H1N1 Vaccination Program FAQs PROVIDER SITE

H1N1 Vaccination Program FAQs PROVIDER SITE
New Jersey Dept. of Health and Senior Services
H1N1 Vaccination Program FAQs
PROVIDER SITE
Date: Sept. 17, 2009
Time: 9:30 AM
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
H1N1 Vaccine System: NJDHSS’s H1N1 vaccine data tracking system which resides in
and uses the format of the New Jersey Immunization Information System (NJIIS), the
state’s immunization registry.
Provider: any entity that will receive vaccine and/or administer vaccinations; providers
include hospitals, FQHCs, local health departments, LINCS agencies, pharmacies,
pharmacists, physicians, and employee health services.
Provider site: physical location where vaccine will be received and/or administered.
Provider type: individual authorized to bind a provider site to receive vaccines and/or
administer vaccinations; provider types can only be licensed physicians, advanced
practice nurses, pharmacies, and pharmacists.
User: any authorized individual associated with a provider site who will or has access to
the H1N1 Vaccine System in order to administer vaccine-related information (e.g., dosesadministered reports, vaccine inventory data); examples of users include physician office
managers, data entry clerks, and health care professionals.
BECOMING A PROVIDER
1. How does a New Jersey provider site register to receive the H1N1 vaccine?
It is required that all providers interested in receiving a direct shipment or being a
“vaccinator only” site must register online at the H1N1 Vaccine System at
http://nj.gov/health/flu/h1n1.shtml. Once there, look to the left side of the
webpage and click on “H1N1 Vaccine Provider Agreement.”
2. Can I fax or send a paper copy to register?
No. Paper copies will not be accepted. Providers must register electronically
online at http://nj.gov/health/flu/h1n1.shtml. Once there, look to the left side of
the webpage and click on “H1N1 Vaccine Provider Agreement.”
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3. Must I have a valid email address?
Yes, an email address must be provided in order to receive a confirmation of your
enrollment and the status of your enrollment application. There will be
information in the email that you will need to receive Webinar training on the
H1N1 Vaccine System for use during the H1N1 influenza season.
4.
Will I get an account number or provider identification number (PIN)?
Yes, once a provider is registered, he or she will be assigned a PIN that will be
needed to electronically order vaccine, electronically record the vaccines that you
administer and electronically record the temperatures of the refrigerator in which
the H1N1 vaccine is stored.
5. How do commercial facilities or providers request vaccines?
Any facility interested in receiving the H1N1 vaccine must register as a provider.
(Refer to question #1 for the enrollment website.)
6. Do individual provider sites need to register if they are not a “ship-to” site but
will be receiving vaccine from a parent company?
Yes, all provider sites, whether direct “ship-to” or “vaccination only” site, must
register to receive the vaccines. That is one of the ways that the State will be able
to monitor the vaccine administered and transferred from one location to another.
Individual staff within those sites do not need to register. Only one individual at
the site is required to register in order to serve as the point of contact for the
NJDHSS and LHD. If you have further questions regarding this, your parent
company should contact the NJ Immunization Program at 609-588-7512 for more
guidance.
7. I am with a local health department or LINCS agency. Who is eligible to
complete and sign the Provider Agreement?
To be eligible to complete and sign the Provider Agreement, an individual must
have a current license as a D.O., M.D., Advanced Practice Nurse, Pharmacist, or
Pharmacy in order to legally bind the terms of the Provider Agreement. In the
H1N1 Vaccine System, this individual is identified in the “Provider Type”
section.
A registered site can designate up to three individuals who will have the ability to
order vaccine. An indefinite number of individuals can serve as data entry
personnel, responsible for entering data on the doses of vaccine administered.
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Criteria for Approving Submitted Application as H1N1 Sites
Combination Ship-to & Vaccinator Site:
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Provider must be licensed or certified to vaccinate in New Jersey.
Provider address must be a business not a home address or PO Box.
Telephone number must be an office number not a cell or mobile #.
Must have internet access.
Provider must have a computer or laptop from which to order vaccine,
record vaccine accountability and refrigerator temperatures where the H1N1
vaccine is stored.
Each person that will administer vaccine must register as a user of the H1N1
Vaccine System.
Refrigerator must be a single-door household size (13 cu. ft) or larger no
dorm-style or bar-style refrigerators permitted.
