm)
Weight
6.3 oz
(179 g)
Operating Temperature
0 to +55°C (32 to 131°F)
Storage Temperature
–40 to +85°C (–40 to 185°F)
Relative Humidity (Operating)
5 to 80% non-condensing
Relative Humidity (Non-Operating)
5 to 95% non-condensing
Shock (Operating)
30g peak acceleration, 11(+/–1)ms pulse width
Shock (Non-Operating)
50g peak acceleration, 11(+/–1)ms pulse width
Vibration (Operating)
2.5g at 5Hz – 2KHz
Vibration (Non-Operating)
5g at 5Hz – 2KHz
Power Consumption
130mA at 12V supplied through SCANport, and
60mA at 24V supplied through DeviceNet
ESD Susceptibility (IEC 1000-4-2)
4KV contact, 8KV open air
Regulatory Agencies
UL 508 and CUL
European Union EMC and Low Voltage Directives
DIN Rail Mounting Standard
1.38 x 0.30 in. (35 x 7.5 mm)
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
A-2
Product Specifications
1336-GM6 Specifications
The following table gives the specifications for the 1336-GM6
Enhanced DeviceNet communications board.
Category
Dimensions
4.5" W x 2.8" H x 0.5" D
(11.43 cm x 7.112 cm x 1.27 cm)
Weight
1.8 oz
(51 g)
Operating Temperature
0 to +55°C (32 to 131°F)
Storage Temperature
–40 to +85°C (–40 to 185°F)
Relative Humidity (Operating)
5 to 80% non-condensing
Relative Humidity (Non-Operating)
5 to 95% non-condensing
Shock (Operating)
30g peak acceleration, 11(+/–1)ms pulse width
Shock (Non-Operating)
50g peak acceleration, 11(+/–1)ms pulse width
Vibration (Operating)
2.5g at 5Hz – 2KHz
Vibration (Non-Operating)
5g at 5Hz – 2KHz
Power Consumption
150mA at 5V (supplied from Drive Control Board)
60mA at 24V (supplied through DeviceNet)
ESD Susceptibility (IEC 1000-4-2)
4KV contact, 8KV open air
Regulatory Agencies
UL 508 and CUL
European Union EMC and Low Voltage Directives
!
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Specifications
ATTENTION: The 1336-GM6 communications
board contains ESD (Electrostatic Discharge) sensitive
parts. Static control precautions are required when
installing, testing, or servicing this assembly. Device
malfunction may occur if you do not follow ESD control
procedures. If you are not familiar with static control
procedures, refer to Allen-Bradley Publication
8000-4.5.2, Guarding Against Electrostatic Damage, or
other applicable ESD protection handbook.
Appendix
B
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Appendix Objectives
Appendix B provides information on the Enhanced DeviceNet
adapter’s parameters and how to configure them. In this appendix,
you will read about the following:
•
Setting the node address.
•
Setting the data rate.
•
Using datalinks and command I/O.
•
Using Master-Slave communications.
•
Using Peer-to-Peer communications.
•
Using Fault Configurable inputs.
•
Parameters in the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter.
Important: The the number for parameters appears in parenthesis
after the name. This is the number in the adapter. If you are using
DeviceNet Manager, the number for each adapter parameter varies
depending on the type of drive you are using.
Setting the Node Address
The Enhanced DeviceNet adapter has a default node address of 63.
This address should be changed to a unique address (between 0 and
62) on your DeviceNet network.
Important: If you are installing multiple Enhanced DeviceNet
adapters on the network at the same time or there is already a node 63
on the network, you need to do one of the following:
•
Connect to each adapter using a serial point-to-point
connection and give each a unique address.
•
Power up only one adapter at a time on the network and give
each a unique node address.
•
If using software that supports the Fault Node Recovery
feature of DeviceNet, power up all the adapters at the same
time and give each a unique node address.
To set the node address, you need to:
1. Access the adapter’s parameters using either a serial connection
(refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced
DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection) or over the
DeviceNet network (refer to Chapter 4, Configuring the
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager).
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-2
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
2. Set the DN Node Address (2) parameter to the desired address.
3. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Setting the Data Rate
The Enhanced DeviceNet adapter supports the following data rates:
•
125 Kbps
•
250 Kbps
•
500 Kbps
•
Autobaud
The adapter defaults to using autobaud data rate detection.
Important: At least one continually transmitting device on the
network (usually the scanner) must be set to a fixed data rate (not
autobaud). This device sets the data rate for the network that the other
nodes using autobaud detect.
If you want to change your adapter’s data rate, you need to:
1. Access the adapter’s parameters using either a serial connection
(refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced
DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection) or the DeviceNet
network (refer to Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager).
2. Set the DN Data Rate (3) parameter to the desired value. Refer to
the following table for information on acceptable values.
Data Rates
125 Kbps
250 Kbps
500 Kbps
Thick Trunk Length
500 m (1 640 ft)
250 m (820 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
Thin Trunk Length
100 m (328 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
100 m (328 ft)
Maximum Drop Length
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
6 m (20 ft)
Cumulative Drop Length
156 m (512 ft)
78 m (256 ft)
39 m (128 ft)
3. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Using Datalinks and Command I/O
Command I/O provides two 16-bit words of input and two 16-bit
words of output when enabled. Datalinks let you increase the size of
I/O to and from a SCANport device (provided the SCANport device
supports datalinks). By enabling datalinks, you can continuously
change or monitor the value of a parameter without using the
DeviceNet to SCANport messaging function.
Datalinks consist of two 16-bit words of input and two 16-bit words
of output when enabled. They provide up to eight words (in and out)
of data if they are supported in the connected SCANport product.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-3
SCANport devices that support this function have a group of
parameters for datalink configuration. These parameters are Data In
A1 – D2 and Data Out A1 – D2.
If you intend to use command I/O and/or datalinks, you must do the
following:
1. Access the adapter’s parameters using either a serial connection
(refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced
DeviceNet Module Using a Serial Connection) or the DeviceNet
network (refer to Chapter 4, Configuring the Enhanced
DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager).
2. Enable the Cmd/Stat Config (4) parameter and/or desired
DataLink (5 – 8) parameters within the Enhanced DeviceNet
adapter.
Figure B.1
Module I/O Configuration
Cmd/Stat Config
Datalink A Confi g
Datalink B Confi g
Datalink C Confi g
Module Input
Datalink D Confi g
Logic Command
Reference
DL A1 Inp
DL A2 Inp
Data from
DeviceNet
DL B1 Inp
DL B2 Inp
DL C1 Inp
Data to the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Inp
DL D1 Inp
DL D2 Inp
Module Output
Logic Status
Feedback
DL A1 Out
DL A2 Out
Data to
DeviceNet
DL B1 Out
DL B2 Out
DL C1 Out
Data from the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Out
DL D1 Out
DL D2 Out
3. Configure or link the Data In A1– D2 and Data Out A1 – D2
parameters in the SCANport product. Refer to the documentation
for your SCANport product.
4. Configure the M-S Input parameter and M-S Output parameter as
desired. Refer to the “M-S Input Parameter Configurations”
section or the “M-S Output Parameter Configurations” sections in
this chapter.
5. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-4
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Using Master-Slave
Communications
To have your Enhanced DeviceNet adapter receive its I/O from a
scanner (PLC or SLC) on the DeviceNet network, you must configure
it for Master-Slave communications.
Figure B.2
Master-Slave Communications
M-S Input (24)
MSB
X
X
X
M-S Output (25)
LSB
MSB
X
X
X
LSB
1=Enable
0=Disable
Adapter Input
Logic Command
Reference
DL A1 Inp
DL A2 Inp
Master Data from
DeviceNet
DL B1 Inp
DL B2 Inp
DL C1 Inp
Data to the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Inp
DL D1 Inp
DL D2 Inp
Adapter Output
Logic Status
Feedback
DL A1 Out
DL A2 Out
Slave Data to
DeviceNet
DL B1 Out
DL B2 Out
DL C1 Out
Data from the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Out
DL D1 Out
DL D2 Out
Master-Slave communications let you transmit 2 – 10 words of I/O
data between the adapter and the scanner.
How you configure your adapter and scanner depends on the type of
allocation you are using. The adapter supports the following:
•
Polled.
•
COS (Change of State).
•
Cyclic.
•
Polled and COS.
•
Polled and Cyclic.
Polled Allocation
In polling, the scanner sends control data to the adapter, and then the
adapter responds with its status data. To use polling, you must enable
polling in the adapter and in the scanner.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-5
Enabling Polling in the Adapter
The following must be configured in the adapter.
1. Enable the desired I/O and datalinks (parameters 4 – 8).
2. Set the M-S Input (24) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Input
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
3. Set the M-S Output (25) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Output
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
4. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Enabling Polling in the Scanner
Use DeviceNet Manager to enable polling in the scanner. Refer to
Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter,
for more information on configuring the scanner.
Polling must be enabled in the Edit Device I/O Parameters dialog
box.
Figure B.3
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box for Polling
1. In the Polled section, click Enabled. An “X” appears.
2. In the Rx field, enter the size for the I/O input. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
3. In the Tx field, enter the size of the I/O output. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
4. In the Poll Rate field, select the desired rate.
5. Click OK.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-6
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
COS (Change of State) Allocation
When you set up COS allocation, the scanner sends data to the
adapter at a constant rate (called a heartbeat). If data in the adapter
changes between messages from the scanner, your adapter sends its
new status to the scanner. To use COS, you must enable COS in the
adapter and in the scanner.
Enabling COS in the Adapter
1. Enable the desired I/O and datalinks (parameters 4 – 8).
2. Set the M-S Input (24) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Input
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
3. Set the M-S Output (25) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Output
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
4. Ensure the Cmd/Stat Config (4) parameter is On.
5. Ensure the lowest bit in the M-S Output (25) parameter is set to 1.
For example, xxx0, 0001. This enables status/feedback to be sent
over the slave connection.
6. Set the COS Status Mask (26) parameter to specify which bits in
the logic status word will trigger a message to the scanner when
changed. (0 = do not check the corresponding bit.)
7. Set the COS Fdbk Change (27) parameter to specify the amount
of change required in the reference word needed to trigger a
message to the scanner. (0 = do not check the corresponding bit)
8. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-7
Enabling COS in the Scanner
Use DeviceNet Manager to enable COS in the scanner. Refer to
Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter,
for more information on configuring the scanner.
COS must be enabled in the Edit Device I/O Parameters dialog box.
Figure B.4
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box for COS
1. If necessary, unselect Enable in the Polled section.
2. In the Change of State/Cyclic section, click Enabled.
3. Click Change of State.
4. In the Rx field, enter 4 for the size for the I/O input.
5. In the Tx field, enter 4 for the size of the I/O output.
6. In the Heartbeat Rate field, enter the desired time for the
maximum interval between messages.
7. Click OK.
Important: After you have configured the scanner and adapter for
COS, you can verify the desired heartbeat rate is used by viewing the
COS/CYC Interval (28) parameter in the adapter.
Cyclic Allocation
When you set up cyclic allocation, your adapter sends or receives data
based on a periodic time interval. To use Cyclic, you must enable
Cyclic in the adapter and in the scanner.
Enabling Cyclic in the Adapter
1. Enable the desired command I/O and datalinks. Refer to the
“Using Datalinks and Command I/O” section in this chapter.
2. Set the M-S Input (24) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Input
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-8
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
3. Set the M-S Output (25) parameter. Refer to the “M-S Output
Parameter Configurations” section in this chapter.
4. Ensure the Cmd/Stat Config (4) parameter is set to On.
5. Ensure the lowest bit in M-S Output (25) parameter is set to 1.
6. Reset the adapter by setting the Reset Adapter (22) parameter to
Enable.
Enabling Cyclic in the Scanner
Use DeviceNet Manager to enable Cyclic in the scanner. Refer to
Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter,
for more information on configuring the scanner.
Cyclic must be enabled in the Edit Device I/O Parameters dialog
box.
Figure B.5
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box for Cyclic
1. If necessary, unselect Enable in the Polled section.
2. In the Change of State/Cyclic section, click Enabled.
3. Click Cyclic.
4. In the Rx field, enter 4 for the size for the I/O input.
5. In the Tx field, enter 4 for the size of the I/O output.
6. In the Send Rate field, enter the desired time for the interval
between messages.
