WaRnIng - Felling Trailers
®
Owner’s Manual
2,000 lb. to 60 ton Load Capacities
OM-102
• Drop-Deck • Deck-Over • Hydraulic Dump
• Tilt Deck (Utility, “IT-E”, “IT-I”, Deck-Over Hyd., Air Tilt)
• Rigid Neck Semi • Hydraulic Detach Gooseneck
Dear Customer,
Thank you for purchasing a Felling Trailer.
You are now part of an ever growing group of Felling Trailers’ owners across North America and Internationally that have made the “Felling Style” their own. At Felling Trailers,
Quality, Craftsmanship & Pride are central in everything we do, and we want you to know
that you can count on us.
Felling Trailers manufactures a large range of trailers, from small Utility to large Hydraulic Detachable Gooseneck trailers, be it a standard model or highly customized, we know
your satisfaction is essential. Felling Trailers knows that the most important thing about
your trailer is the cargo that it is carrying. That is why the features of all Felling Trailers are
designed and engineered with you and your cargo in mind.
We take tremendous Pride in the trailers we build and it shows in everything that we do.
From our innovative designs, to our world class parts & service department, we stand behind
everything that we do to ensure ultimate customer satisfaction. Please know that Felling
Trailers’ dedicated dealer network and employees are here for you. Let Felling Trailers know
how we can be of service now and in the future.
Thanks again and best wishes!
Merle J. Felling
Felling Trailers
Quality, Craftsmanship and Pride.
Felling Trailers Owner’s Manual
Table of Contents
Click on Heading to Navigate to Specified Pages
Introduction & Safety Instructions.......................................................................................1-2
Reporting Safety Defects.........................................................................................3
Driver’s Pre-Tip Inspection..................................................................................................4-5
Coupling & Uncoupling Your Trailer.....................................................................................
Coupling Drop-Deck & Deck-Over Trailers..........................................................................6-7
Uncoupling Drop-Deck & Deck-Over Trailers.................................................8
Coupling Gooseneck Trailers.........................................................................9-10
Uncoupling Gooseneck Trailers......................................................................10
Inspection(after hook-up)....................................................................................................11
Hydraulic Dump/Hoist Operation........................................................................................12
Tilt Trailer Operation............................................................................................................
Utility Tilts.......................................................................................................13
“IT” Series Tilts...............................................................................................14
Deck-Over Hydraulic Tilts..............................................................................15-16
Deck-Over Air Tilts.........................................................................................17-18
Pressurized Hydraulic System Maintenance..................................................19
Rigid Neck Semi Trailer Supplement...................................................................................20-29
TSA Tilt Slide Axle Semi Trailer Supplement.......................................................................30-36
Maintenance Schedule........................................................................................................37
X-FORCE Hydraulic Detachable Gooseneck Supplement..................................................38-45
Utility Reel Trailer Operation................................................................................................46-48
Utility Pole Trailer Operation................................................................................................49
Loading Equipment.............................................................................................................50
Maintenance........................................................................................................................51-58
Tire Safety Information........................................................................................................59-66
Wheel & Rim Torque Requirements.....................................................................................66
Wiring Chart........................................................................................................................67
Parts Supplement................................................................................................................69-86
Warranty Information...........................................................................................................87-88
Frequently Asked Questions...............................................................................................89-90
Disclaimer: Portions of this manual were used with the expressed authority of Dexter Axle,
but Dexter Axle is not responsible for the accuracy of the information contained herin.
Introduction
The owner packet must be made available for use by all operators. Review all
the information before operating the equipment.
Write your trailer model number and serial number on the lines provided.
(Typically located on the inside of the tongue of the trailer.)
Give these numbers to your service representative when you need parts or
information on your trailer.
Model Number:______________________________________
Serial Number: ______________________________________
Safety Instructions
Safety
Read this manual completely, it provides instructions for the operation
and care of your Felling Trailer. The instructions in this manual must
be followed to ensure the safety of persons, your cargo and satisfactory life of the trailer. Safety precautions to protect against injury or
This
User’s
Manual
contains
safety
property damage must be followed at all times. An Owner’s Manual
information and instructions for your trailer. You
that provides general trailer information cannot cover all the specific must read this manual before loading or towing
details necessary for the proper combination of trailer, tow vehicle
your trailer. You must follow all safety precautions
and hitch. Therefore, you must read, understand and follow instrucand instructions.
tions given by the tow vehicle, trailer hitch manufacturers, as well
as the instructions in this manual. Our trailers are built with components produced by various manufacturers. Some
of these items have separate instruction manuals. Be sure to read other manuals provided with this trailer. All equipment has a limit. Make sure you understand the load requirements, brakes, steering, stability, and load characteristics
before you start to operate.
m WARNING
The safety information given in this manual does not replace safety codes, insurance needs, federal, state and local
laws. Make sure your vehicle has the correct equipment required by local laws and regulations.
The safety information in this manual is denoted by the safety alert symbol m
The level of risk is indicated by the following signal words.
m DANGER
m WARNING
DANGER - Immediate hazards which
will result in serious injury or death if
not avoided.
WARNING - Potentially hazardous
situation which could result in serious
injury or death if not avoided.
m CAUTION
m NOTICE
CAUTION - Potentially hazardous
situation which may result in minor/
moderate injury if not avoided.
NOTICE - Alert against unsafe
practices that could result in damage
to the trailer or other property.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 1
Safety Rules
• Work safely while you load, unload and are on the road. Keep in mind that the most common causes of accidents
when transporting equipment over the road are due to operator error and/or failure to correctly secure equipment
to the trailer. Everyone connected with transporting equipment should be aware of the potential hazards of loading
or unloading equipment, and towing a trailer.
•Never exceed a trailers capacity. Always comply with local and state highway standards and inspect the condition
of the truck and trailer when operating. We recommend that all trailers have a daily walk-around inspection.
• DO NOT exceed maximum “tongue” load.
• Maximum towing speed is 60 mph.
• Be sure your tow vehicle and towing apparatus have the capacity to tow your trailer.
• Make sure the load size and how it is placed on the trailer is correct. Know the location of the center of gravity of
the equipment being hauled and of the trailer to specify safe positioning of the load. Also, follow proper loading,
tie-down, transporting, and unloading procedures. This all helps keep transporting equipment a safe operation.
•ALWAYS use safety chains.
•NO RIDERS - A frequent cause of personal injury or death is from persons falling off and being run over.
Do not permit others to ride or be on the trailer when the vehicle is in motion.
• Be aware of all pinch points on the trailer and keep clear.
• Keep bolts tight at all times. Always replace worn or broken parts immediately after they are discovered.
Do not use the trailer if any parts are not functioning properly.
• Do not replace parts with other than genuine factory parts. Doing so could decrease the effectiveness of
the safety features or the operation of the trailer. Always keep safety and informational decals clean and
visible. Replace decals that are damaged, lost, or unreadable.
• Before transporting, be sure the jack and any loading ramps are secure and not touching the ground.
• If equipped, moving the tow vehicle while the body and hoist are in the air could cause a roll-over resulting
in injury or death.
• If equipped, support trailer box with safety prop before working under box. Failure to do so may cause serious
injury or death.
•Air Brakes only (Deck-Over Trailers) If the ABS indicator lamp comes on and stays on when you apply the brakes
to a moving vehicle, the trailer ABS is not working properly. The ABS must be serviced as soon as possible upon
completion of your trip to ensure full anti-lock braking capability. The service brakes will still function properly if the
ABS light is on.
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Reporting Safety Defects
If you believe that your vehicle has a defect which could cause a crash or could cause injury or death, you should
immediately inform the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in addition to notifying Felling Trailers,
Inc.
If NHTSA receives similar complaints, it may open an investigation, and if it finds that a safety defect exists in a group
of vehicles, it may order a recall and remedy campaign. However, NHTSA cannot become involved in any individual
problems between you, your dealer, or Felling Trailers, Inc.
To contact NHTSA you may either call the Vehicle Safety Hotline toll-free at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153),
or go to http://www.safercar.gov; or write to:
U.S. Department of Transportation
NHTSA
1200 New Jersey Avenue S. E.
Washington, DC 20590
You can also obtain other information about motor vehicle safety from the Vehicle Safety Hotline or online at http://
www.safercar.gov.
Upon request we will furnish any additional or more detailed maintenance and operational instructions including any
non-standard make of equipment that was specified and installed.
Contact Information: Felling Trailers, Inc.
1525 Main St. South
Sauk Centre, MN 56378
Ph: 1-800-245-2809
Fax: (320) 352-5230
email: [email protected]
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 3
Driver’s Pre-Trip Inspection
Air/Electrical Connections
• Check that trailer air connectors are sealed and in good condition.
• Make sure glad hands are locked in place, free of damage or air leaks.
• Make sure the trailer electrical plug is firmly seated and locked in place.
Lights/Reflectors
• Check that all external lights and reflective equipment are clean and functional.
• Light and reflector checks include:
- Clearance lights (red on rear, amber elsewhere)
- Headlights (High and low beams)
- Tail lights
- Turn signals
- 4-way flashers
- Brake Lights
- Red reflectors (on rear) and amber reflectors (elsewhere)
Landing Gear
• Check that the landing gear is fully raised, has no missing parts, crank handle is secure and the
support frame is not damaged.
Suspension
• Look for missing, shifted, cracked or broken leaf springs.
• If vehicle is equipped with torsion bars, torque arms or other types of suspension components, check that
they are not damaged and are mounted securely.
• Air ride suspension should be checked for damage and leaks.
• Look for cracked or broken spring hangers, missing or damaged bushing and broken, loose or missing
U-bolts or other axle mounting parts.
• The mounts should be checked at each point where they are secured to the vehicle frame and axle(s).
Slack Adjusters & Shock Absorbers
• See that shock absorbers are secure and that there are no leaks.
• Look for broken, loose or missing parts.
• The angle between the push rod and adjuster arm should be a little over 90 degrees when the brakes are released and not less than 90 degrees when the brakes are applied.
• When pulled by hand, with the brakes release, the brake rod should not move more than one inch.
Brake Chambers/Brake Hoses/Lines
• See that the brake chambers and brake hoses are not leaking, cracked or dented and are mounted
securely.
Drum Brake
• Check for cracks, dents or holes. Also check for loose or missing bolts.
• Brake lining (where visible) should not be worn dangerously thin.
Wheels/Rims
Page 4
• Check for damaged or bent wheels/rims.
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Tires
•The following items MUST be inspected on every tire:
- Tread Depth: Check for a minimum tread depth (4/32 on steering axle tires, 2/32 on all other tires).
- Tire Condition: Check that tread is evenly worn and look for cuts or other damage to tread or side
walls. Valve caps and stems should no be missing, broken or damaged.
– Tire Inflation: Check for proper inflation by using a tire gauge, or by striking tires with a mallet or
similar device.
Hub Oil Seals/Axle Seals
• See that hub oil/grease seals and axle seals are not leaking and if wheel has a sight glass, that oil level is
adequate.
Lug Nuts
• Check that all lug nuts are present, free of cracks and distortions and show no signs of looseness such as
rust trails or shiny threads.
• Make sure all nut holes are not cracked or distorted.
Spacers
• If equipped, check that spacers are not bent, damaged or rusted through.
• Spacers should be evenly centered, with the dual wheels and tires evenly separated.
Frame
• Look for cracks, broken welds, holes or other damage to the frame and crossmembers.
Splash Guards
• Check that splash guards/mud flaps are not damaged and are mounted securely.
Pull Trailer Drawbars
• Check dolly tongue for cracks.
• Check safety cable.
• Check pintle hook/ball coupler to insure it’s locked.
• Check air and electrical connections.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 5
Coupling & Uncoupling The Trailer
Coupling the Trailer to Your Vehicle - Standard Hitch
1.) Attach the trailer to the tow vehicle and secure coupler latch.
Important: Tongue load is the amount of downward force on the coupler when
loaded. Capacity is the total amount of towing weight.
Important: You should always load your trailer with positive tongue load.
m WARNING
• Do not exceed maximum “tongue”
load. Tongue load does not increase the
capacity of the trailer.
Never operate your trailer with an
upward force on the tongue.
Adj. Ball Coupler - Drop Deck Trailers
m CAUTION
If front of trailer is too low, has low
tire pressure, a loose agri-hitch, or is
loaded heavy in the rear, it can cause
swaying.
2.) Secure the trailer chains to the vehicle.
(Chains should be crossed, in an X pattern.)
Adj. Ball Coupler - Drop Deck Trailers
m WARNING
ALWAYS use safety chains. Chains should be crossed, in
an X pattern as required by law. Incorrect rigging of the
safety chains can result in loss of control of the trailer,
leading to serious injury or death, if the trailer uncouples
from the tow vehicle.
Chains must:
• Fasten to the frame of tow vehicle, not to hitch
or ball.
• Cross underneath hitch and coupler with
minimum slack to permit turning and hold tongue
up, if the trailer comes loose.
Adj. Lunette Eye - Deck-Over Trailers
Adj. Lunette Eye - Deck-Over Trailers
Important: On a pull type trailer the hitch height is very important. The trailer bed is to
run level or slightly higher in the front. If the hitch height is too high it will
put excessive weight on the rear axle. If the hitch is too low it will cause the trailer to sway.
m NOTICE
Hitch styles vary depending on the trailer. Be sure your vehicle hitch is
compatible with the one on the trailer. Trailer couplers are designed
to be connected. No hammering should ever be required. Couplers
should also be lubricated with light oil.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
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3.) Attach the Breakaway Switch to the tow vehicle. In the event that the trailer
would become disconnected, a breakaway switch comes pre-installed on
your electric brake trailer. If disconnected, it will apply brakes on the trailer.
The cable needs to be fastened to the tow vehicles frame securely when
transporting. Be certain the cable has no strain or restrictions, and will not be
restricted in case of trailer breakaway.
m WARNING
Connect the breakaway lanyard to the tow vehicle.
NOT to safety chain; and NOT to the hitch, ball or support.
4.) Raise the jack all the way up by turning in a counter clockwise motion. After
the jack stops, DO NOT TORQUE, this could damage the interior components
of the jack and reduce capacity and safety of the jack.
m CAUTION
Never operate the jack when
the lift capacity is exceeded.
Lift capacity is the amount of
weight the jack is rated to lift.
The static load is the amount the
jack is rated to hold when not in
operation.
5.) If equipped, attach each of the air brake connectors on the trailer to the vehicle.
(Deck-Over Trailers)
6.) Connect the electrical connector on the trailer to the vehicle.
m WARNING
Be sure to properly inspect the trailer
after it has been installed to a vehicle before operating on a roadway. Reference
“Inspection” on page 4 & 5 .
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Page 7
Uncoupling the Trailer (Drop-Deck/Deck-Over)
Standard Hitch
1.) Park the trailer on level ground.
2.) Place a board between the ground
and the jack.
3.) Block the tires to prevent rolling.
4.) Set the jack down on the board by
pulling out on the quick release lever
and making sure it is securely locked.
5.) Remove the chains from the tow vehicle. Remove Breakaway lanyard from tow vehicle.
6.) Unplug the electrical connection and place on the trailer.
Do not let it hang to the ground.
7.) If equipped, remove the air brake couplers and secure into place on the
trailer. Do not let them hang on the ground. Soil contamination is the most
common cause of air brake valve failure.
8.) Disconnect the coupler/hitch.
9.) Turn the handle on the jack to raise the tongue of the trailer off of the tow vehicle. Do not crank up too hard at
end of travel.
m CAUTION
Once jack is all the way up or down
“DO NOT TORQUE” this could
damage the interior components
of the jack and reduce the capacity
and safety of the jack.
10.) Check that all trailer parts are not connected and are clear of the tow vehicle.
11.) Perform any necessary maintenance, cleaning or repairs before storing.
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Coupling the Trailer to Your Vehicle - Gooseneck
The gooseneck coupler installs onto a gooseneck ball that is pre-installed
on the bed of the tow vehicle.
The gooseneck ball installed on the tow vehicle must be properly rated
for size and weight of the trailer. Check load ratings for size and weight of
your trailer, the gooseneck ball on the tow vehicle must meet or exceed
the trailers ratings.
m WARNING
If the gooseneck ball on the tow vehicle does not
meet or exceed the gooseneck coupler on the trailer
in load rating and size the trailer could become
uncoupled from the tow vehicle and injury or death
could occur.
1.) Back the tow vehicle up to the trailer and
line up the gooseneck coupler to the
gooseneck ball.
m CAUTION
Lower the tailgate on the tow vehicle before installing the trailer to
prevent damage to the gooseneck coupler and the tow vehicle.
2.) Raise the jack so the gooseneck coupler drops down
and attaches to the gooseneck ball.
3.) Close the lock plate on the gooseneck ball coupler and
install the locking pin.
4.) Test if the trailer is secure by raising the jack up 1 inch.
The tow vehicle bed should raise with the jack.
m WARNING
ALWAYS use safety chains. Chains should be secured to
Safety Chain Receivers on tow vehicle as required by law.
Incorrect rigging of the safety chains can result in loss of
control of the trailer, leading to serious injury or death, if the
trailer uncouples from the tow vehicle.
5.) Secure the trailer chains and breakaway switch to the tow vehicle.
m WARNING
Connect the breakaway lanyard to the tow vehicle.
NOT to safety chain; and NOT to the hitch, ball or support.
Note: Close the tow vehicles tailgate before operating on the roadway.
6.) Raise the jack and the drop leg supports.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 9
7.) If equipped, attach each of the air brake connectors
on the trailer to he tow vehicle.