Refrigerator must maintain a consistent temperature between 35 degrees –
46 degrees.
Thermometer to record temperatures should be housed in the unit in which
the H1N1 vaccine will be stored.
Ship-to only Site:
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Refrigerator must be a single-door household size (13 cu. ft) or larger.
Refrigerator must maintain a consistent temperature between 35 degrees –
46 degrees.
Thermometer to record temperatures should be housed in the unit in which
the H1N1 vaccine will be stored.
Must have internet access.
Provider must have a computer or laptop from which to order vaccine,
record vaccine inventory and refrigerator temperatures where the H1N1
vaccine is stored.
Provider address must be a business not a home address or PO Box suitable
to accept delivery of large shipments of vaccine for distribution to
vaccinator-only sites.
Telephone number must be an office number not a cell or mobile #.
Vaccinator –Only Site
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Provider must be licensed or certified to vaccinate in New Jersey.
Provider address must be a business not a home address or PO Box.
Telephone number must be an office number not a cell or mobile #.
Must have internet access.
Provide must have a computer or laptop from which to order vaccine, record
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vaccine accountability and refrigerator temperatures where the H1N1
vaccine is stored.
Each person that will administer vaccine must register as a user on H1N1
Vaccine System.
Refrigerator must be a single-door household size (13 cu. ft) or larger, no
dorm-style or bar-style refrigerators permitted.
Refrigerator must maintain a consistent temperature between 35 degrees –
46 degrees.
Thermometer to record temperatures should be housed in the unit in which
the H1N1 vaccine will be stored.
New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS)
H1N1 Vaccine System Provider Registration in Brief: Health Care Providers
The following information briefly outlines the NJDHSS H1N1 Vaccine System
registration processes for health care providers (e.g., physicians, pharmacists, advanced
practice nurses).
Step 1 – Provider Site Registration
Providers need to register their office or facility as a site for administering H1N1
vaccines. Eligible providers include physicians, pharmacies, hospitals, employee health
programs, local health departments and federally qualified health centers. If you have
more than one office/location, you will need to register each location separately. In order
to register as a provider site, you will need to provide a valid license number for one of
the following license types – medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, advanced practice
nurse, pharmacist or pharmacy.
Once you register in the H1N1 Vaccine System, your information will be approved by
the appropriate LINCS agency and/or local health department. Once approved and then
verified by NJDHSS, you will receive an email with your PIN and a security access code.
If you enroll during September 17 to 25, 2009, you should receive your PIN and security
access code no later than the first week of October 2009. If you are not approved, you
will receive an email notification, and you can contact the LINCS agency in your
jurisdiction to get further information.
You can be approved as a ship-to site, where the vaccine will be delivered to your
location, or as a vaccinator only site, where you will need to pick up the vaccine from a
designated site in your jurisdiction such as a local health department or LINCS agency.
Important –
• Please provide a valid email address in the provider registration process as all
communication is via email.
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•
Current New Jersey Immunization Information System (NJIIS) providers need to
register for participation in the H1N1 Vaccine System.
Step 2 – User Registration
After you receive your PIN and security access code, you can enroll yourself and
additional members of your staff as users of the H1N1 Vaccine System. All users will
have the ability to track H1N1 vaccine inventory, complete temperature logs, and update
administered doses for each person you vaccinate. In addition, ship-to site users will have
the ability to order vaccine online through the H1N1 Vaccine System.
The email with your PIN and security access code will also include information on online
training available through a webinar and/or self-training through a user manual.
Attending the one-hour webinar is highly encouraged as it includes a Q &A session.
Training sessions are scheduled from September 28 to October 9, 2009.
Step 3 – Vaccine Order (Only for Ship-to Sites)
After completing the previous two steps, i.e., registering your facility and creating your
user account, as soon as NJDHSS is given permission to submit orders (NJDHSS will
send out a notification), you can start ordering H1N1 vaccines by clicking on the “Order
Vaccine” tab. Vaccine ordering privileges will be restricted to three users per registered
ship-to site. As mentioned above, training is available to help you with your ordering
process.
Note: vaccinator only sites will have to place their vaccine orders through the designated
ship-to sites in their jurisdiction such as the LINCS agency or local health department.
