HF27 Technical Manual - AMADA MIYACHI AMERICA
USER'S MANUAL
Revision F
990-370
November 2014
HF27
25kHz HIGH FREQUENCY
DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
MODEL NUMBER
STOCK NUMBER
HF27/240
1-320-01
HF27/400
1-320-01-01
HF27/480
1-320-01-02
Copyright © 1998 -- 2014 Amada Miyachi America
The engineering designs, drawings and data contained herein are the
proprietary work of Amada Miyachi America and may not be reproduced,
copied, exhibited or otherwise used without the written authorization of
Amada Miyachi America.
Printed in the United States of America.
Revision Record
Revision
EO
Date
Basis of Revision
A
20294
03/05
None. Original edition.
B
21590
09/07
Weld Status Codes added to Appendix E, Communications.
C
34461
12/09
Updated technical information & specifications.
D
42009
7/12
Updated communication codes.
E
42840
10/13
Updated to Miyachi America name and logo.
F
43480
11/14
Updated to Amada Miyachi America name and logo.
Important Note
The HF27 contains advanced technology and improved features, yet from an
operational standpoint, it performs the same as older Miyachi Unitek Controls. See
Appendix H, Compatibility and Comparison for an overview of the differences
between the new and old models.
This manual describes HF27 Models 1-320-01, 1-320-01-01, 1-320-01-02
manufactured after June 2005 which contain significant differences than older
models.
HF27 models 1-287-01, 1-287-01-01, and 1-287-01-02 manufactured before June
2005 require a different manual. To get User’s Manual 990-335 for older HF27
models, order a copy using the phone number or e-mail address listed under
Contact Us on page ix of this section.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
ii
990-370
CONTENTS
Page
Revision Record ........................................................................................................................................ ii
Contact Us
....................................................................................................................................... ix
Safety Notes
.........................................................................................................................................x
Declaration Of Conformity ....................................................................................................................... xi
Chapter 1. Description
Section I: Features .................................................................................................................................. 1-1
Control Features ............................................................................................................................... 1-1
Weld Quality Process Tools ............................................................................................................ 1-1
Section II: Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1-2
Section III: Major Components ............................................................................................................. 1-4
Major Components .......................................................................................................................... 1-4
Front Panel Display and Display Controls ...................................................................................... 1-4
Display ..................................................................................................................................... 1-5
Display Controls ....................................................................................................................... 1-6
SCHEDULE Key ................................................................................................................. 1-6
Weld Period Selector Keys ............................................................................................... 1-6
Time/Energy Selector Keys .............................................................................................. 1-6
Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Keys .......................................................................................... 1-7
Key Pad .................................................................................................................................... 1-7
Mode Keys ................................................................................................................................ 1-7
RUN Key ............................................................................................................................ 1-7
MENU Key ......................................................................................................................... 1-7
Control Keys .................................................................................................................................... 1-7
Control Mode Selection Keys .................................................................................................. 1-8
kA Key ............................................................................................................................... 1-8
V Key ................................................................................................................................. 1-8
kW Key .............................................................................................................................. 1-8
COMBO Key ....................................................................................................................... 1-8
Monitor Keys ............................................................................................................................ 1-8
kA Key ............................................................................................................................... 1-8
V Key ................................................................................................................................. 1-9
kW Key .............................................................................................................................. 1-9
ȍ Key ................................................................................................................................. 1-9
ZERO Key .......................................................................................................................... 1-9
CAL Key ............................................................................................................................. 1-9
FORCE Key ........................................................................................................................ 1-9
DISTANCE Key .................................................................................................................. 1-9
ENVELOPE Key ................................................................................................................. 1-9
TIME Key ......................................................................................................................... 1-10
ENERGY Key ................................................................................................................... 1-10
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
iii
CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
WELD/NO WELD Switch .......................................................................................................... 1-10
Emergency Stop Switch Operation ................................................................................................ 1-10
Section III. LVDT Capability .............................................................................................................. 1-11
Chapter 2. Installation and Setup
Section I: Installation ............................................................................................................................. 2-1
Unpacking ..................................................................................................................................... 2-1
Space Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 2-1
Utilities
..................................................................................................................................... 2-2
Power ..................................................................................................................................... 2-2
Compressed Air and Cooling Water ......................................................................................... 2-2
Section II: Setup ..................................................................................................................................... 2-3
Connections to External Equipment ................................................................................................ 2-3
Rear Panel Components and Connectors ......................................................................................... 2-3
Weld Head Connections .................................................................................................................. 2-4
Foot Pedal-Actuated Weld Head Connection .................................................................................. 2-6
EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ..................................................................................................... 2-7
Non-EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ........................................................................................... 2-10
Chapter 3. System Configuration
Section I: Getting Started ....................................................................................................................... 3-1
Before You Start .............................................................................................................................. 3-1
Startup
..................................................................................................................................... 3-1
Section II: Menus ................................................................................................................................... 3-3
Overview
..................................................................................................................................... 3-3
Main Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 3-3
1. Setup .................................................................................................................................... 3-3
2. Weld Counter ....................................................................................................................... 3-4
3. Copy A Schedule ................................................................................................................. 3-5
4. Prop Valve (Proportional Valve) ......................................................................................... 3-5
1. Force Output ................................................................................................................. 3-5
2. Force Units ................................................................................................................... 3-5
3. Soft Touch Pressure ..................................................................................................... 3-5
4. Soft Touch Time ........................................................................................................... 3-5
5. System Security ................................................................................................................... 3-6
1. Schedule Lock .............................................................................................................. 3-6
2. System Lock ................................................................................................................. 3-6
3. Calibration ................................................................................................................... 3-6
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
iv
990-370
Page
6. Communication ................................................................................................................... 3-7
1. Communication Role .................................................................................................... 3-7
2. Baud Rate ..................................................................................................................... 3-8
3. RS232/485 Select ......................................................................................................... 3-8
4. I.D. Number .................................................................................................................. 3-8
7. Relay .................................................................................................................................... 3-9
8. Reset To Defaults .............................................................................................................. 3-10
1. Reset System Parameters ........................................................................................... 3-11
2. Reset All Schedules .................................................................................................... 3-11
3. Reset Schedule Limits ................................................................................................ 3-12
9. Chain Schedules ................................................................................................................ 3-12
Setup 1 ................................................................................................................................... 3-14
1. Footswitch Weld Abort .............................................................................................. 3-14
2. Switch Debounce Time .............................................................................................. 3-15
3. Firing Switch .............................................................................................................. 3-15
1. Auto ..................................................................................................................... 3-15
2. None .................................................................................................................... 3-15
3. Remote ................................................................................................................ 3-15
Setup 2
................................................................................................................................... 3-16
1. Display Contrast ................................................................................................................ 3-16
2. Buzzer Loudness ............................................................................................................... 3-16
3. End Of Cycle Buzzer ......................................................................................................... 3-16
4. Update Graph After Weld ................................................................................................. 3-16
5. Language ........................................................................................................................... 3-17
Setup 3
................................................................................................................................... 3-17
Do Test Weld .......................................................................................................................... 3-17
Always ......................................................................................................................................................... 3-17
Ask .............................................................................................................................................................. 3-17
Section III. Operational States .............................................................................................................................................. 3-18
No Weld State 3-18
Menu State
.............................................................................................................................................................. 3-18
Test State
.............................................................................................................................................................. 3-18
Run State
Weld State
Monitor State
Alarm State
................................................................................................................................... 3-19
................................................................................................................................... 3-20
3-20
................................................................................................................................... 3-21
Section IV. Weld Functions ................................................................................................................. 3-22
Welding Applications .................................................................................................................... 3-22
Weld Head Applicability ............................................................................................................... 3-23
When To Use Functions ................................................................................................................ 3-23
Weld Schedule Definition .............................................................................................................. 3-24
Weld Sequence Timing .................................................................................................................. 3-24
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
v
CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Welding Applications .................................................................................................................... 3-25
Single-Pulse Weld Profile ...................................................................................................... 3-25
Upslope / Downslope Weld Profile ........................................................................................ 3-26
Dual-Pulse Weld Profile ......................................................................................................... 3-26
Chapter 4. Introduction to Feedback Modes and Monitoring
Section I. Programmable Feedback Modes ........................................................................................... 4-1
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 4-1
Current Mode ................................................................................................................................... 4-1
Voltage Mode .................................................................................................................................. 4-1
Power Mode ..................................................................................................................................... 4-2
Combo Mode ................................................................................................................................... 4-2
Section II. Weld Monitoring .................................................................................................................. 4-3
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 4-3
PEAK and AVERAGE MONITORING .................................................................................................. 4-3
Current, Voltage, Power, and Resistance Limits ............................................................................. 4-4
Force Limits .................................................................................................................................... 4-4
Distance Limits ................................................................................................................................ 4-4
Time Limits ..................................................................................................................................... 4-4
Energy Limits .................................................................................................................................. 4-5
Envelope Limits ............................................................................................................................... 4-5
Process Tools ................................................................................................................................... 4-5
1. Active Part Conditioner (APC) ........................................................................................... 4-5
2. Resistance Set ...................................................................................................................... 4-7
3. Pre-Weld Check ................................................................................................................... 4-8
4. Weld To A Limit ................................................................................................................. 4-9
5. Weld Stop .......................................................................................................................... 4-10
Chapter 5. Operating Instructions
Section I: Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 5-1
Before You Start .............................................................................................................................. 5-1
Pre-Operational Checks ................................................................................................................... 5-1
Connections .............................................................................................................................. 5-1
Power ..................................................................................................................................... 5-1
Compressed Air ........................................................................................................................ 5-1
Initial Setup ..................................................................................................................................... 5-2
Section II. Operation .............................................................................................................................. 5-3
Single-Pulse Weld Schedule ............................................................................................................ 5-3
Upslope/Downslope Weld Schedule ............................................................................................... 5-5
Dual-Pulse Weld Schedule .............................................................................................................. 5-7
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
vi
990-370
Page
Section III. Using the Weld Monitor ..................................................................................................... 5-9
Section IV. Active Part Conditioning .................................................................................................. 5-13
Section IV. Resistance Set ................................................................................................................... 5-15
Section VI. Pre-Weld Check ................................................................................................................ 5-17
Section VII. Weld To A Limit ............................................................................................................. 5-19
Section VIII. Weld Stop ....................................................................................................................... 5-21
Section IX. Energy Monitor ................................................................................................................. 5-19
Section X. Distance Monitor ................................................................................................................ 5-24
Distance Limits .............................................................................................................................. 5-24
Displacement ................................................................................................................................. 5-24
LVDT Main Screen ................................................................................................................ 5-24
Before You Start: Set New Electrodes to “Zero” .................................................................. 5-25
Changing from Inches to Millimeters (MM) .......................................................................... 5-25
High and Low Limits for Initial Thickness ................................................................................... 5-26
High and Low Limits for Displacement ........................................................................................ 5-27
STOP ENERGY AT (Weld to a Specific Displacement) ............................................................. 5-27
Section XI. Force Monitor ................................................................................................................... 5-28
Section XII. Time Limits ...................................................................................................................... 5-29
Section XIII. Envelope Limits .............................................................................................................. 5-30
Section XIV. Programming Relays....................................................................................................... 5-31
Chapter 6. Maintenance
Section I. Introduction ........................................................................................................................... 6-1
General Kinds of Problems .............................................................................................................. 6-1
Alarm Messages ............................................................................................................................... 6-1
Section II. Troubleshooting ................................................................................................................... 6-2
Troubleshooting ............................................................................................................................... 6-2
Alarm Messages ............................................................................................................................... 6-3
Section III. Maintenance ...................................................................................................................... 6-12
Electrode Maintenance .................................................................................................................. 6-12
Parts Replacement ......................................................................................................................... 6-12
Section IV. Repair Service ................................................................................................................... 6-13
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
vii
CONTENTS (Continued)
Page
Appendix A. Technical Specifications ............................................................................................... A-1
Appendix B. Electrical and Data Connections ..................................................................................B-1
Appendix C. Calibration .....................................................................................................................C-1
Appendix D. System Timing .............................................................................................................. D-1
Appendix E. Communications ............................................................................................................ E-1
Appendix F. The Basics of Resistance Welding ................................................................................ F-1
Appendix G. Quality Resistance Welding Solutions: Defining the Optimum Process ................ G-1
Appendix H. Compatibility and Comparison .................................................................................. H-1
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
viii
990-370
CONTACT US
Thank you for purchasing a Miyachi Unitek™ Resistance Welding System Control.
Upon receipt of your equipment, please thoroughly inspect it for shipping damage prior to its
installation. Should there be any damage, please immediately contact the shipping company to file a
claim, and notify us at:
Amada Miyachi America
1820 South Myrtle Avenue
P.O. Box 5033
Monrovia, CA 91017-7133
Telephone: (626) 303-5676
FAX:
(626) 358-8048
e-mail:
[email protected]
The purpose of this manual is to supply operating and maintenance personnel with the information
needed to properly and safely operate and maintain the Miyachi Unitek™ HF25 Resistance Welding
System Control.
We have made every effort to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate and adequate.
Should questions arise, or if you have suggestions for improvement of this manual, please contact us at
the above location/numbers.
Amada Miyachi America is not responsible for any loss due to improper use of this product.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
ix
SAFETY NOTES
DANGER
x
Lethal voltages exist within this unit. Do not perform any maintenance inside
this unit.
x
Never perform any welding operation without wearing protective safety glasses.
This instruction manual describes how to operate, maintain and service the HF25 resistance welding
system control, and provides instructions relating to its safe use. A separate manual provides similar
information for the weld head used in conjunction with the power supply. Procedures described in these
manuals must be performed, as detailed, by qualified and trained personnel.
For safety, and to effectively take advantage of the full capabilities of the weld head and power supply,
please read these instruction manuals before attempting to use them.
Procedures other than those described in these manuals or not performed as prescribed in them, may
expose personnel to electrical, burn, or crushing hazards.
After reading these manuals, retain them for future reference when any questions arise regarding the
proper and safe operation of the power supply.
Please note the following conventions used in this manual:
WARNING: Comments marked this way warn the reader of actions which, if not followed, might
result in immediate death or serious injury.
CAUTION: Comments marked this way warn the reader of actions which, if not followed, might result
in either damage to the equipment, or injury to the individual if subject to long-term exposure to the
indicated hazard.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
x
990-370
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
xi
CHAPTER 1
Description
Section I: Features
The HF27 High Frequency Resistance Welding System Control precisely controls and monitors both
electrical and mechanical weld parameters.
Control Features
Ɣ
Constant Current, Voltage & Power
modes
Ɣ
Monitor Energy and Resistance
Ɣ
Force Control
Ɣ
Monitor Displacement and Force
Weld Quality Process Tools
Ɣ
Envelope Function
Ɣ
Active Part Conditioning
Ɣ
Pre-weld Check
Ɣ
Combo Mode
Ɣ
Weld to Limits
Descriptions of the various control modes and
process tools are located in Chapter 3, System
Configuration, and Chapter 4, Introduction to
Feedback Modes and Weld Monitoring.
Detailed instructions on using these features are
located in Chapter 5, Operating Instructions.
NOTE: For the rest of this manual, the Miyachi Unitek HF27 High Frequency Resistance
Welding System Control will simply be referred to as the Control.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-1
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Section II: Introduction
This Control contains advanced technology and improved features, yet from an operational standpoint, it
performs the same as older Miyachi Unitek Controls (see Appendix H, Compatibility and Comparison
for an overview of the differences between the new and old models).
The Control is a 25 kHz, three-phase, state-of-the-art inverter power supply for joining precision
small parts at high speed with controllable rise times. The delivered welding energy is in the form of
DC welding energy. High speed (40 microseconds) digital feedback automatically controls weld
current, voltage, or power, providing more welding consistency compared to traditional direct energy
(AC) or capacitive discharge (CD) technologies. This microprocessor technology automatically
compensates for changes in work piece resistance, load inductance, weld transformer saturation, and
changes in line voltage. In addition, special power device technology precisely controls the weld
energy at both high and low energy levels.
x
You can program the Control from the front
panel, using simplified key clusters and onscreen data fields. A MAIN MENU screen
allows you select all of the system setup
options for working with inputs from
external equipment.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<MAIN MENU>
SETUP
6. COMMUNICATION
WELD COUNTERS
7. RELAY
COPY A SCHEDULE
8. RESET TO DEFAULTS
PROP. VALVE
9. CHAIN SCHEDULES
SYSTEM SECURITY
NUMBER Select an item
x
The RUN screen allows you to easily modify
any time period, current, voltage, or power
value.
Run Screen
x
The MONITOR screen provides instant visual
feedback on the actual current, voltage, or
power used to make each weld. It permits
you to program adjustable limits for both
weld pulses.
Monitor Screen
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-2
990-370
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
x
Rear-mounted RS-232 and RS-485 connectors allow for remote programming, weld schedule
selection, and data logging for SPC purposes. The Control has communication and data options
that allow you to connect a single Control, or multiple Controls, to a printer or a computer in
order to:
Compile, store, view, and print weld history data for detailed analysis.
Remotely program weld schedules on the Control(s).
Remotely program menu items on the Control(s).
Appendix E, Communications in this manual lists all of the commands that the Control will respond
to, and instructions on how to format commands sent to the Control so it will respond properly.
These commands have been implemented in Amada Miyachi America’s Weld Stat program that
provides PC based communication and control of the HF27.
x
The Control has a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) function that allows the
user to:
Measure Initial Part Thickness
Measure Final Part Thickness
Measure displacement during welding
Stop the weld energy after a programmable displacement is reached.
Programmable relay outputs are also provided with this option.
x
The Control has a 0-5 volt input for a weld force transducer. This input allows the user to put limits
around the firing force and the final force used during the weld.
x
The Control has a 0-5 volt output to drive a proportional valve. This allows the user to adjust the
weld force from the Control and change it in each schedule.
x
The design of the Control is directed toward compactness, lightweight, operational simplicity, and
ease of repair. Metric hardware is used throughout the chassis to facilitate international servicing
and repair.
x
The 25 kHz operating frequency ensures that the integral welding transformer is light and compact.
The input/ output connectors on the rear panel provide for quick-connect signal I/O cabling,
facilitating interface with automation systems.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-3
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Section III: Major Components
Major Components
The major components are the front panel, which contains the operator’s controls and indicators, and the
rear panel, which contains fuses, circuit breakers and power and signal connectors. The rear panel
connections are discussed in Chapter 2, Installation and Setup.
Front Panel Display and Display Controls
The front panel of the Control below shows controls and indicators. The function of each item is
described on the following pages.
Front Panel Controls
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-4
990-370
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Display
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)
The Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) on the front panel allows you to locally program the Control with the
front panel controls, and read the results of a weld process following its initiation.
The LCD has three distinct functions, depending on the active mode of the Control. In the run mode, the
display permits you to:
x
View the entire weld schedule profile, individual weld periods, and weld energy parameters.
x
View individual weld parameter program changes as you enter them via the weld period
selector keys.
x
View completed weld feedback data and use the data to modify the weld schedule.
In the menu mode, the display presents system setup options for you to select. In the monitor mode, the
display is your means of programming the energy limits monitor and viewing actual out of limit
conditions.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-5
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Display Controls
There are three display control functions:
x SCHEDULE Selector Key
x Weld Period Selector Keys
x Time/Energy Selector Keys
SCHEDULE Key
Puts the Control into the weld schedule selection mode. Use the
keypad to directly enter a desired weld schedule (refer to Front Panel
Data Entry and Mode Controls in this section), then press the RUN
key.
Weld Period Selector Keys
Select individual weld periods and weld energy fields in the weld schedule profile for programming.
See Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Controls.
Time/Energy Selector Keys
These two switches, one for each of the PULSE 1 and PULSE 2 weld
periods, select either the bottom line of data or the second-to-bottom
line of data on the screen to be programmed. The bottom line of data
is weld period time in milliseconds. The second-to-bottom line is
Weld Energy, in the units selected by the energy units selection keys.
See Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Controls.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-6
990-370
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Keys
Key Pad
The keypad consists of the numeric keys and the up/down/left/right keys.
Numeric Keys: The numeric keys allow you to:
x
Enter or modify weld period time and energy values
x
Enter or modify monitor and limit values
x
Directly recall a specific weld schedule.
To use the numeric keypad, you must first select a time/energy weld period key or
the schedule key.
The arrow keys move the highlighted cursor up, down, to the left and right in all
screens. Pressing SELECT allows editing of the highlighted field. The
keys
allow you to increment (up) or decrement (down) numeric values on the display,
to change states, such as OFF to ON (up) or ON to OFF (down); and to scroll the
schedule number up and down while in the run mode. To end the edit mode for
that field, press any key except SELECT, , , or the numeric keypad.
Mode Keys. The mode keys consist of the RUN key and the MENU key.
RUN Key: Sets the Control to the operating mode. Used to terminate program
mode if already in the RUN screen.
MENU Key: You access the menu screen with this key. Menu items control
system parameters such as setup and weld counter operation. Refer to Menus in
Chapter 3, Section II for details of the functions accessible through that screen.
Control Keys
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-7
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Control Mode Selection Keys. These keys allow you to select the control mode when
programming with the WELD (time/energy) selector keys.
Pressing the kA key selects current as the control mode for this schedule. The
control will output the current waveform shown on the LCD.
Pressing the V key selects voltage as the control mode for this schedule. The
control will output the voltage waveform shown on the LCD.
NOTE: Selecting the voltage feedback mode requires you to make a test weld
when the voltage or weld pulse time is changed. The test weld optimizes the
Control feedback performance. The weld status message TEST disappears after
the internal control parameters are optimized.
Pressing the kW key selects power as the control mode for this schedule. The
control will output the power waveform shown on the LCD.
This allows the user to start a weld in voltage or power mode and then switch to a
constant current when the user-selected current level is reached.
NOTES:
x COMBO mode can be selected independently for pulse 1 and pulse 2.
x Limits and Monitor functions will still apply for this mode.
Monitor Keys
These keys allow you to view the results of the last weld and to set the limits of the welding parameters
beyond which the energy limits monitor terminate the weld and/or initiate alarms.
Pressing the kA key displays the current monitor. This screen shows the results of
the most recent weld. This screen also allows the operator to set limits that
automatically interrupt the weld when they are reached. You can also program
the current monitor to output an alarm when the limits are exceeded.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-8
990-370
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Pressing the V key displays the voltage monitor. This screen shows the results of
the most recent weld. This screen also allows the operator to set limits that
automatically interrupt the weld when they are reached. You can also program
the voltage monitor to output an alarm when the limits are exceeded.
Pressing the kW key displays the power monitor. This screen shows the results of
the most recent weld. This screen also allows the operator to set limits that
automatically interrupt the weld when they are reached. You can also program
the power monitor to output an alarm when the limits are exceeded.
Pressing the ȍ key displays the resistance monitor. This screen shows the results
of the most recent weld.
The Control is always monitoring both the PEAK and AVERAGE of current,
voltage, power, and resistance. When you press this key, the top line in the LCD
screen toggles back and forth between displaying PEAK and AVERAGE.
This key will bring up a menu with two options:
x LVDT
x Force.
This key brings up the CALIBRATION menu with five options:
x Unit calibration
x LVDT gauge thickness
x LVDT calibration
x LVDT quick calibration
x Force input calibration and force output (proportional valve) calibration.
This key brings up the force screen. On this screen you can:
x Set the output force for the proportional valve
x Set force limits around the measured value. You can set different limits
in each schedule. Force will be in lb, N or kgf units. You can set upper
and lower limits for the force at the start and end of the weld.
NOTE: Setting a force value to zero turns that measurement OFF. The function
is turned totally OFF if these values are set to zero.
This allows programming high and low limits for initial thickness, final thickness,
displacement and allows the user to set a thickness at which the unit will stop
providing energy to the weld.
This key brings up the ENVELOPE function for the graphical monitor trace
presently on the screen, or last used monitor screen if the unit is in the RUN mode.
This allows setting independent upper and lower offsets around the waveform
displayed on the screen. Independent envelope modes (current , voltage or
power) can be selected for Pulse 1 and Pulse 2.
The function of the time screen is to allow the user to program limits around the
Cut Off time. The Cut Off time is defined as the time when the control system
commands current to turn off. Current can be turned off either by reaching a
“weld to” type of limit or by reaching the end of the pulse.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-9
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
The user will be able to program upper and lower energy limits for the first and
second pulse. The display will show the calculated watt second value for the first
and second pulse. The limits will apply for the entire upslope, weld and
downslope time.
WELD/NO WELD Switch
When the switch is in the WELD position, the programmed weld sequence can
initiate weld energy.
When you set this switch to the NO WELD position, no weld current can flow.
However, the Control can execute a complete weld sequence. This function is
required to adjust the weld head prior to operation.
Emergency Stop Switch Operation
If your work station is equipped with an emergency stop switch (connected to the emergency stop
connection of the Control), operate the switch to immediately stop the welding process. All power to
the air valves and power circuits will be disconnected. To restart the Control, you must press the RUN
key on the front panel.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-10
990-370
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
Section III. LVDT Capability
The Control is fully capable of using a Linear
Variable Differential Transformer. This is a
combination of an electro-mechanical device
attached to the weld head, which is
electronically linked to software installed in the
Control. For the rest of this manual, this
combination will be referred to simply as the
LVDT.
The LVDT allows the user to:
x Measure initial part thickness as the
electrodes close on the part.
(If too thin, parts may be missing. If too
thick, something extra may be in the way
of the parts.)
x Measure displacement during the weld.
(To measure the collapse of the parts
during welding.)
x Measure final part thickness after the weld.
(Too thick maybe an indication of a cold weld. Too thin maybe an over-welded or blown
weld.)
x Weld to a preset displacement.
(The weld energy will stop when the parts reach a user-programmed displacement value.)
x Actuate a relay when specific LVDT conditions are reached.
(Example: If a weld has too much displacement, a relay could trigger an alarm for the operator
or automation.)
1 = Zero
The point where the two electrodes touch (zero distance between them).
2 = Initial Thickness
The thickness of the weld pieces before welding takes place (measured at
the end of squeeze time).
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
1-11
CHAPTER 1: DESCRIPTION
3 = Final Thickness
The thickness of the weld after welding takes place (measured at the end of
hold time).
4 = Displacement
The amount of collapse when the weld pieces were forced together during
the weld (the difference between Initial Thickness and Final Thickness).
5 = Stop Energy At
Also referred to as WELD STOP. The thickness of the weld pieces
(programmed by the user) at which weld energy stops. Note that further
displacement will occur even after the weld energy is cut off.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
1-12
990-370
CHAPTER 2
Installation and Setup
Section I: Installation
Unpacking
The Control is shipped to you completely assembled, together with the accessories you ordered and a
shipping kit. The contents of the shipping kit, available accessories, and contents of the Datacom Kit are
listed in Appendix A, Technical Specifications. Be sure that the accessories that you ordered have been
packed and the contents of the shipping kit and Datacom kit are as listed.
Verify that the Control shows no signs of damage. If it does, please contact the carrier. Also, contact
Amada Miyachi America Customer Service immediately at the postal or e-mail address or telephone or
FAX number shown in the Foreword of this manual.
Space Requirements
x
Allow ample workspace around the Control
so that it will not be jostled or struck while
welding.
x
Allow sufficient clearance around both sides
and back of the Control for power and signal
cabling runs.
x
Install the Control in a well-ventilated area
that is free from excessive dust, acids,
corrosive gases, salt and moisture.
x
Other installation considerations are:
ņ The work surface must be level, stable,
free from vibration, and capable of
supporting the combined weight of the
total welding system. The weight of the
Control is 62 lbs. (28 kg).
ņ The Control must be far enough from the
weld head to avoid contact with weld
splash.
ņ There are no sources of high-frequency
energy close by.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
2-1
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
Utilities
Power
Because of the different electrical requirements for the countries in which the Control is used, the
Control is shipped without a power cable connector. The required connections for your power cable
connector are described in Appendix B, Electrical and Data Connections. Input power requirements for
the Control are as listed below.
Power Input Specifications
Fuses F1, F2
HF27 Model
Input Voltage,
Copper Wire
50-60 Hz,
Ckt Brkr
Gauge,
Wire Dia
3 phase
Current (A rms) 7 strands (AWG)
(mm)
(Vrms)
Amps/
Volts
Amada
Miyachi
America
P/N
HF27/240
240
25
10
2.5
6.3
330-096
HF27/400
400
20
10
2.5
3.15
330-095
HF27/480
480
13
10
2.5
3.15
330-097
Compressed Air and Cooling Water
If you require compressed air and cooling water service for the weld head, please refer to the weld head
manufacturer’s user’s manual for service specifications.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
2-2
990-370
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
Section II: Setup
Connections to External Equipment
All connections, other than the weld cable connections, between the Control and external equipment are
made through the rear panel.
Rear Panel Components and Connectors
NOTES:
x The weld cable connections from the weld head are made at the weld cable terminals on
the front panel.
x The pre-wired Configuration Plug allows the use of Miyachi Unitek standard foot
switches and weld heads without further configuration. The Control requires configuration
of the I/Os to accept any inputs. For normal use, this plug must be connected to pins 11
through 20 on the 60-pin connector. For other configurations, see Appendix B, Electrical
and Data Connections.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
2-3
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
Weld Head Connections
1.
Connect one end of a weld cable to the negative (-) welding transformer terminal on the
Control.
2.
3.
Connect one end of the second weld cable to the positive (+) welding transformer terminal on
the Control.
Connect the other end of the weld cables to the weld head.
4.
Attach the voltage sensing cable connector to the VOLTAGE SENSE INPUT connector.
5.
Install electrodes in the weld head electrode holders.
NOTE: If you need additional information about the weld heads, please refer to their user’s
manuals.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
2-4
990-370
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
6.
Connect the voltage sensing cable
terminals to the electrode holders.
7.
Attach a leads directly to each electrode
holder as shown on the right.
8.
Put a strain relief on each voltage
sensing lead to its corresponding
electrode holder so that the leads will
not break away under heavy operating
conditions.
NOTES:
x Do not attach the firing switch, foot
switch or EMERGENCY STOP
cables at this time.
x
x
The polarity of the voltage feedback
connections is not important.
If the tapped holes and screws for the voltage sensing connections are not present on the
electrode holders, the holders must be modified to include the tapped holes and screws
prior to installation of the equipment.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
2-5
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
Foot Pedal-Actuated Weld Head Connection
1.
Adjust the weld head force adjustment knob to produce 5 units of force, as displayed on the
force indicator index.
2.
Connect the weld head firing switch cable connector to the Control firing switch cable
connector.
3.
Connect the LVDT cable to the LVDT input connector.
4.
Connect a normally closed, approved, emergency stop switch across the two leads of the
operator emergency stop switch cable. This switch, when operated (open), will immediately
stop the weld cycle. See Appendix B. Electrical and Data Connections for circuit details.
5.
Set the WELD/NO WELD switch on the Control front panel to the NO WELD position. In this
position, the Control cannot deliver weld energy, but the firing switch connection can be
verified.
6.
Set the circuit breaker on the rear panel
of the Control to the ON position. The
default RUN screen will be displayed.
You will use this screen to enter
welding parameters. See Chapter 3,
Using Weld Functions and Chapter 4,
Operating Instructions.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
2-6
990-370
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections
AC EZ-AIR Weld Head Connection
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
2-7
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
DC EZ-AIR Weld Head Connection
1.
Adjust the weld head force adjustment knob to produce 5 units of force, as displayed on the
force indicator index.
2.
Connect the weld head firing switch cable connector to the Control firing switch cable
connector.
3.
Connect a normally closed, approved, emergency stop switch across the two leads of the
operator emergency stop switch cable. This switch, when operated (open), will immediately
stop the weld cycle and retract the weld head. See Appendix B. Electrical and Data
Connections for circuit details.
4.
Connect a Model FS2L or FS1L Foot Switch to the Control FOOT SWITCH connector.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
2-8
990-370
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
5.
Refer to the weld head manufacturer user’s manual. Connect the weld head air valve solenoid
cable connector to the Control AIR VALVE DRIVER connector.
NOTE: This connector supplies 24 VAC power only, and will not drive 115 VAC air valves.
6.
Connect a properly filtered air line to the air inlet fitting on the weld head. Use 0.25 inch O.D.
by 0.17 inch I.D. plastic hose with a rated burst pressure of 250 psi. Limit the length of the air
line to less than 40 in. (1 m) or electrode motion will be very slow.
NOTE: Use a lubricator only with automated installations.
7.
Turn on the air system and check for leaks.
8.