8.) Connect the electrical connector on
the trailer to the tow vehicle.
m WARNING
Be sure to properly inspect the trailer after
it has been installed to a vehicle before
operating on a roadway. Reference “Inspection” on page 4 & 5.
Uncoupling the Trailer (Gooseneck Coupler)
1.) Park the trailer on level ground.
2.) Block the tires to prevent rolling.
3.) Remove the safety chains from the tow vehicle.
4.) Unplug the electrical connection and place on the trailer.
Do not let it hang to the ground.
5.) Disconnect the breakaway switch cable.
6.) If equipped, remove the air brake couplers and secure to the proper
place on the trailer. Do not let them hang on the ground. Soil
contamination is the most common cause of air brake valve failure.
7.) Move the gooseneck coupler to the open position.
8.) Drop the leg supports and the jack.
9.) Turn the handle on the jack clockwise to raise the gooseneck
coupler off the gooseneck ball on the tow vehicle. Do not crank to
hard at the end of travel.
10.) Make sure all drop legs are secure and touching the ground.
m CAUTION
Once jack is all the way up or down “DO NOT TORQUE”
this could damage the interior components of the jack
and reduce the capacity and safety of the jack.
11.) Check that all trailer parts are not connected and are clear of the
tow vehicle.
m CAUTION
Lower the tailgate on the tow vehicle before removing the trailer
to prevent damage to the gooseneck coupler and the tow vehicle.
12.) Perform any necessary maintenance, cleaning or repairs before
storing.
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Inspecting The Trailer
Inspection (Prior to operating on a roadway)
After attaching the trailer to the tow vehicle inspect all the following areas
in addition to local, state and federal regulations before using on the roadways.
• Brakes
• Brake Connections
• Hitch
•All Lights (Tail Lights, Turn Lights, Brake Lights, Marker Lights, ABS Lights)
• Reflectors and decals
•Tires, Wheel Nuts, Rims
•Trailer tie downs and/or equipment transporting is properly secured.
•No items are touching the ground
•Coupler is closed and locked
Air Brakes (Testing)
The trailer’s ABS light (located on the side of the trailer) indicates the status of the
ABS system. If the light comes ON and stays ON when you apply the brakes to a
moving vehicle, there is an ABS malfunction. It is normal for the lamp to come ON
and go OFF to perform a bulb check, but it should not stay ON when the vehicle is
moving above 4 mph. It is important not to ignore this light. When a fault exists in
the ABS system, standard breaking returns to the affected wheel, and the ABS still
controls other monitored wheels. This lets you complete the trip. You should not
ignore the light and should have the vehicle serviced as soon as possible after the
light comes ON and stays ON.
The lights, brake lights and turn signals are
located on the rear of the trailer. After installing
the trailer to the vehicle always check for proper
operation of all the lights.
Breakaway Switch (Testing) for Drop-Deck and Deck-Over Trailers
In the event that the trailer would become
disconnected, a breakaway switch comes
pre-installed on your electric brake trailer.
If disconnected, it will apply brakes on
the trailer. The cable needs to be fastened
to the tow vehicles frame securely when
transporting. Be certain the cable has no
strain or restrictions, and will not be
restricted in case of trailer breakaway.
1.) Visually inspect the breakaway system
for broken or missing parts before
towing the trailer.
2.) To test the breakaway brake battery, remove the pull pin from the switch and attempt to pull the trailer forward. You
should feel the trailer resisting being towed, but the wheels will not necessarily be locked. If the brakes do not
function, do not tow the trailer until brakes, or battery, are repaired.
3.) Immediately replace the pull pin. The breakaway system battery discharges rapidly when the pull pin is removed.
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Page 11
Hydraulic Dump/Hoist Operation
Hydraulic Hoist Operation (If equipped)
1.) Open Dump Gate and secure to trailer (may vary depending on
dump gate that trailer is equipped with), prior to raising hydraulic
hoist. Doing so will prevent damage to the dump gate and trailer.
m WARNING
Do Not Move Tow Vehicle While Hoist Is In Use.
Moving the tow vehicle while the body and hoist are in the air
could cause a roll-over resulting in injury or death.
2.) To Raise Hoist: Tow Vehicle must be in park with emergency
brake set. Push “UP” button on remote.
3.) To Hold Hoist: When button is released hoist will hold it’s desired
position.
4.) To Lower Hoist: Push “DOWN” button on remote. For safe
operation, DO NOT move vehicle until trailer body is completely
down.
Maintenance
Prior to performing any maintenance to the hoist, be sure to place
support in place securely. (see picture on the right.) For detailed
maintenance of Hoist, see manufacturers manual. Be sure to read
and follow all warnings in manufacturer’s manual and on trailer.
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Utility Tilt Trailer Operation
Utility Tilt Trailer Operation
1.) The Utility Tilt trailer operates on a pivot point tilt system. To lower
the trailer bed to the ground, unlatch the bed by depressing the
bracket and lifting the lever. After lifting the lever, the bottom
bracket will detach.
2.) Manually apply weight to the back of the trailer until it reaches the
ground.
3.) Load equipment onto trailer. As the equipment moves onto the
trailer bed, the trailer will raise up into transport position. When
the trailer is empty, manually raise the trailer bed to transport
position by walking from the back to the front of the trailer bed.
4.) Once the trailer bed is in the upright/transport position, secure
the latch and secure any equipment to the trailer bed.
Pivot Point
Bed Latch
m WARNING
When raising, lowering or latching the tilt bed
keep hands away from the “Pinch Area” indicated by the “Pinch Area” decal. Failure to do so
could result in injury or death.
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Page 13
“IT-E” & “IT-I”Series Trailer (H.D. Industrial Tilt) Operation
Loading One Piece of Equipment
Standard “IT-I” Series
“IT-E” Series with Stationary Platform (SP)
1.) To lower the trailer bed to the ground, unlatch the tilt deck by removing the lock pin and
pushing the lever in a downward motion. While holding the lever down, place the pin in the
hole in the lever. This will hold the latch unlocked so the bed is free to tilt.
2.) Manually apply weight to the back of the trailer until it reaches the ground. The trailer bed is
supported by one (FT-7, FT-10 & FT-12) or two (FT-14 & FT-16) tilt cushion hydraulic cylinder
so the trailer bed will tilt gradually.
3.) Load equipment onto trailer bed, as your equipment moves onto the tilt bed, the bed will
float upward into the transport position. When the trailer bed is empty, manually raise the
trailer bed into transport position by walking from the back to the front of the trailer bed.
(Large tilt trailers require a fair amount of effort to tilt the deck up and down. One person’s
body weight may not be enough to tilt the deck alone in all cases.) The trailer bed will then
float up into transport position, secure latch.
Tilt Bed Latch (A)
4.) Secure all equipment to trailer bed.
m WARNING
Tilt Bed Latch (B)
When raising, lowering or latching the tilt bed
keep hands away from the “Pinch Area” indicated by the “Pinch Area” decal. Failure to do so
could result in injury or death.
Loading Multiple Pieces of Equipment
(“IT” Series Trailers- If Equipped With Hydraulic Lock Valve)
1.) Follow steps 1 and 2 from the “Loading One Piece of Equipment”.
Tilt Latch (B) Bar Hook
Located Under Tilt Bed
2.) Once the trailer bed is lowered to the ground push the Hydraulic Lock Valve to prevent the trailer
bed from floating upward into transport position while loading multiple pieces of equipment.
3.) Load and secure your equipment onto the trailer bed.
4.) Once all pieces of equipment have been loaded and secured to the trailer, release the Hydraulic
Lock Valve to allow the trailer bed to float upward into transport position. When the trailer bed is
empty, manually raise the trailer bed into transport position by walking from the back to the front of
the trailer bed. (Large tilt trailers require a fair amount of effort to tilt the deck up and down. One
person’s body weight may not be enough to tilt the deck alone in all cases.) The trailer bed will then
float up into transport position, secure latch.
5.) Secure all equipment to trailer bed.
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Deck-Over Tilt Trailer Operation
Deck-Over Hydraulic Tilt Trailer Operation (Electric Brake System)
Bed Latch
1.) Park the truck and trailer as straight and level as possible.
Set park brakes and chock trailer wheels.
2.) Unlock the manual tilt deck lock(s) (One lock on non-stationary
deck trailers, two on stationary deck trailers). FAILURE TO
RELEASE ALL DECK LOCKS BEFORE LOADING OR UNLOAD
-ING EQUIPMENT WILL RESULT IN TRAILER DAMAGE.
Needle Valve
m WARNING
Operators MUST Release Tilt Lock prior
to loading/unloading. Failure to do so
will result in damage to your trailer
and/or equipment.
3.) On an empty trailer you will need to walk on the trailer bed to the
rear of the trailer to tilt the bed.
4.) If the bed tilts to slowly or quickly, the needle valve on the side of the bed can be adjusted.
To increase the tilt rate turn counter clock wise. To decrease the tilt rate turn clockwise. Too
rapid of a tilt rate can decrease safety and lead to trailer damage.
5.) Load your equipment onto the bed. As your equipment moves on the tilt bed it will gradually
tilt into the transport position.
6.) Lock the manual deck lock(s.)
7.) Secure the equipment to the trailer.
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Page 15
Deck-Over Hydraulic Tilt Trailer Operation (Air Brake System - Manual Tilt)
Deck Lock System
(only on trailers equipped w/air brakes)
1.) Park the truck and trailer as straight and level as possible.
Set park brakes and chock trailer wheels.
2.) Move tilt lock switch to the unlock position. This will open the deck air lock unlocking the tilt deck. (FAILURE TO
RELEASE DECK LOCK BEFORE LOADING OR UNLOADING EQUIPMENT WILL RESULT IN TRAILER DAMAGE.)
m WARNING
Operators MUST Release Tilt Lock prior
to loading/unloading. Failure to do so
will result in damage to your trailer
and/or equipment.
Tilt Lock - Needle Valve - Deck Tilt
3.) On FT-40-2T and FT-50-3T (for trailers equipped with Air Bag Assist feature) move deck tilt
switch to inflate to tilt bed.
m WARNING
Deck Tilt (Air Bag Assist) Switch Must be
Switched to Deflate After loading the
trailer. Failure to do so May result in
damage to your Air Bag Assist System.
Air Bag Assist
4.) On trailers not equipped with Air Bag Assist feature, you will need to walk on the bed to the rear of the trailer
to tilt the bed.
5.) If the bed tilts to slowly or quickly, the needle valve on the side of the bed can be adjusted. To increase the tilt rate
turn counter clock wise. To decrease the tilt rate turn clockwise. To rapid of a tilt rate can decrease safety and lead
to trailer damage.
m WARNING
Too rapid of a tilt rate can decrease safety
and lead to trailer and /or equipment damage.
6.) Load your equipment onto the bed. As your equipment moves on the tilt bed it will gradually tilt into the
transport position.
7.) Move tilt lock switch to the lock position. On FT-40-2 T and FT-50-3 T move the deck tilt switch to the
deflate position.
8.) Secure the equipment to the trailer.
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Deck-Over Air Tilt Trailer Operation (Air Brake System)
Loading procedures for the Felling Air Tilt
1.) Park truck and trailer straight on a firm level spot and apply truck’s parking brake and chock trailer wheels. Do not
apply trailer parking brakes to retain air pressure in trailer supply line.
2.) Check that the area around the trailer is clear of
personnel and obstructions.
3.) If equipped with ramps remove ramp hold up bars
from ramps. Stay clear of area behind ramps.
4.) Switch ramp valve to down position (located at
rear of trailer). Ramps will slowly lower into
position.
5.) Switch deck lock valve from lock to unlock
position (located on the front of the trailer).
Air Ramp Switch
m WARNING
Operators MUST Release Tilt Lock prior
to loading/unloading. Failure to do so
will result in damage to your trailer
and/or equipment.
m NOTICE
Loading Multiple Pieces of Equipment
Air bag will hold up to 7,000 lbs., 48” from the front of
the bulkhead before the pressure relief is set-off.
Deck Tilt Switch
& Tilt Lock Switch
6.) Switch deck tilt switch to up. This will inflate deck tilt bags and slowly raise the deck for loading.
7.) Load equipment by driving up the center of the deck. Set brakes and turn
off equipment. Secure 1st piece of equipment if loading a second. Load second
piece of equipment at this time if needed.
8.) Switch deck tilt switch to down. Stay clear of deck and hitch area.
9.) Switch deck lock valve to lock position.
m NOTICE
Load Must be centered
on deck to ensure
level loading surface.
10.) Switch ramp valve to up position. Ramps will slowly raise into position.
11.) Replace ramp hold up bars on ramps.
12.) Properly secure load.
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Page 17
Unloading Trailer
1) Park truck and trailer straight on a firm level spot and apply truck’s parking brake and chock trailer wheels.
Do not apply trailer parking brakes to retain air pressure in trailer supply line.
2) Check that the area around the trailer is clear of personnel and obstructions.
3) If equipped with ramps remove ramp hold up bars from ramps. Stay clear of area behind ramps.
4) Switch ramp valve to down position. Ramps will slowly lower into position.
5) Check that the parking brake is set on the equipment that is being hauled.
Remove load securement.
6) Switch deck lock valve from lock to unlock position.
7) Switch deck tilt switch to up. This will slowly raise the deck for unloading. Depending on load distribution the deck
may not fully raise until you proceed to step 8. To prevent damage to trailer deck lock must be disengaged and
deck tilt bags must be inflated prior to unloading.
8) Begin to slowly unload first piece of equipment. The deck should tilt well before the equipment is close to the end
of the beavertail. If it does not tilt, move equipment forward and check that deck lock is releasing. Unload second
piece of equipment.
9) Switch deck tilt switch to down. Stay clear of deck and hitch area.
10) Switch deck lock valve to lock position.
11) Switch ramp valve to up position. Ramps will slowly raise into position.
12) Replace ramp hold up bars on ramps.
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Pressurized Hydraulic System Maintenance (If Equipped)
Pressurized Tank
Pressurized Tank on “IT” Series Pressurized Tank on Deck-Over Tilts
The pressurized tank keeps the hydraulic fluid equal around the cylinder(s) to keep the deck from
slamming up/down. Tank pressure should be kept between 15 - 20 P.S.I. The maximum P.S.I.
(pounds per square inch) should be no more than 50 P.S.I. The pressure gauge is usually located
on the right of the tank. This applies to both the “IT” Series and Deck-Over Tilt trailers (If Equipped.)
By pressurizing the hydraulic oil, any voids or air pockets in the system can be eliminated. The
pressure has little effect on the tilting of the deck. Avoiding air pockets in the system allows you
to lock the tilt bed in the tilted position without the tilt bed drifting upward or downward.
PSI Pressure
Gauge
Changing Fluid
It is recommended to change fluid every two years. Depending on climate the fluid may get moisture in it. If this happens the fluid will have a milky white look to it. Change the fluid prior to the two year schedule if this occurs to prevent
damage and/or corrosion.
1. To change the fluid remove the plug on the base of the tank and disconnect hoses from the cylinder(s) and allow
them to drain.
2. Once the tank, hoses and cylinder have drained reconnect hoses to the cylinder(s) and replace the plug on the
tank.
3. Fill the tank with Dextron ATF (automatic transmission fluid)
• “IT” Series - 10 quarts (2 1/2 gallons) Dextron ATF
• Deck-Over Tilt - 12 quarts (3 gallons) Dextron ATF
Bleeding Tank & Lines
The Pressurized Hydraulic System is a self-bleeding system. As the bed lowers and raises it works the air out of the
lines. It is suggested to walk the tilt deck down and up 3-4 times to bleed the lines sufficiently.
Grease Zerks
All grease zerks on your trailer should be greased once a year or every 12,000 miles with multipurpose grease. It is
recommended to grease a trailer if it has been in storage for any period of time.
Grease zerks on a Deck-Over Tilt trailer are located:
• Top and Base of the hydraulic cushion cylinder(s).
• Hinge Pin (pivot point) - this zerk is located in between the
two tires on the mainframe of the trailer. There is one grease zerk on each side of the trailer.
• Axles - two grease zerks on each axle.
• Jack(s) - dependent on options chosen there will be one to two grease zerks located on the jack.
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Page 19
Felling Trailers Owner’s Manual
Rigid Neck Semi Trailers
Supplement
Table of Contents
Click on Heading to Navigate to Specified Pages
REPORTING SAFETY DEFECTS.............................................................................................................................. 21
Driver’s Pre-Trip Inspection......................................................................................................................................21-22
Coupling & Uncoupling............................................................................................................................................23-25
Hydraulic Tail & Upper Deck Ramp............................................................................................................................... 26
Suspension Pressure Gauge......................................................................................................................................... 27
Suspension Air Dump Valve.......................................................................................................................................... 27
Air Brakes...................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Tire Information............................................................................................................................................................. 27
Ramps (Hydraulic, Air, Fold Up).................................................................................................................................... 28
Securing Loaded Materials........................................................................................................................................... 28
Over Width Lights......................................................................................................................................................... 28
Trailer Maintenance....................................................................................................................................................... 29
Weights & Balance........................................................................................................................................................ 29
TSA (Tilt Slide Axle) Trailer Operational Instructions................................................................................................30-36
Maintenance Schedule................................................................................................................................................. 37
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Reporting Safety Defects
If you believe that your vehicle has a defect that could cause a crash or could cause injury or death, you should immediately inform the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in addition to notifying Felling Trailers,
Inc. If NHTSA receives similar complaints, it may open an investigation, and if it finds that a safety defect exists in a
group of vehicles, it may order a recall and remedy campaign. However, NHTSA cannot become involved in any individual problems between you, your dealer, or Felling Trailers, Inc. To contact NHTSA you may either call the Vehicle
Safety Hotline toll-free at 1-888-327-4236 (TTY: 1-800-424-9153), or go to http://www.safercar.gov; or write to:
Administrator
NHTSA
1200 New Jersey Avenue S.E
Washington, DC 20590
You can also obtain other information about motor vehicle safety from http://www.safercar.gov.
