Fully interactive, wireless, retail video display tag, integrated with

Fully interactive, wireless, retail video display tag, integrated with
US 20130117153Al
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10) Pub. No.: US 2013/0117153 A1
SHEN
(54)
(43) Pub. Date:
FULLY INTERACTIVE, WIRELESS, RETAIL
VIDEO DISPLAY TAG, INTEGRATED WITH
CONTENT DISTRIBUTION, DATA
Publication Classi?cation
(51)
MANAGEMENT, FEEDBACK DATA
COLLECTION, INVENTORY AND PRODUCT
PRICE SEARCH CAPABILITIES
May 9, 2013
(52)
Int- Cl
G06Q 30/00
G06Q 10/08
US. Cl.
USPC
(2012.01)
(2012.01)
.......................................... .. 705/269; 705/28
(71) Applicant: JI SHEN, San Diego, CA (US)
(72) Inventor:
JI SHEN, San Diego, CA (US)
(57)
ABSTRACT
(73) Assignee: Pathway Innovations and
Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA (US)
In the disclosed Video display tag, a processor is Wirelessly
(21) App1.No.: 13/661,540
motion sensor are coupled to the processor. The processor is
(22) Filed:
con?gured to update the display screen in real-time With
information relating to availability and/or character of a select
product. Also included is a transmitter that sends the updated
connected to a remote server. A Video display screen and a
Oct. 26, 2012
Related US. Application Data
(60)
display screen information to remote users. The processor
Provisional application No. 61/555,574, ?led on NoV.
actiVates in response to a signal from the motion detector
4,2011.
indicating that a human being is nearby the system.
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 1 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
101
102
103
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 2 0f 11
201
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 3 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 4 0f 11
402
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
501
May 9, 2013 Sheet 5 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 6 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
601
602
Acces point
or
3G Wireless
Base Station
a f3
@ internet
a
/04
Server
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 7 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 8 0f 11
DUE! EI
(D O N
US 2013/0117153 A1
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 9 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
/' 901
902
Upload to Server
Communication
with Server
903
904
.
.
Receive
RecLeiv/jzlrme
p
Video
Update
/-905
Receive
other
Updates
l
90L
-
‘
Trliacéigg?zctkoanck
99
or
y
e906
Sche?uled
On-Demand
inventory
Snapshot
’
Save Content
in Local Storage
Scheduied
Playback
Motion Sensor
Touch Screen
Playback
Playback
Triggered
Triggered
Server Communication
909
908
910
911
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 10 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
1003
1001
1002
T
-
Product
SKU
Management
.t
ransml
Mgndaeoevnfignt ?pa
9
To
Video Tags
l
1005
1O%\\
1007
Product
Central
prlce
Server
Management
Management
“1006
Receive
<——-——
Events
from Video Tag
Product
\
Video
Management
Receive
Video from
10%
Other-product
\
Video Tag
Information
Management
Communicate wih
inventory Management
Systems
1009
* Management functions include upload,
update, edit, delete, search, and view.
FIG.1O
1010
Patent Application Publication
May 9, 2013 Sheet 11 0f 11
US 2013/0117153 A1
1101
1103
1104
Power
Manegement
1102
Antenna
Camera
\
|
l
Touch
Pane'
Controller
RFIC
Camera
Interface
1106
1105
/ BUS
1108
1110
1107
CPU
LCD
Display
DDR
RAM
Solid State Disk
or
Flash Memory
May 9, 2013
US 2013/0117153 A1
FULLY INTERACTIVE, WIRELESS, RETAIL
Traditionally, such information is virtually impossible to
VIDEO DISPLAY TAG, INTEGRATED WITH
CONTENT DISTRIBUTION, DATA
MANAGEMENT, FEEDBACK DATA
COLLECTION, INVENTORY AND PRODUCT
PRICE SEARCH CAPABILITIES
access outside of large retailer’s proprietary and closed inter
nal information systems.
[0001]
The present application is a non-provisional appli
cation of US. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/555,
574, ?led Nov. 4, 2011, the entirety of the contents of Which
are hereby incorporated by reference.
