EISX8M Series
BASR
Building Automation System Remote I/O
BAS Remote
User Manual
# TD040300-0MC
Trademarks
Contemporary Controls and CTRLink are registered trademarks of Contemporary Control Systems, Inc.
BACnet is a registered trademark of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning
Engineers, Inc. Other product names may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective
companies.
Copyright
© Copyright 2008, by Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication
may be reproduced, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any language
or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, optical, chemical,
manual, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of:
Contemporary Control Systems, Inc.
2431 Curtiss Street
Downers Grove, Illinois 60515 USA
Tel:
Fax:
E-mail:
WWW:
+1-630-963-7070
+1-630-963-0109
[email protected]
http://www.ccontrols.com
Contemporary Controls Ltd
Sovereign Court Two, UWSP
Sir William Lyons Road
Coventry CV4 7EZ UK
Tel:
Fax:
E-mail:
WWW:
+44 (0)24 7641 3786
+44 (0)24 7641 3923
[email protected]
http://www.ccontrols.eu
Contemporary Controls GmbH
Fuggerstraße 1 B
04158 Leipzig Germany
Tel:
Fax:
E-mail:
WWW:
+49 (0)3475 66785 0
+49 (0)3475 66785 16
[email protected]
http://www.ccontrols.eu
Disclaimer
Contemporary Control Systems, Inc. reserves the right to make changes in the specifications of the
product described within this manual at any time without notice and without obligation of Contemporary
Control Systems, Inc. to notify any person of such revision or change.
WARNING — This is a Class A product as defined in EN55022.
In a domestic environment this product may cause radio interference
in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
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1 Table of Contents
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS ..................................................................................................... 3
2
HISTORY .............................................................................................................................. 6
3
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................. 6
4
5
3.1
Features and Benefits...................................................................................................... 7
3.2
Software .......................................................................................................................... 8
3.3
Product Image (Master Module)..................................................................................... 8
SPECIFICATIONS............................................................................................................... 9
4.1
Universal Input/Outputs — Channels 1 – 6.................................................................... 9
4.2
Relay Outputs — Channels 7 – 8.................................................................................... 9
4.3
Communications ............................................................................................................. 9
4.4
Protocol Compliance...................................................................................................... 10
4.5
Power Requirements ..................................................................................................... 10
4.6
General Specifications .................................................................................................. 10
4.7
LED Indicators............................................................................................................... 11
4.8
Electromagnetic Compatibility ..................................................................................... 11
4.9
Field Connections ......................................................................................................... 12
4.10
Ordering Information .................................................................................................... 12
4.11
Dimensional Drawing ................................................................................................... 13
4.12
PICS Statement ............................................................................................................. 14
INSTALLATION................................................................................................................ 15
5.1
5.1.1
Power Supply Precautions ........................................................................................ 16
5.1.2
Limited Power Sources ............................................................................................. 16
5.2
6
Power Supply ................................................................................................................ 15
Connecting Expansion Equipment................................................................................ 17
5.2.1
Expansion Module Connections ............................................................................... 17
5.2.2
Modbus Connections ................................................................................................ 18
5.2.3
Cabling Considerations ............................................................................................. 19
FIELD CONNECTIONS.................................................................................................... 20
6.1
Sample BAS Remote Wiring Diagram ......................................................................... 20
6.2
Thermistors ................................................................................................................... 21
6.3
Contact Closure............................................................................................................. 21
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7
6.4
Pulse Inputs................................................................................................................... 23
6.5
Analog Input ................................................................................................................. 24
6.6
Analog Output............................................................................................................... 25
OPERATION ...................................................................................................................... 27
7.1
7.1.1
Ethernet Port on the Master Module ......................................................................... 27
7.1.2
LEDs ......................................................................................................................... 27
7.1.3
Accessing the Web Server on the Master Unit ......................................................... 28
7.1.4
Web Server Screen Overview ................................................................................... 31
7.1.5
On-Screen Help......................................................................................................... 32
7.1.6
Bias and Termination ................................................................................................ 33
7.1.7
Communicating With Modbus Slaves ...................................................................... 33
7.1.8
Communicating from Master to Expansion Modules ............................................... 33
7.2
Input/Output Channels (I/O) ....................................................................................... 34
7.2.1
Universal I/Os ........................................................................................................... 34
7.2.2
Relay Outputs............................................................................................................ 34
7.3
Channel Configuring..................................................................................................... 35
7.3.1
Analog Input Configuring......................................................................................... 35
7.3.2
Analog Output Configuring ...................................................................................... 36
7.3.3
Binary Input Configuring.......................................................................................... 37
7.3.4
Current Input Configuring ........................................................................................ 38
7.3.5
Thermistor Input Configuring................................................................................... 39
7.3.6
Pulse Input Configuring............................................................................................ 40
7.3.7
Relay Output Configuring......................................................................................... 41
7.4
8
General Considerations................................................................................................. 27
Channel Forcing............................................................................................................ 42
7.4.1
Analog Input Forcing................................................................................................ 42
7.4.2
Digital Input Forcing................................................................................................. 43
7.4.3
Current Input Forcing ............................................................................................... 44
7.4.4
Thermistor Input Forcing .......................................................................................... 45
7.4.5
Relay Output Forcing................................................................................................ 46
APPENDIX .......................................................................................................................... 47
8.1
BACnet Object Model .................................................................................................. 47
8.2
Device ........................................................................................................................... 47
8.3
Analog Input .................................................................................................................. 48
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8.4
Analog Output............................................................................................................... 48
8.5
Binary Input .................................................................................................................. 48
8.6
Binary Output ................................................................................................................ 49
8.7
BIBBs............................................................................................................................ 50
8.7.1
DS-RP-B Data Sharing — ReadProperty — B......................................................... 50
8.7.2
DS-WP-B Data Sharing — WriteProperty — B....................................................... 50
8.7.3
DM-DDB Device Management — Dynamic Device Binding — B................................ 50
8.7.4
DM-DOB-B Device Management — Dynamic Object Binding — B ..................... 50
8.7.5
DM-DCC-B Device Management — Device Communication Control — B .............. 50
8.8
Linux License................................................................................................................ 51
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2 History
6/1/2007 040300-A Release
11/1/2007 040300-B Release
5/12/2008 040300-C Release
3 Introduction
The BAS Remote provides a convenient method of expanding building automation
systems in the field when using Ethernet for network communication. Modern building
automation systems are quickly adopting information technology standards such as
Ethernet for communication. The BAS Remote complies with BACnet/IP as defined in
ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 135-2004 while providing six universal input/output points and
two relay outputs. By incorporating a 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port, the BAS Remote can
be connected anywhere in a buildings’ structured wiring system at a point convenient to
mechanical equipment. This eliminates the need to pull proprietary network cable to the
source of the I/O. By being BACnet/IP compliant, there is no need for an external
router. The BAS Remote is ideal for applications where several points of I/O must be
accessed in areas void of proprietary BAS networks. If additional I/O is required, up to
three expansion modules can be connected to one BAS Remote master.
Besides being BACnet/IP compliant, the BAS Remote master functions as a Modbus
TCP Server Gateway allowing access to Modbus serial devices attached to a 2-wire
Modbus EIA-485 serial port. Even the internal BAS Remote master and expansion
units can be assigned Modbus addresses in the same Modbus address space.
Both the BAS Remote master and expansion modules have the same I/O capability.
Six universal input/output points are provided on each module. Depending upon
configuration, each unit can accommodate a contact closure from a digital point, a
thermistor, voltage or current analog input from a field transmitter or supervisory
controller. Analog inputs can range from 0-5 VDC, 0-10 VDC or 0-20 mA. Inputs can
be scaled to accommodate ranges such as 1-5 VDC, 2-10 VDC, and 4-20 mA. Input
point resolution is 10-bits.
Type II and III 10 kΩ thermistor calibration curves are resident in the BAS Remote.
Single-point calibration of temperature is accomplished using the units’ web server.
Inputs can accept pulse trains in the range of 0 to 40 hertz (50% duty cycle) to measure
flow rates.
Analog outputs can be 0-10 VDC or 0-20 mA. However, scaling for 2-10 V, 0-5 V, 1-5 V
and 4-20 mA is possible. LED indicators identify the state of I/O points. Output point
resolution is 12 bits.
There are two relay outputs available with both normally open (NO) and normally closed
(NC) contacts. The relay output rating is 30 VAC/VDC, 2A.
There are two non-isolated 2-wire EIA-485 expansion ports on the master module. The
downstream port (DN) is intended for expansion modules while the Modbus (MB) port
functions as a Modbus TCP Server Gateway allowing for the attachment of Modbus 2wire or 3-wire EIA-485 serial devices. On BAS Remote expansion modules, the two
ports are marked UP and DN, and are dedicated for communication with the BAS
Remote master module and other expansion modules.