Step 4 – Record Patient Vaccination
Use your user name and password (created in Step 2) to access data entry screens for
reporting patient information. If the patient already exists in NJIIS, the state’s
immunization registry, you will only need to update the H1N1 dose; otherwise you will
enter the patient’s name, address and date of birth to complete the record. You will not
be able to order additional vaccine doses if you do not account for the doses already
shipped to you. Any registered user from your facility can enter patient vaccination
information.
Current NJIIS users will also be able to document H1N1 vaccines through NJIIS screens.
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New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS)
H1N1 Vaccine System Provider Registration in Brief:
LINCS Agencies and Local Health Departments (LHDs)
The following information briefly outlines the NJDHSS H1N1 Vaccine System
registration processes for LINCS agencies and LHDs.
Step 1 – Provider Registration and Approval
All LINCS agencies and local health departments need to register in the H1N1 Vaccine
System if they want to be provider sites for administering H1N1 vaccines. You will
receive your approval email from NJDHSS after registration in the H1N1 Vaccine
System. In order to register as a provider site, you will need to provide a valid license
number for one of the following license types – medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy,
advanced practice nurse, pharmacist or pharmacy.
In addition, two LINCS agency staff will be assigned H1N1 Vaccine System
administrative privileges to “approve” ship-to or vaccinator only sites within their
jurisdiction (“LINCS H1N1 Vaccine System administrators”). One person per local
health department will be assigned H1N1 Vaccine System privileges to view the list of
providers enrolling in their county in order to help the LINCS agencies in the approval
process. Ship-to sites will receive vaccine shipments at the address indicated in their
registration information, while vaccinator only sites will be asked to pick up their vaccine
orders from a designated site such as the LINCS agency or local health department. As
you have a limited number of ship-to sites in your jurisdiction, please use your judgment
in allocating them; NJDHSS has provided some guidance for your consideration as you
review provider registration information.
Providers will be able to register in the H1N1 Vaccine System during September 17 to
25, 2009. As the LINCS agency, you are requested to work with local health departments
in your jurisdiction and to approve providers as ship-to sites, where vaccine will be
delivered to these locations, or as vaccinator only sites, where these sites will need to
pick up vaccines from a designated ship-to site such as the local health department or
LINCS agency. You will need to check off a flag on the H1N1 Vaccine System approval
screen to designate ship-to sites. You will be able to start approving providers starting
Wednesday September 23, 2009, and should finalize your approvals no later than October
2, 2009.
Once you approve a site, NJDHSS will verify eligibility and send out an email to the
approved providers with their PIN, security access code and training information.
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Providers that are not LINCS-approved will be sent an email informing them that their
applications have not been approved and that they can contact the designated LINCS
H1N1 Vaccine System administrators for further information. The email address of the
LINCS H1N1 Vaccine administrators will be included in the email.
Step 2 – User Registration
After you receive your PIN and security access code, you can enroll yourself and
additional members of your staff as users of the H1N1 Vaccine System. Users will have
the ability to order vaccine, track vaccine inventory, complete temperature logs, and
update administered doses by inputting the information for each person you vaccinate.
The email with your PIN and security access code will also include information on online
training available through a webinar and/or self training through a user manual.
Attending the one-hour webinar is highly encouraged as it includes a Q &A session.
Training sessions to help you through the approval process will be provided on
September 24 and 25, 2009, through the New Jersey Learning Management Network
(NJLMN).
Step 3 – Vaccine Order
After completing the previous steps, i.e., registering your facility, creating your user ID,
and attending the training, you can start ordering the H1N1 vaccines by clicking on the
“Order Vaccine” tab as soon as NJDHSS is given permission to submit orders (NJDHSS
will send out a notification). As a LINCS agency or LHD, you can also order vaccine for
other vaccinator only sites. Only three users per registered facility can be assigned
vaccine ordering privileges.
Step 4 – Record Patient Vaccination
Use your user name and password to access data entry screens for reporting patient
vaccination information. If the patient already exists in the New Jersey Immunization
Information System, the state’s immunization registry, you will only need to update the
H1N1 dose; otherwise you will enter the patient’s name, address and date of birth to
complete the record. You will not be able to order additional vaccine doses if you do not
account for the ones already shipped to you. Any registered user in your organization can
enter patient vaccination information.
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New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS)
H1N1 Vaccine System Provider Registration in Brief:
Hospitals and Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs)
The following information briefly outlines the NJDHSS H1N1 Vaccine System
registration processes for hospitals and FQHCs.
