Method and system for providing resource access in a mobile

Method and system for providing resource access in a mobile
US006715131B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
(45) Date of Patent:
Martin, Jr. et al.
(54)
(75)
(56)
METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR PROVIDING
RESOURCE ACCESS IN A MOBILE
ENVIRONMENT
B1
B1
B1
B1
1/2001
1/2001
11/2001
4/2002
Beall et al. ............... ..
Nakamura et al. ........ ..
De Boor et al. .......... ..
Gotou et al. .............. ..
707/103
715/513
709/217
701/201
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
2 331 600 A
WO 97/49044
5/1999
12/1997
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days.
Bickmore et al., “Digestor: device—independent access to the
World Wide Web,” Computer Networks and ISDN Systems,
vol. 29, No. 8—13, Sep. 1997, pp. 1075—1082.
Greg Hewgill, “Copilot User’s Manual,” Copilot User’s
(21) Appl. No.: 10/458,033
Jun. 9, 2003
(22) Filed:
Prior Publication Data
(65)
Manual Version 1.0 Beta 9, URL: www.hewgill.com/pilot/
copilot/copilothtml.
Primary Examiner—Thomas M. Heckler
US 2003/0214529 A1 Nov. 20, 2003
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm—Beyer Weaver & Thomas,
LLP
Related US. Application Data
(62)
References Cited
6,169,992
6,178,433
6,317,781
6,377,886
GB
W0
(73) Assignee: Openwave Systems Inc., Redwood
City, CA (US)
(*)
Mar. 30, 2004
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
Inventors: Bruce K. Martin, Jr., Palo Alto, CA
(US); Arnaud P. Y. Capitant, Paris
(FR); Lawrence M. Stein, San Jose,
CA (US); Jonathan M. Wul?', Los
Gatos, CA (US); Andrew L. Laursen,
San Mateo, CA (US)
Notice:
US 6,715,131 B2
Division of application No. 09/575,901, ?led on May 22,
2000, now Pat. No. 6,610,105, which is a continuation-in
part of application No. 09/320,296, ?led on Jun. 7, 1999,
now Pat. No. 6,233,608, which is a continuation of appli
cation No. 08/987,346, ?led on Dec. 9, 1997, now Pat. No.
(57)
ABSTRACT
Techniques that facilitate participation of mobile devices in
accessing resources over a data network are disclosed. The
data network can be wired, wireless or some combination
6,065,120.
thereof. In one aspect, a mobile navigation metaphor is
(60)
Provisional application No. 60/154,420, ?led on Sep. 17,
provided to yield similar navigation experiences on both
(51)
(52)
(58)
Int. Cl.7 ................................................ .. G06F 3/14
central content server is able to return requested content to
US.
requesters in a format suitable for their device.
1999.
mobile devices and personal computers. In another aspect, a
Cl.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . ..
715/526
Field of Search ............................... .. 715/526, 500,
15 Claims, 14 Drawing Sheets
715/5001; 709/208, 217_219; 707/10
Mobile Navigation Metaphor
424
Display Screen
422
1.
2v
3.
4.
. Mai]
. Stock
. Information
Mail
Stock
Information
Address book
. Address book
. Directions
. Remainders
. Travel
. Driving
Markup language B
Markup langmage A
(HTML, XML, ...)
(WML, HDML,
cHTML, ...)
426
420
Menu
Database
Host Server
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1
2
METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR PROVIDING
RESOURCE ACCESS IN A MOBILE
ENVIRONMENT
In order to provide mobility and portable access to the
World Wide Web, interactive tWo-Way communication
mobile devices have been introduced that are capable of
communicating, via Wireless data netWorks, With the Inter
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
net. As an example, see US. Pat. No. 5,809,415, Which is
assigned to the assignee of the present invention, and hereby
incorporated by reference herein. The interactive tWo-Way
This application is a Divisional application of co-pending
US. patent application Ser. No. 09/575,901, entitled
“Method And System for Providing Resource Access in a
Mobile Environment,” ?led May 22, 2000, now US. Pat.