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All field connectors are removable making field replacement of units quick and simple.
A single RJ-45 shielded connector provides the 10/100 Mbps twisted-pair Ethernet
connection. The unit supports auto-negotiation of data rate and duplex. A resident web
server facilitates commissioning and troubleshooting. Configuration is accomplished via
Ethernet. Java must be enabled in the browser used to access the BAS Remote.
Power for the BAS Remote can be derived from a 24 VAC Class 2 transformer capable
of delivering 10 VA or from a 24 VDC power supply capable of at least 10 W. Since the
unit incorporates a half-wave rectified power supply, attached I/O points and the power
supply can share a common ground. Therefore, the BAS Remote can be powered by
the same control transformer used to power other half-wave rectified control equipment.
The BAS Remote can be DIN-rail mounted into a control panel. If panel mounting is
required, use the supplied mounting tabs.
The BAS Remote conforms to the BACnet/IP standard and therefore allows field I/O to
be directly accessed via Ethernet without the need of a router. A standard web browser
with Java enabled is used for commissioning and troubleshooting. The BAS Remote
adheres to the BACnet Application Specific Controller (B-ASC) profile.
3.1 Features and Benefits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Network accessible I/O with built-in 10/100 Mbps Ethernet port
Supports BACnet/IP® eliminating the need for an external router
Adheres to BACnet Application Specific Controller (B-ASC) profile
Six universal input/output points & two relay outputs
Supports thermistor, 0-10 VDC, 0-20 mA, contact closure, 0-40Hz pulse train
inputs, and 0-10 VDC and 0-20 mA outputs
Relay outputs 30 VAC/VDC, 2A.
Expansion port for additional expansion I/O modules
Modbus TCP sever gateway for Modbus serial devices
Removable field connectors
Web server for convenient commissioning and troubleshooting
Low-voltage 24 VAC or VDC powered
LED indicators for inputs, outputs, CPU status, and Ethernet activity/link/data
rate
DIN-rail mount installation or optional panel mounting
UL 508 Listed, Industrial Control Equipment
CE Mark
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3.2 Software
The provided CD-ROM contains:
•
•
•
This User Manual
An Installation Guide
Additional information of interest
3.3 Product Image (Master Module)
I/O Ports 1–3
24 V Loop Supply
I/O Ports 4–6
Reset
Ethernet Port
Input Power
DIN-rail Release Tab
Expansion Port
Figure 1 — BAS Remote Master Main Features
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Output Relays
4 Specifications
4.1 Universal Input/Outputs — Channels 1 – 6
Configured As
Limits
Analog Input
0-5 VDC, 0-10 VDC or 0-20 mA scalable by user. 10-bit resolution.
Input impedance 100 kΩ on voltage and 250 Ω on current.
Temperature Input
Type II or type III thermistors
–35°F to +110°F (–37°C to +44°C)
Contact closure input
Excitation current 2 mA. Open circuit voltage 24 VDC.
Sensing threshold 0.3 VDC. Response time 20 ms.
Pulse input
0–10 VDC scaleable by user. User adjustable threshold.
40 Hz maximum input frequency with 50% duty cycle.
Analog Output
0–10 VDC or 0–20 mA scalable by user. 12-bit resolution.
Maximum burden 750 Ω when using current output.
4.2 Relay Outputs — Channels 7 – 8
Limits
Form “C” contact with both NO and NC contacts available.
30 VAC/VDC 2 A. Class 2 circuits only.
4.3 Communications
Protocol
Data Link and Physical Layers
BACnet/IP
— Master only
ANSI/IEEE 802.3 10/100 Mbps Ethernet.
10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX, auto-negotiation of speed and duplex.
Auto-MDIX. 100 m maximum segment length.
Default IP address is 192.168.92.68/24.
Modbus TCP
— Master only
Expansion Bus
Modified Modbus serial protocol. 2-wire non-isolated EIA-485
57.6 kbaud. Maximum segment length 100 m.
Modbus Serial
— Master only
Modbus serial ASCII or RTU protocol.
2-wire non-isolated EIA-485.
2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 19.2, 38.4, 57.6, 115.2 kbps.
Max segment length 100 m.
Jumper selectable bias and termination.
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4.4 Protocol Compliance
Protocol
Compliance
BACnet/IP
ASHRAE 135-2004 annex J.
Application specific controller device profile B-ASC.
Modbus TCP
Modbus Application Protocol Specification V1.1b Dec. 28, 2006, Modbus.org.
Modbus Messaging on TCP/IP Implementation Guide V1.0b October 24, 2006,
Modbus.org.
Modbus serial
Modbus over Serial Line Specification and Implementation Guide V1.02 December
20, 2006, Modbus.org.
4.5 Power Requirements
Item
Limits
Input power
Master module: 24 VAC/VDC ± 10%, 47-63 Hz, 10 VA
Expansion module: 24 VAC/VDC ± 10%, 47-63 Hz, 8 VA
Loop supply
+24 VDC ± 10%, 150 mA maximum
4.6 General Specifications
Item
Description
Protection
All inputs and outputs (except for relay outputs and communications ports) are
over-voltage protected up to 24 VAC and short-circuit protected.
Environmental
Operating temperature 0° to +60°C.
Storage temperature -40°C to +85°C.
Relative humidity 10 to 95%, non-condensing.
Weight
0.6 lbs. (0.27 kg).
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4.7 LED Indicators
4.8
LED Indicator
Indication
I/O 1–6 configured as
Analog input
Green: > 1% of range, otherwise off
I/O 1–6 configured as
Temperature input
Green: sensor detected
Red: open
I/O 1–6 configured as
Contact input
Green: contact closed, otherwise off
I/O 1–6 configured as
Pulse input
Green: pulse sensed, otherwise off
I/O 1–6 configured as
Analog output
Green: commanded output
Red: expected output not within 40 mV on voltage or 0.2 mA on current
Status
Red: device in reset
Green flashing: booting up
Green: running application
Green flashing: Modbus serial activity after application is running —
master only
Ethernet — Master
module only
Yellow: 10Mbps; flashes with activity
Green: 100 Mbps; flashes with activity
Network — Expansion
module only
Green flashing: expansion bus activity
Electromagnetic Compatibility
Standard
Test Method
Description
Test Levels
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-2
Electrostatic Discharge
6 kV contact
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-3
Radiated Immunity
10 V/m, 80 MHz to 1 GHz
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-4
Fast Transient Burst
1 kV clamp & 2 kV direct
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-5
Voltage Surge
1 kV L-L & 2 kV L-Earth
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-6
Conducted Immunity
10 V (rms)
EN 55024
EN 61000-4-11
Voltage Dips & Interruptions
1 Line cycle, 1-5 s @100% dip
EN 55022
CISPR 22
Radiated Emissions
Class A
EN 55022
CISPR 22
Conducted Emissions
Class B
Radiated Emissions
Class A
CFR 47, Part 15 ANSI C63.4
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4.9 Field Connections
Terminal
Universal I/Os
I/O 1 A
1–3
Terminal
Universal I/Os
Universal I/O point 1 high
I/O 4 A
Universal I/O point 4 high
I/O 1 B
Universal I/O point 1 low
I/O 4 B
Universal I/O point 4 low
I/O 2 A
Universal I/O point 2 high
I/O 5 A
Universal I/O point 5 high
I/O 2 B
Universal I/O point 2 low
I/O 5 B
Universal I/O point 5 low
I/O 3 A
Universal I/O point 3 high
I/O 6 A
Universal I/O point 6 high
I/O 3 B
Universal I/O point 3 low
I/O 6 B
Universal I/O point 6 low
Terminal
Relay Outputs
Terminal
+24 VDC @ 150 mA Loop Supply
OUT 8 NC
Output 8 normally-closed contact
1
+24 VDC
OUT 8 C
Output 8 common
2
+24 VDC
OUT 8 NO
Output 8 normally-open contact
3
+24 VDC
OUT 7 NC
Output 8 normally-closed contact
4
+24 VDC
OUT 7 C
Output 8 common
5
+24 VDC
OUT 7 NO
Output 8 normally-open contact
6
+24 VDC
Terminal
Expansion Ports — Master Module
Expansion Ports — Expansion Module
MB/UP-D+
Modbus terminal D1 (+)
Upstream expansion term. D1 (+)
MB/UP-D–
Modbus terminal D0 (–)
Upstream expansion term. D0 (–)
SC
Modbus signal common
Not used
DN-D+
Downstream expansion terminal D1 (+)
DN-D–
Downstream expansion terminal D0 (–)
Terminal
Power — Master Module
Power — Expansion Module
HI
High AC or DC +
High AC or DC +
COM
AC or DC common
AC or DC common
Earth
Optional earthing connection
No connection
4.10 Ordering Information
Model
Description
BASR-8M
BAS Remote master with eight I/O points
BASR-8X
BAS Remote expansion with eight I/O points
BASR-MT
Pair of panel mounting tabs (one set included with each unit)
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4–6
4.11 Dimensional Drawing
Figure 2 — BAS Remote Dimensions
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4.12 PICS Statement
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5 Installation
The BASR is intended to be mounted in an industrial enclosure or wiring closet on 35mm DIN-rail or panel-mounted with screws (not provided). The panel-mounting tabs are
packaged in a plastic bag within the shipping box. To use these tabs, Figure 3
illustrates how the two studs of each tab are press fitted into their respective holes in
opposing corners of the case.