Driver’s Pre-Trip Inspection
Air/Electrical Connections
• Check that trailer air connectors are sealed and in good condition.
• Make sure glad hands are locked in place, free of damage or air leaks.
• Make sure the trailer electrical plug is firmly seated and locked in place.
Lights/Reflectors
• Check that all external lights and reflective equipment are clean and functional.
• Light and reflector checks include:
- Clearance lights (red on rear, amber elsewhere)
- Headlights (High and low beams)
- Tail lights
- Turn signals
- 4-way flashers
- Brake Lights
- Red reflectors (on rear) and amber reflectors (elsewhere)
Landing Gear
• Check that the landing gear is fully raised, has no missing parts, crank handle is secure and the
support frame is not damaged.
Suspension
• Look for missing, shifted, cracked or broken leaf springs.
• If vehicle is equipped with torsion bars, torque arms or other types of suspension components,
check that they are not damaged and are mounted securely.
• Air ride suspension should be checked for damage and leaks.
• Look for cracked or broken spring hangers, missing or damaged bushing and broken, loose or
missing U-bolts or other axle mounting parts.
• The mounts should be checked at each point where they are secured to the vehicle frame and axle(s).
Slack Adjusters & Shock Absorbers
• See that shock absorbers are secure and that there are no leaks.
• Look for broken, loose or missing parts.
• The angle between the push rod and adjuster arm should be a little over 90 degrees when the
brakes are released and not less than 90 degrees when the brakes are applied.
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• When pulled by hand, with the brakes released, the brake rod should not travel beyond required specs
(refer to Federal Brake Chamber Data Tables.)
Brake Chambers/Brake Hoses/Lines
• See that the brake chambers and brake hoses are not leaking, cracked or dented and are mounted
securely.
Drum Brake
• Check for cracks, dents or holes. Also check for loose or missing bolts.
• Brake lining (where visible) should not be worn dangerously thin.
Wheels/Rims
• Check for damaged or bent wheels/rims.
Tires
•The following items MUST be inspected on every tire:
- Tread Depth: Check for a minimum tread depth (4/32 on steering axle tires, 2/32 on all other tires).
- Tire Condition: Check that tread is evenly worn and look for cuts or other damage to tread or side
walls. Valve caps and stems should not be missing, broken or damaged.
– Tire Inflation: Check for proper inflation by using a tire gauge, or by striking tires with a mallet or
similar device.
Hub Oil Seals/Axle Seals
• See that hub oil/grease seals and axle seals are not leaking and if wheel has a sight glass, that oil level
is adequate.
Lug Nuts
• Check that all lug nuts are present, free of cracks and distortions and show no signs of looseness such
as rust trails or shiny threads.
• Make sure all nuts/bolts are not cracked or distorted.
Spacers
• If equipped, check that spacers are not bent, damaged or rusted through.
• Spacers should be evenly centered, with the dual wheels and tires evenly separated.
Frame
• Look for cracks, broken welds, holes or other damage to the frame and crossmembers.
Splash Guards
• Check that splash guards/mud flaps are not damaged and are mounted securely.
Pull Trailer Drawbars
• Check dolly tongue for cracks.
• Check safety cable.
• Check pintle hook to insure it’s locked.
• Check air and electrical connections.
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Installation and Operation
Knowing how to couple and uncouple correctly is basic to the safe operation of combination vehicles. General
coupling and uncoupling steps are listed below. There are differences between rigs, so learn the details of
coupling and uncoupling the trucks you will operate.
Coupling and Uncoupling
Coupling Tractor Semi - Trailers
1.) Inspect Fifth Wheel
• Check for damaged/missing parts.
• Check to see that mounting to tractor is secure, no cracks in frame, etc.
• Be sure that the fifth wheel plate is greased as required. Failure to keep the fifth wheel plate
lubricated could cause steering problems due to friction between the tractor and the trailer.
• Check if the fifth wheel is in proper position for coupling:
- Wheel tilted down towards rear of tractor.
- Jaws open
- Safety unlocking handle in the automatic lock position.
• If you have a sliding fifth wheel, make sure it’s properly locked.
• Make sure the trailer King Pin is not bent or broken.
2.) Inspect Area and Chock Wheels
• Make sure area around the vehicle is clear.
• Be sure trailer spring brakes are on.
3.) Position Tractor
• Put tractor directly in front of the trailer. (Never back under the trailer at an angle, this may push
the trailer sideways and damage the landing gear).
• Check position, using outside mirrors, look down both sides of the trailer.
• Back slowly, back until fifth wheel just touches the trailer.
4.) Secure Tractor
• Put on parking brake.
• Put transmission in neutral.
5.) Check Trailer Height
• The trailer should be low enough that it is raised slightly by the tractor when the tractor is backed under it.
Raise or lower the trailer as needed. (If trailer is too low, tractor may strike and damage nose of trailer; if
trailer is too high, it may not couple correctly).
• Check that the King Pin and fifth wheel are aligned.
6.) Connect Air Lines to Trailer
• Check glad hand seals and connect tractor supply (emergency) air line to trailer (emergency) glad hand.
• Check glad hand seals and connect tractor control (service) air line to trailer control (service) glad hand.
• Make sure air lines are safely supported where they won’t be crushed or caught while tractor is backing
under the trailer.
7.) Supply Air to Trailer
• From cab, push in “air supply” knob or move tractor protection valve control from the “emergency” to the
“normal” position to supply air to the trailer brake system.
• Wait until the air pressure is normal.
• Check brake system for crossed air lines.
- Shut engine off so you can hear the brakes.
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- Apply and release trailer brakes, listen for sound of trailer brakes being applied and released. You
should hear the brakes move when applied and air escape when the brakes are released.
- Check air brake system pressure gauge for signs of major air loss.
• When you are sure the trailer brakes are working, start engine.
• Make sure air pressure is up to normal.
8.) Lock Trailer Brakes
• Pull out the “air supply” knob, or move the tractor protection valve control from “normal” to “emergency.”
9.) Back Under Trailer
• Use lowest reverse gear.
• Back tractor slowly under trailer to avoid hitting the King Pin too hard.
• Stop when the King Pin is locked into the fifth wheel.
10.) Check Connection for Security
• Raise trailer landing gear slightly off ground.
• Pull tractor gently forward while the trailer brakes are still locked onto the tractor.
11.) Secure Vehicle
• Put transmission in neutral.
• Put parking brakes on.
• Shut off engine and take key out of ignition so that tractor can not be moved while you are under it.
12.) Inspect Coupling (use a flashlight if necessary)
• Make sure there is no space between upper and lower fifth wheel. If there is space, something is
wrong (King Pin may be on top of closed fifth wheel jaws; trailer would come loose very easily).
• Go under trailer and look into the back of the fifth wheel. Make sure the fifth wheel jaws have closed
around the shank of the King Pin.
• Check that the locking lever is in the “lock” position.
• Check that the safety catch is in position over locking lever.
(On some fifth wheels the catch must be put in place by hand).
• If the coupling isn’t right, don’t drive the coupled unit; fix before use.
13.) Connect the Electrical Cord and Check Air Lines
• Plug the electrical cord into the trailer and fasten the safety catch.
• Check both air lines and electrical lines for signs of damage.
• Make sure air and electrical lines will not hit any moving parts of vehicle.
14.) Raise Front Trailer Supports (Landing Gear)
• Use low gear range (if equipped) to begin raising the landing gear. Once free of weight,
switch to the high gear range.
• Raise the landing gear all the way up and secure the crank handle safely.
• When full weight of trailer is resting on tractor:
- Check for enough clearance between rear of tractor frame and landing gear.
(When tractor turns sharply it must not hit landing gear.)
- Check that there is enough clearance between the top of the tractor tires and the nose of the trailer.
m WARNING
If your trailer is too low in the front, has low
tire pressure or is loaded heavy in the rear, it
can cause swaying.
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Uncoupling Tractor Semi - Trailers
Following these steps will help the user to uncouple safely.
1.) Position Rig
• Make sure the surface of the parking area can support the weight of the trailer.
• Have tractor lined up with the trailer. (Pulling out at an angle can damage the landing gear).
2.) Ease Pressure on Locking Jaws
• Shut off trailer air supply to lock trailer brakes.
• Ease pressure on fifth wheel locking jaws by backing up gently (this helps release the fifth wheel
locking lever).
• Put parking brakes on while the tractor is pushing against the King Pin. This will hold the rig with
pressure off the locking jaws.
3.) If the trailer is empty, lower the landing gear until it makes firm contact with the ground, turn crank in
low gear a few extra turns; this will lift some weight off the tractor. (Do not lift the trailer off the fifth
wheel.) This will:
- Make it easier to unlatch the fifth wheel.
- Make it easier to couple for the next use.
4.) Disconnect Air Lines and Electrical Cables
• Disconnect air lines from trailer. Connect air line glad hands to dummy couplers at the back of cab,
or couple them together.
• Hang electrical cable with plug down to prevent moisture from entering it.
• Make sure lines are supported so they won’t be damaged while driving the tractor.
5.) Unlock Fifth Wheel
• Raise release handle lock.
• Pull the release handle to “open” position.
• Keep legs and feet clear of the rear tractor wheels to avoid serious injury in case the vehicle moves.
6.) Pull Tractor Partially Clear of Trailer
• Pull tractor forward until fifth wheel comes out from under the trailer.
• Stop with the tractor frame under the trailer (prevents trailer from falling to the ground if landing gear
should collapse or sink).
7.) Secure Tractor
• Apply parking brake.
• Place transmission in neutral.
8.) Inspect Trailer Supports
• Make sure ground is supporting trailer.
• Make sure landing gear is not damaged.
9.) Pull Tractor Clear of Trailer
• Release parking brake.
• Check the area and drive tractor clear.
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Page 25
Hydraulic Tail Operating Instructions (If Equipped)
The controls for the Hydraulic Tail and
Hydraulic Upper Deck Ramp (if equipped)
are located on the neck of the trailer.
See Image 1.
Image 2
Controls for Air Bag Suspension and
Pressure Gauge are located on the neck
of the trailer. See Image 2.
Image 1
Instructions For Ground Loading (Controls Located on the Neck, Driver’s Side, of the Trailer)
1.) Dump air from suspension.
2.) Fully raise Main Tail by pulling out the main tail valve handle.
3.) Rotate Flip Tail by pulling out flip tail valve Handle.
4.) Lower Main Tail by pushing in on the main tail valve handle.
m WARNING
LOADING OR UNLOADING TRAILER WITH VALVE NOT IN FLOAT POSITION CAN CAUSE
DAMAGE TO TRAILER AND HYDRAULIC TAIL
5.) Carefully load and unload equipment.
Returning Hydraulic Tail To Travel Position (Controls Located On The Neck, Driver’s Side, of the Trailer)
1.) Fully raise Main Tail by pulling out on the main tail valve handle.
2.) Rotate Flip Tail under by pushing in flip tail valve handle.
Flip Tail must be fully retracted to engage locking mechanism.
3.) Carefully lower Main Tail by pushing in on the main tail valve
handle until cylinder lock is engaged.
4.) Check that cylinder and flip tail locks are engaged.
5.) Air up suspension.
Hydraulic Tail is rated to lift and carry 20,000 lbs. (9,071 kg) four (4) feet behind main hinge.
Instructions For Dock Loading (Controls Located On The Neck of the Trailer)
Load Rating Maximum 10,000 lbs. (4,540kg)
1.) Dump air from suspension.
2.) Fully raise Main Tail by pulling
out the main tail valve handle.
3.) Rotate Flip Tail by pushing in flip tail valve handle.
4.) Lower Main Tail until Flip Tail is supported by the dock.
5.) Carefully load and unload equipment.
6.) Return tail to travel position.
Dock
Hydraulic Upper Deck Ramp Operating Instructions (if equipped)
(Controls Located On The Neck of the Trailer)
1.) Fully raise deck ramp by pulling out the deck ramp valve
handle. When the ramp is fully raised the locking bar will
automatically be engaged.
2.) Load and or unload equipment.
3.) Lower deck ramp by pushing in the deck ramp valve handle.
The deck ramp lock bar will automatically disengage.
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Suspension Pressure Gauge
An air bag pressure is provided to determine the amount of weight on each axle.
The numbers provided below are provided as estimated weights and should
never be considered as completely accurate.
20 PSI = approximately 6,200 lbs.
40 PSI = approximately 10,800 lbs.
60 PSI = approximately 15,400 lbs.
80 PSI = approximately 20,000 lbs.
Suspension Air Dump Valve
Manual Suspension Dump Valve is located at the side of the trailer. (See Image Above)
• To dump air bag suspension flip the valve to “Dump”.
• To recharge air bag suspension flip the valve to “Fill”.
m WARNING
Air Bag Suspension Must be inflated before trailer is in motion.
Moving the trailer with the Air Bag Suspension deflated will result in
damage to the suspension and the trailer.
Air Brakes
The trailer’s ABS light (located on the side of the trailer) indicates the status of the ABS
system. If the light comes ON and stays ON when you apply the brakes to a moving
vehicle, there is an ABS malfunction. It is normal for the lamp to come ON and go OFF
to perform a bulb check, but it should not stay ON when the vehicle is moving above
4 mph. It is important not to ignore this light. When a fault exists in the ABS system,
standard breaking returns to the affected wheel, and the ABS still controls other
monitored wheels. This lets you complete the trip. You should not ignore the light
and should have the vehicle serviced as soon as possible after the light comes ON
and stays ON.
The lights, brake lights and turn signals are located on the rear of the trailer. After coupling
the trailer to the vehicle always check for proper operation of all the lights.
Tire Information
Highway Service Dimensional Data
Tire Size
Load Range
Load Rating Single
Load Rating Dual
215/75R17.5 Radial
H 16-ply rated
[email protected] PSI
[email protected] PSI
235/75R17.5 Radial
H 16-ply rated
[email protected] PSI
[email protected] PSI
255/70R22.5 Radial
H-16-ply rated
[email protected] PSI
[email protected] PSI
Axle Size
Drum & Shoe Size
Std. Tire Size
25,000# Air
12-1/4” 7-1/2”
17.5”
25,000# Air
16-1/2” x 7-1/2”
22.5”
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Page 27
Ramps (Fold-Up, Hydraulic Ramps, Air Ramps)
If equipped, the loading ramps are located on the rear
of the trailer. The ramps pivot to the ground and can be
moved from side to side (not applicable with Hyd. or Air
ramps) to fit the width of the equipment you are loading.
The ramps should be returned to the upright position
before transporting.
Each model has a different method for holding the
ramps in an upright/transport position. With Upright
ramps, remove the locking mechanism to lower the ramp and after ramp is
in the raised position reattach locking mechanism. Upright ramps maybe
run by hydraulics or air. On Fold- Up, the ramps have spring-assist and
when in transport position will rest upon the beavertail.
Securing Loaded Materials
Equipment tie downs are located on the trailer. Equipment should be fastened securely to the trailer before
transporting. See equipment manufacturer and/or Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) for recommendations on
proper tie down procedures.
Over-Width Lights (if equipped)
• To extend Over-width lights, loosen tensioner on the inside of the trailer frame.
• Pull firmly on light fixture and it will extend.
• Secure tensioner on the inside of the trailer frame.
• When lights are not in use, loosen tensioner, retract lights and tighten
tensioner to hold the lights tight to the trailer body.
Hydraulic Winch (if equipped)
• See Operator’s Manual for
Usage Guidelines and Maintenance.
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Table Of Contents
MAINTENANCE
Hydraulic Tail/Upper Hydraulic Deck Ramp
• Secure the Hydraulic Tail or Upper Hydraulic Deck Ramp in upright position, so that it will not fall while
maintenance is being performed.
m DANGER
Prior To Any Maintenance Being Performed The
Hydraulic Tail Or Upper Hydraulic Deck Ramp MUST
Be Secured In The Upright Position. Failure To Do So
Will Result In Severe Injury Or Death.
Grease Zerks
All grease zerks on your trailer should be greased once a year or every 12,000 miles with multipurpose grease.
It is recommended to grease a trailer if it has been in storage for any period of time.
Grease zerks are located:
• Top and Base of the hydraulic cushion cylinder(s).
• Hinge Pin (pivot point) - this zerk is located in between the
two tires on the mainframe of the trailer. There is one grease zerk on each side of the trailer.
• Axles - two grease zerks on each axle.
• Jack(s) - dependent on options chosen there will be one to two grease zerks located on the jack.
For additional maintenance of your trailer see the main Owner’s Manual page 18.
Weight & Balance - You are responsible for not being overloaded.
Definitions you should know:
Gross vehicle weight (GVW): The total weight of a single vehicle plus its load.
Gross combination weight (GCW): The total weight of a powered unit plus trailer(s) plus the cargo.
Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR): The maximum GVW specified by the manufacturer for a single
vehicle plus its load.
Gross combination weight rating (GCWR): The maximum GCW specified by the manufacturer for a specific combination of vehicles plus its load.
Axle weight: The weight transmitted to the ground by one axle or one set of axles.
Tire load: The maximum safe weight a tire can carry at a specified pressure. This rating is stated
on the side of each trailer.
Legal Weight Limits
• You must keep weights within legal limits. States have maximums for GVW’s, GCW’s and axle weights
Often, maximum axle weights are set by a bridge formula.