No. 6,610,105, Which claims the bene?t of US. Provisional
communication mobile devices include tWo-Way pagers,
cellular phones, palm-siZed computing devices and personal
10
Application No. 60/154,420, ?led Sep. 17, 1999, entitled
“Method and System for Providing a Mobile Navigation
Metaphor,” and Which is a continuation-in-part of US.
patent application Ser. No. 09/320,296, ?led Jun. 7, 1999,
entitled “Method and System for Securely Interacting With
Managed Data From Multiple Devices,” now US. Pat. No.
6,233,608, Which is a continuation of US. patent application
Ser. No. 08/987,346, ?led Dec. 9, 1997, entitled “Method
And Architecture For Self-Provisioning a Rendezvous To
digital assistant (PDA) devices, and are among the fastest
emerging communication devices. Such devices enable
users to receive, collect, analyZe, revieW and disseminate
information as they travel or move about.
15
In a similar manner to the portals that have been designed
to assist desktop computer users to navigate on the Internet,
efforts have been commenced to provide portals designed
speci?cally for users of mobile devices. For example, Wire
less or portable portals offered by AirFlash.com, Inc. (see
WWW.air?ash.com) and Saraide, Inc. (see WWW.saraide.com)
20
are designed for access by users of mobile devices.
Multiple Devices,” now US. Pat. No. 6,065,120, and
HoWever, a user’s navigation experience on a display
screen of a mobile device and through a typical portal
assigned to the assignee of the present application, the
vieWed on a computer screen are conventionally very dif
Ensure Secure Access to Information In a Database From
disclosures of all of Which are incorporated herein by
reference for all purposes.
ferent. This is primarily because of the substantial differ
25
tWo types of devices. In many cases, it is not at all intuitive
hoW the links and organiZation of those links into menus in
one environment are related to the presentation of those
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
A portion of the disclosure of this patent document
contains material Which is subject to copyright protection.
links and menus in the other environment. This can cause the
30
The copyright oWner has no objection to the facsimile
disclosure as it appears in the US. Patent and Trademark
Of?ce patent ?le or records, but otherWise reserves all
35
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
1. Field of the Invention
puting devices and, more speci?cally, to methods and sys
device based on their familiarity With the navigation process
on the other device. Thus, there is therefore a need for
techniques that provide users With a similar navigation
experience on both mobile devices and computers (e.g.,
desktop computers).
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
The present invention relates to user interfaces for com
user to be confused regarding hoW they should navigate
through the menu structure to get to a desired link on one
reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent
copyright rights Whatsoever.
ences betWeen the user interfaces and menu structures of the
40
Broadly speaking, the invention relates to techniques to
facilitate participation of mobile devices in accessing
tems providing consistent user interaction With a user inter
resources over a data netWork. The data netWork can be
face of a Wireless portal.
2. Description of the Related Art
The Internet is a rapidly groWing communication netWork
Wired, Wireless or some combination thereof. In one aspect
of interconnected computers and computer netWorks around
the World. Together, these millions of connected computers
form a repository of multimedia information that is readily
accessible by any of the connected computers from any
Where at any time. To facilitate the navigation of this
45
a central content server is able to return requested content to
50
repository, a number of Internet access providers offer
portals to the World Wide Web for users.
In a general sense, a “portal” is a door or entrance,
especially a grand or imposing one. In the context of the
present invention, portal is a relatively neW term for a World
Wide Web site that is or proposes to be a major starting site
for users When they get connected to the World Wide Web,
55
an image representation resembling the display screen of the
personal computer, the image representation comprising
is typically represented as a page that contains links to
60
As a computer readable medium including at least com
puter program code for providing a mobile navigation
metaphor in a portal for a mobile device having a display
(WWW.yahoo.com) and Excite (WWW.excite.com), it has
companies operating the portals and the ultimate end-users,
to establish such Internet portals.
contents that can be similarly displayed on the display
screen of the mobile device; and generating an updated
image representation Whenever the contents are updated.
ing to subject matter or the type of services offered at those
sites. With the commercial success of such search engines
that have transformed into portals such as Yahoo!
become desirable, both from the point of vieW of the
requesters in a format suitable for their device.
The invention can be implemented in numerous Ways
including, as a system, apparatus, method and computer
readable medium. Several embodiments of the invention are
discussed beloW.