Figure 3 — Attaching Panel-Mounting Tabs
5.1 Power Supply
An internal portion of the BAS Remote provides the 24 VDC loop supply to power
external devices attached as inputs to the BAS Remote — you do not need a separate
loop supply. Since the BAS Remote can source current via its analog outputs, an
internal source of 24 VDC is provided for powering outputs. Collectively, the sum of
input and output power cannot exceed 150 mA.
The power source for the internal supply is applied via the three terminals labeled Earth,
COM, and HI. Earth allows external connection to earth if better EMC compliance is
needed. COM is for the power source return and also serves as the BAS Remote
common ground connection. Primary 24 VAC/VDC (± 10%) power is applied to HI and
COM. HI connects to a diode accomplishes half-wave rectified power — while providing
reverse input voltage protection.
Maximum current draw for any I/O channel is 20 mA — yielding a total draw of 120 mA
for all six channels. Analog output current sources from the same internal supply, so an
external source of 24 VDC is unneeded — but a return common is. Six +24 VDC pins
are present to serve external transmitters, so they do not need a separate loop supply.
However, the power supply must serve only its own BAS Remote module.
The BASR requires 24 VDC or VAC from a source via a three-pin removable keyed
connector. The proper connections for various power options are shown in Figure 4.
The recommended size for power conductors is 16–18 AWG (solid or stranded). Ground
is directly connected to zero volts. Input connections are reverse-polarity protected.
An internal source provides 24 VDC (allowing a maximum current draw of 150 mA) to
power external transmitters connected as inputs to the BASR — so a separate loop
supply is unneeded.
NOTE:
This device is intended for use with Class 2 circuits.
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Figure 4 — Power Options
WARNING: Powering devices can present hazards. Read the next two sections carefully.
5.1.1 Power Supply Precautions
Internally, the BASR utilizes a half-wave rectifier and therefore can share the same AC
power source with other half-wave rectified devices. Sharing a common DC power
source is also possible. Sharing AC power with full-wave rectified devices is NOT
recommended. Full-wave rectified devices usually require a dedicated AC power
source that has a secondary elevated above ground. Both secondary connections are
considered HOT. AC power sources that power several half-wave devices have a
common secondary connection called COMMON, LO, or GROUND. This connection
might be tied to earth. The other side of the secondary is considered the HOT or HI
side of the connection. Connect the HOT side of the secondary to the HI input on the
BASR and the LO side to COM on the BASR. All other half-wave devices sharing the
same AC power source need to follow the same convention. When using a DC power
source, connect its positive terminal to the HI input on the BASR and the negative terminal
to COM on the BASR. Reversing polarity to the BASR will not damage the BASR.
WARNING: Devices powered from a common AC source could be damaged if a mix of
half-wave and full-wave rectified devices exist. If you are not sure of the type of rectifier
used by another device, do not share the AC source with it.
5.1.2 Limited Power Sources
The BASR should be powered by a limited power source complying with the requirements
of the National Electric Code (NEC) article 725 or other international codes meeting the
same intent of limiting the amount of power of the source. Under NEC article 725, a
Class 2 circuit is that portion of the wiring system between the load side of a Class 2
power source and the connected equipment. For AC or DC voltages up to 30 volts, the
power rating of a Class 2 power source is limited to 100 VA. The transformer or power
supply complying with the Class 2 rating must carry a corresponding listing from a
regulatory agency such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL).
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5.2 Connecting Expansion Equipment
Input/output points beyond those available from the BASR master module can be
increased by adding expansion modules or by connecting to Modbus serial devices.
expansion is accomplished by making connections to the MB and DN ports on the
master module. The MB port is used for connecting to 2-wire Modbus serial devices
while the DN port is used for connecting to BASR expansion modules. Both ports are
non-isolated EIA-485 compatible.
When installing equipment, make a record that identifies the power source, equipment
locations, IP and MAC ID numbers, protocol in use, baud rate, cable color coding, etc.
— anything that will be helpful for future staff.
5.2.1 Expansion Module Connections
Expansion modules are intended to occupy positions to the right or left of the master
module on the same DIN-rail or on additional DIN-rails within the same control panel. In
this situation only a short 2-wire twisted-pair cable is needed for making connections
between MB on the master module and DN on the expansion module. Up to three
expansion modules can attach to the master module using a daisy-chain wiring scheme.
The second expansion module has its UP port connected to the preceding expansion
module’s DN port. The last expansion module will have a vacant UP port. The D+
terminal on one device must attach to the D+ terminal on the other. The same applies
to the D– terminals. Bias and termination exists on the UP terminals. See Figure 6 for
wiring details. For short connections, unshielded cable can be used.
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5.2.2 Modbus Connections
The Modbus port on the BASR master module is non-isolated EIA-485 compatible.
When connecting to other non-isolated devices, care must be exercised to ensure that
all non-isolated Modbus devices share the same ground reference (COM) with the
BASR master module. This is usually accomplished by sharing the same power source.
Configure the Modbus data rate and protocol using the BASR Modbus port web page.
Figure 5 — Internal Termination and Bias
When connecting to a isolated 3-wire Modbus device, the signal common of the isolated
device must be connected to the SC pin between the MB and DN ports. This ties the two
reference points together for reliable communications. Refer to Figure 6 for wiring details.
Modbus serial device can only be attached to the MB port on the master module. Refer
to Figure 5 for details on the bias and termination network present on the MB port.
Together, these resistors approximate one 120 Ω terminating resistor. Terminal D+
represents the more positive connection for the EIA-485 Modbus serial network while
D– represents the less positive connection. Make corresponding connections to
Modbus serial devices. The last device on the bus should have applied bias and
termination or just termination. A shielded twisted-pair cable should be used with
interconnecting devices. Connect the shields together and attached to chassis at only
one point. Refer to Figure 6 for wiring details.
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5.2.3 Cabling Considerations
When attaching cables to the BASR, Table 1 should be considered.
Function
Signaling and
Data Rate
Minimum Required Cable
Maximum Segment Distance
Ethernet
10BASE-T
10 Mbps
Category 3 UTP
100 m (328 ft)
Ethernet
100BASE-TX
100 Mbps
Category 5 UTP
100 m (328 ft)
I/O
Unspecified
Solid: 16-22 AWG
Stranded: 16–18 AWG
Unspecified
Expansion
Unspecified
Belden® 9841 or equivalent*
100 m (328 ft)
Modbus
Varied
Belden® 9841 or equivalent*
100 m (328 ft)
Table 1 — Cabling Considerations
* If using shielded cable, connect to chassis at only one point.
NOTE: Wire size may be dictated by electrical codes for the area where the equipment
is being installed. Consult local regulations.
Observe in Table 1 that 10BASE-T segments can successfully use Category 3, 4 or 5
cable — but 100BASE-TX segments must use Category 5 cable. Category 5e cable is
highly recommended as the minimum for new installations.
The Ethernet port of the BASR employs Auto-MDIX technology so that either straightthrough or crossover cables can be used to connect to the network.
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6 Field Connections
6.1 Sample BAS Remote Wiring Diagram
Figure 6 — Sample BAS Remote Wiring Diagram
Wire Channels 1–6 so the most positive wire goes to the
“A” terminal and the most negative wire to the “B” terminal.
The wiring options for Channels 1–6 are shown in Figure 7.
For each case in which polarity matters, proper polarity is
indicated.
Considerations in making field connections for various types
of input and output devices are discussed in the following
pages.
Figure 7 — I/O Options (Channels 1–6)
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6.2 Thermistors
The BAS Remote has built-in calibration curves for 10 kΩ Type II or Type III thermistors.
These devices have a non-linear with a negative coefficient of resistance to temperature
and provide a nominal resistance of 10 kΩ at 25°C. Using the web server, configure an
input for either Type II or Type III thermistor. As shown in Figure 8, connect the twowire thermistor to points A and B. Polarity is not an issue. If averaging of temperature
is desired, connect multiple thermistors in a series-parallel combination so that the nominal
resistance remains at 10 kΩ as shown. Make sure that all devices are of the same type.
The effective range of temperature measurement is from –35° to +110°F (–37° to
+44°C). An open input results in a fault condition that produces a red LED indication for
that channel.
Figure 8 — Thermistor Connections
6.3 Contact Closure
The BAS Remote can sense the make or break of a contact from a relay or push-button.
