Organise and prepare food products and services

Organise and prepare food products and services
Organise and prepare food products and
services
D1.HRS.CL1.10
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare
food products and
services
D1.HRS.CL1.10
Trainee Manual
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Project Base
William Angliss Institute of TAFE
555 La Trobe Street
Melbourne 3000 Victoria
Telephone:
(03) 9606 2111
Facsimile:
(03) 9670 1330
Acknowledgements
Project Director:
Chief Writer:
Subject Writer:
Project Manager:
Editor:
DTP/Production:
Wayne Crosbie
Alan Hickman
Garry Blackburn
Alan Maguire
Jim Irwin
Daniel Chee, Mai Vu, Kaly Quach
The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) was established on 8 August 1967. The Member
States of the Association are Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia,
Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Viet Nam.
The ASEAN Secretariat is based in Jakarta, Indonesia.
General Information on ASEAN appears online at the ASEAN Website: www.asean.org.
All text is produced by William Angliss Institute of TAFE for the ASEAN Project on “Toolbox
Development for Front Office, Food and Beverage Services and Food Production Divisions”.
This publication is supported by the Australian Government’s aid program through the ASEANAustralia Development Cooperation Program Phase II (AADCP II).
Copyright: Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) 2013.
All rights reserved.
Disclaimer
Every effort has been made to ensure that this publication is free from errors or omissions. However,
you should conduct your own enquiries and seek professional advice before relying on any fact,
statement or matter contained in this book. The ASEAN Secretariat and William Angliss Institute of
TAFE are not responsible for any injury, loss or damage as a result of material included or omitted
from this course. Information in this module is current at the time of publication. Time of publication is
indicated in the date stamp at the bottom of each page.
Some images appearing in this resource have been purchased from stock photography suppliers
Shutterstock and iStockphoto and other third party copyright owners and as such are non-transferable
and non-exclusive. Clip arts, font images and illustrations used are from the Microsoft Office Clip Art
and Media Library. Some images have been provided by and are the property of William Angliss
Institute.
Additional images have been sourced from Flickr and SKC and are used under Creative Commons
licence: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en
File name: TM_Organise_&_prepare_food_products_&_services_FN_070214
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Table of contents
Introduction to trainee manual........................................................................................... 1
Unit descriptor................................................................................................................... 3
Assessment matrix ........................................................................................................... 5
Glossary ........................................................................................................................... 7
Mise-en-place ................................................................................................................... 9
Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use .................................. 11
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks ........................... 29
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry ............................................................... 43
Appendix – basic recipe for mise-en-place...................................................................... 65
Presentation of written work ............................................................................................ 81
Recommended reading................................................................................................... 83
Trainee evaluation sheet................................................................................................. 85
Trainee Self-Assessment Checklist................................................................................. 87
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Introduction to trainee manual
Introduction to trainee manual
To the Trainee
Congratulations on joining this course. This Trainee Manual is one part of a ‘toolbox’
which is a resource provided to trainees, trainers and assessors to help you become
competent in various areas of your work.
The ‘toolbox’ consists of three elements:

A Trainee Manual for you to read and study at home or in class

A Trainer Guide with Power Point slides to help your Trainer explain the content of the
training material and provide class activities to help with practice

An Assessment Manual which provides your Assessor with oral and written questions
and other assessment tasks to establish whether or not you have achieved
competency.
The first thing you may notice is that this training program and the information you find in
the Trainee Manual seems different to the textbooks you have used previously. This is
because the method of instruction and examination is different. The method used is called
Competency based training (CBT) and Competency based assessment (CBA). CBT and
CBA is the training and assessment system chosen by ASEAN (Association of SouthEast Asian Nations) to train people to work in the tourism and hospitality industry
throughout all the ASEAN member states.
What is the CBT and CBA system and why has it been adopted by ASEAN?
CBT is a way of training that concentrates on what a worker can do or is required to do at
work. The aim is of the training is to enable trainees to perform tasks and duties at a
standard expected by employers. CBT seeks to develop the skills, knowledge and
attitudes (or recognise the ones the trainee already possesses) to achieve the required
competency standard. ASEAN has adopted the CBT/CBA training system as it is able to
produce the type of worker that industry is looking for and this therefore increases
trainees chances of obtaining employment.
CBA involves collecting evidence and making a judgement of the extent to which a worker
can perform his/her duties at the required competency standard. Where a trainee can
already demonstrate a degree of competency, either due to prior training or work
experience, a process of ‘Recognition of Prior Learning’ (RPL) is available to trainees to
recognise this. Please speak to your trainer about RPL if you think this applies to you.
What is a competency standard?
Competency standards are descriptions of the skills and knowledge required to perform a
task or activity at the level of a required standard.
242 competency standards for the tourism and hospitality industries throughout the
ASEAN region have been developed to cover all the knowledge, skills and attitudes
required to work in the following occupational areas:

Housekeeping

Food Production

Food and Beverage Service
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Organise and prepare food products and services
1
Introduction to trainee manual

Front Office

Travel Agencies

Tour Operations.
All of these competency standards are available for you to look at. In fact you will find a
summary of each one at the beginning of each Trainee Manual under the heading ‘Unit
Descriptor’. The unit descriptor describes the content of the unit you will be studying in the
Trainee Manual and provides a table of contents which are divided up into ‘Elements’ and
‘Performance Criteria”. An element is a description of one aspect of what has to be
achieved in the workplace. The ‘Performance Criteria’ below each element details the
level of performance that needs to be demonstrated to be declared competent.
There are other components of the competency standard:

Unit Title: statement about what is to be done in the workplace

Unit Number: unique number identifying the particular competency

Nominal hours: number of classroom or practical hours usually needed to complete
the competency. We call them ‘nominal’ hours because they can vary e.g. sometimes
it will take an individual less time to complete a unit of competency because he/she
has prior knowledge or work experience in that area.
The final heading you will see before you start reading the Trainee Manual is the
‘Assessment Matrix’. Competency based assessment requires trainees to be assessed in
at least 2 – 3 different ways, one of which must be practical. This section outlines three
ways assessment can be carried out and includes work projects, written questions and
oral questions. The matrix is designed to show you which performance criteria will be
assessed and how they will be assessed. Your trainer and/or assessor may also use
other assessment methods including ‘Observation Checklist’ and ‘Third Party Statement’.
An observation checklist is a way of recording how you perform at work and a third party
statement is a statement by a supervisor or employer about the degree of competence
they believe you have achieved. This can be based on observing your workplace
performance, inspecting your work or gaining feedback from fellow workers.
Your trainer and/or assessor may use other methods to assess you such as:

Journals

Oral presentations

Role plays

Log books

Group projects

Practical demonstrations.
Remember your trainer is there to help you succeed and become competent. Please feel
free to ask him or her for more explanation of what you have just read and of what is
expected from you and best wishes for your future studies and future career in tourism
and hospitality.
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Unit descriptor
Unit descriptor
Organise and prepare food products and services
This unit deals with the skills and knowledge required to Organise and prepare food
products and services in a range of settings within the hotel and travel industries
workplace context.
Unit Code:
D1.HRS.CL1.10
Nominal Hours:
35 hours
Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Performance Criteria
1.1 Identify equipment and utensils that may be used in mise-en-place tasks
1.2 Select and assemble the equipment and utensils for required mise-en-place tasks
1.3 Use equipment and utensils to perform mise-en-place tasks
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place
tasks
Performance Criteria
2.1 Identify ingredients that may be used for mise-en-place tasks
2.2 Select and assemble the ingredients for required mise-en-place tasks
2.3 Prepare ingredients in accordance with identified need
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Performance Criteria
3.1 Perform mise-en-place tasks with meat
3.2 Perform mise-en-place tasks with seafood
3.3 Perform mise-en-place tasks with poultry
3.4 Perform mise-en-place tasks with game
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Unit descriptor
4
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Assessment matrix
Assessment matrix
Showing mapping of Performance Criteria against Work Projects, Written
Questions and Oral Questions
The Assessment Matrix indicates three of the most common assessment activities your
Assessor may use to assess your understanding of the content of this manual and your
performance – Work Projects, Written Questions and Oral Questions. It also indicates
where you can find the subject content related to these assessment activities in the
Trainee Manual (i.e. under which element or performance criteria). As explained in the
Introduction, however, the assessors are free to choose which assessment activities are
most suitable to best capture evidence of competency as they deem appropriate for
individual students.
Work
Projects
Written
Questions
Oral
Questions
Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
1.1
Identify equipment and utensils that may be
used in mise-en-place tasks
1.1
1, 2, 3
1
1.2
Select and assemble the equipment and
utensils for required mise-en-place tasks
1.1
4, 5 ,6, 7
2
1.3
Use equipment and utensils to perform miseen-place tasks
1.1
8, 9
3
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
2.1
Identify ingredients that may be used for miseen-place tasks
2.1
10, 11
4
2.2
Select and assemble the ingredients for
required mise-en-place tasks
2.2
12, 13, 14
5
2.3
Prepare ingredients in accordance with
identified need
2.3
15, 16, 17,
18, 19
6
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.1
Perform mise-en-place tasks with meat
3.1
20, 21, 22,
23
7
3.2
Perform mise-en-place tasks with seafood
3.2
24, 25
8
3.3
Perform mise-en-place tasks with poultry
3.3
26, 27
9
3.4
Perform mise-en-place tasks with game
3.4
28, 29, 30
10
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Assessment matrix
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Glossary
Glossary
Term
Explanation
Blanch
Plunge food into boiling water to partly cook
Bouquet Garni
Mixture of aromatic vegetables and herbs and spices, used to impart
flavour, tied in bunches so removal can be achieved before cooking
process is finished
Brunoise
Julienne dice 3mm x 3mm x 3mm; used to garnish salads; consommé
Clarify
Process of making clear
Croutons
Dried pieces of bread that has been dried in oven or cooked fat; used for
garnish
Foodstuff
Any type of food suited for human consumption
Garnish
Decoration of the meal
Gratinate
Process of browning the surface of foods; predominately sauces, under a
salamander
Honing
Using sharpening steel to re-align feather on knife blade
Julienne
Cut of vegetable that resembles a matchstick; 3mmx3mmx 20mm long
Marinate
Process of marinating food to enhance flavour
Marinating
Using acidic liquids to tenderise and flavour foods before cooking process
begins
Mirepoix
Mixture of onion, carrot and celery; roughly of equal proportions; used in
many different dishes; fine cut or rough chop
Mouli
Hand operated mill to pulp cooked solids; has been replaced by food
processor or stick wands. It is also known as a food mill.
Panada
A paste or gruel of bread crumbs, toast, or flour combined with milk, stock,
or water and used for making soups, binding forcemeats, or thickening
sauces.
Peelings
Outer skins of vegetables and fruit that are discarded
Pinch
Small measure that can be gathered with fingers
Refresh
Plunge partly cooked food into cold or ice water to stop the cooking process
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Glossary
Term
Explanation
Roux
Mixture of cooked flour and fat that is used to thicken liquids
Salamander
A piece of equipment that will radiate heat onto food from above or below
foodstuff
Segments
Fruit that has been sliced or portioned with no skin attached
Sharpening
Making the cutting edge of knife finer to allow for easier cutting
Snips
Cut with scissors rather than knife
Standard Recipes
List of ingredients for any dish and method of process those ingredient to
produce a set amount of food; usually for 10 people
Trimmings
Off cuts of fruit and vegetables that can be utilised in other processes or
dishes
Zest
Outer rind of citrus fruits where the volatile oils reside
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Mise-en-place
Mise-en-place
Food mise-en-place
Selecting and assembling the equipment and utensils needed is part of the process
known in the kitchen as ‘mise-en-place’.
This is a French term meaning ‘to put in place’ – it means getting everything ready before
you start cooking so that you don’t have to interrupt the preparation process while you
look for something:

Make sure you have gathered all the ingredients and have weighed all quantities
accurately

Check you have pots and pans clean and ready to use, and that they are of the
necessary size and number

Check fruit and vegetables to be used are suitable for use
and have been washed and prepared as necessary

Check you have all the utensils you will need for the recipe –
knives, spoons, whisks etc.
Mise-en-place is something to be done for every recipe, every
time you cook an item.
You will note in this context, the expression ‘assemble the equipment’ simply means
getting it ready or getting it all together ready to use.
Station mise-en-place
Whilst the focus above has been ensuring that the immediate kitchen area is complete,
there are other ‘mise-en-place activities that need to take place.
Whilst most preparation may be done in the kitchen area, additional service areas or
stations may need to be set up in their entirety or have sufficient service items in place so
that staff responsible for these areas can efficiently undertake their necessary activities.
These stations include but are not limited to:

Buffets

Waiter stations

Condiment stations

Satellite kitchens

BBQ areas

Self-service stations.
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Mise-en-place
Mental mise-en-place
Whilst the physical set up of equipment, utensils, ingredients and specific work areas is
vital in the preparation for a service shift, the mental preparation for an upcoming shift
must also be considered and addressed.
Normally this can be helped by having a detailed plan of
activities mapped out including timelines to ensure all
necessary items and activities are undertaken in the lead up to
service.
In service periods requiring a number of food items to be
prepared, cooked, presented and displayed at different
temperatures, at different times and at different locations, the
importance of planning cannot be underestimated.
The more you can mentally prepare for an upcoming shift, it hopefully leads to less stress
in an already stressful environment.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Element 1:
Organise and prepare equipment and
utensils for use
1.1 Identify equipment and utensils that may be
used in mise-en-place tasks
Equipment and utensils
Equipment and utensils that can be used in a commercial kitchen
environment can be simple or state of the art electronic controlled
machines.

Knives, cleavers and any chopping or cutting implements

Bowls

Colanders

Chinois

Graters.
(accurate weighing of ingredients)
Proper production processes will require accurate weights and
measure being used.
Consistency can only be achieved if Standard Recipes are used
and proper measurements are used to produce the product.
such as standard sized:

Buckets

Cup measure

Spoon measure.
These are volume measures but all ingredients will weigh different
weights when measured like this.
Electronic scales are more accurate than volume measures.
Food processors, slicers, mixers and blenders are all machines that
require electricity for them to operate and Occupational Health and
Safety requires that all people have training in correct operation of
this equipment.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Small kitchen equipment

Bowls

Colanders

Chinois

Graters

Spoons; metal and wooden

Whisks

Vegetable peelers.
Cooking equipment

Pots

Frypans

Woks

Stoves

Electric

Gas

Induction cookers

Grillers,

Salamanders

Fryers

Brat pans

Steam jackets.
Items unique to the host enterprise or host country required to prepare specialist cuisine:

Tandoori ovens.
Holding equipment
Refrigeration units also called coolroom or chillers for holding high risk foods at a
controlled temperature of less than 5°C to minimise the growth of bacteria.
Freezer units, for storing frozen items at a temperature of less than minus 18°C (-18) for
periods of up to three to six months at a time.
Bain-maries are used to hold food HOT after it has been cooked until it is to be served to
the customer.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
1.2 Select and assemble the equipment and
utensils for required mise-en-place tasks
Select and assemble equipment and utensils means that workers must be able to select
or choose the correct piece of equipment to do the job that is required.
When that is done the following must taken into consideration.
Cleanliness of items
Is the equipment clean and suitable for use? The Food Safety Plan should state that all
equipment is clean after the last time that it was used.
Equally people must ensure that equipment is clean before use. This is a check in place
to see if the Food Safety Plan is actually working.
Any observance of utensils being found not to be cleaned must be reported to Supervisor
so checks can be made as to the reason why.
Cleaning of knives

Always wash and wipe the knife dry before use

Never leave knives in a sink with water

Never put wooden-handled knives through a dishwasher

Dry thoroughly with the blade pointing away from your
hand

Place clean knives in a wrap protector and/or toolbox.
Maintaining clean equipment

Loosen food particles by soaking, scraping and prerinsing

Wash equipment by using hot water with a cleaning
agent (detergent), scrubbing or scouring and jet
spraying

Rinse with hot water to remove soil and detergent
residue

Sanitise by using a chemical sanitiser or immersing in boiling water. Dishwasher’s
final rinse cycle is above 80ºC which eliminates all airborne bacteria

Drying equipment can be achieved by using clean kitchen cloths, air drying and heat
drying methods.
Choice of correct type and size of equipment and utensils
When the equipment has been found to be clean the next step is to ensure that the
equipment is the correct size and is suitable for the job required.
When cooking large quantities of food it is important that there is enough room to stir the
soup without spilling over the edge.
When deep frying ensure that the basket is not overloaded.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Collecting equipment and utensils in the necessary numbers
How many of each piece of equipment will be needed to do the job.

When setting a function service point it is good practice to ensure that there is a
serving spoon for every dish rather than just one spoon for 3 dishes

To bake 20 cakes with 4 tins is tiresome and in efficient; purchase more tins.
How much food is going to be produced?

To cook 400 (four hundred) chicken breasts you will need to have 20 trays to hold
twenty (20) chicken breasts if all are to be cooked

To cook 400 with 2 trays will take much longer.
Ensuring safety of equipment and utensils
Is the equipment safe to use? Does the worker have the skills and knowledge to operate
or use the particular piece of equipment?
It is the responsibility of the managers to ensure that staff have the knowledge to operate
equipment safely before allowing staff to use the equipment.
Using equipment safely
Accidents in kitchens are caused mainly by carelessness, lack of
concentration or lack of equipment knowledge.
A good working knowledge of equipment is crucial. Certain key steps
must be followed.
Electrical equipment
Check equipment before use:

Never put hands close to live electricity or the moving parts of
the unit

Switch equipment off after use

Switch equipment off and remove power plugs prior to
cleaning

Do not use electrical equipment in wet areas

NEVER place electrical items in water.
All electrical equipment should be clean and fully assembled
when they were last used.
This is to ensure that all the parts have been cleaned and all the parts are there, and
clean when it is re-assembled.
People should still check that the piece of equipment is clean before use because others
may be lazy. Check every time.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Checking power and equipment
Government legislation; whether Local, State or National; requires employers to maintain
equipment safely at all times.
This entails regular maintenance and cleaning by staff or contractors.
Periodic safety checks should be conducted by qualified service
technicians who follow a standard procedure that is easily monitored by
owners:

Use a checklist for items

Record the date of service

Record faults found on equipment

Indicate repairs/maintenance required

Record date of repair and name of repairer

Kitchen staff should report any unsafe or dangerous equipment
immediately.
The item should be clearly labelled and removed from the work area.
Physically assemble equipment
Can the staff member assemble the required equipment safety to ensure efficient
operation of that piece of equipment?
When purchasing equipment it is necessary to keep Instruction Manual on Correct
Operation of machinery. Some people may tend to think this is not necessary so they can
be filed in the wrong place and become lost.
It is good practice for managers to file copies of these manuals in office files until
machinery is no longer used. All staff should have access to a copy of these manuals.
Modern communications allow for people to obtain copies of Operating Manuals from
Manufacturers websites.
Students should look for Operating manuals for all equipment that are in their kitchens
and store them on computer memory sticks.
There is a need to use equipment in the kitchen according to
manufacturer’s instructions. There can be a need to:

Keep, read and follow any instructions that accompany the
delivery of a new piece of equipment. If you can’t find the
instructions then ring the manufacturer or supplier to get a copy
or check the net

Get the manufacturer to come and show you how to use the
item of equipment – ask then for some on-site training.
There is also a need when handling equipment and utensils to do so without causing
damage:

The user manual will provide advice on this but you should also be guided by the
advice given from the supplier.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
It should also be remembered failing to follow manufacturer’s instructions in relation to the
use, cleaning and maintenance of equipment can void warranties or guarantees.
Finally, check out any individual store practices:

The place where you work may have some special ways of using equipment or may
prohibit a certain piece of equipment being used in a particular way.
Ensuring full operational effectiveness of equipment and utensils
When the equipment operates well production is more efficient and cost effective.
When the equipment does not operate properly production will suffer because efficiencies
are lost. It becomes slower and more tiring.
– these require regular straining of the oil used:

Replace oil when necessary

Service to the gas pilot light and the thermostat is
essential

Operate the deep fat fryer at holding temperatures
when not in use to conserve energy and to extend
the life of the cooking oil or fat.
– whether gas or electric, these require
comprehensive cleaning after use:

Thermostats, gas supply lines and electricity
leads/points should be checked regularly and serviced
as needed

If the water supply is automatic check its supply has not
been turned off by the last operator and it is open whilst
in operation.
– whether fridges, freezers or cool rooms
ensure all doors and lids close and seal properly:

Check the seals on the doors regularly and ensure these
are cleaned regularly to help prevent sticking and splitting –
these should be replaced where worn or split

Keep doors closed to allow refrigeration units to operate to
their full potential

Check thermostats regularly and verify readings with an
independent thermometer as indicated by your Food Safety
Plan

Keep fridges and coolrooms clean and tidy at all times

Have motors, compressors services regularly and regassed as required.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
1.3 Use equipment and utensils to perform miseen-place tasks
Introduction
Equipment and utensils may include:
Knives, cleavers and hand-held utensils:
This equipment will be the most used equipment in the kitchen. This is the equipment that
is going to cause the most injuries.
Attention to safe use of cutting implements will greatly reduce injury in the workplace.
Knife handling techniques
In kitchens, knives are essential but can be dangerous if not handled correctly. Knives are
probably the greatest single contributor to accidents in the kitchen.
Below are the steps to safely handle knives.
Cleaning

Always wash and wipe the knife dry before use.