7. Click OK.
Important: After you have configured the scanner and adapter for
Cyclic, you can verify the desired send rate is used by viewing the
COS/CYC Interval (28) parameter in the adapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-9
Polled and COS Allocation
You can enable both polling and COS allocations. This lets the
scanner poll the adapter at a fixed interval and the adapter report its
status changes to the scanner after they occur.
Enabling Polling and COS in the Adapter
Refer to both the “Polled Allocation” and the “COS (Change of State)
Allocation” sections in this chapter for information.
Enabling Polling and COS in the Scanner
Use DeviceNet Manager to enable polling in the scanner. Refer to
Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter,
for more information on configuring the scanner.
Polling and COS must be enabled in the Edit Device I/O Parameters
dialog box.
Figure B.6
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box for Polling and COS
1. In the Polled section, click Enabled.
2. In the Rx field, enter the size for the I/O input. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
3. In the Tx field, enter the size of the I/O output. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
4. In the Poll Rate field, select the appropriate rate.
5. In the Change of State/Cyclic section, click Enabled.
6. Click Change of State.
7. In the Rx field, enter 4 for the size for the I/O input.
8. In the Heartbeat Rate field, enter the desired time for the
maximum interval between messages.
9. Click OK.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-10
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Polled and Cyclic Allocation
You can enable both polling and cyclic allocations. This allows the
scanner to poll the adapter at fixed intervals and the adapter to send its
status to the scanner at fixed intervals.
Enabling Polling and Cyclic in the Adapter
Refer to both the “Polled Allocation” section and the “Cyclic
Allocation” section in this chapter for information.
Enabling Polling in the Scanner
Use DeviceNet Manager to enable polling in the scanner. Refer to
Chapter 5, Configuring a Scanner to Communicate with the Adapter,
for more information on configuring the scanner.
Polling and Cyclic must be enabled in the Edit Device I/O
Parameters dialog box.
Figure B.7
Edit Device I/O Parameters Dialog Box for Polling and Cyclic
1. In the Polled section, click Enabled.
2. In the Rx field, enter the size for the I/O input. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
3. In the Tx field, enter the size of the I/O output. Enter 4 for each
datalink enabled and 4 if Com/Ref is enabled. For example, if
Cmd/Ref and all 4 datalinks are enabled, you would enter 20.
4. In the Poll Rate field, select the appropriate rate.
5. In the Change of State/Cyclic section, click Enabled.
6. Click Cyclic.
7. In the Rx field, enter 4 for the size for the I/O input.
8. In the Send Rate field, enter the time for the message interval.
9. Click OK.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Using Peer-to-Peer
Communications
B-11
To have your adapter receive data from or transmit data to another
1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 on the DeviceNet network, you must
configure it for peer-to-peer communications. Peer-to-peer
communications are best used in the following instances:
•
A PLC sends data to a drive. That drive re-transmits the data to
other drives on the network.
•
A drive is configured on a network. It sends data to other drives
on the network.
Important: After setting up peer-to-peer communications, you must
make sure the configuration that you set up works as you intend it to
work.
To enable peer-to-peer communications, you must enable one adapter
to transmit peer I/O and one or more adapters to receive peer I/O.
Enabling the Adapter to Receive Peer I/O
To have your Enhanced DeviceNet adapter receive input data from
another Enhanced DeviceNet adapter on the network, you must
configure it for peer-to-peer communications.
Figure B.8
Receiving I/O from a Peer Device
Peer A Input
Module Input
Peer Cmd Mask
Peer Ref Adjust
Logic Command
Reference
DL A1 Inp
DL A2 Inp
Peer Input
Data from
DeviceNet
DL B1 Inp
DL B2 Inp
DL C1 Inp
Data to the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Inp
Peer A Word 1
DL D1 Inp
Peer A Word 2
DL D2 Inp
Peer B Word 1
Peer B Word 2
Module Output
Logic Status
Feedback
DL A1 Out
DL A2 Out
DL B1 Out
DL B2 Out
DL C1 Out
Data from the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Out
DL D1 Out
DL D2 Out
Peer B Input
In Peer-to-Peer communications, you can receive 2 or 4 I/O words
from another adapter. Follow these directions:
1. Enable the desired I/O and datalinks within the adapter and
SCANport product. Refer to the Using Datalinks and Command
I/O section in this chapter.
2. Ensure the Peer Inp Enable (36) parameter is Off.
3. Set the Peer Node to Inp (34) parameter to the number of the node
from which you want to receive data.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-12
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
4. Set the Peer A Input (29) parameter to a destination for the first 2
words of data.
5. If using 4 words of input, set the Peer B Input (30) parameter to a
destination for the second two words of data.
6. If receiving Cmd/Ref input data, set the bits in the Peer Cmd
Mask (31) parameter according to the following table.
Important: If both Master-Slave data and Peer data are being used to
control the adapter, make sure you know which one is transmitting
which control bits. The adapter will receive each control bit from only
one source. This includes the stop bit.
If receiving I/O from:
Then set bit to:
Master device (PLC or SLC)
0
Peer device (another Enhanced
DeviceNet adapter)
1
7.
If sending Cmd/Ref I/O data, set the percentage in the Peer Ref
Adjust (23) parameter. The adapter multiplies this value with the
speed reference value to determine the drive’s speed.
8. Set the Peer Input Timeout (35) parameter to the maximum amount
of time the adapter will wait for a message before timing out.
Important: This value must be greater than the product of Peer Out
Time (41) parameter multiplied by the Peer Out Skip (42) parameter
in the adapter from which you are receiving I/O.
9. Set the Peer Flt Action (33) parameter to determine what the
adapter should do if it times out.
10. Set the Peer Inp Enable (36) parameter to On.
11. Check the Peer Inp Status (37) parameter to verify operation. It
should either be Waiting (meaning it is waiting for the first Tx) or
Running (meaning it is receiving input data).
Your adapter is now configured to accept I/O data from another
Enhanced DeviceNet adapter. Make sure another Enhanced
DeviceNet adapter on the DeviceNet network is configured to
transmit peer data. Refer to the “Enabling the Adapter to Transmit
Peer I/O” section in this chapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-13
Enabling the Adapter to Transmit Peer I/O
You can have your Enhanced DeviceNet adapter send I/O data to
another Enhanced DeviceNet adapter on the network.
Figure B.9
Transmitting I/O to Another Adapter
Peer A Output
Peer Input
Data from
DeviceNet
M-S Input
Data from
DeviceNet
Module Input
Logic Command
Reference
DL A1 Inp
DL A2 Inp
Peer Output
Data to
DeviceNet
DL B1 Inp
DL B2 Inp
DL C1 Inp
Data to the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Inp
Peer A Word 1
DL D1 Inp
Peer A Word 2
DL D2 Inp
Peer B Word 1
Peer B Word 2
Module Output
Logic Status
Feedback
DL A1 Out
DL A2 Out
DL B1 Out
DL B2 Out
DL C1 Out
Data from the
SCANport
Device
DL C2 Out
DL D1 Out
DL D2 Out
Peer B Output
To have your adapter send output data to another adapter, you need to:
1. Ensure the Peer Output Enable (40) parameter is Off.
2. Set the Peer A Output (38) parameter to the source of the output
data.
3. If transmitting 4 words, set the Peer B Output (39) parameter to a
different source of output data.
4. Set the Peer Output Time (41) parameter to the minimum time
interval between peer messages.
5. Set the Peer Output Skip (42) parameter to a value between 1 and
16. The product of this value and the value of the Peer Output
Time (41) parameter determine the maximum time interval
between peer messages if there is not a change in status.
6. Set the Peer Output Enable (40) parameter to On.
Your adapter is now configured to transmit I/O data to another
Enhanced DeviceNet adapter. Make sure another Enhanced
DeviceNet adapter on the DeviceNet network is configured to receive
peer data. Refer to the “Enabling the Adapter to Receive Peer I/O”
section in this chapter.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-14
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Using Fault Configurable Inputs
You can select constant values that your adapter will maintain in the
event of a controller mode change or error. These constant values are
referred to as Fault Configurable inputs. When the controller is placed
in program mode or a DeviceNet network fault occurs, the control
outputs from the adapter to the SCANport product can be set to
automatically switch to the constant values set in the Fault Cfg In
parameters. This lets you define a safe operating state for controlled
devices that depend on pre-programmed output from the adapter.
!
ATTENTION: Risk of severe bodily injury or
equipment damage exists. The Idle Flt Action (9) and
Comm Flt Action (10) parameters allow the user to
change the default configuration that would allow the
module and associated drive to continue to operate if
communication is lost. Precautions should be taken to
assure that your settings for these parameters and your
application do not create a hazard of bodily injury or
equipment damage.
If you intend to use Fault Configurable inputs, you must do the
following:
1. Set desired values for the Fault Cfg Logic (11), Fault Cfg Ref
(12), and Fault Cft In (13 – 20) parameters.
2. Set the Idle Fault Config (9) parameter and/or the Comm Flt
Action (10) parameter to Fault Cfg.
Refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Enhanced DeviceNet
Module Using a Serial Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager, for
instructions on editing parameters.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter
Parameters
B-15
The following table provides information on the Enhanced DeviceNet
communications adapter’s parameter set.
Important: When accessing this parameter set through the
DeviceNet Parameter Class, add the adapter’s parameter number
to the number of the last parameter of the SCANport device. When
accessing this parameter set through the vendor-specific SCANport
Variables-Linear Class, add the adapter’s parameter number to
4000H.
Valid Values/
Settings
Default
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
SCANport
Adapter
0-7
NA
No
No
Identifies the port number to-which the adapter
is connected on the SCANport product.
2
DN Node Address
0-63
63
Yes
Yes
Identifies the DeviceNet Node Address for the
adapter.
3
DN Data Rate
125K
250K
500K
Auto
Auto
Yes
Yes
Identifies the data rate used on the DeviceNet
network.
Important: At least one node on your
DeviceNet network must be configured to a
data rate (125, 250, or 500 K), not autobaud.
4
Cmd/Stat Config
Off, On
On
Yes
Yes
Determines whether to pass logic command and
analog reference control data from a DeviceNet
connection to a SCANport product.
5
Datalink A Cfg
Off, On
Off
Yes
Yes
Determines whether to pass control data
contained in datalink A from a DeviceNet
connection to the SCANport product.
6
Datalink B Cfg
Off, On
Off
Yes
Yes
Determines whether to pass control data
contained in datalink B from a DeviceNet
connection to the SCANport product.
7
Datalink C Cfg
Off, On
Off
Yes
Yes
Determines whether to pass control data
contained in datalink C from a DeviceNet
connection to the SCANport product.
8
Datalink D Cfg
Off, On
Off
Yes
Yes
Determines whether to pass control data
contained in datalink D from a DeviceNet
connection to the SCANport product.
#
Name
1
Description
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-16
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
#
Name
9
Idle Flt Action
Valid Values/
Settings
Fault
Zero Data
Hold Last
Fault Cfg
Default
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
Fault
Yes
No
Description
Determines the action the adapter should
instruct the SCANport product to take if the
adapter detects that the PLC is set to program
mode.
Important: If you change this parameter’s
value, the user application may not be able to
control the product after a fault.
!
10
Comm Flt Action
Fault
Zero Data
Hold Last
Fault Cfg
Fault
Yes
No
ATTENTION: Risk of severe bodily
injury or equipment damage exists.
The Idle Flt Action (9) parameter
allows the user to change the default
configuration that would allow the
module and associated drive to
continue to operate if communication
is lost. Precautions should be taken
to assure that your settings for these
parameters and your application do
not create a hazard of bodily injury or
equipment damage.
Determines the action the adapter should
instruct the SCANport product to take if the
adapter detects a network failure.
Important: If you change this parameter’s
value, the user application may not be able to
control the product after a fault.
!
ATTENTION: Risk of severe bodily
injury or equipment damage exists. The
Comm Flt Action (10) parameter allows
the user to change the default
configuration that would allow the
module and associated drive to
continue to operate if communication is
lost. Precautions should be taken to
assure that your settings for these
parameters and your application do not
create a hazard of bodily injury or
equipment damage.