Set the WELD/NO WELD switch on the Control front panel to the NO WELD position. In this
position, the Control cannot deliver weld energy, but it can control the weld head.
9.
Set the circuit breaker on the rear panel
of the Control to the ON position. The
default RUN screen will display.
10. Press the foot switch to actuate the first level. The weld head upper electrode should descend
smoothly to the DOWN position. When it reaches the down position, release the foot switch
and proceed to Step 12. If it does not descend smoothly, proceed to Step 11.
11. Adjust the weld head down speed control knob and repeat Step 10 until the upper electrode
descends smoothly.
12. Press the foot switch all the way down to close both levels. The weld head upper electrode
should descend smoothly to the DOWN position, and send the firing switch signal back to the
Control when the preset electrode force is reached. The upper electrode should then ascend
smoothly back to the UP position.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
2-9
CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION AND SETUP
Non-EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections
Non-EZ-AIR heads may be connected to the Control as shown below, however you should refer to the
manual provided with the weld head you are using for specific instructions.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
2-10
990-370
CHAPTER 3
System Configuration
Section I: Getting Started
Before You Start
Configuration is simply a matter of selecting various MENU options so the Control will work with all the
components of your welding system.
x
x
x
x
Verify that all connections have been made according to the instructions in Chapter 2,
Installation and Setup.
Turn the Control ON.
Turn any peripherals such as the Proportional Valve and Load Cell Amplifier ON.
Turn the shop air supply ON.
Startup
1.
Press the MENU key.
2.
Press 4 for PROPORTIONAL VALVE.
NOTE: This feature is only applicable if
the optional Proportional Valve has been
installed. If a Proportional Valve has not
been installed, skip this section and continue
with Section II, Menus.
3.
Press 1 for FORCE OUTPUT to turn the
valve output ON.
4.
Press 2 to select FORCE UNITS.
Pressing the 2 key will toggle between
LBS (pounds), KG (kilograms), or N
(Newtons).
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<MAIN MENU>
SETUP
6. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD COUNTERS
7. RELAY
COPY A SCHEDULE
8. RESET DEFAULTS
PROP. VALVE
9. CHAIN SCHEDULES
SYSTEM SECURITY
NUMBER Select an item,
1.
2.
3.
4.
.
<PROPORTIONAL VALVE>
FORCE OUTPUT
: OFF
FORCE UNITS
: LBS
SOFT TOUCH PRESSURE
: 0.000 LBS
SOFT TOUCH TIME
: 050 ms
NUMBER Select an item, RUN or MENU
5.
Press 3 to adjust the SOFT TOUCH PRESSURE.
6.
Use the numeric keys to input a force that is 25% of the maximum force of the head. Refer
to the manual supplied with the Weld Head for specifications.
Example: If the maximum force of the head is 20 pounds, set the SOFT TOUCH to 5 pounds.
7.
Press the
key to accept the setting. The screen will go to the previous page.
8.
Press 4 to adjust the SOFT TOUCH TIME. Use the numeric keypad to enter a time in
milliseconds.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-1
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
9.
Press the
key to accept the setting. The screen will go to the previous page.
NOTE: After initial settings, you can change the settings above as often as necessary.
10. Press the RUN key. The screen will display SAVING CHANGES then go back to the RUN screen.
11. Press the FORCE key on the front panel
to get the FORCE & LIMITS menu.
12. Enter a value for PROP VALVE
OUTPUT FORCE.
13. Push the FORCE key again to accept
these values. The screen will display
<FORCE & LIMITS>
PROP VALVE OUTPUT FORCE : 010.0 LBS
WELD START
WELD END
LO LIM
000.0LBS
000.0LBS
HI LIM
000.0LBS
000.0LBS
LAST
000.0LBS
000.0LBS
ACTION: CONTINUE
SAVING CHANGES.
14. Press the RUN key to go back to the RUN screen. You may now use the foot switch to raise and
lower the electrodes.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-2
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Section II: Menus
Overview
You program the system settings of the Control
through the MAIN MENU screen and its submenus. You go to the MAIN MENU screen by
pressing the MENU key on the front panel of the
Control.
All of the menu screens have similar prompts that
tell you how to go to a function on the menu and/or
get to the next menu.
x
x
x
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<MAIN MENU>
SETUP
6. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD COUNTERS
7. RELAY
COPY A SCHEDULE
8. RESET DEFAULTS
PROP. VALVE
9. CHAIN SCHEDULES
SYSTEM SECURITY
Number Select an item
At the NUMBER Select an item prompt, use the numeric keypad to select one of the functions on
the menu.
Press the down
keys to go to the next or previous menu. Each additional menu gives you
choices for additional functions.
Press the MENU key to return to the main menu.
Main Menu
1. SETUP
From the MAIN MENU screen, press 1 to go to the
SETUP 1 screen.
The SETUP 1 screen is shown on the right with
typical settings.
<SETUP, page 1 of 3>
1. FOOTSWITCH WELD ABORT
:
2. SWITCH DEBOUNCE TIME
:
3. FIRING SWITCH
:
Number Select,
From the SETUP 1 screen, press the
key.
The SETUP 2 screen is shown on the right with
typical settings.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
From the SETUP 2 screen, press the key.
The SETUP 3 screen is shown on the right with
typical settings.
Page, RUN or MENU
<SETUP, page 2 of 3>
DISPLAY CONTRAST
:
BUZZER LOUDNESS
:
END OF CYCLE BUZZER
:
UPDATE GRAPH AFTER WELD
:
LANGUAGE
:
Number Select,
OFF
10 ms
AUTO
50
40
OFF
ON
ENGLISH
Page, RUN or MENU
<SETUP, page 3 of 3>
1. DO TEST WELD
: ALWAYS
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-3
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
2. WELD COUNTER
1.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 2 key
to go to the WELD COUNTERS screen.
The total welds counter increments each
time a weld is made in any weld
schedule.
1.
2.
3.
4.
<WELD COUNTERS>
TOTAL WELDS
:
0000000
OUT OF LIMITS HIGH
:
000000
OUT LIMITS LOW
:
000000
WITHIN LIMITS
:
000000
Number Select an item, , RUN or MENU
NOTE: The Control breaks down the weld count into three additional categories, as
determined by the energy limits monitor: rejects due to higher than programmed weld energy,
rejects due to lower than programmed weld energy, and the number of welds within limits.
2.
To select the weld counters, press the 1, 2, 3 or 4 key to select the desired weld counter.
The example below shows the TOTAL WELDS screen.
3.
To reset the counter, press the 0 key.
4.
To input a preset number, use the
numeric keys.
5.
If you accidentally reset the wrong
counter, press the period (.) key. The
original count will reappear. Press the
MENU key to return to the MAIN MENU
screen.
<WELD COUNTERS>
1. TOTAL WELDS
: 0017429
NUMBER Select, [.] Restore,
Page, MENU
3. COPY A SCHEDULE
The Control can store 99 (numbered 1 through
99) individual weld energy profiles. This
function allows you to copy any weld schedule
from one numbered weld schedule to another
numbered weld schedule
<COPY SCHEDULE>
COPY SCHEDULE [ 1 ] TO SCHEDULE [2 ]
1.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 3 key to
go to the COPY SCHEDULE screen.
Enter NUMBERS followed by
Use SCHEDULE to copy
2.
Using the numeric keys, enter 1 in the
source schedule number field.
<COPY SCHEDULE>
COPY SCHEDULE [ 1 ] TO SCHEDULE [2 ]
3.
Press the key to select the destination
schedule number field.
4.
Using the numeric keys, enter 2 in the
destination schedule number field.
Enter NUMBERS followed by
Use SCHEDULE to copy
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-4
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
5.
Press the SCHEDULE key to copy the schedule and exit the screen.
6.
Press the MENU key to return to the main menu. The contents of Weld Schedule 1 will be
copied to Weld Schedule 2, overwriting the previous contents of Weld Schedule 2. Note that
this function will copy schedule settings, monitor limits and envelope offsets, but it will not
copy the reference waveforms for envelope limits.
4. PROP VALVE (Proportional Valve Option)
From the MAIN MENU, press the 4 key to go to up
PROPORTIONAL VALVE screen. This screen
allows you to program the features for the force
output on the HF27.
<PROPORTIONAL VALVE>
1. FORCE OUTPUT
: OFF
2. FORCE UNITS
: LBS
3. SOFT TOUCH PRESSURE
: 0.000 LBS
4. SOFT TOUCH TIME
: 050 ms
NUMBERS Select an item, RUN or MENU
1. Force output
The function allows the user to turn the proportional valve output ON or OFF.
2. Force units
This function allows the user to set the units for force measurement. The user can choose among LBS
(pounds), KG (kilogram force), or N (Newtons).
3. Soft touch pressure
This function allows the user to program a lower pressure that is applied as the weldhead is closing.
This soft touch pressure, which is maintained for the soft touch time (see 4. below) causes the weldhead
to come down at a slower speed than if the full weld pressure were used. This setting can be used to
reduce deformation on round parts, parts with projections, or more delicate parts.
4. Soft touch time
This function allows the user to program the duration of lower pressure that is applied as the weldhead is
closing. This time starts as soon as the solenoid valve closes and runs for the user-programmed time.
Note that squeeze time will not start until soft touch time is over and the firing switch (if any) is closed.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-5
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
5. SYSTEM SECURITY
From the MAIN MENU, press the 5 key to go to up
SYSTEM SECURITY screen. With this screen,
you can protect the weld schedules from
unauthorized changes by programming the
Control with a user-defined protection code.
<SYSTEM SECURITY>
1. SCHEDULE LOCK
:
OFF
2. SYSTEM LOCK
:
OFF
3. CALIBRATION
:
OFF
NUMBERS Select an item, RUN or MENU
1. Schedule Lock
This function prevents unauthorized users from selecting any weld schedule other than the displayed
schedule, and from changing any weld energy/time parameters within the weld schedule.
2. System Lock
This function prevents unauthorized users from changing any of the options on the main menu. It also
prevents unauthorized users from changing weld energy/time parameters within weld schedules 1-99.
Note that schedule 0 is a “scratchpad” and can still be edited when the System Lock is ON. This
security level allows you to select different schedules from the front panel.
3. Calibration
This function prevents unauthorized users from modifying any of the calibration settings.
NOTE: All security options use the same procedure to enter a security code and to turn the security
code OFF.
1.
2.
Press the 1 key to select SCHEDULE
<CHANGE STATUS>
LOCK. This will bring up the CHANGE
PASSWORD
: –––––––
STATUS screen, as shown at the right.
Enter a 7-digit number, from 0000001
NUMBERS for code followed by [.]
to 9999999, in the code field, and then
enter a period. This will bring up the
SYSTEM SECURITY menu screen, this
time with SCHEDULE LOCK: ON.
With ON selected, all other weld schedules are locked out and cannot be modified or used for
welding.
3.
To unlock the Control from security protection, return to the CHANGE STATUS screen and
enter the code that you entered in Step 2. This will bring up the SYSTEM SECURITY menu
screen, this time with SCHEDULE LOCK: OFF.
4.
If you forget the security code and wish to unlock the Control from security protection:
x Return to the CHANGE STATUS screen.
x Enter a security code of 280.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-6
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
6. COMMUNICATION
The following menu screens tell you how to set the Control's communication and data options.
However, to enable the Control to perform these functions, you must install the software from the
optional DC25/UB25/HF27 Datacom Communications Interface Kit, commonly referred to as "the
Datacom kit” or Weldstat in a host computer. The Datacom Operator Manual describes cables,
connections, RS-232 operation, RS-485 operation, sample weld reports, data collection, and how to use
remote commands. The Datacom Kit allows you to connect a single Control, or multiple Controls, to a
printer or a computer in order to:
x Compile, store, view, and print weld history data for detailed analysis.
x Remotely program weld schedules on the Control(s).
x Remotely program menu items on the Control(s).
Rear-mounted RS-232 and RS-485 connectors allow for remote programming, weld schedule selection,
and data logging for SPC purposes. Data output provides the necessary process documentation for
critical applications and permits data logging for SPC purposes.
Appendix E, Communications in this manual lists all of the commands that the Control will respond to,
and instructions on how to format commands sent to the Control so it will respond properly.
The Control contains internal software that gives you a great deal of flexibility in the setup and use of
your welding system. The Control software displays various menu screens on the LCD, each containing
prompts telling you which of the Control's front panel controls to use in order to customize operating
parameters, set the Control for use in an automated welding system, and program communication
settings for use with data-gathering devices such as a host computer.
1. Communication Role
1.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 6 key
to go to the COMMUNICATION menu
(shown with default settings).
From the COMMUNICATION menu, toggle
the 1 key to select MASTER or SLAVE.
The COMMUNICATION ROLE line will now
reflect your role selection.
<COMMUNICATION>
1.
2.
3.
4.
COMMUNICATION ROLE
BAUD RATE
RS232/485 SELECT
I.D. NUMBER
:
:
:
:
SLAVE
9600
RS232
1
NUMBER Select an item, RUN or MENU
x
x
In the MASTER role, the Control will:
Send weld data to the host computer after each weld operation.
Send text data to a serial printer, providing a printout of the average voltage and
current values for each weld, generating a "paper history" of welds performed.
In the SLAVE role, the Control will send weld data only when requested by the host
computer. You must use this role for RS-485 installations with mulitple controls on one
communications channel.
NOTE: For weld data collection and host computer control information, refer to the
Datacom Operator Manual, which describes how to use the MASTER and SLAVE options.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-7
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
2.
Press MENU to return to the MAIN MENU.
2. Baud Rate
The baud rate at which the data is sent must match the baud rate of the host computer. To enter the baud
rate, proceed as follows:
1.
2.
From the COMMUNICATION menu,
press the 2 key to get the BAUD RATE
selection screen.
Use the numeric keypad to select the
baud rate of the receiving device. The
display automatically returns to the
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1200
2400
4800
9600
14.4K
Number Select,
<BAUD RATE>
6.
7.
8.
19.2K
28.8K
38.4K
Page or MENU
COMMUNICATION menu, which shows
the new baud rate.
3.
Press MENU to return to the MAIN MENU.
3. RS232/485 SELECT
Pressing the 3 key will alternately select either RS232 or RS485 communications. The default selection
is RS232.
4. I.D. Number
The host computer may be used to talk with multiple Controls using a single RS-485 communications
line. Each Control sharing that line must have a unique identification number. To enter an identification
number for the Control, proceed as follows:
1.
2.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 6 key
to go to the COMMUNICATIONS MENU.
I.D. NUMBER
<I.D. NUMBER>
: 01
Number Select,
Page or MENU
From the COMMUNICATIONS MENU
screen, press the 3 key to get the I.D.
NUMBER entry screen.
3.
Enter a two-digit number, from 01 to 30, in the I.D. NUMBER field.
4.
Press the MENU key to get the COMMUNICATION menu screen. This time the I.D. NUMBER
line will display your I.D. number entry.
5.
Press MENU to return to the MAIN MENU.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-8
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
7. RELAY
1.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 7 key
to go to the RELAY output state
selection menu, shown at the right. The
Control has four relays that can provide
dry-contact signal outputs under many
different conditions.
1.
2.
3.
4.
RELAY1:ON
RELAY2:ON
RELAY3:ON
RELAY4:ON
<RELAY>
OTHER
FORCE LIMIT
ALARM
ALARM
ALARM
Number Select an item, RUN or MENU
See Appendix C, System Timing for the timing diagrams for the four relays.
2.
3.
From the RELAY menu, press the 1 key
to go to RELAY 1 shown at the right.
Press the 1 key to toggle the relay
contact signal state: ON (closed) or OFF
(open).
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
Number Select,
4.
Press the 2 key to select the WHEN
menu, shown at the right.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ALARM
OUT OF LIMITS
WELD
END OF WELD
P1 & P2
Number Select,
5.
Press the 2 key to select OUT OF LIMITS
as the condition for initiating the Relay
1 output signal. This will bring up the
RELAY 1 menu screen, where the WHEN
line will now reflect OUT OF LIMITS.
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
Number Select,
6.
Choosing WHEN options 1 - 4 or 9 will
complete the relay programming
process. Choosing options 5 - 8 or 0
will bring up the RELAY (1, 2, 3, or 4)
screen with a new option, number 3.
Press 3 to access the next level menus
which are shown on the next page.
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
3. kW & R
Number Select,
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: ALARM
Page, RUN or MENU
<WHEN>
6. kA & V
7. kW & R
8. OTHER
9. MG3 SYNC
0. LVDT
Page, RUN or MENU
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: OUT OF LIMITS
Page, RUN or MENU
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: OUT OF LIMITS
WHEN
kW LIMIT
Page, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-9
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<P1 &P2 WHEN>
OUT OF LIMITS
6. P2 HIGH
P1 OUT OF LIMITS
7. P2 LOW
P1 HIGH
P1 LOW
P2 OUT OF LIMITS
Number Select,
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Page, RUN or MENU
kA LIMIT
V LIMIT
P1 kA HIGH
P1 kA LOW
P2 kA HIGH
Number Select,
<kA & V WHEN>
6. P2 kA LOW
7. P1 V HIGH
8. P1 V LOW
9. P2 V HIGH
0. P2 V LOW
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #5
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
kW LIMIT
R LIMIT
P1 kW HIGH
P1 kW LOW
P2 kW HIGH
Number Select,
Option #6
<kW & R WHEN>
6. P2 kW LOW
7. P1 R HIGH
8. P1 R LOW
9. P2 R HIGH
0. P2 R LOW
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Page, RUN or MENU
FORCE LIMIT
START FORCE
END FORCE
ENERGY LIMIT
ENERGY HI
Number Select,
<OTHER WHEN>
6. ENERGY LO
7. TIME LIMIT
8. TIME HIGH
9. TIME LOW
0. ENVELOPE LIMIT
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #7
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ANY
INITIAL LO
INITIAL HI
FINAL LO
FINAL HI
Number Select,
Option #8
<LVDT WHEN>
6. DISPL LO
7. DISPL HI
8. INITIAL NG
9. DISPL NG
0. STOP ENERGY AT
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #9
8. RESET TO DEFAULTS
From the MAIN MENU, press the 8 key to go to
the RESET TO DEFAULTS menu, as shown at the
right. Through this menu, you may reset all
system programmed parameters and all weld
schedules to the original factory default settings
(see the table below).
<RESET TO DEFAULTS>
1. RESET SYSTEM PARAMETERS
2. RESET ALL SCHEDULES
3. RESET SCHEDULE LIMITS
Number Select an item, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-10
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Factory Default System Parameters
System Parameter
Default Setting
System Parameter
Default Setting
Foot Switch Weld Abort
OFF
Weld Counters
All “0”
Switch Debounce Time
10 ms
Force Output
OFF
Firing Switch
AUTO
Force Units
LBS
Display Contrast
50%
Soft Touch Pressure
30.0 LBS
Buzzer Loudness
40%
Soft Touch Time
000 ms
End of Cycle
Buzzer
OFF
Communication
Role
SLAVE
Update Graph After
Weld
ON
Baud Rate
38.4K
Language
ENGLISH
ID Number
1
Do Test Weld
ALWAYS
Relays 1,2,3 and 4
ON WHEN
ALARM
1. RESET SYSTEM PARAMETERS
1.
With the reset to defaults screen
displayed, press the 1 key. This will
bring up the RESET SYSTEM
PARAMETERS query menu, as shown at
the right.
<RESET SYSTEM PARAMETERS?>
1. NO
2. YES
Number Select,
2.
Page, RUN or MENU
Press the 2 key to select YES. This will automatically reset the system to the factory and
return the screen to the RESET TO DEFAULTS display.
2. RESET ALL SCHEDULES
1.
2.
Press the 2 key. This will
automatically reset all weld schedule
parameters to the factory defaults and
return the screen to the RESET TO
DEFAULTS display.
Press the MENU key to return to the
MAIN MENU screen.
<RESET ALL SCHEDULES?>
1. NO
2. YES
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-11
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
3. RESET SCHEDULE LIMITS
1.
2.
3.
The last SCHEDULE you used will
appear as highlighted. You may
change this to any SCHEDULE number
you want to reset using the numeric
keypad.
Press the key to reset the limits of the
schedule you highlighted.
SCHEDULE
<RESET SCHEDULE LIMITS>
: 01
PUSH
TO RESET THIS SCHEDULE’S
LIMIT VALUES
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
Press the MENU key to return to the MAIN MENU screen.
9. CHAIN SCHEDULES
This feature allows you to automatically change from any weld schedule to any other schedule after a
preset count, creating a "chain" of schedules that can accommodate a variety of welding needs. For
example:
x
x
A single work piece requires four welds, two weld points require the same weld schedule, each
of the other two points require different weld schedules.
In this case you would program a sequence, or "chain," that looks like this: Schedule 01 [2
times] - Schedule 02 [1 time] - Schedule 03 [1 time] - Schedule 01. This sequence will
repeat, or "loop," until you turn Chain Schedules OFF.
Some applications require a lower current for a number of welds after the electrodes have been
replaced or resurfaced. Once the electrodes have been “seasoned”, the current can be increased
as required. If the electrodes require 100 welds to “season”, Schedule 01 can be programmed
with a lower current and Schedule 02 can be programmed with a higher current. The chain
would look like this: Schedule 01 [100 times] - Schedule 02 [1 time] - Schedule 02 [1 time].
In this chain, Schedule 02 will just keep repeating after the 100 welds made using Schedule 01.
When the electrodes are replaced or resurfaced, you can manually switch back to Schedule 01
to restart the sequence.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-12
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
You can program any of the Control's 99 stored schedules to chain to any other schedule, or back to
itself as in the second example above. The chain code becomes part of each weld schedule. You can
turn the Chain Schedules feature ON or OFF, or re-program chains, any time you want.
1
From the MAIN MENU, press the 9 key
to go to the CHAIN SCHEDULES menu.
NOTE: You should program, or
"setup," the chain of schedules you
want before you turn this feature ON.
CHAIN SCHEDULES
1. CHAIN SCHEDULE
:OFF
2. SETUP CHAIN SCHEDULES
Number Select an item, RUN or MENU
2
Press the 1 key to toggle CHAIN SCHEDULES ON or OFF.
3
From the CHAIN SCHEDULES menu,
press the 2 key to go to the CHAIN
SCHEDULE SETUP menu.
CHAIN SCHEDULE SETUP
SCHEDULE NUMBER WELD COUNT
Ø1
ØØØ1
Ø2
ØØØ1
Ø3
ØØØ1
Ø4
ØØØ1
NEXT
Ø1
Ø2
Ø3
Ø4
Select field, RUN or MENU
4
Use the
(Up/Down) keys on the
front panel to scroll vertically through
the schedules to highlight the weld
count for the schedule you want to
chain.
CHAIN SCHEDULE SETUP
SCHEDULE NUMBER WELD COUNT
Ø4
ØØØ1
Ø5
ØØØ1
Ø6
ØØØ1
Ø7
ØØØ1
NEXT
Ø4
Ø5
Ø6
Ø7
Select field, RUN or MENU
5
6
7
8
Use the numeric keypad to enter the
number of times you want this schedule
to weld before going to the next
schedule.
Use the key to move the highlight
horizontally to select NEXT.
Use the numeric keypad to enter the
number of the next schedule in the chain.
Use the key to move the highlight
horizontally back to the WELD COUNT
column. Repeat Steps 4 through 8 to
program the rest of the chain.
CHAIN SCHEDULE SETUP
SCHEDULE NUMBER WELD COUNT
Ø4
ØØØ1
Ø5
ØØØ2
Ø6
ØØØ1
Ø7
ØØØ1
NEXT
Ø4
Ø5
Ø6
Ø7
Select field, RUN or MENU
CHAIN SCHEDULE SETUP
SCHEDULE NUMBER WELD COUNT
Ø4
ØØØ1
Ø5
ØØØ2
Ø6
ØØØ1
Ø7
ØØØ1
NEXT
Ø4
Ø5
Ø6
Ø7
Select field, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-13
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
9
When you finish programming the chain, press the MENU key to return to the CHAIN
SCHEDULES menu.
10 Press the 1 key to toggle between ON or OFF.
11 Press the RUN key on the front panel, then use the
keys to select the first weld schedule in
the chain you want to use. The Control will now weld in the "chain" mode until you turn the
Chain Schedules feature OFF.
NOTE: When Chain Schedules is turned ON, the LCD screen changes to show the chain
information on the right side of the screen.
Below the current schedule number, you can see the number of times the current schedule will
be repeated, and the number of the next schedule in the chain.
Setup 1
1. Footswitch Weld Abort
From the SETUP 1 screen, press the 1 key to toggle between ON and OFF. This function controls how
the Control interfaces with a foot switch, a force firing switch, or a programmable logic control (PLC).
Any of these switches could be the weld initiation switch in your system setup.
ON means that the welding process is initiated by closure of the initiation switch and continues to its
conclusion while the initiation switch remains closed. If the initiation switch opens during the welding
process, the welding process will terminate. The ON state is preferred for human operated welding
stations since it allows you to abort the weld process by releasing the foot switch (or the foot pedal in the
case of a manually actuated weld head).
OFF is preferred for computer or PLC controlled welding stations since a single start pulse can be used
to initiate the welding process. To select the ON/OFF states, press the 1 key. The FOOTSWITCH WELD
ABORT line will now reflect your selection.
2. Switch Debounce Time
The contacts of single pole mechanical firing switches “bounce” when they close. The switch debounce time function allows you to specify that the initiation switch contacts must remain closed for 10,
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-14
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
20, or 30 milliseconds before the weld period can be initiated, thereby avoiding false starts caused by the
switch contact bouncing.
1.
2.
From the SETUP 1 screen, press the 2
key to go to the SWITCH DE-BOUNCE
TIME menu screen.
Select the required debounce time by
pressing the 1, 2, 3 or 4 key. NONE
represents a debounce time of 0 ms.
<SWITCH DEBOUNCE TIME>
1. NONE
2. 10 ms
3. 20 ms
4. 30 ms
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
Use NONE for interfacing with the Miyachi Unitek Model 350C Electronic Weld Force Control.
3.
The SWITCH DEBOUNCE TIME line will now reflect your switch debounce time selection.
3. Firing Switch
With the SETUP 1 screen displayed, press the 3 key to select this function. The firing switch input, in
conjunction with or without inputs from the foot switch input, initiates the weld energy sequence. Select
the required switch type by pressing the 1, 2, or 3 key. Pressing the numeric keys automatically returns
the display to the SETUP 1 screen.
1. Auto
<FIRING SWITCH>
The Control accepts a single pole, double pole or
optical firing switch input from a Miyachi
Unitek weld head. Firing switch activation
indicates that the weld head has reached the set
weld force, thus permitting the weld energy
sequence to start.
1. AUTO
2. NONE
3. REMOTE
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
2. None
When using a non-force fired weld head, weld energy initiation must be supplied with the foot switch
input. Additionally, you must select sufficient squeeze time to permit the weld force to stabilize after
contacting the weld pieces.
3. Remote
Use this setting in an automation application or when using PLC control. The BCD input lines, via the
CONTROL SIGNALS connector (see Appendix B. Electrical and Data Connections), select weld energy
schedules and initiate the weld energy sequence.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-15
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Setup 2
1. Display Contrast
1.
From the SETUP 2 screen, press the 1
key to go to the DISPLAY CONTRAST
adjustment screen.
2.
Use the and keys to adjust the
screen contrast for comfortable viewing
in the shop environment.
<DISPLAY CONTRAST >
DISPLAY CONTRAST
: 50 %
0
10
20
Adjust ,
3.
Press the
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Page, RUN or MENU
key to return to the SETUP, PAGE 2 (of 3) screen.
2. Buzzer Loudness
1.
From the SETUP 1 screen, press the 2
key to go to the BUZZER LOUDNESS
adjustment screen.
2.
Use the and keys to adjust the
buzzer tone so that it can be heard
against shop background noise.
3.
Press the
<BUZZER LOUDNESS >
DISPLAY CONTRAST
: 50 %
0
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
Adjust ,
Page, RUN or MENU
90
key to return to the SETUP, PAGE 2 (of 3) screen.
3. End Of Cycle Buzzer
1.
With the SETUP 2 screen displayed, press the 3 key to toggle the end of cycle buzzer ON or
OFF. This function is normally used with manually actuated weld heads. ON means that an
audible signal will be given at the end of each weld process to signal you to release the foot
pedal.
2.
To select the ON/OFF states, toggle the 3 key. The END OF CYCLE BUZZER line will now
reflect your state selection.
4. Update Graph After Weld
From the SETUP 2 screen, press the 4 key to toggle the update graph after weld ON or OFF function.
The UPDATE GRAPH AFTER WELD line will now reflect your state selection.
ON means that the actual weld energy profile will overlay the programmed weld profile after each
weld is made. The weld graph is useful for detecting weld splash, which is indicated by vertical
gaps in the overlap. You can reduce weld splash, and eliminate it in some cases, by using the
upslope weld energy profile.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-16
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
5. Language
Press the 5 key to toggle between English and German. All menu items and instructions on the screen
will be in the language selected.
Setup 3
1. DO TEST WELD
In voltage mode, the unit will do a test weld to optimize response to varying weld conditions. Press 1 to
bring up the following choices:
1) ALWAYS
A test weld will be done if:
x The voltage level changes
x The time in any element of the schedule changes
x If the weld energy field is highlighted and the V key is pressed.
2) ASK
The user will be prompted to choose if a test weld is done or not upon the following conditions:
x The voltage level changes
x The time in any element of the schedule changes
x If the weld energy field is highlighted and the V key is pressed.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-17
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Section III. Operational States
The Control has seven operational states:
NO WELD
TEST
WELD
ALARM
MENU
RUN
MONITOR
You go to the NO WELD, MENU, TEST, RUN and MONITOR states through the control panel. The WELD
and ALARM states are functions of the force firing switch and foot switch input states.
No Weld State
Setting the WELD/NO WELD switch on the control panel to the NO WELD position inhibits the delivery of
weld energy if a weld is initiated, and will display a WELD SWITCH IN NO WELD POSITION alarm on the
screen. But the Control will still go through its electronic weld cycles as programmed into the selected
weld schedule. Use the no weld state when adjusting the air regulators on air actuated weld heads.
Menu State
Pressing the MENU key puts the Control in the
menu state. It brings up menu screens that
enable you to select various options common to
all weld schedules, such as how the Control
interfaces with the force firing switch, foot
switch and weld head.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<MAIN MENU>
SETUP
6. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD COUNTERS
7. RELAY
COPY A SCHEDULE
8. RESET DEFAULTS
PROP VALUE
9. CHAIN SCHEDULES
SYSTEM SECURITY
Number Select an item
Test State
Programming a schedule for a voltage feedback
welding mode, or changing the voltage or time
settings while in the voltage feedback welding
mode, puts the Control in the TEST state. After
making one weld, the Control internally
optimizes the feedback control loop to produce
the fastest rise time, minimum overshoot weld
pulse. The TEST state is automatically replaced
by the run state for subsequent welds.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-18
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Run State
Pressing the RUN key puts the Control in the run
state. In the run state, the screen shows a trace
that represents your programmed parameters for
a given weld schedule. You may select a
different weld schedule to be programmed with
the SCHEDULE key and keypad, or with the up
and down arrows. Then, you may program
squeeze time, up slope, weld time, weld energy,
down slope and cool time with the trace segment selector keys.
In the example on the right, the top line of the
screen shows that the Control is in the RUN state,
the voltage at the voltage sense lead connections
for the PULSE 1 weld period was 1.012 volts, the
monitor is set for displaying peak voltage (rather
than average voltage), the voltage at the voltage
sense input
connection for the PULSE 2 weld period was 1.014 volts, and the total weld count since the weld counter
was last reset is 5,237.
The weld profile trace is an analog display of the electrical parameters programmed with the weld period
selector keys. When the weld is initiated, a profile of the actual weld energy delivered during the weld
cycle, or both weld cycles, will be overlaid on the trace.
The large-type number 1 is the selected weld schedule.
The values 0.050kA and 0.060kA below the trace are respectively the weld current values programmed
for PULSE 1 and PULSE 2 weld periods. You may optionally program weld energy in volts or kilowatts
with the energy units selection keys.
Use the time/energy selector keys to toggle between the weld energy value field and the bottom line of
text, which is the weld period time selection field. Use the weld period selector keys to enable the weld
periods for programming, and use the numeric pad keys for entering time values in milliseconds.