Never leave knives in a sink with water.

Never put wooden-handled knives through a dishwasher.

Dry thoroughly with the blade pointing away from your hand.

Place clean knives in a wrap protector and or toolbox.
Sharpening a knife

Use a stone to sharpen a knife and steel to maintain it.

Lubricate the stone with water, oil or detergent.

Sharpen at a 20º angle to the stone.

‘Hone’ the knife edge after using a stone, to bring the knife edge back into alignment
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use

this is done with a steel

Keep knives razor sharp. The less pressure exerted, the quicker and safer the activity.
Storage

Wash the knife carefully, paying attention to where the handle joins the blade as food
may stick in this area

Never soak knives in water or place in a dishwasher

Dishwashers generate temperatures that are too high for knives, except for knives
especially designed for dishwashers

Dry thoroughly with the blade pointing away from your hand

Store in a wrap, wallet or tool box.
Carrying in the kitchen

Carry with the point facing down, and close to the body.
Outside the kitchen

In a locked toolbox or secured in a knife wrap.
Handling knives

Use correct knife for each activity

Keep knives sharp

Hold knife and item being cut firmly (but not too tight)

Keep fingers away from the blade

Do not immerse knives under water or leave them in food

Clean and wipe the knife with the blade facing away from
you

Store knives safely after use

Do not try and catch a falling knife

Do not leave your knife sitting on a bench or cutting board with the blade facing
upward.
Cutting techniques

Hold knife firmly by the handle with fingers together

Fingers should grasp the food, be tucked in while the
thumb sits behind the item being cut

Only knuckles should be visible from above

As you cut, use the knuckles as a guide for the knife

Keep the point of the knife on the board

Use the correct knife for the activity.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Food processors, slicers, mixers and blenders
All commercial kitchens will have equipment designed to make the work easier and
production more efficient.
Students must know how to operate these pieces of equipment safely.
Cleaning of these machines requires that they are dismantled correctly; each part is
washed and dried then reassembled ready for the next use.
It is good practice for the person who uses the machine to wash and reassemble each
machine as it is used.
This minimises the loss of small locking bolts that hold machine together.
The loss of just one small piece will render the machine useless and the work the
machine does will have to be done by hand.
Slicer
Blender
Food
processor
Weighing scales and portion-control utensils
Scales are used to precisely weigh ingredients for cakes and pastries. Scales are also
important if any product is to be sold by weight. These must be checked by regulators to
ensure fair and equitable trading.
Pots, bowls, pans and small kitchen equipment
In most kitchens the pots and frypans, woks are the mainstay equipment.
In smaller kitchens these are the main form of cooking while in larger modern kitchens the
bulk of the cooking takes place in
and
.
will roast, steam and bake. These ovens have water connected and
are able to generate steam to inject into the cooking chamber as required.
These ovens have become sophisticated enough that they can clean themselves when
required; this is much faster than cleaning by hand.
Brat pan is basically a large flat open pot that is heated by gas or electric elements..
Brat pans have a hinged lid that allows for a casserole to be cooked slowly without the
loss of too much liquid.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Grillers, salamanders and fryers
Grillers can be flat plate heated to cook food by direct
contact. Grillers can also be bars over heated rocks
with heat rising up from below. BBQ is an example of
this and is one of the oldest methods of cooking over
heat.
Salamanders will be found hanging on the walls of
kitchen. Can be electric or gas fired.
Salamanders are wall hung to save on kitchen bench
space. The element is normally above the food and the
heat radiates down over the food.
In the USA they are called broilers and will have
elements above and below the food for faster cooking.
Frying is either done in shallow fry pan or in deep fryer.
A deep fryer is just a metal box that contains oil which
can be either gas or electric.
They will be deep enough to allow food to submerge below the surface of the fat so that it
can be cooked all over without the need to be turned over during the process.
In some countries a large open wok or cooking vessel does the same job.
Deep frying it is important not to allow the oil or fat to get too hot due to the ‘flash point’.
The ‘flash point’ is the temperature that the oil or fat will burst into flame.
Modern gas and electric deep fryers will have thermostats that will shut off the heat
source when the desired temperature is reached.
The open containers and woks need to be watched and the temperature controlled if
disaster is to be avoided
Holding equipment, including refrigeration and freezer units, bainmaries
Modern kitchen will have holding equipment.
This equipment is designed to hold foods at required temperatures until required.
Cold holding
Cold holding is done in refrigerators, coolrooms or fridges. All high risk foods must be held
at temperatures below 5°C for up to 5 days or less.
Freezing
Freezing is the other cold holding methods and long term freezing must be at minus 18C
(-18C).
These temperatures are recognised by the World Health Organisation as the standard
minimum temperature to be used.
At 5°C and below bacterial growth will be kept to a minimum if food is protected from
outside contamination. At 0°C to 1°C it will be less.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Bain-marie
Bain-maries are designed to keep food hot for short
periods of time. Hot food need to be kept above 60°C
until it is served to the customer.
Food must be hot before it is placed into a Bain-marie
and it is recommended that Bain-maries are operated at
a temperature of 80°C to keep food hot above 60°C.
Bain-maries are not designed to heat food. The heating
process will be too slow and bacteria could grow and
cause adverse reaction in customers when food is consumed.
Bain-marie is a French word that mean ‘water bath’ or ‘double boiler’.
A stainless steel bowl over a pot of hot water; 80°C-100°C.
They are used to cook or heat products and allow for the heat to be
controlled.
Use the steam coming off the water to slowly and gently heat or cook food
products
Bain-maries can be fitted into workbenches or sit on top of benches so they can be
moved to storage when not needed.
Mobile or movable Bain-maries are also available ; these can be moved around and used
where needed.
Bain-maries can be water baths or dry. Water baths are the best but give off high volumes
of steam. Care needs to be exercised around them due to the heat. Any temperature over
50°C feels hot against human skin.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Student Activity
What does this equipment do?
Students are to fill in answers and keep as evidence of competency knowledge.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Mise-en-place tasks may include:
All these manuals and the language used in them is based on the Australian Cooking
Industry; French terminology was the language of the kitchen 50 years ago but most of
that is now written in English.
Brush up on your English. Find the meaning of these words and translate into your own
language.
English word
Your language
English Meaning
Preparing
Cleaning
Washing
Tins
Sanitizing
Sifting
Weighing
Portioning
Mixing
Raw Materials
De-Frosting
Ready For Use
Peeling
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
English word
Your language
Crumbing
Filleting
Boning
Shredding
Chopping
Crushing
Batter
Combining
Pre-cooking
Pre-prepared
Carton
Mincing
Skinning
Temperature
Slicing
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English Meaning
Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Standard recipe sheet
Recipe
Spaghetti Carbonara
Portions
10
Potion size
Ingredients
Weight
Unit
Bacon
150 gm
kg
Onion
100 gm
kg
Butter
80 gm
kg
Egg Yolk
10 ea
each
Cream 35% fat
300
kg
Parmesan Cheese
200 gm
kg
Salt
3 gm
kg
Pepper
150 gm
Waste
Useable
Purchase
Cost
per
Cost per
%
%
Weight
Unit
Quantity
kg
Spaghetti
800g
kg
Chives
½ bunch
bch
Total Cost
Cost per serve or portion
Selling price @33% food cost
Method of production; temperatures; time; serving procedures
Date Tested
Approved by
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer.
You must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion
of the project to your Trainer by the agreed date.
Students will need to work with their trainer to decide exactly what mise-en-place will
need to take place.
This unit can be assessed in conjunction with Apply basic techniques of commercial
cookery D1.HCC.CL2.01.
The selected recipes will have to be followed to produce the required dishes.
When the recipes have been decided the students will have complete the following points.
1.1 Identify equipment and utensils that may be required.
1.2. Select and assemble required equipment.
1.3. Use equipment and utensils to perform mise-en-place.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Summary
Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
Identify equipment and utensils that may be used in mise-en-place tasks


There are many pieces of equipment that can be used in the kitchen
; knives, spoons, peelers, pots and pans

: food processors, stick wands; equipment that can easily move around the
kitchen and used anywhere

that will be stationary and the work will have to come to that piece of
equipment; ovens, brat pans, coolrooms, dishwasher, salamanders.
Select and assemble the equipment and utensils for required mise-en-place tasks

Kitchen staff will have to know how select the correct piece of equipment for the job that is
needed to be accomplished

The machine must be checked to ensure that it has been assembled correctly so that it
operates efficiently and does not cause harm to the user.
Use equipment and utensils to perform mise-en-place tasks

Each piece of equipment will have different and sometimes similar roles.

Machines are there to assist staff to do the job easier.