Step 1 – Provider Site Registration
Hospitals and FQHCs need to register in the H1N1 Vaccine System if they want to be
provider sites for administering H1N1 vaccines. If you have more than one location, you
will need to register each location separately. In order to register as a provider site, you
will need to provide a valid license number for one of the following license types –
medical doctor, doctor of osteopathy, advanced practice nurse, pharmacist or pharmacy.
Once you register in the H1N1 Vaccine System, your information will be approved and
verified by NJDHSS. Once approved and verified, you will receive an email with your
PIN and a security access code. If you enroll during September 17 to 25, 2009, you
should receive your PIN and security access code no later than the first week of October
2009.
Important –
• Please provide a valid email address in the provider registration process as all
communication is via email.
• Current New Jersey Immunization Information System (NJIIS) providers need to
register for participation in the H1N1 Vaccine System.
Step 2 – User Registration
After you receive your PIN and security access code, you can enroll yourself and
additional members of your staff as users of the H1N1 Vaccine System. All users will
have the ability to track H1N1 vaccine inventory, complete temperature logs, and update
administered doses for each person you vaccinate. In addition, you will have the ability to
order vaccine online through the H1N1 Vaccine System.
The email with your PIN and security access code will also include information on online
training available through a webinar and/or self-training through a user manual.
Attending the one-hour webinar is highly encouraged as it includes a Q &A session.
Training to help you through the approval process will be provided on September 24 and
25, 2009, through the New Jersey Learning Management Network (NJLMN). If you are
unable to make these early sessions (which target hospitals, FQHCs, LINCS agencies and
local health departments), you can attend additional training sessions available to general
health care providers, scheduled from September 28 to October 9, 2009.
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Step 3 – Vaccine Order
After completing the previous two steps, i.e., registering your facility and creating your
user account, as soon as NJDHSS is given permission to submit orders (NJDHSS will
send out a notification), you can start ordering H1N1 vaccines by clicking on the “Order
Vaccine” tab. Vaccine ordering privileges will be restricted to three users per registered
site. As mentioned above, training is available to help you with your ordering process.
Step 4 – Record Patient Vaccination
Use your user name and password (created in Step 2) to access data entry screens for
reporting patient information. If the patient already exists in NJIIS, the state’s
immunization registry, you will only need to update the H1N1 dose; otherwise you will
enter the patient’s name, address and date of birth to complete the record. You will not
be able to order additional vaccine doses if you do not account for the doses already
shipped to you. Any registered user from your facility can enter patient vaccination
information.
Current NJIIS users will also be able to document H1N1 vaccines through NJIIS screens.
REPORTING
8. Are providers required to report each dose administered to an individual?
Yes, all doses administered must be reported to the New Jersey Department of
Health and Senior Services electronically at http://nj.gov/health/flu/h1n1.shtml .
9. How do I inform the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services of
the doses used or administered?
All enrolled providers will be sent by email the information needed to access a
Webinar training on the H1N1 Vaccine System. The 20-minute training will
show where all doses administered must be electronically entered and reported in
the H1N1 Vaccine System.
10. Is there a way to transfer data to the registry from other electronic systems?
Yes, the H1N1 Vaccine System is capable of receiving data from various electronic
systems. The documentation is available on the NJ Immunization Information
System (NJIIS), the state’s immunization registry, website at
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http://nj.gov/health/flu/h1n1.shtml. Data must include the lot number of the vaccine
administered to an individual. This is a CDC requirement. The H1N1 Vaccine
System also allows documenting refrigerator temperature logs, and the doses
administered.
LOGISTICS
11. How will the public be able to locate a vaccination location?
It is anticipated that there will be multiple sites to which the public can go to be
vaccinated. They should contact the Local Health Department for locations that
are available for vaccination in their area or go to the NJDHSS website at
http://nj.gov/health/flu/findflushot.shtml or at the Maxim website at
http://www.FindaFluShot.com for vaccination locations.
RECEIVING SITES
12. What kind of providers can be designated as “vaccinator only” site?
Providers that have the capability to receive, store and administer vaccine, including
but not limited to provider offices, occupational health clinics, hospitals, local
health departments, community vaccinators and pharmacies.