FIELD Retail display tools, video kiosk, interactive
SUMMARY
[0008]
Disclosed is a video display tag that includes a pro
cessor that is Wirelessly connected to a remote server. A video
display screen and a motion sensor are coupled to the proces
sor. The processor is con?gured to update the display screen
in real-time With information relating to availability and/or
character of a select product. Also included is a transmitter
that sends the updated display screen information to remote
users. The processor activates in response to a signal from the
kiosk, digital media player, personal mobile
computing devices.
motion detector indicating that a human being is nearby the
BACKGROUND
includes a display monitor and a publicly accessible server
system.
[0009]
[0002]
A traditional retail display tool is primarily the
paper price tag. HoWever, What can be displayed on a price tag
is limited; not much more than the price, product name, and a
bar code are possible. Shelf space is limited. Products don’t
just sell by sitting on a shelf. Signage and attention getters
increase sales. A solution is hard to come by and expensive.
FIG. 1 shoWs three examples of typical display tags 101, 102
and 103.
In another embodiment a video display tag system
coupled to the display monitor. The publicly accessible server
is con?gured to display updated product information in real
time on the display monitor as product information changes.
The publicly available server is further con?gured to transmit
the updated product information to remote users.
[0010]
A bar code reader can be attached to any of the
embodiments. The processor Would display information
relating to a scanned bar code in response to the bar code’s
detection by the bar code reader. In other circumstances the
[0003] Electronic price tags have emerged. They are mostly
processor Would provide product information upon receipt of
small gray scale LCD displays similar to the panels used in a
a stock keeping unit (SKU) number by a remote user.
Wristwatch. They display no more than the price, product
[0011] A method of providing up-to-date product informa
name, and a bar code. FIG. 2 shoWs an example of a typical
tion to a user Would include selecting a product and display
electronic price tag 201.
[0004] Video presentation of product data, similar to an
infomercial, advertising clips, user’s manual, endorsements,
demonstrations, and user testimonials, all can signi?cantly
improve sales by supplying su?icient information to potential
ing a video relating to the product and the product’s availabil
ity. Availability includes information such as hoW to use the
product, ease of assembly or use, availability Within a store’s
inventory, availability at other stores, user comments and
feedback about the product, suggested companion products.
consumer buyers. HoWever, traditionally, such a rich set of
information is not possible to present at retail shelves Where
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE
ACCOMPANYING DRAWINGS
the product is physically present.
[0005]
Furthermore, consumer feedback of products, reac
tions to certain ad or demonstration, has been dif?cult to
collect, even though they are highly valuable to manufactur
ers and retailers. Fully interactive kiosks exist often With the
form factor of a small photo booth standing on the ?oor. They
present a rich and interactive experience. But they are too big
and too expensive, Which makes them only suitable for shoW
casing expensive products or being used as information
booth.
[0006] The advent of Wireless personal computing devices
has reached a critical threshold, Where poWerful computing
devices capable of processing general operating system tasks
[0012] FIG. 1 is a traditional retail price tag;
[0013] FIG. 2 is an existing electronic price tag;
[0014] FIG. 3 is a single Video Tag Device;
[0015] FIG. 4 is an embodiment of possible mounting appa
ratus for the Video Tag Device;
[0016] FIG. 5 is an alternative mounting apparatus for the
Video Tag Device;
[0017]
FIG. 6 is a Wireless Communication NetWork Dia
gram Linking the Video Tag Devices and the Server System;
[0018]
FIG. 7 is a consumer vieWing and interacting With
the video tag device;
[0019]
FIG. 8 is a consumer doWnloading content onto
as full motion video playback, have become highly affordable
for mass consumption. Consumers have seen highly poWerful
mobile device and vieW the content later;
[0020] FIG. 9 is a softWare logical diagram for the device;
[0021] FIG. 10 is a server softWare logical diagram for the
mobile phones running embedded Linux OS in beloW $40
device; and
price range. It is desirable to put a miniaturized Wireless
computer in front of every product on a retail shelf to fully
[0022]
such as ?le management and user interface functions as Well
shoWcase the product to achieve its sales potential.
[0007] From another perspective, consumers not only need
suf?cient, easy to understand information, and clear demon
stration of a product, they also Want to conveniently search
and ?nd out Which retailer is carrying a product at any given
time and Whether the product is on the shelf, by using a Web
broWser from home PCs, mobile phones, or tablet computers.
FIG. 11 is an electronic Circuit Logical Diagram.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
[0023] The present system places a Wireless mobile com
puting device in place of a price tag on retail shelves, poten
tially for every product/SKU. It is connected With an open
back of?ce management system Wirelessly to have continu
ous content updated, collected and transmitted to and from
customers.