The contacts being sensed must be absent of any applied source of energy, and be
rated for low-voltage, low-current switching. The BAS Remote will provide the electrical
energy to be sensed. Using the web server, configure an input for contact closure. As
shown in Figure 9, simply connect the contacts between points A and B. For common
mechanical contacts, polarity is not an issue. The open-circuit voltage is 24 VDC and
the short-circuit current is 2 mA.
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Figure 9 — Contact Closure Connections
For solid-state switches, there are further concerns. It is recommended that a solidstate device have an opto-isolated open-collector NPN transistor output stage with a
collector-emitter output voltage (Vce) of at least 30 V. Output sinking current should be
greater than 5 mA. The collector-emitter saturation voltage should be less than 0.2 V
when sinking 2 mA. The emitter should be connected to point B and the collector to
point A which is the more positive point. This polarity must be observed when using
solid-state devices. When an input is configured for a contact closure, the BAS Remote
sets the low-threshold to 2 V and the high-threshold to 3 V. When a contact is made or
the solid-state switch is on (resulting in a saturated output), the voltage at point A is
close to zero volts. The corresponding LED for that channel will be on. If the contact is
opened or the solid-state switch is turned off, the voltage at point B will quickly begin to
rise towards 24 V. Once the voltage passes the 3 V high-threshold, the input channel
will sense the “off” state. To return to the “on” state, this voltage needs to return to 2 V.
The one-volt difference is called hysteresis. There is no need to add an external pull-up
resistor when using a contact closure input.
Contact closure inputs are sampled every 10 ms and for a change of state to be
recognized, the input state must be stable for two consecutive samples. Therefore,
contact closure response is from 20–30 ms.
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6.4 Pulse Inputs
A variation on contact closure inputs is pulse inputs. In this situation speed is critical so
the input filtering that limits the time response is removed. When an input is configured
for Pulse Input, a pulse rate up to 40 Hz can be measured, assuming a 50% duty cycle.
The pulse device could have an opto-isolated open-collector NPN transistor output
stage like the one identified under Contact Closure, or it could provide an active
sinusoidal output signal that needs to be detected. Data can be in the form of frequency
or pulse count.
The Pulse Input voltage range is 0–10 VDC and the installer can set both the lowthreshold and high-threshold on the Pulse Input web page. The difference in the two
thresholds is the hysteresis. You can detect sinusoidal input signals by setting the high
threshold below the positive peak and the low threshold above the negative peak.
Setting the two thresholds well toward the center of the sinusoidal waveform (rather than
near its peaks) offers some noise immunity. It is not necessary for the input signal to
swing from zero to 10 V. Any substantial swing within this range can be detected. The
input impedance using Pulse Input is 100 kΩ. Connect the output of the pulse device to
point A and the common to BAS Remote common as shown in Figure 10.
Figure 10 — Pulse Input Connections
The pulse output could be sinusoidal with no DC offset so the BAS Remote could
experience both positive and negative excursions of the signal. The BAS Remote can
only detect positive voltages so the negative excursions will be ignored. It is still
possible to detect the input signal by only sensing the positive excursions.
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When interfacing to a pulse device that has an opto-isolated open-collector output, a pull-up
resistor must be added to the device output. In Figure 10, a 3-phase wattmeter has three
opto-isolated open-collector outputs, each requiring an external pull-up resistor. Since
each of the opto-isolators is rated for 60 VDC, install a 100 kΩ pull-up resistor between
each output and the +24 V loop supply. The common of the opto-isolators connects to
the common of the BAS Remote. Since each BAS Remote input has a 100 kΩ input
impedance, the resulting voltage divider sets the off-state voltage to 12 V. Even though
the BAS Remote input range is 0–10 VDC, this will not harm it. Set the two thresholds
to 2 V and 3 V. The threshold points on digital signals are not critical. Consult the pulse
device manual for more guidance.
6.5 Analog Input
An analog input can measure voltage in the range of 0–5 VDC or 0–10 VDC or it can
measure current in the range of 0–20 mA. Transmitters that produce an elevated “zero”
such as 1–5 VDC, 2–10 VDC or 4–20 mA can be measured as well. Using the web
page, configure the input for either voltage or current and select an appropriate range.
Scaling the input is accomplished by assigning the low and high points to engineering
units. When set as a voltage input, the input impedance is 100 kΩ and for a current
input, the impedance is 250 Ω.
With voltage measurement, connect the more positive voltage to point B and the less
positive to BAS Remote common as shown in Figure 11. On three-wire devices such
as damper actuators, the output signal is referenced to the damper’s power supply
common. That common must be at the same reference as the BAS Remote common.
Notice the connections in the diagram. In this situation it is only necessary to attach the
transmitter output to point A on the BAS Remote input.
Figure 11 — Analog Input Connections
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When measuring current, remember the BAS Remote sinks current to ground. A 250 Ω
impedance is effectively applied between points A and B on the input. To measure
current, it must be driven into point A with respect to point B. For two-wire current
transmitters, the more positive point on the transmitter attaches to the +24 V on the BAS
Remote loop supply or it can attached to an external loop supply as long as that loop
supply has a common connection with the BAS Remote. The less positive connection
is made to point A on the input.
Care should be exercised when connecting to a three-wire current transmitter. These
are usually non-isolated devices between the power source and signal output. The BAS
Remote will sink current from its input to ground so the transmitter must source current
from a positive potential to ground. If the three-wire transmitter works in this manner, it
can be accommodated.
Four-wire transmitters usually have isolation between power supply and signal output so
their output stage can usually be treated as a two-wire transmitter.
6.6 Analog Output
Either voltage in the range of 0–10 VDC or current in the range of 0–20 mA can be
outputted by assigning analog outputs. Configure an output using a web page. Select
the appropriate range. For DC voltage, the output voltage is applied to point A with
respect to common. For DC current, the output current is sourced from point A to
common so there is no need for a loop supply. A current output can source up to 20
mA into a resistive load not exceeding 750 Ω. Verify the burden that a current output
device will present. The BAS Remote can not generate enough voltage to drive loads
with higher resistance.
Figure 12 — Analog Output Connections
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Figure 12 illustrates connections to a three-wire damper actuator. The damper requires
a 0–10 V command signal which can easily be accomplished by the BAS Remote.
However, if a current output is desired it is possible to set the BAS Remote analog
output to 4–20 mA and install an external 500 Ω resistor that will convert the 4–20 mA
signal to 2–10 V.
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7 Operation
7.1 General Considerations
Configuration is accomplished while the unit is connected to a computer running a web
browser (Java-enabled) that accesses the unit’s built-in web server.
7.1.1 Ethernet Port on the Master Module
Auto-Negotiation
The Ethernet port on the BAS Remote master unit offers full auto-negotiation. A single
cable links two Ethernet devices. When these devices auto-negotiate, the data rate will
be 100 Mbps only if both are capable of that speed. Likewise, full-duplex will only be
selected if both can support it. If only one device supports auto-negotiation, then it will
default to half-duplex mode and match the data rate of the non-auto-negotiating device.
Auto-MDIX (Auto-Crossover)
The Ethernet port offers Auto-MDIX. When interconnecting two Ethernet devices, a
straight-through cable or crossover cable can be used — but if one device uses AutoMDIX, the cable wiring does not matter; Auto-MDIX adjusts for either type.
Reset Switch
The IP Address, Subnet Mask and Gateway Address on the master can be reset to their
factory defaults by means of the Reset switch (located in Figure 1) as follows: Recycle
power to the switch and immediately push a paper clip or similar device through the
Reset hole until actuating the switch. Keep pressure on the Reset switch while the unit
boots up and until 3 seconds after the Status LED stops flashing. Remove the paper
clip and recycle power again. After this second reboot, the default values will apply.
7.1.2 LEDs
To aid in troubleshooting, several LEDs have been provided.
The Status LED flashes green during boot up — then glows solid green while operation is
fault-free. If a fault occurs, the LED glows solid red. On the master module, this LED
flashing green (after boot up) indicates Modbus serial activity.
The master module has an Ethernet LED that glows green when properly linked to
equipment operating at 100 Mbps (yellow for 10 Mbps) and indicates activity by flashing.
The expansion module has a Network LED that flashes green to indicate data transfers.
I/O LEDs 1–8 follow the behavior described in the chart below :
If the I/O channel is …
Green indicates …
Red indicates …
a Relay output
the coil is energized.
(not used for relay output.)
an Analog output
the command is greater than zero.
10% deviation from command
a Contact input
the contact is made.
(not used for contact input.)
a Pulse input
the input state changed.
(not used for pulse input.)
a Thermistor
current flow is detected
No current flow detected
an Analog input
the signal is greater than 1% of span.
(not used for analog input.)