• Overloading can have negative effects on steering, braking and speed control. Overloaded trucks have
to go very slow on upgrades and may gain too much speed on downgrades. Stopping distance increases,
and Brakes may fail due to over use.
• During unfavorable weather conditions or in mountains, it may not be safe to operate at legal
maximum weights. Take these factors into account before driving.
• The GAWR and tire information shown on the vehicle identification plate was applicable at the time that the
trailer was manufactured. If the tires or other components of the running gear have been changed or altered
since the trailer was manufactured, the GAWR may have changed.
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Page 29
TSA (Tilt Slide Axle)
Operating Instructions
m CAUTION
When Operating Semi Trailer, Do
Not Back Over The Curb. Doing So
Will Cause SEVERE Damage To The
Undercarriage and Undercarriage
Cylinder.
Winch Lever
The Winch lever is located on the driver’s side of the upper deck. It is the first lever with two positions:
IN In this position, the cable is reeled back into the winch.
OUT
In this position, the cable is released.
Deck Tilt Lever
The Deck Tilt lever is located on the driver’s side of the upper deck. It is the second lever with two positions:
UP In this position,the front end of the semi trailer rises to the load position.
DOWN In this position, the front end of the semi trailer lower so the transport position.
Axle Control Lever
The Axle Control Lever is located on the control panel. It is the third lever
with two positions:
BACK
In this position, the undercarriage slides forward for loading.
FORWARD
In this position, the undercarriage slides to the rear. The undercarriage must be in the
rear-most position for transport.
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Operating
Decal Instructions
TRAILER Operation
**NOTE: DO NOT OPERATE BEFORE
READING OPERATOR’S MANUAL.
1.) Park Tractor And Trailer In A Straight Line On Level Ground.
2.) Set Tractor Brakes And Release Trailer Brakes.
3.) Engage PTO Or Pony Motor.
WARNING: ALWAYS
USE LOW LOAD ANGLE
TO LOAD AND UNLOAD
POWERED PRODUCTS
4.) Pull Axles Forward.
WARNING: DO NOT OPERATE TRAILER WHEN DETACHED FROM
TRACTOR. DO NOT OVERBALANCE TRAILER TOWARD TAIL END.
UP
IN
BACK
DECK
TILT
WINCH
AXLES
DOWN
OUT
FORWARD
5.) To Achieve Low Load Angle Alternate Between Raising The Trailer And Pulling The Axles Forward Until The Approach Plate Touches Ground And Axles
Are Completely Forward.
CAUTION: DO NOT
ALLOW REAR AXLE TO
LEAVE THE GROUND.
6.) Maximum Tilt Angle Is Only Intended For Unloading Non-Powered Products
And To Transfer Load To Tractor. Transfer Load To Tractor By Raising Deck and
Moving Axles Toward Rear Until Load Is Forward Of Rear Axle.
m WARNING
Wide Load Lights MUST
be COLLAPSED Before
Moving The Slide Axles.
Failure To Do So Will Result
In Damage To The Trailer.
7.) To Return to Level Position Reverse Steps Used To Tilt Trailer.
m WARNING
FOR SAFE TRAILER OPERATION, THE TRAVELING AXLES
MUST BE IN THE REAR MOST
POSITION FOR HIGHWAY USE.
Table Of Contents
m WARNING
CABLE LENGTH CHANGES
WHEN TILTING TRAILER.
NOTICE
Check Engine Oil Per
Manufacturer’s
Recommendation.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 31
Loading Procedure
1.) Practice all standard industrial safety standards. Do not load any
payload that will overload any component of the trailer or cause an
unsafe condition.
2.) Park the tractor/semi trailer in a straight line on a level even surface.
Set the tractor brakes and release the trailer brakes.
3.) Start operation of hydraulic power system. If the hydraulic engine
package is installed, start and warm up engine following engine
operating instructions in. (Read engine operator’s manual.)
4.) Move undercarriage forward five to eight feet using the AXLE
CONTROL lever. To insure that the trailer does not rock back, keep
undercarriage behind the trailer center of gravity.
5.) If winch cable is connected to lower bed, disconnect cable from
lower bed or reel out cable as needed to keep it from becoming too
tight when tilting bed. Using the DECK TILT lever tilt the front of the
bed up until approach plate touches the ground or is to full tilt
position.
6.) If the approach plate has not touched the ground, move
undercarriage forward until approach plate just touches the ground.
7.) Alternate between lowering bed tilt angle and moving undercarriage
fully forward so weight of the trailer bed rests partly on approach
plate and partly on undercarriage as undercarriage is moved forward.
Reel winch in or out as needed to keep some tension on the cable.
The object is to have the approach plate resting on the ground when
ever the center of gravity of the trailer and load is behind the center of
the undercarriage. In loading or unloading position, the approach
plate should be resting on the ground and the undercarriage fully
forward.
Page 32
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
m DANGER
1. Do Not Go Near Undercarriage When Camrollers Are In Motion If A Hydraulic Hose Is Disconnected From The System, The Undercarriage
Could Slide Abruptly.
2. The Center of Gravity Of The Load Must Be
In Front Of The Undercarriage Whenever The
Approach Plate Is Not Supported By The Ground.
Failure To Do This Can Cause TheSemi
Trailer
To
Tilt
Back
May
And
Result In Injury Or Death.
3.
Clear
While
Keep
All
Persons
Tilting
The
Trailer
To
Avoid
Serious
Injury Or Death By The Indicated Pinch Points On
The Trailer.
m CAUTION
Do Not Allow The Back Axle Of The Trailer To
Leave The Ground. Failure To Do This May Result
In Damage To The Semi Trailer.
m CAUTION
Tilting
The
Semi
Trailer
Deck
Will
Increase
Tension
On
The
Winch
Cable,
Which
Can
Cause
The
Load
To Be Pulled Forward. Do Not Hook
The Cable To The Lower Deck When
Tilting.
Table Of Contents
IMPORTANT
MAXIMUM ANGLE IS ONLY INTENDED FOR UNLOADING
NON-POWERED CARGO AND TO TRANSFER LOAD TO
TRACTOR. TRANSFER LOAD TO TRACTOR BY RAISING
DECK AND MOVING AXLES REAR WARD UNTIL LOAD IS
FORWARD OF REAR AXLE, THUS APPLYING LOAD TO
TRACTOR.
8.) Winch or drive the load onto the semi trailer. Insure that the load is
steering straight upon to the semi trailer and does not maneuver off
the side of the semi trailer. Continue until load center of gravity is just
ahead of the axles, if possible. The load should never place more
weight on the kingpin than on the rear axles during loading and
unloading.
9.) Securely tie down the load and attach the winch cable to the front of
the load, if it is not already attached. Reel in winch cable until it becomes tight. (Winch cable serves as a safety tie down incase load tie
down fails but is not to replace tie downs.)
10.) To adjust trailer to a transport position, alternate between tilting the
front of the bed up toward full tilt position and moving the undercarriage rearward, until the center of gravity of the trailer load is ahead of
the center of the undercarriage. Keep part of the load on the wheels
and part on the approach plate. Reel winch out as needed to keeps
light tension on the cable. Never move the undercarriage so far to the
rear that the approach plate is lifted off the ground.
11.) When the center of gravity of the trailer and load is in front of the
undercarriage or when the trailer is in full tilt and the undercarriage as
far back as possible without lifting the approach plate off the ground,
fully lower the tilt angle. Reel in the winch cable as needed to keep
slight tension on the cable.
12.) After bed tilt angle is fully lowered, move the undercarriage to the rear
until it is in transport position. Hold DECK TILT lever in the down position until hydraulic system works against the bottomed out Hydraulic
Tilt Cylinders (Approximately 2-5 seconds). Hold Axle Control lever in
the transport position until hydraulic system works against the fully
retracted Hydraulic Axle Cylinder (Approximately 2-5 seconds).
13.) Re-check that load is properly secured. If necessary, unsecure the
load, move load slightly forward or rearward on the load bed to get
correct weight distribution on king pin and the trailer axles, and resecure the load with the tie downs and winch cable.
14.) Shut down hydraulic power system. If hydraulic engine package is
installed, shut down the auxiliary hydraulic power engine following
manufacturers operating instructions.
Assure maintenance schedule is up-to-date and semi trailer is ready to
be pulled.
Table Of Contents
m CAUTION
In Loading Or Unloading Position, The Approach
Plate Should Be Resting On The Ground And The
Undercarriage Fully Forward.
m WARNING
Always Use Low Load Angle To Load And Unload
Powered Cargo/Equipment.
m CAUTION
Do Not Allow The Back Axle Of The Trailer To
Leave The Ground. Failure To Do This May Result
In Damage To The Semi Trailer.
m CAUTION
Tandem Axle Semi Trailer Maximum Concentrated
Load In A 52,500 lbs. In 16’. Triple Axle Semi Trailer
Maximum Concentrated Load In A 60,000 lbs. In
16’.
m CAUTION
1.) The Semi Trailer Must Be Coupled To A Tractor And The Landing Gear Raised Off The Ground
Before Operating.
2.) Do Not Exceed The Gross Axle Weight Ratings For Any Axle On Your Vehicle. The Combined
Weight Of The Semi Trailer And Cargo Must Not
Exceed The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)
Of The Trailer.
m WARNING
Assure
Maintenance
Schedule
Is
UpTo-Date
And
Semi
Trailer
Is
Ready
To Be Pulled. Failure To Do So May
Result In Damage To The Unit And/Or Cargo.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 33
Steps for loading and unloading
LOADING
m WARNING: Center of
gravity of load must remain
ahead of suspension center
when approach plate is not
supported by ground.
m caution: Do not
allow back axle to
leave the ground.
m WARNING:
always use
low load angle to load
and unload
powered
cargo.
UNLOADING
Page 34
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Unloading Procedure
1.) Practice all standard industrial safety standards.
2.) Park the tractor/semi trailer in a straight line on a level even surface.
Set the tractor brakes and release the semi trailer brakes.
3.) Start operation of hydraulic power system. If the hydraulic engine
package is installed, start and warm up the auxiliary hydraulic power
engine following manufacturer’s engine operating instructions.
4.) Make sure load is still in correct position to get proper weight distribution
on kingpin and secured with appropriate load tie downs.
5.) Using the Axle Control lever, move undercarriage forward five to eight
feet,or just behind the center of gravity of the loaded semi trailer. This is
to insure that the trailer does not rock back. Actual center of gravity will
relocate to the rear as the trailer is tilted up. CAUTION DO NOT ALLOW
THE BACK SEMI TRAILER AXLE TO LEAVE THE GROUND. THIS CAN
RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE SEMI TRAILER.
6.) Using the Deck Tilt lever, raise the front of bed up to full tilt position
reeling out winch cable as needed to keeps light tension on the cable.
m CAUTION
Do Not Allow The Back Semi Trailer Axle To Leave
The Ground. Failure To Do So May Result In Damage To The Semi Trailer.
m WARNING
Always Use Low Load Angle To Load And Unload
Powered Cargo/Equipment.
7.) If the approach plate has not touched the ground, move the undercarriage forward until the approach plate touches the ground and starts
supporting the trailer. Then alternate between moving the undercarriage
forward while lowering the tilt angle and reeling in the winch cable. The
object is to keep part of the weight on the approach plate, and part of the
weight on the wheels while lowering the tilt angle and keeping slight
tension on the winch cable. Always use low load angle to unload
powered cargo. To achieve low load angle, the undercarriage has to be
all the way forward. The maximum load angle is only intended, if required,
for unloading non-powered cargo and to transfer load to tractor. Transfer
load to tractor by raising deck and moving axles toward rear until load is
forward of rear axle, thus transferring load to tractor.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 35
IMPORTANT
MAXIMUM ANGLE IS ONLY INTENDED FOR
UNLOADING NON-POWERED CARGO AND TO
TRANSFER LOAD TO TRACTOR. TRANSFER
LOAD TO TRACTOR BY RAISING DECK AND
MOVING AXLES REARWARD UNTIL LOAD IS
FORWARD OF REAR AXLE, THUS APPLYING
LOAD TO TRACTOR.
8.) If load is non-powered, insure that the winch cable is
firmly attached to the load and tension is on the cable. Tilt
trailer according to Unloading Procedures Novembers 5-7,
adjusting tension on winch cable as required. With winch
cable firmly attached to load and sufficient tension on the
cable so load securing devices can be safely removed,
remove other load securing devices. Use the winch to
assist the load down to end of approach plate. With end of
load resting on ground, block load from rolling or sliding, if
necessary. Disconnect the winch and move the trailer from
under the load, allowing the load to move off trailer to the
ground.
9.) If powered load is secured to lower deck only, tilt semi
trailer according to Unloading Procedures Numbers 5-7.
Make sure the trailer is tilted to the low load angle. Check
that powered equipment parking brakes are set and winch
cable hooked to powered equipment with sufficient tension
so load securing devices can be removed. Remove safety
secure devices. Take tension off winch cable and remove
winch cable. Power load off the trailer.
m WARNING
When Removing Load, Insure That The Load Is Steering
Straight So It Does Not Maneuver Off The Side Of The Semi
Trailer. Failure To Do So Could Result In Damage To Equipment,
Injury Or Death.
m CAUTION
Before Returning The Semi Trailer To Transport
Position, Insure That There Is Sufficient Distance
Between The Load And The Rear Of The Semi
Trailer. Failure To Do So May Result In Damage To
The Semi Trailer And/Or Load.
12.) Using the Deck Tilt lever and Axle Control lever, alternate
between tilting the front of the bed up to full tilt position
and moving undercarriage to the rear as trailer wheels
become unloaded. Keep part of the load on the wheels
and part on the approach plate. Never move undercarriage so far to the rear that the approach plate is lifted off
the ground when center of gravity of semi trailer and load
is behind center of undercarriage. Never allow wheels to
leave the ground while the trailer is tilted.
13.) After the trailer is fully tilted and the undercarriage is as far
back as possible without lifting the approach plate off the
ground, fully lower bed tilt angle.
14.) With bed tilt angle fully lowered, move undercarriage
rearward to transport position. Hold Deck Tilt lever in the
down position until hydraulic system works against the
bottomed out Hydraulic Tilt Cylinders (Approximately 2-5
seconds). Hold Axle Control lever in the transport position
until hydraulic system works against the fully extended
Hydraulic Axle Cylinder (Approximately 2-5 seconds).
15.) Reel in winch cable and secure hook on upper deck.
16.) Shut down hydraulic power system. If hydraulic engine
package is installed, shut down the auxiliary hydraulic
power engine following manufacturer’s operating
instructions.
10.) If powered load is secured to both upper and lower deck,
attention is required before tilting the trailer. Adjust load
securing devices to allow semi trailer to tilt and sufficiently
secure load from movement while semi trailer is tilted to
low load angle before tilting the semi trailer.
11.) Before returning the semi trailer to transport position
insure that there is sufficient distance between the load
and the rear of the semi trailer so that the semi trailer does
not hit the load when being folded back to transport
position.
Page 36
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
®
Maintenance Schedule
Item
Function
Required
Wheel Torque
Check at 50 miles
Brake Air System
Test that they are operational
Brake ADJ & Wear
Inspect, tighten & adjust
Slack Adjusters
Inspect, tighten & adjust
Lights
Inspect and test that they are
operational
Wiring & Connections
Inspect
•
Fasteners
Inspect and tighten
King pin & Plate
Inspect, Clean & Lubricate
•
•
Relay valves
Inspect & Clean
Camshaft Assembly
Inspect & Lubricate
hub oil
Inspect, lubricate & when
needed replace
•
•
wheel bearings &
cup
Inspect for corrosion or wear,
Clean & repack
•
Air Ride suspension
Inspect, Tighten/adj. torque
as needed
Undercarriage
rollers
Lubricate
•
Hydraulic Oil
Inspect & replace as needed
Hydraulic Filter
Replace
hoses
Inspect & replace as needed
winch gear case
Inspect
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Tire inflation & wear Inflate tires to mfg.’s specifications
Weekly
•
•
•
Every 3 months
/ 3,000 miles
12 months /
25,000 miles
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
wheel lug nuts
Tighten to specified torque
values
•
•
Suspension alignment
Inspect for bending, loose
fasteners & wear
•
•
Table Of Contents
6 months /
12,000 miles
•
•
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 37
Felling Trailers Owner’s Manual
Hydraulic Detachable
Gooseneck Trailer Supplement
Table of Contents
Click on Heading to Navigate to Specified Pages
Trailer Terminology.................................................................................................................. 39-40
Introduction...................................................................................................................................41
Detaching Trailer..................................................................................................................... 41-42
Attaching Gooseneck To Trailer.............................................................................................. 43-44
Air Lift/Lower Kits..........................................................................................................................44
Recommended Outrigger Loading...............................................................................................45
Page 38
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Table Of Contents
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 39
Page 40
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Introduction - Hydraulic Detachable Gooseneck
These instructions are designed to make you familiar with the operation of our product. It is not intended for the purpose of training or to replace common knowledge in operating a hydraulic detachable gooseneck trailer. Make sure
you read these instructions completely before using the Felling X-Force Hydraulic Detachable Gooseneck trailer.
Operation Instructions
1.) These decals are placed in key areas on the trailer and point out
instructions and important safety factors in those areas. Failure to
understand these instructions could cause serious injury.
m NOTICE
IMPORTANT! Read and understand all safety
decals and the operating decal prior to using
the trailer!