See Chapter 5, Operating Instructions for application-related descriptions of the weld schedule profile.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-19
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Weld State
Once weld current is flowing, the Control is in the WELD state. You can terminate weld current in five
ways:
x Remove the first level of a single-level foot switch, assuming weld abort is ON.
x Remove the second-level of a two-level foot switch, assuming weld abort is ON.
x Input the process stop signal (refer to Appendix B, Electrical and Data Connections).
x Open the normally closed switch across the operator emergency stop switch cable.
NOTE: This action removes all power from the Control.
x Through the action of the monitor settings.
Completion of the firing state is indicated by a profile of actual delivered weld energy superimposed on
the programmed weld energy trace, as shown in the example above.
Monitor State
From the MONITOR keys section on the front
panel, press the kA, V, kW or ȍ key to go to the
monitor state. In this state, when the Control
detects an out of limits condition, it will take one
of four actions for PULSE 1, and one of two
actions for PULSE 2 depending on the selection
made with the MONITOR display as shown at the right. Also, an alarm message will be displayed and
any relay set for ALARM or OUT OF LIMITS will be energized.
The selections for PULSE 1 are:
x NONE: The weld cycle will continue.
x STOP WELD: The weld cycle will stop immediately. Pulse 2 (if applicable) will not fire.
x INHIBIT PULSE2: During the COOL time, the Control calculates the average of the Weld1 pulse
(including upslope, weld and downslope). If the average of the Weld1 pulse is out of limits, the
weld cycle will stop and the Weld2 pulse will be inhibited.
x PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1) stops Pulse 1 immediately after upper or lower energy limits
are exceeded, but allows Pulse 2 to fire.
The selections for PULSE 2 are:
x NONE: The weld cycle will continue.
x STOP WELD: The weld cycle will stop immediately.
The display shows the actual trace of the weld current, voltage or power, and either the peak or the
average value for each weld pulse as selected by pressing the PEAK/AVERAGE key.
See Chapter 4, Using Feedback Modes and Weld Monitoring for a detailed description of monitor and
energy limits operation.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-20
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Alarm State
The Control automatically recognizes many
alarm conditions. The example WELD SWITCH
IN NO WELD POSITION alarm screen shown at
the right is displayed when you attempt to
initiate a weld with the WELD/ NO WELD switch
in the NO WELD position.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-21
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Section IV. Weld Functions
Welding Applications
Some welding applications require the use of
specialized weld functions. A weld function is a
unique heat profile created by weld current,
voltage, or power that is applied over a fixed
time period, to resistance weld different parts.
An example of a fully programmed weld profile
is shown at the right.
Applications include parts that:
x Are plated with cadmium, tin, zinc, or nickel
x Have heavy oxide coatings such as aluminum
x Are round or not flat
By programming the appropriate weld period time and weld energy amplitudes for the weld period
segments, you can program an appropriate weld schedule profile to perform the above applications.
Typical applications and recommended weld schedule profiles are defined in the table below. For more
information about resistance welding, see Appendix F, The Basics Of Resistance Welding and Appendix
G, Quality Resistance Welding Solutions, Defining The Optimum Process
Welding Applications
Weld Function
Typical Application
Single Pulse
Make single spot welds on simple flat parts without plating, or on conductive parts such as
those made of copper or brass.
Up/Downslope
Weld round parts, parts that are not flat, spring steel parts, or heavily plated or oxidized parts
such as aluminum.
Dual Pulse
Use for best control of miniature and small parts spot welding with or without plating.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-22
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Weld Head Applicability
The weld functions can be used with Miyachi Unitek force fired, manual weld heads; air actuated weld
heads; or Series 300 Weld Heads. SQUEEZE TIME is used to allow sufficient time for the electrodes to
close and apply the required weld force to the parts before the weld current begins. Weld current begins
when the squeeze period ends.
When the weld functions are used with any type of air actuated weld head, the hold period can be used
to automatically keep the electrodes closed on the parts after weld current has terminated to provide
additional heat sinking or parts cooling.
NOTES:
x Miyachi Unitek Series 300 Electronic Force Controlled Weld Heads: The SQUEEZE TIME
is controlled by the weld head, not the Control. SQUEEZE TIME begins when the force-firing
switch closes, therefore you will set the Control SQUEEZE TIME to zero and set the DEBOUNCE
TIME to zero.
x Air-Actuated Weld Heads: For force fired, air actuated weld heads, SQUEEZE TIME begins
when both levels of a two-level foot switch are closed and the force firing switch in the air
actuated weld head closes.
x Manual Weld Heads: For manually actuated weld heads, SQUEEZE TIME begins when the
force-firing switch closes. Using SQUEEZE TIME is optional, depending on the welding process
you have developed.
When To Use Functions
To ensure accurate, consistent welds, the Control delivers extremely precise pulses of energy to the weld
head. Each pulse is comprised of weld-time and weld-energy (voltage, current, or power) values preprogrammed by the user. The Control is a closed-loop welding control using internal and external
sensors to measure the weld-energy delivered to the weld head. Weld-energy feedback instantly goes to
the Control's logic circuits that actively correct the pulse to compensate for any variation in part
resistance. The Control also has several monitor functions that give you remarkable control over the
welding and production process. Together, these features ensure precise, consistent welds, higher
productivity, a lower rejection rate, and longer electrode life.
Before operating the Control, it is important to know how to match the Control's capabilities to specific
weld applications. This section provides Weld details in the following order:
x
Weld Schedules
Single-Pulse
Upslope/Downslope
Dual-Pulse
Chapter 5, Operating Instructions, contains the step-by-step instructions on how to program each of the
functions above.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-23
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Weld Schedule Definition
Weld Schedule is the name given to each of 99 separate weld profiles stored in the Control, numbered
from 01 to 99. A weld profile is the graphic representation [or waveform] of the numeric weld-time
and weld-energy values. NOTE: There is an additional weld schedule numbered 00, which can be used
as a "scratch pad" to develop new weld schedules.
When time and energy values are entered using the numeric keypad, the Control displays a line-graph of
the weld profile on the LCD screen. You can see the graph change as you enter new time and energy
values.
Weld profiles may be programmed for single-pulse, upslope/downslope, or dual-pulse operation.
Weld schedules may also use special monitoring features of the Control such as Energy Limit, Active
Part Conditioner, and Pre-Weld Check. These features are described later in this chapter.
Weld Sequence Timing
A weld schedule is a unique heat profile programmed in constant current, voltage, or power that is
applied over a fixed time period, to resistance weld different parts. The entire weld can include all of
the following time periods: Squeeze Time, Upslope 1, Weld Pulse 1, Downslope 1, Cool Time, Upslope
2, Weld Pulse 2, Downslope 2, and Hold Time. The sample dual-pulse profile [or waveform] below
shows the weld current and the corresponding position of the weld head. The graph labeled WELD
CURRENT is what displays on the LCD when you schedule a weld profile.
Sample Weld Sequence (Dual-Pulse)
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-24
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Welding Applications
Weld Pulse Profile
Typical Application
Single-Pulse
Can be used for many of spot-welding applications. Use on flat parts
without plating, or on conductive parts such as those made of copper or
brass.
Upslope/Downslope
Upslope/Downslope should be used for the majority of spot welding
applications. Weld round parts, parts that are not flat, spring steel parts,
or heavily plated or oxidized parts.
Dual-Pulse
Use for spot welding parts with plating. First pulse can be used to
displace plating or oxides and the second pulse to achieve the weld.
For a detailed coverage of resistance welding theory, please refer to Appendix D, The Basics of
Resistance Welding.
Single-Pulse Weld Profile
Applications
x
Flat parts that do not have any plating or heavy oxides. Conductive parts made of copper
or brass.
Description
Single-Pulse is a term used by the industry to describe the simplest heat profile used for many
resistance spot-welding applications.
Single-Pulse Weld Profile
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-25
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Upslope/Downslope Weld Profile
Applications
x
Round or non-flat parts and most resistive materials.
Description
Upslope allows a gradual application of weld energy which permits the parts to come into better
contact with each other reducing the electrode to part contact resistances. Upslope can allow a
smaller electrode force to be used, resulting in a cleaner appearance by reducing electrode
indentation, material pickup and electrode deformation. It can also be used to displace plating
and/or oxides, reduce flashing and spitting, or reduce thermal shock when welding parts containing
glass-to-metal seals.
Downslope (annealing) assists in the grain refinement of certain heat-treatable steels, and prevents
cracking in aluminum and other materials by reducing the cooling rate. Annealing is not typically
used for welding small parts.
Upslope / Downslope Weld Profile
Dual-Pulse Weld Profile
Applications
x
x
x
Flat-to-flat parts.
Round-to-round parts.
Round-to-flat small parts that may or may not be plated.
Description
Adding upslope to the front of both weld periods allows a reduction in electrode force, this results
in a cleaner appearance by reducing electrode indentation, material pickup and electrode
deformation.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
3-26
990-370
CHAPTER 3: SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
Upslope will also help to displace plating and/or oxides, reduce flashing and spitting, or reduce
thermal shock when welding parts containing glass-to-metal seals. In the normal application of
dual-pulse, the Pulse 1 weld period provides sufficient heat to displace the plating or oxides, seat
the electrodes against the base metals, and force the parts into intimate contact. The cool period
allows time to dissipate the heat generated during Pulse 1.
The Pulse 2 weld period completes the structural weld. The Pulse 2 weld current is typically greater
than the Pulse 1 weld current by a factor of 3 as the first pulse significantly reduces the resistance of
the interface between the parts. The only use for the downslope period following the Pulse 1 or
Pulse weld period is to control grain refinement in brittle parts by slowly reducing the weld current
to zero during the downslope period.
The dual-pulse weld profile is very valuable for pre-checking gross parts positioning problems and
reducing parts scrap. Use the Pulse 1 weld at 0.050 kA [or less] and 2.0 ms as a pre-check pulse.
Experiment with upper and lower limit values that you can use to inhibit the Pulse 2 weld if the test
conditions measured by the Pulse 1 weld are out of limits.
NOTE: Upslope is required when a lower limit value is programmed.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
3-27
CHAPTER 4
Introduction to Feedback
Modes and Monitoring
Section 1. Programmable Feedback Modes
Introduction
The feedback mode (current, voltage, power or combo) is one of the selections entered when
programming a weld schedule. Programming weld schedules is explained in Chapter 5, Operating
Instructions.
Current Mode
Application
x
Flat parts where the part-to-part and electrode-to-part contact is controlled and
consistent
Description
This mode delivers the programmed current regardless of work piece resistance changes. This
compensates for slight changes in part thickness without affecting weld quality. Set monitoring
limits on voltage.
Voltage Mode
Application
x
Ideal for welding round or non-flat parts
Description
This mode controls the voltage across the work piece during welding. It helps to compensate for
part misplacement and force problems and automatically reduces weld splash, which is often
associated with non-flat parts and wire welds. Set monitoring limits on current.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
4-1
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
Power Mode
Application
x
Breaking through surface oxides and plating
x
Automated applications where part or electrode surface conditions can vary over time.
Description
This mode precisely varies the weld current and voltage to supply consistent weld energy to the
parts. The power mode has been shown to extend electrode life in automated applications. Set
monitoring limits on current or voltage.
Combo Mode
Application
x
Ideal or welding round parts or projections – especially those with poor initial fit-up or
oxides.
x
Breaking through surface oxides and plating
Description
Combo mode starts out in either constant voltage or constant power control. When the current
produced by that voltage or power control mode exceeds a user-programmed limit for up to 0.2
milliseconds, the unit switches to constant current control at that level. This weld mode is ideal for
parts that start off with oxides or parts whose current-carrying cross section changes significantly
during the weld. For welds that start out in voltage control, set monitor limits on power. For welds
that start out in power, set monitor limits on voltage.
NOTE: In a Dual-Pulse weld profile, a different feedback mode can be used for each pulse. For
example, a constant power first pulse can be used to break through plating in combination with a
constant current second (welding) pulse.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
4-2
990-370
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
Section II. Weld Monitoring
Introduction
The Control's feedback sensors not only control weld energy output, but they can also be used to
monitor each weld. The Control's MONITOR features allow you to view graphic representations of
welds, visually compare programmed welds to actual welds, look at peak or average energy values, set
upper and lower limits for welds, and vary the time periods for these limits during the weld pulse. These
limits can be used for several purposes. Common uses for out-of-limits welds are to stop a weld, or to
trigger a relay to remove parts with bad welds from the production line. These functions are accessed
using the MONITOR buttons on the front panel. To use these functions, see Chapter 5, Operating
Instructions.
PEAK and AVERAGE MONITORING
The Control is always monitoring both the PEAK and AVERAGE of current, voltage,
power, and resistance at the same time. When you press the PEAKļAVERAGE key,
the top line in the LCD simply toggles back and forth so you can view either PEAK or
AVERAGE values whenever you choose.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
4-3
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
Current, Voltage, Power, and Resistance Limits
With the RUN screen selected, you can select what you want to monitor by pressing the following
MONITOR keys above: kA = current, V = voltage, and kW = power, and Ÿ = resistance. These
monitors allow you to program upper and lower limits for PULSE 1 and for PULSE 2. These limits
will display as dotted lines on the LCD screen. Pushing either PULSE button will toggle between
upper and lower limits. PULSE 1 and for PULSE 2 can be programmed to monitor the same units or
monitor separate units. For example, PULSE 1 can monitor kA and PULSE 2 can monitor V.
NOTE: Whichever unit you select, the upper and lower limits for a single pulse must be in the
same units, such as kW.
Force Limits
To access FORCE & LIMITS, press the FORCE button on the front screen. However, the PROP
VALVE OUTPUT FORCE function will only work if you have an optional Proportional Valve
connected to the weld head and connected to the Control. The LO LIM (low limit), HI LIM (high
limit), and LAST functions will only work if you have an optional Load Cell installed in the weld
head and a Load Cell Amplifier (Signal Conditioner) connected to the Control.
Installation and setup instructions for the Proportional Valve, Load Cell, and Load Cell Amplifier
(Signal Conditioner) are supplied by the manufacturers of these devices. Instructions for making
electrical connections to the Control are in Appendix B, Electrical and Data Connections.
NOTE: You can use a Proportional Valve without using a Load Cell and you can use a Load Cell
without using a Proportional Valve.
Distance Limits
To access DISTANCE LIMITS, press the DISTANCE button on the front screen, however it will only
be operational if you have an optional LVDT on the weld head and connected to the Control. This
function allows you to set high and low limits for INITIAL THICKNESS, FINAL THICKNESS, and
FINAL DISPLACEMENT. It also allows you to weld to a specific thickness by entering a thickness
value in the STOP ENERGY AT field.
Time Limits
To access TIME CUT OFF, press the TIME button on the front screen. This function verifies that not
only are the other values you programmed consistent, but the time it takes to reach them are
consistent. The time displayed in the STOP ENERGY AT field for the limits shown above is the
programmed time. The actual weld time may vary. The TIME CUT OFF function allows you to “fine
tune” the actual weld time by placing high and low limits around the time a weld pulse is stopped.
Example: The time entered for the STOP ENERGY AT field is programmed for a 10 millisecond
pulse. Actual weld times run at 5 ms but vary between 4-6 ms. You can then put a low limit of 3
ms and a high limit of 7 ms. If any weld is outside these time limits an OUT OF LIMITS alarm will
sound.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
4-4
990-370
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
Energy Limits
To access ENERGY LIMITS, press the ENERGY button on the front screen. The Control monitors
ENERGY as the combination of power multiplied by time throughout the weld measure in kJ (killi
Joules). This function allows you to put high and low limits around the energy of PULSE 1 and
PULSE 2.
Envelope Limits
To access ENVELOPE LIMITS, press the
ENVELOPE button on the front screen.
Instead of setting “flat” upper and lower
limits, this function sets limits above and
below an actual weld pulse as you can see
by the dotted lines on the right.
The LCD screen will prompt you to press the SELECT key on the front panel to choose a
reference pulse for both PULSE 1 and PULSE 2. Any pulse outside the envelope limits will sound
an OUT OF LIMITS ALARM.
Process Tools
These “tools” are proven methods to use the monitor and limit functions described above in order to
achieve specific results. There are five commonly defined Process Tools.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Active Part Conditioner (APC)
Resistance Set
Pre-Weld Check
Weld To A Limit
Weld Stop
1. Active Part Conditioner (APC)
Application
x Displace surface oxides and contamination
x Reduce contact resistances before delivering the main weld energy.
Description
In the production environment, it is common to see large variations in:
x Oxide and contamination
x Plating thickness and consistency
x Shape and fit up
x Contact resistances due to varying part fit up
In order for a weld to occur, the surface oxides and contamination must be displaced to allow proper
current flow through the parts. Levels of oxide and contamination vary from part to part over time,
which can have an adverse effect on the consistency of the welding process.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
4-5
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
If production parts are plated, there can also be a plating process variation over time resulting in
inconsistent welds. These minor material variations are a major cause of process instability, and it is
best welding practice to seek to minimize their effect.
Active Part Conditioner is designed to cope with material contamination, variation and can be
programmed to apply the exact power to the parts required to displace oxide or contaminants. In
addition, the “Part Conditioner” pulse will terminate at a precise current flow preventing the sudden high
flow, which occurs when the oxide is displaced. This prevents weld splash and material expulsion,
which occurs as a result of an excessively fast heating rate. Part conditioning can help to reduce
variations in contact resistance from part to part caused by different fit up of parts. It will stabilize the
contact resistances before the main welding pulse, therefore reducing variation from weld to weld.
How It Works
Both constant current feedback and constant voltage feedback modes are limited in their ability to
deal with varying levels of part contamination and oxide. If constant current feedback were used, the
power supply would ramp the voltage to very high levels in order to achieve current flow through the
oxide. This rapid input of current is likely to cause splash, especially with round parts. Constant
voltage mode is not ideal for this purpose either, as the voltage will be restricted from reaching
sufficient levels to break down the oxide.
Constant power is ideal for this purpose. As the power supply tries to achieve constant power to the
weld, it raises the voltage to high levels early in the output waveform, since current cannot flow due to
the oxide. As the high voltage breaks down the oxide layer, more current flows to the weld and the
voltage and resistance drop. It will achieve this in a controlled fashion to maintain constant power to the
weld.
Constant Power Waveform With Corresponding
Voltage and Current Waveforms
Active Part Conditioning uses a dual-pulse output. The first pulse is programmed for constant power,
and the second for either constant current, constant voltage, or constant power. (Constant voltage is
used if there is still a chance of weld splash). The purpose of a dual-pulse operation is to enable the first
pulse to target displacement of oxides and good fit up; the second pulse achieves the weld.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
4-6
990-370
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
Active Part Conditioning Waveform
The use of a current limit monitor for the first pulse enables the pulse to be terminated when a
predetermined amount of current flow is achieved. The rise of the current waveform is proof positive
that the oxide is breaking down and the parts are fitting up together, ready to weld. The first pulse,
therefore, should be programmed to be much longer than generally required. The power supply will
terminate the pulse based on the reading of current in the power supply’s monitor.
2. Resistance Set
Application
x Reduce variations in Resistance prior to the weld
x Reduce contact resistances before delivering the main weld energy.
Description
Resistance Set is used when parts vary in initial resistance due to:
x Shape and part fit up
x Very small parts
Resistance Set is very similar to APC except that there are applications where you do not want a high
voltage at the beginning of the pulse. Instead, you want to start both voltage and current low and build
on an upslope. This would be used primarily where resistance would vary from weld to weld, coping
with material contamination, and variation due to part fit up problems. It can be programmed to apply
the exact power to the parts required to reduce the resistance to a consistent level for every weld.
Resistance Set uses a dual-pulse output. The first pulse is programmed for upslope power, and the
second for either constant current, constant voltage, or constant power. (Constant voltage is used if
there is still a chance of weld splash). The purpose of a dual-pulse operation is to enable the first pulse
to target variations in resistance; the second pulse achieves the weld.
Resistance Set Waveform
The use of a current limit monitor for the first pulse enables the pulse to be terminated when a
predetermined amount of current flow is achieved. The rise of the current to a consistent level ensures a
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
4-7
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
consistent resistance at the beginning of the second pulse. Depending on the initial resistance, the
amount of time required to bring the resistance down will vary from weld to weld. The first pulse,
therefore, should be programmed to be much longer than generally required to ensure that the current
limit is always reached. The power supply will terminate the pulse based on the reading of current in the
power supply’s monitor.
3. Pre-Weld Check
Application
x
Detect Misaligned or Missing parts.
Function
This is used to see if parts are misaligned or missing before a welding pulse is delivered to the weld
head. If a part is missing or misaligned, you do not want the machine to weld because the result would
be an unacceptable weld and/or damaged electrodes.
When using a Pre-Weld Check, Pulse 1 should be very short (1-2 milliseconds), and the current
should be low, about 10% of the Pulse 2 current. Pulse 1 should be used as a measurement pulse and
should not perform a weld.
Pre-Weld Check Waveform
Example: To detect misaligned parts, use constant current and set upper and lower voltage limits for
Pulse 1 If parts are misaligned, the work piece resistance will be higher, so the voltage will be higher.
If parts are missing, voltage will be lower. In either case, the Pulse 1 upper or lower limits will be
exceeded, and Pulse 1 can be inhibited.
NOTE: You must have upslope programmed into the pulse in order to set a lower limit.
In addition to inhibiting the weld, the Control has four programmable relay outputs, which can be used
to trigger alarms to signal operators of weld faults or signal automation equipment to perform preprogrammed actions, such as stopping the assembly line so the faulty weld piece can be removed.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
4-8
990-370
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
4. Weld To A Limit
Applications
x Parts with narrow weld window
x Part-to-part positioning problems
x Electrode-to-part positioning problems
Function
To stop the weld when a sufficient current, voltage, or power level is reached. Using limits in this way
ensures a more consistent input of energy, which produces consistently good welds.
Description
This function terminates the weld energy during the welding process if pre-set weld current, voltage, or
power limits are exceeded. In addition to inhibiting the weld, the Control has four programmable relay
outputs which can be used to trigger alarms to signal operators of weld faults, or signal automation
equipment to perform pre-programmed actions, such as stopping the production line so the faulty weld
piece can be removed.
The monitor measures the weld energy parameters during the weld period and compares the
measurements against the programmed limits. If any of the programmed limits are exceeded, the energy
limits monitor sets the Control to a state selected from the OUT OF LIMITS ACTION menu. In addition,
the Control's relays can be programmed to trigger alarms, or trigger an action in an automated welding
system.
In the profile above, the weld current limit is at a sufficient level to get a good weld. In this case, the
operator has selected the option to terminate the weld energy under this condition, so the energy limits
monitor terminates the Pulse 1 weld and inhibits the Pulse 2 weld if it had been programmed.
NOTE: When using the energy limits monitor, always select a monitor mode that is different from the
feedback mode. For example:
x
x
x
If you are welding in constant current, monitor voltage.
If you are welding in constant voltage, monitor current.
If you are welding in constant power, monitor current or voltage.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
4-9
CHAPTER 4: INTRODUCTION TO FEEDBACK MODES AND MONITORING
5. Weld Stop
Applications
x Part-to-part positioning problems
x Electrode-to-part positioning problems
Function
To detect work piece resistance changes that occur when parts are positioned incorrectly at the weld
head. In this case, the energy limits will prevent blowouts, parts damage, and electrode damage. Limits
can be set to terminate the weld if this occurs.
Description
This function terminates the weld energy during the welding process if pre-set weld current, voltage, or
power limits are exceeded. In addition to inhibiting the weld, the Control has four programmable relay
outputs which can be used to trigger alarms to signal operators of weld faults, or signal automation
equipment to perform pre-programmed actions, such as stopping the production line so the faulty weld
piece can be removed.
In the profile above, the weld current is exceeding the selected upper limit before the end of the welding
cycle. The spike in the current waveform indicates that parts were misplaced. In this case, the operator
has selected the option to terminate the weld energy under this condition, so the energy limits monitor
terminates the Pulse 1 weld and inhibits the Pulse 2 weld if it had been programmed.
The monitor measures the weld energy parameters during the weld period and compares the
measurements against the programmed limits.
NOTE: When using the energy limits monitor, always select a monitor mode that is different from the
feedback mode. For example:
x
x
x
If you are welding in constant current, monitor voltage.
If you are welding in constant voltage, monitor current.
If you are welding in constant power, monitor current or voltage.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
4-10
990-370
CHAPTER 5
Operating Instructions
Section I: Introduction
Before You Start
Before operating the Control, you must be familiar with the following:
x The location and function of Controls and Indicators. For more information, see Chapter 1 of
this manual.
x How to select and use the Control functions for your specific welding applications. For more
information, see Chapter 3, System Configuration.
x The principles of resistance welding and the use of programmed weld schedules. For more
information, see Appendix E, The Basics of Resistance Welding. For additional information on
the welding process, see Appendix F, Quality Resistance Welding Solutions, Defining the
Optimum Process.
Pre-Operational Checks
Always perform these checks before attempting to operate the Control.
Connections
Verify that the Control has been connected to a manual or air-actuated weld head as described in
Chapter 2 of this manual. Verify that the Emergency Stop Switch shorting wires are connected or verify
that an Emergency Stop Switch is connected properly.
Power
Verify that power is connected as described in Chapter 2 of this manual.
Compressed Air
If you are using an air-actuated weld head, verify that compressed air is connected as described in the
appropriate sections of your weld head manual. Turn the compressed air ON, and adjust it according to
the instructions in your weld head manual.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-1
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Initial Setup
1.
Adjust the weld head force adjustment knob for a force appropriate for your welding
application. A good starting point is the mid-point in the range of the weld head force.
2.
Set the WELD/NO WELD switch on the Control front panel to the NO WELD position. In this
position, the Control will operate the weld head without producing weld energy.
NOTE: When you are ready to perform a weld, be sure to set this switch back to the WELD
position.
3.
Turn the ON/OFF switch on the rear panel of the Control to the ON position. The default RUN
screen will be displayed. You will use this screen to enter welding parameters.
Default RUN Screen
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-2
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section II. Operation
Single-Pulse Weld Schedule
NOTE: If you are using the optional LVDT, you must perform the procedures described in Appendix 3,
Calibration, Section II, Calibrating the LVDT in addition to the procedures below.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows or
the numeric keypad.
Press the SQUEEZE key to enter the squeeze time before the weld. Use the numeric
keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 999
milliseconds. If using the LVDT, enter a time between 1 and 999 milliseconds. If
using a relay for MG3 synchronization, enter a time between 50 and 999 milliseconds
NOTE: We recommend 150 milliseconds.
Press the PULSE 1 UPSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
upslope. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter 0
milliseconds.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key to highlight the bottom line of the LCD to enter the weld
time. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key again to highlight the middle line of the LCD to enter
weld energy. Use the numeric keypad to enter the energy level or use the VW arrows.
The Control output ranges are:
x Current: from 0.1 o 2.4 kA
x Voltage: 0.2 o 9.999 V
x Power: 0.05 o 9.999 kW
x Combo: The pulse starts in either Voltage or Power using the above limits, and
has a current limit as shown above.
Perform one of the following:
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kA key to program
x
current as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the V key to program
x
voltage as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kW key to program
x
power as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the COMBO key to
x
program combo as the feedback mode.
Press the PULSE 1 DOWNSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
downslope. Use the numeric keypad or the VW arrows. Enter 0 milliseconds. Note
that in combo mode when the unit reaches a constant current, any time programmed in
this segment will be added to the weld at the constant current level.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-3
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
8.
9.
10.
Press the COOL key to enter the amount of time for the cool period after Pulse 1. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter 0.5 milliseconds.
Program Pulse 2 by repeating Steps 3 through 7 above using the keys for Pulse 2, entering the
value 0 in each step.
Press the HOLD key to enter the amount of time for the hold period after the weld. Use
the numeric keypad or the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 999 milliseconds.
We recommend at least 50 milliseconds as weld strength is formed in the hold time.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-4
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Upslope/Downslope Weld Schedule
NOTE: If you are using the optional LVDT, you must perform the procedures described in Chapter 6,
Calibration, Section II, Calibrating the LVDT in addition to the procedures below.
1.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows or
the numeric keypad.
2.
Press the SQUEEZE key to enter the squeeze time before the weld. Use the numeric
keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 999
milliseconds. If using the LVDT, enter a time between 1 and 999 milliseconds. If
using a relay for MG3 synchronization, enter a time between 50 and 999 milliseconds
NOTE: We recommend 150 milliseconds.
3.
Press the PULSE 1 UPSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
upslope. Use the numeric keypad or the VW arrows to enter the time. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds. A good starting point is 5 milliseconds.
4.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key to highlight the bottom line of the LCD to enter the weld
time. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds.
5.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key again to highlight the middle line of the LCD to enter
weld energy. Use the numeric keypad to enter the energy level or use the VW arrows.
The Control output ranges are:
x Current: from 0.1 o 2.4 kA
x Voltage: 0.2 o 9.999 V
x Power: 0.05 o 9.999 kW
x Combo: The pulse starts in either Voltage or Power using the above limits, and
has a current limit as shown above.
6.
Perform one of the following:
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kA key to program
x
current as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the V key to program
x
voltage as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kW key to program
x
power as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the COMBO key to
x
program combo as the feedback mode.
7.
Press the PULSE 1 DOWNSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
downslope. Use the numeric keypad or the VW arrows to enter the time. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds. A good starting point is 5 milliseconds. Note that
in combo mode when the unit reaches a constant current, any time programmed in this
segment will be added to the weld at the constant current level.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-5
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
8.
9.
10.
Press the COOL key to enter the amount of time for the cool period after Pulse 1. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter 0.5 milliseconds.
Program Pulse 2 by repeating Steps 3 through 7 above using the keys for Pulse 2, entering the
value 0 in each step.
Press the HOLD key to enter the amount of time for the hold period after the weld. Use
the numeric keypad or the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 999 milliseconds.
We recommend at least 50 milliseconds as weld strength is formed in the hold time.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-6
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Dual-Pulse Weld Schedule
NOTE: If you are using the optional LVDT, you must perform the procedures described in Appendix
D, LVDT Option, Section 4, Operating Instructions in addition to the procedures below.
1.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows or
the numeric keypad.
2.
Press the SQUEEZE key to enter the squeeze time before the weld. Use the numeric
keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 999
milliseconds. If using the LVDT, enter a time between 1 and 999 milliseconds. If
using a relay for MG3 synchronization, enter a time between 50 and 999 milliseconds
NOTE: We recommend 150 milliseconds.
3.
Press the PULSE 1 UPSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
upslope. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds.
4.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key to highlight the bottom line of the LCD to enter the weld
time. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time
between 0 and 99 milliseconds.
5.
Press the PULSE 1 WELD key again to highlight the middle line of the LCD to enter
weld energy. Use the numeric keypad to enter the energy level or use the VW arrows.
The Control output ranges are:
x Current: from 0.1 o 2.4 kA
x Voltage: 0.2 o 9.999 V
x Power: 0.05 o 9.999 kW
x Combo: The pulse starts in either Voltage or Power using the above limits, and
has a current limit as shown above.
6.
Perform one of the following to program the Pulse 1 feedback mode:
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kA key to program
x
current as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the V key to program
x
voltage as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the kW key to program
x
power as the feedback mode.
From the CONTROL keys section on the front panel, press the COMBO key to
x
program combo as the feedback mode.
7.
Press the PULSE 1 DOWNSLOPE key to enter the amount of time for the Weld Pulse 1
downslope. Use the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a
time between 0 and 99 milliseconds. Note that in combo mode when the unit
reaches a constant current, any time programmed in this segment will be added to the
weld at the constant current level.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-7
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
8.
9.
10.
Press the COOL key to enter the amount of time between Pulse 1 and Pulse 2. Use the
numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0 and 99
milliseconds. We recommend at least 2 milliseconds.
Program Pulse 2 by repeating Steps 3 through 7 above using the keys for Pulse 2, entering
appropriate values for Pulse 2.
Press the HOLD key to enter the amount of time for the hold period after the weld. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the time or use the VW arrows. Enter a time between 0
and 999 milliseconds. We recommend at least 50 milliseconds.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-8
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section III. Using the Weld Monitor
Overview
The Control allows you to adjust extremely precise limits for the amount of energy and weld time. Like
all welding processs development, you’ll need to make several test welds, and view the waveforms and
limits of actual welds in order to “fine tune” the limits to your needs.
The energy limits appear as horizontal dotted lines on the LCD screen. The UPPER LIMIT line is longer
than the lower limit line because it includes the UPSLOPE, WELD, and DOWNSLOPE portions of the
actual weld waveform. The LOWER LIMIT line is shorter because it only includes the WELD portion of
the waveform. If the line of either limit crosses the weld energy waveform, the Control can trigger an
alarm, inhibit the second pulse, or stop the weld energy. See Chapter 4, Using Feedback Modes and
Weld Monitoring for more details.