May 9, 2013
US 2013/0117153 A1
[0024]
The present system has a form factor that is slightly
bigger or thicker than a typical credit card and it can be
securely mounted on retail shelves and near end caps. It can
play full motion video or it can present a slideshoW of images.
As such, it can display pricing and product information elec
tronically.
[0025]
The system has markings, such as a barcode, a serial
number, radio frequency integrated circuit (RFIC) or 3G
Wireless integrated circuit, Wireless pairing ID’ s, etc. so that a
customer can identify the device and the corresponding prod
uct that is displayed on the video screen using a customer
handheld bar code scanner or RFID scanner. On the other
hand, the system has a barcode scanner, credit card reader,
cash receptacle and other means of reading and accepting
payment information from the customer. Advantageously, a
customer can then buy a product right at the video display tag
system.
[0026]
The present system has internal storage of video or
image ?les for playback. Motion sensors trigger playback of
video When a customer is present, and lack of motion causes
the system to go to “sleep” When no one is present.
[0027]
Embodiments of the system enable Wireless receipt
and transmission of content from a server system. The content
can be something that is locally collected such as shopper’s
habits, the number of times a display tag is passed and/or
activated, and information relating to a product. Also, the
product supplier Who has access to the server or by the cus
tomer (if alloWed by a system administrator). Things such as
pricing, product description, neW product versions, etc. are
updatable through the back o?ice. As such, information is
stored on the server, pricing, product description information,
pricing and other product presentation content are available in
open and searchable format.
[0032] The back of?ce server also enables management of
the collection, storage, distribution and presentation of user
feedback statistics. As discussed above, feedback is likely
collected through the local device via user text input, facial
recognition, etc. Actual consumer comments are likely col
lected via Web broWsers.
[0033] An alternative embodiment of the system is one in
Which an ultra-loW cost disposable display, such as an MP4
player or other recyclable device, is included in product pack
aging. For example, a home theatre or stereo system Would
include the disclosed device rather than a paper instruction
manual. The device can be triggered by touch, light or a
sWitch and con?gured With a tutorial video to help a customer
set up a productiin this example, the stereo. It can even be
con?gured With voice recognition that can trigger a “fre
quently asked questions” menu. Similar to above, using facial
recognition techniques, the disposable system can have a
camera that captures the facial expressions of a user in order
to determine Whether to offer help to a visibly perplexed
system can have a front facing camera that can capture a
customer.
customer’s visual reactions to a product. A gesture recogni
tion lookup table can be coupled to the system that can pro
vide an image or response to the userbased on and in response
[0034] Preferably, the disposable system Will be mailed
back to the product supplier for further use in other product
packaging. Alternatively, the disposable system can be pro
to the facial expressions of the customer. This includes being
able to recogniZe When a customer’s facial reaction is positive
vided to a store to use as a video display tag as explained
above. The store can even offer a deposit similar to returned
or negative via facial pattern recognition techniques.
aluminum cans.
[0028] The system can have a fully interactive user inter
face, With buttons and touchable screens that Will alloW a user
to complete many functions such as looking up information
on a product, transmission of product information to a smart
[0035] With reference to the ?gures, FIG. 3 is a depiction of
an embodiment of a video display tag system 301 including a
sliding video display screen 302. The screen is con?gured to
Buttons (mechanical, touch screen or other ?nger operated
engage With a shelf via a sliding tab on the back of the screen
302. Thus, store clerks can quickly change the screen if nec
essary. FIG. 4 shoWs a more permanent display screen 401
phone and programming With particular product information.
inputs) can capture consumer survey feedback on the spot,
that is tacked to a shelf at its rear side 402 via screWs or some
right at the video display tag.
other type of fastener. FIG. 5 shoWs a rack video display tag
[0029]
“back facing camera,” i.e. the system has a camera that can
501 that can be attached to a clothes rack and elevated via a
post to average eye level to catch a customer’s attention.
capture images of What’ s being displayed on the shelf behind
the display tag. This back facing camera can help visually
the intemet via a 3G Wireless base station as shoWn in FIG. 6
When positioned on the shelf, the system has a
[0036]
Communication to the “back of?ce” is done through
recogniZe the approximate number and quality of inventory
(this system is not limited to 3G; any other mobile telecom
on a merchant’s shelf. The advantage to this is that a person
Who is on the Way to a store to pick up an item can get visual
munications technology generation is available). The display
veri?cation via smartphone or some other personal data assis
tant of the inventory left in the store.