2.) The X-FORCE Series hydraulic detachable gooseneck trailer features a king pin hitch system for use with
tractor truck fifth-wheels. Make sure the truck fifth-wheel is in the proper location so that the gooseneck can be
properly detached and reattached to the trailer bed.
3.) Park truck and trailer in a straight line and on as level ground as possible.
Detach Trailer
4.) Engage hydraulic system. Start the hydraulic system so that oil is flowing to
the gooseneck. If your trailer has a pony motor option, start the pony motor
according to the instructions on the pony motor decal.
5.) Disconnect air and electrical lines from the gooseneck to the trailer deck, roll
up and put them in their storage area. Storage area located at the front of the
trailer deck near the front ramp.
6.) Using the hydraulic control levers, (located on the driver’s side of the neck),
raise gooseneck until load blocks can be rotated back.
m WARNING
Stand Clear When Lowering The Gooseneck
To The Ground. Failure To Do So May Result
In Severe Injury.
7.) Using the hydraulic control levers,
(located on the driver’s side of the
neck), lower the gooseneck to the
ground. Continue lowering
gooseneck until there is approximately 1/4” gap below the bottom of
the load pin and load plate.
Table Of Contents
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 41
Detach Trailer
8.) Lower the gooseneck lifting arm to the truck frame using the front
hydraulic control lever. Lower it only to touch the frame enough to
support the gooseneck.
9.) Pull Safety Lock Pin Handle out and rotate to rest on web.
m WARNING
Stand Clear Of Latch Block Position Arm
When Operating Air Release. Failure To Do
So May Result In Severe Injury.
Page 42
10.) Pull latch release Air Valve out to rotate and unlock latch.
11.) Slowly drive forward and adjust the lift arm accordingly so the
gooseneck load plates clear the ground by 1” to 1.5”, but do not
drag on the ground.
12.) Flip down the front ramps and carefully load or unload the equipment.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Attaching Gooseneck To Trailer
1.) Adjust the gooseneck lift arm so that the load plate is approximately 1-1/2” above the ground. Do this by lifting or lowering the gooseneck with the
gooseneck lifting arm hydraulics control (located on the driver’s side of the
neck.).
2.) Push latch Air Valve in to reset latch (located
on the front driver’s side of the deck).
m WARNING
Unlock
Position
Safety Lock Pin Handle MUST Remain In
The Unlocked Position (Out.) Failure To Do
So May Result In Severe Injury.
3.) Back up the truck slowly until lock latches. The undercarriage will self-align
with the trailer (if not, pull ahead and adjust accordingly). Spring loaded
Latch Position Arm will rotate up and back down to the locked position when
locked.
m WARNING
Do Not Allow Debris Between Load Plate And
Front Of Trailer.
4.) Rotate Safety Lock Pin off web (located on the front driver’s side of the deck).
Pin should retract 3” to lock position.
Unlocked
Locked
5.) Raise the gooseneck lift arm (shoe plate).
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 43
Attaching Gooseneck To Trailer
6.) Raise the gooseneck and trailer until the Ride
Height Cam Blocks can be rotated forward and
positioned to the desired ride height position.
7.) Lower the gooseneck and trailer to transport
position.
IMPORTANT: Visually check to make sure the Ride height Cam Blocks are
on the same notch.
8.) Connect the air and electrical lines.
Rear Lift Axle
The rear lift axle should only be when the trailer is unloaded. This kit reduces
wear when transporting the trailer without a load.
At the rear of the trailer you will find
the Lift/Lower Axle valve.
Follow instructions per decal:
To lift the rear axle - Pull the knob out.
To lower the rear axle - Push the knob.
Outrigger Boards With Hold-Downs
With this option, an operator can store the outrigger boards in
the open areas of the deck. The hold-downs are spring loaded.
Follow the instruction decal.
Page 44
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Recommended Outrigger Loading
Proper Loading Technique
Because outriggers (swinging side brackets or extension brackets) are often used to extend the useable width of the
deck by approximately 12” on each side, the proper loading technique is very important.
Recommended Practice
The centerline of the Vehicle’s tires, tracks, or grouses must be “in-line” or “in-board” of the outside edge of the deck.
m WARNING
Outrigger brackets are designed for use only
with 2” thick boards. Use of thicker boards may
result in outrigger failure, subsequent damage to
equipment and/or serious injury or death.
Maximum recommended width not to
exceed width of trailer
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 45
Utility Reel Trailers
Installing Reel - (please note this will likely require at least 2 people for safe and proper installation.)
m WARNING
Do not operate Reel Trailer without proper
safety equipment (safety glasses, gloves, etc.)
Failure to do so could result in injury or death.
1.) Remove Shaft Lock Clamp pins on each side of trailer.
2.) Remove shaft from reel holder.
3.) Remove collars from shaft.
4.) Unlock spring loaded “lock pins” on each side of trailer.
5.) Move reel into position.
Note: In order to properly use power wind feature and hand brake, reel must be aligned properly to the passenger side of trailer.
Page 46
6.) Slide shaft through reel, and install collars tight to reel and position reel
between uprights.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
7.) Lower reel loader using remote pendant. Remote
pendant is located inside the hydraulic system storage
box on the front of the trailer.
Remote Pendant
8.) Position reel shaft through reel at appropriate level.
9.) Install Reel Holder pins.
10.) Raise reel loader using remote pendant.
11.) Lock spring loaded “Lock Pins”(ensure pins are properly locked before use).
Installing 12” removable hand brake (if equipped)
Table Of Contents
1.) Locate hand brake storage area and remove.
2.) Remove Reel Holder pin on passenger side of reel trailer.
3.) Locate hand brake at appropriate level ensuring that brake pads are
positioned properly on each side of disc brake.
4.) Install Reel Holder pin.
5.) Hand brake is adjusted using manual wheel.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 47
Operating Power Reel (if equipped)
1.) Ensure hand brake is open to allow reel to spin freely.
2.) Start gas engine power unit. Be sure to check engine oil before use.
Shut fuel off when engine is not in use.
m CAUTION
The Engine Enclosure Cover MUST Be
Open During Normal Operation To
Provide Access To The Controls And
Proper Ventilation For The Engine.
3.) Move Power Reel Arm into place using
“Reel Arm” valve.
Note: Speed of Reel Arm can be adjusted via
“Flow Control” lever located on side of
valve block.
4.) Power Reel Tire should be slightly compressed against reel
to ensure power drive grips properly.
5.) Close “Flow Control” lever.
m WARNING
Not closing the Flow Control valve prior to
actuating the Power Reel can lead to “unsafe”
reel speed conditions.
6.) Engage “Power Reel” valve.
7.) Actuate “Flow Control” lever to open position slowly to desired reel speed.
8.) To stop Power reel actuate “Flow Control” lever to closed position and close “Power Reel” valve.
Page 48
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Utility Pole Trailers
Telescoping Tongue
1.) To extend the Telescoping Tongue remove the tongue pin.
Block trailer tires with wheel chocks to prevent the trailer from moving.
2.) Drive tow vehicle ahead slowly to extend the
telescoping tongue.
m WARNING
Do Not Over Extend Tongue. Overextending
tongue could damage tow vehicle and/or cause
possible injury.
Table Of Contents
3.) After the Telescoping tongue is
fully extended place tongue pin
in place to prevent it from
retracting while in use.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 49
Loading Equipment on a Trailer
If equipped, the loading ramps are located on the rear of the trailer. The
ramps pivot to the ground and can be moved from side to side to fit the
width of the equipment you are loading. The ramps should be returned to
the upright position before transporting.
Each model has a different method for holding the ramps in an upright/
transport position. On Drop-Deck trailers, remove the locking mechanism
to lower the ramp and after ramp is in the raised position reattach locking
mechanism. On Deck-Over trailers, if equipped, are fold up ramps with
spring-assist.
Equipment tie downs are located on the trailer. Equipment should be fastened
securely to the trailer before transporting. See equipment manufacturer and/or
Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) for recommendations on proper tie down
procedures.
Corner Tie Down
Standard Drop-Deck Ramps
D-ring - Drop-Decks
Standard Deck-Over Ramps
D-ring - Heavy Deck-Over
Page 50
Stake Pocket
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Maintenance
Preventative Maintenance
Regular preventative maintenance items outlined in this section may be repeated and reinforced to extend the life of
your trailer. Check your packet for additional maintenance items on your trailer.
• Gooseneck Hitch - Before each tow, the gooseneck coupler and the gooseneck ball need a thin layer of
automotive grease to reduce wear and insure proper operation. Replace any parts immediately if they show wear,
corrosion or if the parts are not in proper working order. If the gooseneck coupler or ball need to be replaced, be
sure to replace it with the correct load rating.
•Wheel Bolts - Check the torque after the first 50 miles and again at 100
miles. Then at a minimum of every one thousand miles make sure they are
tight. It is extremely important to apply and maintain the proper wheel
mounting torque on your trailer axle. If you are replacing a wheel it is
important that the wheels, tires, and axle are properly matched. Be sure to
match the wheel to the axle hub. Make sure the wheels have enough load
carrying capacity and pressure rating to match the maximum load of the
tire and trailer. Care should be taken to match any replacement wheel with
the same offset wheel as originally equipped. Failure to match offset can
result in reducing the load carrying capacity of your axle and cause bearing
stress.
•Tire Pressure - Check tire pressure regularly. See the section “Tire Information” for
the correct tire pressure for your trailer.
•Breakaway Switch - Check the battery for a full charge frequently.
•Suspension - All components (springs, hangers, bolts, etc.) of the suspension
should be visually inspected every 6,000 miles for signs of wear. Worn items
should be replaced or fixed immediately. See your packet information for more
details on inspecting and replacing suspension components.
• Brakes - Inspect and adjust the brakes every 10,000 to 15,000 miles. (Be sure to adjust all brake wheels.)
See your packet information for more details on inspecting and replacing brake components.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 51
• Wheel Bearings - Pack the wheel bearings once a year or every 12,000 miles whichever comes first using regular wheel bearing grease. On oil bath hub seals use 80-90W gear lube.
• Jack - Grease jack when needed with multipurpose grease. Always grease after taking the trailer out of storage.
•Cleanliness - Wash the trailer regularly.
•Daily Inspection - Conduct a walk-around inspection daily, fix any problems you find immediately.
Lifting and Supporting the Trailer
When maintenance or repairs are being mad
to the trailer it should be properly supported.
Use properly rated jack stands to support the
trailer.
Page 52
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Felling Trailers
Maintenance Schedule
Item
Function
Required
Wheel Torque
Check at 50 miles
Brake
Test that they are operational
Brake Adjustment
Adjust to proper operating
clearance
brake magnets
Inspect for wear and current
draw
brake linings
Inspect for wear or
contamination
brake controller
Check for correct amperage
& modulation
brake cylinders
Check for leaks, sticking
•
brake lines
Inspect for cracks, leaks,
kinks
•
trailer brake wiring
Inspect wiring for bare spots,
fray, etc.
•
breakway system
Check battery charge and
switch operation
hub/drum
Inspect for abdominal wear
or scoring
•
wheel bearing &
cups
Inspect for corrosion or wear.
Clean & repack
•
seals
Inspect for leakage, Replace
if removed
•
springs
Inspect for wear, loss of arch
•
Suspension parts
Inspect for bending, loose
fasteners, wear
hangers
Inspect welds
wheels nuts and
bolts
Tighten to specified torque
values
wheels
Inspect for cracks, dents or
distortion
Tire inflation
pressure
Inflate tires to mfg.’s
specifications
tire condition
Inspect for cuts, wear,
bulging, etc.
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Weekly
Every 3 months
/ 3,000 miles
6 months /
12,000 miles
12 months /
25,000 miles
•
At Every Use
•
•
•
•
•
At Every Use
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Felling Trailers
Highway Service Dimensional Data
Tire Size
Load Range
Load Rating Single
Load Rating Dual
ST205/75R15 RADIAL
C 6-ply rated
1820 @ 50 PSI
N/A
ST225/75R15 RADIAL
C 6-ply rated
2150 @ 50 PSI
N/A
ST225/75R15 RADIAL
D 8-ply rated
2540 @ 50 PSI
N/A
ST235/80R16 RADIAL
E 10-ply rated
3520 @ 80 PSI
3093 @ 80 PSI
LT235/85R16 RADIAL
G 14-ply rated
3750 @ 110 PSI
3200 @ 110 PSI
9.00 x 14.5 BIAS
F 12-ply rated
3230 @ 100 PSI
2840 @ 100 PSI
12.00 x 16.5 BIAS
F 12-ply rated
4045 @ 75 PSI
3560 @ 75 PSI
9R17.5 HC
H 16-ply rated
4410 @ 110 PSI
3970 @ 110 PSI
11R17.5 HC
H 16-ply rated
5530 @ 120 PSI
4850 @ 110 PSI
215/75R17.5 RADIAL
H 16-ply rated
4805 @ 125 PSI
4540 @ 125 PSI
245/70R17.5 RADIAL
H 16-ply rated
6005 @ 125 PSI
5675 @ 125 PSI
235/75R17.5 RADIAL
H 16-ply rated
6005 @ 125 PSI
5675 @ 125 PSI
255/70R22.5
H 16-ply rated
5510 @ 115 PSI
5070 @ 115 PSI
275/70R22.5
H 16-ply rated
6610 @ 125 PSI
6175 @ 125 PSI
295/70R22.5
H 16-ply rated
6610 @ 120 PSI
6005 @ 105 PSI
11R22.5
G 14-ply rated
6610 @ 120 PSI
6005 @ 120 PSI
Axle Size
Drum & Show Size
Std. tire Size
2,200# Electric
7” x 1-1/4”
10” - 12”
2,200# Hydraulic
7” x 1-3/4”
10”-12”
3,500#
10” x 2-1/4”
13” - 15”
6,000#
12” x 2”
15” - 16”
7,000#
12” x 2”
16”
7,200#
12-1/4” x 2-1/2”
16”
8,000#
12-1/4” x 3-3/8”
16”
9,000#
12-1/4” x 3-3/8”
16”
10,000# Electric 12-1/4” x 3-3/8”
16”
10,000# Air
12-1/4” x 4”
16”
12,000# Electric
12-1/4” x 5”
16”
12,000# Air
12-1/4” x 5”
16”
15,000# Electric
12-1/4” x 5”
17.5”
15,000# Air
12-1/4” x 5”
17.5”
25,000# Air
12-1/4” x 7-1/2”
17.5”
25,000# Air
16-1/2” x 7-1/2”
22.5”-24.5”
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1. TIRE SAFETY INFORMATION (Effective September 1st, 2005)
This portion of the User’s Manual contains tire safety infor1.1. Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit-Trailer
mation as required by 49 CFR 575.6.
Determining the load limits of a trailer includes more than
Section 1.1
understanding the load limits of the tires alone. On all
contains “Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit - Trailer”. Felling Trailers there is a Federal certification/VIN label that is
located on the forward half of the left (road) side of the unit.
This certification/VIN label will indicate the trailer’s Gross
Section 2.1
Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). This is the most weight the
contains “Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit – Tow
fully loaded trailer can weigh. It will also provide the Gross
Vehicle”.
Axle Weight Rating (GAWR). This is the most a particular axle
Section 2.2
can carry. If there are multiple axles, the GAWR of each axle
contains a Glossary of Tire Terminology, including “cold
will be provided.
inflation pressure”, “maximum inflation pressure”,
If your trailer has a GVWR of 10,000 pounds or less, there is
“recommended inflation pressure”, and other non-technical
a vehicle placard located in the same location as the
terms.
certification label described above. This placard provides tire
Section 2.3 contains information from the NHTSA brochure
and loading information. In addition, this placard will show a
entitled “Tire Safety – Everything Rides On It”.
statement regarding maximum cargo capacity. Cargo can be
added to the trailer, up to the maximum weight specified on
This brochure, as well as the preceding subsections, dethe placard. The combined weight of the cargo is provided
scribes the following items;
as a single number. In any case, remember: the total weight
• Tire labeling, including a description and explanation of of a fully loaded trailer can not exceed the stated GVWR.
each marking on the tires, and information about the For trailers with living quarters installed, the weight of water
DOT Tire Identification Number (TIN).
and propane also need to be considered. The weight of fully
• Recommended tire inflation pressure, including a filled propane containers is considered part of the weight of
description and explanation of:
the trailer before it is loaded with cargo, and is not considA. Cold inflation pressure.
ered part of the disposable cargo load. Water however, is a
disposable cargo weight and is treated as such. If there is a
B. Vehicle Placard and location on the vehicle.
fresh water storage tank of 100 gallons, this tank when filled
C. Adverse safety consequences of under inflation would weigh about 800 pounds. If more cargo is being
(including tire failure).
transported, water can be off-loaded to keep the total
D. Measuring and adjusting air pressure for proper amount of cargo added to the vehicle within the limits of the
inflation.
GVWR so as not to overload the vehicle. Understanding this
flexibility will allow you, the owner, to make choices that fit
•Tire Care, including maintenance and safety practices.
your travel needs.
• Vehicle load limits, including a description and When loading your cargo, be sure it is distributed evenly to
explanation of the following items:
prevent overloading front to back and side to side. Heavy
A. Locating and understanding the load limit items should be placed low and as close to the axle
information, total load capacity, and cargo capacity.
positions as reasonable. Too many items on one side may
overload a tire. The best way to know the actual weight of
B. Calculating total and cargo capacities with varying the vehicle is to weigh it at a public scale. Talk to your dealer
loading configurations including quantitative
to discuss the weighing methods needed to capture the
examples showing / illustrating how the vehicles various weights related to the trailer. This would include the
cargo capacity decreases as combined number weight empty or unloaded, weights per axle, wheel, hitch or
and size of cargo increases. This item is also king-pin, and total weight.
discussed in Section 3.