As a method for providing a mobile navigation metaphor
in a portal for a mobile device having a display screen, one
embodiment of the invention includes the acts of: providing
mobile device but being displayed on a display screen of a
or that users tend to visit as an anchor site. Such a portal site
numerous other sites, With the links being organiZed accord
of the invention a mobile navigation metaphor is provided to
yield similar navigation experiences on both mobile devices
and personal computers. In another aspect of the invention,
65
screen, one embodiment of the invention includes: computer
program code for providing an image representation resem
bling the display screen of the mobile device but being
US 6,715,131 B2
3
4
displayed on a display screen of a personal computer, the
thorough understanding of the present invention. HoWever,
image representation comprising contents that can be simi
larly displayed on the display screen of the mobile device;
and computer program code for generating an updated
image representation Whenever the contents are updated.
it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the
present invention may be practiced Without these speci?c
details. The description and representation herein are the
common means used by those experienced or skilled in the
art to most effectively convey the substance of their Work to
others skilled in the art. In some instances, Well knoWn
The advantages of the invention are numerous. Different
embodiments or implementations may have one or more of
the folloWing advantages. One advantage of the invention is
methods, procedures, components, and circuitry have not
that a similar navigation experience can be had for users of
been described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring
aspects of the present invention.
The invention relates to techniques to facilitate participa
both mobile devices and personal computers. Another
10
advantage of the invention is that servers can distinguish
betWeen requesting device types (e.g., mobile device vs.
personal computer) so that the returned content is suitable
for the requesting device type.
Other aspects and advantages of the invention Will
become apparent from the folloWing detailed description,
taken in conjunction With the accompanying draWings,
illustrating by Way of example the principles of the inven
tion of mobile devices in accessing resources over a data
netWork. The data netWork can be Wired, Wireless or some
combination thereof. In one aspect of the invention a mobile
15
In another aspect of the invention, a central content server is
able to return requested content to requesters in a format
suitable for their device.
tion.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
The present invention Will be readily understood by the
folloWing detailed description in conjunction With the
accompanying draWings, Wherein like reference numerals
designate like structural elements, and in Which:
FIG. 1A shoWs exemplary system con?guration in Which
25
Referring to the draWings, in Which like numerals refer to
like parts throughout the several vieWs, FIGS. 1A—6 are
discussed in detail beloW. FIG. 1A illustrates an exemplary
system con?guration in Which the present invention may be
practiced. Landnet 100 is a landline netWork (Wired
netWork) that may be the Internet, the Intranet or a data
netWork formed from a set of private netWorks. Airnet 102
the present invention may be practiced;
FIG. 1B depicts a mobile device (e.g., a digital cellular
phone) that can be used in the exemplary system con?gu
ration of FIG. 1A;
is a Wireless data netWork. Coupled to landnet 100 are a
personal computer (PC) 110 representing one of the many
computers coupled to landnet 100 and a plurality of netWork
servers 104 (identi?ed as elements 104-1, 104-2, . . . , 104-m
in the ?gure). Preferably, personal computer 110 runs a
FIG. 2A shoWs an architecture based on the exemplary
HyperText Markup Language (HTML) broWser, such as
Netscape Navigator from Netscape Communications Cor
system con?guration of FIG. 1A;
FIG. 2B shoWs a user account associated With a mobile
device serviced by the exemplary system con?guration of
FIG. 1A;
navigation metaphor is provided to yield similar navigation
experiences on both mobile devices and personal computers.
poration (WWW.netscape.com). The HTML broWser accesses
35
information stored in netWork servers 104 via landnet 100
using HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP). The netWork
FIG. 3A shoWs an exemplary portal page according to one
servers 104 may be Workstations or desktop computers. The
information stored in netWork servers 104 may be various
media or hypermedia information and may include video
embodiment of the invention;
FIG. 3B illustrates a screen display for a mobile device
according to the mobile navigation metaphor of FIG. 3A;
footage, audio clips, text, hyperlinks, and various applica
FIG. 4A shoWs a matching table used to synchroniZe user
interfaces betWeen tWo different broWsers;
FIG. 4B shoWs a menu generation system in Which a
tions.