11
Fault Cfg Logic
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the logic command data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
12
Fault Cfg Ref
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the analog reference data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-17
#
Name
Valid Values/
Settings
Default
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
13
Fault Cfg A1 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the first word of datalink A data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
14
Fault Cfg A2 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the second word of datalink A data to
the SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
15
Fault Cfg B1 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the first word of datalink B data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
16
Fault Cfg B2 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the second word of datalink B data to
the SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
17
Fault Cfg C1 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the first word of datalink C data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
18
Fault Cfg C2 In
0 – 65535
0
No
No
Provides the second word of datalink C data to
the SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
19
Fault Cfg D1 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the first word of datalink D data to the
SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
20
Fault Cfg D2 In
0 – 65535
0
Yes
No
Provides the second word of datalink D data to
the SCANport product when the adapter is
instructed to use the values for the Fault Cfg
parameters.
21
Serial Port Rate
9600
19200
9600
Yes
Yes
Sets the baud rate for the adapter’s serial/DF1
port.
Important: If you change the baud rate in the
adapter, you must also change it in your
terminal emulation software or terminal.
22
Reset Adapter
Ready
Enable
Set Defaults
Ready
Yes
No
Ready = No change or reset.
Enable = Resets the module.
Set Defaults = Sets all parameters to their
factory-default values.
Description
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-18
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
#
Name
Valid Values/
Settings
Default
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
23
Active I/O Cfg
0 or 1 for each bit
N/A
No
No
Description
Displays what I/O is activated in the adapter.
datalink B
datalink C
datalink A
datalink D
Cmd/Stat
xxx0, 0000
0 = Off
1 = On
24
M-S Input
0 or 1 for each bit
xxx0, 0001
Yes
Yes
Determines the source of the bits for input.
datalink B
datalink C
datalink A
datalink D
Cmd/Ref
xxx0, 0000
0 = Peer or other input
1 = Master-Slave input
For more information, refer to the “M-S Input
Parameter Configurations” section in this
chapter.
25
M-S Output
0 or 1 for each bit
xxx0, 0001
Yes
Yes
Determines the source of the bits for output.
datalink B
datalink C
datalink A
datalink D
Stat/Fdbk
xxx0, 0000
0 = Peer or other output
1 = Master-Slave output
For more information, refer to the “M-S Output
Parameter Configurations” section in this
chapter.
26
COS Status Mask
0 or 1 for each bit
0
Yes
No
Provides a mask of the Logic Status word to
define which bits are checked for changes
during COS allocation.
0 = Off (not checked)
1 = On (checked)
Important: Refer to your SCANport product’s
documentation for information on its Logic
Status word.
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-19
Valid Values/
Settings
Default
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
COS Feedback
Change
0 = disable
0 = disable
Yes
No
Determines how much (+/-) the feedback word
can change before a message is sent during
COS operations.
28
COS/Cyc Interval
N/A
N/A
No
No
Displays the interval used by the controller to
check for data in the adapter during COS or
Cyclic allocation.
29
Peer A Input
Off,
Cmd/Ref
DL A Input
DL B Input
DL C Input
DL D Input
Off
Yes
No
Determines where the peer A input is sent in the
SCANport product.
Important: This parameter cannot be changed
when the Peer Inp Enable (36) parameter is On.
30
Peer B Input
Off
Cmd/Ref
DL A Input
DL B Input
DL C Input
DL D Input
Off
Yes
No
Determines where the peer B input is sent in the
SCANport product.
Important: This parameter cannot be changed
when the Peer Inp Enable (36) parameter is On.
31
Peer Cmd Mask
0 or 1 for each bit
0
Yes
Yes
Provides a mask for the Logic Status word
when it is received through peer input.
0 = Off (input received from Master)
1 = On (input received from Peer)
32
Peer Ref Adjust
0-200.00%
0
Yes
No
Provides the percentage of the Reference value
received through peer input that will be applied
to the SCANport reference value.
33
Peer Flt Action
Fault
Zero Data
Hold Last
Fault Cfg
Fault
Yes
No
Determines the action the adapter should
instruct the SCANport product to take if the
adapter does not receive peer input in the
allowed time.
#
Name
27
Description
!
34
Peer Node to Inp
0-63
0
Yes
No
ATTENTION: Risk of severe bodily
injury or equipment damage exists.
The Peer Flt Action (33) parameter
allows the user to change the default
configuration that would allow the
module and associated drive to
continue to operate if communication
is lost. Precautions should be taken
to assure that your settings for these
parameters and your application do
not create a hazard of bodily injury or
equipment damage.
Determines the node address of the node
producing I/O for the adapter to receive.
Important: This parameter cannot be changed
when the Peer Inp Enable (36) parameter is On.
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-20
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
#
Name
Valid Values/
Settings
Default
35
Peer Inp Timeout
0.01-180.00 sec
10.00
36
Peer Inp Enable
Off, On
37
Peer Inp Status
Off
Waiting
Running
Faulted
NA
No
No
Displays the status of the consumed peer input
connection.
38
Peer A Output
Off
Cmd/Ref
DL A Input
DL B Input
DL C Input
DL D Input
DL A Output
DL B Output
DL C Output
DL D Output
Off
Yes
No
Determines the source of peer A output data in
the SCANport product.
Important: This parameter cannot be changed
when the Peer Out Enable (40) parameter is
On.
39
Peer B Output
Off
Cmd/Ref
DL A Input
DL B Input
DL C Input
DL D Input
DL A Output
DL B Output
DL C Output
DL D Output
Off
Yes
No
Determines the source of peer B output data in
the SCANport product.
Important: This parameter cannot be changed
when the Peer Out Enable (40) parameter is
On.
40
Peer Out Enable
On, Off
Off
Yes
No
Off = Disables peer output communications.
On = Enables peer output communications.
41
Peer Out Time
0.01 – 10.00
1.00
Yes
No
Determines the minimum interval of time
between peer transmissions.
42
Peer Out Skip
1 – 16
Off
1
Writable
Reset or
Power Cycle
Yes
Yes
Yes
Description
Determines the time out time. If the adapter
does not receive input from the peer node in this
amount of time, it will do what is selected in
Peer Flt Action (33) parameter.
No
No
Off = Disables peer input communications.
On = Enables peer input communications.
Determines the maximum interval of time
between peer transmissions by multiplying this
value by the value in the Peer Out Time (41)
parameter.
Important: For information on accessing and editing parameters, refer to Chapter 3, Configuring the 1203-GU6 Using a Serial
Connection, or Chapter 4, Configuring the 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6 Adapter Using DeviceNet Manager.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-21
M-S Input Parameter Configurations
The M-S Input (24) parameter has the following five configurable
bits.
Figure 8.2
Bits and Corresponding I/O
datalink B
datalink C
datalink A
datalink D
Cmd/Ref
0 = Peer or other input
1 = Master-Slave input
xxx0, 0000
When you enable Cmd/Stat (4) or datalink (5-8) parameter(s) in the
adapter, you must set the corresponding bit in the M-S Input (24)
parameter if you want the input data to come from the scanner or
master device.
The following table lists possible configurations for the M-S Input
(24) parameter and the types of allocation associated with each.
ALLOCATION (Number Of Words)
ADAPTER
CONFIGURATION
Data Size Sent From The Controller To The Adapter
M-S Input
M-S Output
Poll Only
COS Only
Cyclic Only
Poll & COS
Poll &
Cyclic
00000
xxxx0
0
NA
NA
NA
NA
00001
xxxx0
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
00010
xxxx0
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
00011
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
00100
xxxx0
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
00101
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
00110
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
00111
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
01000
xxxx0
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
01001
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01010
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01011
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
01100
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01101
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
01110
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-22
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
ALLOCATION (Number Of Words)
ADAPTER
CONFIGURATION
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Data Size Sent From The Controller To The Adapter
M-S Input
M-S Output
Poll Only
COS Only
Cyclic Only
Poll & COS
Poll &
Cyclic
01111
xxxx0
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
10000
xxxx0
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
10001
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
10010
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
10011
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
10100
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
10101
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
10110
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
10111
xxxx0
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
11000
xxxx0
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
11001
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
11011
xxxx0
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
11100
xxxx0
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
11101
xxxx0
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
11110
xxxx0
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
11111
xxxx0
10
NA
NA
NA
NA
00000
xxxx1
0
0
0
0/0
0/0
00001
xxxx1
2
2
2
2/0
2/0
00010
xxxx1
2
2
2
2/0
2/0
00011
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
00100
xxxx1
2
2
2
2/0
2/0
00101
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
00110
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
00111
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
01000
xxxx1
2
2
2
2/0
2/0
01001
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
01010
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
01011
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
01100
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
01101
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-23
ALLOCATION (Number Of Words)
ADAPTER
CONFIGURATION
Data Size Sent From The Controller To The Adapter
M-S Input
M-S Output
Poll Only
COS Only
Cyclic Only
Poll & COS
Poll &
Cyclic
01110
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
01111
xxxx1
8
8
8
8/0
8/0
10000
xxxx1
2
2
2
2/0
2/0
10001
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
10010
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
10011
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
10100
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
10101
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
10110
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
10111
xxxx1
8
8
8
8/0
8/0
11000
xxxx1
4
4
4
4/0
4/0
11001
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
11011
xxxx1
8
8
8
8/0
8/0
11100
xxxx1
6
6
6
6/0
6/0
11101
xxxx1
8
8
8
8/0
8/0
11110
xxxx1
8
8
8
8/0
8/0
11111
xxxx1
10
10
10
10/0
10/0
M-S Output Parameter Configurations
The M-S Output parameter has the following five configurable bits.
Figure 8.3
Bits and Corresponding I/O
datalink B
datalink C
datalink A
datalink D
Stat/Fdbk
xxx0, 0000
0 = Peer or other
output
When you enable Cmd/Stat (4) or datalink (5-8) parameter(s) in the
adapter, you must set the corresponding bit in the M-S Output (25)
parameter if you want the output data to be sent to the scanner or
master device.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-24
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
The following table lists possible configurations for the M-S Output
(25) parameter and the types of allocation associated with each.
ALLOCATION (Number Of Words)
Data Size Sent From The Adapter To The Controller
M-S Output
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Poll Only
COS Only
Cyclic Only
Poll & COS
Poll &
Cyclic
00000
0
NA
NA
NA
NA
00010
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
00100
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
00110
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01000
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
01010
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01100
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
01110
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
10000
2
NA
NA
NA
NA
10010
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
10100
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
10110
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
11000
4
NA
NA
NA
NA
11010
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
11100
6
NA
NA
NA
NA
11110
8
NA
NA
NA
NA
00001
2
2
2
2/2
2/2
00011
4
2
2
4/2
4/2
00101
4
2
2
4/2
4/2
00111
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
01011
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
01101
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
01111
8
2
2
8/2
8/2
10001
4
2
2
4/2
4/2
10011
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
10101
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
10111
8
2
2
8/2
8/2
11001
6
2
2
6/2
6/2
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
B-25
ALLOCATION (Number Of Words)
Data Size Sent From The Adapter To The Controller
M-S Output
Poll Only
COS Only
Cyclic Only
Poll & COS
Poll &
Cyclic
11011
8
2
2
8/2
8/2
11101
8
2
2
8/2
8/2
11111
10
2
2
10/2
10/2
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
B-26
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter’s Parameters
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Appendix
C
DeviceNet Objects
Appendix Objectives
Appendix C defines the DeviceNet object classes, class services, and
attributes that are supported by the Enhanced DeviceNet adapter.
These objects can be used to develop programs for the module.
This appendix assumes that you have experience in object
programming.
Object Classes
The Enhanced DeviceNet adapter supports the following object
classes:
Class
Object
Page
0x01
Identity
C-2
0x02
Message Router
C-4
0x03
DeviceNet
C-5
0x05
Connection
C-6
0x07
Register
C-8
0x0F
Parameter
C-10
0x10
Parameter Group
C-16
0x93
SCANport Pass-Through Parameter
C-18
0x97
SCANport Pass-Through Fault Queue
C-19
0x98
SCANport Pass-Through Warning Queue
C-21
0x99
SCANport Pass-Through Link
C-23
0x67
PCCC Object
C-25
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-2
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x01 — Identity Object
The identity object provides identification and general information
about the device.
Class Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
Name
Data
Type
2
Get
Max Instance
UINT
Description
Maximum instance number of
an object currently created in
this class level of the device.
Instances
The total number of instances depends on the number of
microprocessors in the SCANport product connected to the module.