Utensils are hand held objects that are most commonly used to cut, clean, peel, beat, whip,
and blend food commodities before heat is applied to make food more edible and enjoyable.
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Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Element 2:
Organise and prepare ingredients for
mise-en-place tasks
2.1 Identify ingredients that may be used for miseen-place tasks
Ingredients may include raw and pre-prepared/convenience and must include:

Dairy products and eggs, including alternatives such as
soy

Meat, fish/seafood and poultry, fresh, frozen and
processed

Dry goods, including herbs, spices, flours, sugar, rice,
pasta, bread products and boosters

Fruit and vegetables

Smallgoods

Items unique to the host enterprise or host country required to
prepare specialist cuisine

Liquid ingredients, including juices, milk, cream, alcohol,
vinegar and oils.
Select and assemble the ingredients should include:

Reference to menus being presented, bookings received and
service style being offered

Establishment requirements in relation to standard
recipes, house preferences, signature dishes and
recipe cards

Matching type and quality of ingredient selected to
intended use of the item

Ensuring the safety of all foodstuffs selected

Ensuring quantity of ingredients assembled matches
identified/expected trading demand

Protecting the integrity and food safety of items selected until mise-en-place tasks
commence

Safely transporting, and storing, foods to the mise-en-place area

Completing necessary internal documentation to reflect stock use.
Requirements of the ingredient preparation are stated in the Standard Recipe Card.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
2.2 Select and assemble the ingredients for
required mise-en-place tasks
Select the required ingredients
Commodity identification is the most important skill when beginning to cook.
Student Activity
From the list below research and apply name you understand what is this commodity.
Name
Classification
Apple
Fruit
Your
language
Name
Classification
Milk
Dairy Product
Mushroom
Capsicum
Onion
Cauliflower
Flathead
Cucumber
Parsnip
Sea urchin
Potato
Lime
Pineapple
Cilantro
Radish
Alfalfa
Mushroom
Prosciutto
Honeydew
Lemon grass
Watermelon
Radicchio
Raspberries
Squash
Spinach
Turnip
Shallots
Coriander
Cabbage
Sweet potato
Prawn
Asparagus
Zucchini
Rock melon
Broccoli
Sorrel
Turnips
Beetroot
Yoghurt
Cheese
Salami
Chervil
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Your
language
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Standard recipe sheet
Recipe
Mayonnaise
Number of portions
Portion
Portion Size
250 gm
Waste%
Usable%
Purchase
Amount
Cost
per
Cost per
Weight
Unit
Purchase
Ingredients
Weight
Unit
%
%
Eggs yolks
2
ea
50
50
Vinegar, white
20
ml
100
Salt
3
gm
100
Pepper
2
gm
100
Dijon Mustard
10
gm
100
Oil, Vegetable
250
ml
100
Total Cost
Cost Per Individual Portion
Selling Price @ 28% F.C.
Method, cooking temperature and serving procedures
Place the egg yolks into a stainless steel bowl salt, pepper, and Dijon mustard.
Add the vinegar and whisk together.
Slowly add oil while whisking vigorously.
Add oil in small amounts until oil begins to be emulsified into egg yolk mix.
Continue whisking until all oil is emulsified into mixture.
Correct seasoning if required.
Place into clean container and chill until required.
Tested and approved by:
Date:
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
A standard recipe
A standard recipe is a precise record of ingredients, method, serving instructions and cost
of any food item on a menu.
A standard recipe needs to include:

Summary of ingredients

Required quantities or each item

Specific preparation guidelines

Garnish and service details

Portion sizes

Accurate costs

% wastage

Date of last change.
Why do we use Standard Recipes?

Standardise recipes –regardless of who makes them

Consistent quality – look, cost and taste the same

Customer satisfaction – always the same quality.
2.3 Prepare ingredients in accordance with
identified need
Introduction
Preparing ingredients will consist of the following:
Washing of vegetables
Root vegetables
Wash in cold water to remove all fine particles of dirt and any
dead leafy matter.
Any hard caked mud or dirt may have to be scrubbed with brush
to remove the dirt.
These brushes must only be used for cleaning vegetables, not
used to scrub the toilet or floors.
When washed, the vegetables can be peeled and cut to size
required.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Leafy vegetables
These will need to be washed in lots of cold water:

Half fill a container with leaf salad and cover with cold water
almost to the top of container

Move salad leaf gently in water allowing leaf to float back to
the top

This allows for the dirt to fall to the bottom of container

If the salad is touching the bottom of container the dirt cannot
be released from the leaf salad.
When washed the salad will need to be dried; it is best to use a
salad spinner where the centrifugal forces will throw the excess
water off the leaves without causing too much damage.
Store the salad in container cover and chill until required for
service.
Prepare ingredients must reflect the tasks identified in miseen-place tasks (above) and include:

Preparing items that conform with identified need

Safe food handling practices

Techniques unique to the host enterprise or host country required to prepare specialist
cuisine

Timely preparation to meet workflow requirements of the enterprise and support
operational cooking and food preparation demands

Waste minimisation.
Meat preparations
Many animals are used in restaurants around the world.
Listed below types that may be used:

Beef and veal

Lamb and mutton

Pork

Goat.
Exotic meats are a term used to describe something that is not commonly used in
kitchens.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Students should list what are ‘normal meats’ and what is ‘exotic meats’ in the country
where they work.
Processing of meats might include cutting carcasses into pieces or just cutting a sirloin
into porterhouse steaks.
The processing may be of fresh meat or the cutting of frozen meats that have been
thawed.
Seafood may include:
Any fish that is available in the local market place. These will
have to be killed, gutted, scaled washed and cut into portions if
required by the standard recipe instructions.
Killing needs to be humanely and as efficiently as possible.
When killed the fish needs to be gutted and scaled. This is done
with lots of water to clean the waste product away as quickly as
possible.
Portioning of fish

Round fish have two fillets that can be removed

Flat fish have four fillets, two from top, two from bottom

Fish may be required whole so no further processing is
required

Place into clean container, cover and chill until cooking is to
commence.
Precision vegetable cuts
Having everything cut to the size means the product will cook more evenly and at the
same time. It is more pleasing to the eye to have consistent sizes.
These include:
Julienne:
strips (2 mm x 2 mm x 40 mm)
Brunoise:
small cube (2 mm cube)
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Paysanne:
thinly sliced shapes either triangular,
square or round
(15 mm diameter)
Macedoine:
dice/cube (8 mm cube)
Jardinière:
small batons
(4 mm x 4 mm x 20 mm)
Turned:
barrel shape
(approx. 5 mm x 2.5 mm) this can
vary
How to dice an onion

Peel the onion and divide down the
centre

Slice through the onion at 3mm
intervals.

Do not cut the entire length of the
onion.

Holding firmly but gently, slowly slice
the onion horizontally at 4mm intervals

Do not slice all the way through

Be careful of your fingers

Retract them.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks

Holding the onion firmly by the edges,
slice across the onion to achieve a fine
dice.
Crumbing set
Seasoned flour
Egg mixture
Crumbs or batter
To do a crumbing set you will need 5 plates

A plate/dish to hold the food to be crumbed or coated

A plate/bowl for the seasoned flour; dries the surface of the food and when wetted by
the egg will act as a glue for the crumb to bind it to the food

A plate/bowl for the egg mixture

A plate/bowl for the coating, breadcrumbs or batter

A plate/bowl for the food that has been coated.
After the food has been coated with dry coating it will need to rest in coolroom to enable
the coating to bond to the surface of the food.
If you try to fry too quickly the coating can dislodge from the food and fall off on the plate.
Wet batter coated food should be placed immediately into the fryer or frypan.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Example of mise-en-place for veal schnitzel
Veal Schnitzel is escalopes of Veal crumbed and then shallow fried in a fry pan.
The escalopes are normally cut from the topside muscle from the rear leg of a young
beef; veal is meat from a beef animal less than 12 months of age.
Food Ingredients
Equipment
Veal escalopes
Meat mallet
Eggs
Plastic sheets
Milk
Wooden block
Flour
Plastic wrap
Salt
5 baking dishes
Pepper
Workbench
Breadcrumbs
Method of preparation

Review diagram on previous page

Mix egg with equal amount of milk, whisk together; place into
shallow tray and place onto workbench

Place breadcrumbs into another tray and place onto bench
beside egg mix

Mix flour and seasoning together and place into third tray
and place onto workbench

The tray sequence should be the same as diagram

Flour: Egg mixture: Breadcrumbs

One tray in beginning for veal uncoated; one tray other end
for crumbed veal

Check veal for suitability and place between two sheets
of plastic

Using meat mallet gently tap the piece of veal until it is
thin and even thickness

Continue until all veal pieces have been prepared

Place one piece of veal in flour and coat both side of
meat

Remove excess flour and dip into egg mixture then into breadcrumbs

Coat both sides in breadcrumbs and place piece of veal onto last tray

Continue until all veal has been coated

Lay veal pieces in single layers neatly on tray and lay plastic sheet over meats before
starting second layer

When all meat is crumbed then cover with plastic wrap, label and date
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks

Place into coolroom until required

Clean the workbench; discard all ingredients that has been placed into the crumbing
set trays

These ingredients cannot be kept due to the ingredients; veal eggs and milk being
high-risk products.
When describing what is required in the mise-en-place process it is important to think of
all things that have to be completed, no matter how small and inconsequential it seems.
Mise-en-place for garden salad

Fill container with cold water

Place salad leaves into cold water and gently move up and
down

Salad leaves must be able to float above the base of the
container so any small pieces of dirt can fall to the bottom

Remove salad leaves from the water and drain excess water
from the leaves

A salad spinner is good to use to remove excess water from
leaves

Place the washed salad leaves into clean container and keep
chilled until required; container must have a lid

Wash tomato and cut into wedges

Grate carrots

Peel and slice onions

Wash and chop parsley

Place all ingredients into separate containers

Make vinaigrette; set aside

Cover and place all cut ingredients into coolroom.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Student activity:
What are the names of the seafood available in the local market place.
Name
Classification
Your
language
Name
Eel
Octopus
Cod
Squid
Perch
Oysters
Barramundi
Razor clam
John Dory
Lobster
Tuna
Crab
Mussels
Cuttlefish
Clams
Kingfish
Trevally
Mackerel
Snapper
Abalone
Shrimp
Turbot
Cockles
Whiting
Sole
Bugs
Classification
Your
language
Haddock
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39
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer.
You must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion
of the project to your Trainer by the date agreed.
Students will need to work with their trainer to decide exactly what mise-en-place will
need to take place.
This unit can be assessed in conjunction with Apply basic techniques of commercial
cookery D1.HCC.CL2.01.
The selected recipes will have to be followed to produce the required dishes.
When the recipes have been decided the students will have complete the following points.
2.1 Identify ingredients:

Read the recipes and identify what ingredients are required.
2.2. Select and assemble ingredients:

Assemble all the required ingredients.
2.3. Prepare ingredients as required in the recipe:

40
Read the recipe carefully.
© ASEAN 2013
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Summary
Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
Identify ingredients that may be used for mise-en-place tasks

Foods do not change in other countries. The names change. Flavour may change slightly with
growing conditions but all are fundamentally the same

Skill needs to be enhanced know by sight and be able to adapt to different languages

If your language is not the same as the recipe then research needs to be done to ascertain
exactly what the word means.
Select and assemble the ingredients for required mise-en-place tasks