13. How many sites can be designated to be a “ship-to” site?
There will be a maximum of approximately 90,000 sites to which vaccine can be
shipped via centralized distribution. CDC has developed a formula to determine the
maximum number of sites within each state. New Jersey has 2,353 “ship-to” sites.
More information is available on the CDC website.
14. What is the difference between direct “ship-to” and “vaccinator site”?
Direct “ship-to” sites are designated sites to receive the shipment of vaccine from
McKesson while “vaccinator sites” will vaccinate only, but not receive the
vaccine directly from McKesson. “Vaccintor only” sites need to contact their
local LINCS agency to obtain the vaccine.
14. How many direct “ship-to” sites are in New Jersey?
New Jersey has 2,353 direct “ship-to” sites.
SHIPMENTS/RECEIVING SITES/LOGISTICS
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15. How will vaccine be shipped to New Jersey?
Vaccine will be shipped by CDC’s contractor for centralized distribution,
McKesson Specialty, to hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, health departments, and
other providers of vaccines that have been designated as “ship-to” sites.
16. How frequently will vaccine shipments arrive to New Jersey ship-to sites?
As details of distribution are finalized, CDC will communicate with states about the
anticipated time period between placing vaccine orders and receiving shipments.
17. How many sites can be designated as “vaccinator only” sites?
One of the key benefits of using a centralized, third party distributor to support
H1N1 vaccine distribution is that it allows distribution of doses to a much larger
number of providers sites than would be feasible with direct manufacturer
distribution. Thus, we will be able to serve a significantly larger provider base than
the original state “ship-to” sites, and are planning to be able to accommodate more
providers than are currently served by the VFC program.
18. How long will it take for vaccine to arrive once I place my order?
The shipping timelines for 2009 H1N1 vaccine are currently being established
between CDC and McKesson. Information will be provided to state planners as
soon as it is available.
19. What should states expect with respect to frequency of vaccine shipments?
Vaccine will be shipped as it becomes available, taking into account state
allocations and orders. The process will be modeled after that utilized by
immunization programs that order seasonal influenza vaccine off the federal
contract, except for the shipment timeline, which is not yet finalized.
20. Can a “ship-to” site transfer vaccine to another “ship-to” or “vaccinator
site”?
Yes, as long as the site to which the vaccine is being transferred and the site
receiving the vaccine are registered as H1N1 vaccine sites.
21. Can a “ship-to” or vaccinator site transfer vaccine to another location?
Yes, if properly packaged for transport with a thermometer inside to monitor the
container temperature in which the vaccine is being moved. Maintaining the
cold-chain is very important to protecting the potency of the vaccine.
22. What is the minimum dose order for shipments of 2009 H1N1 vaccine?
For each vaccine formulation (identified by its National Drug Code) the minimum
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dose order is 100 doses and all orders must be placed in increments of 100 doses.
Each ancillary supply kit will contain supplies to support 100 doses of vaccine, with
different kits available for prefilled syringe products and for multi-dose vial
products.
23. When will vaccine shipping begin?
Planners should assume shipping of vaccine will begin mid-October, although there
is a possibility that some vaccine may be available for shipping starting in late
September. Visit the CDC website for the latest information on vaccine availability.
PRIORITY GROUPS
24. Who can be vaccinated first with the initial supply of H1N1 vaccine that comes
to New Jersey?
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has established a priority
listing for vaccination with H1N1 vaccine. Based on what is known now, it seems
likely recommendations will include that, pregnant women, younger people (6 months
– 24 years of age), household contacts of children less than 6 months of age, healthcare
workers (HCW), and people aged 25 years – 64 years who have underlying health
conditions seek vaccination as soon as a vaccine is available.
ACIP - a panel made up of medical and public health experts, met July 29, 2009, to
make recommendations on who should receive the new H1N1 vaccines when it
becomes available. While some issues are still unknown, such as how severe the flu
season will be, the ACIP considered several factors, including current disease patterns,
populations most at risk for severe illness based on current trends in illness,
hospitalizations and deaths, how much vaccine is expected to be available, and the
timing of vaccine availability.
The groups recommended to receive the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine include:
Pregnant women because they are at higher risk of complications and can potentially
provide protection to infants who cannot be vaccinated;
Household contacts and caregivers for children younger than 6 months of age
because younger infants are at higher risk of influenza-related complications and cannot
be vaccinated. Vaccination of those in close contact with infants younger than 6 months
old might help protect infants by “cocooning” them from the virus.