When netWork servers 104 provide information for
mobile devices, the information may include mobile data
designed for mobile devices. The mobile data may be
expressed in a format that is more appropriate for transport
over a Wireless netWork and for presentation (i.e., display)
single database service is used in creating different user
interfaces depending on the broWser type;
45
FIG. 4C shoWs a How diagram in Which a request is
received and parsed to access appropriate data, applications,
on a screen of the mobile devices. In such cases, the mobile
and services in a host server;
data may be communicated over the Wireless netWork using
a different protocol than that used for data transmitted over
FIG. 4D shoWs a second exemplary portal page according
to one embodiment of the invention after the “stock” link in
the mobile navigation metaphor With respect to the ?rst
exemplary portal page is activated;
FIG. 4E illustrates a screen display for a mobile device
according to the mobile navigation metaphor of FIG. 4D;
55
FIG. 5A illustrates a block diagram of a mobile device
according to one embodiment of the present invention;
FIG. 5B illustrates a block diagram of a host server
a Wired netWork (e.g., the landnet). For example, the Wired
netWork might use HTTP and HTML protocols and the
Wireless netWork might use HTTP and HDML protocols.
Mobile device 106 represents one of many mobile devices
serviced by airnet 102. Typically mobile device 106 is an
interactive tWo-Way communication device that includes,
but is not limited to, a mobile computing device, a Wireless
telephone, a palm-siZed computing device, a PDA, or an
Internet-capable appliance remote controller. Mobile device
106 is capable of communicating Wirelessly With antenna
according to one embodiment of the pint invention; and
FIG. 6 shoWs a process ?oWchart for the host server of
In the folloWing description of the present invention,
108 via airnet 102.
For simplicity, antenna 108 also represents a Wireless
carrier infrastructure that generally comprises a base station
and an operations and maintenance center. The base station
controls radio or telecommunication links With mobile
device 106. The operations and maintenance center com
numerous speci?c details are set forth in order to provide a
prises a mobile sWitching center performing the sWitching of
FIG. 5B according to one embodiment of the present inven
tion.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE
INVENTION
65
US 6,715,131 B2
5
6
calls between the mobile devices and other ?xed or mobile
network users. The operations and maintenance center man
ages mobile account services, such as authentication, and
oversees the proper operation and setup of the Wireless
netWork. Each of the hardWare components and processes in
carrier infrastructure 108 are knoWn to those skilled in the
art and are not described herein to avoid unnecessarily
factured by OpenWave Systems Inc., RedWood City, Calif.,
the assignee of the present invention. The micro-broWser
Works ef?ciently When used to display a markup language
?le speci?cally designed for use With the portable device.
Examples of such markup languages include HDML and
WML.
Referring noW to FIG. 2A, there is depicted a system
architecture based on the exemplary system con?guration of
FIG. 1A. As described above, the airnet 102 communicates
simultaneously With a plurality of mobile devices 106
obscuring aspects of the present invention.
BetWeen landnet 100 and airnet 102 there is a server
device 114 functioning as a bridge betWeen the tWo net
Works 100 and 102. Server 114, also referred to as a link
(shoWn as devices 106-1, 106-2, . . . 106-n in the ?gure). A
PC 110 represents one of the computers that use the HTML
broWser running on HTTP to access other computers/servers
132 or 134 to fetch information on line or simply copy ?les
server, proxy server, Wireless data server or netWork gate
Way server, may be a Workstation or a personal computer.
Link server 114 couples airnet 102 to landnet 100 to facili
tate the communication betWeen the tWo netWorks. It should
15
be noted that server 114 may be of the same type as one of
therefrom. When employing the present invention, PC 110
can be used to pre-enter or organiZe the frequent transactions
desired by a user of a mobile device through use of a larger
user interface and easier user input.
It is generally understood that a database or an allocation
of memory, as referenced by 130 in FIG. 2A, hosts a
servers 104, except that it implements an embodiment of the
present invention. In other Words, any one of servers 104
may function as a proxy server.