•
Instance 1 includes information on both the adapter and the
product.
•
The instances for the SCANport product’s microprocessors start
at instance 2.
•
The instance for the adapter is present after all the instances for
the SCANport product’s microprocessors.
Instance
1
2 through n - 1➀
n➀
➀
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
Total Product
Product components
Enhanced DeviceNet Adapter
The value of n is the maximum instance in the object. This value is obtainable via class
attribute 2.
DeviceNet Objects
C-3
Instance Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Name
Data Type
Description
1
Get
Vendor ID
UINT
Identification of each vendor by number.
1 = Allen-Bradley
2
Get
Device Type
UINT
Indication of general type of product.
0x69 = Sub-Component
0x6F = SCANport Device
3
Get
Product Code
UINT
Identification of a particular product of an individual vendor.
0xXX02 = 1336 PLUS 0.5 – 10 HP -S/B 0xXX02
0xXX03 = 1336 PLUS 7.5 – 800 HP -S/B 0xXX03
0xXX07 = 1336 PLUS II -S/B 0xXX07
0xXX10 = 1336 FORCE w/ PLC Adapter -S/B 0xXX10
0xXX11 = 2364F RGU -S/B 0xXX11
0xXX12 = 1394 Motion Drive -S/B 0xXX12
0xXX13 = 1557 Medium Voltage AC Drive -S/B 0xXX13
0xXX14 =193 SMP-3 -S/B 0xXX14
0xXX15 = 150 SMC Dialog Plus -S/B 0xXX15
0xXX17 = 1305 AC Drive -S/B 0xXX17
0xXX18 = 1397 DC Drive -S/B 0xXX18
0xXX19 = 1336 VSC -S/B 0xXX19
0xXX20 = 1336T Force w/ Std Adapter -S/B 0xXX20
0xXX22 = 1336 IMPACT -S/B 0xXX22
Note: The high byte of each code indicates a particular size or
configuration within a product family.
4
Get
Revision
STRUCT of
Major Revision
USINT
Minor Revision
USINT
Revision of the item that this instance of the Identity Object
represents.
Value varies based on product.
5
Get
Status
WORD
Summary status of product.
Value varies based on product.
6
Get
Serial Number
UDINT
Serial number of product.
Value varies based on product.
7
Get
Product Name
SHORT_
STRING
Human readable identification.
Value varies based on product.
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x05
Yes
No
Reset
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x10
No
No
Set_Attribute_Single
0x11
Yes
N/A
Find_Next_Obj_Instance
Get_Attribute_All Response
None supported.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-4
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x02 — Message
Router Object
The Message Router Object provides a messaging connection point
through which a client may address to any object class or instance
residing in the physical devices.
Class Attributes
Not supported.
Instances
Instance
1
Description
Message Router Object
Instance Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
2
Get
Number
available
UINT
Maximum number of connections
supported by the message router.
3
Get
Number
active
UINT
Number of connections currently
used by system components.
4
Get
Active
connections
ARRAY
of UINT
A list of the connection IDs of the
currently active connections. This
attribute not used.
Reserved for compatibility
purposes.
Name
Data
Type
Description
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
0x0E
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Service Name
Class
Instance
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x03 — DeviceNet
Object
C-5
The DeviceNet Object is used to provide the configuration and status
of a physical attachment to DeviceNet. A product must support one
(and only one) DeviceNet Object per physical network attachment.
Class Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
1
Get
Name
DeviceNet
Specification
Data
Type
Word
Description
Returns 2
Instances
Not supported.
Instance Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
1
Get
Mac ID
USINT
Node Address
2
Get
Data Rate
USINT
Data Rate
3
Get
BOI
BOOL
Default = 0
4
Set
Bus Off
Counter
USINT
Increments if BOI is non-zero
and Bus Off occurs. Can only
be set to zero.
5
Get
Allocation
Information
STRUCT
of BYTE
USINT
The allocation information a
slave supports when the
master allocates.
6
Get
Node Adx
Switch Err
BOOL
If non-zero, the Node Address
NVS value does not match the
online value.
7
Get
Data Rate
Switch Err
BOOL
If non-zero, the Data Rate
NVS value does not match the
online value.
8
Get
Node Adx
Switch
USINT
The actual value in the
EEPROM
9
Get
Data Rate
Switch Val
USINT
The actual value in the
EEPROM or the operating
value after an autobaud was
completed.
Name
Data
Type
Description
Common Services
Not supported.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-6
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x05 — Connection
The Connection Class allocates and manages the internal resources
associated with both I/O and Explicit Messaging Connections. The
specific instance generated by the Connection Class is referred to as a
Connection Instance or a Connection Object.
Important: An externally visible interface to the Connection Class
across Explicit Messaging Connections DOES exist. Unless
otherwise noted, all services/attributes noted in the following sections
are accessible using Explicit Messaging.
A Connection Object within a particular module actually represents
one of the end-points of a Connection. It is possible for one of the
Connection end-points to be configured and “active” (e.g.,
transmitting) without the other end-point(s) being present.
Connection Objects are used to model the communication specific
characteristics of a particular Application-to-Applications(s)
relationship. A specific Connection Object Instance manages the
communication-specific aspects related to an end-point.
A Connection Object on DeviceNet uses the services provided by a
Link Producer and/or Link Consumer to perform low-level data
transmission and reception functions.
Class Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
1
Get
Name
Data Type
Revision
UINT
Description
Revision of the Connection Object class definition
upon which the implementation is based
Range 1 – 65535
Instances
Instance
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
1
Group 2 Messaging
2
Group 2 Polling
4
Group 2 COS/Cyclic
6
Group 3 Messaging
7
Group 3 Messaging
8
Group 3 Messaging
9
Group 3 Messaging
10
Group 3 Messaging
DeviceNet Objects
C-7
Instance Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
1
Get
2
Name
Data Type
Description
State
USINT
State of the connection as defined in the DeviceNet
specification
Get
Instance type
USINT
Indicates I/O or Messaging connection
3
Get
Transport Class Trigger
USINT
The Transport Class Trigger for this instance
4
Get
Produced Cnxn ID
USINT
CAN Identifier to transmit on
5
Get
Consumed Cnxn ID
USINT
CAN Identifier to receive on
6
Get
Initial Comm Char
USINT
Defines the DeviceNet message groups that the tx/rx
Cnxn’s apply
7
Get
Produced Cnxn Size
UINT
Max bytes to transmit across this connection
8
Get
Consumed Cnxn Size
UINT
Max bytes to receive across this connection
9
Get/Set
EPR
UINT
Expected Packet Rate
12
Get/Set
Watchdog Action
USINT
How to handle inactivity/watchdog time-outs
13
Get
Produced Path Length
UINT
Number of bytes in the produced connection path
attribute
14
Get
Produced Cnxn Path
ARRAY of USINT
Specifies the application object whose data is to be
produced by this connection
15
Get
Consumed Path Length
UINT
Number of bytes in the consumed connection path
attribute
16
Get
Consumed Cnxn Path
ARRAY of USINT
Specifies the application object to receive the data
consumed by this application
17
Get/Set
Production Inhibit Time
UINT
Defines minimum time between new data production
for COS connections
Common Services
Not supported.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-8
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x07 — Register Object
The Register Object is used to address individual bits or a range of
bits. It may operate as either a producer (input) register or a consumer
(output) register. A producer register object produces data onto the
network. A consumer register object consumes data from the
network.
Message writes to the Register Object can perform control functions.
Therefore, message writes are only allowed when the controller is not
actively controlling the module and the message write is done through
a connection with a time-out value not equal to zero. Writes cannot be
performed through an unconnected message. After a write, any
time-out or closure of the connection may cause the SCANport
product to fault.
Refer to Chapter 7, Using DeviceNet Explicit Messaging, for
information about writing to the Register Object.
Class Attributes
Not supported.
Instances
Instance
➀
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
1
All polled data being read from the SCANport device (read-only)
2
All polled data written to the SCANport device (read/write)
3
Logic Status and Feedback data (read-only)
4
Logic Command and Reference data (read/write)
5
Datalink A input data (read-only)
6
Datalink A output data (read/write)
7
Datalink B input data (read-only)
8
Datalink B output data (read/write)
9
Datalink C input data (read-only)
10
Datalink C output data (read/write)
11
Datalink D input data (read-only)
12
Datalink D output data (read/write)
13
Logic Status and Feedback Data (read-only)
14
Logic Command and Reference Data➀ (read/write)
The command word is set to the value of the first word of the data where there are ones
in the second word of the data. Command = (word 1 and not word 2) or (word 1 and
word 2). This only controls specified bits in the logic command data to the SCANport
product and does not change the reference value.
DeviceNet Objects
C-9
Instance Attributes
Setting of an assembly attribute can only be accomplished through a
connection. This feature is to prevent accidental control of the
SCANport product.
Attribute
ID
Access Rule
1
➀
Name
Data
Type
Get
Bad Flag
BOOL
If set to 1, then attribute 4
may contain invalid, bad or
otherwise corrupt data.
0 = good
1 = bad
2
Get
Direction
BOOL
Direction of data transfer
0 = Producer Register
1 = Consumer Register
3
Get
Size
UINT
Size of register data in bits
4
Conditional➀
Data
ARRAY
of BITS
Description
Data to be transferred
The access rule of Set is optional if attribute 2, Direction = 1. If Direction = 0, the
access rule is Get.
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x10
No
Yes
Set_Attribute_Single
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-10
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x0F — Parameter
Object
The Parameter Object provides a known, public interface for device
configuration data. This object also provides all the information
necessary to define and describe each individual configuration
parameter of a device.
Class Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
1
Get
Revision
UINT
Revision of this object. First
revision, value = 1.
2
Get
Max Instance
UINT
Maximum instance number of
an object currently created in
this class level of the device.
8
Get
Parameter
Class
Descriptor
WORD
Bits that describe parameters.
9
Get
Configuration
Assembly
Instance
UINT
Instance number of the
configuration assembly.
This attribute is set to zero
because a configuration
assembly is not supported.
10
Set
Native
Language
USINT
Language ID for all character
array accesses.
0 = English
1 = French
2 = Spanish
3 = Italian
4 = German
5 = Japanese
6 = Portuguese
Name
Data
Type
Description
Instances
The number of instances varies based on the number of parameters in
your SCANport product. The adapter parameters immediately follow
the SCANport product parameters.
Instance
➀
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
1 through n - 41➀
SCANport Product Parameters
n - 41 through n ➀
Module Parameters
The value of n is the maximum instance in the object. This value is obtainable via class
attribute 2.
DeviceNet Objects
C-11
Instance Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Stub/Full
Name
1
➀
Stub
Parameter Value
2
Get
Stub
Link Path Size
3
Get
Stub
Link Path
Data Type
Specified in
Descriptor,
Data Type and
Data Size
attributes.
Description
Actual value of parameter. Data type
specified in descriptor, data type, and data
size.➀➁
USINT
Size of Link Path attribute. If this attribute is 0,
then no link is specified.
Number of BYTEs in attribute 3.
ARRAY of path
segments
Path to the object from where this parameter
value is retrieved.
The link path is limited to 255 BYTEs.
Segment type/port
BYTE
Segment Address
Path (format
depends on
data contained
in segment
type/port)
4
Get
Stub
Descriptor
WORD
Descriptor of parameter. Refer to the table on
page C-12.
5
Get
Stub
Data Type
USINT
Data type code. Refer to the table on
page C-13.
6
Get
Stub
Data Size
USINT
Number of BYTEs in attribute 1, Parameter
Value.
7
Get
Full
Parameter Name
String
SHORT_
STRING
A human readable string representing the
parameter name. For example, “frequency
#1.”
The maximum number of characters is 16.
(The first byte is a length code.)
8
Get
Full
Units String
SHORT_
STRING
Engineering unit string.
The maximum number of characters is 4.
(The first byte is a length code.)
9
Get
Full
SHORT_
STRING
The maximum number of characters is 64.
(The first byte is a length code.) Always
returns 0.
10
Get
Full
Minimum Value
Same as
attribute 1
The minimum valid actual value to which
attribute 1, Parameter Value can be set.
11
Get
Full
Maximum Value
Same as
attribute 1
The maximum valid actual value to which
attribute 1, Parameter Value can be set.
12
Get
Full
Default Value
Same as
attribute 1
The actual value attribute 1, Parameter Value
should be set to when the user wants the
default for the parameter.