Read the recipe to find the list of ingredients required

Assemble all ingredients before beginning the cooking process

All ingredients should be stand alone and not combined with other ingredients until instructed.
Prepare ingredients in accordance with identified need

Prepare as stated in the recipe

Add ingredients in the correct order as stated in the recipe

Follow processing instruction as stated.
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Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
42
© ASEAN 2013
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Element 3:
Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.1 Perform mise-en-place tasks with meat
Storing meats
Raw meats are favourable mediums for bacterial growth, if they are not stored and
handled correctly.
There are two main conditions to be met when storing meat.
They are:

Temperature 1 to 3C

Humidity 85 %.
Other factors to be considered are:

Place meat in single layers on trays – fat side up

Trays must be changed regularly to prevent blood pooling

Meat must be covered with plastic wrap

Different types of meat should not be mixed

Raw and cooked meats should NEVER be spread on the
same tray

A sound stock rotation program should be maintained.
Storing fat side up is to prevent the blood pooling and
discolouring the fat.
Covering meat is to stop dehydration of the surface.
Meats can be similar in colour but different species so it is important not to mix meats.
Goat and pork, goat and lamb, beef and goat.
Consideration of different cultures needs to be recognised. Some cultures do not eat pork
or pork products so their requirements need to be considered and respected.
Keeping meat separated is also good stock taking practice; easier to control purchasing
requirements.
Freezing meat
Fresh meats can be frozen successfully and stored for between three and six months
depending on the type of meat and provided it is kept between (-18°C and -24°C).
Fluctuations in temperature will cause loss in quantity and decrease in the shelf life of the
meat.
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43
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
When freezing meats:

Never freeze large quantities stacked on top of
each other

Boneless meat freezes quickest

Thicker cuts of meat take longer to freeze

Excess fat cover slows freezing

Guard against freezer burn by looking after frozen
meats and using sound stock rotation

Freeze in strong bags, eliminating as much air as possible
from the bags

Label and date all items to be frozen

Thaw frozen meats in the refrigerator at 1ºC – 3°C.
Freezing meat which is spoiling is not a method of
improving its quality
Freezing meats should only be for the short term. Even though it
will keep for 6 months it is not good business practice to have it
stored in your freezer for 6 months.
Purchase only what is required for the purchasing cycle.
Use the freezer to store excess product that did not sell until it is
able to be utilised in the next cycle or as new menu items.
Restaurants in large city restaurants do not really need to store meats frozen. Frozen
meats are best for long distance transport where chilled will not last the distance.
Cleaning, trimming, slicing and preparing meat
Basic preparation of meat, be it beef, veal, lamb or pork,
will include some cleaning and trimming of excess fat
cover, lymph nodes, connective tissue and blood vessels.
Cleaning meat should be performed with a suitably sized,
sharp knife.
The skill required is in the ability to remove the undesired
pieces, while retaining as much saleable meat as possible.
Vacuum packaged meat must be removed from the package at least half an hour prior to
cooking to allow meat to return to its natural colour and smell. If the meat does not return
to its natural smell and colour treat as spoiled and contact supplier:

Trimming is the cutting of meat to a certain required shape and size

Trimming meat gives it a more appealing presentation.
This can be achieved by trimming the fat coverage down to a required thickness, or by
trimming bones on cutlets to a certain length.
Trimming is performed in most kitchens on a daily basis, and there are always a number
of off-cuts obtained as a by-product.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
These off-cuts, sometimes referred to as trimmings, may or may not have some culinary
use.
Slicing refers to cutting raw meats into steaks, chops and escalopes.
It also refers to cutting cooked meats and smallgoods into an appropriate presentation
slices for use in sandwiches, canapés, salads, appetizers or entrees:

When slicing meat always cut across the grain.
Mincing is the process by which meat is trimmed of
all sinew, cut into manageable pieces, passed
through a mincing machine or a mincing attachment
fitted to a commercial mixing machine:

Course or fine holed disks can be fitted to the
mincer.

Meat for mincing is often the off-cuts left over from
trimming meat.
Warning: When fitting mincer attachments to mixing machines, make sure you have
followed the manufacturer’s procedures correctly.
If unsure about how to operate the mixing machine correctly, refer to the manufacturer’s
“Safe Operating Procedures”.
Using the trimmings of meat
The following are culinary uses for common off-cuts obtained when trimming meats :
Bones and sinew:
Can be used to make stocks, soups and sauces.
Extra flavour is achieved when roasted in oven before being
placed into water
Fat:
Can be rendered to produce lard (pork fat) or dripping (beef
fat), which are used for shallow frying or basting during the
roasting process
This is not necessarily cost effective in the modern kitchen.
Good quality lard and dripping is available from suppliers
Large meat trims
Can be sliced for stir fry; diced for casseroles; minced for
burgers or bolognaise sauce; meatballs fillings for samosas
Try these websites for cuts of meat:

http://www.beeflambnz.co.nz/documents/resource-todayslambcuts.pdf

http://www.beeflambnz.co.nz/resources/Reference_Guide.pdf.
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45
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Portioning meat
Meat portions are derived from primary cuts from a carcass of meat:

Beef

Lamb

Goat

Buffalo.
All these animals have one thing in common. They
are all basically the same shape. They are different
size but same shape.
4 legs, body, neck head.
Muscle structure is the same; size is different.
Tenderness of the meat will depend on breed of each type of animal.
Animal carcasses are broken to halves; from the halves they will be broken down or cut
into smaller, more manageable pieces.
Rear leg portions of Lamb and Goat are small so consumers are able to purchase whole
leg the take and cook:

These are not good restaurant cuts as they do not yield single portions

The loin or the centre of the animal can be divided into rib loin and mid lion

The rib loin will have the full bone of the rib cage attached

The mid loin will have the smaller bones from the end of the ribcage and then no bone

The diagrams on the following pages will show break down for different animals.
Restaurant cuts
Restaurant cuts are the smaller portions that are cut from the small carcass sections.
Lamb midloin will have nine rib bones.
That will yield 2 racks of four to five points.
or
9 lamb cutlets.
How the enterprise wants the carcass broken down into
smaller portions will be decided by the chef.
Modern premises may ask the butcher to do this
breakdown for them.
Cooks need to clean up any excess matter to make the piece look neat and tidy.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Beef cuts
A side of is beef divided into 2 Primary cuts (forequarter and hindquarter) then each one
is further divided into Secondary cuts and then into Restaurant cuts.
This diagram and table, shows the main muscles used in the industry.
Secondary Cuts
Restaurant Cuts
1
Shin
Osso bucco - diced
2
Topside (silverside and girello behind)
Escalloped pieces – mince – diced – whole roast
3
Round (knuckle)
Whole roast – diced
4
Rump
Rump Steak – main eye muscle roast
5
Tenderloin (fillet)
Eye fillet - tournedos – medallions – strips – tartare –
minute steak – chateaubriand
6
Sirloin/strip loin
Sirloin Steak – t-bone – porterhouse – whole roast
7
Rib eye
Scotch fillet – cutlets – rolled – standing rib/rack,
Rib eye steak
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47
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Pork cuts
A side of pork is divided into 2 Primary cuts (forequarter and hindquarter) then each one
is further divided into Secondary cuts and then into Restaurant cuts, as the table below
indicates.
Secondary Cuts
Restaurant Cuts
1
Trotter (hindquarter and forequarter)
Boned and farced
2
Hock (hindquarter and forequarter)
Boned - smoked
3
Leg
Whole boned – topside escalope – round –
silverside – dice – mince
4
Rump
Steak – chop – dice – stir fry strips – mince
5
Tenderloin (fillet)
Fillet – medallion – butterfly steak
6
Mid loin
Rolled – chops – steak
7
Rib loin
Cutlet – rolled loin – rack
8
Spring
Spare ribs – rolled – diced
9
Foreloin (shoulder)
Whole boned - chops - diced - pork scotch mince
10 Neck
48
Whole boned – escalopes – diced
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Lamb cuts
A side of lamb is usually divided into 3 Primary cuts (forequarter, loin and long leg) then
each one is further divided into Secondary cuts and then into Restaurant cuts, as the
table below indicates.
(Note: a Hindquarter of lamb is also available when the loin and long leg are intact.)
Secondary Cuts
Restaurant Cuts
1
Shank (hindquarter and forequarter)
Frenched shank
2
Short leg
Whole boned – topside – round – silverside
3
Chump
Chump – chops
4
Tenderloin (fillet)
Fillet
5
Short loin (mid loin)
Rolled loin – chops – eye denuded – rosettes
6
Rack (rib loin)
Racks – cutlets – chops
7
Breast
Epigrams – diced, mince
8
Neck
Diced – chops- mince
9
Square cut shoulder
Boned rolled – diced – chops – mince
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49
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.2 Perform mise-en-place tasks with seafood
Cleaning, Trimming and Preparing Fish and Shellfish
Fish
The majority of hotels, restaurants and other catering outlets will purchase fish which has
been either partially or totally cleaned. Fish can be purchased whole – i.e. just scaled and
gutted; or filleted and skinned.
However it is an important skill to have to be able to clean and prepare fish from the sea
or river, for the plate.
Once a fish has been caught, removed from its natural environment and is being
transported to market, its quality is already beginning to deteriorate. It is important to gut
fish as soon as possible.
Filleting fish can be applied to both ROUND fish and
FLAT fish:

Round fish yield two fillets

Flat fish yield four fillets.
To fillet a round fish

Use a sharp knife

Lay the fish on its side and make an incision behind
its gills, angled into the back of the head

Cut along the backbone on the upper side of the
dorsal fin, from head to tail

Carefully remove the fillet from the bone

Turn the fish over and repeat to remove the other fillet

Any ribcage bones can be removed by laying the fillet, skin side down, on a board

Using your sharp knife, carefully remove the bones from the flesh, by cutting between
the flesh and bones.
Other bones throughout the flesh can be removed using fish tweezers.
Removal of skin

If required, the skin can be removed from the fillets. Lay your fillet on your cutting
board with skin side down and the tail nearest you

Carefully make an incision between the skin and fillet, taking care not to cut through
the skin, the knife should be parallel to the board to prevent this

Carefully work the blade of your knife back and forth between the skin and fillet,
pushing and cutting towards the head end of the fillet, and pulling the skin towards
yourself.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Shellfish
All shellfish are delicate and should be handled with care:

Shellfish should be fresh and smell like the sea

Colours should be bright and appropriate

They should look moist and not be slimy

Shellfish like mussels, oysters, scallops should be
served free of grit, sand and broken shell pieces

Shellfish like prawns, yabbies, crayfish should have
all required shell removed and the intestinal tract
removed

Additional information on cleaning, preparing and
suitable cookery methods is given in subsequent
modules.
Fish and shellfish storage
Fish have a short shelf life due to the rapid deterioration of their flesh after they are
caught.
Fish should always be stored in a fish fridge if possible, or in a special section of the cool
room (The coolest part), close to 0° as possible:

Fresh fish should be stored for one or two days only

Should be kept in the coldest part of the cool room

At a temperature of 0°C – 1°C.
Very few refrigerators can achieve such a low temperature, so it is usually necessary to
store fish on crushed ice, taking note of the following:

Cleaned fish, fillets and cutlets should be kept on crushed ice on a perforated tray, set
into another tray to allow for drainage

It is best to have a layer of plastic between the fish and ice

Un-gutted fish should be scaled, gutted and washed thoroughly, then stored as above.
Live fish can be kept for short periods of time in fresh or salt water tanks. The tanks and
water should always be kept in the best condition:

Shellfish should be stored at 1°C.
Live crayfish, crabs, yabbies and such can be kept in a refrigerator in a box covered with
wet hessian, or they may be kept in tanks.
Fresh (not live) and cooked shellfish can be kept for a couple of days – on ice, in a
perforated trays and covered.
Remember: raw and cooked foods should NEVER be stored together.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Freezing fish and shellfish
As the saying goes – ‘frozen fish and shellfish are never as good as fresh’.
However if they must be frozen, the following guidelines should be observed:

They should be stored at -18°C and -24°C

Whole fish, fillets and cutlets should be wrapped well in plastic, excluding as much air
as possible – or vacuum packed

Fish fillets and cutlets can also be frozen in layers inter leaved with plastic

Lobsters, crabs, yabbies and such, can be frozen cooked or raw – wrapped well in
plastic, excluding as much air as possible – or vacuum packed

All frozen items must be labelled and dated.
Portioning seafood
Fish can be portioned into the following cuts:
Fillet
If the fillets are large then they can be cut into the
following cuts.
Supremes
A portion of the whole fillet.
Goujon
Strips of fillet.
Goujonette
Smaller strips of fish flesh.
Darne or cutlet
This is a piece of a round fish cut from the whole body, includes the bones.
A portion of fillet will be on both sides.
Whole fish
Farmed fish that are harvested while still at ‘baby stage’ may be used for whole fish;
single serve.
This is how enterprises are able to offer plate size; single portion serves of whole fish.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Shellfish
Shell fish are normally served in shell so portioning is normally determined by the size of
the shells.
Some shellfish may need to be prepared before serving.
Oysters
If oysters come un-opened then they will need to be
prepared before serving to customers.
Oysters are flat one side and round on the other:

Hold the oyster so the flat side is facing up

Take a short bladed oyster knife and lever between
the two shell parts

Some people lever into the hinge down at the bottom
of the shell while others lever in on the side

The object is to break the muscle that is holding it closed.
Care needs to be taken not to break up too much of the
shell as it will become gritty in the juice inside the oyster.
Some people like to save the juice for flavour while
others rinse it out to get rid of any grit.
Some people will cut the oyster from the shell and turned
over for better presentation.
Abalone
Abalone has only about a 35% yield.
http://www.diver.net/seahunt/abalone/abalone.htm
Is a website showing how to clean abalone along with
useful recipes.
Scallops
If purchased live in the shell they are opened in similar
manner to oysters.
Care needs to be taken not to break the shell.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
54
Crustacean
Cephalopods
s
s
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Molluscs
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.3 Perform mise-en-place tasks with poultry
Cleaning poultry
Today poultry can be bought in many different ways.
It is readily available:

Pre-portioned

Cut into specific cuts

Marinated

On skewers.
However it is necessary for chefs to know how to clean and trim poultry correctly.
Chicken is portioned into different cuts depending on the requirements of the cooking
method and the menu item.
Mincing is the process by which poultry is trimmed of all sinew, then cut into manageable
pieces and freed of any bone.
The meat is then passed through a mincing machine or a mincing attachment fitted to a
commercial mixing machine. Course or fine whole disks can be fitted to the mincer.
Warning: When fitting mincer attachments to mixing machines, make sure you have
followed the manufacturer’s procedures correctly.
Before switching on, check that the securing nut is firmly in place. If unsure about how to
operate the mixing machine correctly, refer to the manufacturer’s “Safe Operating
Procedures”.
Poultry purchasing unit
When purchasing or ordering, poultry is ordered by the weight of the bird.
The size increases in 0.100 Kg steps:

A size 12 bird weighs 1.200 Kg

A size 24 bird weighs 2.400 Kg

A size 9 bird weighs 0.900 Kg
Student Activity
Students need to find industry standards for standardising sizes in each country or
marketplace. Is there a standard?
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55
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Storing poultry
When purchased fresh poultry will be delivered in containers from the supplier.

How is poultry products delivered to you in your establishment?
When receiving poultry into storage, these poultry items need to be placed into storage
containers that will not allow any excess water to contaminate the other produce in the
storage area:

Fresh poultry should be stored in bags that they are delivered in until required

Poultry should then be place in a refrigerator, where it can be kept for approximately
3 days

Storage temperature needs to be less than 5°C, closer to 2°C is best for poultry.
Check containers daily for signs of damage.
Freezing poultry
When freezing poultry, ensure that each piece is
individually and well wrapped or vacuum packed:

Store in freezer until required at a temperature of (18°C and - 24°C ) for no longer than 3 months

Never freeze poultry in bulk

Spread out to freeze and when frozen, store freezer
boxes or crates.
When any food item is thawed for use, it should NOT be re-frozen.
Cutting poultry into portions

Legs:

Drumsticks

Thighs.
Thighs can with ‘bone in’ or ‘bone out’; whole legs can
be boned out for ballotines:

Wings:

Drumettes, these are the first wing bone that
has been ‘Frenched’ for finger foods

Fillets

Supremes

Tenderloins.
‘Supreme’ is the chicken fillet with tenderloin and first wing bone still attached.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Poultry chart
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.4 Perform mise-en-place tasks with game
Storing meat
Raw meats are favourable mediums for bacterial growth, if they are not stored and
handled correctly.
There are two main conditions to be met when storing meat. They are:

Temperature 1 to 3C

Humidity 85 %.
Other factors to be considered are:

Place meat in single layers on trays – fat side up

Trays must be changed regularly to prevent blood
pooling

Meat must be covered with plastic wrap

Different types of meat should not be mixed

Raw and cooked meats should NEVER be spread on the same tray

A sound stock rotation program should be maintained.
Freezing meat
Fresh meats can be frozen successfully and stored for between three and six months
depending on the type of meat and provided it is kept between (-18°C and -24°C ).
Fluctuations in temperature will cause loss in quantity and decrease in the shelf life of the
meat.
When freezing meats:

Never freeze large quantities stacked on top of each other

Boneless meat freezes quickest

Thicker cuts of meat take longer to freeze

Excess fat cover slows freezing

Guard against freezer burn by looking after frozen
meats and using sound stock rotation

Freeze in strong bags, eliminating as much air as
possible from the bags

Label and date all items to be frozen

Thaw frozen meats in the refrigerator at 1ºC – 3°C.
Freezing meat which is spoiling is not a method of improving its quality.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Cleaning meat
Basic preparation of all meat whether beef, veal, lamb or pork, will include some cleaning
and trimming of excess fat cover, lymph nodes, connective tissue and blood vessels.
Cleaning meat should be performed with a suitably sized, sharp knife.
The skill required is in the ability to remove the undesired pieces, while retaining as
much ‘saleable meat’ as possible.
Trimming is the cutting of meat to a certain required
shape and size:

Trimming meat gives it a more appealing
presentation.
This can be achieved by trimming the fat coverage
down to a required thickness, or by trimming bones
on cutlets to a certain length.
Trimming is performed in most kitchens on a daily basis, and there are always a number
of off-cuts obtained as a by-product.
These off-cuts, sometimes referred to as trimmings, may or may not have some culinary
use.
Slicing refers to cutting raw meats into steaks, chops and escalopes. It also refers to
cutting cooked meats and small goods into appropriate presentation slices for use in
sandwiches, canapés, salads, appetizers or entrees.
When slicing meat always cut across the grain.
Mincing is the process by which meat is trimmed of all sinew, then, cut into manageable
pieces, passed through a mincing machine or a mincing attachment fitted to a commercial
mixing machine. Course or fine-hole discs can be fitted to the mincer. Meat for mincing is
often the off-cuts left over from trimming meat.
Warning: When fitting mincer attachments to mixing machines, make sure you have
followed the manufacturer’s procedures correctly. Before switching on, check that the
securing nut is firmly in place. If unsure about how to operate the mixing machine
correctly, refer to the manufacturer’s “Safe Operating Procedures”.
Mincing is an excellent use of off-cuts but it needs to contain a certain amount of fat to
add moisture and flavour. If you do not add some fat it will dry very quickly and be tough
in the mouth feel.
Student Activity
Students need to find industry standards for standard sizes in each country or
marketplace.
Is there a standard?
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Game
Game is classified as a wild animal or bird that is hunted in the wild for human
consumption.
Game meats and game birds is a more accurate description. The game meats come from
animals with hooves and fur.
Game birds have feathers the meat tends to be darker than poultry birds like chicken.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Work Projects
It is a requirement of this Unit you complete Work Projects as advised by your Trainer.
You must submit documentation, suitable evidence or other relevant proof of completion
of the project to your Trainer by the date agreed.
Students will need to work with their Trainer to decide exactly what mise-en-place will
need to take place.
This unit can be assessed in conjunction with Apply basic techniques of commercial
cookery D1.HCC.CL2.01.
The selected recipes will have to be followed to produce the required dishes.
When the recipes have been decided the students will have complete the following points;
3.1 Mise-en-place with meat:

Clean the meat and then portion and slice as required

Place onto clean tray and cover and store in controlled environment until needed
Label before storing.
3.2. Mise-en-place seafood:

Clean the seafood and portion as required

Place onto clean tray and cover and store in controlled environment until needed
Label before storing.
3.3. Mise-en-place poultry:

Clean the poultry and portion as required

Place onto clean tray and cover and store in controlled environment until needed

Label before storing.
3.4. Mise-en-place game:

Clean the game meat and portion as required

Place onto clean tray and cover and store in controlled environment until needed

Label before storing.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Summary
Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Perform mise-en-place tasks with meat

Select required meat or offal and inspect to ensure that it is suitable for human consumption

Clean away any unwanted matter

Slice, chop, mincemeat as required

Place onto a clean food grade storage container, cover with plastic wrap to protect from
contamination from other food sources or foreign objects

Label with:


Name of the product

Preparation date

Use by date

Name of person preparing product
Place into controlled storage atmosphere; chilled to below 5°C.
Perform mise-en-place tasks with seafood

Select required fish or shellfish and inspect to ensure that it is suitable for human consumption

Clean away any unwanted matter like scales from fish and barnacles form mussels. Ensure
that inside of fish is free from any gut material

Slice, chop, portion or mince flesh of fish as required and count numbers of oysters to be sure
of numbers required

Place onto a clean food grade storage container, cover with plastic wrap to protect from
contamination from other food sources or foreign objects

Label with:


Name of the product

Preparation date

Use by date

Name of person preparing product
Place into controlled storage atmosphere; chilled to below 5°C.
Perform mise-en-place tasks with poultry

Select required meat or offal product and inspect to ensure that it is suitable for human
consumption

Clean away any unwanted matter

Slice, chop, mincemeat as required

Place onto a clean food grade storage container, cover with plastic wrap to protect from
contamination from other food sources or foreign objects

Label with:


Name of the product

Preparation date

Use by date

Name of person preparing product
Place into controlled storage atmosphere; chilled to below 5°C.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
Perform mise-en-place tasks with game

Select required meat and inspect to ensure that it is suitable for human consumption

Clean away any unwanted matter

Slice, chop, mincemeat as required

Place onto a clean food grade storage container, cover with plastic wrap to protect from
contamination from other food sources or foreign objects

Label with:


Name of the product

Preparation date

Use by date

Name of person preparing product
Place into controlled storage atmosphere; chilled to below 5°C.
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Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
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Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Appendix – basic recipe for mise-enplace
Julienne carrot
Ingredients
80 gm
Carrot
Method

Wash and peel carrot, remove the top and tail

Cut into 4 cm lengths

Cut into 2 mm slices, then into 2 mm sticks.
Brunoise carrot
Ingredients
80 gm
Carrot
Method

Wash and peel carrot, remove the top and tail

Cut into 4 cm lengths

Cut into 2 mm slices, then into 2 mm sticks, then into 2 mm dice.
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65
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Segment orange and grapefruit
Ingredients
1
Orange
1
Grapefruit
Method

Cut the top and bottom off the orange to expose the flesh

Remove all the skin and pith from the sides of the orange taking care not to remove
too much of the flesh

Cut between each membrane of the orange to remove the segments

Each segment should have no pith, membrane or pips

Follow the same procedure for the grapefruit.
Chiffonade
Ingredients
3 lettuce leaves
Method

Wash lettuce leaves and dry well

Roll up leaves and shred into thin slices.
Mirepoix
Ingredients
30 gm
Carrot
30 gm
Onion
30 gm
Celery
Method

Peel onion, wash celery, wash and peel carrot

Rough cut into similar size pieces

Precision of cuts will be determined by it use, e.g.: stock, base for casserole etc.
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Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Slice and dice onion
Ingredients
1
Onion
Method

Peel onion and cut in half vertically

Slice the half onion thinly from top to bottom of the onion

Slice the other half of the onion thinly from top to bottom without cutting all the way
through at the root end

Cut twice horizontally then slice thinly across the onion towards the root end to a fine
dice.
Tomato concasse raw
Ingredients
1
Tomato
Method 1

Bring a pot of water to the boil

Core and score the tomato

Blanch by putting into boiling water for a few minutes

Refresh by removing from boiling water and placing into cold water

Allow to cool then remove from water

Peel tomato, cut in half through the equator and remove seeds

Cut into 1cm dice.
Method 2

Divide the tomato into segments, 4 or 6 depending on the size

Cut the seeds from the centre

Lay the tomato flat on your board, skin side down

Cut the flesh from the skin by

Dice into 1 cm pieces.
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Organise and prepare food products and services
67
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Tomato concasse cooked
Ingredients
1
15 gm
1 tsp
to taste
Raw tomato concasse; from one tomato
Onion, fine diced
Oil
Salt and pepper
Method

Add onion into the warm oil and sweat on, add the raw concasse

Add salt and pepper and cook gently until the juice has evaporated

Served on a plate no oil or juice should leak on to the plate.
Turned potato
Ingredients
1
Potato
Method

Wash and peel potato

Cut into 5 cm lengths

Turn into barrel shape,

2 per portion.
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© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Crushed garlic
Ingredients
3 cloves
Garlic
Method

Peel the cloves of garlic

Lightly chop into smaller pieces

Using the flat edge of the knife flatten the cloves of garlic to a smooth paste.
Grated ginger
Ingredients
20 gm
Ginger
Method

Cover the fine grating side of a box grater with Glad Wrap

Peel the ginger and grate on top of the Glad Wrap

Remove the pulp without the fibre.
Clarified butter
Ingredients
125 gm
Butter
Method

Melt butter in a bain-marie over low heat. Do not boil.

Skim any scum from the surface.

Carefully pour of the butter oil into a clean container, leaving the sediment behind.
Note: the sediment is a white milky substance and very salty.
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Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
69
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Croutons
Ingredients
100 ml
Clarified butter (refer to recipe above)
1 slice
Bread
Method

Slice bread to an 1 cm slices

Remove crusts

Cut bread slices into even sized cubes

Heat clarified butter in a sauté pan

Fry bread cubes tossing or turning with a slotted spoon to evenly colour and cook

When croutons are cooked and golden brown, drain and lay out on absorbent paper.
Garlic butter or compound butter
Ingredients
125 gm
Softened butter
2 cloves
Crushed garlic
10 gm
few drops
trace
Chopped parsley
Lemon juice
Salt & pepper
Method

Whip butter until almost white

Mix in other ingredients until they are evenly distributed

Place butter on a sheet of greaseproof paper

Shape the butter with the paper to form a 3cm diameter roll

Tighten the roll by twisting the ends of the grease proof paper

Refrigerate to harden.
Note: Instead of rolling, the flavoured butter may be piped into rosettes before it is
refrigerated or served
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© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Lemon slices
Ingredients
1
Lemons
Method

Cut one lemon in half horizontally

Remove the zest and pith of the lemon. Cut into even slices

Cut strips off the zest of the other half lemon. Cut into even slices.
Lemon wedges
Ingredients
1
Lemon
Method

Cut top and bottom off the lemon

Cut in half vertically. Then cut each half in three vertically

Remove the inner membrane and any pips

Present and reserve for garlic butter recipe.
Mushroom duxelle
Ingredients
5 gm
15 gm
150 gm
butter
onions (finely diced)
mushrooms (finely chopped)
5 gm
parsley (finely chopped)
trace
salt & pepper
Method

Melt butter, add onions and sweat well

Add mushrooms and cook gently until most of the moisture is evaporated

Add parsley and season to taste.
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Organise and prepare food products and services
71
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Chopped parsley
Ingredients
1/4 bunch
Parsley, Curly or Italian
Method

Wash parsley, dry thoroughly

Pick 6 small sprigs of parsley and leave in water to stay crisp

Finely chop remaining parsley, wrap up in a tea towel and wash under running water
until the water runs clear. Squeeze dry and turn out into a container

Present and reserve for garlic butter recipe.
Garnish of julienne vegetables
Ingredients
25 gm
Carrot
Julienne
25 gm
Cucumber Julienne
1/2
Tomato
Julienne
1/2
Red Onion Sliced
3 leaves
Mint
Chiffonade
3 leaves
Basil
Torn
6 leaves
Coriander Picked
Juice
2 Lemon Wedges
Drizzle
Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper to taste
Method

Wash and prepare all vegetables and herbs as per instructors demonstration

Toss vegetables and herbs together gently

Ensure you have presented your lemon wedges to your instructor for feedback

Squeeze lemon wedges over vegetable mix

Add a drizzle of olive oil, season & toss to combine

Place in a small pile on a clean dry plate.
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Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Teriyaki chicken skewers
Ingredients
1
Chicken Thigh
70 ml
Sake
70 ml
Mirin
70 ml
Soy Sauce
2 tsp
Sugar
1tsp
Cornflour
Water to make slurry
Method

Soak Bamboo skewers in cold water

Prepare chicken as per demonstration

Combine sake, mirin, soy sauce and sugar in a pot

Bring to the boil, then simmer until sugar is dissolved

Thicken slightly with corn flour slurry & cool

Marinate skewers for a minimum or 20 minutes

Cook skewers in fry pan or on grill

Serve on a hot clean plate & garnish.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
73
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Crumbed chicken breast
Ingredients
1
100 gm
1/8 Bunch
Good Pinch
20 gm
100 gm
Chicken Breast
Panko Crumbs (Japanese style breadcrumbs)
Continental Parsley Chopped
Cracked Black Pepper
Grated Parmesan Cheese
Seasoned Flour
1
Egg
50 ml
Milk
20 ml
Oil
Method

Clean, trim and flatten chicken breast to an even thickness as necessary.

Organise and prepare the crumbing set of seasoned flour, egg/milk mix and
breadcrumbs

Mix Panko crumbs, parsley, pepper and parmesan place in a small flat try

Place seasoned flour in small flat tray

Mix egg and milk together

Dip chicken breast into seasoned flour then into an egg wash solution

Then place chicken into your breadcrumbs mixture and coat liberally

Cover label and place in fridge for ten minutes

Heat oil in a fry pan

Fry Chicken golden brown, turning once only

Drain on absorbent paper and serve immediately.
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© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Lemon ginger marinated chicken drumstick
Ingredients
1
Chicken Drumstick
1
Garlic Clove (finely chopped)
1/2 tsp
Ginger (finely chopped)
20 ml
Olive Oil
20 ml
Lemon Juice
1/4 tsp
Dried Chilli
1/4 tsp
Paprika
2 tsp
Parsley (finely chopped)
Salt & Pepper
Method:

Mix garlic, ginger, parsley, oil, lemon juice, chilli and paprika

Slash chicken drumstick to the bone 2 or 3 times

Place drumstick in marinade and leave for 2 hours

Place chicken on wire rack, over a baking dish

Cook in a preheated oven at 180°C for approximately 15 minutes

Baste the drumstick with excess marinade frequently

Make sure you do not baste with marinade once it comes out of the oven, prior to
serving (food safety!)