[0030] Through a Web address or phone number speci?c to
the display tag, a remote user can connect to the display tag.
Connectivity alloWs consumers to doWnload video and other
product information onto their mobile devices, such as an
iPhone or an Android phone, for later vieWing or record
tags are con?gured to send and receive signals 601 to and
from the 3G Wireless base station 602 through the intemet
603 . A server 604 at the back of?ce collects and transmits data
to be used on the display tag for display to a customer. As
shoWn in FIG. 7, a customer Would be able to vieW an update
701 to the video display tag as it occurs. There is no need to
shut doWn the tag to update the displayed information.
[0037]
If a customer is interested in vieWing information
keeping. Connectivity also alloWs consumers to easily share
about a product at a later period, the customer can doWnload
the video content and URL Web links to products via various
the information from the video display tag to a personal data
assistant or a smart phone for vieWing later. As shoWn in FIG.
8, a request can be made to the video display tag 801 to send
communication means such as email, direct Wireless trans
mission, etc.
[0031] The “back of?ce” can be another name for a store
o?ice, control room or simply a remote or local server. The
video information 802 about a product to a smartphone 803.
server manages the storage, distribution and update of video
information at home including information that can be found
on various internet sources about the product in general as
Well as information about a particular unit on the shelf includ
or image content onto respective display devices matching
various products. This update can be done by the store, by the
The smartphone holding customer then can revieW product
May 9, 2013
US 2013/0117153 A1
ing Whether the product Was previously bought and returned
to the store by another customer.
[0038]
A method for maintaining an updated video display
tag and back room server is shoWn in FIG. 9. A snapshot of
inventory units is taken at step 906 and sent to a server in steps
901 and 902. The server can then update the video display tag
display tag With an RFID. The portable video display tag can
be programmed With the holder’s personal information such
as likes, dislikes, mobile phone number, etc. It can be pro
grammed to provide different levels of access to other users.
For example, general bar patrons can be alloWed access to
likes and dislikes, but the tag holder Would have to grant
With price, video or other updates at steps 903, 904 and/or
access to a person Who desires a telephone number or email
905. The video display tag has a local memory means such as
a non-volatile hard drive on Which the original inventory
content as Well as updates canbe stored. Storing occurs at step
907. At data collection step 908, a customer’s facial features
are determined. If a particular facial contortion is discovered,
one of various videos is selected for playback based on the
facial contortion and played to a customer. Such a facial
contortion is communicated to the back room server and
stored therein. Alternatively, a video is played back in accor
address.
dance With a predetermined schedule at step 909. In steps 910
and 911, respectively, a video is played in response to a
motion sensor or in response to a touch screen request.
[0039] FIG. 10 shoWs a product price management dia
gram. Product SKU 1001, price 1004, related video 1007, and
[0044]
Also, rather than have a portable display tag given to
a user, a singles’ bar patron can have a personal tag. In this
Way, before getting to a venue, the tag holder can connect With
cameras at the venue to determine hoW many people are
already there. If that person Wants to advertise his or her
arrival at the venue, he or she can send a general message to
all of the patrons currently at the bar With an attached picture
or video of himself as Well as personal statistical information.
[0045] With further reference to a video display tag used in
a shopping center, a portable “shopping assistant” is possible.
The portable shopping assistant Would be installed on shop
ping carts or handed to a shopper at the entrance to a store. As
a result, the shopper can have video pushed to the portable
other product information 1008 are all managed via a central
shopping assistant When he or she gets close to a shelved
server 1005. A separate inventory management system 1009
video display tag. The shelved tag Would emit a signal once it
communicates With the central server 1005. The central
server receives video 1010 and events 1006 from the video
is triggered by an RFID of the shopper’s portable shopping
display tag. Such events include number of requests for infor
mation, customer’s facial expressions, etc. The central server
1005 updates a video tag management server 1002 and in
return can be updated by the video tag management server
1002. The transmission 1003 occurs via Wireless intemet or
any other form of electronic communication.
[0040] As shoWn in FIG. 11, the circuitry for the video
display tag includes a poWer management component 1103, a
touch panel 1104, RFID 1105 and antenna 1101, a camera
assistant.