As you can see by the LCD screens above, you can shorten the length of the time of the LOWER LIMIT so
it will not cross the weld waveform. This allows you to raise or lower the LOWER LIMIT closer to the
peak of the actual waveform without crossing the weld waveform. For some welds it may be very
important to get up to the peak voltage or current to get the right melting and get there at the right time
during the pulse. Every millisecond could be very important.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-9
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
1.
2.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad. Fire the welder and view the output waveform (shaded graph)
on the display.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the
or
,
,
key to view the desired waveform. Note that the other monitor keys do not
have graphical waveforms.
Toggle the Pulse 1 weld time/energy selector key to select the upper limit field for the
weld period. Use the numeric keypad or the VW arrows to enter the upper limit value
for the Pulse 1 weld period.
3.
4.
,
Perform one of the following to program the Pulse 1 monitor limit mode:
Press the kA key to program current as the limit mode.
x
x
Press the V key to program voltage as the limit mode.
x
Press the kW key to program power as the limit mode.
x
Press the Ƿ key to program resistance as the limit mode.
5.
Toggle the Pulse 1 weld time/energy selector key to select the lower limit field for the
weld period. Enter the lower limit value for the Pulse 1 weld period.
NOTE: In order for a Pulse 1 lower limit to be programmed, you must first program a
Pulse 1 upslope in the weld schedule.
The lower limit mode (current, voltage, or power) will automatically be the same as the
upper limit mode programmed in Step 4.
6.
Press the COOL weld period key.
This will bring up the PULSE 1
OUT OF LIMITS ACTION screen.
This screen allows you to select
the action that the Control will
take if the Pulse 1 upper or lower
limits are exceeded. You have
four choices:
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1. none
2. STOP WELD
3. INHIBIT PULSE2
4. PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
x
NONE takes no action if upper or lower energy limits are exceeded.
x
STOP WELD stops the weld immediately during Pulse 1, and prevents Pulse 2 from
firing (if applicable).
x
INHIBIT PULSE2 stops the weld at the end of Pulse 1, and prevents Pulse 2 from
firing. This function will not operate if both pulses are joined without a cool time.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-10
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
x
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1) stops Pulse 1 immediately after upper or lower
energy limits are exceeded, but allows Pulse 2 to fire. This function will not operate
if both pulses are joined without a cool time.
NOTE: See Section IV, Programming For Active Part Conditioning.
7.
After making your selection the display will automatically return to the monitor screen.
8.
Program the upper and lower limits for Pulse 2 by repeating Steps 4 through 6 above using the
keys for Pulse 2, entering appropriate values for Pulse 2.
NOTES:
x
The monitor limit mode (current, voltage, power or resistance) for Pulse 2 can be
different than the monitor limit mode for Pulse 1.
x
To “fine tune” the monitor limits to very precise values, see Chapter 4, Introduction to
Feedback Modes and Monitoring.
9.
Press the HOLD period key.
This will bring up the PULSE 2
OUT OF LIMITS ACTION screen.
This screen allows you to select
the action that the Control will
take if the Pulse 2 upper or
lower limits are exceeded. You
have two choices:
PULSE 2 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1. none
2. STOP WELD
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
ƒ
NONE takes no action if upper or lower energy limits are exceeded.
ƒ
STOP WELD stops PULSE 2 immediately after upper or lower energy limits are
exceeded.
10.
After you have made your selection the
display will automatically return to the
MONITOR screen.
NOTE: The Control adds dotted lines
to the appropriate graph to show the
programmed limits.
The screen on the right shows how the
Limits and Alarm actions appear when
an actual weld trace is displayed on the
LCD.
11.
After entering or changing monitor limits, you must press either the appropriate MONITOR or
RUN buttons to save the changes. If this is not done, the last input field will remain
highlighted, and the changes will not be saved to memory. Any welds done in this condition
will use the older, unedited values still stored in the memory.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-11
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
NOTE: All lower limits apply only to the Pulse 1 and Pulse 2 WELD periods. Lower limits
do not cover any upslope or downslope periods. All upper limits apply to the entire Pulse 1
and Pulse 2 periods, including their upslope and downslope periods.
1.
Set an UPPER LIMIT and LOWER LIMIT using the procedures in Section III, Programming the
Weld Monitor.
2.
Perform a weld to see how the limits (dotted lines) appear compared to the weld graph.
3.
Raise or lower the UPPER LIMIT and LOWER LIMIT as necessary using the procedures in
Section III, Programming the Weld Monitor.
4.
To lengthen or shorten the time periods, go to the MONITOR screen.
5.
Press the UPSLOPE key for PULSE 1 or PULSE 2 to get the MONITOR LIMITS screen.
NOTE: INGNORE 1st deletes time
< PULSE 1 MONITOR LIMITS >
1. LOWER LIMIT IGNORE 1ST :
0.0ms
from the beginning of the limit, IGNORE
2. LOWER LIMIT IGNORE LAST :
2.5ms
LAST deletes time from the end of the
3. UPPER LIMIT IGNORE 1ST :
0.0ms
limit. This will not only shorten the
4. UPPER LIMIT IGNORE LAST :
0.0ms
limit time, but depending on the amount
of time deleted on each end of the limit,
NUMBER Select an item, ENERGY Monitor screen
the limit will appear to move
horizontally across the screen. This
allows you to fit the LOWER LIMIT precisely into the waveform graph.
6.
Use the numerical keypad to select the number of the limit you want to change.
7.
When the value is highlighted (Example: 2.5ms), use the numerical keypad to type in a new
value. You must leave a minimum time of 0.5 ms in order for the changes to be saved in
memory.
8.
Press the RUN or monitor key when you have finished entering new values.
9.
Raise or lower the UPPER LIMIT and LOWER LIMIT as necessary using the procedures in
Section III, Programming the Weld Monitor.
10. Return to the RUN screen and make a test weld in order to view the waveform to see where
the new limits appear compared to the waveform graph.
11. Repeat steps 1 £ 10 until the limits are where you want them.
NOTE: Lower limits apply to the programmed weld time only. Programming a longer
upslope extends the time before a lower limit applies in the monitoring screen.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-12
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section IV. Active Part Conditioning
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad.
Program a single pulse for Constant Power operation. Program the power level and weld time
to cause slight sticking between the two parts. Make a few welds and pull them apart. Increase
or decrease the power setting until a light tack weld is achieved.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the voltage V key and
observe the high peak of the voltage waveform.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the ȍ (resistance) key and
observe the resistance waveform. This should appear to begin high, then start to drop as
a tack weld is made and oxides are removed.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the kA (current) key and
observe the current waveform starting to rise as the oxidization breaks down. If the
current waveform starts to flatten, this is an indication that the resistance has stabilized
and the parts have come into closer contact.
Push RUN and optimize the energy and time setting of Pulse 1 (constant power) to
provide an adequate tack weld and also a current waveform (view in the monitor screen)
that has started to flatten out, but is still rising. This indicates that a full melt has not yet
occurred.
From the MONITOR keys section
on the front panel, press the kA
key to program an upper current
limit on the MONITOR screen.
NOTE: You can toggle between PEAK and AVERAGE readings by pressing the
PEAK/AVERAGE key.
Press the COOL weld period
key. This will bring up the
8.
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS
ACTION screen.
Select 4. PART CONDITIONER
9.
(Stop Pulse1).
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1.
2.
3.
4.
none
STOP WELD
INHIBIT PULSE2
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
NOTE: For more details on this process, see Active Part Conditioner in Chapter 4, Using
Feedback Modes and Weld Monitoring.
10.
Since different levels of oxide require different amounts of time to reach the current
limit, return to the RUN screen and extend the programmed weld time (usually double
the time works). This will ensure that there will be enough time for the current to rise
and reach the limit, even with heavily oxidized parts.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-13
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
11.
Try welds with varying oxide (clean and dirty). The power supply terminates the first pulse
when your programmed current is reached. A clean part will reach the current limit sooner and
the pulse will terminate early. A dirty part will require more time before the oxide is broken
down and current can flow.
12.
Program your second welding pulse as
normal to achieve a strong weld.
Constant voltage is recommended for
round parts and constant current for flat
parts. An upslope may be required to
restrict the current flow early in the
second pulse and avoid weld splash.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-14
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section V. Resistance Set
Note: The Resistance Set tool is very similar to the Active Part Conditioning tool. The difference is
that the first pulse is programmed as all Upslope for Resistance Set, where it is programmed as all Weld
Time (Square Wave) for Active Part Conditioning. The Resistance Set pulse is programmed as all
Upslope to keep both the Voltage and Current low at the beginning of the pulse.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad.
Program a single pulse for Constant Power operation, but program the time in the Upslope
portion of Pulse 1. Program the Weld Time and Downslope of Pulse 1 to 0.0 ms. Program the
power level and Upslope time to cause slight sticking between the two parts. Make a few
welds and pull them apart. Increase or decrease the power setting until a light tack weld is
achieved.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the voltage V key and
observe gradual rise of the voltage waveform.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the ȍ (resistance) key and
observe the resistance waveform. This should appear to begin high, then start to drop as
a tack weld is made and the resistance decreases.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the kA (current) key and
observe the current waveform starting to rise as the resistance decreases. If the current
waveform starts to flatten, this is an indication that the resistance has stabilized and the
parts have come into closer contact.
Push RUN and optimize the energy and time setting of Pulse 1 to provide an adequate
tack weld and also a current waveform (view in the monitor screen) that has started to
flatten out, but is still rising. This indicates that a full melt has not yet occurred.
From the MONITOR keys section
on the front panel, press the kA
key to program an upper current
limit on the MONITOR screen.
NOTE: You can toggle between PEAK and AVERAGE readings by pressing the
PEAK/AVERAGE key.
8.
Press the COOL weld period
key. This will bring up the
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS
ACTION screen.
9.
Select 4. PART CONDITIONER
(Stop Pulse1)
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1.
2.
3.
4.
none
STOP WELD
INHIBIT PULSE2
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-15
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
NOTE: For more details on this process, see Resistance Set in Chapter 4, Using Feedback
Modes and Weld Monitoring.
10.
Since different levels of resistance require different amounts of time to reach the current
limit, return to the RUN screen and extend the programmed weld time (usually double
the time works). This will ensure that there will be enough time for the current to rise
and reach the limit, even with wide variations in initial resistance.
11.
The power supply terminates the first pulse when your programmed current is reached. A low
resistance part will reach the current limit sooner and the pulse will terminate early. A highly
resistive part will require more time before the resistance decreases and current can flow.
12.
Program your second welding pulse as
normal to achieve a strong weld.
Constant voltage is recommended for
round parts and constant current for flat
parts. An upslope may be required to
restrict the current flow early in the
second pulse and avoid weld splash.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-16
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section VI. Pre-Weld Check
Note: The Pre-Weld Check function is used to detect misaligned or missing parts before the weld is
performed. Therefore, the Pre-Weld Check function should only be programmed after the welding
schedule has been developed. The welding schedule includes the time and energy settings as well as the
electrode force required to produce strong, consistent welds.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad.
Program the second pulse as required to produce strong, consistent welds. Then, program the
first pulse for Constant Current operation. Program the first pulse current level to
approximately 10% of the second pulse current. Program the first pulse upslope time to 1 ms
and first pulse weld time to 2 ms. Program 2 ms of cool time between the pulses. Make a few
welds and verify that the welds are strong and consistent.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the voltage V key and observe
the peak voltage reading of the first pulse. Make several more welds and observe the
range of first pulse peak voltage readings from weld to weld.
Press the Pulse 1 weld key to highlight the upper limit field for the weld period. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the upper limit value for the Pulse 1 weld period. Program
a voltage level that is slightly higher than the voltages observed in step 3 above.
5.
Press the voltage V key to save the setting as an upper voltage limit.
6.
Press the COOL weld period
key. This will bring up the
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS
ACTION screen.
Select 1. STOP WELD
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1.
2.
3.
4.
none
STOP WELD
INHIBIT PULSE2
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
7.
Toggle the Pulse 1 weld key to highlight the lower limit field for the Pulse 1 weld
period. Use the numeric keypad to enter a lower limit value with a voltage level that is
slightly lower than the voltages observed in step 3 above.
8.
Press the voltage V key to save the setting as a lower voltage limit.
9.
10.
Make several more welds and verify that under normal circumstances, the limits are not
reached and the welds are not aborted. If the limits are reached under normal welding
conditions, adjust the levels and times of the upper and lower voltage limits accordingly.
Return to the RUN screen and make several welds. Observe that under normal
conditions, the welds are not aborted, and that consistent, strong welds can be produced.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-17
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
11.
Try making welds with only one part present. Also try making welds with misaligned parts.
Observe that the power supply terminates the weld during the first pulse as soon as the voltage
limits are reached. If the voltage limits are not being reached with these conditions present,
return to the voltage monitor screen and adjust the limits accordingly. You may also have to
adjust the Pulse 1 current from the RUN screen if needed to optimize the Pre-Weld Check
settings.
12.
The Pre-Weld Check function can now
be used to detect misaligned or missing
parts before the Pulse 2 welding current
is delivered to the parts.
Pre-Weld Check Waveform
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-18
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section VII. Weld To A Limit
NOTE: The Weld to a Limit function is used to stop the weld when a specific current, voltage, or
power level, sufficient to produce good welds, is reached. Using limits in this way ensures a more
consistent input of energy, which produces consistently good welds for some applications. The Weld to
a Limit function should only be programmed after a welding schedule, which produces acceptable
results, has been developed. The welding schedule includes the time and energy settings as well as the
electrode force setting. In the following steps, a Constant Voltage weld is used as an example to show
how the Weld to a Limit function is programmed.
1.
2.
3.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad.
Program a single pulse for Constant Voltage operation as required to make strong welds.
Make a few welds and verify that the welds are acceptable.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the kA
(current), V (voltage), kW (power), and ȍ (resistance) keys and
observe the resulting waveforms.
NOTE: You can toggle between PEAK and AVERAGE readings by pressing the
PEAK/AVERAGE key.
4.
5.
6.
Press the kA (current) key and observe the current waveform. If the current waveform
is still rising at the end of the pulse, the Weld to a Limit function may work well for the
application. If the current waveform quickly rises and flattens out early in the pulse, the
Weld to a Limit function is not appropriate for the application.
Observe the peak current reading on the current monitor screen. Make several more welds
and observe the range of peak current readings from weld to weld.
Press the Pulse 1 weld key to highlight the upper limit field for the weld period. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the upper limit value for the Pulse 1 weld period. Program
a current level that is the same as the peak current readings observed in step 5 above.
7.
Press the current kA key to save the setting as an upper current limit.
8.
Press the COOL weld period
key. This will bring up the
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS
ACTION screen.
9.
Select 1. STOP WELD
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1.
2.
3.
4.
none
STOP WELD
INHIBIT PULSE2
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-19
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
10.
11.
Return to the RUN screen and
increase the weld time by 1-2
ms. Make several welds and
verify that the upper voltage
limit is reached for every weld,
and the weld pulse stops before
the end of the programmed weld
time.
Weld to a Limit Waveform
Make several more welds and inspect them for consistency of weld quality and/or weld
strength.
NOTE: When using the Weld to a Limit function, always select a monitor mode that is
different from the feedback mode. For example:
x
x
x
If you are welding in constant current, put limits on voltage.
If you are welding in constant voltage, put limits on current.
If you are welding in constant power, put limits on current or voltage.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-20
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section VIII. Weld Stop
Note: The Weld Stop function is similar to the Pre-Weld Check function, as both are used to detect
missing or misaligned parts. Both functions are used to stop the weld when a specific current, voltage,
or power level is reached. The Weld Stop function stops the weld in the actual welding pulse; the PreWeld Check uses a small pre-pulse to stop the weld. The Weld Stop function should only be
programmed after a welding schedule, which produces acceptable results, has been developed. The
welding schedule includes the time and energy settings as well as the electrode force setting. In the
following steps, a Constant Current weld is used as an example to show how the Weld Stop function is
programmed.
1.
2.
3.
Press the SCHEDULE key, then select a Weld Schedule using either the VW arrows
or the numeric keypad.
Program a single pulse for Constant Current operation as required to make strong, consistent
welds. Make a few welds and verify that the welds are acceptable.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press the kA
(current), V (voltage), kW (power), and ȍ (resistance) keys and
observe the resulting waveforms.
NOTE: You can toggle between PEAK and AVERAGE readings by pressing the
PEAK/AVERAGE key.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Press the V (voltage) key and observe the voltage waveform.
Observe the peak and average readings on the voltage monitor screen. Make several more
welds and observe the range of voltage readings from weld to weld.
Press the Pulse 1 weld key to highlight the upper limit field for the weld period. Use
the numeric keypad to enter the upper limit value for the Pulse 1 weld period. Program
an upper voltage limit that is slightly above the peak voltage readings observed in step 5
above.
Press the voltage V key to save the setting as an upper voltage limit.
Press the COOL weld period
key. This will bring up the
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS
ACTION screen.
9.
Select 1. STOP WELD
PULSE 1 OUT OF LIMITS ACTION
1.
2.
3.
4.
none
STOP WELD
INHIBIT PULSE2
PART CONDITIONER (Stop Pulse1)
NUMBER Select, MENU Previous menu
10.
Toggle the Pulse 1 weld key to highlight the lower limit field for the Pulse 1 weld
period. Use the numeric keypad to enter a lower limit value with a voltage level that is
slightly lower than the voltages observed in step 3 above.
11.
Press the voltage V key to save the setting as a lower voltage limit.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-21
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
12.
13.
14.
Make several more welds and verify that under normal circumstances, the limits are not
reached and the welds are not aborted. If the limits are reached under normal welding
conditions, adjust the levels and times of the upper and lower voltage limits accordingly.
Return to the RUN screen and make several welds. Observe that under normal
conditions, the welds are not aborted, and that consistent, strong welds can be produced.
Try making welds with only one part present. Also try making welds with misaligned parts.
Observe that the power supply terminates the weld as soon as the voltage limits are reached. If
the voltage limits are not being reached with these conditions present, return to the voltage
monitor screen and adjust the limits accordingly.
15.
Return to the RUN screen and
make several welds. Verify that
the Weld Stop function detects
missing and misaligned parts.
Weld Stop Waveform
NOTE: When using the Weld Stop function, always select a monitor mode that is different
from the feedback mode. For example:
x
x
x
If you are welding in constant current, put limits on voltage.
If you are welding in constant voltage, put limits on current.
If you are welding in constant power, put limits on current or voltage.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-22
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section IX. Energy Monitor
Press the ENERGY key and the
screen on the right appears.
In this screen you can program upper and lower watt second limits for the first and second pulse. The
display will show the calculated watt second values for the first and second pulse.
Refer to Section III of this chapter for specific instructions on setting upper and lower limits and out of
limit actions.
Note: The upper limit applies to the entire upslope, weld and downslope time. The lower limit applies
for, and is checked only, at the end of P1 and the end of P2. Note that the energy is cumulative through
both pulses. The energy displayed at the end of P2 is the sum of the energy delivered during P1 and P2.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-23
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section X. Distance Monitor
Distance Limits
Displacement
Displacement is how far the weld pieces collapsed during the weld – the difference between the initial
part thickness and the final part thickness. You can place high and low limits around displacement as
well.
LVDT Main Screen
From the LVDT keys section on the
front panel, press the DISTANCE key
and the screen on the right appears.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM
HI LIM
INITIAL
+000
000
FINAL
+000
+000
DISPLC
+000
000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
3600277
LAST
+000
CONT
+000
+000
XX%
XXXX
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
NOTES:
x
POSITION in the top row indicates the position of the top electrode relative to the bottom
x
x
electrode.
This screen shows +092, which means that the top electrode is 0.092” away (up) from the
bottom electrode. The 7-digit number on the right side of the screen (3600277 in this
example) indicates the number of welds made.
The xx% number shows the displacement as a percentage of the initial thickness
The xxxx after the WELD TO limit shows the time at which the limit was reached.
x
x
x
x
x
x
The large
1
indicates which weld schedule is currently selected.
SCHEDULE in the bottom line indicates that you press the SCHEDULE or DISTANCE button
in order to edit the LVDT screen.
In order to get accurate initial thickness readings, squeeze time must be set to
at least 1 msec.
When you first press the SCHEDULE button, the INITIAL LO LIM is highlighted and the
bottom line changes as shown on the right
RUN in the bottom line indicates that you press the RUN button in order to leave the LVDT
screen and return to the RUN screen.
If you wish to remain in the LVDT screen, press the DISTANCE button instead of the RUN
button. This will remove highlighting, but leave you in the LVDT screen.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-24
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Before You Start: Set New Electrodes to “Zero”
The LVDT must have a zero reference point (for example, when the two electrodes touch each other,
there is zero distance between them). All distances calculated by the LVDT are measured from this
zero. When you change electrodes in your weld head or agressiveley clean the electrodes, the electrodes
may not be in the same exact position as the old electrodes, so zero may no longer be the same, therefore
you must set a new zero.
There are two ways to set a new zero: Either perform the quick calibration procedure detailed above or
perform the new zero procedure detailed below. The preferred method is to set a new zero and
recalibrate as detailed above.
To set a new zero without recalibration:
1.
From the monitor keys section on
the front panel, press the ZERO
key. The screen on the right
appears. Select option 1 for ZERO
LVDT.
<ZERO LVDT OR FORCE>
1. ZERO LVDT
2. ZERO (TARE) FORCE
2.
During the next weld, the initial
position will be set to 0.
3.
The screen should now show NEW ELECTRODE: IS SET.
Number Select an item, RUN or MENU
Changing from Inches to Millimeters (MM)
Before programming LVDT screens, select
inches (IN) or millimeters (MM) as your units of
measurement. The default is IN. To change to
MM:
1.
Press the VW buttons to scroll down
to the STOP ENERGY AT line.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM HI LIM LAST
INITIAL
+00.00
00.00
+00.00
FINAL
+00.00
+00.00
+00.00
DISPLC
+000
000
+000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
XXXX
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
0000000
STOP
XX%
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
2.
Press the
keys to scroll right to highlight IN/1000.
3.
Press the SELECT key to change to MM. This will change all fields to mm. Limits and last
measurement data will be zeroed.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-25
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
High and Low Limits for Initial Thickness
Initial thickness of the parts is measured in
1/1000 of an inch (or 1/100 of a mm). As the
electrode goes down, the numbers decrease
towards zero. Initial thickness is measured at the
end of squeeze time before the weld energy
flows.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM HI LIM LAST
INITIAL
+037
041
+000
FINAL
+000
+000
+000
DISPLC
+000
000
+000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
XXXX
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
0000000
CONT
XX%
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
From the main LVDT screen, press the SCHEDULE button to edit the screen.
Scroll to INITIAL LO LIM.
Use the numerical keypad on the front of the Control to enter a numerical value.
Scroll to INITIAL HI LIM.
Use the numerical keypad on the front of the Control to enter a numerical value.
Scroll to CONT for “Continue.” If the initial thickness is out of the high or low limits, you
may choose to have welding continue or stop by pressing the PEAK/AVERAGE button (it
toggles between stop and continue).
NOTE: If you select CONT, it will continue to weld even if it is out of limits. If you choose
STOP, it will stop and not weld.
Verify that the weld schedule has at least 1 msec squeeze time. Amada Miyachi America
recommends 150 msec.
Example: In the screen on the right, The
INITIAL LO LIM was set to 037.0, the HI LIM
was set to 041.0, and “Continue” was set to
“Stop” if the parts were out of limits. This
weld was stopped because the LAST shows
only 0.022 inch, lower than the INITIAL LO
LIM. This indicates a weld piece was
missing or too thin.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM
HI LIM
LAST
INITIAL
+037
041
+022
FINAL
+000
+000 000
DISPLC
+000
000
+000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
XXXX
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
0000000
STOP
XX%
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
NOTE: See Section XIV, Programming Relays for setting relay actions.
High and Low Limits for Final Thickness
FINAL thickness is measured at the end of hold time after the weld. You can put high and low limits
around final thickness. The Control will give you an alarm on the screen, which says out of limits. See
Section XIV, Programming Relays for setting relay actions.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-26
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
1.
Scroll to FINAL LO LIM.
2.
Use the numerical keypad on the front
of the Control to enter a numerical
value.
3.
Scroll to FINAL HI LIM. Use the
numerical keypad on the front of the
Control to enter a numerical value.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM HI LIM LAST
INITIAL
+037
041
+000
FINAL
+000
+000
000
DISPLC
+000
000
+000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
XXXX
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
0000000
CONT
XX%
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-27
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
High and Low Limits for Displacement
DISPLACEMENT is the change or difference between the INITIAL and FINAL thickness. You can put high
and low limits around displacement. The Control will give you an alarm on the screen, which says out
of limits. The percentage value shown on the right is for reference only. See Section XIV,
Programming Relays for setting relay actions.
1.
Scroll to DISPLC LO LIM.
2.
Use the numerical keypad on the front
of the Control to enter a numerical
value.
3.
Scroll to DISPLC HI LIM.
LVDT
POSITION +092
LO LIM HI LIM LAST
INITIAL
+037
041
+000
FINAL
+000
+000
000
DISPLC
+000
000
+000
STOP ENERGY AT
000
XXXX
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
0000000
CONT
XX%
IN/1000
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
4.
Use the numerical keypad on the front of the Control to enter a numerical value.
STOP ENERGY AT: (Weld to a Specific Displacement)
You can program the LVDT to stop the current flow in the middle of the weld once it has reached a
specific displacement.
1. From the main LVDT screen, press the SCHEDULE button to edit the screen.
2. Scroll to WELD TO.
3. Use the numerical keypad on the front of the Control to enter a numerical value of the
displacement when you want the weld energy to stop.
Example: On the LVDT screen, the
WELD STOP-DISPLC REACHED @8MS
0000283
LO LIM HI LIM
LAST
results show that the STOP ENERGY AT
INITIAL
+000
000
+056
CONT
displacement was programmed for 003”.
FINAL
+000 +
+000
+046
The STOP ENERGY AT number will
DISPLC
+000
000
+010
18%
STOP ENERGY AT
003
008
IN/1000
always be less than the actual
NEW ELECTRODE:
IS SET
displacement. The actual displacement
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
was +010” as shown in the LAST
column (Last Weld). The time at which
the weld reached the displacement limit is shown in the LAST column.
On the RUN screen, the same
information is displayed on the right.
The current (shaded graph) was turned
OFF before the programmed time
because the WELD TO thickness was
reached.
NOTE: See relay screens for options to signal operators or automation of errors.
2
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-28
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section XI. Force Monitor
Force Limits
Description
Force Control (FORCE OUTPUT) can control one electronic pressure regulator. This electronic pressure
regulator is often referred to as a proportional valve. Output Force is programmed in lbs, kg or N using
front panel controls. Once the Operator calibrates the output and programs the Output Force, the
Control converts this to the correct voltage to be sent to the electronic pressure regulator in order to get
the desired force. Calibration is a simple 2-step procedure using front panel controls, See Appendix C,
Calibration for details.
Operation
The electronic pressure regulator attached to the Control should have an association of 0-5V = 0-100 psi
or 0-10V = 0-100 psi depending on the type of regulator used. To measure force a sensor has to be
connected to the Control (0 – 5V or 0 – 10V, depending on the sensor type). See Appendix B, Electrical
and Data Connections for details on making the FORCE SET and FORCE READ connections.
FORCE & LIMITS Main Screen
Press the FORCE key and the screen
on the right appears.
< FORCE & LIMITS >
PROP VALVE OUTPUT FORCE : 010.0 LBS
LO LIM
WELD START 000.0LBS
WELD END
000.0LBS
ACTION: CONTINUE
HI LIM
000.0LBS
000.0LBS
LAST
000.0LBS
000.0LBS
x
PROP VALVE OUTPUT FORCE: Enter the desired force at the electrode.
x
WELD START Force Limits: Enter the desired low and high force limits. The force will be
measured at the end of SQUEEZE and displayed in the LAST position.
x
WELD END Force Limits: Enter the desired low and high force limits. The force will be
measured at the end of HOLD and displayed in the LAST position.
x
ACTION:
ņ
ņ
CONTINUE will allow the weld to continue and only give an OUT OF LIMIT message.
STOP will stop the weld process.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-29
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section XII. Time Limits
Time
The function of the time screen is to allow the user to program limits around the Cut Off time. The Cut
Off time is defined as the time when the control system commands current to turn off because it reached
a user-programmed limit. For both P1 and P2, this time is measured from the start of the first pulse.
Setting a value to zero turns off that limit.
In order for this function to accept limits, a monitor limit must be set. They can be based on current,
voltage, power, energy, resistance, envelope or displacement. If multiple limits are set for “weld to” the
time cut off limits will apply to the value that actually terminates the weld.
There are upper and lower limits for Cut Off
time for P1 and for P2. See Chapter 3 to
program relay actions corresponding to these
time limits.
P1
P2
LO LIM
ØØØ.Ø ms
000.0 ms
<TIME CUT OFF>
HI LIM
ØØØ.Ø ms
000.0 ms
LAST
ØØ2.Ø ms
ØØ8. Ø ms
1
Arrows to select field, RUN or, MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-30
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section XIII. Envelope Limits
Operation of Envelope
The user can program a limit around a reference waveform for current, voltage or power for Pulse 1 and
Pulse 2. Different modes can be selected for Pulse 1 and Pulse 2.
1.
2.
Press the ENVELOPE button to call up
the envelope screen.
Push SELECT to choose a reference
ENVELOPE Ø.ØØØ
peak PØ Ø.ØØØ
ØØØØ511
1
waveform for Pulse 1 and Pulse 2
+OFFSET: none
-OFFSET: none
3.
Press 1, 2 or 3 to select the reference
waveform for Pulse 1. Press 4, 5 or 6 to
select the reference waveform for Pulse
2.
none
none
none
none
<SAVE REFERENCE WAVEFORM>
1. P1 PULSE kA
4. P2 PULSE kA
2. P1 PULSE V
5. P2 PULSE kA
3. P1 PULSE kW
6. P2 PULSE kW
Number Select an item, RUN or MENU
4.
The screen on the right shows a current
reference waveform for both P1 and P2.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Press the P1 Time/Energy Selector key to input the upper offset from the reference
waveform for P1.
Press the P1 Time/Energy Selector key again to input the lower offset from the reference
waveform for P1.
Repeat this process for P2 if desired.
Push the Upslope key to adjust the time over which these limits apply.
NOTES:
x The Graphic will scale to fit the screen
as positive and negative offsets are
programmed.
x
From any RUN screen pushing the envelope key will bring up the envelope type limit for
the first pulse. Pressing it again will switch to the From the RUN screen, you will go
directly to whichever mode has the envelope limits.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-31
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
Section XIV. Programming Relays
1.
From the MAIN MENU, press the 7 key
to go to the RELAY output state
selection menu, shown at the right. The
Control has four relays that can provide
dry-contact signal outputs under many
different conditions.
1.
2.
3.
4.
RELAY1:ON
RELAY2:ON
RELAY3:ON
RELAY4:ON
<RELAY>
OTHER
FORCE LIMIT
ALARM
ALARM
ALARM
Number Select an itemRUN or MENU
See Appendix C, System Timing for the timing diagrams for the four relays.
2.
3.
From the RELAY menu, press the 1 key
to go to RELAY 1 shown at the right.
Press the 1 key to toggle the relay
contact signal state: ON (closed) or OFF
(open).
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
Number Select,
4.
Press the 2 key to select the WHEN
menu, shown at the right.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ALARM
OUT OF LIMITS
WELD
END OF WELD
P1 & P2
Number Select,
5.
Press the 2 key to select OUT OF LIMITS
as the condition for initiating the Relay
1 output signal. This will bring up the
RELAY 1 menu screen, where the WHEN
line will now reflect OUT OF LIMITS.
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
Number Select,
6.
Choosing WHEN options 1 - 4 or 9 will
complete the relay programming
process. Choosing options 5 - 8 or 0
will bring up the RELAY (1, 2, 3, or 4)
screen with a new option, number 3.
Press 3 to access the next level menus
which are shown on the next page.