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7.1.3 Accessing the Web Server on the Master Unit
7.1.3.1
Web Browser
The master contains an interactive web server, accessible from any Internet-compatible
PC on the local network. It is compatible with recent versions of Internet Explorer (5.0 or later,
suggested) or Netscape Navigator (7.1 or later, required). It is factory-programmed with
a default IP address of 192.168.92.68 and a Class C subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
Once configured, changing the BAS Remote IP address is strongly encouraged.
7.1.3.2
Initial Access
The hardware arrangement for initially setting the master
IP address appears in Figure 13. The PC should be
temporarily disconnected from the Ethernet LAN in
case the master’s default address matches that of a
device on the existing LAN. The procedure for altering
the IP address creates a temporary LAN composed of
nothing but the master, the PC used to configure it and
a CAT5 cable connecting the two. Since the master
supports Auto-MDIX, either straight-through or crossover
cable can be used.
Figure 13 — Setup for Initial IP Address
Configuration by Web Browser
For initial configuration, the PC chosen for the
procedure should temporarily have its IP address
modified as shown in Figure 14 — which employs a
Windows 2000 example.
Figure 14 — Steps for Changing the IP Address of the PC Used for Setup
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Figure 14 suggests an IP address for the PC of 192.168.92.69, but the final quad of the
address could be any value from 1 to 254 — except for 68 which is used by the master.
After the IP address of the PC has been set to the same LAN as the master, a browser
can access the master’s default IP address. The master does not support DHCP.
Figure 15 displays just the relevant upper portion of the screen that appears when you
access the master. Just beneath the device image is a link named “Configure Settings”.
Clicking this link opens another window where you can adjust the values shown in
Figure 17. The System Configuration portion is discussed in Section 7.1.3.3 below. The
Modbus Configuration portion (not relevant for all users) is discussed in Section 7.1.7.
Figure 15 — Master Main Page (Partial View)
Figure 16 — Expansion Main Screen (Partial View)
Figure 16 displays a faded view of an expansion main screen (for three expansion
Units) except for those elements that differ from the master screen.
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7.1.3.3
System Configuration (Figure 17)
System Name
Give your system any name you wish.
IP Address
Changing the default value of 192.168.92.68 is recommended.
Subnet Mask
The default value of 255.255.255.0 is adequate for most users.
Gateway Address If your Ethernet LAN has a gateway (router) enter its address here.
On a BACnet network, each device must have a unique 22-bit number
to identify itself. The BAS Remote master instance has a valid
range of 0–4194302 (including the boundary).
Device Instance
Master Unit Name Give your master module any name you wish.
Modbus Address
The default value is 1.
Expansion Units
Choose from the default of 0 to as many as 3 units. This value will
set the number of tabs that you see atop the main screen.
NOTE: Whether you are adjusting System Configuration
or Modbus Configuration Clicking “UPDATE” will save
your values to internal memory, but you must reboot the
master module before the new values will apply!
After the master has been given its initial configuration, it will be ready for use in the full
original Ethernet network. The temporary Ethernet network constructed in Figure 13
should be dismantled and the PC re-configured to restore its original IP address.
Figure 17 — Configuring the Master Module
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7.1.4 Web Server Screen Overview
From the Web Server Screen (Figure 18) you can configure all I/O channels, view their
status or force them as part of a commissioning process. (The figure uses the master unit
as an example, but the expansion unit appears very similar and functions the same.)
Immediately beneath the right side of the banner, the following links are displayed:
Help displays a new window (Figure 20) with context-sensitive information.
BASAutomation.com links to the WWW home page for further helpful information.
Figure 18 — Web Server Page
The Configure Settings button (just below the device image) provides access to the basic
device configuration fields already discussed (Figure 17).
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The BAS Remote image includes a graphic representation of each I/O Channel. Each of
and
) that open additional windows used for
the 8 channels has two icons (
configuring or forcing each Channel. The use of these links is discussed in Section 7.3.
The large gray section at the bottom of the screen labeled Current Settings is the device
“Monitor” — a read-only display of information for the BAS Remote module currently
selected. The tab in bold face near the top of the screen indicates the module selected.
Figure 19 below is an example in which expansion Unit 2 has been selected.
NOTE: The number of tabs displayed is determined by the number of
expansion Units selected in the master Configuration Screen (Figure
17).
Figure 19 — The Tab in Bold Face Indicates the Selected Module
In the upper-left portion of the Monitor shown in Figure 18, two values (Unit Name and
Modbus Address) are displayed for the currently selected module.
To the right of the Modbus Address value is a box which reports one of two possible
pieces of information — depending on the type of BAS Remote module currently selected.
When the master is selected, the box will display the BACnet Device Instance of the
master. If an expansion module is selected, the box will report the module’s status: It will
be ONLINE if its connection to the master is valid or OFFLINE if the connection is invalid.
An OFFLINE report usually means the expansion module cannot communicate with the
master due to a cabling issue.
In the upper-right portion of the Monitor, the status of each channel (point) is reported with
the Override indicators and the LED Status indicators. All of these LEDs are refreshed at
the rate of once per second.
The lower portion of the Monitor displays the Channel Names and their Present Values.
7.1.5 On-Screen Help
There are several screens used for configuring or forcing each channel. The upper-right
portion of each screen displays a Help option. Clicking this option launches another
browser window with helpful information about the current screen.
Figure 20 — Help Window
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7.1.6 Bias and Termination
Each master and expansion module has two expansion ports. The master ports are
labeled MB and DN; the expansion ports are UP and DN. These are shared buses
where only one device drives the bus at any one time. When no device is driving the
bus, the bus floats. To prevent noise from being interpreted as data, the bus must be
biased to a valid state. (The Modbus Serial specification calls this polarization.) With
no data on the bus, the D+ pin is biased to be more positive than the D- pin. Bias is
applied at only one point on the bus: the master provides bias internally on its MB port,
the expansion does so on its UP port.
7.1.7 Communicating With Modbus Slaves
The master is compliant with the Modbus TCP specification and functions as a server
gateway to Modbus slave devices. It passes data between a Modbus TCP host and
Modbus slaves attached on its MB port which must be properly configured using a web
browser. As illustrated in the lower section of Figure 1, you must specify the Baudrate
(2.4 k, 4.8 k, 9.6 k, 19.2 k, 38.4 k, 57.6 k or 115.2 k), the Protocol (ASCII or RTU), Parity
(odd, even or none) and the Timeout (seconds the master will wait for a reply from an
attached Modbus device). In the previous sentence, default settings are indicated by
bold-face type. If no parity is selected, two stop bits are inserted instead of one.
Each master and expansion module can be accessed through the Modbus TCP server
gateway using a Java-enabled web browser. Each master and expansion module must
be assigned a unique Modbus address from 1 to 247, preventing a conflict with any
Modbus slave address. The only configuration needed for accessing master and
expansion modules is their address assignment.
Attach EIA-485 Modbus slave devices to the master’s MB port. Match the D+ and Dpins on the MB connector to the corresponding pins on the Modbus slave.
For a 2-wire Modbus slave, make earth connections on both the master and the slave.
For a 3-wire isolated EIA-485 Modbus slave, its common connection must be made to
the SC pin on the MB port. If shielded cable is employed, use two-pair cable with one
pair for data and one pair (with wires shorted together) connected to signal common.
Connect the shield to earth at only one point, preferably near the master.
7.1.8 Communicating from Master to Expansion Modules
The master uses the downstream port DN to communicate to the upstream port UP on
the expansion. If additional expansion modules are used, they are cascaded such that
the DN port of the expansion module nearest the master is connected to the UP port on
the added expansion module. Commands received by an expansion module’s UP port
are relayed to its DN port while being read by the module itself. Similarly, a response
received at the DN port is transferred to the UP port — eventually arriving at the master.
Thus all connections (master-expansion and expansion-expansion) are point-to-point
with termination and bias in each UP transceiver. DN ports have termination only.
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7.2 Input/Output Channels (I/O)
7.2.1 Universal I/Os
Six identical universal I/O channels allow any mix of inputs and outputs requiring only
two connections labelled A and B. Pin A is always more positive than pin B. Channels
are labelled I/O 1 through I/O 6 and are divided equally between two six-pin terminal
blocks. One terminal block is for I/O 1–3 and the other is for I/O 4–6. Configuring is
done via the built-in web server. Input resolution is 10 bits; output resolution is 12 bits.
Schottky barrier diodes protect the electronics from over-voltage faults on inputs A and
B. Also, a PPTC (polymeric positive temperature coefficient) resettable fuse protects
terminal B from over-voltage when driven to ground.
Pin A can be an input or output. Pin B can be an input or ground. A D/A converter is
used for generating analog voltage or current outputs, and for providing excitation
current for contact closure sensing and for thermistor measurement.
In current output mode, pin B is grounded. The output burden applied to pins A and B
can range from 0 to 750 Ω. Since the internal burden is 250 Ω, the output voltage at pin
A can range from 0–20 volts when driving 20 mA.