To facilitate the description of the present invention, FIG.
plurality of user accounts, each designated to an authoriZed
1B depicts a cellular phone 150 that can be used as one of
capacity in Which managed or personaliZed information is
the mobile devices 106 in the exemplary system con?gura
kept. The information stored in the user accounts can be used
tion of FIG. 1A. Cellular phone 150 includes a small screen
to provide a mobile navigation metaphor in a portal asso
152 and an extended phone keypad 154. Screen 152 is
typically a LCD display. Extended phone keypad 154
comprises, preferably, a regular phone keypad 155, a pair of
generic keys 158 and 160 and positioning key 156. Generic
ciated With mobile devices and PCs. Database 130 can be an
25
a portal from a computer on landnet 104 or through a mobile
device, the user needs ?rst to be authenticated to enable
keys 158 and 160 are used to activate soft keys displayed in
screen 152, and positioning key 156 is used to reposition an
access to a respective user account in the host server 128 or
database 130. This is typically accomplished through use of
a username/passWord pair or an assigned ticket (code).
Due to the reduced siZe, Weight and cost of mobile
devices as compared to desktop computers, most of the
element indicator or a cursor to activate a desired function
(e. g., activate one of the hyperlinks displayed in screen 152).
It should be understood that generic keys 158 and 160 and
positioning key 156 are not necessary in practicing the
present invention and can be replaced by a set of designated
keys in regular phone keypad 155. Generic keys 158 and 160
mobile devices also have very limited computing resources
35
provide a convenient means for a user to interact ef?ciently
telephone, have a keypad having far feWer keys or buttons
than a PC keyboard has, Which makes data entry laborious.
For example, a user requesting information on Stanford
University using InfoseekTM as the search engine, Would
have to input the folloWing string:
WWW.infoseek.com folloWed by “Stanford University”
devices that use soft keys or icons as an input means for
users to interact With the devices. In the folloWing, unless
otherWise speci?cally described, keys or buttons are gener
The string listed above includes over 40 characters. Auser
45
Would have no problem. HoWever, the same user operating
a keypad of a Wireless device to input the string Would be
information in a server (e.g., server 104). HoWever, HTTP
requires considerable computing poWer and netWork band
severely limited in terms of the speed of data entry due to the
small number of available keys and the close spacing
betWeen them.
Some transactions frequently desired by a user of such
mobile devices may be predetermined or pre-entered in a
Width resources. For example, a request from the computer
to establish a communication session With a netWork server
computer, including personal computers and Workstations
coupled to a netWork operating HTTP, generally has suf?
cient computing poWer, memory and display capabilities.
The computing resources available in cellular phone 150
inputting a string of this type using a PC keyboard and
broWser (e.g., Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Explorer)
an HTML broWser using HTTP can access hypermedia
may require an exchange of a number of data packets. In
addition to the resources required to implement HTTP,
signi?cant resources must be supported in the computer to
request, format, process and display information. This is not
a signi?cant disadvantage in many situations because the
compared to such computers. Moreover, the graphics capa
bilities of the display screens of the mobile devices are also
limited. Some of the mobile devices, such as a Wireless
With the phone 150. Further, it should be understood that
having a regular phone keypad is not a requirement to
practice the present invention. Some of the mobile devices
Which may be used With the present invention may have feW
or no physical keys at all, such as those palm-siZe computing
ally referred to as either the physical keys or soft keys.
It is generally understood that a computer equipped With
independent storage location or physically a part of host
server 128. To access the personaliZed information through
55
corresponding user account maintained in a host server 128
or link server 114, so that the user need only select desired
transactions folloWed by a feW letters. For example, if there
is a list of stock symbols of interest in a user account that is
associated With the user’s mobile phone, a user of the mobile
phone Will not have to key in the symbols every time he
desires to look up the current trading price of those stocks.
Instead, the list of stock symbols can be previously entered
of FIG. 1B or mobile devices 106 of FIG. 1A are typically
and associated With the user account. When the phone user
much less than What is found in a personal computer. To
enable such a mobile device to communicate ef?ciently With
accesses an application program providing stock price
a data netWork, a micro-broWser requiring less memory and
information, the list of stock symbols and their correspond
con?gured to execute in a portable device may be used. An 65 ing prices can be automatically retrieved.