1. SET RELAY TO
2. WHEN
3. kW & R
Number Select,
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: ALARM
Page, RUN or MENU
<WHEN>
6. kA & V
7. kW & R
8. OTHER
9. MG3 SYNC
0. LVDT
Page, RUN or MENU
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: OUT OF LIMITS
Page, RUN or MENU
<RELAY 1>
: ON
: OUT OF LIMITS
WHEN
kW LIMIT
Page, RUN or MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
5-32
990-370
CHAPTER 5. OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<P1 &P2 WHEN>
OUT OF LIMITS
6. P2 HIGH
P1 OUT OF LIMITS
7. P2 LOW
P1 HIGH
P1 LOW
P2 OUT OF LIMITS
Number Select,
Page, RUN or MENU
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
kA LIMIT
V LIMIT
P1 kA HIGH
P1 kA LOW
P2 kA HIGH
Number Select,
<kA & V WHEN>
6. P2 kA LOW
7. P1 V HIGH
8. P1 V LOW
9. P2 V HIGH
0. P2 V LOW
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #5
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
kW LIMIT
R LIMIT
P1 kW HIGH
P1 kW LOW
P2 kW HIGH
Number Select,
<kW & R WHEN>
6. P2 kW LOW
7. P1 R HIGH
8. P1 R LOW
9. P2 R HIGH
0. P2 R LOW
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #6
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
FORCE LIMIT
START FORCE
END FORCE
ENERGY LIMIT
ENERGY HI
Number Select,
<OTHER WHEN>
6. ENERGY LO
7. TIME LIMIT
8. TIME HIGH
9. TIME LOW
0. ENVELOPE LIMIT
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #7
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
ANY
INITIAL LO
INITIAL HI
FINAL LO
FINAL HI
Number Select,
Option #8
<LVDT WHEN>
6. DISPL LO
7. DISPL HI
8. INITIAL NG
9. DISPL NG
0. STOP ENERGY AT
Page, RUN or MENU
Option #9
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
5-33
CHAPTER 6
Maintenance
Section I. Introduction
General Kinds of Problems
It has been our experience that most resistance welding power supply ‘problems’ are caused by lack of
material control, process control and electrode tip surface maintenance. The problems that you might
encounter fall into two groups:
x Soft — The problem is transient, and you can correct it by resetting the system
or parameter limits. For example, you should ensure that:
Correct force is set at the weld head
Correct weld energy and time is set at the Control
The equipment is set up properly
All electrical connections are tight
Electrode alignment allows flush contact with the weld pieces
Electrodes are properly dressed
x Hard — The problem is embedded in the system and some form of repair will
be needed. For example, repair might include replacing a broken weld head
flexure.
Alarm Messages
Built-in automatic self-test and self-calibration routines will bring up alarm messages on the display
screens. These messages will usually let you know what action is required of you to correct the reason
for the alarm. For a complete listing of the alarm messages, what they mean, and corrective actions, see
Section II, Troubleshooting.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-1
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Section II. Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting
Problem
Cause (in order of probability)
Problem
Cause (in order of probability)
Electrode
Damage
1. Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25 Electrode
Sparking
1. Excessive or insufficient weld head
force
1. Wrong electrode tip shape
2. Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
2. Contaminated weld piece surface/
plating
2. Wrong electrode material
2. Contaminated electrode surface
1. Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25
1. Insufficient weld head force
1. Slow weld head follow-up
1. Incompatible weld piece projection
design
1. Contaminated weld piece surface/ plating
1. Wrong electrode tip shape
2. Wrong electrode material
2. Contaminated electrode surface
Electrode
Sticking
1. Contaminated weld piece surface/
Weld Piece
plating
Warping
1. Wrong electrode material/ tip shape
1. Insufficient weld head force
2. Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25
2. Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
2. Contaminated electrode surface
3. Slow weld head follow-up
1. Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
1. Excessive weld head force
1. Incompatible weld piece projection
design
2. Incompatible weld piece materials
2. Wrong electrode tip shape
3. Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25
Insufficient
Weld
Nugget
1. Insufficient current/ energy set at
HF27/25
1. Wrong electrode material/ tip shape
1. Worn/mushroomed electrodes
2. Insufficient weld time set at HF27/25
2. Incorrect weld head polarity
2. Contaminated weld piece surface/
plating
2. Excessive weld head force
3. Insufficient weld head force
3. Contaminated electrode surface
3. Incompatible weld piece projection
design
3. Slow weld head follow-up
4. Incompatible weld piece materials
4. No cover gas on weld piece
Metal
Expulsion
1. Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25
1. Insufficient weld head force
1. Slow weld head follow-up
1. Incompatible weld piece projection
design
2. Contaminated weld piece surface/ plating
2. Incompatible weld piece materials
2. Contaminated electrode surface
2. Wrong electrode tip shape
3. No cover gas on weld piece
4. Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-2
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Problem
Weld Piece
Overheating
Cause (in order of probability)
1.
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
Problem
Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
Weld Piece
Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25 Discoloration
Insufficient weld head force
Incompatible weld piece materials
Wrong electrode material/tip shape
Contaminated electrode surface
Cause (in order of probability)
1.
1.
2.
3.
3.
4.
4.
Excessive weld time set at HF27/25
No cover gas on weld piece
Excessive current/energy set at HF27/25
Insufficient weld head force
Contaminated weld piece surface/ plating
Wrong electrode material/tip shape
Contaminated electrode surface
Alarm Messages
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#01
CHECK CONTROL
SIGNALS INPUT
STATUS
One or more of the I/O input control
signals is preventing the HF27/25 from
continuing to operate.
Remove the I/O input control signal condition
preventing further HF27/25 operation.
NOTE: The correct removal action depends on
how the control signal select in the Setup 1 menu
was programmed by the user.
#02
CHECK INPUT
SWITCH STATUS
All bits on the remote schedule input
port are set ON.
Hardware problem. Repeated displays of this
message should be diagnosed and fixed by a
technician.
#03
FIRING SWITCH
BEFORE FOOT
SWITCH
The Firing Switch input has been
activated before the Foot Switch has
been activated, preventing weld current
from flowing.
Check the weld head for an improperly adjusted
firing switch.
Automation Only - Check the timing on the PLC
control lines to the Firing Switch and Foot
Switch inputs.
#04
EMERGENCY
STOP ON
CONTROL
SIGNALS INPUT
The Process Stop signal on the
CONTROL SIGNALS connector has
been activated, immediately terminating
weld current.
Remove the Process Stop activating signal from
the CONTROL SIGNALS connector.
#05
POWER
TRANSISTOR
OVERHEATED
The power dissipated by the power
transistors has exceeded the HF27/25
specified capability.
Reduce duty cycle.
Reduce weld time.
#06
EMERGENCY STOP
- OPERATOR
ACTIVATED
The Operator Emergency Stop switch
has been activated. All power to the
HF27/25 is immediately terminated.
Remove any unsafe operating conditions at the
welding electrodes.
Reset the Operator Emergency Stop switch.
Turn off power to the HF27/25, then turn it on
again
The Firing Switch on a Miyachi Unitek
air actuated weld head did not activate
within 10 seconds after the Foot Switch
was initially activated.
Press RUN and readjust the air pressure to the
Miyachi Unitek air actuated weld head.
#07
FIRING SWITCH
DIDN’T CLOSE IN
10 SECONDS
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-3
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
#08
WELD
TRANSFORMER
OVERHEATED
Description
Corrective Action
Software detected that the welding
transformer is too hot.
Allow transformer to cool. If repeated displays of
this message, allow more cool time between
welds or, if practical, weld at a lower heat
setting.
#9
Test Weld
The voltage mode PID’s will be adjusted
when the next weld is done.
None.
#10
VOLTAGE
SELECTION PLUG
IS MISSING
The Voltage Selection Plug on the Weld
Transformer is missing or improperly
connected.
Verify the Voltage Selection Plug connection on
the Weld Transformer.
#11
INHIBIT CONTROL
SIGNALS
ACTIVATED
The Inhibit input control signal is
activated, preventing the HF27/25 from
continuing to operate.
NOTE: Activating the Inhibit input
terminates only future operations. It does
NOT terminate any present HF27/25
operation.
Remove the Inhibit signal condition preventing
further HF27/25 operation.
NOTE: The correct removal action depends on
how the control signal I/O logic was
programmed by the user.
#13
NO CURENT
READING
Previous weld current was below
minimum value.
Check current pickup.
#14
NO VOLTAGE
READING
Previous weld voltage was below
minimum value.
Check voltage pickup.
#15
LOAD
RESISTANCE TOO
HIGH
The total electrical resistance, comprised
of the weld cables, weld head, and parts
to be welded, has exceeded the drive
capability of the HF27/25.
The HF27/25 will not be able to
maintain the user set weld parameters.
Reduce the total electrical resistance by reducing
the weld cable length.
Reduce the total electrical resistance by
increasing the weld cable diameter.
Check cable and weld head connections.
Verify that all three phases from the input power
lines are functioning
#16
NO WELD
TRANSFORMER
DETECTED
Cable connecting the Control and Power
PCB’s is open.
Cable connecting the Power PCB to the
Weld Transformer is open.
Verify installation of the welding
transformer/rectifier module connections.
#17
WELD SWITCH IN
NO WELD
POSITION
User has tried to activate the HF27/25
with the Weld/No Weld Switch in the
No Weld Position.
No weld current will flow.
Set the Weld/No Weld switch to the Weld
position.
#18
CHECK INPUT
SWITCH STATUS
One or more of the Firing or Foot Switch
input signals is preventing the HF27/25
from continuing to operate.
Remove the I/O input control signal condition
preventing further HF27/25 operation.
NOTE: The correct removal action depends on
how the INPUT SWITCH SELECT in the Setup
1 menu was programmed by the user.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-4
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#18
CHECK VOLTAGE
CABLE
No electrode voltage measurement was
made.
Verity that the Voltage Sense Cable is properly
connected to the electrodes or electrode holder.
NOTE: Polarity is not important for the cable
connection.
#19
CALIBRATION
VALUES RESET TO
DEFAULT
User entered calibration values reset to
factory default values.
Execute the built-in calibration procedure to get
the correct setting.
The user has tried to program a Lower
Limit value that is greater than the Upper
Limit value for Weld1 or Weld2 time
periods.
Re-program the invalid Lower Limit value.
User programmed the HF27/25 to
automatically reset all 100 weld
schedules, I/O and other system
parameters to their factory set default
values.
CAUTION: Be careful when using the MENU
default features. There is no way to restore a
default action.
#26
SAFE ENERGY
LIMIT REACHED
The HF27/25 internal power dissipation
has exceeded the HF27/25 specified
capability.
Reduce duty cycle.
Reduce weld time.
#31
UPSLOPE
REQUIRED FOR
LOWER LIMIT
User has programmed a Lower Limit
value for Weld1 or Weld2 periods
without using an upslope period. The
HF27/25 will automatically stop when
activated because the starting weld
energy will always be lower than the
Lower Limit.
Delete the Weld1 or Weld2 Lower Limit value.
Add an upslope period before Weld1 or Weld2 if
a Lower Limit value is desired.
#32
INPUT TOO LARGE
The user has attempted to program a
weld energy or time that exceeds the
capability of the HF27/25.
Re-program welding parameters to be within the
capability of the HF27/25.
#33
INPUT TOO SMALL
The user has attempted to program a
weld energy or time that is below the
capability of the HF27/25.
Re-program welding parameters to be within the
capability of the HF27/25.
#38
LIMIT DELAYS
RESET TO 0
Sum of Pulse 1 or Pulse 2 delays
exceeded scheduled time for a pulse
limit check.
Revisit Pulse 1 or Pulse 2 delays and set them to
acceptable values.
Operator tried to change a weld schedule
number, individual weld schedule
parameters, I/O switch functions, and
calibration parameters.
Press MENU, select System Security, then enter
the correct access code to turn off the System or
Calibration Lock protection features.
NOTE: Entering a security code of 280 will
always unlock the system.
#20
LOWER LIMIT
GREATER THAN
UPPER LIMIT
#23
SYSTEM &
SCHEDULE RESET
TO DEFAULTS
#39
ACCESS DENIED!
SYSTEM
SECURITY ON
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-5
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#40
ILLEGAL
SECURITY CODE
ENTERED
The wrong security code was entered to
de-activate the System, Schedule, or
Calibration Lock protection features.
Press MENU, select System Security, then enter
the correct access code to turn off System,
Schedule, or Calibration Lock protection
features.
NOTE: Entering a security code of 280 will
always unlock the system.
#47
ACCESS DENIED!
SCHEDULE LOCK
ON
Operator tried to change a weld schedule
or individual weld parameters.
Press MENU, select System Security, then enter
your access code to turn off System Security.
NOTE: Entering a security code of 280 will
always unlock the system.
#48
INITIAL
THICKNESS – LO
At start of weld, the LVDT position was
outside the lower limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a lower initial LO LIM or removing this
limit check by setting it to zero.
#49
INITIAL
THICKNESS – HI
At start of weld, the LVDT position was
outside the upper limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a higher initial HI LIM or removing this
limit check by setting it to zero.
#50
FINAL THICKNESS
– LO
At end of of weld, the LVDT position
was outside the lower limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a lower final LO LIM or removing this
limit check by setting it to zero.
#51
FINAL THICKNESS
– HI
At end of weld, the LVDT position was
outside the upper limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a higher final HI LIM or removing this
limit check by setting it to zero.
#52
DISPLACEMENT –
LO
Measured displacement from start of
weld to end of weld was less than the
expected lower limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a setting wider initial/final limits or
removing this limit checks altogether by setting
them to zero.
#53
DISPLACEMENT –
HI
Measured displacement from start of
weld to end of weld was more than the
expected upper limit.
Check/Calibrate LVDT. At the Distance Screen,
consider a setting wider initial/final limits or
removing this limit checks altogether by setting
them to zero.
#54
WELD STOP
DISPLACEMENT
REACHED
Weld was terminated when the measured
displacement reached the weld stop
limit.
None required, if this action is desired.
Otherwise, clear the weld stop displacement
action on the Distance Screen by setting STOP
ENERGY AT to zero.
#55
P1 CURRENT 1 >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld current is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld1 at
the Current Monitor screen
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld1 to a larger
value.
#56
P1 CURRENT 1 <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld current is less than the user
set Lower Limit value for Weld1 at the
Current Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld current to
drop below the user set Lower Limit for Weld1.
Add upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the lower Limit for Weld1 to a smaller
value.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-6
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#57
P1 VOLTAGE >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld voltage is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld1 at
the Voltage Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld voltage to
exceed the user set Upper Limit for Weld1. Add
upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld1 to a larger
value.
#58
P1 VOLTAGE <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld voltage current is less than
the user set Lower Limit value for
Weld1 at the Voltage Monitor screen.
Reduce the weld cable length or increase the
diameter of the weld cables.
Reset the Lower Limit for Weld1 to a smaller
value.
#59
P1 POWER 1 >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld power is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld1 at
the Power Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld power to
exceed the user set Upper Limit for Weld1. Add
upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld1 to a larger
value.
#60
P1 POWER 1 <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld power is less than the user
set Lower Limit value for Weld1 at the
Power Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld power to
drop below the user set Lower Limit for Weld1.
Add upslope to reduce weld splash. Reset the
Lower Limit for Weld1 to a smaller value.
#61
P1 RESISTANCE >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld resistance is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld1 at
the Resistance Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld resistance
to exceed the user set Upper Limit for Weld1.
Add upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld1 to a larger
value.
#62
P1 RESISTANCE <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld resistance is less than the
user set Lower Limit value for Weld1 at
the Resistance Monitor screen.
Reduce the electrical resistance of the material
being welded..
Reset the Lower Limit for Weld1 to a smaller
value.
#65
SCHEDULES ARE
RESET
User programmed the HF27/25 to
automatically reset all 100 weld
schedules to their factory set default
values.
CAUTION: Be careful when using the MENU
default features. There is no way to restore a
default action.
#66
SYSTEM
PARAMETERS ARE
RESET
User programmed the HF27/25 to
automatically reset all I/O and other
system parameters to their factory set
default values.
CAUTION: Be careful when using the MENU
default features. There is no way to restore a
default action.
#69
WELD TIME TOO
SMALL
The user has attempted to program zero
for all upslope, weld, and downslope
time periods.
Re-program the welding parameters to be within
the capability of the HF27/25.
#71
P1 CURRENT 2 >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld current is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld2 at
the Current Monitor screen.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld2 to a larger
value.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-7
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#72
CURRENT 2 <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld current is less than the user
set Lower Limit value for Weld2 at the
Current Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld current to
drop below the user set Lower Limit for Weld2.
Add upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the lower Limit for Weld2 to a smaller
value.
#73
P2 VOLTAGE >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld voltage is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld2 at
the Voltage Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld voltage to
exceed the user set Upper Limit for Weld2. Add
upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld2 to a larger
value.
#74
P2 VOLTAGE <
THAN LOWER
LIMIT
Actual weld voltage current is less than
the user set Lower Limit value for
Weld2 at the Voltage Monitor screen.
Reduce the weld cable length or increase the
diameter of the weld cables.
Reset the Lower Limit for Weld2 to a smaller
value.
#75
P2 POWER 2 >
THAN UPPER
LIMIT
Actual weld power is greater than the
user set Upper Limit value for Weld2 at
the Power Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld power to
exceed the user set Upper Limit for Weld2. Add
upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Upper Limit for Weld2 to a larger
value.
#76
P2 POWER < THAN
LOWER LIMIT
Actual weld power is less than the user
set Lower Limit value for Weld2 at the
Power Monitor screen.
Weld splash can cause the actual weld power to
drop below the user set Lower Limit for Weld2.
Add upslope to reduce weld splash.
Reset the Lower Limit for Weld2 to a smaller
value.
#80
WELD STOP LIMIT REACHED
The user set Upper Limit value has been
exceeded and automatically terminated
the weld energy.
This is a MONITOR LIMITS feature activated
by the selecting the ENERGY key, then
programming the Upper Limit values for Weld1
and Weld2.
If the terminated weld energy is not adequate for
the weld, re-set the Upper Limit values for
Weld1 and Weld2.
#93
THIN MUST BE
LESS THAN THICK
During LVDT gauge calibration, the thin
value is greater than or equal to the thick
value.
Restart LVDT gauge calibration procedure.
#94
THICK TOO
SMALL
During LVDT gauge calibration, the
LVDT calibration thickness < minimum
delta.
Restart LVDT gauge calibration procedure.
#95
P1 JOULES >
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 1 energy in Joules exceeded the
upper limit.
Joules is power over time. If welds are good and
message consistently happens, decrease the
power, shorten the time, or change the limit.
#96
P1 JOULES <
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 1 energy in Joules did not reach
the lower limit.
Joules is power over time. If welds are good and
message consistently happens, increase the
power, increase the time, or change the limit.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-8
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#97
P2 JOULES >
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 2 energy in Joules exceeded the
upper limit.
Joules is power over time. If welds are good and
message consistently happens, decrease the
power, shorten the time, or change the limit.
#98
P2 JOULES <
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 energy in Joules did not reach
the lower limit.
Joules is power over time. If welds are good and
message consistently happens, increase the
power, increase the time, or change the limit.
#100
P1 CUTOFF TIME >
UPPER LIM
Pulse 1 ended after the cutoff time upper
limit.
This message usually signals a bad weld. If it
consistently happens and the welds are good, set
the time limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#101
P1 CUTOFF TIME <
LOWER LIM
Pulse 1 ended before the cutoff time
lower limit.
This message usually signals a bad weld. If it
consistently happens and the welds are good, set
the time limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#102
P2 CUTOFF TIME >
UPPER LIM
Pulse 2 ended after the cutoff time upper
limit.
This message usually signals a bad weld. If it
consistently happens and the welds are good, set
the time limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#103
P2 CUTOFF TIME <
LOWER LIM
Pulse 2 ended before the cutoff time
lower limit.
This message usually signals a bad weld. If it
consistently happens and the welds are good, set
the time limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#105
P1 FORCE > UPPER
LIMIT
Measured force during Pulse 1 was
greater than the upper force limit.
Check force calibration.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set force limits broader or remove them
altogether.
Measured force during Pulse 1 was less
than the lower force limit.
Check force calibration.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set force limits broader or remove them
altogether.
Measured force during Pulse 2 was
greater than the upper force limit.
Check force calibration.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set force limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#108
P2 FORCE <
LOWER LIMIT
Measured force during Pulse 2 was less
than the user lower force limit.
Check force calibration.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set force limits broader or remove them
altogether.
#109
NEED TO SET
MONITOR LIMIT
AN ATTEMPT TO SET A LIMIT ON
THE TIME/ENERGY SCREEN
FAILED BECAUSE A MONITOR
LIMIT MUST BE PRESENT BEFORE
THIS ACTION IS ALLOWED.
Set a monitor limit. Re-do the action that failed.
#106
P1 FORCE <
LOWER LIMIT
#107
P2 FORCE > UPPER
LIMIT
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-9
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
#110
ACCESS DENIED!
CALIBRATION
LOCK ON
Description
Corrective Action
System security has locked out
calibration changes.
Unlock calibration changes at the system security
screen.
Squeeze time increased for the MG3.
The MG3 must have a squeeze time of at
least 50ms. If programmed squeeze time
is less than this it is forced to that value.
None.
#112
P1 kA > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 1 current exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#113
P1 kA < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 1 current did not reach the
envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#114
P1 VOL > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 1 voltage exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#115
P1 VOL < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 1 voltage did not reach the
envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#116
P1 PWR > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 1 power exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#117
P1 PWR < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 1 power did not reach the envelope
lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#118
P1 DISP > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 1 LVDT displacement exceeded
the envelope upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#119
P1 DISP < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 LVDT displacement did not
reach the envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#120
P2 kA > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 2 current exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#121
P2 kA < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 current did not reach the
envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#122
P2 VOL > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 2 voltage exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#123
P2 VOL < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 voltage did not reach the
envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#111
SQUEEZE TIME
INCREASED
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-10
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Alarm Message
Description
Corrective Action
#124
P2 PWR > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 2 power exceeded the envelope
upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#125
P2 PWR < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 power did not reach the envelope
lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#126
P2 DISP > ENV
UPPER LIMIT
Pulse 2 LVDT displacement exceeded
the envelope upper limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
#127
P2 DISP < ENV
LOWER LIMIT
Pulse 2 LVDT displacement did not
reach the envelope lower limit.
If welds are good and message consistently
happens, set envelope limits broader or remove
them altogether.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-11
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Section III. Maintenance
Electrode Maintenance
When a welding schedule has been suitable for a particular welding application over many welds, but
poor quality welds are now resulting, electrode deterioration could be the problem. If you need to
increase welding current to maintain the same weld heat, the electrode tip has probably increased in
surface area (mushroomed), effectively increasing weld current density, thus cooling the weld. Try
replacing the electrodes.
The rough surface of a worn electrode tip tends to stick to the work pieces. So, periodic tip resurfacing
(dressing) is required to remove pitting, oxides and welding debris from the electrode. You should limit
cleaning of an electrode on the production line to using a #400-600 grit electrode polishing disk. If you
must clean a badly damaged tip with a file, you must use a polishing disk after filing to ensure the
electrode faces are smooth.
The best method of preventing electrode problems is to regularly re-grind electrode tip surfaces and
shapes in a certified machine shop.
Parts Replacement
Below is a list of the replacement parts for the Control. All items listed are a quantity of 1 each.
WARNING: Only qualified technicians should perform internal adjustments or replace parts. Removal
of the unit cover could expose personnel to high voltage and may void the warranty.
Part Description
Amada Miyachi America
Part Number
Input Power Line Protection Fuses F1 and F2:
Location
Rear Panel
HF27/240
330-071
HF27/400
330-092
HF27/480
330-092
Control Power Protection Fuse F1
330-078
Input Power Selection Plug Set:
240 Volts
4-34314-01
400 Volts
4-34315-01
480 Volts
4-34316-01
Power PCB
Welding Transformer
Chassis
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
6-12
990-370
CHAPTER 6: MAINTENANCE
Section III. Repair Service
If you have problems with your Control that you cannot resolve, please contact our service department
at the address, phone number, or e-mail address indicated in the Foreword of this manual.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
6-13
APPENDIX A
Technical Specifications
NOTE: The specifications listed in this appendix may be changed without notice.
Power
Input Power Line .................................................................................................... 50-60 Hz, 3 phase
Input Voltage Range at Maximum Output Current
HF27/240 ....................................................................................................... 216-264 VAC at 25A
HF27/400 ....................................................................................................... 360-440 VAC at 20A
HF27/480 ....................................................................................................... 432-528 VAC at 13A
Input kVA (Demand) ........................................................................... 30 kVA max at 3% duty cycle
Output Power at 12% Duty Cycle and a
Combined PULSE 1 and PULSE 2 Pulse Width of 50 ms ................................ 6.0 kW max
Maximum Output Current ........................................................................................................ 2400A
Max Peak Output Voltage at Max Peak Output Current .......................................................... 5.2V
Duty Cycle at Max Peak Output Current...................................................................................... 3%
Max Load Resistance for Max Output Current...................................................................... 2.1mȍ
Output Adjustment Range, Resolution and Accuracy
NOTE: Actual maximum and minimum current, voltage or power achievable depends on
transformer and load resistance.
Parameter
Adjustment Range
Resolution (Steps)
Accuracy
Current
100 - 2400 A
0.001 kA
± (2% of setting +2A)
Voltage
0.2 - 9.99 V
0.001 V
± (2% of setting +0.02V)
Power
0.05-9.99 kW
0.001 kW
± (5% of setting +10W)
Weld Periods
0.0 - 9.9 ms
10 - 99 ms
0.1 ms
1.0 ms
± 20 μs
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
A-1
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Physical Specifications
Size:
...............................(see illustration)
Weight ................................. 62 lbs. (28 kg)
Performance Capabilities
Number of Weld Schedules ...................................................................................................................100
Programmable Weld Periods:
Squeeze .................................................................................................................................0 - 999 ms
Upslope 1 .................................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Weld 1 ...................................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Downslope 1 ............................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Cool
...................................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Upslope 2 ................................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Weld 2 ...................................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Downslope 2 ............................................................................................................................0 - 99 ms
Hold
.................................................................................................................................0 - 999 ms
Weld Energy Limits Monitoring
Energy Limit Mode: Terminate weld energy upon reaching the programmed current, voltage,
power or resistance alarm level.
Weld Pre-Check Mode: Inhibit second weld pulse when first test pulse exceeds programmed
limits.
Measurement Parameters: Current, voltage and power.
Measurement Selection: Peak or average.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
A-2
990-370
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Measurement Range and Accuracy:
Parameter
Range
Accuracy
Current
0.1 - 2.4 kA
± (2% of setting +2A)
Voltage
0.2 - 9.999 V
± (2% of setting +0.02V)
Power
0.05 - 9.999 kW
± (5% of setting +10W)
Limit Ranges: Same as the measurement ranges
Alarms: Display alert and four programmable AC/DC relay contact outputs.
Force Specifications
Force Set Output Range:
Force Set Output Accuracy:
Force Read Input Range:
Force Read Input Accuracy:
0 – 5 VDC and 0-10 VDC
+/- (3.0% + 0.1 lb)
0 – 5 VDC and 0-10 VDC
+/- (3.0% + 0.1 lb)
LVDT Specifications
Stroke:
Absolute Accuracy:
Weld Displacement Accuracy:
Displayed Resolution:
Measurement Resolution:
Repeatability:
Maximum Weld Rate:
1.0” (25.4mm) maximum
See Following Graph
0.003” (0.076mm)
0.001” (0.01mm)
0.00025” (0.006mm)
1%
2 weld per second
NOTE: The suggested minimum weld force to use with the LVDT is 2 lbs. (0.9 kgf).
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
A-3
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Weld Head System Compatibility
Force Fired, Foot Actuated
Force Fired, Single Valve Air Actuated
Non Force-Fired, Single Valve Air or Cam Actuated
Force Fired, EZ Air Kit
Plug-and-Play 24VDC EZ-AIR weld head
301/350 Series Electronic Weld Heads
Input Signals
NOTE: Except where parenthetically noted below, all input signals accept 5 to 24 VDC, normally open
or normally closed, positive or negative logic. Inputs are optically isolated.
Firing Switch Initiation: 1-level foot switch, 2-level foot switch or opto firing switch.
Remote Control Barrier Strip: Remote weld schedule select, process inhibit, emergency stop and
force set (0 - 5 VDC or 0 -10 VDC) and force read (0 - 5 VDC or 0 – 10 VDC).
RS232: Change weld schedules and individual weld parameters.
RS485: Change weld schedules and individual weld parameters. “Daisy chain” RS485 input with
RS485 output from other HF25 controls and host computer.
Voltage: Weld voltage signal for voltage feedback operation (0 to 10 volt peak).
Weld Head: Plug-and-play connector with Firing and Foot switch inputs, Voltage Sense input and
24VDC Air Valve Driver output.
Output Signals
Monitor: Internal analog voltage signals representing secondary current feedback (0-5 VDC),
primary current (0-4 VDC), or weld voltage (0-5VDC).
Air Valve Driver: 24 VAC, 1 amp; timing controlled by the HF27. No weld over-force protection.
Alarm Relay: Four programmable mechanical relays: 24 VAC/VDC at 1 amp.
RS232: Monitor weld parameter data. Download and upload schedules.
RS485: Monitor weld parameter data. “Daisy chain” RS485 input with RS485 output from other
HF25 Controls and host computer. Download and upload schedules.
24V_OUT: 24 VDC power supply, polyfused at 1 amp.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
A-4
990-370
APPENDIX B
Electrical and Data Connections
Section I. Electrical Connection
Input Power
As described in Chapter 2, you need to supply a connector for the Control input power cable (see
diagram below).
Connect the Control power cable to a 3-phase, 50/60Hz power source. The voltage range for each
model is set at the factory by a set of two jumper plugs. One jumper plug is installed on power
connector J23, located on the center chassis plate. The other jumper plug, P22, plugs into welding
transformer cable connector J22. The jumper plug set determines the power wiring configuration
between the power board and the welding transformer.
Input Power Wiring Diagram
CAUTIONS:
x Be sure that the shop source power is appropriate for your Control model.
x If the blue phase wire is not connected, no alarm will occur and the weld control will produce
more than 20% ripple in the weld output waveform.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-1
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Section II. I/O Connectors
Overview
The control can be configured several different ways in order to match your welding needs.
Configuration is achieved by using the pre-wired Configuration Plug and by fabricating your own I/O
cables using five un-wired plugs. All of these connectors are supplied in the Ship Kit. Complete
connection information is in Section III, I/O Configuration.
Before fabricating I/O cables, you should be familiar with the physical characteristics of the Control’s
I/O connectors.
60-Pin Connector
The 60-pin I/O connector is located on the
Control’s rear panel as shown on the right. This
connector can accommodate six 10-pin plugs,
including the factory-supplied Configuration
Plug.
Selected pins contain red inserts as shown below. These inserts prevent properly configured 10-pin
plugs from being plugged into the wrong sections of the 60-pin connector.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-2
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
10-Pin Connectors
Five un-wired, “blank” 10-pin connectors are supplied in the Ship Kit. These connectors are used for
the configurations described in Section III, I/O Configuration. These connectors easily snap apart and
use screw-terminal wire connections so no soldering is required. Each pin of this connector has a tab on
top as shown below.
When you fabricate I/O cables according to the configuration instructions, you must also cut off the
tabs on the top of specific pins as indicated by the black shading below.
Example: To fabricate a connector for pins 31 £ 40, you must remove the tabs for pins 34, 35, and 36.
If you do not remove the appropriate tabs, you will not be able to insert the plug into the Control.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-3
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
NOTE: Depending on the peripheral equipment
you use, you may be connecting wires from
different devices to the same plug in order to
match pins on the plugs to the pins on the 60-pin
connector.
Example: As shown on the right, some wires
from the LOAD CELL and the PROPORTIONAL
VALVE both go to the plug connected to pins
21 £ 30.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-4
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Section III. I/O Configuration
Factory Configuration Plug
A pre-wired CONFIGURATION PLUG is supplied
in the Ship Kit which allows the use of Miyachi
Unitek standard foot switches and weld heads
without any further configuration.
Before normal use, this plug should be
connected to pins 11 through 20 on the 60-pin
connector as shown above. In addition, five unwired plugs are supplied in the Ship Kit so you
may fabricate your own custom I/O cables.
The factory default setting is 0VDC. The plug’s
internal wiring is shown on the right.
Input Section Example
This Control employs bi-directional opto isolators
which allow the user to configure the inputs to sink
current, i.e. +24VDC active, or source current, i.e.