When measuring input voltages, pin A receives input while pin B is held at ground. Any
DC voltage in the range of 0–5 V or 0–10 V can be measured.
When measuring current, pin B is unused and the input on pin A sees a 250 Ω load.
To sense contact closure, 2 mA is output at pin A while pin B is grounded. Then the
voltage at pin A is measured. Any value below 0.3 volts (150 Ω) is considered a closed
circuit. Dry-contact or solid-state switches being sensed must withstand an opensource voltage of 24 VDC and a current of 2 mA. For solid-state switches, the most
positive connection is at pin A and a saturation voltage under 0.3 V is required.
A 10 kΩ thermistor is applied between pins A and B. Thermistors are non-linear heat
sensing devices with a negative temperature coefficient of resistance. At nominal room
temperature (77 °F), the resistance of a Type II or Type III thermistor is 10 kΩ. Both
have curves with an accuracy of ±0.36 °F from 32 °F to 158 °F. Because higher
resistance thermistors (such as 10 kΩ) introduce error due to the self-heating effect, lower
thermistor current is used — thus minimizing self-heat and measurement inaccuracy.
7.2.2 Relay Outputs
There are two independent SPDT relay outputs. For each output, both the NO and NC
contacts are brought out to a six-pin terminal block. Contacts are rated at 2A at 30 VAC
and 2A at 30 VDC. Wiring to the BAS Remote should only be Class 2. To control
higher voltages, the safer approach is to connect the coils of Class 2 interposing relays
to the contacts of the BAS Remote and have the contacts of the interposing relays
connect to the Class 1 circuits. These interposing relays should be further from the
BAS Remote and closer to the Class 1 equipment.
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7.3 Channel Configuring
To configure a channel, access the Web Server Page, click on the
icon for the channel
of interest and make adjustments in the new screen that appears. Your selected channel
is confirmed by the blue number on the left side of the new screen. As shown in Figure
21, once you click on the Save button, a confirmation is displayed in the lowest box in the
screen. If you attempt to set an illegal value, this box will display an error message.
7.3.1 Analog Voltage Input Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as “INPUT: 0–10V Analog” or “INPUT: 0–5V Analog” (Figure
21 uses Channel 1 and 0-10V as an example). Such a channel can accept an input voltage in
the range of 0–10 volts or 0–5 volts. On this screen, you can adjust these parameters:
Channel Name
You can rename the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Electrical default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The VOLTS default can be set to any option in the list. These options change
automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
User Scaling section of the screen:
ACTUAL HIGH
This specifies the highest value within the range.
ACTUAL LOW
This specifies the lowest value within the range.
SCALED HIGH
You can set a physical value corresponding to the high value.
SCALED LOW
You can set a physical value corresponding to the low value.
Figure 21 — Analog Input Configuration
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7.3.2 Analog Voltage Output Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as type “OUTPUT : 0–10V Analog” as shown in Figure 22,
using Channel 1 as an example. Such a channel can supply an output voltage in the range of
0–10 V. On this screen, you can adjust any of the following parameters.
Channel Name
You can rename the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Electrical default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The VOLTS default can be set to any option in the list. These options change
automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
User Scaling section of the screen:
ACTUAL HIGH
This specifies the highest value within the range.
ACTUAL LOW
This specifies the lowest value within the range.
SCALED HIGH
You can set a physical value corresponding to the high value.
SCALED LOW
You can set a physical value corresponding to the low value.
Figure 22 — Analog Output Configuration
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7.3.3 Binary Input Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as type “INPUT: Binary” as shown in Figure 23 which uses
Channel 1 as an example. On this screen, you can adjust these parameters.
Channel Name
You can name the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Others default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The NO_UNITS default can be set to any option in the list. These options
change automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
Figure 23 — Binary Input Configuration
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7.3.4 Current Input Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as type INPUT: 0–20 mA as shown in Figure 24 which uses
Channel 1 as an example. Such a channel can accept an input current in the range of 0–20
mA. On this screen, you can adjust any of the following parameters.
Channel Name
You can rename the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Electrical default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The MILLIAMPERES default can be set to any option in the list. These options
change automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
User Scaling section of the screen:
ACTUAL HIGH
This specifies the highest value within the range.
ACTUAL LOW
This specifies the lowest value within the range.
SCALED HIGH
You can set a physical value corresponding to the high value.
SCALED LOW
You can set a physical value corresponding to the low value.
Figure 24 — Current Input Configuration
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7.3.5 Thermistor Input Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as a Type II or III thermistor input as shown in Figure 25 which
uses a Type 3 thermistor and Channel 1 as an example. On this screen, you can adjust any of
the following parameters.
Channel Type
You can select a Type II or Type III thermistor profile.
Channel Name
You can name the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Temperature default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The DEGREES_FAHRENHEIT default can be set to any option in the list.
These options change to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
Temperature Input section of the screen:
Offset
You can specify a (+) or (–) number of degrees offset — if, for example,
the thermistor in use is known to be delivering an inaccurate reading.
Temp Units
The default Fahrenheit temperature scale can be changed to Celsius.
Figure 25 — Thermistor Input Configuration
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7.3.6 Pulse Input Configuring
You can define any channel 1–6 as type “INPUT: Pulse” as shown in Figure 26 which uses
Channel 1 as an example. Such a channel can accept a pulse train in the range of 0–40 Hz.
On this screen, you can adjust any of the following parameters.
Channel Name
You can rename the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Others default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The NO_UNITS default can be set to any option in the list. These options
change automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
User Scaling section of the screen:
ACTUAL HIGH
This specifies the highest value within the range.
ACTUAL LOW
This specifies the lowest value within the range.
SCALED HIGH
You can set a physical value corresponding to the high value.
SCALED LOW
You can set a physical value corresponding to the low value.
Pulse Input section of the screen:
Period
If the “Rate” option has been selected, this specifies the period in
seconds — otherwise, this field is not present on the screen.
Rate
This specifies that the rate of the input is being obtained.
Accumulate
This specifies that the input pulses are being accumulated (absolute
count) — with no limit to the time during which pulses are counted.
High Level (V)
You can specify a value from 10 down to (but more than) the “Low Level”.
Low Level (V)
You can specify a value from 0 up to (but less than) the “High Level”.
Figure 26 — Pulse Input Configuration
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7.3.7 Relay Output Configuring
Channels 7 and 8 are fixed as type OUTPUT: Relay as shown in Figure 27 which uses Channel
8 as an example. Each channel provides a relay contact rated at 30 VAC/DC, 2A. Each relay
has a normally-open and a normally-closed set of contacts. On this screen, you can adjust one
parameter.
Channel Name
You can name the channel using no more than 48 characters.
BACnet Unit Group
The Others default can be set to any option in the list.
BACnet Unit Value
The NO_UNITS default can be set to any option in the list. These options
change automatically to agree with the BACnet Unit Group you specify.
Figure 27 — Relay Output Configuration
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7.4 Channel Forcing
To force a channel, access the Web Server Page, click on the
icon for the channel of
interest and make adjustments in the new screen that appears. Your selected channel
is confirmed by the blue number on the left side of the new screen. If you apply an
override value, the override condition will be indicated by a simulated LED on the main
Web Server Screen — as described in Section 7.1.4.
For any channel type selected, the “Forcing” screen will report information for the
following read-only fields:
Channel Type
This reports the type that you have defined for this channel.
Channel Name
This reports the name that you have specified for this channel.
Status
This reports any of the following conditions:
Status OK
Output Overload
Input Shorted or Open
Input Open
Input Shorted
7.4.1 Analog Input Forcing
In addition to type, name and status — this screen displays the following fields :
Input Value
This reports the Input Value (read-only).
Override Value
You can specify an Override Value.
Override
Checking this box will put the Override Value in effect — after the
Apply button is clicked.
Figure 28 — Analog Input Forcing
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7.4.2 Digital Input Forcing
In addition to type, name and status — this screen displays the following fields :
Input Value
This reports the Input Value (read-only) as ON or OFF.
Override Value
You can specify an Override Value as ON or OFF.
Override
Checking this box will put the Override Value in effect — after the
Apply button is clicked.
Figure 29 — Digital Input Forcing
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7.4.3 Current Input Forcing
In addition to type, name and status — this screen displays the following fields :
Input Value
This reports the Input Value (read-only).
Override Value
You can specify an Override Value.
Override
Checking this box will put the Override Value in effect — after the
Apply button is clicked.
Figure 30 — Current Input Forcing
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7.4.4 Thermistor Input Forcing
In addition to type, name and status — this screen displays the following fields :
Input Value
This reports the Input Value (read-only).
Override Value
You can specify an Override Value.
Override
Checking this box will put the Override Value in effect — after the
Apply button is clicked.