Healthcare and emergency medical services personnel because infections among
healthcare workers have been reported and this can be a potential source of infection for
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vulnerable patients. Also, increased absenteeism in this population could reduce
healthcare system capacity.
All people from 6 months through 24 years of age
Children from 6 months through 18 years of age because cases of 2009 H1N1
influenza have been seen in children who are in close contact with each other in
school and day care settings, which increases the likelihood of disease spread, and
Young adults 19 through 24 years of age because many cases of 2009 H1N1
influenza have been seen in these healthy young adults and they often live, work
and study in close proximity, and they are a frequently mobile population; and,
Persons aged 25 through 64 years of age who have health conditions associated with
higher risk of medical complications from influenza.
25. What are the underlying health conditions?
Currently, insufficient data are available to determine who is at higher risk for
complications of novel influenza A (H1N1) virus infections. Thus, at this time, the
same age and risk groups who are at higher risk for seasonal influenza complications
should also be considered at higher risk for swine-origin influenza complications.
Groups at higher risk for seasonal influenza complications include:
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Children less than 5 years old;
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Persons aged 65 years or older;
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Children and adolescents (less than 18 years) who are receiving long-term
aspirin therapy and who might be at risk for experiencing Reye syndrome
after influenza virus infection;
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Pregnant women;
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Adults and children who have chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular, hepatic,
hematological, neurologic, neuromuscular, or metabolic disorders;
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Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities.
26. How will the state determine that vaccine is given to the recommended target
groups?
Each provider that enrolls to be a “ship-to” or “vaccination only” site will sign the
Provider Agreement in which they will agree to comply with the ACIP
recommendations for the H1N1 vaccine.
27. Given the potential for large amounts of vaccine available during the first
month of vaccine shipments, are priority groups needed?
It is not expected that there will be a shortage of the H1N1 vaccine, but availability
and demand can be unpredictable. There is some possibility that initially the
vaccine will be available in limited quantities, and priority groups may be needed.
28. Will there be requirements regarding documentation of priority group
membership?
There will be no federal requirements or New Jersey requirements for vaccinators
to require documentation of priority group status such as a doctor’s note
documenting pregnancy or risk status.
29. How will the State determine that the vaccine can be administered to other
target populations?
Once the demand for vaccine for the prioritized groups has been met at the local
level, providers should also begin vaccinating everyone from the ages of 25
through 64 years. Current studies indicate that the risk for infection among
persons age 65 or older is less than the risk for younger age groups. However,
once vaccine demand among younger age groups has been met, providers should
offer vaccination to people 65 or older.
30. Are school nurses considered to be health care workers (HCW)?
Yes, school nurses are considered to be HCWs. School nurses provide direct
medical care to students, including those who might have respiratory illness.
VACCINE AND SUPPLIES
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31. Will vaccine be in multi-dose vials?
The majority of vaccine will be in multi-dose vials, the remainder in single-dose
syringes or nasal sprayers. The aim is to have enough vaccine in single-dose
syringes (i.e., preservative free) for young children and pregnant women.
32. Which ancillary supplies will be provided with vaccine?
CDC will provide needles, syringes, sharps containers and alcohol swabs.
33. How will ancillary supplies be distributed?
Ancillary supplies will be distributed to the same “ship-to” sites as the vaccine.
Plans for ensuring the distribution of these products are currently being developed.
34. How will orders of ancillary supplies be transmitted?
Ancillary supply kits and sharps containers will be included in the vaccine order
that is shipped from McKesson to the “ship-to” site.
35. Can vaccine be sent to one address and ancillary supply kits to another
address?
No, because of logistical considerations, vaccine and ancillary supply kit orders
cannot be shipped to different addresses.
STATE ALLOTMENTS
36. Can States request less than their full allocation?
Yes, States will not be required to accept vaccine they cannot store or administer.
37. If a State requests less than their full allocation, will they have given up rights
to the balance of their allocation?
States will not forfeit the remainder of their allotment if not all is ordered at one
time.
38. Can States share or exchange allocations of specific products with other
States?
As with seasonal influenza vaccine, CDC will facilitate such exchanges.
STORAGE
39. What is the cold chain?
Vaccines must be stored properly from the time they are manufactured until the
time they are administered. Excess heat or cold will reduce their potency,
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increasing the risk that recipients will not be protected against vaccinepreventable diseases. The system used to distribute and keep vaccines in good
condition is called the cold chain.