FIG. 2B shoWs a user account associated With mobile
example of a micro-broWser Well-suited to operate in a
mobile communication device is one designed and manu
device 106 according to one embodiment. Typically, each
US 6,715,131 B2
7
8
mobile device serviced by a carrier (responsible for host
mobile device navigation screen, it is not required to be an
identical or near identical replication. Instead, the mobile
server 128) is assigned a device ID 140 Which can be a
phone number of the device, or a combination of an IP
navigation metaphor 302 should provide a suf?ciently simi
lar impression to a user of the mobile device. In other Words,
address and a port number, for example:
204.163.165.132101905, Where 204.163.165.132 is the IP
address and 01905 is the port number. The device ID 140 is
further associated With a subscriber number (sub #) 142
the image representation associated With the mobile navi
gation metaphor 302 re?ects enough of the details of What
is depicted on the display screen of the mobile device so that
a user is provided With a similar navigation experience
authoriZed by the carrier in link server 114 as part of the
procedures to activate the phone 106. The sub # may take the
form, for example, of 861234567-10900ipn.mobile.att.net
10
by AT&T Wireless Service and is a unique identi?cation to
device 106. Each of the mobile devices 106 has a unique
device ID that corresponds to a user account in a server (e.g.,
regardless of Whether using the PC or the mobile device.
Thus, depending on the actual implementation, the contents
displayed in the mobile navigation metaphor 302 may or
may not be identical but, in any case, substantially close to
What is displayed on the display screen of the mobile device.
Hence, the mobile navigation metaphor for a Wireless
portal alloWs a user to obtain a similar navigation experience
link server 114 or host server 128). It may be appreciated by
those skilled in the art that the link server 114 does not have 15 on a PC as on a mobile device. The similarity of the
to be a separate server and can be a part of host server 128.
navigation experience Will enable a user to better understand
More generally, the user account associated With the
the menu structure of both the PC and mobile device
mobile device 106 can be determined by user identity. The
interfaces, and to more efficiently navigate to a desired
above-described use of subscriber numbers is one approach
source of information by reinforcing the navigation experi
to determining the user identi?cations and thus the user 20 ence using tWo different devices. In other Words, a user Will
experience a navigation process on one device that rein
accounts. Other approaches can, for example, use user
forces that learned or experienced on the other device.
name/passWord authentication, a portal-speci?c security
model using cookies (e.g., HTTP cookies), or Secure Sock
ets Layer (SSL) client-side certi?cates.
According to one embodiment of the present invention, a
corresponding account 144 in database 130 is indexed by an
account structure 143 comprising the sub # 142, user infor
mation 146, code information 148, and feature information
150. The sub # 142 is received from link server 114 as an
index to the account structure 143. User information 146
25
device ID 140 and the sub # 142 may be used as the
authentication code that Will alloW mobile device 106 to
pass through account entry 124. In other implementations,
30
comprises the account con?guration and other account
related information. Code information 148 includes creden
tial information to control entry to account 144 in the
database 130. From the data netWork perspective, any com
puter can log on through HTTP to an account entry 152
identi?ed by an address identi?er (Which may take the form
metaphor 302 illustrated in FIG. 3A. As used herein, a
display screen is the physical display apparatus in a device,
35
FIG. 3B illustrates a representative screen display 322 of
the mobile device. Note that the screen display 322 Was
represented by the mobile navigation metaphor 302 of FIG.
As shoWn in the ?gure, the PC 110 may attempt to
40
account 144 in the database 130 associated With the PC 110
(namely, the user’s account), the PC 110 can provide a code
3A. Display screen 320 is typically a LCD With limited
display area. Note that the entire menu structure established
45
143, then the access requested by the PC 110 is alloWed,
otherWise, the entry to the account 144 may be denied.