Figure 31 — Thermistor Input Forcing
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7.4.5 Relay Output Forcing
In addition to type, name and status — this screen displays the following fields :
Input Value
This reports the Input Value (read-only) as ON or OFF.
Override Value
You can specify an Override Value as ON or OFF.
Override
Checking this box will put the Override Value in effect — after the
Apply button is clicked.
Figure 32 — Relay Output Forcing
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8 Appendix
8.1 BACnet Object Model
The BAS Remote complies with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 135-2004.
8.2 Device
Property Identifier
Property Datatype
Code Value
Object_Identifier
BACnetObjectIdentifier
R
(Device, Instance 2749)
Object_Name
CharacterString
R
“BAS System Building 1”
Object_Type
BACnetObjectType
R
DEVICE
System_Status
BACnetDeviceStatus
R
(OPERATIONAL)
Vendor_Name
CharacterString
R
“Contemporary Controls”
Vendor_Identifier
Unsigned16
R
245
Model_Name
CharacterString
R
“BASR-8M”
Firmware_Revision
CharacterString
R
“1.0”
Application_Software_Version
CharacterString
R
“1.0”
Protocol_Version
Unsigned
R
2
Protocol_Revision
Unsigned
R
Protocol_Services_Supported
BACnetServicesSupported
R
(List of Services)
Protocol_Object_Types_Supported
BACnetObjectTypesSupported
R
(List of Object Types)
Object_List
BACnetARRAY[N]of ..Identifier
R
(List of all the objects)
Max_APDU_Length_Accepted
Unsigned
R
1476
Segmentation_Supported
BACnetSegmentation
R
(NO SEGMENT)
APDU_Timeout
Unsigned
R
(3000 MSEC)
Number_Of_APDU_Retries
Unsigned
R
0
Device_Address_Binding
List of BACnetAddressBinding
R
Database_Revision
Unsigned
R
1
Object Identifier (comprised of the object type DEVICE and an instance number) must be
unique within the complete BACnet network. The default instance (2749) is changed during
commissioning. Object Name can be set to some meaningful description (e.g.: device location).
The remaining fields are set by the manufacturer.
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8.3 Analog Input
Property
Identifier
Property Datatype
Cod
e
Object_Identifier
BACnetObjectIdentifier
Object_Name
CharacterString
R
Object_Type
BACnetObjectType
R
Present_Value
REAL
R
Status_Flags
BACnetStatusFlags
R
Event_Stte
BACnetEventState
R
Out_Of_Service
BOOLEAN
R
Units
BACnetEngineeringUnits
R
Property
Identifier
Property Datatype
Cod
e
Object_Identifier
BACnetObjectIdentifier
R
Object_Name
CharacterString
R
Object_Type
BACnetObjectType
R
Present_Value
REAL
W
Status_Flags
BACnetStatusFlags
R
Event_Stte
BACnetEventState
R
Out_Of_Service
BOOLEAN
R
Units
BACnetEngineeringUnits
R
Priority Array
BACnetPriorityArray
R
Relinquish_Default
REAL
R
Property
Identifier
Property Datatype
Code
Object_Identifier
BACnetObjectIdentifier
R
Object_Name
CharacterString
R
Object_Type
BACnetObjectType
R
Present_Value
BACnetBinaryPV
R
Status_Flags
BACnetStatusFlags
R
Event_State
BACnetEventState
R
Out_Of_Service
BOOLEAN
R
Polarity
BACnetPolarity
R
Remarks
R
8.4 Analog Output
Remarks
8.5 Binary Input
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Remarks
8.6 Binary Output
Property Identifier
Property Datatype
Code
Object_Identifier
BACnetObjectIdentifier
R
Object_Name
CharacterString
R
Object_Type
BACnetObjectType
R
Present_Value
BACnetBinaryPV
W
Status_Flags
BACnetStatusFlags
R
Event_State
BACnetEventState
R
Out_Of_Service
BOOLEAN
R
Polarity
BACnetPolarity
R
Remarks
BAS Remotes comply with the BACnet Application Specific Controller (B-ASC) profile of the six
possible standardized BACnet devices. A B-ASC device can do the following:
Data Sharing
•
Ability to provide the values of any of its BACnet objects
•
Ability to allow modification of some or all of its BACnet objects by another device
Alarm and Event Management
•
No requirement
Scheduling
•
No requirement
Trending
•
No requirement
Device and Network Management
•
Ability to respond to queries about its status
•
Ability to respond to request for information about any of its objects
•
Ability to respond to communication control messages
Based upon these requirements, a B-ASC must comply with the following BACnet Interoperability
Building Blocks (BIBBs).
B-ASC
Data Sharing
DS-RP-B
DS-WP-B
Device and Network
Management
DM-DDB-B
DM-DOB-B
DM-DCC-B
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8.7 BIBBs
BIBBs are collections of one or more BACnet services between devices on a BACnet network.
An “A” device is generally the user of the service or client while the “B” device is the provider of
the service or the server. These references are necessary when understanding the BIBBs.
8.7.1
DS-RP-B Data Sharing — ReadProperty — B
The BAS Remote functions as the B device and is a provider of data to an A device.
BACnet Service
Initiate
ReadProperty
8.7.2
Execute
X
DS-WP-B Data Sharing — WriteProperty — B
The BAS Remote functions as the B device and allows a value to be changed by the A device.
BACnet Service
Initiate
WriteProperty
8.7.3
Execute
X
DM-DDB Device Management — Dynamic Device Binding — B
The BAS Remote functioning as the B device provides information about its device attributes
and responds to requests to identify itself.
BACnet Service
Initiate
Who-Is
X
I-Am
8.7.4
Execute
X
DM-DOB-B Device Management — Dynamic Object Binding — B
The BAS Remote functioning as the B device provides address information about its objects
upon request.
BACnet Service
Initiate
Who-Has
X
I-Have
8.7.5
Execute
X
DM-DCC-B Device Management — Device Communication Control — B
The BAS Remote functions as a B device and responds to communication control exercised by
an A device.
BACnet Service
Initiate
DeviceCommunicationControl
Execute
X
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8.8 Linux License
GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
Version 2, June 1991
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991 Free Software Foundation, Inc.,
51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA
Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies
of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.
Preamble
The licenses for most software are designed to take away your freedom to share and change it. By
contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change
free software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. This General Public License applies to
most of the Free Software Foundation’s software and to any other program whose authors commit to
using it. (Some other Free Software Foundation software is covered by the GNU Lesser General Public
License instead.) You can apply it to your programs, too.
When we speak of free software, we are referring to freedom, not price. Our General Public Licenses are
designed to make sure that you have the freedom to distribute copies of free software (and charge for this
service if you wish), that you receive source code or can get it if you want it, that you can change the
software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that you know you can do these things.
To protect your rights, we need to make restrictions that forbid anyone to deny you these rights or to ask
you to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for you if you distribute
copies of the software, or if you modify it.
For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must give the
recipients all the rights that you have. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source
code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights.
We protect your rights with two steps: (1) copyright the software, and (2) offer you this license which gives
you legal permission to copy, distribute and/or modify the software.
Also, for each author’s protection and ours, we want to make certain that everyone understands that there
is no warranty for this free software. If the software is modified by someone else and passed on, we
want its recipients to know that what they have is not the original, so that any problems introduced by
others will not reflect on the original authors’ reputations.
Finally, any free program is threatened constantly by software patents. We wish to avoid the danger that
redistributors of a free program will individually obtain patent licenses, in effect making the program
proprietary. To prevent this, we have made it clear that any patent must be licensed for everyone’s free
use or not licensed at all.
The precise terms and conditions for copying, distribution and modification follow.
TD040300-0MC
51
GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE
TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COPYING,
DISTRIBUTION AND MODIFICATION
0. This License applies to any program or other work which contains a notice placed by the copyright
holder saying it may be distributed under the terms of this General Public License. The “Program”, below,
refers to any such program or work, and a “work based on the Program” means either the Program or any
derivative work under copyright law: that is to say, a work containing the Program or a portion of it, either
verbatim or with modifications and/or translated into another language. (Hereinafter, translation is
included without limitation in the term “modification”.) Each licensee is addressed as “you”.
Activities other than copying, distribution and modification are not covered by this License; they are outside
its scope. The act of running the Program is not restricted, and the output from the Program is covered only
if its contents constitute a work based on the Program (independent of having been made by running the
Program). Whether that is true depends on what the Program does.
1. You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program’s source code as you receive it, in any
medium, provided that you conspicuously and appropriately publish on each copy an appropriate
copyright notice and disclaimer of warranty; keep intact all the notices that refer to this License and to the
absence of any warranty; and give any other recipients of the Program a copy of this License along with
the Program.
You may charge a fee for the physical act of transferring a copy, and you may at your option offer
warranty protection in exchange for a fee.