0VDC active. A typical input section is shown on
the right.
See Modification of I/O Configuration on page B-6
for both complete input sections.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-5
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
I/O Signal Interface General Description
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-6
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Input/Output Signals
Pin
Signal Name
Description
1
CHASSIS GROUND
Chassis Ground
2
24COM
NEGATIVE of internal 24 VDC power supply
3
HEAD_1
COMMON for air valve solenoid, switched
For 24VDC operation: Connect other end of solenoid to +24V_OUT
For 24VAC operation: Connect other end of solenoid to 24VAC
4-6
Not active
7
8-10
24VAC
24VAC power supply
Not active
11
FIRE 1
Fires Control
12
24COM
NEGATIVE of internal 24 VDC power supply
13-14
Not active
15
I/O COMMON
COMMON terminal for pins 24 - 31
16
FOOT 1
Activates foot level stage 1
17
FOOT 2
Activates foot level stage 2
18
24COM
NEGATIVE of internal 24 VDC power supply
19
FS1/FS2/FIRE_COM
COMMON terminal for pins 10-13, 16, 17, 32
+24V_OUT
+24 VDC output of internal power supply, polyfused at 1 amp
22
I/O COMMON
COMMON terminal for pins 24 - 31
23
24COM
NEGATIVE of internal 24 VDC power supply
24
SCHEDULE 0
Binary Schedule input terminals, used for schedule selection
25
SCHEDULE 1
26
SCHEDULE 2
27
SCHEDULE 4
28
SCHEDULE 8
29
SCHEDULE 16
30
SCHEDULE 32
31
WELD_INHIBIT
Inhibits weld
32
CURRENT_STOP
Interrupts weld current Interrupts weld current ( < 100 ȝs from
current_stop trigger to end-of-weld current with debounce set to Ø)
33
RELAY_1
34
RELAY_1R
Relay 1 output, dry contact, programmable
Contact rating: 24VDC/AC, 1 amp
35
RELAY_2
Relay 2 output, dry contact, programmable
20-21
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-7
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Pin
Signal Name
Description
36
RELAY_2R
Contact rating: 24VDC/AC, 1 amp
37
RELAY_3
38
RELAY_3R
Relay 3 output, dry contact, programmable
Contact rating: 24VDC/AC, 1 amp
39
RELAY_4
40
RELAY_4R
41-42
Not Active
Relay 4 output, dry contact, programmable
Contact rating: 24VDC/AC, 1 amp
43
FORCE SET 10
Proportional valve output, 0-10V (use pin 44, 49 or 59 as ground
reference)
44
FORCE GROUND
Force input/proportional valve output ground
45
FORCE READ 10 INPUT
Force input, 0-10V, (use pin 44, 49 or 59 as ground reference) (DO NOT
USE 0-5V FORCE INPUT AT THE SAME TIME)
46-47
Not Active
48
FORCE READ 5 INPUT
Force input, 0-5V, (use pin 44, 49 or 59 as ground reference) (DO NOT
USE 0-10V FORCE INPUT AT THE SAME TIME)
49
FORCE GROUND
Force input/proportional valve output ground
50
CHASSIS GROUND
Chassis ground
51
Not Active
52
LVDT GND
53
LVDTPRI_1
54
LVDTPRI_2
55
LVDTSEC_1
56
LVDTSEC_2
57
LVDT GND
58
FORCE SET 5
Proportional valve output, 0-5V (use pin 44, 49 or 59 as ground
reference)
59
FORCE GROUND
Force input/proportional valve output ground
60
CHASSIS GROUND
Chassis ground
LVDT Connections
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-8
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Modification of I/O Configuration:
The inputs of this Control are grouped into two major blocks, which can be independently configured.
SCHEDULE INPUTS
Common
I/O COMMON
Input
Pin Number
SCHEDULE 0
24
SCHEDULE 1
25
SCHEDULE 2
26
SCHEDULE 4
27
SCHEDULE 8
28
SCHEDULE 16
29
SCHEDULE 32
30
WELD INHIBIT
31
FOOT SWITCH/FIRE SWITCH INPUTS
Common
FS1/FS2/FIRE_COM
Inputs
Pin Number
FIRE_1
11
FOOT_1
16
FOOT_2
17
WELD ABORT
10
WELD/NO WELD
13
CURRENT STOP
32
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-9
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Configuration for Common Input Connections:
Dry Contact Input
Common Negative Input
(External Power)
Common Positive Input
(External Power)
Common Positive Input
(Internal Power)
NOTE: The preceding configuration methods can be used for both input blocks.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-10
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Two-Level Foot Switch Connector
When you press the foot switch to the first level, the Control energizes the air actuated weld head. This
causes the upper electrode to descend and apply force to the weld pieces. If you release the foot switch
before pressing it to the second level, the Control will automatically return the upper electrode to its UP
position so that you may re-position the weld pieces.
If you do not release the foot switch at the first level and proceed to the second level, the force-firing
switch in the weld head will close. Weld current will flow, and the Control will automatically return the
upper electrode to its UP position.
Using the supplied Configuration plug on Pins 11 – 20 allows the use of the Miyachi Unitek 2-level
footswitch directly. If a PLC or other means of trigger is used, refer to the I/O Signal Interface General
Description on page B-3.
Foot Switch Connector
Pin
Description
1
Chassis Ground
2
Foot_1 (to activate Foot Switch Level 1, connect to pin 4 )
3
Foot_2 (to activate Foot Switch Level 2, connect to pin 4)
4
24COM
Standard Air Valve Driver Output Connector
The air valve driver output (24VAC) is initiated when Foot Switch Level 1 is initiated.
Using the supplied Configuration plug on Pins 11 – 20 allows the use of the Miyachi Unitek 2-level
footswitch directly. If a PLC or other means of trigger is used, refer to the I/O Signal Interface General
Description on page B-3. The mating connector is an AMP type 206429-1, using cable clamp AMP
type 206358-2. The two male pins used are Amp type 66361-2.
Air Valve Driver 24 VAC Connector
Pin
Description
1
24VAC (for solenoid)
2
HEAD_1 (Switched 24V common)
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-11
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Voltage Sense Input Connector
The voltage leads are connected to the electrode holders to sense weld voltage.
Voltage Sense Input Connector
Pin
Description
1
Not Used
2
VOLT_IN
3
VOLT_COM
Weld Head Connector
The Weld Head Connector combines all the inputs and outputs necessary to connect a plug-and-play
EZ-AIR Miyachi Unitek weld head
Using the supplied Configuration plug on Pins 11 – 20 allows the use of the Miyachi Unitek 2-level
footswitch directly. If PLC or other means of trigger is used, refer to the I/O Signal Interface General
Description on page B-3.
Weld Head Connector
Pin
Description
1
HEAD_1
(switched 24V common for solenoid)
2
24V_OUT (24VDC for solenoid)
3
24COM
4
FIRE_1
5
VOLT_IN
6
VOLT_COM
7
AIRHEAD
8
Not used
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-12
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
LVDT Connector
The LVDT connector provides the inputs for the LVDT sensor.
LVDT Connector
Pin
Description
1
LVDTPRI_1
2
LVDTPRI_2
3
LVDTSEC_1
4
LVDT GND
5
LVDT GND
6
LVDTSEC_2
Force Firing Switch Cable Input
Function
The force-firing switch input to the Control from the weld head signals that the selected pressure has
been applied to the weld pieces. Note that a mechanical firing switch is subject to contact bounce,
which can cause false weld starts. The effects of switch bounce can be avoided at low weld speeds by
using the switch debounce function on the Control main menu. If welding speeds are to exceed 1.5
welds per second, use an optical firing switch.
Connections
The firing switch cable is 5 feet long, Type 2/C, 600-volt cable containing two shielded, twisted pair 22
AWG stranded leads.
The firing switch cable connector is a 2-pin Amphenol Type 80-MC2FI. It mates with the weld head
firing switch connector, which is a 2-Pin Amphenol Type 80-MC2M.
Firing Switch Connector
Pin
Description
1
24COM
2
FIRE_1 (to fire Control, connect to pin 2)
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-13
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Operator Emergency Stop Cable Switch Input
Function
You must connect a normally closed, single-pole switch across both cable leads, otherwise the Control
cannot be turned ON. Use the switch during Control operation as an emergency stop switch. When
operated (opened), it will immediately halt the weld process.
NOTE: You must press the RUN key on the front panel to reset the Control following an emergency
stop operation.
Connections
Connect an approved, normally closed emergency stop switch across the 2-foot (61 cm) operator
emergency stop switch cable. When the switch is operated (opened), it de-energizes the main power
contactor, removing three-phase input power to the Control.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-14
990-370
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
PLC Timing Diagram
BCD Welding Schedule Selection Scheme
Weld
Schedule
No.
Bit 20
Pin 1
Bit 21
Pin 2
Bit 22
Pin 3
Bit 23
Pin 4
Bit 24
Pin 12
Bit 25
Pin 5
Bit 26
Pin 14
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
5-98
99
BCD progression from 5 to 98
1
1
0
0
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
B-15
APPENDIX B: ELECTRICAL AND DATA CONNECTIONS
Relay Outputs
Function
Four mechanical relays on the control board can be independently programmed to supply alarm or weld
status contact signal outputs. You can access the programming function through the main menu, as
described in Chapter 3. The events that you can program for each relay and their timing diagrams are as
follows:
Relay contacts closed or open in the energized state. Relays are energized when:
1. Weld cycle starts.
2. Weld cycle ends.
3. Alarm state is detected.
4. Weld is out of programmed limits.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
B-16
990-370
APPENDIX C
Calibration
Section I. Calibrating the Control
Overview
The Control is calibrated by the software, using inputs from a calibration setup during a weld process.
Following a few calibration inputs, the Control will adjust itself and store the calibration values in RAM,
where they will be used as standards for the operational welding parameters.
CAUTION: Only authorized personnel should perform this procedure.
Calibration Equipment Required
The required equipment for the setup is as follows:
x 2 weld cables, No. 2/0, 1 ft (30 cm) long, PN 2/0 BB11
x 1000ȝȍ coaxial shunt resistor accurate to ±0.2%.
Source for shunt resistor: Model R7500-8
T & M Research Products, Inc.
139 Rhode Island Street NE
Albuquerque, NM 87108
Telephone: (505) 268-0316
x
x
x
x
x
Shielded voltage sense cable, PN 4-32998-01
Digital oscilloscope, Tektronix 724C or equivalent
Male BNC to dual binding post
2-wire, normally open switch for weld initiation, mating connector PN 520-011
Coaxial BNC-to-BNC cable
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
C-1
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
Calibration Procedure
Initial Calibration Setup
1.
Connect the calibration setup to the
Control as shown.
2.
Turn the Control ON.
3.
From the MONITOR keys section on the
front panel, press the CAL key and the
menu on the right will appear.
4.
Press 1 for HF27 CALIBRATION which
will bring up the CAUTION screen on
the right.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<CALIBRATION>
HF27 CALIBRATION
LVDT GAUGE
LVDT CALIBRATION
LVDT QUICK CALIBRATION
FORCE CALIBRATION
Number Select an item, Run or Menu
CAUTION
CALIBRATION SHOULD BE PERFORMED BY A
QUALIFIED TECHNICIAN ONLY.
REFER TO MANUAL FOR CALIBRATION SETUP.
W next, MENU menu
5.
Press 2 to calibrate the Control.
<PRE-CALIBRATION>
1.
2.
3.
4.
TEST HF27 (T-232 REQUIRED)
CALIBRATE HF27
RESET CALIBRATION
SET SHUNT VALUE
Number Select an item, Run or Menu
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
C-2
990-370
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
6.
7.
8.
9.
The first calibration screen is the
CAUTION screen. If you are qualified to
proceed with the calibration press to
continue.
<CALIBRATION SHUNT>
Shunt value
:
0987.6 ȝǷ
The next page is for the CALIBRATION
SHUNT. This screen asks for the actual
Number change W Proceed
value of the 1000 micro-ohm shunt.
The actual value is printed on the exterior of the R7500-8 shunt. Enter this value using the
number keys, and press to continue.
NOTE: The next calibration screen is the CURRENT SHUNT. It is not necessary to change the
current shunt value unless the internal welding transformer was changed. If it was changed,
remove the top cover and enter the shunt value, which is stamped on the copper conductor
connected to the transformer. Press to continue.
The next two screens are 1. CALIBRATE
D/A HIGH and 2. CALIBRATE D/A LOW.
Following the screen instructions, adjust
the energy output using the measuring
parameter feature of the oscilloscope.
NOTE: Do not use a visual
assessment.
Press the period [ . ] key to advance to
Calibration Signal
the next step.
The next calibration screen is CALIBRATE HIGH. Disconnect the oscilloscope from the shunt
resistor and connect the output of the shunt resistor to the VOLTAGE SENSE INPUT
connector using the male BNC to binding post adapter and voltage sense cable. Follow the
screen instructions for this step and the next step, 4. CALIBRATION LOW.
Final Calibration Setup
10. The last calibration screen is 5. END OF CALIBRATION. Press the MENU key. Calibration is
now complete.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
C-3
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
Section II. Calibrating the LVDT
Before You Start
Before using the LVDT during welding, it is extremely important to calibrate the LVDT in order to
verify that the measurements displayed on the LCD screen match the actual distance between the
electrodes. The only equipment required for LVDT calibration is a calibration gauge or piece of metal
machined to an exact known thickness. This will be placed between the electrodes as a reference. The
recommended calibration gauge thickness is shown below.
Recommended Gauge Thickness:
Part Thickness
80 Series Heads
Other Heads
< 0.025” (< 0.63mm)
0.100” (2.54mm)
0.025” (0.63mm)
0.025” to 0.100” (0.63 to 2.54mm)
0.100” (2.54mm)
Similar to part
Over 0.100”
Similar to part
Similar to part
Before LVDT calibration, you must tell the unit the thickness of the calibration gauge you will be
using.
1.
2.
From the MONITOR keys section on the
front panel, press the CAL key for the
menu on the right.
Press 2 for LVDT GAUGE.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<CALIBRATION>
HF27 CALIBRATION
LVDT GAUGE
LVDT CALIBRATION
LVDT QUICK CALIBRATION
FORCE CALIBRATION
Number Select an item, Run or Menu
3.
4.
Input the gauge thickness for the THICK
gauge (required). Note that the THICK
gauge must be at least 0.0176” greater
than the thin gauge value programmed
in step 4.
Input the gauge thickness for the THIN
gauge (optional). If you are not using a
thin gauge, input 000.
LVDT CALIBRATION
INPUT CALIBRATION CAUGE THICKNESSES
THICK > THIN + 17.6 INCHES/1000
THIN
000.0 IN/1000
THICK 100.0 IN/1000
CAL Previous menu
Example: Using a gauge that is 0.100” thick, enter the numbers 1, 0, and 0. They will display
as thousands of an in as shown on the right.
5.
From the MONITOR keys section on the front panel, press CAL to return to the CALIBRATION
menu.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
C-4
990-370
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
After the calibration gauge thickness is entered, there are two ways to calibrate the LVDT:
Full Calibration (Selection 3)
Quick Calibration (Selection 4)
The Quick Calibration procedure is designed to expedite the calibration of air operated Miyachi Unitek
heads. Otherwise, use the Full Calibration. Both processes are detailed below.
Full Calibration
This procedure does not set a new zero point. It merely establishes the calibration for the LVDT. Use
this procedure on automated machinery or in cases where the Miyachi Unitek gauge will not fit between
the electrodes. For best accuracy, the weldhead should be set to the force that will be used for welding.
NOTE: To set a new zero point, see Set New Electrodes to Zero following this procedure.
1.
From the MONITOR keys section on the
front panel, press the CAL key for the
menu on the right, then press 3
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<CALIBRATION>
HF27 CALIBRATION
LVDT GAUGE
LVDT CALIBRATION
LVDT QUICK CALIBRATION
FORCE CALIBRATION
Menu menu
2.
Verify that the electrodes are securely
installed in the electrode holders.
3.
Manually adjust the weld head so the
electrodes are touching, then press the
W button on the front panel as shown
on the screen on the right.
4.
Open the electrodes.
5.
Insert the calibration gauge of the value
requested between the electrodes.
6.
Manually adjust the weld head so the
electrodes are touching the part, then
press the W button on the front panel as
shown on the screen on the right.
LVDT CALIBRATION
PUT THE ELECTRODES TOGETHER, THEN
PRESS W WHEN THEY ARE TOGETHER
Press CAL to abort LVDT calibration
LVDT CALIBRATION
PUT THE GAUGE OF 0.100 in BETWEEN
ELECTRODES, CLOSE THE ELECTRODES
AROUND THE PIECE THEN PRESS W
Press CAL to abort LVDT calibration
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
C-5
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
NOTE: If your reference piece is too
thin, or not properly placed between the
electrodes, you will see the prompt at
the bottom of the screen on the right.
LVDT CALIBRATION
PUT THE GAUGE OF 0.100 in BETWEEN THE
ELECTRODES, CLOSE THE ELECTRODES
AROUND THE PIECE THEN PRESS W
PIECE MISSING OR TOO THIN
Press CAL to abort LVDT calibration
7. When you have finished, press the MENU key to return to the previous menu.
Quick Calibration (Quick Cal)
The procedure sets a new zero position and recalibrates the LVDT. For best accuracy, the weldhead
should be set to the force that will be used for welding.
1.
From the MONITOR keys section on the
front panel, press the CAL key for the
menu on the right.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
<CALIBRATION>
HF27 CALIBRATION
LVDT GAUGE
LVDT CALIBRATION
LVDT QUICK CALIBRATION
FORCE CALIBRATION
Menu menu
2.
Press 4 for QUICK CALIBRATION.
Follow the instructions on these
screens.
LVDT QUICK CAL
REMOVE ANY PIECE BETWEEN ELECTRODES.
PRESS W TO CONTINUE CALIBRATION.
V ABORT CAL
3.
A message will then flash to release the
footswitch. Do so and the screen on
the right appears. Verify the electrodes
are securely installed in the electrode
holders. Place the calibration piece
between the electrodes and press the
footswitch.
LVDT QUICK CAL
PUT THE THICK CALIBRATION GAUGE OF 0.100 in
BETWEEN THE ELECTRODES.
PRESS FOOTSWITCH
V ABORT CAL
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
C-6
990-370
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
NOTE: if your reference piece is too
thin, or not properly placed between the
electrodes, you will see the prompt at
the bottom of the screen on the left.
QUICK CAL will restart from the
beginning
4.
Release the footswitch to complete the
quick calibration procedure. The screen
on the right appears.
LVDT QUICK CAL
PIECE MISSING OR TOO THIN – START AGAIN
PUSH THE CAL KEY TO START OVER
V ABORT CAL
LVDT QUICK CAL
QUICK CALIBRATION DONE
PUSH DISTANCE FOR LVDT SCREEN
V ABORT CAL
Set New Electrodes to “Zero”
The LVDT must have a zero reference point (for example, when the two electrodes touch each other,
there is zero distance between them). All distances calculated by the LVDT are measured from this
zero. When you change electrodes in your weld head or agressiveley clean the electrodes, the electrodes
may not be in the same exact position as the old electrodes, so zero may no longer be the same, therefore
you must set a new zero.
There are two ways to set a new zero: Either perform the quick calibration procedure detailed above or
perform the new zero procedure detailed below.
To set a new zero without recalibration:
1.
From the MONITOR keys section on
the front panel, press the ZERO key
and the menu on the right will appear.
ZERO LVDT OR FORCE
1. ZERO LVDT
2. ZERO (TARE) FORCE
NUMBER Select an item, Run or Menu
2.
To zero the LVDT, press 1 and the
screen on the right will appear.
During the next weld, the initial
position will be set to 0.
3.
Press V to return to the previous
menu, or press Run to continue
welding, or press Menu for the MAIN
ZERO LVDT
A NEW LVDT ZERO WILL BE SET AT THE
NEXT WELD.
V Page, Run or Menu
MENU
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
C-7
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
Section III. Force Calibration
Overview
The following procedures calibrate the Proportional Valve and the Load Cell. The Proportional Valve
controls the force, the Load Cell monitors the force. Both must be calibrated simultaneously in order for
the Control to perform accurately.
Force Calibration
CAUTION: Make sure to connect the electronic pressure regulator according to its voltage range (0
– 5V or 0 – 10V). 0V corresponds to 100 psi and full voltage corresponds to 100 psi. Lo psi during
calibration will be about 30 psi and Hi psi will be about 80 psi. Make sure the force gauge used and
the electrodes can withstand the force of the weldhead at 80 psi.
1.
Press the CAL key on the front panel to
get the Calibration menu
2.
Press 5 for the FORCE Calibration
3.
Move the cursor to LOW GAUGE
FORCE.
4.
Place a force gauge between the
electrodes.
5.
Press the SCHEDULE button on the
Control Panel to close the electrodes.
<FORCE CALIBRATION>
1. FORCE UNITS
: LBS
2. FORCE UNITS IN : Ø1535
LOW GAUGE FORCE
ØØ8.2
HIGH GAUGE FORCE
Ø17.6
Press SCHEDULE to start
NOTE: In FORCE CALIBRATION
mode, the Control will not send weld
current to the electrodes.
6.
Let the force stabilize, then check the
force on the force gauge. Press the
SCHEDULE button to release the
weldhead.
7.
Repeat steps 3 and 4 to be sure the value has stabilized. Enter the number of measured force
under LOW GAUGE FORCE on the LCD screen.
7.
Select HIGH GAUGE FORCE on the control. Place a force gauge between the electrodes.
8.
Press the SCHEDULE button on the Control Panel to close the electrodes.
9.
Let the force stabilize, then check the force on the force gauge. Press the SCHEDULE button
to release the weldhead.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
C-8
990-370
APPENDIX C: CALIBRATION
10. Repeat steps 7 and 8 to make sure the force has stabilized. Enter the measured force under
HIGH GAUGE FORCE on the LCD screen. Press the FORCE button to save this information.
FORCE Calibration is now complete
Example: As shown above on the FORCE CALIBRATION screen, Low Gauge force was 7.2
lbs, High Gauge Force was 17.6 lbs.
Set Force (tare) to “Zero”
To set a new zero without recalibration:
1. From the MONITOR keys section on
the front panel, press the ZERO key
and the menu on the right will appear.
ZERO LVDT OR FORCE
1. ZERO LVDT
2. ZERO (TARE) FORCE
NUMBER Select an item, Run or Menu
2. To zero the FORCE (Tare), press 2
and the screen on the right will appear.
3. Press V to return to the previous
menu, or press Run to continue
welding, or press Menu for the MAIN
MENU
FORCE GAUGE HAS BEEN SET TO ZERO (TARED).
V Page, Run or Menu
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
C-9
APPENDIX D
System Timing
Basic Weld Operation: Air Head System with Two-Level Foot Switch
NOTE: “SOFT TOUCH PRESSURE” only applies when a Proportional Valve is being used.
Definitions
T1
Delay time from Foot Switch Level 1 closure to Weld Force start. Maximum delay time
is 1 ms plus switch debounce time. Switch debounce time can be set to none, 10, 20, or
30 ms with the SETUP 1 menu screen.
D1
Delay time from Weld Force start to Firing Switch closure. Maximum D1 time is 10
seconds. If the firing switch does not close within 10 seconds, the message FIRING
SWITCH DIDN’T CLOSE IN 10 SECONDS will be displayed.
D2
Delay time from Firing Switch closure and Foot Switch Level 2 closure to squeeze time
(SQZ). Maximum D2 time is 2 ms plus switch debounce time.
SQZ
Squeeze time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
UP
Up slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
WELD
Weld time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
DOWN
Down slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
COOL
Cool time: Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
HOLD
Hold time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
D-1
APPENDIX D: SYSTEM TIMING
Basic Weld Operation: Manual Head System with Firing Switch Operation
Definitions
DELAY
Delay time from firing switch closure to the start of the weld sequence (that is, start of
SQZ). Maximum DELAY time is 2 ms, plus switch debounce time.
SQZ
Squeeze time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
UP
Up slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
WELD
Weld time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
DOWN
Down slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
COOL
Cool time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
HOLD
Hold time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
D-2
990-370
APPENDIX D: SYSTEM TIMING
Basic Weld Operation: System with Remote Firing Switch
NOTE: The firing switch mode is selected under the Setup 1 menu.
Definitions
DELAY
Delay time from Remote Schedule Select Signal ON to the start of the weld sequence
(that is, start of SQZ). DELAY time is 23 ms.
SQZ
Squeeze time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
UP
Up slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
WELD
Weld time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
DOWN
Down slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
COOL
Cool time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
HOLD
Hold time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
D-3
APPENDIX D: SYSTEM TIMING
Basic Weld Operation: Air Head System with Two-Level Foot Switch and
Proportional Valve
Definitions
T1
Delay time from Foot Switch Level 1 closure to Weld Force start. Maximum delay time
is 1 ms plus switch debounce time. Switch debounce time can be set to none, 10, 20, or
30 ms with the SETUP 1 menu screen.
T2
Soft touch time.
D1
Delay time from Foot Switch Level 2 to Firing Switch closure. Maximum D1 time is 10
seconds. If the firing switch does not close within 10 seconds, the message FIRING
SWITCH DIDN’T CLOSE IN 10 SECONDS will be displayed.
D2
Delay time from Firing Switch closure and Foot Switch Level 2 closure to squeeze time
(SQZ). Maximum D2 time is 2 ms plus switch debounce time.
SQZ
Squeeze time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms. Note that for SQZ to start, Foot
Switch level 2 must be ON, Soft touch time must be complete and the firing switch must
be closed.
UP
Up slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
WELD
Weld time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
DOWN
Down slope time. Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
COOL
Cool time: Selectable range is 0.0 to 99.0 ms.
HOLD
Hold time. Selectable range is 0 to 999 ms.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
D-4
990-370
APPENDIX E
Communications
Overview
The Control has the ability to communicate with a host computer or with automation control system.
The communications option uses either RS-232 to connect one control to one host, or RS-485 multi-drop
architecture to connect up to 30 controls to one host on a single channel. Amada Miyachi America’s
optional Weld-Stat software will allow you to connect a single or multiple Controls to a computer in
order to:
x Compile, store, view, and print weld history data for detailed analysis.
x Check the status of the Control(s).
x Remotely program weld schedules on the Control(s).
x Remotely program menu items on the Control(s).
Remote Programming
Most users will find the Weld-Stat software functions sufficient for collecting and using weld history
information and remote schedule programming. However, advanced users may wish to perform
additional programming for custom welding applications. The codes needed to perform remote
programming are listed in Section II. Communications Protocol and Commands. Using these codes,
users can write customized software for controlling all functions of the welding control and interfacing
the unit to automation control systems.
For more information on the Weld-Stat Kit (Amada Miyachi America Part Number 10-600-06), call or
e-mail us using the Contact Us information in the front of this manual.
RS-485 Connectors
The unit has two DB-9 (female) connectors wired as follows:
#1 – Not Used
#2 -- Not Used
#6 -- Not Used
#7 -- Not Used
#3 -- Not Used
#8 -- Rx+
#4 -- Tx+
#9 -- Rx#5 -- Tx-
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-1
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
A terminating resistor assembly is supplied with the unit. If only one unit is connected to the host, the
terminating resistor assembly must be installed in that unit. If multiple units are connected to the host,
only one unit (the unit furthest from the host) must have the terminating resistor assembly installed.
RS-232 Serial Connector Information
The serial port pin assignment is as follows:
#1 – Not Used
#2 -- TXD (Transmit Data)
#6 -- DTR (Data Terminal Ready)
#7 -- CTS (Clear to Send)
#3 – RXD (Receive Data)
#8 -- RTS (Request to Send)
#4 – DSR (Data Set Ready)
#9 -- RI (Ring Indicator)
#5 -- SGND (Signal Ground)
Host settings
Baud Rate
Data bits
Stop bit
Parity
1.2k, 2.4k, 4.8k, 9.6k, 14.4k, 19.2k, 28.8k, 38.4k (set on the unit)
8
1
None
NOTES:
x The host must be set to the same baud rate as the unit. The computer hardware and operating
system needed to support communication depends upon the RS-485 adapter (or converter box)
used.
x
For a microprocessor-based conversion (such as the Edgeport USB converter from Inside
Outside Networks), the host computer should be at least a Pentium II-233 running Windows 98,
Windows ME, Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows NT 4.0. For a hardware-based
converter without an internal microprocessor (such as the Telebyte model 285), the host
computer should be at least a Pentium III-550 running Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows
2000, Windows XP or Windows NT 4.0.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-2
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
For RS-485 communication, do not exceed the capacity of each channel. The product of:
(total number welds per second on all welders on that channel)
times
(total number of bytes exchanged per weld)
times
(8 bits per byte)
must in all cases remain less than the theoretical maximum capacity of the channel – the baud rate
selected on the unit. This capacity is not an issue on RS-232 channels.
A good guideline is that on a line free of electrical noise, the number calculated above must remain less
that 70% of the theoretical maximum capacity. Electrical noise on the communications lines will further
reduce this capacity. Shielded cables are recommended.
Several commands require the unit to be in HOST mode for the unit to accept them. Those commands
include the REPORT command and all SET commands. See the MASTER CNTL command in Chapter 3
and the REMOTE command below for more information.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-3
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Section II. Communications Protocol and Commands
Command Format
#ID KEYWORD parameters <crlf><lf>
UNIT IDENTIFICATION:
number).
COMMAND KEYWORDS:
#ID
(ID is any number from “00” to “30”, must be a two digit
BOLD.
VARIABLE: italics.
REQUIRED PARAMETERS: {enclosed in braces} (one required and only one parameter allowed).
CHOICE OF PARAMETERS: separated by vertical bar "|" indicates one OR another of choices
presented.
REQUIRED/OPTIONAL PARAMETERS: [enclosed in brackets] (one or more allowed, used in the
SET parameter)(zero allowed in the READ parameter).
RANGE OF PARAMETERS:
low_end - high_end (separated by hyphen).
END OF PARAMETER TERMINATOR: <crlf> (carriage return followed by linefeed).
TERMINATION OF COMMAND: <lf> (linefeed - must be preceded by the end of line terminator
<crlf>).
Each unit identifier, command keyword, and parameters must be separated by one or more spaces except
the termination of command <lf> must follow the end of parameter terminator<crlf> immediately. I. E.
“<crlf><lf>”
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-4
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Computer Originated Commands
These are the commands sent by the host computer, via RS-485 or RS-232 to a Control.
Command
STATUS<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the status of the weld data buffer. Control returns STATUS
with either “OK” or “OVERRUN.”
Command
TYPE<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to return the type of welder, release number, and revision letters.
Command
COUNT<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the number of weld data accumulated since the last data
collection. Control returns the COUNT even if there is no weld data available.
Command
ERASE<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to erase all the weld reports.
Command
SYNC<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Provides synchronization of the commands. The Control returns SYNC command back to the
host computer.
Command
CURRENT<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the sampled Current data of the last weld. Control shall return
with CURRENT report. See CURRENT command under Control Originating Commands
section.
Command
VOLTAGE <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the sampled Voltage data of the last weld. Control shall return
with a VOLTAGE report. See VOLTAGE command under Control Originating Commands
section.
Command
POWER <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the sampled Power data of the last weld. Control shall return
with POWER report. See POWER command under Control Originating Commands section.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-5
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
OHMS <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the sampled resistance data of the last weld. Control shall
return with OHMS report. See OHMS command under Control Originating Commands
section.
Command
STATE {READ | RUN | MENU}<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Commands the Control to identify its current state ("READ" keyword, see STATE under
CONTROL ORIGINATED COMMANDS section) or go to either RUN state or PROGRAM
state.
Command
LOAD {schedule_number}<crlf><lf>
Control State
RUN state
Description
Selects the schedule_number as the currently loaded schedule. schedule_number may be any
number from 0 to 99. There must be a space between LOAD and schedule_number.
Command
COUNTERS {READ | SET} {TOTAL | HIGH | LOW | GOOD}<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to return the Control weld counter contents.
TOTAL:
Returns the total number of weld counter.
HIGH:
Returns the out of limits high counter.
LOW:
Returns the out of limits low counter.
GOOD:
Returns the within limits counter.
Command
REPORT {ALL | P1 | P2 | LVDT | ERASE} number <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to send the weld report.
All : a request to send the number of oldest weld reports, all fields, since the last data
collection. The reported weld data will not be erased.
P1: a request to send the number of oldest weld reports, only pulse 1 related fields, since the
last data collection. The reported weld data will not be erased.