Upon completion of the authentication process, the user
of PC 110 is typically presented With a portal page that
comprises a plurality of hyperlinks to desired or frequently
such as a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screen. A screen
display is the image presented on the display screen.
locator (URL), for example, WWW.xyZ.com).
or passWord to the host server 128, Which then can perform
a veri?cation of that code or passWord based on information
contained in account structure 143. If the supplied con?
dential code or passWord matches that in account structure
authentication or user identi?cation can be achieved using
user name/passWord, cookies or certi?cates. Once the user
of mobile device 106 is authenticated, the user is presented
With a screen display that resembles the mobile navigation
of a universal resource identi?er (URI) or universal resource
establish access to account entry 152. HoWever, to access the
With respect to the mobile device interfaces, When mobile
device 106 accesses the Wireless portal, it Will be prompted
for authentication code information. In one implementation,
by a user may exceed the display capabilities of the screen
of the mobile device. In such cases, screen display 322 can
be scrolled up or doWn by use of a scrolling key. Screen
display 322 or display screen 320 also includes an “OK”
button 324 and a “Menu” button 326.
Screen display 322 is a menu structure comprising a list
of hyperlinks. In the example shoWn in FIG. 3B, the list
includes nine (9) items, each item is a descriptive hyperlink
50
representing a category of content. Due to the limited siZe of
the display screen 320, only the ?rst ?ve (5) items of the list
visited sites, along With other personaliZed information. The
hyperlinks may be organiZed according to categories based
initially appear on the screen display 322. HoWever, a
remaining portion 328 of the list includes four (4) items
on subject matter, type of service offered, or another crite
rion established by the user. The personaliZed information
Which can subsequently appear on the screen display 322
55 folloWing scrolling actions. If a user clicks or activates one
may take the form of contact or informative information or
of the hyperlinks, the user Will be taken to the same or nearly
a user speci?ed hierarchy of links to desired data.
the same content (e.g., page) or application he/she Would be
In accordance With one embodiment of the present
able to access using the same category in the mobile
invention, FIG. 3A shoWs a portal page 300 that comprises
a mobile navigation metaphor 302. In this embodiment, the
60
mobile navigation metaphor 302 is an image representation
of a display screen of a mobile device. The portal page 300
also includes frequently visited hyperlinks, graphics, texts
and other personaliZed information. The portal page 300 is
displayed on the display screen of the PC.
It should be noted that although the mobile navigation
metaphor 302 is shoWn in FIG. 3A as a replication of a
navigation metaphor present on the screen display of the
desktop computer. The content or application may vary to
make it appropriate for the device (e.g., mobile device or
desktop computer). In one embodiment, a shared database
service can be used to create a different user interface for the
65
mobile or desktop device depending on the device type and
characteristics of the softWare in the device responsible for
producing the interface displays (e.g., the broWser type in
each device).
US 6,715,131 B2
10
same structure or even features as a corresponding one
cation 402, then the appropriate HTML broWser link or
WML broWser link Would be selected from the table depend
ing on the type of broWser in use. The URL matching table
designed for use by or presentation on a PC. This may be
400 includes examples for three different applications 402.
Typically, an application, service or set of data designed
for presentation and use on a mobile device may not have the
expressed by saying that each application, service, etc. has
For a home page application, the mapped URL can be the
a “dual” nature. By this term is meant that each such
same. The mapped URL directs the user to the home page of
application or service designed for use by a mobile device
a Wireless portal regardless of broWser type. For a mail
application, the mapped URL can be directed to different
has a corresponding application or service designed for use
on a PC, and that the tWo corresponding applications and
servers (i.e., mail servers) that provide the same content
services may not be identical in form or implementation.
(e.g., same email contents). In this case, the applications
This is because there are situations in Which certain features
being mapped to are for mail services but different servers
are used because of the different implementations used by
or functions of an application or service may be useful and
the different devices. For a stock application, the mapped
supportable on one type of device, but not on the other.
URL can be directed to a common server but an indication
Furthermore, even if the same feature or function is imple
mented on both types of devices, the manner in Which the 15 (e.g., “HTML” or “WML”) can be provided to inform the
server of the broWser type so that the content returned to
feature or function is executed, or the manner in Which the
result of the feature or function is displayed, may differ
requesting devices is suitable for display on the requesting
devices.
betWeen the tWo types of devices.