[0046] Those skilled in the art Will appreciate from the
foregoing description that the broad techniques of the
embodiments of the present invention can be implemented in
a variety of forms. Therefore, While the embodiments of this
invention have been described in connection With particular
examples thereof, the true scope of the embodiments of the
invention should not be so limited since other modi?cations
Will become apparent to the skilled practitioner upon a study
of the draWings, speci?cation, and folloWing claims.
interface 1106 and a camera 1102, an LCD display 1107, a
I claim:
processor 1108, memory 1109 and storage means 1110. The
term “coupled” may be used herein to refer to any type of
a processor Wirelessly connected to a remote server,
relationship, direct or indirect, betWeen the components in
question, and may apply to electrical, mechanical, ?uid, opti
cal, electromagnetic, electromechanical or other connections.
In addition, the terms “?rst,” “second,” etc. might be used
herein only to facilitate discussion, and carry no particular
temporal or chronological signi?cance unless otherWise indi
cated.
[0041] The technology disclosed in this document can
expand to use in other applications. For example, it is envi
1. A video display tag comprising:
a video display screen coupled to the processor, and
a motion sensor coupled to the processor con?gured to
activate the display screen upon sensing motion Within a
prede?ned distance of the video display tag,
Wherein the processor is con?gured to update the display
screen in real-time With information relating to instan
taneous characteristic of a product purported to be in a
merchant’s inventory.
2. The video display tag as recited in claim 1 further com
sioned that a restaurant table top can include a video display
prising a transmitter for sending the updated display screen
on Which menus Would be displayed. Cameras positioned in
the table or someWhere nearby could capture a diner’s
response to food suggestions. Thus, rather than having a
information to remote users.
Waiter or Waitress on staff to take a person’s order, a diner can
simply order at the table directly to a kitchen or single Wait
staff. As diners often have special requests such as removing
onions from a hamburger, the video display tag system can be
con?gured to ansWer questions about food specials, menu
items, etc.
[0042] Also, if video display tags can be placed in a restau
3. The video display tag as recited in claim 1 Wherein the
processor is con?gured to activate in response to a signal from
the motion detector indicating that a human being is nearby
the system.
4. The video display tag as recited in claim 1 further com
prising a camera directed at a product in a predetermined
radius of the video display tag to provide actual product
availability to a user.
rant’ s kitchen so that diners can see hoW clean a kitchen is and
5. The video display tag as recited in claim 4 Wherein the
remote servers is coupled to a plurality of video display
the cooking habits used by the chefs. Often a diner Will
screens.
comment on hoW they have to be nice to the Wait staff or the
Wait staff Will tamper With the food. Kitchen cameras that
6. The video display tag as recited in claim 5 Wherein the
processor is con?gured to provide a plurality of locations to a
remote user, each location having a like product respective to
send images to dining tables can help eliminate this problem.
[0043] Another alternative use Would be in singles’ bars.
Each person at a singles’ bar Would be given a portable video
every other location, the plurality of locations provided to the
user sorted nearest to farthest from the user.
May 9, 2013
US 2013/0117153 A1
7. The video display tag as recited in claim 1, Wherein the
instantaneous characteristic is selected from the group con
sisting of an amount of product in stock, quality of remaining
product units, price of product, future price discounts and
equivalent product alternatives.
8. A video display tag system comprising:
a display monitor; and
a publicly accessible server coupled to the display monitor;
Wherein the publicly accessible server is con?gured to
display updated product information in real-time on the
display monitor as product information changes.
9. The video display tag system as recited in claim 8
Wherein the publicly available server is further con?gured to
transmit the updated product information to remote users.
10. The video display tag system as recited in claim 8
further comprising a motion detector coupled to the proces
sor, Wherein the processor is con?gured to activate in
response to a signal from the motion detector indicating that
a human being is nearby the system.
11. The video display tag system as recited in claim 8
further comprising a bar code reader.
12. The video display tag system as recited in claim 11
Wherein the processor is con?gured to display information
relating to a scanned bar code in response to the bar code’s
detecting by the bar code reader.
13. The video display tag system as recited in claim 8
Wherein the processor is con?gured to provide product infor
mation upon receipt of a stock keeping unit (SKU) number by
a remote user.
14. The video display tag system as recited in claim 8
Wherein the product information is selected from the group
consisting of an amount of product in stock, quality of
remaining product units, price of product, future price dis
counts and equivalent product alternatives.
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