Serve on a hot clean plate and garnish.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
75
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Apple fritters
Ingredients
100 gm
5 gm
½
5 gm
100 ml
10 ml
Flour
Sugar
Egg
Yeast
Water (warm 37°C)
Oil
10 gm
Sugar
1
Apple
10 ml
Lemon juice
pinch
Cinnamon
10 gm
Castor Sugar
Method

Mix yeast and 5g of sugar with warm water

Lightly beat an egg in a bowl, pour half into the yeast mixture, add oil

Sift flour into a bowl and make a well in the centre.

Pour in the yeast-egg-oil mixture and mix to a smooth batter

Cover and leave to prove for 1 hour

Peel and core the apple, then slice to .5 cm to 1 cm thick. Coat with lemon juice

Dry apple, dust with flour, dip in the batter, let the excess drain off

Deep fry at 180C until golden brown

Drain on paper towel, then toss in cinnamon sugar, serve hot.
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© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Onion rings
Ingredients
1
Onion
100 gm
Bread Crumbs
100 gm
Seasoned Flour
1
50 ml
Eggs
Milk
Method

Peel onion, ensuring it remains whole

Slice the onion across the equator to form rings, about 0.5 cm thick

Push the rings apart to form individual rings.
Coating

For crumbed onion rings, dip some floured rings into an egg wash solution

Then place them into your fine breadcrumbs and coat liberally

Now place into deep fryer and cook until golden brown, ensure they remain separate

Drain well on absorbent paper and serve hot garnished.
Marinade (Asian style)
Ingredients
100 ml
soya sauce
60 ml
Chinese rice wine
3 gm
sambal oelek
20 ml
honey
10 ml
sesame oil
3 gm
garlic paste
3 gm
ginger (fresh)
pinch
5 spice powder
Method

Mix all ingredients together

Taste with a spoon and ensure a balance of flavours, adjust if necessary

This marinade is suitable for chicken wings and meat cut into strips.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
77
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Vinaigrette
Ingredients
100 ml
Oil
30 ml
Vinegar
trace
Salt & pepper
Method

Place the vinegar in a stainless steel bowl then add salt and pepper

Whisk gradually, beating in the oil to form an emulsion.
Mayonnaise
Ingredients
2
5 ml
Egg yolks
Vinegar
5 gm
Dijon mustard
trace
Salt
trace
White pepper
250 ml
10 ml
Oil
Hot water
Method

Place the egg yolks, vinegar and seasoning in a stainless steel bowl and whisk well.
Gradually add oil very slowly, whisking continuously until all the oil is incorporated

Whisk in the hot water to stabilize the mayonnaise

Correct the seasoning and acidity with lemon juice.
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© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Chantilly cream
Ingredients
150 ml
Cream
15 gm
Castor Sugar
Few drops
Vanilla Essence
Method

Place ingredients into a bowl

Whisk until the cream is thick and remains in the whisk

Refrigerate until required.
Fresh breadcrumbs
Ingredients
¼
Loaf of white bread
Method

Remove crusts and cut into cubes

Place in a food processor and process

Store until needed

Storage for more than extended periods should be in a controlled atmosphere due to
mould growth.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
79
Appendix – Basic recipe for mise-en-place
Chicken wings
Ingredients
(4 wings to prepare)
4 pieces Chicken wings:
pinch
Chilli powder
pinch
Ginger powder
pinch
Sugar
1 tsp
Soy sauce
Method

Take wings from fridge and note and record the temp (around 2-4°C). Take out only 2
at one time

Remove wing tips, then remove the fine bone from the wing

Cut around the second bone and scrap back the flesh and skin to the other end of the
bone

Once all wings are prepared, show to the teacher to note the temp. (Temperature not
above 15°C)

Higher temp indicates slow work and working in danger zone

Place with marinade in foil dish and Glad Wrap and refrigerate

After 1 hour place the foil dish without Glad Wrap in preheated oven at 180°C until
cooked.
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© ASEAN 2013
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Organise and prepare food products and services
Presentation of written work
Presentation of written work
1. Introduction
It is important for students to present carefully prepared written work. Written presentation
in industry must be professional in appearance and accurate in content. If students
develop good writing skills whilst studying, they are able to easily transfer those skills to
the workplace.
2. Style
Students should write in a style that is simple and concise. Short sentences
and paragraphs are easier to read and understand. It helps to write a plan
and at least one draft of the written work so that the final product will be
well organized. The points presented will then follow a logical sequence
and be relevant. Students should frequently refer to the question asked, to
keep ‘on track’. Teachers recognize and are critical of work that does not
answer the question, or is ‘padded’ with irrelevant material. In summary,
remember to:

Plan ahead

Be clear and concise

Answer the question

Proofread the final draft.
3. Presenting Written Work
Types of written work
Students may be asked to write:

Short and long reports

Essays

Records of interviews

Questionnaires

Business letters

Resumes.
Format
All written work should be presented on A4 paper, single-sided with a left-hand margin. If
work is word-processed, one-and-a-half or double spacing should be used. Handwritten
work must be legible and should also be well spaced to allow for ease of reading. New
paragraphs should not be indented but should be separated by a space. Pages must be
numbered. If headings are also to be numbered, students should use a logical and
sequential system of numbering.
© ASEAN 2013
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81
Presentation of written work
Cover Sheet
All written work should be submitted with a cover sheet stapled to the front that contains:

The student’s name and student number

The name of the class/unit

The due date of the work

The title of the work

The teacher’s name

A signed declaration that the work does not involve plagiarism.
Keeping a Copy
Students must keep a copy of the written work in case it is lost. This rarely happens but it
can be disastrous if a copy has not been kept.
Inclusive language
This means language that includes every section of the population. For instance, if a
student were to write ‘A nurse is responsible for the patients in her care at all times’ it
would be implying that all nurses are female and would be excluding male nurses.
Examples of appropriate language are shown on the right:
Mankind
Humankind
Barman/maid
Bar attendant
Host/hostess
Host
Waiter/waitress
Waiter or waiting staff
82
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Recommended reading
Recommended reading
Australia New Zealand Food Authority 2001, Safe food Australia: a guide to the food
safety standards, [2nd ed.], Australia New Zealand Food Authority, Canberra, A.C.T
Bailey, Adrian & Ortiz, Elisabeth Lambert, 1915-2003 & Dowell, Philip & Radecka,
Helena, 1939- 1980, The book of ingredients, Michael Joseph, London
th
Cersani, Kinton & Foskett; 1995 (8 edition), Practical Cookery; Hodder and Stoughton
B001KDSJH2
1861528736
Cracknell.H,
Kaufmann.R; 2009 (3rd edition); Practical
Professional Cookery; Cengage Learning
Dark .Graham, McLean. Deirdre & Weatherhead. Sarah; 2011 (2nd edition); Kitchen
Operations 2nd Ed, Pearson Australia
Dodgshun. Graham,Peters.M; 2012 (6th edition);Cookery for the Hospitality Industry;
Cambridge University Press
Draz, John & Koetke, Christopher 2014, The culinary professional, Second edition, Tinley
Park, Illinois The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc
nd
Graham Dark, Deirdre McLean & Sarah Weatherhead 2011; Kitchen Operations 2 Ed;
Published by Pearson Australia
H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufman, Revised Third Edition, 1999; Practical Professional
Cookery; Published by The Macmillan Press Ltd, UK
Harold Magee, 2004; Magee on Food and Cooking; Published by Hodder and Stoughton,
United Kingdom
McLean.D,Satori.l, Walsh C&S; 2004;The Professional Cook’s book: Commercial
Cookery; Tertiary Press
Knechtges, Paul L; 2012; Food safety: theory and practice; Jones & Bartlett Learning
Pulle, Mervyn; 2003; Food hazards: factors that affect food safety; Knowledge Books and
Software
Shirley Cameron, Suzanne Russell; Cookery the Australian Way, 7th ed. 2006; Macmillan
Education Australia
The Culinary Institute of America (CIA); 2011 (9th edition); The Professional Chef; Wiley
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
83
Recommended reading
84
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Trainee evaluation sheet
Trainee evaluation sheet
Organise and prepare food products and services
The following statements are about the competency you have just completed.
Please tick the appropriate box
Agree
Don’t
Know
Do Not
Agree
Does Not
Apply
There was too much in this competency to
cover without rushing.
Most of the competency seemed relevant to
me.
The competency was at the right level for me.
I got enough help from my trainer.
The amount of activities was sufficient.
The competency allowed me to use my own
initiative.
My training was well-organized.
My trainer had time to answer my questions.
I understood how I was going to be assessed.
I was given enough time to practice.
My trainer feedback was useful.
Enough equipment was available and it
worked well.
The activities were too hard for me.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
85
Trainee evaluation sheet
The best things about this unit were:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
The worst things about this unit were:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
The things you should change in this unit are:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
86
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
Trainee Self-Assessment Checklist
Trainee Self-Assessment Checklist
As an indicator to your Trainer/Assessor of your readiness for assessment in this unit
please complete the following and hand to your Trainer/Assessor.
Organise and prepare food products and services
Yes
No*
Element 1: Organise and prepare equipment and utensils for use
1.1
Identify equipment and utensils that may be used in mise-en-place tasks
1.2
Select and assemble the equipment and utensils for required mise-enplace tasks
1.3
Use equipment and utensils to perform mise-en-place tasks
Element 2: Organise and prepare ingredients for mise-en-place tasks
2.1
Identify ingredients that may be used for mise-en-place tasks
2.2
Select and assemble the ingredients for required mise-en-place tasks
2.3
Prepare ingredients in accordance with identified need
Element 3: Prepare meat, seafood and poultry
3.1
Perform mise-en-place tasks with meat
3.2
Perform mise-en-place tasks with seafood
3.3
Perform mise-en-place tasks with poultry
3.4
Perform mise-en-place tasks with game
Statement by Trainee:
I believe I am ready to be assessed on the following as indicated above:
Signed:
_____________________________
Date:
______ / ______ / ______
Note:
For all boxes where a No* is ticked, please provide details of the extra steps or work you
need to do to become ready for assessment.
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
87
Trainee Self-Assessment Checklist
88
© ASEAN 2013
Trainee Manual
Organise and prepare food products and services
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