This situation of “dual” applications and services means
FIG. 4B shoWs a host server 420 for use in creating
different user interfaces depending on the type of broWser
and/or device according to one embodiment of the inven
tion. The host server 420 can be used to cause changes made
that it is important that When a menu item is activated on the
mobile device, the proper application or service for that class
of device (e.g., mobile device) is accessed. Similarly, for the
desktop computer or PC, it is important that When a menu
item is activated the corresponding application or service for
to a mobile device screen display 422 Which displays a menu
structure on the PC in the form of a mobile navigation
that class of device (e.g., PC) is accessed. Therefore, it is 25 metaphor 424. The host server 420 may also be used to cause
important that When a menu item on the inventive mobile
changes made to the PC menu structure to be displayed on
the mobile device screen display 422 and on the mobile
navigation metaphor is accessed from the PC, the PC
appropriate application or service is accessed.
navigation metaphor 424 (this function may occur automati
cally or by execution of a “metaphor update” function).
According to one embodiment, the PC side executes an
HTML broWser While the mobile device executes a WML or
For example, a user may edit a list of choices on the
HDML broWser. The mobile navigation metaphor can also
mobile device using a WML broWser. Upon an activation of
a “SEND” key, the edited list is sent to the host server 420
include personaliZed information including hyperlinks to
frequently visited applications and displays. Also, Whenever
that operates a menu generation process in conjunction With
the menu structure of the mobile device is changed, the
mobile navigation metaphor can be updated so that it is
continues to be representative of the menu structure of the
mobile device.
device information stored in a menu database 426. The menu
35
generation process produces an appropriate menu for the
requesting device based on the device information. The
device information can, for example, include one or more of:
To ensure that both the PC and the mobile device access
device characteristics, rendering context for the menu, user
identity and/or broWser type utiliZed by the requesting
the appropriate application or service, a URL mapping
function can be performed. Note that the mobile navigation
device.
The generation of the menu (list) for the mobile naviga
metaphor can display a menu structure having links to the
mobile device appropriate applications or services or to the
PC appropriate applications or services. In the case that the
tion metaphor alloWs the user to access the PC side appli
metaphor hyperlinks are for the mobile device side appli
For example, a user updates a menu on the mobile device
cations or displays, When one of the hyperlinks in the mobile
cations from a menu structure de?ned on a mobile device.
45
and the updated menu in WML is sent to the host server 420.
navigation metaphor is activated, a request including a URL
Here the updated menu is converted to a neW menu in
is generated to cause the host server to look up a URL
HTML that can be displayed in the mobile navigation
metaphor on the PC device. The HTML compatible links
accessible by the HTML menu of the mobile navigation
metaphor permit a mobile device user to navigate to the PC
side appropriate applications or services via the mobile
navigation metaphor on the PC device using the menu
corresponding to the same hyperlink for the PC. This is
accomplished by the URL mapping function.
Referring to FIG. 4A, there is shoWn a URL matching
table 400 suitable for synchroniZing user interfaces betWeen
the tWo broWsers or devices by implementing a mapping
function. A portal is hosted in a server identi?ed by an
address such as my.phone.com. According to one
embodiment, the mobile navigation metaphor on the portal
structure of the mobile device. Conversely, When a user
updates a menu in the mobile navigation metaphor, the host
55
page accessible by a PC includes a list of applications 402,
server 420 updates the menu for the mobile device.
Furthermore, When a user alters the menu structure (e.g., by
adding or deleting bookmarks, etc.) on the PC side, the
mobile navigation metaphor is also updated to re?ect those
With each identi?ed by an address identi?er that serves as a
hyperlink. In the URL matching table 400, each of the
address identi?ers for the HTML broWser 404 corresponds
changes.
Thus, if the hyperlinks in the mobile navigation metaphor
for the applications 402 correspond to those appropriate for
Regarding the URL mapping, there are several situations
in Which the corresponding URLs may be looked up in a
different manner. As far as a mobile portal is concerned, both
the mobile device then, When such a hyperlink is activated
at the PC device, the corresponding hyperlink for the PC
device broWser (e. g., HTML broWser 404) Would instead be
selected from the table and activated. Similarly, if the
hyperlink is a more general reference to a particular appli
database 426. FIG. 4C shoWs that a request is received 440
in the host server 420. The request can be sent to the host
server 420 from either the PC side or the mobile device.
Since the request can comprise indication information about
to an address identi?er for HDML or WML broWser 406.
a PC and a mobile device can access the same menu
65
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