P2: a request to send the number of oldest weld reports, only pulse 2 related fields, since the
last data collection. The reported weld data will not be erased.
LVDT: a request to send the number of oldest weld reports, only the LVDT related fields,
since the last data collection. The reported weld data will not be erased.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-6
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Description
ERASE: a request to erase the number of oldest welds.
(Continued)
number: the number of weld data to be sent.
If the number is greater than the number of weld data in the buffer, less than the number of
weld data will be sent.
NOTE: There must be at least one space between each of the three fields.
Command
COPY {from_schedule_number} {to_schedule_number}<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Allows one schedule to be copied to another schedule number. From_schedule_number and
to_schedule_number may be any number from 0 to 99. Copying a schedule to itself has no
effect other than to invoke a schedule printout when "PRINT SCHEDULES/PROGRAMS" is
enabled.
Command
COMBO {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
SCHEDULE under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the
currently loaded schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the
parameter_name and value variables:
TYPE1
TYPE2
ENG1
ENG2
KA
KA
{ weld_energy }
{ weld_energy }
feedback type for combo P1
feedback type for combo P2
combo cutoff energy for pulse 1
combo cutoff energy for pulse 2
Command
SCHEDULE<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any state except while welding.
Description
Requests the Control to return the currently selected schedule number.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-7
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
SCHEDULE {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
SCHEDULE under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the
currently loaded schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the
parameter_name and value variables:
FEEDBACK1
FEEDBACK 2
SQUEEZE
UP1
WELD1
DOWN1
COOL
UP2
WELD2
DOWN2
HOLD
ENG1
ENG2
RINDEX1
RINDEX2
EINDEX1
EINDEX2
{ KA | V | KW}
feedback type for pulse 1
{ KA | V | KW}
feedback type for pulse 2
{ squeeze_time }
squeeze time
{ weld_time }
up slope time of pulse 1
{ weld_time }
weld time of pulse 1
{ weld_time }
down slope time of pulse 1
{ weld_time }
cool time
{ weld_time }
up slope time of pulse 2
{ weld_time }
weld time of pulse 2
{ weld_time }
down slope time of pulse 2
{ hold_time }
hold time
{ weld_energy }
energy amount for pulse 1
{ weld_energy }
energy amount for pulse 2
{ resistance index } index value into PID resistance table for pulse 1
{ resistance index } index value into PID resistance table for pulse 2
{ energy index } index value into PID energy table for pulse 1
{ energy index } index value into PID energy table for pulse 2
NOTES:
squeeze_time and hold_time are the parameter that defines the time for the given period in 1
msec. Valid range is from 0 to 999.
weld_time is the parameter that defines the time for the given period. . Each count of weld_
time is equivalent to 0.01 for increments from 0.1 to 0.99 msec and increments of 0.1 msec
for 1.0 to 9.9 msec and increments of 1.0 msec for 10.0 to 99.0 msec. (see table next page)
HOST
CONTROL
Increments
Range
Time Range
Increments
0.01
0.1-0.99
0.1-0.99 ms
0.01 ms
0.1
1.00-9.90
1.0-9.9 ms
0.1 ms
1.0
10.00-99.0
10.0-99.0 ms
1 ms
weld_energy is the parameter that specifies the amount of weld energy. In the current
feedback mode, weld_energy is in unit of 0.001KA. In the voltage feedback mode,
weld_energy is in units of 0.001V. In the power feedback mode, weld_energy is in units of
0.001kW.
volt multiplier is an index value for a table of resistance vs. a PID multiplier for voltage mode.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-8
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
NOTE: Not used in versions where RINDEXx and EINDEXx are present.
resistance index is an index value into a table of resistance vs. energy PID tables. If 0, then a
test pulse will occur on the next weld to determine the actual resistance (Note: customer
control of this value is not recommended).
energy index is an index value into a PID energy vs. PID values table. (NOTE: customer
control of this value is not recommended).
Command
Control State
Description
MONITOR {READ | SET}<crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Any except while welding
Provides control over the basic weld monitor settings of the Control schedule. When used with
the "READ" keyword, the basic weld monitor settings of the currently loaded schedule are
returned (see MONITOR under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET"
keyword is used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters of the
basic weld monitor settings pertaining to the currently loaded schedule. The following is a list
of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and value variables:
{delay_value}
Monitor Type for pulse 1
Out of Limit Action for pulse 1
Upper Limit for pulse 1
Lower Limit for pulse 1
Monitor Type for pulse 2
Out of Limit Action for pulse 2
Upper Limit for pulse 2
Lower Limit for pulse 2
Pulse 1 Lower Delay Start Time
Lower Limit
Pulse 1 Lower Delay End Time
P1UDLY1
For
{delay_value}
Lower Limit
Pulse 1 Upper Delay Start Time
P1UDLY2
For
{delay_value}
Upper Limit
Pulse 1 Upper Delay End Time
P2LDLY1
For
{delay_value}
Upper Limit
Pulse 2 Lower Delay Start Time
P2LDLY2
For
{delay_value}
Lower Limit
Pulse 2 Lower Delay End Time
P2UDLY1
For
{delay_value}
Lower Limit
Pulse 2 Upper Delay Start Time
P2UDLY2
For
{delay_value}
Upper Limit
Pulse 2 Upper Delay End Time
MONTYPE1
ACTION1
UPPER1
LOWER1
MONTYPE2
ACTION2
UPPER2
LOWER2
P1LDLY1
For
P1LDLY2
For
{ KA | V | KW| R }
{ none | STOP | INHIBIT | APC }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ KA | V | KW| R }
{ none | STOP }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{delay_value}
Upper Limit
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-9
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
limit_value is the parameter that specifies the range of the valid readings. If the reading was
within the range of the limit_value, no alarm will occur. If the reading was out of the valid
range, an alarm will occur. If the monitor type is KA, the limit_value is in unit of 1A. If the
monitor type is V, the limit_value is in unit of 1mV. If the monitor type is kW, the limit_value
is in unit of 1W. The valid number for limit_value is 1 through 9999 and 0 is for none.
The delay_value is the parameter that defines the time for the given period in 0.1ms. Valid
range is from 0 to 99. Lower delay value is only valid during WELD time. Upper delay value
is valid during UP time, WELD time, and DOWN time.
Command
ENVLIMIT {READ | SET}<crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Provides control over the basic welding envelope limit settings of the current schedule. When
used with the "READ" keyword, the basic welding envelope limit settings for the currently
loaded schedule are returned (see ENVLIMIT under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS).
When the "SET" keyword is used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the
parameters of the basic welding envelope limit settings pertaining to the currently loaded
schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and
value variables of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and value variables:
TYPE1
UPPER1
LOWER1
ACTION1
TYPE2
UPPER2
LOWER2
ACTION2
P1LDLY1
{ KA | V | KW }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ none | STOP | INHIBIT | APC }
{ KA | V | KW }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ none | STOP }
{delay_value}
P1LDLY2
{delay_value}
P1UDLY1
{delay_value}
P1UDLY2
{delay_value}
P2LDLY1
{delay_value}
P2LDLY2
{delay_value}
P2UDLY1
{delay_value}
P2UDLY2
Upper Limit
{delay_value}
Energy Type for pulse 1
Upper Limit for pulse 1
Lower Limit for pulse 1
Out of Limit Action for pulse 1
Energy Type for pulse 2
Upper Limit for pulse 2
Lower Limit for pulse 2
Out of Limit Action for pulse 2
Pulse 1 Lower Delay Start Time For
Lower Limit
Pulse 1 Lower Delay End Time For
Lower Limit
Pulse 1 Upper Delay Start Time For
Upper Limit
Pulse 1 Upper Delay End Time For
Upper Limit
Pulse 2 Lower Delay Start Time For
Lower Limit
Pulse 2 Lower Delay End Time For
Lower Limit
Pulse 2 Upper Delay Start Time For
Upper Limit
Pulse 2 Upper Delay End Time For
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-10
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
ENVWAVE READ pulse_number<crlf><lf>
ENVWAVE SET number_of_data_points pulse_number type <crlf>
data <crlf> . . . data<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Requests the Control to report the stored envelope.
When used with the "READ" keyword, the current stored envelope waveform is returned (see
WAVEFORM under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the stored envelope waveform. The following is a list of valid
literal substitutions for the parameter_name and value variables:
number_of_data_points: Total count of data points in this waveform.
pulse_number:
P1
P2
data for pulse 1 to follow.
data for pulse 2 to follow.
type: { KA | V | KW } Envelope Type for pulse.
NOTE: At least one space should be placed between each field in the title before the first
<crlf>.
Command
RELAY {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
Any except while welding
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters for relay settings. When used with the
"READ" keyword, the relay settings of the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
RELAY under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is used,
the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the relay settings of the currently loaded
schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and
value variables:
ACTIVE1
CONDITION1
SUBCOND1
{ HIGH | LOW }
condition_value
extended_condition_value
Relay 1 Active High or Active Low
Relay 1 Active Conditions
Relay 1 Extended Conditions.
ACTIVE2
CONDITION2
SUBCOND2
{ HIGH | LOW }
condition_value
extended_condition_value
Relay 2 Active High or Active Low
Relay 2 Active Conditions
Relay 2 Extended Conditions.
ACTIVE3
CONDITION3
SUBCOND3
{ HIGH | LOW }
condition_value
extended_condition_value
Relay 3 Active High or Active Low
Relay 3 Active Conditions
Relay 3 Extended Conditions.
ACTIVE4
CONDITION4
SUBCOND4
{ HIGH | LOW }
condition_value
extended_condition_value
Relay 4 Active High or Active Low
Relay 4 Active Conditions
Relay 4 Extended Conditions.
condition_value:
{ ALARM | LIMITS | WELD | END | P1+P2 | KA+V | KW+R
| OTHER | MG3 | DISP}
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-11
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
NOTE:
extended_condition_value not valid unless condition_value is:
P1+P2 or KA+V or KW+R or OTHER or DISP.
extended_condition_value:
for P1+P2:
{ LIMITS | P1OUT | P1HI | P1LOW | P2OUT | P2HI | P2LOW}
for KA+V:
{ KALIMIT | VLIMIT | P1KAHI | P1KALOW | P2KAHI | P2KALOW
| P1VHI | P1VLOW | P2VHI | P2VLOW}
for KW+R:
{ KWLIMIT | RLIMIT | P1KWHI | P1KWLOW | P2KWHI | P2KWLOW
| P1RHI | P1RLOW | P2RHI | P2RLOW}
for OTHER: { FRLIMIT | STFORCE | EDFORCE | EGLIMIT | EGHI | EGLOW
| TMLIMIT | TMHI | TMLOW | ENVLIM}
for DISP:
{ANY | ILO | IHI | FLO | FHI | DLO | DHI | INI | DSP | SEA}
NOTES:
P1+P2 condition value explanations:
LIMITS:
Pulse 1 or Pulse 2 out of limits.
P1OUT:
Pulse 1 out of limits.
P1HI, P1LOW:
Pulse 1 hi/low limit reached.
P2OUT:
Pulse 2 out of limits.
P2HI, P2LOW:
Pulse 2 hi/low limit reached.
KA+V condition value explanations:
KALIMIT
Current Limit Reached.
VLIMIT
Voltage Limit Reached.
P1KAHI, P1KALOW:
Pulse 1 Current hi/low error.
P2KAHI, P2KALOW:
Pulse 1 Current hi/low error.
P1VHI, P1VLOW:
Pulse 2 Voltage hi/low error.
P2VHI, P2VLOW:
Pulse 2 Voltage hi/low error.
KW+R condition value explanations:
KWLIMIT:
Power Limit Reached
RLIMIT:
Resistance Limit Reached
P1KWHI, P1KWLOW:
Pulse 1 Power hi/low error
P2KWHI, P2KWLOW:
Pulse 1 Power hi/low error
P1RHI, P1RLOW:
Pulse 2 Resistance hi/low hi error
P2RHI, P2RLOW:
Pulse 2 Resistance hi/low error
OTHER condition value explanations:
FRLIMIT
STFORCE:
Starting force limit reached.
EDFORCE :
Ending force limit reached.
EGLIMIT:
Energy limit reached.
EGHI, EGLOW:
Energy hi/low limit reached.
TMLIMIT:
Time limit reached.
TMHI, TMLOW:
Time hi/low limit reached.
DISP condition value explanations:
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-12
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
ANY
ILO, IHI
FLO, FHI
DLO, DHI
INI
DSP
Any displacement error.
Initial thickness low/hi error.
Final thickness low/hi error.
Final displacement low/hi error.
Initial thickness error.
Any final displacement error.
SEA
Stop energy at error.
SYSTEM {READ | SET}<crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Provides control over the Control's system parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all system parameters are returned (see SYSTEM under CONTROL ORIGINATED
COMMANDS). When used with the "SET" keyword, the host may set (change) the value of
one or more of the system parameters.
The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and value
variables:
LIGHT
{ light_value }
LCD contrast
LOUDNESS
{ loudness_value }
Buzzer Loudness
BUZZER
{ OFF | ON }
End of cycle buzzer
DISPLAY
{ PEAK | AVG }
Display mode
SWSTATE
{ switch_state }
Input Switch Type
FIRESW
{ AUTO | REMOTE | NONE }
Firing Switch Type
CTSTATE
{ switch_state }
Control Signals Type
GRAPH
{ OFF | ON }
Update Graph
WELDABORT
{ OFF | ON }
Footswitch weld abort
DEBOUNCE
{ NONE | 10 | 20 | 30 }
Switch debounce time in
Msec
These parameters pertain to the settings of the option menus available via the front panel user
interface.
light_value is a number 0 to 100 for brightness of the LCD. 0 is dark and 100 is the
brightest.
loudness_value is a number 0 to 100 for buzzer loudness. 0 is off and 100 is the loudest.
switch_state:
{ MECHOPEN | MECHCLOSED | OPTOOPEN | OPTOCLOSED
| PLC0V | PLC24V}
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-13
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
ALARM {READ | CLEAR | SET error_number | DISPLAY
alarm_message_string}<crlf><lf>
Any
Provides access to the Control alarm logic. When used with the "READ" keyword, the current
error condition value is returned. See Appendix A for list of alarm messages. When the
"CLEAR" keyword is used, all alarm conditions are canceled. When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may invoke an error identified by error_number. When the "DISPLAY"
keyword is used, an error condition can be created with any message desired. The length of
the error message must be limited to 40 characters or less. No help message will be available
in connection with this created error message.
Control State
Description
Command
TIME {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
SCHEDULE under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the
currently loaded schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the
parameter_name and value variables:
UPPER1
LOWER1
UPPER2
LOWER2
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
Upper Time Limit for pulse 1
Lower Time Limit for pulse 1
Upper Time Limit for pulse 2
Lower Time Limit for pulse 2
Command
FORCE {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
SCHEDULE under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the
currently loaded schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the
parameter_name and value variables:
UPPER
LOWER
FIRE
ACTION
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ limit_value }
{ none | STOP }
Upper Force Limit
Lower Force Limit.
Upper Force Limit.
Out of Limit Action for force
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-14
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
VALVE {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Provides control over the Control schedule parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see
SCHEDULE under Control ORIGINATED COMMANDS). When the "SET" keyword is
used, the host may set (change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the
currently loaded schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the
parameter_name and value variables:
SOFT
TIME
FINAL
{ value }
{ time }
{ value }
Soft pressure value
Soft Pressure time.
Final Pressur
Command
Control State
Description
SECURITY {OFF | F | C | Y | A}<crlf><lf>
Any
Allows control of the system security mode.
F = “OFF” sets all security status Control to “OFF.”
C = “SCHEDULE” sets the schedule lock to “ON.”
Y = “SYSTEM” sets the system lock to “ON.”
A = “CALIBRATION” sets the calibration lock to “ON.”
Command
DISP {READ | SET} <crlf>
[parameter_name value<crlf>]
<lf>
Control State
Any except while welding
Description
Provides control over the displacement limit check parameters. When used with the "READ"
keyword, all parameters pertaining to the currently loaded schedule are returned (see DISP
under Control Originated Commands). When the "SET" keyword is used, the host may set
(change) the value of one or more of the parameters pertaining to the currently loaded
schedule. The following is a list of valid literal substitutions for the parameter_name and
value variables:
INITLO
INITHI
FINALLO
FINALHI
DISPLO
DISPHI
DISPWT
UNITS
INITERR
{ initial_thick_lo }
{ initial_thick_hi }
{ final_thick_lo }
{ final_thick_hi }
{ displacement_lo }
{ displacement_hi }
{ displacement_wtd }
{ IN/1000 | MM }
{ CONT | STOP }
low limit for initial thickness
high limit for initial thickness
low limit for final thickness
high limit for final thickness
low limit for final displacement
high limit for final displacement
limit for “weld to” displacement
displacement limit units
initial thickness error action
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-15
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
NOTES:
The units of the limit fields parameters depend on the value of the UNITS parameter as
follows:
IN/1000:
1 = 0.001 inches; 10 = 0.01 inches
MM:
1 = 0.01 mm; 10 = 0.1 mm
Initial and final thicknesses are positive if the electrodes move farther apart and negative if
they move closer together (in relation to the “zero setting”). The reference “zero setting” for
thickness measurements may be set using the DISPZERO command.
Displacement is positive if the electrodes moved closer together during the weld and negative
if they moved further apart.
INITERR controls the HF25 action if an Initial Thickness limit is reached. CONT continues
the weld and gives an alarm at the end of the weld. STOP terminates the weld operation after
squeeze time (when the initial thickness is measured).
Command
DISPZERO {READ | CLEAR}<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
Any except while welding
Description
Provides control over the Control's displacement measuring “zero setting”. When used with
the "READ" keyword, the a/d converter counts (not actual position) for the current zero
setting of the upper electrode are returned When used with the "CLEAR" keyword, the host
may clear the zero setting and the upper electrode position at the start of the next weld will
establish the new zero setting.
NOTE: This zero setting is the reference position for the initial and final thickness
measurements.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-16
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Control Originated Commands
These are the commands sent from a Control to a host computer.
Command
STATUS state_name <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Identifies the current status of the weld data buffer. May be in response with “OK” or
“OVERRUN.” “OK” means that the Control weld buffer did not over-run since the last data
collection and all the data are intact. “OVERRUN” means that the Control weld buffer did
over-run since the last data collection and only the latest 900 weld data are available to report.
Command
TYPE type, release numbers, revision letters<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns “HF27 1.00 A 37232” for the first release of an HF27.
Command
COUNT number <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the number of weld data available in Control. The total number of weld data that the
Control holds in the buffer is 900.
Command
NAME schedule_name<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the current schedule’s name up to a maximum of 20 charters.
Command
STATE state_name<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Identifies the current state of operation of the Control. May be in response to the STATE
READ Command sent by the host, or may be sent as a result of a state change from the
Control front panel.
state_name may be "RUN”, "MENU" or “PROG”.
Command
COUNTER<crlf>
TOTAL number<crlf>
HIGH number<crlf>
LOW number<crlf>
GOOD number<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the requested current Control weld counter values.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-17
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
ALARM error_message<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Identifies the current error condition of operation of the Control. May be in response to the
ALARM READ command sent by the host, or may be sent as a result of an error condition
occurring in the Control. error_message is a text string describing the error message, which is
the same error message that is displayed to the screen.
Command
CURRENT number_of_data <crlf>
data <crlf> data <crlf> . . . .
data <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the Current waveform data of the last weld. First field is the number of data to be
sent. Then follows the packets of data. Each data is separated by <crlf> and this command
ends with <crlf><lf>.
number_of_data: This is the number of data that shall be included in this command. The
Control samples current every 40 Ps. For a weld less than 80 ms weld time, the number
of data will be approximately: total weld time y 40 Ps. This number will always be less
than 2000.
data: an integer number in unit of A.
Command
VOLTAGE number_of_data <crlf>
data <crlf> data <crlf> . . . .
data <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the Voltage waveform data of the last weld. First field is the number of data to be
sent. Then follows the packets of data. Each data is separated by <crlf> and this command
ends with <crlf><lf>.
number_of_data: This is the number of data that shall be included in this command.
The Control samples Voltage every 40 Ps. For a weld less than 80 ms weld time, the
number of data will be approximately: total weld time y 40 Ps. This number will always
be less than 2000.
data: An integer number in unit of mV.
Command
POWER number_of_data <crlf>
data <crlf> data <crlf> . . . .
data <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the Power waveform data of the last weld. First field is the number of data to be sent.
Then follows the packets of data. Each data is separated by <crlf> and this command ends
with <crlf><lf>.
number_of_data: This is the number of data that shall be included in this Command.
The Control samples Current and Voltage every 40 Ps. For a weld less than 80 ms weld
time, the number of data will be approximately: total weld time y 40 Ps. This number
will be always less than 2000.
data: An integer number in unit of W.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-18
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
OHMS number_of_data <crlf>
data <crlf> data <crlf> . . . .
data <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the Resistance waveform data of the last weld. First field is the number of data to be
sent. Then follows the packets of data. Each data is separated by <crlf> and this command
ends with <crlf><lf>.
number_of_data: This is the number of data that shall be included in this Command.
The Control samples Current and Voltage every 40 Ps. For a weld less than 80 ms weld
time, the number of data will be approximately: total weld time y 40 Ps. This number
will be always less than 2000.
data: An integer number in unit of mOhms.
Command
ENERGY number_of_data <crlf>
data <crlf> data <crlf> . . . .
data<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Returns the energy waveform data of the last weld. First field is the number of data to be
sent. Then follows the packets of data. Each data is separated by <crlf> and this
command ends with <crlf><lf>.
Description
number_of_data: This is the number of data that shall be included in this Command.
The Control samples Current and Voltage every 40 Ps. For a weld less than 80 ms weld
time, the number of data will be approximately: total weld time y 40 Ps. This number
will be always less than 2000.
Data: An integer number in units of joules.
Command
SYNC <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
The Control return SYNC command back to the host computer when the SYNC command is
received from the host computer.
Command
COMBO<crlf>
TYPE1
KA<crlf>
TYPE2
KA<crlf>
ENG1
{ weld_energy }<crlf>
ENG2
{ weld_energy }<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Returns the Combo energy limits set for the current schedule.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-19
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
TIME<crlf>
UPPER1
LOWER1
UPPER2
LOWER2
<lf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Returns the time limits set for the current schedule.
Command
FORCE<crlf>
UPPER
LOWER
FIRE
ACTION
<lf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ none | STOP }<crlf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Returns the force limits.
Command
VALVE<crlf>
SOFT
TIME
FINAL
<lf>
{ value }<crlf>
{ time }<crlf>
{ value }<crlf>
Control State
RUN state.
Description
Returns the pressure limits.
Command
SYSTEM <crlf>
LIGHT
BUZZER
LOUDNESS
DISPLAY
SWSTATE
FIRESW
CTSTATE
GRAPH
WELDABORT
DEBOUNCE
<lf>
Control State
{ light_value }<crlf>
{ OFF | ON }<crlf>
{ loudness_value }<crlf>
{ PEAK | AVG }<crlf>
{ switch_state }<crlf>
{ AUTO | REMOTE | NONE } <crlf>
{ switch_state }<crlf>
{ OFF | ON } <crlf>
{ OFF | ON } <crlf>
{NONE | 10 | 20 | 30 } <crlf>
Any
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-20
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Description
Reports the current settings of the Control system parameters.
light_value is a number 0 to 99 for brightness of the LCD. 0 is dark and 100 is the
brightest.
loudness_value is a number 0 to 99 for buzzer loudness. 0 is off and 100 is the loudest.
switch_state:
{ MECHOPEN | MECHCLOSED | OPTOOPEN | OPTOCLOSED
| PLC0V | PLC24V}
Command
ENVLIMIT<crlf>
TYPE1
{ KA | V | KW }<crlf>
UPPER1
{ limit_value }<crlf>
LOWER1
{ limit_value }<crlf>
ACTION1
{ none | STOP | INHIBIT | APC }<crlf>
TYPE2
{ KA | V | KW }<crlf>
UPPER2
{ limit_value }<crlf>
LOWER2
{ limit_value }<crlf>
ACTION2
{ none | STOP }<crlf>
P1LDLY1
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P1LDLY2
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P1UDLY1
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P1UDLY2
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P2LDLY1
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P2LDLY2
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P2UDLY1
{ delay_value }<crlf>
P2UDLY2
{ delay_value }<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
Any
Returns the envelope limits that are set for this schedule.
Description
Command
ENVWAVE number_of_data_points { P1 | P2 }<crlf>
data <crlf> . . . data<crlf>
<lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the reference envelope waveform.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-21
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
REPORT type_of_report number_of_reports <crlf>
report <crlf> report <crlf> . . . .
report <crlf><lf>
Command
Control State
Description
Any
Returns the requested number of weld reports. First field is the type of reports to be sent. The second
field is the number of reports sent. Then follows the packets of report. One report pack holds the
information about the weld requested. Each report packet is separated by <crlf> and this Command
ends with <crlf><lf>.
Type_of_report: This field defines the type of report that was requested by the host computer.
ALL: This defines that a returned report will contain all fields of weld data. The fields in the report
packet are separated with a comma and all fields are in integer format. There are always 37 fields in
this report packet.
Report: {unit_number, schedule_number , weld_status, average_current_1 , average_voltage_1,
peak_current_1 , peak_voltage_1, average_power_1 , peak_power_1, average_resistance_1,
peak_resistance_1, time_1, null_1, average_current_2 , average_voltage_2, peak_current_2 ,
peak_voltage_2, average_power_2 , peak_power_2, average_resistance_2, peak_resistance_2,
time_2, null_2, disp_units, disp_initial, disp_final, disp_displacement, monitor_limit,
disp_SEA_flag, disp_SEA_time, off_time_1, off_time_2, energy_1, energy_2, start_force,
end_force, weld_count}
P1: This defines that a returned report will contain only fields pertaining to Pulse 1 of the weld data.
The fields in the report packet are separated with a comma and all fields are in integer format. There
are always 17 fields in this report packet.
Report:
{unit_number, schedule_number , weld_status, average_current_1 , average_voltage_1,
peak_current_1 , peak_voltage_1, average_power_1 , peak_power_1, average_resistance_1,
peak_resistance_1, time_1, off_time_1, energy_1, start_force, end_force, weld_count}
P2: This defines that a returned report will contain only fields pertaining to Pulse 2 of the weld data.
The fields in the report packet are separated with a comma and all fields are in integer format. There
are always 17 fields in this report packet.
Report: {unit_number, schedule_number , weld_status, average_current_2 , average_voltage_2,
peak_current_2 , peak_voltage_2, average_power_2 , peak_power_2, average_resistance_2,
peak_resistance_2, time_2, off_time_2, energy_2, start_force, end_force, weld_count}
LVDT: This defines that a returned report will contain only fields pertaining to
displacement weld data. The fields in the report packet are separated with a comma and all
fields are in integer format. There are always 10 fields in this report packet.
Report: {unit_number, schedule_number , weld_status, disp_units, disp_initial,
disp_final, disp_displacement, monitor_limit, disp_SEA_flag, disp_SEA_time}
Number_of_reports: This is the number of reports that shall be included in this command. If the
host computer requests more weld data than is available in the weld data buffer, the Control sends
only the weld reports in the weld buffer and the number_of_reports is the number of weld reports
available in the weld data buffer. After the report is sent to the host computer, the Control does not
erase the weld data sent to the host from the weld data buffer. You must use the REPORT ERASE #
command to erase weld data from the weld buffer.
unit_number:
Schedule_number:
weld_status:
Average_current_1:
Average_voltage_1:
peak_current_1:
peak_voltage_1:
The unit number assigned to the unit.
The schedule number of the weld.
The status of the weld.
The average current of pulse 1 (in A).
The average voltage of pulse 1(in mV).
The peak current of pulse 1 (in A).
The peak voltage of pulse 1 (in mV).
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-22
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
average_power_1:
The average power of pulse 1 (in W).
peak_power_1:
The peak power of pulse 1 (in W).
average_resistance_1:
The average resistance of pulse 1 (in 10-5:).
peak_resistance_1:
The peak resistance of pulse 1 (in 10-5:).
time_1:
APC or MG3 cutoff time.
null_1:
The field is always zero.
average_current_2:
The average current of pulse 2 (in A).
average_voltage_2:
The average voltage of pulse 2(in mV).
peak_current_2:
The peak current of pulse 2 (in A).
peak_voltage_2:
The peak voltage of pulse 2 (in mV).
average_power_2:
The average power of pulse 2 (in W).
peak_power_2:
The peak power of pulse 2 (in W).
average_resistance_2:
The average resistance of pulse 2 (in 10-5:).
peak_resistance_2:
The peak resistance of pulse 2 (in 10-5:).
time_2:
MG3 cutoff time.
null_2:
The field is always zero.
disp_units:
The displacement measurement units (0=inches/1000, mm)
disp_initial:
The displacement initial thickness value.
Disp_final:
The displacement final thickness value.
Disp_displacement:
The displacement value (initial minus final).
Monitor_limit:
The time reached in ms.
Disp_SEA_flag:
The SEA limit reached (0=FALSE, 1=TRUE).
Disp_SEA_time:
The limit time in ms.
off_time_1:
The error cutoff time
off_time_2:
The error cutoff time
energy_1:
The total energy for pulse 1.
Energy_2:
The total energy for pulse 2.
Start_force: The force at the start of the weld.
end_force: The force at the end of the weld.
Weld_count: The number of this weld assigned by the unit.
NOTE:
disp_xxxx values are signed integer values that have units that depend on disp_units as
follows:
units = 0 = inches/1000:
1 = 0.001 inches; 10 = 0.01 inches
units = 1 = mm: 1 = 0.01 mm, 10 = 0.10 mm
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-23
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD STATUS CODES
Number
Status Message
0
GOOD
1
CHECK CONTROL SIGNALS INPUT STATUS
2
CHECK INPUT SWITCH STATUS
3
FIRING SWITCH BEFORE FOOT SWITCH
4
STOP ON CONTROL SIGNALS INPUT
5
POWER TRANSISTOR OVERHEATED
6
EMERGENCY STOP - OPERATOR ACTIVATED
7
FIRING SWITCH DIDN'T CLOSE IN 10 SECOND
8
WELD TRANSFORMER OVERHEATED
9
TEST WELD
10
VOLTAGE SELECTION PLUG IS MISSING
11
INHIBIT CONTROL SIGNALS ACTIVATED
12
LOW BATTERY
13
NO CURRENT READING
14
NO VOLTAGE READING
15
LOAD RESISTANCE TOO HIGH
16
NO WELD TRANSFORMER DETECTED
17
WELD SWITCH IN NO WELD POSITION
18
CHECK VOLTAGE CABLE & SECONDARY CIRCUIT
19
CALIBRATION RESET TO DEFAULT
20
LOWER LIMIT GREATER THAN UPPER LIMIT
21
COOL TIME ADDED FOR DIFFERENT FEEDBACK
22
ENERGY SETTING TOO SMALL
23
SYSTEM & SCHEDULE RESET TO DEFAULTS
24
LIMITS ROUND UP
25
CHAINED TO NEXT SCHEDULE
26
SAFE ENERGY LIMIT REACHED
27
P1 LOWER LIMIT DELAYS ADJUSTED
28
P1 UPPER LIMIT DELAYS ADJUSTED
29
P2 LOWER LIMIT DELAYS ADJUSTED
30
P2 UPPER LIMIT DELAYS ADJUSTED
31
UPSLOPE REQUIRED FOR LOWER LIMIT
32
INPUT TOO LARGE
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-24
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD STATUS CODES
Number
Status Message
33
INPUT TOO SMALL
34
PRESS RUN BEFORE WELDING
35
ERASE FAILED
36
PROGRAM FAILED
37
NO LOWER LIMIT WITH STOP P1 ACTION
38
LIMIT DELAYS RESET TO 0
39
ACCESS DENIED! SYSTEM SECURITY ON
40
ILLEGAL SECURITY CODE ENTERED
41
NOT USED
42
NOT USED
43
NOT USED
44
NOT USED
45
NOT USED
46
NOT USED
47
ACCESS DENIED! SCHEDULE LOCK ON
48
INITIAL THICKNESS LOW
49
INITIAL THICKNESS HIGH
50
FINAL THICKNESS LOW
51
FINAL THICKNESS HIGH
52
DISPLACEMENT LOW
53
DISPLACEMENT HIGH
54
WELD STOP DISP. REACHED
55
CURRENT1 > UPPER LIMIT
56
CURRENT1 < LOWER LIMIT
57
VOLTAGE1 > UPPER LIMIT
58
VOLTAGE1 < LOWER LIMIT
59
POWER1 > UPPER LIMIT
60
POWER1 < LOWER LIMIT
61
RESISTANCE1 > UPPER LIMIT
62
RESISTANCE1 < LOWER LIMIT
63
P1 LFCD DISP > UPPER LIMIT
64
P1 LFCD DISP < LOWER LIMIT
65
SCHEDULES ARE RESET
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-25
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD STATUS CODES
Number
Status Message
66
SYSTEM PARAMETERS ARE RESET
67
P2 ENV DISP > UPPER LIMIT
68
P2 ENV DISP < LOWER LIMIT
69
WELD TIME TOO SMALL
70
NOT USED
71
CURRENT2 > UPPER LIMIT
72
CURRENT2 < LOWER LIMIT
73
VOLTAGE2 > UPPER LIMIT
74
VOLTAGE2 < LOWER LIMIT
75
POWER2 > UPPER LIMIT
76
POWER2 < LOWER LIMIT
77
RESISTANCE2 > UPPER LIMIT
78
RESISTANCE2 < LOWER LIMIT
79
INHIBIT 2ND PULSE
80
WELD STOP - LIMIT REACHED
81
SYSTEM ERROR: BUS ERROR
82
SYSTEM ERROR: SOFTWARE INTERRUPT
83
SYSTEM ERROR: ILLEGAL INSTRUCTION
84
SYSTEM ERROR: DIVIDED BY ZERO
85
SYSTEM ERROR: SPURIOUS INTERRUPT
86
COOL TIME MINIMUM
87
TEST WELD? [MENU]=NO [RUN]=YES
88
CAPACITY LIMIT EXCEEDED P1
89
CAPACITY LIMIT EXCEEDED P2
90
STABILITY LIMIT EXCEEDED P1
91
STABILITY LIMIT EXCEEDED P2
92
WELD FIRE LOCKOUT
93
THIN MUST BE LESS THAN THICK
94
THICK TOO SMALL
95
P1 JOULES > UPPER LIMIT
96
P1 JOULES < LOWER LIMIT
97
P2 JOULES > UPPER LIMIT
98
P2 JOULES < LOWER LIMIT
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-26
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
WELD STATUS CODES
Number
Status Message
99
FORCE TIMED OUT > 10 SEC.