C. Determining compatibility of tire and vehicle load capabilities.
D. Adverse safety consequences of overloading on handling and stopping on tires.
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Excessive loads and/or underinflation cause tire overloading
and, as a result, abnormal tire flexing occurs. This situation
can generate an excessive amount of heat within the tire.
Excessive heat may lead to tire failure. It is the air pressure
that enables a tire to support the load, so proper inflation is
critical. The proper air pressure may be found on the certification/VIN label and/or on the Tire Placard. This value should
never exceed the maximum cold inflation pressure stamped
on the tire.
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6. If your vehicle will be towing a trailer, load from your trailer will be transferred to your vehicle.
Consult the vehicle’s owner’s manual to determine how
this weight transfer reduces the available cargo and
luggage capacity of your vehicle.
2.2. Glossary of Tire Terminology
1.1.1. Trailers 10,000 Pound GVWR or Less
Bead
The part of the tire that is made of steel wires, wrapped or
reinforced by ply cords and that is shaped to fit the rim.
Tire and Loading Information Placard – Figure 1-1
Bead separation
1.) Locate the statement, “The weight of cargo should nev- The breakdown of the bond between components in the
bead.
er exceed XXX kg or XXX lbs.,” on your vehicle’s placard.
See figure 1-1.
Bias ply tire
2.) This figure equals the available amount of cargo and
A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to the
luggage load capacity.
beads are laid at alternate angles substantially less than 90
degrees to the centerline of the tread.
3.) Determine the combined weight of luggage and cargo
being loaded on the vehicle. That weight may not safely
Carcass
exceed the available cargo and luggage load capacity.
The tire structure, except tread and sidewall rubber which,
The trailer’s placard refers to the Tire Information Placard
when inflated, bears the load.
attached adjacent to or near the trailer’s VIN (Certification)
Chunking
label at the left front of the trailer.
The breaking away of pieces of the tread or sidewall.
2. Trailers over 10,000 Pounds GVWR
(NOTE: These Trailers Are Not Required to Have
Cold inflation pressure
a Tire Information Placard on the Vehicle)
The pressure in the tire before you drive.
1. Determine the empty weight of your trailer by
weighing the trailer using a public scale or other means. This step does not have to be repeated.
Cord
The strands forming the plies in the tire.
2. Locate the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) of
the trailer on your trailer’s VIN (Certification) label.
Cord separation
The parting of cords from adjacent rubber compounds.
3. Subtract the empty weight of your trailer from the
GVWR stated on the VIN label. That weight is the
maximum available cargo capacity of the trailer and
may not be safely exceeded.
Cracking
Any parting within the tread, sidewall, or inner liner of the
tire extending to cord material.
2.1. Steps for Determining Correct Load Limit- Tow Vehicle
1. Locate the statement, “The combined weight of
occupants and cargo should never exceed XXX
lbs.,” on your vehicle’s placard.
2. Determine the combined weight of the driver and passengers who will be riding in your vehicle.
3. Subtract the combined weight of the driver and passengers from XXX kilograms or XXX pounds.
4. The resulting figure equals the available amount of cargo capacity.
CT
A pneumatic tire with an inverted flange tire and rim system in which the rim is designed with rim flanges pointed
radially inward and the tire is designed to fit on the underside of the rim in a manner that encloses the rim flanges
inside the air cavity of the tire.
Curb weight
The weight of a motor vehicle with standard equipment
including the maximum capacity of fuel, oil, and coolant,
and, if so equipped, air conditioning and additional weight
optional engine.
5. Determine the combined weight of cargo being loaded on the vehicle. That weight may not safely exceed the available cargo capacity calculated in Step # 4.
Extra load tire
A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher
inflation pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Groove
The space between two adjacent tread ribs.
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Gross Axle Weight Rating
The maximum weight that any axle can support, as
published on the Certification / VIN label on the front left
side of the trailer. Actual weight determined by weighing
each axle on a public scale, with the trailer attached to the
towing vehicle.
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
The maximum weight of the fully loaded trailer, as published on the Certification / VIN label. Actual weight determined by weighing trailer on a public scale, without being
attached to the towing vehicle.
Hitch Weight
The downward force exerted on the hitch ball by the trailer
coupler.
Innerliner
The layer(s) forming the inside surface of a tubeless tire
that contains the inflating medium within the tire.
Innerliner separation
The parting of the innerliner from cord material in the
carcass.
Intended outboard sidewall
The sidewall that contains a white-wall, bears white
lettering or bears manufacturer, brand, and/or model name
molding that is higher or deeper than the same molding on
the other sidewall of the tire or the outward facing sidewall
of an asymmetrical tire that has a particular side that must
always face outward when mounted on a vehicle.
Light truck (LT) tire
A tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily intended
for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger
vehicles.
Load rating
The maximum load that a tire is rated to carry for a given
inflation pressure.
Maximum load rating
The load rating for a tire at the maximum permissible
inflation pressure for that tire.
Maximum permissible inflation pressure
The maximum cold inflation pressure to which a tire may
be inflated.
Maximum loaded vehicle weight
The sum of curb weight, accessory weight, vehicle
capacity weight, and production options weight.
Measuring rim
The rim on which a tire is fitted for physical dimension
requirements.
Non-pneumatic rim
A mechanical device which, when a non-pneumatic tire
assembly incorporates a wheel, supports the tire, and
attaches, either integrally or separably, to the wheel center
member and upon which the tire is attached.
Non-pneumatic spare tire assembly
A non-pneumatic tire assembly intended for temporary
use in place of one of the pneumatic tires and rims that are
fitted to a passenger car in compliance with the requirements of this standard.
Non-pneumatic tire
A mechanical device which transmits, either directly or
through a wheel or wheel center member, the vertical load
and tractive forces from the roadway to the vehicle, generates the tractive forces that provide the directional control
of the vehicle and does not rely on the containment of any
gas or fluid for providing those functions.
Non-pneumatic tire assembly
A non-pneumatic tire, alone or in combination with a wheel
or wheel center member, which can be mounted on a
vehicle.
Normal occupant weight
68 kilograms (150 lbs.) times the number of occupants
specified in the second column of Table I of 49 CFR
571.110.
Occupant distribution
The distribution of occupants in a vehicle as specified in
the third column of Table I of 49 CFR 571.110.
Open splice
Any parting at any junction of tread, sidewall, or innerliner
that extends to cord material.
Outer diameter
The overall diameter of an inflated new tire.
Overall width
The linear distance between the exteriors of the sidewalls
of an inflated tire, including elevations due to labeling,
decorations, or protective bands or ribs.
Ply
A layer of rubber-coated parallel cords.
Ply separation
A parting of rubber compound between adjacent plies.
Pneumatic tire
A mechanical device made of rubber, chemicals, fabric
and steel or other materials, that, when mounted on an
automotive wheel, provides the traction and contains the
gas or fluid that sustains the load.
Pin Weight
The downward force applied to the 5th wheel or gooseneck ball, by the trailer kingpin or gooseneck coupler.
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Production options weight
The combined weight of those installed regular production
options weighing over 2.3 kilograms (5 lbs.) in excess of
those standard items which they replace, not previously
considered in curb weight or accessory weight, including
heavy duty brakes, ride levelers, roof rack, heavy duty
battery, and special trim.
Radial ply tire
A pneumatic tire in which the ply cords that extend to the
beads are laid at substantially 90 degrees to the centerline
of the tread.
Recommended inflation pressure
This is the inflation pressure provided by the vehicle
manufacturer on the Tire Information label and on the
Certification / VIN tag.
Reinforced tire
A tire designed to operate at higher loads and at higher
inflation pressures than the corresponding standard tire.
Rim
A metal support for a tire or a tire and tube assembly
upon which the tire beads are seated.
Rim diameter
The nominal diameter of the bead seat.
Rim size designation
The rim diameter and width.
Rim type designation
The industry of manufacturer’s designation for a rim by
style or code.
Rim width
The nominal distance between rim flanges.
Tread rib
A tread section running circumferentially around a tire.
Tread separation
Pulling away of the tread from the tire carcass.
Treadwear indicators (TWI)
The projections within the principal grooves designed to
give a visual indication of the degree of wear of the tread.
Vehicle capacity weight
The rated cargo and luggage load plus 68 kilograms (150
lbs.) times the vehicle’s designated seating capacity.
Vehicle maximum load on the tire
The load on an individual tire that is determined by distributing to each axle its share of the maximum loaded vehicle
weight and dividing by two.
Vehicle normal load on the tire
The load on an individual tire that is determined by distributing to each axle its share of the curb weight, accessory
weight, and normal occupant weight (distributed in accordance with Table I of CRF 49 571.110) and dividing by 2.
Weather side
The surface area of the rim not covered by the inflated tire.
Wheel center member
In the case of a non-pneumatic tire assembly incorporating
a wheel, a mechanical device which attaches, either integrally or separably, to the non-pneumatic rim and provides
the connection between the non-pneumatic rim and the
vehicle; or, in the case of a non-pneumatic tire assembly
not incorporating a wheel, a mechanical device which
attaches, either integrally or separably, to the non-pneumatic tire and provides the connection between tire and
the vehicle.
Section width
The linear distance between the exteriors of the sidewalls
of an inflated tire, excluding elevations due to labeling,
decoration, or protective bands. Wheel-holding fixture
The fixture used to hold the wheel and tire assembly
securely during testing.
Sidewall
That portion of a tire between the tread and bead.
The National Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has
published a brochure (DOT HS 809 361) that discusses
all aspects of Tire Safety, as required by CFR 575.6. This
brochure is reproduced in part below. It can be obtained
and downloaded from NHTSA, free of charge, from the
following web site:
Sidewall separation
The parting of the rubber compound from the cord
material in the sidewall.
Special Trailer (ST) tire
The “ST” is an indication the tire is for trailer use only.
2.3 Tire Safety - Everything Rides On It
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/TireSafety/ridesonit/
tires_index.html
Studies of tire safety show that maintaining proper tire
pressure, observing tire and vehicle load limits (not carrying more weight in your vehicle than your tires or vehicle
can safely handle), avoiding road hazards, and inspecting
Tread
tires for cuts, slashes, and other irregularities are the most
That portion of a tire that comes into contact with the road. important things you can do to avoid tire failure, such as
tread separation or blowout and flat tires. These actions,
Test rim
The rim on which a tire is fitted for testing, and may be
any rim listed as appropriate for use with that tire.
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along with other care and maintenance activities, can also:
•Improve vehicle handling
•Help protect you and others from avoidable breakdowns and accidents
•Improve fuel economy
•Increase the life of your tires.
limit, that is, the greatest amount of weight a vehicle can
safely carry and the vehicle’s tire size. The proper tire pressure for your vehicle is referred to as the “recommended
cold inflation pressure.” (As you will read below, it is difficult to obtain the recommended tire pressure if your tires
are not cold.)
•Basic tire maintenance
Because tires are designed to be used on more than one
type of vehicle, tire manufacturers list the “maximum
permissible inflation pressure” on the tire sidewall. This
number is the highest amount of air pressure that should
ever be put in the tire under normal driving conditions.
•Uniform Tire Quality Grading System
6. Checking Tire Pressure
•Fundamental characteristics of tires
•Tire safety tips.
It is important to check your vehicle’s tire pressure at least
once a month for the following reasons:
This booklet presents a comprehensive overview of tire
safety, including information on the following topics:
Use this information to make tire safety a regular part of
your vehicle maintenance routine. Recognize that the time
you spend is minimal compared with the inconvenience
and safety consequences of a flat tire or other tire failure.
3. Safety First - Basic Maintenance
Properly maintained tires improve the steering, stopping,
traction, and load-carrying capability of your vehicle. Underinflated tires and overloaded vehicles are a major cause
of tire failure. Therefore, as mentioned above, to avoid flat
tires and other types of tire failure, you should maintain
proper tire pressure, observe tire and vehicle load limits,
avoid road hazards, and regularly inspect your tires.
4. Finding Your Vehicle’s Recommended Tire
Pressure and Load Limits
Tire information placards and vehicle certification labels
contain information on tires and load limits. These labels
indicate the vehicle manufacturer’s information including:
•Recommended tire size
•Recommended tire inflation pressure
•Vehicle capacity weight (VCW–the maximum occupant and cargo weight a vehicle is designed
to carry)
• Front and rear gross axle weight ratings (GAWR –
the maximum weight the axle systems are designed
to carry).
Both placards and certification labels are permanently
attached to the trailer near the left front.
5. Understanding Tire Pressure and Load Limits
Tire inflation pressure is the level of air in the tire that provides it with load-carrying capacity and affects the overall
performance of the vehicle. The tire inflation pressure is a
number that indicates the amount of air pressure– measured in pounds per square inch (psi)–a tire requires to
be properly inflated. (You will also find this number on the
vehicle information placard expressed in kilopascals (kPa),
which is the metric measure used internationally.)
Manufacturers of passenger vehicles and light trucks
determine this number based on the vehicle’s design load
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•Most tires may naturally lose air over time.
• Tires can lose air suddenly if you drive over a pothole or other object or if you strike the curb when parking.
•With radial tires, it is usually not possible to determine underinflation by visual inspection.
For convenience, purchase a tire pressure gauge to keep
in your vehicle. Gauges can be purchased at tire dealerships, auto supply stores, and other retail outlets.
The recommended tire inflation pressure that vehicle
manufacturers provide reflects the proper psi when a tire is
cold. The term cold does not relate to the outside
temperature. Rather, a cold tire is one that has not been
driven on for at least three hours. When you drive, your
tires get warmer, causing the air pressure within them to
increase. Therefore, to get an accurate tire pressure reading, you must measure tire pressure when the tires are cold
or compensate for the extra pressure in warm tires.
7. Steps for Maintaining Proper Tire Pressure
•Step 1: Locate the recommended tire pressure on the vehicle’s tire information placard, certification label, or in the owner’s manual.
•Step 2: Record the tire pressure of all tires.
•Step 3: If the tire pressure is too high in any of the tires, slowly release air by gently pressing on the tire valve stem with the edge of your tire gauge until you get to the correct pressure.
• Step 4: If the tire pressure is too low, note the
difference between the measured tire pressure and the
correct tire pressure. These “missing” pounds of pressure are what you will need to add.
• Step 5: At a service station, add the missing pounds
of air pressure to each tire that is underinflated.
•Step 6: Check all the tires to make sure they have the same air pressure (except in cases in which the front and rear tires are supposed to have different amounts of pressure).
If you have been driving your vehicle and think that a tire is
underinflated, fill it to the recommended cold inflation pres-
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safety standard certification and in case of a recall.
sure indicated on your vehicle’s tire information placard
or certification label. While your tire may still be slightly
12.1.1.1. Information on Passenger Vehicle Tires
underinflated due to the extra pounds of pressure in the
Please refer to the diagram below.
warm tire, it is safer to drive with air pressure that is slightly
lower than the vehicle manufacturer’s recommended cold
inflation pressure than to drive with a significantly underinflated tire. Since this is a temporary fix, don’t forget to
recheck and adjust the tire’s pressure when you can obtain
a cold reading.
8. Tire Size
To maintain tire safety, purchase new tires that are the
same size as the vehicle’s original tires or another size recommended by the manufacturer. Look at the tire information placard, the owner’s manual, or the sidewall of the tire
you are replacing to find this information. If you have any
doubt about the correct size to choose, consult with the
tire dealer.
9. Tire Tread
The tire tread provides the gripping action and traction
that prevent your vehicle from slipping or sliding, especially when the road is wet or icy. In general, tires are not
safe and should be replaced when the tread is worn down
to 1/16 of an inch. Tires have built-in treadwear indicators that let you know when it is time to replace your tires.
These indicators are raised sections spaced intermittently
in the bottom of the tread grooves. When they appear
“even” with the outside of the tread, it is time to replace
your tires. Another method for checking tread depth is
to place a penny in the tread with Lincoln’s head upside
down and facing you. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s
head, you are ready for new tires.
10. Tire Balance and Wheel Alignment
To avoid vibration or shaking of the vehicle when a tire
rotates, the tire must be properly balanced. This balance
is achieved by positioning weights on the wheel to counter
balance heavy spots on the wheel-and-tire assembly. A
wheel alignment adjusts the angles of the wheels so that
they are positioned correctly relative to the vehicle’s frame.
This adjustment maximizes the life of your tires. These
adjustments require special equipment and should be
performed by a qualified technician.
11. Tire Repair
The proper repair of a punctured tire requires a plug for the
hole and a patch for the area inside the tire that surrounds
the puncture hole. Punctures through the tread can be
repaired if they are not too large, but punctures to the sidewall should not be repaired. Tires must be removed from
the rim to be properly inspected before being plugged and
patched.
P
The “P” indicates the tire is for passenger vehicles.
Next number
This three-digit number gives the width in millimeters of
the tire from sidewall edge to sidewall edge. In general, the
larger the number, the wider the tire.
Next number
This two-digit number, known as the aspect ratio, gives
the tire’s ratio of height to width. Numbers of 70 or lower
indicate a short sidewall for improved steering response
and better overall handling on dry pavement.
R
The “R” stands for radial. Radial ply construction of tires
has been the industry standard for the past 20 years.
Next number
This two-digit number is the wheel or rim diameter in
inches. If you change your wheel size, you will have to
purchase new tires to match the new wheel diameter.
Next number
This two- or three-digit number is the tire’s load index. It is
a measurement of how much weight each tire can support.
You may find this information in your owner’s manual. If
not, contact a local tire dealer. Note: You may not find this
information on all tires because it is not required by law.