40. What is the size of storage volume for each product type?
CDC will communicate the corresponding storage volume of 100 dose increments
of each product type as soon as that information becomes available.
41. What are general requirements for vaccine storage?
Refrigerators without freezers, and stand-alone freezers, may be better at
maintaining the required temperatures. However, a combination
refrigerator/freezer unit sold for home use is acceptable for vaccine storage if the
refrigerator and freezer compartments each have a separate external door.
Additional information is available at
http://www2a.cdc.gov/vaccine/ed/shtoolkit/storage_equipment.htm#Thermo
meters
42. Can I use a small single-door or bar-style (dormitory-style) unit to store
vaccines?
Small single-door (dormitory-style or bar-style) combined refrigerator-freezer
units should not be used for permanent vaccine storage. However, this type of unit
may be adequate for temporarily storing small quantities of inactivated vaccines
in the refrigerator compartment. Unused vaccine should be removed at the end of
the business day and restored in the appropriate size refrigerator.
43. What is the recommended temperature to store H1N1?
Read the vaccine package insert for correct temperature requirements, most
inactivated vaccines should be stored between 35° and 46°F (2°C and 8°C). The
temperature should never fall below 35°F (2°C) or rise above 46°F (8°C).
44. How often should I check the temperature of the refrigerator or freezer?
The recommended method to ensure that a refrigerator or freezer is maintaining
the proper temperature for vaccine storage is to check and record the temperature
at least twice a day and electronically record the temperatures in the H1N1
Vaccine System. For further information, visit “Check the Internal Temperature”
at
http://www2a.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/shtoolkit/storage_euipment.htm#Thermomet
ers
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45. What type of thermometers do I use?
The CDC recommends using only certified calibrated thermometers for
measuring vaccine storage unit temperatures. For further information, visit
http://www2a.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/shtoolkit/pages/storage_equipment.htm#Ther
mometers
VACCINE ISSUES
46. Will two doses of vaccine be required?
We are currently awaiting information from the CDC and FDA regarding the
number of doses necessary.
47. What will be the recommended interval between the first and second dose, if
two doses are needed?
We are currently awaiting information from the CDC and FDA. For planning
purposes, assume 21-28 days between the first and second vaccination.
48. Will there be federal requirements to recall persons for their second dose, if a
second dose is needed?
There will be no federal requirement to send out recall notices. Providing
information on second dose at the time of the first dose, as well as educating
persons about who needs a second dose administered is important if it is needed.
49. Will vaccine be adjuvanted?
It is unlikely H1N1 vaccine will be adjuvanted. Definitive information will be
available once clinical trial data are available.
50. If vaccine is adjuvanted, how will it be formulated?
Formulation will vary by provider. For Novartis, vaccine may be preformulated
with adjuvant. For CSL, GSK and Sanofi Pasteur, mixing of vaccine and adjuvant
at the site of administration will be necessary. Specific information on storage
requirements and procedures for mixing vaccine and adjuvant will be provided by
CDC. MedImmune vaccine will not be adjuvanted.
51. Will the vaccine be administered under EUA (Emergency Use Authorization)?
EUA will not be used for unadjuvanted vaccine if FDA licenses the vaccine under
the current BLA (Biologics License Application) as a strain change.
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52. How much thimerosal-free vaccine will be available?
It is anticipated that enough thimerosal-free vaccine in pre-loaded syringes will be
available for young children and pregnant women.
53.Will it be necessary for the first and second dose to be the same product?
Ideally, first and second doses would be from the same product. However, until
clinical trials are completed it should be assumed that the products will be
interchangeable. More information on this will follow.
54. How many manufacturers are producing vaccine?
Five manufacturers are producing vaccine for the U.S.: Sanofi Pasteur, Novartis,
GSK, Medimmune and CSL.
ADMINISTERING VACCINE
55. Can the seasonal vaccine and the H1N1 vaccine be given at the same time?
It is anticipated that seasonal flu and H1N1 vaccines may be administered on the
same day at different anatomical sites (e.g., right arm, left arm). However, we
expect the seasonal vaccine to be available earlier than the H1N1 vaccine. The
usual seasonal influenza viruses are still expected to cause illness this fall and
winter. Individuals are encouraged to get their seasonal flu vaccine as soon as it is
available.