13
Get
Full
Scaling Multiplier
UINT
Multiplier for scaling formula.
14
Get
Full
Scaling Divisor
UINT
Divisor for scaling formula.
➀
The access rule is defined in bit 4 of instance attribute 4, the Descriptor. If bit 4 is 0 the access rule is Set and the Parameter Value can be read and
written. If bit 4 is 1, the access rule is Get and the Parameter Value can only be read.
➁
Data type specified in instance attributes 4 (Descriptor), 5 (Data Type) and 6 (Data Size).
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-12
DeviceNet Objects
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Stub/Full
Name
Data Type
Description
15
Get
Full
Scaling Base
UINT
Base for scaling formula.
16
Get
Full
Scaling Offset
UINT
Offset for scaling formula.
17
Get
Full
Multiplier Link
UINT
Parameter object instance number of
multiplier source.
18
Get
Full
Divisor Link
UINT
Parameter object instance number of base
source.
19
Get
Full
Base Link
UINT
Parameter object instance number of offset
source.
20
Get
Full
Offset Link
UINT
Parameter object instance number of offset
source.
21
Get
Full
Decimal Precision
USINT
Specifies number of decimal places to use
when displaying the scaled engineering
value. Also used to determine actual
increment value so that incrementing a value
causes a change in scaled engineering value
to this precision.
➀
The access rule is defined in bit 4 of instance attribute 4, the Descriptor. If bit 4 is 0 the access rule is Set and the Parameter Value can be read and
written. If bit 4 is 1, the access rule is Get and the Parameter Value can only be read.
➁
Data type specified in instance attributes 4 (Descriptor), 5 (Data Type) and 6 (Data Size).
Bit Definitions for Instance Attribute 4
Bit
Definition
Value
0
Supports settable path
0 = Link path can not be set.
1 = Link path can be set.
1
Supports enumerated strings
0 = Enumerated strings are not supported.
1 = Enumerated strings are supported and may be read with the Get_Enum_String service.
2
Supports scaling
0 = Scaling not supported.
1 = Scaling is supported. The scaling attributes are implemented and the value presented is
in engineering units.
3
Supports scaling links
0 = Scaling links not supported.
1 = The values for the scaling attributes may be retrieved from other parameter object
instances.
4
Read only parameter
0 = Parameter value attribute can be written (set) and read (get). Access rule is set.
1 = Parameter value attribute can only be read. Access rule is get.
5
Monitor parameter
0 = Parameter value attribute is not updated in real time by the device.
1 = Parameter value attribute is updated in real time by the device.
6
Supports extended precision
scaling
0 = Extended precision scaling is not supported.
1 = Extended precision scaling should be implemented and the value presented to the user
in engineering units.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
DeviceNet Objects
C-13
Data Types for Instance Attribute 5
Attribute
ID Value
Data Type
Description
Definition
Scaling Supported
on this Data Type
1
WORD
16-bit word
No
2
UINT
16-bit unsigned integer
Yes
3
INT
16-bit signed integer
Yes
4
BOOL
Boolean
No
5
SINT
Short integer
Yes
6
DINT
Double integer
Yes
7
LINT
Long integer
Yes
8
USINT
Unsigned short integer
Yes
9
Not Supported
Unsigned double
integer
Yes
10
Not Supported
Unsigned long integer
Yes
11
Not Supported
Single floating point
format (IEEE 754)
Yes
12
Not Supported
Double floating point
format (IEEE 754)
Yes
13
Not Supported
Duration (short)
Yes
14
Not Supported
Duration
Yes
15
Not Supported
Duration (high
resolution)
Yes
16
Not Supported
Duration (long)
Yes
17
Not Supported
Date
No
18
Not Supported
Time of Day
No
19
Not Supported
Date and time
No
20
Not Supported
8-bit per character
string
No
21
Not Supported
16-bit per character
string
No
22
Not Supported
N-byte per character
string
No
23
Not Supported
Short N-byte character
string
No
24
Not Supported
8-bit string
No
25
Not Supported
32-bit string
No
26
Not Supported
64-bit string
No
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-14
DeviceNet Objects
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x01
No
Yes
Get_Attribute_All
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x10
No
Yes
Set_Attribute_Single
0x4B
No
Yes
Get_Enum_String
0x05
Yes
No
Reset_Request (sets
all parameters to
default values)
0x15
Yes
No
Restore_Request
0x16
Yes
No
Save_Request
Get_Attribute_All Response
Not supported.
At the instance level, the order of attributes returned in the
Get_Attributes_All response is as follows:
Class Attribute ID
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Attribute Name and Default Value
1
Parameter Value
2
Link Path Size
3
Link Path
4
Descriptor
5
Data Type
6
Data Size
7
Parameter Name String, default character count = 0
8
Units String, default character count = 0
9
Help String, default character count = 0
10
Minimum Value default = 0
11
Maximum Value default = 0
12
Default Value default = 0
13
Scaling Multiplier Default = 1
14
Scaling Divisor Default = 1
15
Scaling Base Default = 1
16
Scaling Offset Default = 0
17
Multiplier Link Default = 0
18
Divisor Link Default = 0
19
Base Link Default = 0
20
Offset Link Default = 0
DeviceNet Objects
Class Attribute ID
21
C-15
Attribute Name and Default Value
Decimal Precision Default = 0
Object Specific Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
0x4B
Service Name
Class
Instance
No
Yes
Get_Enum_String
Enumerated strings are human-readable strings that describe either a
bit or a value depending on the data type of instance attribute 1, the
Parameter Value. If the data type is a BYTE or WORD, the
enumerated string is a bit enumerated string. If the data type is INT or
UINT, the enumerated string is a value enumerated string. Any other
data type does not have enumerated strings.
The table below lists the parameters for the Get_Enum_String request
service.
Name
Data Type
Enumerated String
Number
USINT
Description of Attribute
Number of enumerated string to retrieve
(MAX value is 255).
•
If the string to be returned is a bit enumerated string, then the
enumerated string number represents a bit position and the
Get_Enum_String service returns a string from that bit.
•
If the string to be returned is a value enumerated string, then the
enumerated string number represents a value and the
Get_Enum_String service returns a string for that value.
The enumerated string is returned in the form of a SHORT_STRING
and is 16 characters long plus the preceding length byte.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-16
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x10 — Parameter
Group Object
The Parameter Group Object identifies and provides access to groups
of parameters in a device grouping. The Parameter Group Object
provides convenient access to related sets of parameters.
Class Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
1
Get
Parameter
group version
UINT
Returns 1
2
Get
Max Instance
UINT
Maximum instance number of
an object currently created in
this class level of the device.
8
Get
Native
Language
USINT
Language ID for all STRING
accesses.
0 = English
1 = French
2 = Spanish (Mexican)
3 = Italian
4 = German
5 = Japanese
6 = Portuguese
Name
Data
Type
Description
Instances
The number of instances varies based on the number of groups in the
SCANport product. One additional group is added for the module.
Instance
1 – (n - 1)
n➀
➀
Description
SCANport product groups
Module group
n is the value returned by a get from class attribute 2 (max instance).
Instance Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
1
Get
Group Name String
2
Get
Number of Members in
Group
UINT
Number of parameters in group.
3
Get
1st Parameter Number
in Group
UINT
Parameter instance number.
4
Get
2nd Parameter Number
in Group
UINT
Parameter instance number.
n
Get
(n-2)th Parameter
Number in Group
UINT
Parameter instance number.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Name
Data Type
SHORT_
STRING
Description
A human-readable string representing the group name (e.g.,
set-up, frequency set).
Maximum number of characters = 16
DeviceNet Objects
C-17
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
0x0E
Service Name
Class
Instance
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
Get_Attribute_All Response
Not supported.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-18
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x93 — SCANport
Pass-Through Parameter Object
The SCANport Pass-Through Parameter Object lets you perform a
scattered read or write.
Class Attributes
Not supported.
Instance Attributes
Not supported.
Common Services
Not supported.
Object-Specific Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
➀
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x32
Yes
No
Scattered_Parameter_
Value_Read➀
0x34
Yes
No
Scattered_Parameter_
Value_Write➀
Must be directed to Attribute 0, Instance 0.
The table below lists the parameters for the Scattered_Parameter_
Value_Read and Scattered_Parameter_Value_Write object-specific
services:
Name
Scattered
Parameters
Data Type
Description
STRUCT of
Parameter Number
WORD
Parameter to read or write
Parameter Value
WORD
Parameter value to write (zero when
reading)
Important: The STRUCT may repeat up to 32 times in a single
message.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x97 — SCANport
Pass-Through Fault Object
C-19
The SCANport Pass-Through Fault Object provides information on
the product’s fault queue.
Class Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Name
Data Type
Description
0
Set
Write Fault Command
BYTE
1 = Clear Faults
2 = Clear Fault Queue
3 = Reset Product
1
Get
Read Number of Fault
Queue Entries
BYTE
Reads the number of fault queue entries.
2
Get
Read Fault Queue Trip
Index
BYTE
Reads the index of the fault that tripped the product.
Instance Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Name
Data Type
0
Get
Read Fault Queue Entry
Full/All Info
Fault Text
STRUCT of
Fault Code
Fault Time Stamp
ARRAY of BYTE
WORD
STRUCT
BYTE
129
Get
BYTE
BYTE
Hour (0 – 23).
➀
Sunday is a value of zero.
➁
Year is an offset from 1990.
Fault Code and Time
Stamp
Fault Code
STRUCT of
Fault Time Stamp
STRUCT of
BYTE
Read Fault Text String
Only
1/100 Second (0 – 99).
Second (0 – 59).
Minute (0 – 59).
BYTE
BYTE
Get
16 character string (no length information, no
terminating null).
Fault Code.
BYTE
BYTE
BYTE
128
Description
WORD
Day of Week (0 – 6).➀
Date (1 – 31).
Month (1 – 12).
Year (0 – 99➁).
Fault Code.
1/100 Second (0 – 99).
BYTE
BYTE
Second (0 – 59).
Minute (0 – 59).
BYTE
BYTE
Hour (0 – 23).
BYTE
BYTE
Date (1 – 31).
Month (1 – 12).
BYTE
Year (0 – 99➁).
ARRAY of BYTE
Day of Week (0 – 6).➀
16 character string (no length information, no
terminating null).
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-20
DeviceNet Objects
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x01
Yes
Yes
Set_Attribute_Single
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x98 — SCANport
Pass-Through Warning Object
C-21
The SCANport Pass-Through Warning Object provides information
on the product’s warning queue.
Class Attributes
Attribute
ID
Access
Rule
0
Set
Write
Warning
Command
BYTE
1
Set
Read Number
of Warning
Queue
Entries
BYTE
Name
Data Type
Read
Warning
Queue Entry
Full/All Info
Warning Text
STRUCT of
Warning
Code
Warning Time
Stamp (Time
Stamps not
available in all
products)
WORD
Name
Data Type
Description
Write Warning Command.
1 = Clear Warnings
2 = Clear Warning Queue
3 = Reset Product
Instance Attributes
Attribute
ID
0
Access
Rule
Get
ARRAY of
BYTE
BYTE
1/100 Second (0 – 99).
BYTE
BYTE
Second (0 – 59).
Minute (0 – 59).
BYTE
BYTE
Hour (0 – 23).
BYTE
BYTE
Sunday is a value of zero.
➁
Year is an offset from 1990.
16 character string (no length
information, no terminating
null).
Fault Code.
STRUCT
BYTE
➀
Description
Day of Week (0 – 6).➀
Date (1 – 31).
Month (1 – 12).
Year (0 – 99➁).
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-22
DeviceNet Objects
Attribute
ID
128
Access
Rule
Get
Name
Data Type
Warning
Code and
Time Stamp
(Time Stamps
not available
in all
products)
STRUCT of
Warning
Code
Warning Time
Stamp (Time
Stamps not
available in all
products)
129
Get
Read
Warning Text
String Only
➀
Sunday is a value of zero.
➁
Year is an offset from 1990.
WORD
Description
Fault Code.
STRUCT of
BYTE
1/100 Second (0 – 99).
BYTE
BYTE
Second (0 – 59).
Minute (0 – 59).
BYTE
BYTE
Hour (0 – 23).
BYTE
BYTE
Date (1 – 31).
Month (1 – 12).