12. Tire Fundamentals
M+S
The
“M+S” or “M/S” indicates that the tire has some mud
Federal law requires tire manufacturers to place standardand
snow capability. Most radial tires have these markings;
ized information on the sidewall of all tires. This information
hence,
they have some mud and snow capability.
identifies and describes the fundamental characteristics
of the tire and also provides a tire identification number for
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Speed Rating
The speed rating denotes the speed at which a tire is
designed to be driven for extended periods of time. The
ratings range from 99 miles per hour (mph) to 186 mph.
These ratings are listed below. Note: You may not find this
information on all tires because it is not required by law.
Traction Letter
This letter indicates a tire’s ability to stop on wet pavement. A higher graded tire should allow you to stop your
car on wet roads in a shorter distance than a tire with a
lower grade. Traction is graded from highest to lowest as
“AA”,”A”, “B”, and “C”.
Temperature Letter
This letter indicates a tire’s resistance to heat. The temperature grade is for a tire that is inflated properly and not
overloaded. Excessive speed, underinflation or excessive
loading, either separately or in combination, can cause
heat build-up and possible tire failure. From highest to lowest, a tire’s resistance to heat is graded as “A”, “B”, or “C”.
Letter Rating
Speed Rating
Q
99 mph
R
106 mph
S
112 mph
T
118 mph
U
124 mph
H
130 mph
V
149 mph
W
168* mph
Y
186* mph
12.1.1.3. Additional Information on Light Truck Tires
Please refer to the following diagram.
* For tires with a maximum speed capability over 149
mph, tire manufacturers sometimes use the letters ZR. For
those with a maximum speed capability over 186 mph, tire
manufacturers always use the letters ZR.
U.S. DOT Tire Identification Number
This begins with the letters “DOT” and indicates that the
tire meets all federal standards. The next two numbers or
letters are the plant code where it was manufactured, and
the last four numbers represent the week and year the tire
was built. For example, the numbers 3197 means the 31st
week of 1997. The other numbers are marketing codes
used at the manufacturer’s discretion. This information is
used to contact consumers if a tire defect requires a recall.
Tire Ply Composition and Materials Used
The number of plies indicates the number of layers of
rubber-coated fabric in the tire. In general, the greater the
number of plies, the more weight a tire can support. Tire
manufacturers also must indicate the materials in the tire,
which include steel, nylon, polyester, and others.
Maximum Load Rating
This number indicates the maximum load in kilograms
and pounds that can be carried by the tire.
Maximum Permissible Inflation Pressure
This number is the greatest amount of air pressure that
should ever be put in the tire under normal driving
conditions.
12.1.1.2. UTQGS Information
Treadwear Number
This number indicates the tire’s wear rate. The higher the
treadwear number is, the longer it should take for the tread
to wear down. For example, a tire graded 400 should last
twice as long as a tire graded 200.
Table Of Contents
Tires for light trucks have other markings besides those
found on the sidewalls of passenger tires.
LT
The “LT” indicates the tire is for light trucks or trailers.
ST
An “ST” is an indication the tire is for trailer use only.
Max. Load Dual kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire
pressure when the tire is used as a dual, that is, when four
tires are put on each rear axle (a total of six or more tires
on the vehicle).
Max. Load Single kg (lbs) at kPa (psi) Cold
This information indicates the maximum load and tire
pressure when the tire is used as a single.
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 65
Load Range
This information identifies the tire’s load-carrying capabilities and its inflation limits.
13. Tire Safety Tips
Preventing Tire Damage
•Slow down if you have to go over a pothole or other object in the road.
•Do not run over curbs or other foreign objects in the roadway, and try not to strike the curb when parking.
Tire Safety Checklist
•Check tire pressure regularly (at least once a month), including the spare.
•Inspect tires for uneven wear patterns on the tread, cracks, foreign objects, or other signs of wear or trauma.
• Remove bits of glass and foreign objects wedged in the tread.
•Make sure your tire valves have valve caps.
• Check tire pressure before going on a long trip.
•Do not overload your vehicle. Check the Tire Information and Loading Placard or User’s Manual for the maximum recommended load for the vehicle.
Wheel and Rim Torque Requirements
DescriptionApplication
Min. Torque (ft-lbs.)
Max. Torque (ft-lbs.)
1/2” Cone Nut
12” - 13” Wheel
50
65
1/2” Cone Nut
14” - 16” Wheel
90
120
5/8” Cone NutFlat Disc Wheel
175
225
5/8” Cone NutClamp Ring
190
210
3/4” Hex Nut
Demountable Ring Clamp
210
260
3/4” Spherical Nut
Single Wheel
450
500
3/4” Spherical Nut
Inner Dual
450
500
1-1/8” Spherical NutOuter Dual
450
500
5/8” Solid Flange Nut
Dual Wheels
225
275
3/4” Solid Flange Nut
Dual Wheels
275
325
5/8” Swivel Flange Nut
Dual Wheels
175
225
3/4” Swivel Flange Nut
Dual Wheels
225
375
Min. Torque (ft-lbs.)
Max. Torque (ft-lbs.)
Aluminum Wheel Torque
DescriptionApplication
3/4 - 1 - 1/8 stud
17.5” Wheels
450
500
15/16 - 1 - 15/16 stud
22.5” Wheels
750
900
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
TRAILERS
WIRING DIAGRAMS
7 RV
Plug Says
FRONT VIEW
Trailer Wired
Function
White
Common Ground
Red
Back-up Lights
Brown
Tail Markers
Blue
Electric Brake
Brown
Green
RT Turn/Brake
Red
Yellow
LT Turn/Brake
Black
Black
Battery Charger
White
Center Pole
Green
Blue
Black
Trailer Wired
Function
Yellow (LT)
Yellow (LT)
Left Turn/Stop
Green (RT)
Green (RT)
Right Turn/Stop
Blue (S)
Electric Brake
White (GD)
White (GD)
Ground
Brown (TM)
Brown (TM)
Tail/Marker
Black (A)
Auxiliary
Black
Green
Brown
Red
Blue
Plug Says
Black (A)
Green
Brown
6 Round
Blue (S)
TOW VEHICLE
TRAILER
White
White
Blue
TRAILER
TOW VEHICLE
TM
TM
GD
GD
S
A
RT
LT
4 Flat
A
RT
LT
TOW VEHICLE
TRAILER
Green
Yellow
White . . . Ground
Brown . . . Tail Marker
Yellow . . . Left Turn
Green . . . Right Turn
Brown
White
TOW VEHICLE
TRAILER
7 Semi
Plug Says Trailer Wired
Function
Black
Yellow
Yellow
Left Turn
Green
Green
Right Turn
Brown
Brown
Tail/Marker
White
White
Common Ground
Red
Stop
Black
Black
ID & Marker
Blue
Blue
ABS/Elec. Brakes
Red
White
White
Table Of Contents
Black
Brown
Blue
Green
Blue
Yellow
Yellow
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 67
Felling Trailers Parts Manual
Drop-Deck & Deck-Over
Supplement
Table of Contents
Drop-Deck Trailers....................................................................................................................................... 69-80
Deck-Over/Semi Trailers...................................................................................................................................
• Electric/Hydraulic Brake..................................................................................................... 81-85
• Air Brake................................................................................................................................ 86
Felling Trailers Parts Department
1-800-245-2809
or go online to
1-866-335-5464
Page 68
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
Parts Information For Drop-Deck Trailers
5 Bolt, 4.5”, 4.75”, 5”, 5.5” Bolt Circle
• Fits #84 Spindle, L68149 Inner/L44649 Outer Bearings.
• Capacity of 1,750 lbs. per each
• Available in Standard or E-Z Lube Application
• Used on Dexter and most 3,500 lb. axles
• Drum Size: 10” x 2 1/4”
• 4 Different Bolt Patterns
Part No.
84546UC3
84546UC3-EZ
84546
845476UC3
845476UC3-EZ
845476
84556UC3
84556UC3-EZ
84556
84557UC3
84557UC3-EZ
84557
L68149
L44649
L68111
L44610
58846
10-19
46749
21-3-1
85-1
7-122
X1023R
Description
COMPLETE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 4.5” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE E-Z LUBE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 4.5” BOLT CIRCLE
HUB AND DRUM ONLY, 4.5” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 4.75” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE E-Z LUBE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 4.75” BOLT CIRCLE
HUB AND DRUM ONLY, 4.75” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 5” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE E-Z LUBE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 5” BOLT CIRCLE
HUB AND DRUM ONLY, 5” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 5.5” BOLT CIRCLE
COMPLETE E-Z LUBE HUB AND DRUM ASSEMBLY, 5.5” BOLT CIRCLE
HUB AND DRUM ONLY, 5.5” BOLT CIRCLE
INNER BEARING
OUTER BEARING
INNER RACE
OUTER RACE
GREASE SEAL (2.565” O.D., 1.719” I.D.), SINGLE LIP
GREASE SEAL (2.565” O.D., 1.719” I.D.) FOR E-Z LUBE, DOUBLE LIP
GREASE CAP 1.986” O.D., DRIVE-IN
GREASE CAP 1.986” O.D., DRIVE-IN, FOR E-Z LUBE
GREASE CAP PLUG FOR E-Z LUBE
DRIVE-IN STUD, 1/2” DIAMETER
1/2” CONE WHEEL NUT
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Page 69
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Table Of Contents
8 Bolt, 6.5” Bolt Circle
• Fits Dexter 5,200 lb. thru 7,000 lb. axles
• #42 Spindle, 25580 Inner / 14125A Outer Bearings
• Capacity of 3,500 lbs. per each
• For Spindles requiring 2 1/4” or 2-1/8” I.D. Seal
• Drum Size 12” x 2”
• Std. Grease
• 1/2” Studs Standard
Part No.
Description
42866uc3
COMPLETE HUB & DRUM ASSEMBLY W/ 2-1/4” I.D. SEAL, PAINTED
42866
HUB & DRUM ONLY, GREASE/E-Z LUBE®, PAINTED
25580
INNER BEARING
14125a
OUTER BEARING
25520
INNER RACE
14276
OUTER RACE
10-36
GREASE SEAL (3.376” O.D., 2.25” I.D.), FOR E-Z LUBE®, DOUBLE LIP
21-39
GREASE CAP, 2.72” O.D.,DRIVE-IN, “DERBY STYLE”
21-43-1
grease cap for e-z lube®
85-1
grease cap plug for e-z lube®
165995
DRIVE-IN STUD, 1/2” DIA. X 2.50” LONG
X1023R
1/2” CONE WHEEL NUT
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Table Of Contents
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Page 73
Electric Brake Assembly - Dexter 10” x 2-1/4” - 3500# Axles
Dexter 10” x 2 1/4” Electric Brake Assemblies
• Capacity: 3,500 lbs. per pair
Part No.
Description
23-26
LEFT BRAKE (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
23-27
RIGHT BRAKE
EB01-100
LEFT BRAKE W/HARDWARE, PACKAGED
EB01-105
RIGHT BRAKE W/HARDWARE, PACKAGED
Part No.
Description
BP01-110
1
BP02-170
MAGNET KIT
MAGNET KIT (GREEN WIRE), GENUINE DEXTER
W/PROTECTIVE WIRE SLEEVE
ACTUATING ARM, LEFT HAND
BP02-180
ACTUATING ARM, RIGHT HAND
2
BP04-090
SHOE & LINING (ONE WHEEL)
3
BP06-120
SHOE HOLD DOWN SPRINGS
4
BP07-105
SHOE RETURN SPRINGS (QTY 2)
5
BP08-070
ADJUSTER SPRINGS
6
BP10-060
ADJUSTER
7
BP10-220
ADJUSTER DUST PLUG, PKG OF 4
8
BP19-001
MAGNET RETAINER CLIP FOR OVAL MAGNET, PKG OF 4
9
BP01-115
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Replacement Parts
Item
2
Table Of Contents
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Hydraulic Brake Assembly - Dexter 12” x 2” - 6000# and 7000# Axles
12” x 2” Single-Servo Hydraulic Brake Assemblies
• Choose from Standard Single Servo or Free-backing versions (Duo-Servo on the next page)
Capacity
Part No.
Description
Per Pair
23-324
LEFT BRAKE - DEXTER (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
5,200
23-325
RIGHT BRAKE - DEXTER
5,200
23-338
LEFT BRAKE - DEXTER
7,000
23-339
RIGHT BRAKE - DEXTER
7,000
23-342
LEFT BRAKE, FREE-BACKING - DEXTER (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
7,000
23-343
RIGHT BRAKE, FREE-BACKING - DEXTER
7,000
23510
RIGHT BRAKE - DEMCO/DICO
6,000
23511
LEFT BRAKE - DEMCO/DICO
6,000
42028
RIGHT BRAKE, FREE-BACKING - DEMCO/DICO (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
6,000
42029
LEFT BRAKE, FREE-BACKING - DEMCO/DICO
6,000
Part No.
Description
Replacement Parts
Item
BP04-160
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL)
BP04-162
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), RIGHT HAND DEXTER FREE-BACKING
1A
BP04-164
BP04-168
BP06-090
1A
1A
2
BP07-175
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), LEFT HAND DEXTER FREE-BACKING
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), DEMCO/DICO FREE-BACKING
SHOE HOLD DOWN SPRINGS
PRIMARY SHOE RETURN SPRING SET (UPPER & LOWER),
DEXTER FREE-BACKING (QTY. 3)
PRIMARY SHOE RETURN SPRING SET (UPPER & LOWER),
DEMCO/DICO FREE-BACKING (QTY. 3)
SHOE RETURN SPRINGS
BP08-120
ADJUSTER SPRING
BP10-080
ADJUSTER, DEXTER FREE-BACKING, DEMCO/DICO, BENDIX
BP10-045
ADJUSTER, DEXTER
BP07-121
BP07-123
1
3A
3
4
5
5A
BP10-220
ADJUSTER DUST PLUG, (ALL), PKG OF 4
BP17-020
WHEEL CYLINDER ASSEMBLY, RIGHT HAND, SINGLE SERVO
BP17-030
WHEEL CYLINDER ASSEMBLY, LEFT HAND, SINGLE SERVO
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3A
6
N/S
7
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 77
Dexter 12-1/4” x 2-1/2” Electric
Dexter 12 1/4” x 2 1/2” Electric Brake Assemblies
• Capacity: 7,200 lbs. per pair
• In May, 2000 this brake was redesigned. New design utilizes a cast braking plate.
Part No.
Description
23-369
RIGHT BRAKE, 9 BOLT, STAMPED BACKING PLATE (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
23-370
LEFT BRAKE, 9 BOLT, STAMPED BACKING PLATE
23-428
RIGHT BRAKE, 4 BOLT, CAST BACKING PLATE
23-429
LEFT BRAKE, 4 BOLT, CAST BACKING PLATE
Replacement Parts
Part No.
Page 78
Item
Description
BP01-265
MAGNET KIT, OVAL (WHITE WIRE)
1
BP02-270
ACTUATING ARM, LEFT HAND
2
BP02-275
ACTUATING ARM, RIGHT HAND
N/S
BP04-235
SHOE & LINING, (ONE WHEEL), STAMPED BACKING PLATE
N/S
BP04-236
SHOE & LINING, CAST BACKING PLATE, LH
3
BP04-238
SHOE & LINING, CAST BACKING PLATE, RH
N/S
BP06-280
ARM/SHOE RETAINER, LH
4
BP06-290
ARM/SHOE RETAINER, RH
N/S
BP07-190
SHOE RETURN SPRING
5
BP08-070
ADJUSTER SPRING
6
BP10-090
ADJUSTER
7
BP07-185
SHOE CENTERING SPRING
8
BP19-005
MAGNET RETAINER CLIP, PKG OF 4
9
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Table Of Contents
Dexter - 7 Bolt Flange - 12-1/4” x 3-3/8” Electric
Part No.
Brake Assemblies Cast Backing Plate
Description
23-450
LEFT BRAKE, 9K & 10K GD, 7 BOLT (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
23-451
RIGHT BRAKE, 9K & 10K GD, 7 BOLT
Replacement Parts
Part No.
Description
Item
BP01-301
MAGNET KIT, 9K & 10K GD, “NEW STYLE” (YELLOW WIRE)
1
BP02-327
ACTUATING ARM, LEFT HAND FOR FORWARD ADJUST BRAKE
2
BP02-328
BP04-245
BP04-255
71-455-1
ACTUATING ARM, RIGHT HAND FOR FORWARD ADJUST BRAKE
SHOE & LINING (ONE WHEEL) LEFT HAND
SHOE & LINING (ONE WHEEL) RIGHT HAND
ARM/SHOE RETAINER, LEFT HAND
N/S
3
N/S
4
71-455-2
ARM/SHOE RETAINER, RIGHT HAND
N/S
BP07-190
SHOE RETURN SPRING SET
5
BP07-195
SHOE CENTERING SPRING
6
BP08-155
ADJUSTER SPRING
7
BP10-136
ADJUSTER & LEVER, LEFT HAND
8
BP10-146
ADJUSTER & LEVER, RIGHT HAND
8
BP13-022
ADJUSTER CABLE
9
BP19-005
MAGNET RETAINER CLIP, QTY 4
10
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Table Of Contents
Parts Information For Deck-Over Trailers
DEXTER 12-1/4” X 5” ELECTRIC, 12K & 15K ELECTRIC BRAKE
Electric Brake Assemblies Cast Backing Plate
Part No.