56. When will the decision to administer vaccine be made?
For planning purposes, it should be assumed that vaccine will be available to
administer in the fall.
57. Will it be necessary for the first and second dose to be given by the same
provider?
No. Patients will need to bring vaccination history information to the other
provider if they are using a different provider. Otherwise, all information should be
accessible through the H1N1 Vaccine System.
REIMBURSEMENT
58. Will insurance plans reimburse private providers for administration?
CDC asked America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) and on behalf of its members.
AHIP provided this response:
"Every year health plans contribute to the seasonal flu vaccination campaign in
several ways:
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a) Health plans communicate directly with plan sponsors and members on the
current ACIP recommendations and encourage immunization; they also provide
information on where to get vaccinations, and who to contact with any questions.
b) Just as health plans have provided extensive coverage for the administration of
seasonal flu vaccines in the past, public health planners can make the assumption
that health plans will provide reimbursement for the administration of a novel (A)
H1N1 vaccine to their members by private sector providers in both traditional
settings e.g., doctor’s office, ambulatory clinics, health care facilities, and in nontraditional settings, where contracts with insurers have been established"
59. Will private providers be able to charge patients for vaccine administration if
they are uninsured?
Yes, providers may charge patients if they are uninsured. The administration fee
cannot exceed the regional Medicare vaccine administration fee. For more
information, go to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services web site and see
the state reimbursement rates for Medicare and Medicaid at www.cms.hhs.gov/
60. Can persons be charged for vaccine administration in public health-organized
large scale vaccination clinics?
Per CDC, there will be no administration fee for vaccination in public-health
organized large-scale vaccination clinics.
61. Is billing of third party payors/insurers permissible in public health clinics or
mass vaccination sites/clinics conducted by, or on behalf of a public health
jurisdiction?
It is permissible to bill third party payors/insurers in public health clinics or mass
vaccination sites/clinics conducted by, or on behalf of a public health entity. Public
health jurisdictions that do not currently have a robust billing system in place may not
use CDC Public Health Emergency Response (PHER) funds to develop billing systems.
62. Is it permissible to charge patients a co-pay or any out-of-pocket charge in
public health clinics or mass vaccinations sites/clinics conducted on behalf of a
public health entity?
It is not permissible to charge patients in public health clinics or mass vaccination
sites/clinics conducted by or on behalf of a public health entity.
63. What is the definition of a “public health clinic?”
A “public health clinic” is defined as a clinic that is conducted by, or on behalf of a
state or local health jurisdiction and received PHER implementation funds to administer
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H1N1 vaccine in any setting. For example, this may include a commercial community
vaccinator (CCV) or other private provider that has a formal agreement with the public
health entity.
64. Is it permissible to use PHER funds to offset the costs to private providers to
vaccinate uninsured or under-insured persons?
It is permissible to use PHER funds to offset the costs to private providers to vaccinate
the uninsured or under-insured population providing that the jurisdiction has systems in
place to assure accountability through auditing and/or other means of accountability.
Those that do not have current systems in place are encouraged not to use PHER funds
to develop systems of accountability.
OTHER
What about the use of antivirals to treat 2009 H1N1 infections?
Antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaled powder) that fight
against the flu by keeping flu viruses from reproducing in your body. If you get sick,
antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and make you feel better faster. They may
also prevent serious flu complications. This fall, antivirals may be prioritized for persons
with severe illness or those at higher risk for flu complications.
Who is responsible to contact and distribute the vaccine to vaccinator-only sites?
LINCS agencies in collaboration with the Local Health Departments are responsible for
sites in their respective jurisdiction.
How will information about vaccine-receiving sites be transmitted to McKesson?
The NJISS Inventory Monitoring Ordering Distribution System (IMODS) will transmit
orders to CDC. These orders will be sent to McKesson the morning after they arrive at
CDC. CDC is working with McKesson to determine how the vaccine and ancillary
supply components of the orders will be handled and the shipment timeline, relative to
vaccine orders.
Will states be able to determine where specific presentations of vaccine (multi-dose
vials, single dose syringes, and nasal sprayers) are directed?
Providers will select the specific presentation of vaccine when placing their order
electronically in NJISS. The NJIIS will be able to track the vaccine to know where and
what vaccine has been shipped by way of a report that is generated by McKesson.
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