BYTE
Year (0 – 99➁).
ARRAY of
BYTE
Day of Week (0 – 6).➀
16 character string (no length
information, no terminating
null).
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x01
Yes
Yes
Set_Attribute_Single
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x99 — SCANport
Pass-Through Link Object
C-23
The SCANport Pass-Through Link Object lets you perform a
scattered read or write of a number of links or a single read or write of
a link.
Class Attributes
Attribute ID
Access Rule
Name
Data Type
Description
0
Set
Link Command
BYTE
1 = Clear all links.
1
Get
NVS Link Diagnostic Value
WORD
Checksum.
Instance Attributes➀
Attribute ID
0
Access Rule
Set
Name
Parameter Link
Data Type
Reference➁
Description
WORD
➀
An instance in this class is the number of a parameter that is to get its value from another parameter.
➁
The Parameter Link Reference value is the number of the parameter whose value is to be transferred.
Common Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x0E
Yes
Yes
Get_Attribute_Single
0x01
Yes
Yes
Set_Attribute_Single
Object-Specific Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
➀
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x32
Yes
No
Scattered_Link_
Reference_Value_Read➀
0x34
Yes
No
Scattered_Link_
Reference_Value_Write➀
Must be directed to Attribute 0, Instance 0.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-24
DeviceNet Objects
The table below lists parameters for Scattered_Link_Reference_Read
and Scattered_Link_Reference_Write object-specific services.
Name
Scattered Link Read/Write
Data Type
Description
STRUCT of
Parameter Number
WORD
Parameter Link Reference to read or write.
Parameter Link Reference
WORD
Link Reference value to write (zero when reading).
Important: The STRUCT may repeat up to 32 times in a single
message.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
DeviceNet Objects
Class Code 0x67 — PCCC Object
C-25
The PCCC Object is used to process encapsulated PCCC messages
from DeviceNet. The PCCC Object does not implement any specific
class or instance attributes, so the instance field for any received
messages is ignored.
Class Attributes
Not supported.
Instance Attributes
Not supported.
Common Services
Not supported.
Object Specific Services
Implemented for:
Service Code
Service Name
Class
Instance
0x4B
No
Yes
Execute_PCCC
0x4D
No
Yes
Execute_Local_PCCC
Message Structure for Execute_PCCC
Request
Data
Type
Name
Length
USINT
Response
Description
Length of requestor ID
Data
Type
Name
Length
USINT
Description
Length of requestor ID
Vendor
UINT
Vendor number of requestor
Vendor
UINT
Vendor number of requestor
Serial Number
UDINT
ASA serial number of requestor
Serial Number
UDINT
ASA serial number of requestor
Other
Product Specific
Identifier of user, task, etc. on the
requestor
Other
Product Specific
Identifier of user, task, etc. on the
requestor
CMD
USINT
Command byte
CMD
USINT
Command byte
STS
USINT
0
STS
USINT
Status byte
TNSW
UINT
Transport word
TNSW
UINT
Transport word. Same value as
the request.
FNC
USINT
Function code. Not used for all
CMD’s.
EXT_STS
USINT
Extended status. Not used for all
CMD’s.
PCCC_params
ARRAY of
USINT
CMD/FNC specific parameters
PCCC_results
ARRAY of
USINT
CMD/FNC specific result data
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
C-26
DeviceNet Objects
Message Structure for Execute_Local_PCCC
Request
Data
Type
Name
Response
Description
Data
Type
Name
Description
CMD
USINT
Command byte
CMD
USINT
Command byte
STS
USINT
0
STS
USINT
Status byte
TNSW
UINT
Transport word
TNSW
UINT
Transport word. Same value as
the request.
FNC
USINT
Function code. Not used for all
CMD’s.
EXT_STS
USINT
Extended status. Not used for all
CMD’s.
PCCC_params
ARRAY of
USINT
CMD/FNC specific parameters
PCCC_results
ARRAY of
USINT
CMD/FNC specific result data
More Information
For more information on PCCC messages, refer to Appendix D,
Supported PCCC Messages.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Appendix
D
Supported PCCC Messages
Appendix Objectives
DF-1/PCCC Support (1203-GU6
Only)
Appendix D describes the PCCC object, which allows existing
PLC-type controllers to connect to the DeviceNet network. In this
appendix, you will learn about the following:
•
DF-1/PCCC support (1203-GU6 only).
•
A list of supported PCCC messages.
The 1203-GU6 translates PCCC messages into SCANport messages
between the SCANport device and the module. To communicate to
the SCANport device, you need:
•
A PC running software that can communicate and translate the
DF-1/PCCC messages supported by the module.
•
A modem that supports full duplex communication (if you’re
connecting the modem to a serial port that utilizes point-to-point
DF-1 full duplex protocol at selected baud rates).
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
D-2
Supported PCCC Messages
Supported PCCC Messages
CMD
The 1203-GU6 and 1336-GM6 support the following PCCC
messages:
FNC
Message Definition
Supported?
0x06
0x03,4,5,0,1
Identify Host and Some Status
Yes
0x0F
0x67
PLC-5 Typed Write
Yes
0x0F
0x68
PLC-5 Typed Read
Yes
Logical ASCII Address
Yes
Logical Binary Address
No
PLC-2 System Address
No
PLC-3 Symbolic Address
No
0x0F
0xA1
SLC-500 Protected Typed Logical Read w/ 2 Address Fields — File, Element
No
0x0F
0xA2
SLC-500 Protected Typed Logical Read w/ 3 Address Fields — File, Element,
Sub-Element
Yes
0x0F
0xA9
SLC-500 Protected Typed Logical Write w/ 2 Address Fields — File, Element
No
0x0F
0xAA
SLC-500 Protected Typed Logical Write w/ 3 Address Fields — File, Element,
Sub-Element
Yes
0x0F
0xAB
SLC-500 Protected Typed Logical Write w/ 4 Address Fields — File, Element,
Sub-Element, Bit Mask
No
0x0F
0x95
Encapsulate Other Protocol message
Yes
Related Documentation
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
For more information on PCCC messages, refer to the DF1 Protocol
and Command Set Reference Manual, publication 1770-6.5.16.
Appendix
E
N-File Addresses
Appendix Objectives
Appendix E provides information on the N-File addresses used when
accessing the PCCC object or the DF-1 serial port. When using
messages, you can use the N-file addresses to locate information
about the adapter or SCANport product.
N-File Addresses
The 1203-GU-6 and 1336-GM6 support the N-file addresses shown
below:
Address
N-File Addresses
N10:0
Number of SCANport product parameters
N10:1 – 999
SCANport product parameters 1 – 999 (value only)
N11:0 – 999
SCANport product parameters 1000 – 1999 (value only)
N12:0 – 999
SCANport product parameters 2000 – 2999 (value only)
N13:0
Number of SCANport adapter parameters
N13:1 – 999
SCANport adapter parameters 1 – 999 (value only)
N30:1 – 999
SCANport product parameters 1 – 999 (all information — read only)
N31:1 – 999
SCANport product parameters 1000 – 1999 (all information — read
only)
N32:1 – 999
SCANport product parameters 2000 – 2999 (all information — read
only)
N33:1 – 999
SCANport adapter parameters 1 – 999 (all information — read only)
N40:0 – 63
Block Transfer Emulation file
N42:5
1203-Gx2 Firmware Emulation Version — The firmware version of the
1203-Gx2 this adapter emulates for DriveTools compatibility.
N42:6
Max Network Node — The maximum DeviceNet Node Number
N42:7
Adapter Port # — The SCANport adapter port number the adapter is
connected to on the SCANport product
N42:8
Reserved for future use — Always zero
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
E-2
N-File Addresses
Address
N-File Addresses
N50:0
Number of SCANport product parameters
N50:1 – 249
SCANport product parameters 1 – 249 (value only)
N51:0 – 249
SCANport product parameters 250 – 499 (value only)
.
.
.
N61:0 – 249
SCANport product parameters 2750 – 2999 (value only)
N90:1 – 249
SCANport product parameters 1 – 249 (value only)
N91:0 – 249
SCANport product parameters 250 – 499 (value only)
.
.
.
N101:0 – 249
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
SCANport product parameters 2750 – 2999 (value only)
Appendix
F
Supported Emulated Block Transfer
Commands
Appendix Objectives
What is Emulated Block Transfer?
Appendix F provides information about the Emulated Block Transfer
commands supported by the DeviceNet adapter. In this appendix, you
will learn about the following:
•
Emulated block transfer commands.
•
Emulated block transfer error response.
•
Setting up the data files for each of the emulated block transfer
commands listed.
•
Examples of each emulated block transfer command listed.
Emulated block transfer is a method used by some SCANport
peripherals to read and write information using PCCC messages.
Some Allen-Bradley DeviceNet products can send PCCC messages.
Other products can send PCCC messages using a DF-1 connection.
This appendix assumes that you have experience using emulated
block transfer commands with SCANport peripherals.
Supported Emulated Block Transfer
Commands
The following table lists the supported emulated block transfer
commands and pages in this appendix where you can find more
information on them.
Command
Page
Parameter Value Read ➀
F-3
Parameter Value Write ➀
F-4
Parameter Read Full ➀
F-5
Product ID Number Read ➀
F-8
Scattered Parameter Read Value
F-10
Scattered Parameter Write Value
F-12
NVS Functions
F-14
Fault Command Write ➀
F-15
Fault Queue Entry Read Full ➀
F-16
Fault Queue Size ➀
F-18
Trip Fault Queue Number ➀
F-19
➀
This function can be accessed in the module and product. The following examples describe
how to access it in the product. To do so in the module, add 16384 to the decimal value of
header word 2.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-2
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Emulated Block Transfer Status
Word
When an operation is unsuccessful, header word 2 of the drive
response contains a negative value (bit 15 = 1).
If an error occurs, the drive also returns a status word to indicate the
reason for the failure. The location of the status word is typically
header word 4 in the drive response, but will depend on the message.
Figure F.1
Example Message Structure and Error Message Reply
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
4
Header 1
Header 2
Data
Header Word 0
Header Word 1
Message Length
Header 1.OR.0x8000
Header Word 0
Header Word 1
Header Word 2
Data Word 3
Header 2
Header Word 2
Error Code
Header Word 3
The following table lists the error codes.
Value
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Description
0
No error occurred.
1
The service failed due to an internal reason, and the drive could not perform the
request.
2
The requested service is not supported.
3
An invalid value in the block transfer emulation request header word 2.
4
An invalid value in the block transfer emulation request header word 3.
5
An invalid value in the block transfer emulation request header word 2.
6
The data value is out of range.
7
There is a drive state conflict. The drive is in an incorrect state to perform the
function. The drive cannot be running when you perform certain functions.
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Parameter Value Read
F-3
Parameter Value Read reads the 16-bit parameter data value for the
selected parameter number.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 1 word
Figure F.2
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
3
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
769
Header Word 1
Parameter Number
(See Drive List)
Header Word 2
Header 0
Header
Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
769=OK –31999=Error
Header
Word 1
Header 2
Header
Word 2
Parameter Value or
Status Word
Data
Word 3
Message Operation
Parameter Value Read reads parameter values from the drive and
places that value (or an error code) in word 3 of the drive response
data file. The value is shown in device units. Device units are listed in
the user manual for the device you are using.
If an error occurs:
•
Word 3 of the response contains the status code.
•
The status area of the data file is non-zero.
Example
In this example, the value of parameter 20 was requested from a 1336
PLUS drive and a value of 4096 was returned. 4096 is the internal
drive unit value for Maximum Rated Voltage. This corresponds to a
value of 100% Drive Rated Volts in Display Units.
Data File Format
0
1
2
PLC request
3
769
20*
Drive response
6
769
20*
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
4069*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-4
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Parameter Value Write
Parameter Value Write writes a 16-bit parameter data value to the
selected parameter number.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 1 word
Drive response instruction length: 4 words
Figure F.3
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
4
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
Header Word 1
–31999
Header
Word 0
Message Length
4
PLC Decimal Value
Header
Word 1
769 — Message OK
–31999 — Message Error
Parameter Number
Data Word 2
Parameter Number
Data
Word 2
Parameter Data
Data Word 3
Status Word
Data
Word 3
Message Operation
Parameter Value Write sends a new value to the specified
parameter. The value must be in device units. Units for each
parameter are listed in the device manual.