Description
23-442
LEFT BRAKE, 7 BOLT, 12K (BLACK WIRE) SHOWN IN PHOTO
23-443
RIGHT BRAKE, 7 BOLT, 12K (BLACK WIRE)
23-446
LEFT BRAKE, 7 BOLT, 15K (BLUE WIRE)
23-447
RIGHT BRAKE, 7 BOLT, 15K (BLUE WIRE)
Replacement Parts
Part No.
Description
Item
BP01-306
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), LEFT HAND
1
BP01-311
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), RIGHT HAND
1
47-123-36
SHOE HOLD DOWN KIT
2
47-123-35
SHOE RETURN SPRING
BP04-365
ADJUSTER SPRING, OLD STYLE
BP04-375
ADJUSTER, LEVER AND SPRING, LEFT HAND, OLD STYLE
71-455-1
ADJUSTER, LEVER AND SPRING, RIGHT HAND, OLD STYLE
71-455-2
ADJUSTER KIT FOR FORWARD SELF-ADJUST BRAKES LH
N/S
BP07-190
ADJUSTER KIT FOR FORWARD SELF-ADJUST BRAKES RH
5
BP07-195
ADJUSTER CABLE AND RETAINER, BEFORE 1987-1996 (14” LONG)
6
BP08-155
BRAKE DUST SHIELD, 7 BOLT (1-PIECE) METAL
7
BP10-136
WHEEL CYLINDER REBUILD KIT (1.250” BORE )
8
BP10-146
BLEEDER SCREW (QTY 4)
BP13-022
CYLINDER PUSH ROD
9
BP19-005
PISTON STOP BAR, AFTER 1987
10
Table Of Contents
N/S
3
N/S
4
N/S
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 81
DEXTER 12-1/4” X 5” DUO-SERVO HYDRAULIC, 12K & 15K HYDRAULIC BRAKE
DEXTER 12 1/4” X 5” DUO-SERVO HYDRAULIC BRAKE ASSEMBLIES
• CAPACITY: 12,000 & 15,000 LBS. PER PAIR
• REDESIGNED WITH FORWARD ADJUST FEATURE IN 1997
Part No.
Description
23-408
LEFT BRAKE, 12K (SHOWN IN PHOTO)
23-409
RIGHT BRAKE, 12K
23-406
LEFT BRAKE, 15K
23-407
RIGHT BRAKE, 15K
Replacement Parts
Part No.
Description
Item
BP04-380
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), LEFT HAND
1
BP04-390
SHOE AND LINING (ONE WHEEL), RIGHT HAND
2
BP06-235
SHOE HOLD DOWN KIT
3
BP07-240
SHOE RETURN SPRING
4
BP08-150
ADJUSTER SPRING
5
BP10-135
ADJUSTER, LEVER AND SPRING, LEFT HAND
6
BP-10-145
ADJUSTER, LEVER AND SPRING, RIGHT HAND
6
BP10-150
ADJUSTER KIT FOR FORWARD SELF-ADJUST BRAKES LH
6,7
BP10-160
ADJUSTER KIT FOR FORWARD SELF-ADJUST BRAKES RH
6,7
BP13-033
ADJUSTER CABLE AND RETAINER, BEFORE 1987-1996 (14” LONG)
7
BP15-190
BRAKE DUST SHIELD, 7 BOLT (1-PIECE) METAL
8
BP16-050
WHEEL CYLINDER REBUILD KIT, 12K (1.250” BORE )
9
K71-082-00
WHEEL CYLINDER REBUILD KIT, 12K (1.375” BORE )
9
BP18-011
BLEEDER SCREW (QTY 4)
10
54-33
CYLINDER PUSH ROD
11
34-62
PISTON STOP BAR, AFTER 1987
12
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 85
MISCELLANEOUS AIR BRAKE REPLACEMENT PARTS FOR DEXTER AIR BRAKES
Replacement Parts
Part No.
Page 86
Description
Item
BP020-090
CAMSHAFT REPAIR KIT FOR 12 1/4” DEXTER AIR BRAKES,
INCLUDES WASHERS, SEALS & BUSHINGS
1
BP20-120
BRAKE SHOE REPAIR KIT FOR 12 1/4” DEXTER AIR BRAKES,
INCLUDES ROLLERS, ANCHOR PINS, ETC. (OLD STYLE)
2
K71-136
BRAKE SHOW REPAIR KIT FOR 16 1/2” Q-STYLE DEXTER AIR BRAKES,
INCLUDES ROLLERS, ANCHOR PINS, ETC.
3
BP20-135
BRAKE SHOW REPAIR KIT W/ROLLERS, ANCHOR PINS,
FOR DEXTER 12 1/4” PQ SHOES
4
BP22-010
SHOE W/LINING (2 PER WHEEL REQUIRED) FOR 12 1/4” X 4” (OLD STYLE)
5
BP22-015
SHOW W/LINING (2 PER WHEEL REQUIRED) FOR 12 1/4” X 4”
DEXTER AIR BRAKE “PQ-STYLE”
6
BP22-020
SHOW W/LINING (2 PER WHEEL REQUIRED) FOR 12 1/4” X 5”
(OLD STYLE)
6
BP22-025
SHOE W/LINING (2 PER WHEEL REQUIRED) FOR 12 1/4” X 5” DEXTER
AIR BRAKE “PQ STYLE”
6,7
BP22-035
SHOW W/LINING (2 PER WHEEL REQUIRED) FOR 12 1/4” X 7 1/2”
DEXTER AIR BRAKE “PQ STYLE”
6,7
34-59-1
AIR CHAMBER,TYPE 24, FOR 12 1/4” X 7 1/2” AIR BRAKE
7
34-57-1
AIR CHAMBER,TYPE 30, FOR 12 1/4” OR 1
8
34-261-7
WHEEL CYLINDER REBUILD KIT, 12K (1.250” BORE )
9
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
®
FIVE YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY POLICY
WARRANTY:
Trailers, Inc. warrants your trailer will be free from defects in materials and workmanship,
to the original purchaser. The trailer warranted hereunder must be operated by the purchaser in accordance with the
practice approved by
Trailers, Inc., with loads not exceeding the manufacturer’s rated capacities and subject
to all terms and conditions of this limited warranty. NOTE: Warranty start date is one (1) year from manufacture date or
in service purchase date, whichever comes first. A copy of this signed warranty must be returned to
Trailers, Inc. at the address listed within 10 days of the date of purchase or all warranties will be null and void. The address to
Trailers, Inc. Warranty Department, 1525 Main Street
send the warranty or contact for information is:
South Sauk Centre, MN 56378. Fax information to: (320)352-5230. Email information to: [email protected]
®
®
®
®
Note:
All warranty work must be pre-authorized by
Trailers, INC. Warranty Manager. Failure to do so will result in no warranty payment of any kind. Labor amounts will be determined from the flat rate
shop manual, not to exceed $75.00 per hour. Contact the Warranty Manager to verify your labor rate.
®
Trailers, Inc.’s sole obligation under this warranty shall be limited to repairing or replacing, at its option,
in accordance with the schedule below, any defective part of the warranted trailer, which shall be returned to
Trailers, Inc.’s factory location or authorized service facilities within five (5) years from the date of delivery to the original
trailer purchaser, and which
Trailers, Inc.’s examination shall disclose to its satisfaction to have been defective; provided, that the purchaser notifies the Warranty Department immediately upon identification of defect, and such
a defective trailer is returned by the purchaser to a location authorized by the Warranty Department of
Trailers, Inc. with transportation and freight charges prepaid.
®
®
®
®
The customer may be required to deliver defective trailer to
result of defect covered in this warranty and the
that the trailer was defective at the time of the sale.
Trailers, Inc. if the trailer was destroyed as a
Trailers, Inc. Warranty Department is reasonably satisfied
®
®
THIS WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES OF MATERIAL, WORKMANSHIP,
DESIGN, APPLICATION, OR OTHERWISE WITH RESPECT TO ANY EQUIPMENT, WHETHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE, AND OF ALL OTHER OBLIGATIONS OR LIABILITIES ON THE PART OF
TRAILERS,
INC. THIS
TRAILERS, INC. WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, WHICH VARY
FROM STATE TO STATE.
®
®
REPAIR:
®
Trailers, Inc. shall warrant the MAIN FRAME of the trailer under the following schedule:
One (1) Year - 100%
Two (2) Years - 70%
Four (4) Years - 40%
Five (5) Years - 20%
Three (3) Years - 50%
Components manufactured by
Trailers, Inc. (other than Main Frame) and Components supplied by other
manufacturers shall be warranted under the following schedule:
®
I. Axles (Dexter Axles -2 year warranty), Suspension, Wheels, Rims, Hubs, Hydraulic Valve Body,
Trailers, Inc. Manufactured Components
®
1 Year
Over 1 Year
100%
0%
II.Air Lines, Springs, Air Bags, Leveling Valves, Bearings, Brake Valves,
Oil Seals, Brake Drums, Shock Absorbers, Electrical, Cylinders,
Hydraulic Hoses & Connections, Landing Gear
1 Year 100%
Over 1 Year
0%
III. Tires
Warranty claims must be made
directly to the tire dealers.
Table Of Contents
Warranty Policy Continued on Next Page
Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
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Warranty Policy Continued
From Previous Page
IV. Paint Warranty. Does not cover Wear, Misuse, Rock Chips, 3 Years
100%
Deterioration and/or Damage from Road Elements, Improper Over 3 Years
0%
Wash Solvents, Salt, Sand and/or Weather Conditions.
Any Damage Caused by or Attributed to any act of God
whatsoever is not covered by Manufacturer’s Warranty.
V. Wood Products (if any)
0%
Your maintenance schedule shall be followed as dictated according to the appropriate manufacturer, to keep the
warranty in force. The maintenance schedule is in your trailer packet.
Any modification, alteration or repair to any product manufactured by
knowledge and consent, will void manufacturer’s warranty.
®
Trailers, Inc. without their prior
This warranty does not expand, enlarge upon or alter in any way, the warranties provided by the original manufacturers
and suppliers of component parts and accessories. All other warranties, if any, extended by the makers and suppliers of
component parts, accessories, or other goods included in the manufacture of
Trailers, Inc.’s product will be
assigned, if contractually permitted to the purchaser. This warranty excludes such parts or accessories which are not
defective but may wear out and have to be replaced during the warranty period, including, but not limited to normal wear
items, light bulbs, paint, brake lining, brake drums, decking and the like. (Tire Warranties are expressly excluded from
Trailers, Inc. warranty herein.) Purchaser is expected to pay for all repairs or replacement costs including
any applicable freight in connection with this agreement, including sales and other taxes immediately upon completion of
work performed.The warranty claim will be reviewed by Trailers, Inc. or the applicable vendor. If found to
be covered by the said warranty and within the specified warranty time frame the customer would receive reimbursement
of all or partial fees previously paid not including freight charges.
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LIMITED OF LIABILITY:
Trailers, Inc. shall not be liable to purchaser for any incidental or consequential
damages suffered by purchaser, including, but not limited to, any commercially reasonable charges, expenses or commissions incurred in connection with effecting cover or any other reasonable expense incident to the delay or other breach of
warranty by
Trailers, Inc., any loss of or damage to any cargo loaded or shipped in or on our trailer, loss of
anticipated profits, transportation expenses due to repair, non-operation or increased expense of operation costs of
purchased or replaced equipment, claim of customers, cost of money, any loss of use of capital or revenue, or for any special
damage of loss of any nature arising at any time or from any cause whatsoever. Some States do not allow the exclusion or
limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above may not apply to you.
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LIMITATION OF REMEDY: In the event of Trailers, Inc. failure to repair the trailer subject to the
warranty contained herein, the purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy against
Trailers, Inc. shall be for the
repair or replacement of any defective part or parts of the trailer subject to work or repair within the time period and manner set forth herein. This exclusive remedy shall not be deemed to have failed of its essential purpose so long as
Trailers, Inc. is willing and able to repair or replace defective parts in the prescribed manner.
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This warranty is not transferable by the original purchaser.
improve its products covered by this warranty.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
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Trailers, Inc. reserves the right to modify or
Table Of Contents
Frequently Asked Questions
Bearings - How often should I grease the bearings?
Along with bearing adjustment, proper lubrication is essential to the current function and reliability of your trailer axle.
Bearings should be lubricated every 12 months or 12,000 miles. Oil bath axles should be checked each trip through
sight glass.
Bearings - What is the proper bearing adjustment procedure and recommended grease (9K-15K)?
Please review the axle service manual for instructions and specifications relating to bearing adjustment and lubrication.
m WARNING
It is important to NOT mix different types of grease thickeners. The grease that the axles use has a
lithium complex thickener. Mixing the grease with a barium, calcium, clay, or polyurea soap based
thickener agent will cause adverse affects. This may include causing the two greases to harden,
separate, become acidic, or pose other hazards and damage to the bearings.
Brakes - How do I measure brake current or amperage?
7” brakes draw about 2.5 amps per brake and all other brake magnets draw about 3 amps per brake. The total system amperage is calculated by multiplying this number by the number of brakes/magnets connected to the brake system. To measure the brake current, the engine of the towing vehicle should be running. Disconnect the wire at each
point that you wish to measure the current draw and put the ammeter in series with this line. Make sure your ammeter
has sufficient capacity and note polarity to prevent damaging your ammeter.
NOTE: If a resistor is used in the brake system, it must be set to zero or bypassed completely to obtain the
maximum amperage reading. The amount of current draw will depend on what point you are measuring. If the
ammeter is at the plug, you will get the total current draw from all magnets. If the ammeter is connected at
one of the magnets, you will measure the current draw through that magnet only.
Brakes - How do I measure brake voltage?
System voltage is measured at the magnets by connecting a voltmeter to the magnet lead wires at any brake. This
may be accomplished by using a pin probe inserted through the insulation of the wires dropping down from the
chassis or by cutting the wires. Voltage in the system should begin at 0 volts and, as the controller bar is slowly
actuated, should gradually increase to about 12 volts.
Brakes - How often should I adjust my brakes?
It is recommended that manual adjust brakes should be adjusted. 1) After the first 200 miles of operation when the
brake shoes and drums have “seated” 2) At 3,000 mile intervals 3) or as use or performance requires.
Brakes - My brake linings are cracked, do I have to replace them?
Usually, light cracking of the surface of a brake lining can be expected under normal use. This is not cause for
replacement. However, if the lining is deeply cracked to the shoe surface or is missing chunks, your brake lining will
require replacement.
Brakes - Which magnet wire is the positive, they are both the same color?
The magnet is not a polarized component. Use one wire to connect to power from the brake controller and use the
other to attach to ground. It is recommended that a common ground be ran from the trailer plug to the magnets. Do
not ground each brake individually to the trailer frame or structure. Also note that the brakes should be wired in parallel, not in series. The wire color is used to identify the component since so many magnets physically look the same on
the outside, however they are different strengths for the different capacity brakes.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Page 89
Brakes - Why can’t I lock and slide my electric brakes?
On an unloaded trailer, you may be able to lock up your brakes if your electric brake controller is supplying full
amperage to the brakes. When loaded to capacity, you may not be able to lock up your brakes as electric brakes
are designed to slow the trailer at a controlled rate, and not designed to lock up the wheels on a fully loaded trailer.
Our brakes are designed to meet all applicable safety standards. All of our brakes will perform better after numerous
burnish stops to seat the brake lining into the drums.
Brakes - Why do I have to adjust my brakes?
Brakes must be adjusted to compensate for the lining and drum wear that occurs during the use of the braking
system. Some brakes require manual adjustment to move the lining closer to the drum. Refer to brake adjustment
in the support material that came with your trailer.
Brakes - Why do my brakes and hubs get so hot?
Braking systems use friction to slow the vehicle and the energy used to slow the trailer is converted to heat. Our
brakes are designed to operate up to extremely high temperatures during hard braking applications. This heat is
noticeable on the hub and drums and is to be expected on a properly functioning brake. If a brake is malfunctioning
and running excessively hot, this can be noticed by smoking brakes or the paint burning off the brake drum.
Miscellaneous - How do you calculate hitch weights?
The hitch weight for conventional, bumper type hitches should be 10% to 15% of the gross weight of the vehicle. The
remaining 85% to 90% of the load will be carried on the running gear. The hitch weight for 5th wheel and gooseneck
type trailers should be 15% to 20% of the gross weight of the vehicle. The remaining 80% to 85% of the load will be
carried on the running gear.
Wheels and Tires - Can I use wheels with greater offsets?
Wheel offset is the distance from the mounting surface to the centerline of the tire. Our axles bearing sets are
designed for wheel with 0 to 1/2” inset. Exceeding this offset will shorten bearing life and may lead to dangerous
bearing failure.
Wheels and Tires - Why do I need to re-torque my trailer wheels when I don’t do that on my truck?
Trailer wheels carry substantially more weight than tow vehicle wheels of the same size and see more disc flexing
due to side loading stresses. It is necessary to re-torque them several times until the wheel nut torque stabilizes.
This is especially true for new wheels that need to have the paint worn away at the hub mounting face and under the
wheel nuts.
m WARNING
Be very careful to use only recommended wheel fastening torque amount as specified for that
wheel fastener. It is possible to permanently damage a wheel that has been over torqued and may
cause the loss of that wheel from the trailer.
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Felling Trailers, Inc. 6/1/13
Table Of Contents
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Quality ~ Craftsmanship ~ Pride ~ Since 1974
Manufactured and Distributed by:
Felling Trailers, Inc.
1525 Main Street South • Sauk Centre, MN 56378
1-800-245-2809 • (320) 352-5230 Fax
www.felling.com • [email protected]
© 2013 Felling Trailers, Inc. Form OM-102 6-13 Printed in U.S.A.
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