2. You may modify your copy or copies of the Program or any portion of it, thus forming a work based on
the Program, and copy and distribute such modifications or work under the terms of Section 1 above,
provided that you also meet all of these conditions:
a) You must cause the modified files to carry prominent notices stating that you changed the files and
the date of any change.
b) You must cause any work that you distribute or publish, that in whole or in part contains or is derived
from the Program or any part thereof, to be licensed as a whole at no charge to all third parties under
the terms of this License.
c) If the modified program normally reads commands interactively when run, you must cause it, when
started running for such interactive use in the most ordinary way, to print or display an announcement
including an appropriate copyright notice and a notice that there is no warranty (or else, saying that you
provide a warranty) and that users may redistribute the program under these conditions, and telling the
user how to view a copy of this License. (Exception: if the Program itself is interactive but does not
normally print such an announcement, your work based on the Program is not required to print an
announcement.)
These requirements apply to the modified work as a whole. If identifiable sections of that work are not
derived from the Program, and can be reasonably considered independent and separate works in
themselves, then this License, and its terms, do not apply to those sections when you distribute them as
separate works. But when you distribute the same sections as part of a whole which is a work based on
the Program, the distribution of the whole must be on the terms of this License, whose permissions for
other licensees extend to the entire whole, and thus to each and every part regardless of who wrote it.
Thus, it is not the intent of this section to claim rights or contest your rights to work written entirely by you;
rather, the intent is to exercise the right to control the distribution of derivative or collective works based
on the Program.
In addition, mere aggregation of another work not based on the Program with the Program (or with a work
based on the Program) on a volume of a storage or distribution medium does not bring the other work
under the scope of this License.
TD040300-0MC
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3. You may copy and distribute the Program (or a work based on it, under Section 2) in object code or
executable form under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above provided that you also do one of the following:
a) Accompany it with the complete corresponding machine-readable source code, which must be
distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a medium customarily used for software
interchange; or,
b) Accompany it with a written offer, valid for at least three years, to give any third party, for a charge no
more than your cost of physically performing source distribution, a complete machine-readable copy of
the corresponding source code, to be distributed under the terms of Sections 1 and 2 above on a
medium customarily used for software interchange; or,
c) Accompany it with the information you received as to the offer to distribute corresponding source
code. (This alternative is allowed only for noncommercial distribution and only if you received the
program in object code or executable form with such an offer, in accord with Subsection b above.)
The source code for a work means the preferred form of the work for making modifications to it. For an
executable work, complete source code means all the source code for all modules it contains, plus any
associated interface definition files, plus the scripts used to control compilation and installation of the
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is normally distributed (in either source or binary form) with the major components (compiler, kernel, and
so on) of the operating system on which the executable runs, unless that component itself accompanies
the executable.
If distribution of executable or object code is made by offering access to copy from a designated place,
then offering equivalent access to copy the source code from the same place counts as distribution of the
source code, even though third parties are not compelled to copy the source along with the object code.
4. You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Program except as expressly provided under
this License. Any attempt otherwise to copy, modify, sublicense or distribute the Program is void, and will
automatically terminate your rights under this License.
However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from you under this License will not have their
licenses terminated so long as such parties remain in full compliance.
5. You are not required to accept this License, since you have not signed it. However, nothing else
grants you permission to modify or distribute the Program or its derivative works. These actions are
prohibited by law if you do not accept this License. Therefore, by modifying or distributing the Program
(or any work based on the Program), you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so, and all its
terms and conditions for copying, distributing or modifying the Program or works based on it.
6. Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the Program), the recipient automatically
receives a license from the original licensor to copy, distribute or modify the Program subject to these terms
and conditions. You may not impose any further restrictions on the recipients’ exercise of the rights granted
herein. You are not responsible for enforcing compliance by third parties to this License.
TD040300-0MC
53
7. If, as a consequence of a court judgment or allegation of patent infringement or for any other reason
(not limited to patent issues), conditions are imposed on you (whether by court order, agreement or
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this License. If you cannot distribute so as to satisfy simultaneously your obligations under this License
and any other pertinent obligations, then as a consequence you may not distribute the Program at all.
For example, if a patent license would not permit royalty-free redistribution of the Program by all those
who receive copies directly or indirectly through you, then the only way you could satisfy both it and this
License would be to refrain entirely from distribution of the Program.
If any portion of this section is held invalid or unenforceable under any particular circumstance, the
balance of the section is intended to apply and the section as a whole is intended to apply in other circumstances.
It is not the purpose of this section to induce you to infringe any patents or other property right claims or
to contest validity of any such claims; this section has the sole purpose of protecting the integrity of the
free software distribution system, which is implemented by public license practices. Many people have
made generous contributions to the wide range of software distributed through that system in reliance on
consistent application of that system; it is up to the author/donor to decide if he or she is willing to
distribute software through any other system and a licensee cannot impose that choice.
This section is intended to make thoroughly clear what is believed to be a consequence of the rest of this License.
8. If the distribution and/or use of the Program is restricted in certain countries either by patents or by
copyrighted interfaces, the original copyright holder who places the Program under this License may add
an explicit geographical distribution limitation excluding those countries, so that distribution is permitted
only in or among countries not thus excluded. In such case, this License incorporates the limitation as if
written in the body of this License.
9. The Free Software Foundation may publish revised and/or new versions of the General Public License
from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail
to address new problems or concerns.
Each version is given a distinguishing version number. If the Program specifies a version number of this
License which applies to it and “any later version”, you have the option of following the terms and
conditions either of that version or of any later version published by the Free Software Foundation. If the
Program does not specify a version number of this License, you may choose any version ever published
by the Free Software Foundation.
10. If you wish to incorporate parts of the Program into other free programs whose distribution conditions
are different, write to the author to ask for permission. For software which is copyrighted by the Free
Software Foundation, write to the Free Software Foundation; we sometimes make exceptions for this.
Our decision will be guided by the two goals of preserving the free status of all derivatives of our free
software and of promoting the sharing and reuse of software generally.
NO WARRANTY
11. BECAUSE THE PROGRAM IS LICENSED FREE OF CHARGE, THERE IS NO WARRANTY FOR THE
PROGRAM, TO THE EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW. EXCEPT WHEN OTHERWISE STATED IN
WRITING THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND/OR OTHER PARTIES PROVIDE THE PROGRAM “AS IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE
RISK AS TO THE QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS WITH YOU. SHOULD THE PROGRAM
PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU ASSUME THE COST OF ALL NECESSARY SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION.
12. IN NO EVENT UNLESS REQUIRED BY APPLICABLE LAW OR AGREED TO IN WRITING WILL ANY
COPYRIGHT HOLDER, OR ANY OTHER PARTY WHO MAY MODIFY AND/OR REDISTRIBUTE THE PROGRAM
AS PERMITTED ABOVE, BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY GENERAL, SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE
PROGRAM (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LOSS OF DATA OR DATA BEING RENDERED INACCURATE OR
LOSSES SUSTAINED BY YOU OR THIRD PARTIES OR A FAILURE OF THE PROGRAM TO OPERATE WITH
ANY OTHER PROGRAMS), EVEN IF SUCH HOLDER OR OTHER PARTY HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
END OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS
TD040300-0MC
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How to Apply These Terms to Your New Programs
If you develop a new program, and you want it to be of the greatest possible use to the public, the best
way to achieve this is to make it free software which everyone can redistribute and change under these
terms.
To do so, attach the following notices to the program. It is safest to attach them to the start of each
source file to most effectively convey the exclusion of warranty; and each file should have at least the
“copyright” line and a pointer to where the full notice is found.
<one line to give the program’s name and a brief idea of what it does.>
Copyright (C) <year> <name of author>
This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU
General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License,
or (at your option) any later version.
This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without
even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See
the GNU General Public License for more details.
You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with this program; if not, write
to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USA.
Also add information on how to contact you by electronic and paper mail.
If the program is interactive, make it output a short notice like this when it starts in an interactive mode:
Gnomovision version 69, Copyright (C) year name of author Gnomovision comes with ABSOLUTELY
NO WARRANTY; for details type `show w’. This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; type `show c’ for details.
The hypothetical commands `show w’ and `show c’ should show the appropriate parts of the General
Public License. Of course, the commands you use may be called something other than `show w’ and
`show c’; they could even be mouse-clicks or menu items—whatever suits your program.
You should also get your employer (if you work as a programmer) or your school, if any, to sign a
“copyright disclaimer” for the program, if necessary. Here is a sample; alter the names:
Yoyodyne, Inc., hereby disclaims all copyright interest in the program `Gnomovision’ (which makes
passes at compilers) written by James Hacker.
<signature of Ty Coon>, 1 April 1989
Ty Coon, President of Vice
This General Public License does not permit incorporating your program into proprietary programs. If
your program is a subroutine library, you may consider it more useful to permit linking proprietary
applications with the library. If this is what you want to do, use the GNU Lesser General Public License
instead of this License.
TD040300-0MC
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