If an error has occurred, word 1 of the response returns a value of
–31999, and word 3 contains a status code.
Example
In this example, a value of 4096 was sent to Parameter 20. 4096 is in
drive units and indicates a value of 100% Drive Rated Volts, as
defined in P147, Drive Rated Volts.
Data File Format
0
1
2
3
PLC request
4
–31999
20*
4096*
Drive response
3
769
20*
4
5
6
7
8
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
9
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Parameter Read Full
F-5
Parameter Read Full provides all known attributes for the
parameters requested. This information includes the parameter’s
current value, descriptor, multiply and divide value, base value, offset
value, text string, group element reference, minimum value,
maximum value, default value, and unit text string.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 20 words
Figure F.4
Message Structure
PLC Request
Message Length
3
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
768
Header Word 1
Parameter Number
(See Drive List)
Header Word 2
Message Length
23
PLC Decimal Value
768 — Message OK
–31999 — Message Error
Header
Word 0
Header
Word 1
Parameter Number
Data
Word 2
Parameter Value
or Status Word
Data
Word 3
Descriptor
Data
Word 4
Multiply Value
Data
Word 5
Divide Value
Data
Word 6
Base Value
Data
Word 7
Offset Value
Data
Word 8
Char 2
Char 1
Data
Word 9
Char 4
Char 3
Data
Word 10
Char 6
Char 5
Data
Word 11
Char 8
Char 7
Data
Word 12
Char 10
Char 9
Data
Word 13
Char 12
Char 11
Data
Word 14
Char 14
Char 13
Data
Word 15
Char 16
Char 15
Data
Word 16
Parameter
Text
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-6
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Figure F.4
Message Structure (Continued)
Drive Response
File, Group, Element
Data
Word 17
Minimum Value
Data
Word 18
Maximum Value
Data
Word 19
Default Value
Char 2
Char 1
Char 4
Char 3
Unit Text
Data
Word 20
Data
Word 21
Data
Word 22
Message Operation
Parameter Read Full retrieves the attributes of the specified
parameter. The attributes for each parameter include the data,
minimum and maximum values, and the parameter text. The response
message returns this information.
If an error has occurred in reading any of the values, word 3 contains
the status word.
The parameter text is returned with each data word containing two
ASCII characters per word. The first and second characters are in
opposite order.
Example
In this example, a Parameter Read Full was performed through
block transfer on a 1336 PLUS drive. N10:10 shows the header
message for the request. The data is returned in the response data file,
starting with word 3, for parameter 20. Word 3 shows the present
value in drive units. Word 4 through word 8 provide scaling
information, used to convert drive units to engineering units for the
Human Interface Module (HIM). Word 9 through word 16 provide
the parameter name.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
F-7
This example shows the response message in both binary and ASCII.
Note the ASCII information beginning with word 9. The parameter
name characters return in reverse order for each word. Word 9 has the
ASCII value of (aM). To read this, reverse the word to read (Ma). The
next word (ix), reversed, gives you (xi). These words, along with the
following two words, form the word Maximum. You can see the
parameter name Maximum Voltage in word 9 through word 16 of the
response message. In addition, words 21 – 22 are also returned in this
format. These words provide the units in which the parameter is
defined. In this example it is vlts.
Word 17 contains the file, group, and element which are used to
reference the parameter.
Words 18 – 20 contain the minimum, maximum, and default values of
this parameter.
Data File Format
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
PLC request
3
768
20*
Drive response
23
768
20*
4096*
355*
1*
4096*
460*
0*
24909*
(Decimal)
27000*
30061*
8301*
28502*
29804*
26465*
8293*
1794*
1024*
4915*
4096*
27734*
29556*
Drive response
\00\17
\03\00
\00\14
\10\00
\01 c
\00\01
\10\00
\01\CC
\00\00
aM
(ASCII)
ix
um
m
oV
tl
ga
e
07 02
04 00
\13 0
\10\00
lV
st
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-8
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Product ID Number Read
Product ID Number Read returns the product ID of the device to
which the DeviceNet adapter is connected.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 4 words
Figure F.5
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
3
PLC Decimal Value
256
0
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Header Word 0
Message Length
6
Header
Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
Header
Word 1
Header Word 1
256 — Message OK
–32512 — Message Error
Data Word 2
0
Header
Word 2
Product ID Number
Data
Word 3
Product Code
(Hex)
Product Code
(Decimal)
Bulletin
Number
0x02
2
1336S
1336 PLUS Fractional HP
0x03
3
1336S
1336 PLUS
0x07
7
1336F
1336 PLUS II
0x10
16
1336T
1336 FORCE w/PLC Adapter Board
0x11
17
2364F
2364 RGU DC Bus Regen Front End
0x12
18
1394
1394 Motion Drive
0x13
19
1557
1557 Medium Voltage AC Drive
0x14
20
193
SMP-3
0x15
21
150
SMC Dialog Plus
0x17
23
1305
1305 AC Drive
0x18
24
1397
1397 DC Drive
0x19
25
1336R
1336 Line Regeneration Package
0x20
32
1336T
1336 FORCE w/Standard Adapter Board
0x22
34
1336E
1336 IMPACT
Product
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
F-9
Message Operation
Product ID Number Read, through the drive response message
word 3, indicates the type of device the DeviceNet adapter is
connected to. This value is defined in the message response chart
shown above.
If an error has occurred, word 1 of the response returns a negative
value of –32512.
Example
In this example, the Product ID Number Read was requested. The
drive response contained a value of 3 in word 3 of its message
response, indicating a connection to a 1336 PLUS drive.
Data File Format
0
1
2
PLC request
3
256
0
Drive Response
6
256
0
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-10
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Scattered Parameter Value Read
Scattered Parameter Value Read reads a scattered list of
parameters.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 5 – 63 words
Drive response instruction length: 5 – 63 words
Figure F.6
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
5 – 63
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
3
Header Word 1
Number of Parameter
Values to Read
Header Word 2
Parameter Number
1
Data Word 3
0
Data Word 4
Parameter Number
2
Data Word 5
0
Data Word 6
Parameter Number
3
Data Word 7
0
Data Word 8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Parameter Number
30
Data Word 61
0
Data Word 62
Message Length
5 – 63
Header
Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
3 — Message OK
–32765 — Message Error
Header
Word 1
Number of Parameter
Values to Read
Data
Word 2
bit
15
Parameter Number
1
Parameter Value or
Status Word
1
bit
15
Parameter Number
2
Parameter Value or
Status Word
2
Data
Word 3
Data
Word 4
Data
Word 5
Data
Word 6
Parameter Number
3
Parameter Value or
Status Word
3
Data
Word 7
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Parameter Number
30
Parameter Value or
Status Word
30
Data
Word 61
bit
15
bit
15
Data
Word 8
Data
Word 62
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
F-11
Message Operation
Scattered Parameter Value Read reads a pre-defined group of
parameter values, in any order, from the device. You define the
number of parameters to read in word 2 of the request. The
parameters to be read and their order is defined starting with word 3.
An unused word is left between each parameter request, so the drive
can respond with the parameter value, as shown.
If an error has occurred in reading any of the parameters:
•
Word 1 of the drive response returns a value of –32765.
•
Bit 15 of the drive response word for the number of that
parameter is set.
•
The drive response word for the value of that parameter returns a
status word instead of returning the parameter value.
Example
In this example, eight parameters were read from a 1336 PLUS drive,
as defined in word 2 of the request. Parameter numbers 5, 7, 8, 20, 18,
17, 19, and 36 were requested. The drive response returned the values
of these parameters in the data file. These values are in drive units.
Data File Format
PLC request
Drive response
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
19
3
8*
5*
0
7*
0
8*
0
20*
0
18*
0*
17*
0
19*
0
36*
0
19
3
8*
5*
6*
7*
1000*
8*
1000*
4096*
18*
4096*
17*
51*
19*
60*
36*
6144*
20*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-12
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Scattered Parameter Value Write
Scattered Parameter Value Write writes to a scattered list of
parameters and returns the status of each parameter. If any of the
states have errors, the parameter number is negative.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 5 – 63 words
Drive response instruction length: 5 – 63 words
Figure F.7
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
5 – 63
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
–32765
Header Word 1
Number of Parameter
Values to Write
Parameter Number
1
Parameter Value
1
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Header Word 2
Data Word 3
Message Length
5 – 63
Header
Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
3 — Message OK
–32765 — Message Error
Header
Word 1
Number of Parameter
Values to Write
Data
Word 2
bit
15
Data Word 4
Parameter Number
2
Data Word 5
Parameter Value
2
Data Word 6
Parameter Number
3
Data Word 7
Parameter Value
3
Data Word 8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Parameter Number
30
Data Word 61
Parameter Value
30
Data Word 62
bit
15
Parameter Number
1
Data
Word 3
Status Word 1
Data
Word 4
Parameter Number
2
Data
Word 5
Status Word 2
bit
15
Parameter Number
3
Status Word 3
bit
15
Data
Word 6
Data
Word 7
Data
Word 8
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Parameter Number
30
Status Word 30
Data
Word 61
Data
Word 62
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
F-13
Message Operation
Scattered Parameter Value Write writes data values to a
pre-defined group of device parameters in any order. You define the
number of parameters to write in word 2. The parameters to be
written to and their order is defined starting with word 3.
If an error occurs while writing to any of the parameters:
•
Word 1 of the drive response returns a value of –32765.
•
Bit 15 of the drive response word for that parameter’s number is
set.
•
The drive response word for that parameter’s status word is
non-zero.
If no error has occurred:
•
Word 1 of the drive response returns a value of 3.
•
Each of the drive response’s parameter numbers are the same as
in the request.
•
Each of the drive response status words returns a value of 0.
Example
In this example, six parameters were written to in a 1336 PLUS drive.
Word 2 of the request defines the number of parameter values that are
transferred. Beginning with word 3, the message lists each parameter
number followed by the value of the parameter. The values are
entered in device units.
The drive response returns the status of each parameter write. If the
request was successful, a zero is returned. If an error has occurred, the
response returns a status word code for the error.
Data File Format
PLC request
Drive response
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
15
–32765
6*
90*
1*
150*
4*
30*
20*
31*
10*
10*
2*
12*
5*
15
3
6*
90*
0*
150*
0*
30*
0*
31*
0*
10*
0*
12*
0*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-14
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
NVS Functions
NVS (Non-Volatile Storage) Functions activates the specified NVS
functions.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 4 words
Drive response instruction length: 3 words
Figure F.8
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
4
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
–31998
Header Word 1
0
Header Word 2
NVS Command
Data Word 3
Value
Message Length
3
PLC Decimal Value
770 — Message OK
–31998 — Message Error
Header
Word 0
Header
Word 1
Header
Word 2
0
NVS Command
00
01
02
03
Not Used
NVS Save
NVS Recall
NVS Default Initialize
Message Operation
The NVS storage function allows three different message requests:
•
NVS Save saves parameter information from the working
memory or RAM to NVS Storage.
•
NVS Recall retrieves the last saved data from NVS Storage and
places it in the working memory or RAM.
•
NVS Default Initialize clears the RAM and NVS Storage and sets
all parameter values to default.
If an error has occurred, response word 1 returns a value of -31998.
Example
This example requests the NVS Storage Save function be performed.
Data File Format
0
1
2
3
PLC request
4
–31998
0*
0, 1, 2, or 3
Drive response
3
770
0*
4
5
6
7
8
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
9
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Fault Command Write
F-15
Fault Command Write activates the Clear Fault, Clear Fault Queue,
and Drive Reset functions.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 4 words
Drive response instruction length: 4 words
Figure F.9
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
4
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
–30976
Header Word 1
0
Header Word 2
Fault Command
Data Word 3
Value
Message Length
4
PLC Decimal Value
1792 — Message OK
–30976 — Message Error
Header
Word 0
Header
Word 1
0
Header
Word 2
Status Word
Data
Word 3
Fault Command
00
01
02
03
Not Used
Clear Fault
Clear Fault Queue
Drive Reset (1336 FORCE Only)
Message Operation
The specified fault Clear/Reset function sends a fault handling
request to the device.
•
A Clear Fault request clears the last fault that occurred.
•
A Clear Fault Queue clears the entire fault buffer. Certain devices
may store more than one fault.
•
A Drive Reset is used with the 1336 FORCE drive product only.
This function resets the drive; it clears the fault queue and writes
the parameter information stored in NVS Storage to RAM.
Data File Format
0
1
2
3
PLC request
4
–30976
0
0, 1, 2, or 3
Drive response
4
1792
0
0*
4
5
6
7
8
9
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-16
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Fault Queue Entry Read Full
Fault Queue Entry Read Full reads the contents of the specified
fault queue entry. A message is returned which includes the fault text
and fault code associated with the specified fault queue entry. The
1336 FORCE drive also returns the time stamp associated with the
fault.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 12 or 16 words
Figure F.10
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
3
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
1792
Header Word 1
Fault Queue
Entry Number
Header Word 2
1792 — Message OK
–30976 — Message Error
Fault Text
1336 FORCE
Drive Only
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Message Length
18
PLC Decimal Value
Fault Queue
Entry Number
Header
Word 0
Header
Word 1
Header
Word 2
Char 2
Char 1
Data
Word 3
Char 4
Char 3
Data
Word 4
Char 6
Char 5
Data
Word 5
Char 8
Char 7
Data
Word 6
Char 10
Char 9
Data
Word 7
Char 12
Char 11
Data
Word 8
Char 14
Char 13
Char 16
Char 15
Data
Word 9
Data
Word 10
Fault Code Value
Data
Word 11
SES
REF
Data
Word 12
Hour
Minute
Data
Word 13
Date
Day
Data
Word 14
Year
Month
Data
Word 15
Clock
Time
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
F-17
Message Operation
Fault Queue Entry Read Full reads the contents of the fault queue
specified in word 3 of the request. The response returns the fault text
which can be ASCII text. Every two characters of text are in reverse
order. Also, the 1336 FORCE drive returns a time stamp, indicating
the day and time the fault occurred.
If an error has occurred, word 1 of the response returns a negative
value.
Example
In this example, Fault Queue Entry number 3 was retrieved from a
1336 PLUS drive. The drive response returned the ASCII text Drive
Reset Flt, with each character reversed. The fault code for this
example is 22.
Data File Format
0
1
2
PLC request
3
1792
3*
Drive response
18
1792
8303*
22*
\00\12
\07\00
t
\00\16
Drive response
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
3*
29252*
20313*
8293*
25938*
25971*
8308*
27718*
\03\00
rD
vi
e
eR
es
t
lF
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-18
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Fault Queue Size
Fault Queue Size gets the number of fault entries allowed in the fault
queue.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 4 words
Figure F.11
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
3
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
1793
Message Length
5
Header Word 1
PLC Decimal Value
0
Header Word 2
Header
Word 0
1793 — Message OK
–30975 — Message Error
Header
Word 1
0
Header
Word 2
Fault Queue Size
Data
Word 3
Message Operation
Fault Queue Size reads back the size of the fault queue available in
the product. Each product may have a different number of fault queue
entries available for storage.
If an error has occurred, word 1 of the response returns a value of
-30975.
Example
In this example, a 1336 PLUS drive was used. This product has a fault
queue of four storage locations available to store faults. This value is
seen in word 3 of the response header message.
Data File Format
0
1
2
PLC request
3
1793
0
Drive response
6
1793
0
3
4
5
6
7
8
4*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
9
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
Trip Fault Queue Number
F-19
Trip Fault Queue Number provides the fault queue number of the
fault that caused the device to trip.
PLC Block Transfer Emulation Instruction Data
PLC request instruction length: 3 words
Drive response instruction length: 4 words
Figure F.12
Message Structure
PLC Request
Drive Response
Message Length
3
Header Word 0
PLC Decimal Value
1794
Header Word 1
0
Header Word 2
Header
Word 0
Message Length
4
PLC Decimal Value
Header
Word 1
1794 — Message OK
–30984 — Message Error
0
Header
Word 2
Number of Trip Fault
Header
Word 3
Message Operation
Trip Fault Queue Number provides the number of the entry in the
fault queue that tripped the device in word 3 of the drive response.
The fault queue number is 0 when the device is not faulted.
If an error has occurred in the block transfer, word 1 of the response is
negative.
Example
In this example, the device has stored a fault in the first entry of the
fault queue that caused the drive to trip. Word 3 of the response
indicates the entry number.
Data File Format
0
1
2
PLC request
3
1794
0
Drive response
6
1794
0
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1*
* Example only — These values vary depending on parameters and products.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
F-20
Supported Emulated Block Transfer Commands
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Appendix
G
Event Queue Messages
Appendix Objectives
Appendix G provides information on the messages in the adapter’s
Event Queue. This queue is only available using the DF-1 serial port
on the 1203-GU6 module.
Event Queue Messages
The following table lists the messages you might receive.
Event
Empty Queue
What It Means
Nothing to report.
DeviceNet Reset
A reset to the DeviceNet Identity Object was received.
SP Msg Timeout
The SCANport product did not respond to a message request. Verify the cables are connected.
Noise Corruption
This should never occur. If you see this message, it is most likely the result of external noise.
SCANport Reset
The SCANport product issued a reset command.
Logon Error
An incorrect response was made to the SCANport logon sequence.
No Pings Found
SCANport pings. (Heartbeat messages were not received for more than 2 seconds. Check cables.)
No I/O Messages
SCANport I/O messages were not received for more than 2 seconds. Possible drive problem.
Datalink Missed
Not all datalinks selected have been received in the last 2 seconds.
I/O Port Changed
The SCANport PIN ID has changed. This message is normal after a power cycle.
SCANport Bus-Off
The SCANport CAN connection turn bus-off. Normally caused by too much noise.
Drive Fault Msg
SP PIN ID 7
The drive issued a fault broadcast message.
A SCANport PIN ID of seven indicates that no SCANport product is connected to the adapter.
DN I/O Timeout
An expected packet rate timer expired on a DeviceNet I/O connection.
DN I/O Too Long
A DeviceNet I/O message was longer than the configured length to be received. You may need to
reconfigure the I/O length in the scanner.
Manual Reset
Reset Adapter was set to cause an adapter reset.
Bad I/O Fragment
A DeviceNet I/O fragment was recived out of sequence. Possible line noise problem.
Idle I/O Message
The DeviceNet scanner was placed in the Program mode.
Peer I/O Timeout
A peer I/O message was not received for the time-out period.
Adapter Reset
Bad EEPROM CRC
The adapter microprocessor was reset. Normal after a power cycle.
The adapter parameter storage EEPROM has a corrupt CRC. To correct this, save a new value to one of the
adapter parameters and check that all adapter parameters are at their desired values.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
G-2
Event Queue Messages
This Page Intentionally Left Blank.
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
Index
Numerics
1203-GU6
configuring to communicate with a scanner,
5-1 to 5-25
default settings, 3-1 to 3-2, 4-1 to 4-2
description, 1-2
DF1 statistics, 3-13
editing parameters in, 3-9, 4-3
EDS file, 5-5
event queue, 3-10
firmware, 3-15
flash upgrade, 3-15
function, 1-1
hardware, 1-5
I/O data, 3-12
illustration, 1-5
installation, 2-1
LEDs, 8-1 to 8-4
mapping to DeviceNet network, 5-10
network node address, B-15
parameters, B-15 to B-20
removal, 2-5
resetting, B-17
serial connection to, 3-2
serial number, 3-14
setting up, 1-7
specifications, A-1
troubleshooting, 8-1
1336-GM6
configuring to communicate with a scanner,
5-1 to 5-25
default settings, 4-1 to 4-2
description, 1-2
editing parameters in, 4-3
EDS file, 5-5
function, 1-1
hardware, 1-6
illustration, 1-6
installation, 2-6
LEDs, 8-1 to 8-4
mapping to DeviceNet network, 5-10
network node address, B-15
parameters, B-15 to B-20
removal, 2-9
resetting, B-17
setting up, 1-7
specifications, A-2
troubleshooting, 8-1
A
audience for this manual, P-1
B
baud rate
DeviceNet
parameter, B-15
setting, B-2
serial
parameter, B-17
setting in terminal, 3-8
setting in terminal emulation software, 3-6
block transfer emulation, refer to emulated block
transfer commands
C
cables
DeviceNet
connecting to adapter, 2-3, 2-8
disconnecting from adapter, 2-5, 2-9
selecting, 2-2
SCANport
connecting to module, 2-4
disconnecting from module, 2-5
selecting, 2-2
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
I–2
Index
change of state, B-6
E
communications module, refer to 1203-GU6 or
1336-GM6
EDS files, 5-5
Cyclic, B-7
emulated block transfer commands
fault command write, F-15
fault queue entry read full, F-16
fault queue size, F-18
NVS functions, F-14
parameter read full, F-5
parameter value read, F-3
parameter value write, F-4
product ID number read, F-8
scattered parameter value read, F-10
scattered parameter value write, F-12
trip fault queue number, F-19
D
data rate on DeviceNet, B-2
datalinks
description, B-2
I/O size, 5-8
list of, B-15
using, B-3
DeviceNet
cable, 2-2
definition, P-3
network node addresses, B-1
overview, 1-1
setting data rate, B-2
DeviceNet Manager
configuring a PLC scanner, 5-10
configuring an SLC scanner, 5-17
creating an EDS file for SCANport product, 5-5
editing a module’s parameters, 4-3
using online mode, 5-2
DeviceNet objects, C-1 to C-26
connection, C-6
DeviceNet, C-5
identify, C-2
message router, C-4
parameter, C-10
PCCC, C-25
register, C-8
SCANport pass-through fault queue, C-19
SCANport pass-through link, C-23
SCANport pass-through parameter, C-18
SCANport pass-through warning queue, C-21
DF1 protocol statistics, 3-13
DIN rail
attaching modules, 2-3
specification, A-1
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
electrostatic discharge precautions, 2-7
equipment required, 1-7
configuring a scanner, 5-1
installation
1203-GU6, 2-1
1336-GM6, 2-6
ladder logic programming, 6-1
serial connection, 3-2
event queue, 3-10, G-1
F
fault configurable inputs, B-14
firmware upgrading, 3-15
flash upgrades, 3-15
H
HyperTerminal, 3-3
I
I/O data, 3-12, B-2
installation
of 1203-GU6, 2-1
of 1336-GM6, 2-6
Index
L
ladder logic programs
description, 6-2
example, 6-3 to 6-8
LEDs
DeviceNet, 8-2
location, 8-1
module, 8-2
SCANport, 8-3
M
manual
audience, P-1
contents, P-2
conventions, P-4
purpose, P-1
master-slave communications, B-4
master-slave input configurations, B-21
master-slave output configurations, B-23
messaging
controlling devices with, 7-10
description, 7-1
emulated block transfer, F-1 to F-19
examples, 7-6 to 7-10
explicit
1747-SDN scanner, 7-4
1771-SDN scanner, 7-2
N-file structure, E-1
PCCC, D-1
writing to register object, 7-12
module, refer to 1203-GU6 or 1336-GM6
I–3
O
objects, refer to DeviceNet objects
P
parameters
module
datalinks, B-2
default settings, 3-1 to 3-2
editing, 3-9, 4-3
fault configurable inputs, B-14
list of, B-15 to B-20
viewing on DeviceNet Manager, 4-7
SCANport product
using emulated block transfer commands to
view, F-3 to F-13
viewing in DeviceNet Manager, 4-7
PCCC
messaging, D-1
peer-to-peer communications, B-11
PLC
configuring to communicate with module, 5-10
ladder logic programs, 6-5
polling, B-4
polling and change of state, B-9
polling and Cyclic, B-10
R
removal
of 1203-GU6, 2-5
of 1336-GM6, 2-9
resetting of the module, B-17
N
RSLogix, 6-1
navigation techniques in software, 3-9
network node address, B-1
N-file structure, E-1
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
I–4
Index
S
T
safety precautions, P-3
technical support, P-4
SCANport
cables, 2-2
definition, P-3
peripherals, P-3, 1-4
products, P-3, 1-4
terminal, 3-8
serial connection
cable, 3-2
using a PC running terminal emulation software,
3-3
using a VT100-compatible terminal, 3-8
serial number, 3-14
serial port rate, refer to baud rate
SLC
configuring to communicate with module, 5-17
ladder logic programs, 6-7
specifications, A-1
Publication 1203-5.12 – August 1998
terminal emulation software, 3-3
terms and abbreviations, P-3
troubleshooting, 8-1
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