100
P1 CUTOFF TIME > UPPER LIMIT
101
P1 CUTOFF TIME < LOWER LIMIT
102
P2 CUTOFF TIME > UPPER LIMIT
103
P2 CUTOFF TIME < LOWER LIMIT
104
SELECTED SCHEDULE LIMITS ARE RESET
105
P1 FORCE > UPPER LIMIT
106
P1 FORCE < LOWER LIMIT
107
P2 FORCE > UPPER LIMIT
108
P2 FORCE < LOWER LIMIT
109
NEED TO SET MONITOR LIMIT
110
ACCESS DENIED! CALIBRATION LOCK ON
111
SQUEEZE TIME INCREASED
112
P1 kA > ENV UPPER LIMIT
113
P1 kA < ENV LOWER LIMIT
114
P1 VOL > ENV UPPER LIMIT
115
P1 VOL < ENV LOWER LIMIT
116
P1 PWR > ENV UPPER LIMIT
117
P1 PWR < ENV LOWER LIMIT
118
P1 DISP > ENV UPPER LIMIT
119
P1 DISP < ENV LOWER LIMIT
120
P2 kA > ENV UPPER LIMIT
121
P2 kA < ENV LOWER LIMIT
122
P2 VOL > ENV UPPER LIMIT
123
P2 VOL < ENV LOWER LIMIT
124
P2 PWR > ENV UPPER LIMIT
125
P2 PWR < ENV LOWER LIMIT
126
P2 DISP > ENV UPPER LIMIT
127
P2 DISP < ENV LOWER LIMIT
128
SCREEN UPDATES ARE OFF
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-27
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
SCHEDULE schedule_number <crlf><lf>
Control State
Any
Description
Returns the current schedule number to the host. schedule_number may be any number from
0 to 99.
Command
SCHEDULE
FEEDBACK1
FEEDBACK2
SQUEEZE
UP1
WELD1
DOWN1
COOL
UP2
WELD2
DOWN2
HOLD
ENG1
ENG2
RINDEX1
RINDEX2
EINDEX1
EINDEX2
<lf>
schedule_number <crlf>
{ KA | V | KW } <crlf>
{ KA | V | KW } <crlf>
squeeze_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
weld_time <crlf>
hold_time <crlf>
weld_energy <crlf>
weld_energy <crlf>
resistance_index<crlf>
resistance_index<crlf>
energy_index<crlf>
energy_index<crlf>
Control State Any
Description
Reports the settings of the currently loaded Control schedule parameters. The
schedule_number variable identifies which schedule is currently loaded, and may be any value
from 0 to 99.
squeeze_time and hold_time are the parameter that defines the time for the given period in 1
msec. Valid range is from 0 to 999.
weld_time is equivalent to 0.01 for Increments from 0.1 to 0.99 msec and increments of 0.1
msec for 1.0 to 9.9 msec and increments of 1.0 msec for 10.0 to 99.0 msec. (see table below)
HOST
CONTROL
Increments
Range
Time Range
Increments
0.01
0.1-0.99
0.1-0.99 ms
0.01ms
0.1
1.00-9.90
1.0-9.9 ms
0.1 ms
1.0
10.00-99.0
10.0-99.0 ms
1 ms
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-28
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
weld_energy is the parameter that specifies the amount of weld energy.
x
Current Feedback mode: the weld_energy range for the HF27 is from 10 to 2.400A
(10-2400). .
x
Voltage Feedback mode: weld_energy for the HF27 is in units of 0.001 V, and the
range is from 0.200 to 9.9V (200 to 9900).
x
(NOTE: Maximum attainable voltage is dependent on the HF27 model and the load
resistance).
x
Power Feedback mode: weld_energy for the HF27 is in units of 1W, and the range
is from 10W to 9900W (10 to 9900).
volt multiplier is the index value for a table of resistance vs. a PID multiplier for voltage mode
(used for the last weld). Note: Not used in versions where RINDEXx and EINDEXx are
present.
resistance index is the index value into a table of resistance vs. energy PID tables used for the
last weld.
energy index is the index value into a PID energy vs. PID values table used for the last weld.
Command
MONITOR
MONTYPE1
ACTION1
UPPER1
LOWER1
MONTYPE2
ACTION2
UPPER2
LOWER2
schedule_number<crlf>
{ KA | V | KW | R }<crlf>
{ none | STOP | INHIBIT | APC }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ KA | V | KW | R }<crlf>
{ none | STOP }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
{ limit_value }<crlf>
P1LDLY1
P1LDLY2
P1UDLY1
P1UDLY2
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
P2LDLY1
P2LDLY2
P2UDLY1
P2UDLY2
<lf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
{delay_value}<crlf>
Control State
Any
Description
Reports the settings of the weld monitor of the currently loaded Control schedule. The
schedule_number variable identifies which schedule is currently loaded, and may be any
value from 0 to 99. The possible value for all variables listed after their parameter name
correspond to the values listed under MONITOR in Host Originated Commands of this
manual.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-29
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
RELAY <crlf>
ACTIVE1
CONDITION1
SUBCOND1
ACTIVE2
CONDITION2
SUBCOND2
ACTIVE3
CONDITION3
SUBCOND3
ACTIVE4
CONDITION4
SUBCOND4
<lf>
{ HIGH | LOW }<crlf>
{condition_value}<crlf>
{extended_condition_value}<crlf>
{ HIGH | LOW }<crlf>
{condition_value}<crlf>
{extended_condition_value}<crlf>
{ HIGH | LOW }<crlf>
{condition_value}<crlf>
{extended_condition_value}<crlf>
{ HIGH | LOW }<crlf>
{condition_value}<crlf>
{extended_condition_value}<crlf>
condition_value:
{ ALARM | LIMITS | WELD | END | P1+P2 | KA+V | KW+R
| OTHER | MG3 | DISP}
NOTE:
extended_condition_value not valid unless condition_value is:
P1+P2 or KA+V or KW+R or OTHER or DISP.
extended_condition_value:
for P1+P2:
{ LIMITS | P1OUT | P1HI | P1LOW | P2OUT | P2HI | P2LOW}
for KA+V:
{ KALIMIT | VLIMIT | P1KAHI | P1KALOW | P2KAHI | P2KALOW
| P1VHI | P1VLOW | P2VHI | P2VLOW}
for KW+R:
{ KWLIMIT | RLIMIT | P1KWHI | P1KWLOW | P2KWHI | P2KWLOW
| P1RHI | P1RLOW | P2RHI | P2RLOW}
for OTHER: { FRLIMIT | STFORCE | EDFORCE | EGLIMIT | EGHI | EGLOW
| TMLIMIT | TMHI | TMLOW | ENVLIM}
for DISP:
{ANY | ILO | IHI | FLO | FHI | DLO | DHI | INI | DSP | SEA}
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-30
990-370
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
NOTES:
P1+P2 condition value explanations:
LIMITS:
Pulse 1 or Pulse 2 out of limits.
P1OUT:
Pulse 1 out of limits.
P1HI, P1LOW:
Pulse 1 low/hi limit reached.
P2OUT:
Pulse 2 out of limits.
P2HI, P2LOW:
Pulse 2 low/hi limit reached.
KA+V condition value explanations:
KALIMIT
Current Limit Reached.
VLIMIT
Voltage Limit Reached.
P1KAHI, P1KALOW:
Pulse 1 Current low/hi error.
P2KAHI, P2KALOW:
Pulse 1 Current low/hi error.
P1VHI, P1VLOW:
Pulse 2 Voltage low/hi error.
P2VHI, P2VLOW:
Pulse 2 Voltage low/hi error.
KW+R condition value explanations:
KWLIMIT:
Power Limit Reached
RLIMIT:
Resistance Limit Reached
P1KWHI, P1KWLOW:
Pulse 1 Power low/hi error
P2KWHI, P2KWLOW:
Pulse 1 Power low/hi error
P1RHI, P1RLOW:
Pulse 2 Resistance low/hi error
P2RHI, P2RLOW:
Pulse 2 Resistance low/hi error
OTHER condition value explanations:
FRLIMIT
STFORCE:
Starting force limit reached.
EDFORCE :
Ending force limit reached.
EGLIMIT:
Energy limit reached.
EGHI, EGLOW:
Energy low/hi limit reached.
TMLIMIT:
Time limit reached.
TMHI, TMLOW:
Time low/hi limit reached.
DISP condition value explanations:
ANY
Any displacement error.
ILO, IHI
Initial thickness low/hi error.
FLO, FHI
Final thickness low/hi error.
DLO, DHI
Final displacement low/hi error.
INI
Initial thickness error.
DSP
Any final displacement error.
SEA
Control State
Any
Description
Reports the relay settings.
Stop energy at error.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
990-370
E-31
APPENDIX E. COMMUNICATIONS
Command
Control State
Description
SECURITY<crlf>
SCHEDULE
{ ON | OFF }<crlf>
SYSTEM
{ ON | OFF }<crlf>
CALIBRATION { ON | OFF }<crlf><lf>
Any
Returns the current status of the security settings.
schedule_number <crlf>
{ initial_thick_lo } <crlf>
{ initial_thick_hi } <crlf>
{ final_thick_lo } <crlf>
{ final_thick_hi } <crlf>
{ displacement_lo } <crlf>
{ displacement_hi } <crlf>
{ displacement_wtd } <crlf>
{ IN/1000 | MM } <crlf>
{ CONT | STOP } <crlf>
Command
DISP
INITLO
INITHI
FINALLO
FINALHI
DISPLO
DISPHI
DISPWT
UNITS
INITERR
<lf>
Control State
Any except while welding
Description
Reports the current settings of the Control system displacement limit checking parameters.
NOTES:
The units of the limit fields parameters depend on the value of the UNITS parameter as
follows:
IN/1000:
1 = 0.001 inches; 10 = 0.01 inches
MM:
1 = 0.01 mm; 10 = 0.1 mm
Initial and final thickness are positive if the electrodes move farther apart and negative if they
move closer together (in relation to the “zero setting”). The reference “zero setting” for
thickness measurements may be set using the DISPZERO command (see Host Originated
Commands section).
Displacement is positive if the electrodes moved closer together during the weld and negative
if they moved further apart.
Command
DISPZERO ad_counts<crlf><lf>
Control State
Any except while welding
Description
Reports the current “zero setting” of the Control system displacement measuring device.
This value is in a/d converter counts (not actual position). If zero, the position of the upper
electrode at the start of the next weld will establish the new zero setting.
NOTE: This zero setting is the reference position for the initial and final thickness
measurements.
HF27 LINEAR DC RESISTANCE WELDING CONTROL
E-32
990-370
APPENDIX F
The Basics Of
Resistance Welding
Resistance Welding Parameters
Resistance welding heat is produced by passing electrical current through the parts for a fixed time
period. The welding heat generated is a function of the magnitude of the weld current, the electrical
resistance of the parts, the contact resistance between the parts, and the weld force applied to the parts.
Sufficient weld force is required to contain the molten material produced during the weld. However, as
the force is increased, the contact resistance decreases. Lower contact resistance requires additional
weld current, voltage, or power to produce the heat required to form a weld.
The higher the weld force, the greater the weld current, voltage, power, or time required to produce a
given weld. The formula for amount of heat generated is I2RT -- the square of the weld current [ I ]
times the workpiece resistance [ R ] times the weld time [ T ].
Welding Parameter Interaction
Interaction of Welding Parameters
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
F-1
APPENDIX F: THE BASICS OF RESISTANCE WELDING
Electrode Selection
Correct electrode selection strongly influences how weld heat is generated in the weld area. In general,
use conductive electrodes such as a RWMA-2 (Copper alloy) when welding electrically resistive parts
such as nickel or steel so that the weld heat is generated by the electrical resistance of the parts and the
contact resistance between the parts. Use resistive electrodes such as RWMA-13 (Tungsten) and
RWMA-14 (Molybdenum) to weld conductive parts such as copper and gold because conductive parts
do not generate much internal heat so the electrodes must provide external heat. Use the following
Electrode Selection Table for selecting the proper electrode materials.
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
Alumel
-2
Alumel
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Alumel
-2
Chromel
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Alumel
-2
Dumet
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Brass
Aluminum
-1
Aluminum
-1
Brass
-2, -14
Tinned Brass
-14
Aluminum
-1
Aluminum
Alloys
-1
Brass
-2, -14
Consil
-2
Aluminum
-1
Cadmium Plating
-1
Brass
-2, -14
Constantan
-2
Aluminum
-1
Tinned Brass
-14
Brass
-2, -14
Copper
-14
Aluminum
-1
Tinned Copper
-14
Brass
-2, -14
Tinned Copper
-14
Aluminum
-1
Gold Plated
Dumet
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Dumet
-2
Aluminum
-1
Gold Plated
Kovar
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Nichrome
-2
Aluminum
-1
Kovar
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Nickel
-2
Aluminum
-1
Magnesium
-1
Brass
-2, -14
NiSpan C
-2
Aluminum
-1
Cold Rolled Steel
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Paliney 7
-2
Aluminum
-1
Stainless Steel
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Silver
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Brass
-2, -14
Brass
-2, -14
Stainless Steel
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Copper
-14
Bronze
-2, -11
Bronze
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Tinned Copper
-14
Bronze
-2, -11
Tinned Copper
-14
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Nickel
-2
Bronze
-2, -11
Iron
-2
-2, -14
-11, -14
-2, -11
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
F-2
990-370
APPENDIX F: THE BASICS OF RESISTANCE WELDING
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
Bronze
-2, -11
Nichrome
-2
Copper
-14
Silver
-11, -14
Bronze
-2, -11
Nickel
-2
Copper
-14
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Chromel
-2
Chromel
-2
Copper
-14
Stainless Steel
-2
Chromel
-2
Constantan
-2
Dumet
-2
Dumet
-2
Chromel
-2
Copel
-2
Dumet
-2
Nichrome
-2
Chromel
-2
Copper
-14
Dumet
-2
Nickel
-2
Chromel
-2
Tinned Copper
-14
Dumet
-2
Platinum
-2
Chromel
-2
Dumet
-2
Dumet
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Chromel
-2
Nichrome
-2
Evanohm
-14
Copper
-14
Chromel
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Gold
-14
Gold
-14
Consil
-2
Consil
-2
Gold
-14
Kovar
-2
Consil
-2
Tinned Copper
-14
Hastalloy
-2
Titanium
-2
Consil
-2
Dumet
-2
Inconel
-2
Inconel
-2
Constantan
-2
Constantan
Inconel
-2
Kulgrid
-2
Constantan
-2
Copper
-14
Invar
-2
Invar
-2
Constantan
-2
Tinned Copper
-14
Iridium
-2
Iridium
-2
Constantan
-2
Iron
-2
Iridium
-2
Platinum
-2
Constantan
-2
Nichrome
-2
Iron
-2
Iron
-2
Constantan
-2
Nickel
-2
Karma
-2
Karma
-2
Copper
-14
Copper
-14
Karma
-2
Nickel
-2
Copper
-14
Dumet
-2
Karma
-2
Platinum
-2
Copper
-14
Invar
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Copper
-14
Karme
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Kulgrid
-2
Copper
-14
Manganin
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Nickel
-2
Copper
-14
Nichrome
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Silver
-11, -14
Copper
-14
Nickel
-2
Kovar, Gold
Plate
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Copper
-14
Paliney 7
-2
Magnesium
-1
Magnesium
-1
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
F-3
APPENDIX F: THE BASICS OF RESISTANCE WELDING
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
MATERIAL
ELECT
RWMA
TYPE
Molybdenum
-2
Nickel
-2
NiSpan C
-2
NiSpan C
-2
Molybdenum
-2
Tungsten
-2
NiSpan C
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Nichrome
-2
Nichrome
-2
NiSpan C
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Nichrome
-2
Nickel
-2
Niobium
-2
Niobium
-2
Nichrome
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Platinum
-2
Platinum
-2
Nichrome
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Paliney 7
-2
Paliney 7
-2
Nickel
-2
Nickel
-2
Silver
-11, -14
Silver
Nickel
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Silver
-11, -14
Cadmium
-13
Nickel
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Nickel
-2
Tantalum
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Nickel
-2
Tungsten
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
Tantalum
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Stainless Steel
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Tinned Brass
-14
Stainless Steel
-2
Tungsten
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Beryllium
Copper
-2
Tantalum
-2
Tantalum
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Consil
-2
Titanium
-2
Titanium
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Tinned Copper
-14
Tungsten
-2
Tungsten
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Nichrome
-2
Tungsten
-2
henium
-2
Nickel Alloy
-2
Nickel
-2
Zinc
-14
Zinc
-14
Nickel Alloy
-2
Cold Rolled
Steel
-2
-11, -14
Electrode Maintenance
Depending on use, periodic tip resurfacing is required to remove oxides and welding debris from
electrodes. Cleaning of electrodes on production line should be limited to use of #400-600 grit electrode
polishing disks. For less critical applications, a file can be used to clean a badly damaged tip. However,
after filing, polishing disks should then be used to ensure that the electrode faces are smooth. If this is
not done, the rough surface of the electrode face will have a tendency to stick to the work piece.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
F-4
990-370
APPENDIX F: THE BASICS OF RESISTANCE WELDING
Weld Schedule Development
Developing a weld schedule is a methodical procedure, which consists of making sample welds and
evaluating the results. The first weld should be made at low energy settings. Adjustments are then
made to each of the welding parameters one at a time until a successful weld is made.
1
Install the correct electrodes in the electrode holders on the Weld Head. See the preceding
Table for electrode material recommendations.
2
Use a flat electrode face for most applications. Use a "domed" face if surface oxides are a
problem. If either of the parts is a wire, the diameter of the electrode face should be equal to or
greater than the diameter of the wire. If both parts are flat, the face should be at least one-half
the diameter of the electrodes. Pencil point electrodes cause severe electrode sticking to the
parts, unexplained explosions, and increase the weld heat substantially because of the reduced
electrode-to-part contact area.
3
Use the Force Adjustment Knob on the Weld Head to set the Firing Force and adjust an Air
Actuated Weld Head.
4
Program a weld schedule, then make your first weld. Always observe safety precautions when
welding and wear safety glasses. For a complete procedure on making welds, refer to
Operating Instructions.
5
Use pliers to peel the welded materials apart. A satisfactory weld will show residual material
pulled from one material to the other. Tearing of base material around the weld nugget
indicates a material failure NOT a weld failure. Excessive electrode sticking and/or "spitting"
should define a weld as unsatisfactory and indicates that too much weld current, voltage,
power, or time has been used.
6
If the parts pull apart easily or there is little or no residual material pulled, the weld is weak.
Increase the weld time in 1 msec increments. Increase weld current, voltage, or power if a
satisfactory weld achieved using 10 msec of weld time.
NOTE: Actual weld strength is a user-defined specification.
7
Polarity, as determined by the direction of weld current flow, can have a marked effect on the
weld characteristics of some material combinations. This effect occurs when welding materials
with large differences in resistivity, such as copper and nickel or when welding identical
materials with thickness ratios greater than 4 to 1. The general rule is that the more resistive
material or the thinner material should be placed against the negative (-) electrode. Polarity on
the Control can only be changed by reversing the Weld Cables.
Weld Strength Testing
Destructive tests should be performed on a random basis using actual manufacturing parts. Destructive
tests made on spot welds include tension, tension-shear, peel, impact, twist, hardness, and macro-etch
tests. Fatigue tests and radiography have also been used. Of these methods torsional shear is preferred
for round wire and a 45-degree peel test for sheet stock.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
F-5
APPENDIX F: THE BASICS OF RESISTANCE WELDING
Weld Strength Profiles
Creating a weld strength profile offers the user a scientific approach to determining the optimum set of
welding parameters and then displaying these parameters in a graphical form.
1
Start at a low weld current, voltage, or power, making five or more welds, then perform pull tests
for each weld. Calculate the average pull strength. Increase weld current, voltage, or power and
repeat this procedure. Do not change the weld time, weld force, or electrode area.
2
Continue increasing weld current, voltage, or power until any unfavorable characteristic occurs,
such as sticking or spitting.
3
Repeat steps 1 through 3 for different weld forces, then create a plot of part pull strength versus
weld current, voltage, or power for different weld forces as shown in the illustration on the next
page, Typical Weld Strength Profile.
4
Repeat steps 1 through 3 using a different but fixed weld time.
Typical Weld Strength Profile
The picture on the right illustrates a typical weld
strength profile. The 14 lb electrode force curve
shows the highest pull strengths but the lowest
tolerance to changes in weld current, voltage, or
power. The 12 lb electrode force curve shows a
small reduction in pull strength, but considerably
more tolerance to changes in weld energy. Weld
heat will vary as a result of material variations and
electrode wear.
The 12 lb electrode force curve is preferred. It
shows more tolerance to changes in weld current,
voltage, or power and has nearly the same bond
strength as the 14 lb electrode force curve.
A comparison of weld schedules for several
different applications might show that they could be
consolidated into one or two weld schedules. This
would have obvious manufacturing advantages.
Typical Weld Strength Profile
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
F-6
990-370
APPENDIX G
Quality Resistance Welding Solutions:
Defining the Optimum Process
Introduction
A quality resistance welding solution both meets the application objectives and produces stable,
repeatable results in a production environment. In defining the optimum process the user must approach
the application methodically and consider many variables. In this article we will look at the following
key stages and principles to be considered when defining the optimum resistance welding process:
x Materials and their properties
x Basic resistance welding
x principles
x Weld profiles
x Approach to development
x Common problems
x Use of screening DOE’s
x Use of factorial DOE’s
Resistance Welding -- A Material World
The first consideration in designing a quality welding solution is the properties of the materials to be
joined and the quality requirements of the desired welded joint. At this stage, it is worthwhile to review
the way the resistance welding process works and the likely outcome when the parts are resistance
welded.
There are four main types of structural materials:
x Metals (silver, steel, platinum)
x Ceramic (alumina, sand)
x Plastics/polymers (PVC, teflon)
x Semiconductors (silicon, geranium)
Of these, only metals can be resistance welded because they are electrically conductive, soften on
heating, and can be forged together without breaking.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-1
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Alloys are a mixture of two or more metals. An
alloy is normally harder, less conductive, and more Alloy
brittle than the parent metal which has bearing on
the type of joint one can expect when resistance
welding a combination of different metals.
Metal A
Metals atoms are naturally attracted to other
Metal B
metal atoms even in different parent materials.
Metals and alloys will bond together once
surface contaminants such as dirt, grease, and
oxides removed. Resistance welding generates
heat at the material interface, which decomposes the dirt and grease and helps to break up the oxide film.
The resultant heat softens or melts the metal and the applied force brings the atoms on either side into
close contact to form the bond. The strength of the joint develops as it cools and a new structure is
formed.
There are three main types of bonds that can be formed using the resistance welding process:
•
•
•
Solder or Braze Joint
A filler material such as a solder or braze compound is either added during the process or
present as a plating or coating. Soldered joints are typically achieved at temperatures less than
400°C and brazed joints such as Sil-Phos materials melt at temperatures above 400°C.
Solid-State Joint
A solid state joint can be formed when the materials are heated to between 70-80% of their
melting point.
Fusion Joint
A fusion joint can be formed when both metals are heated to their melting point and their atoms
mix.
Many micro-resistance welding challenges involve joining dissimilar metals in terms of their melting
points, electrical conductivity, and hardness. A solid-state joint can be an ideal solution for these
difficult applications; there is no direct mixing of the two materials across the weld interface thus
preventing the formation of harmful alloys that could form brittle compounds that are easily fractured.
Remember that in a solid-state joint, the metals are only heated to 70-80% of their respective melting
points, resulting in less thermal stress during heating and subsequent joint cooling in comparison to a
fusion weld. As there is no real melting of the materials in a solid-state joint, there is less chance of
weld splash or material expulsion. A weld nugget can still be achieved with a solid-state joint.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-2
990-370
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Consider the Material Properties
The important material properties to be considered in the resistance welding process are:
x
x
x
x
x
Electrical and thermal conductivity
Plating and coating
Hardness
Melting point
Oxides
The figure below illustrates the variance in resistivity and melting points for some of the more common
materials used in micro resistance welding today.
Ti-6Al-4V
Inconel
Nichrome
OFF Scale
800
Group II
Resistivity
(nano-ohm)
600
Stainless Steels
(304, 316, etc.)
Group I
Ti
400
Group III
Br
Pt-Ir
200
Al Ag
500
Steel
Ni
Bro
Nb
Pt
Cu
1000
1500
Ta
Mo
2000
2500
W
3000
3500
G
Melting Point (C)
The materials can be grouped into three common categories. The types of joints achievable within each
of the main groups are detailed below:
x
Group I – Conductive Metals
Conductive metals dissipate heat and it can be difficult to focus heat at the interface. A solidstate joint is therefore preferred. Typically, resistive electrode materials are used to provide
additional heating.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-3
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
x
Group II – Resistive Metals
It is easier to generate and trap heat at the interface of resistive metals and therefore it is
possible to form both solid state and fusion welds depending on time and temperature. Upslope
can reduce contact resistances and provide heating in the bulk material resistance.
x
Group III – Refractory Metals
Refractory metals have very high melting points and excess heating can cause micro-structural
damage. A solid-state joint is therefore preferred.
The chart below gives some guidance on the type of joint that can be expected and design considerations
required when joining materials from the different groups.
Group I
Group I
(Copper)
• Solid-State
• W/Mo electrodes
Group II
(Steel)
Group II
Group III
• Solid-State
• Projection on Group I
• Solid-State
• Fine projections on
• Solid-State or Fusion
• Solid-state or braze of II
Group III
on III
• Projection on III
• Solid-State
Group III
(Moly)
Basic Principles
R2
R1
R4
R3
Contact Resistance
Resistance
R5
Bulk Resistance
R6
R7
Time
The figure above shows the key resistances in a typical opposed resistance weld and the relationship
between contact resistances and bulk resistances over time, during a typical resistance weld:
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-4
990-370
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
R1 & R7
The electrode resistances affect the conduction of energy and weld heat to the parts and
the rate of heat sinking from the parts at the end of the weld.
R2, R4 & R 6 The electrode-to-part and part-to-part “Contact Resistances” determine the amount of
heat generation in these areas. The contact resistances decline over time as the parts
achieve better fit up.
R3 & R5
The metal “Bulk Resistances” become higher during the weld as the parts are heated.
If a weld is initiated when the contact resistances are still high, the heat generated is in relation to the level
and location of the contact resistances, as the materials have not had a chance to fit up correctly. It is
common for the heat generated at the electrode-to-part and part-to-part resistances to cause multiple
welding problems when welding resistive materials including:
x
Part marking and surface heating
x
Weld splash or expulsion
x
Electrode sticking
x
Weak welds
Alternately, conductive materials can be welded by using high contact resistance and fast heating
because their bulk resistance is not high and cannot be relied upon for heat generation.
If a weld is initiated when both parts and electrodes are fitted up correctly, the contact resistance is
lower and bulk resistance now controls the heat generation. This type of weld is achieved with a slower
heating rate and normally longer time is preferred for welding resistive materials, which can generate
heat through their bulk resistance.
The contact resistances present at the weld when the power supply is fired have a great impact on the heat
balance of a weld and, therefore, the heat affected zone.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-5
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
The figure below shows a weld that is fired
early on in the weld sequence when the
contact resistance is still quite high.
The figure shows a weld that is initiated when the
contact resistance is lower; in this example, we are
using bulk resistance to generate our weld heat.
Contact Resistance
Contact Resistance
Resistance
Weld Pulse
Resistance
Weld Pulse
Bulk Resistance
Bulk Resistance
Time
Time
Heat Affected Zone
(NOTE: Larger nuggets are possible with longer weld times when using bulk resistance.)
In general, conductive materials benefit from a faster heating rate, as the higher contact resistances assist
heat generation in the weld. Resistive materials benefit from slower heating rates which allow the
contact resistances to reduce significantly. Bulk resistances, therefore, become the major source for heat
generation. The heat-affected zone is also much smaller in this case producing a weld with less
variation.
The following figure shows the three stages of heat generation for resistive materials in a fusion weld.
In the first stage, the heat is focused in the part-to-part and electrode-to-part contact areas, since contact
resistance is high relative to bulk resistance. In the second stage, contact resistance decreases as the
electrodes seat better to the parts. Less heat is generated in the electrode-to-part contact areas, and a
greater amount of heat is generated in the parts as the bulk resistance increases. In the third stage, the
bulk resistance becomes the dominant heat-generating factor and the parts can reach their bonding
temperature at the part-to-part interface. The stages of heat generation for conductive materials will be
similar to that of resistive materials, but there will be less heat generated in the bulk resistance due to the
conductivity of the materials.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-6
990-370
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Weld Profiles
The basic welding profile (or schedule) consists of a controlled application of energy and force over
time. Precision power supplies control the energy and time and therefore heating rate of the parts. The
weld head applies force from the start to finish of the welding process.
The figure on the right
Welding Force
shows a typical welding
sequence where the force is
Trigger Force
Current
applied to the parts; a
squeeze time is initiated
which allows the force to
stabilize before the current
is fired. Squeeze time also
allows time for the contact
resistances to reduce as the
Squeeze
Heat
Hold
materials start to come into
closer contact at their interface. A hold time is initiated after current flows to allow the parts to cool
under pressure before the electrodes are retracted from the parts. Hold time is important as weld
strength develops in this period. This basic form of weld profile is sufficient for the majority of small
part resistance welding applications.
Power supply technology selection is based on the requirements of both the application and process. In
general, closed loop power supply technologies are the best choice for consistent, controlled output and
fast response to changes in resistance during the weld (for further details comparison see the Miyachi
Unitek “slide rule” tool).
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-7
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Approach to Weld Development
The first stage in developing a quality welding process is to fix as many of the variables as possible in
the welding equipment set up. The welding variables can be grouped in the following categories:
x
x
x
Material Variables
Base material
Plating
Size
Shape
Weld Head & Mechanical Variables
Force, squeeze, hold
Actuation method
Electrode material and shape
Power Supply Variables
Energy
Time (squeeze, weld, hold)
x
x
Process Variables
Tooling, level of automation
Repetition rate
Part positioning
Maintenance, electrode cleaning
Quality Requirements
Pull strength
Visual criteria
Test method, other weld joint requirements
The first stage in developing a quality welding process is to fix as many of the variables as possible in
the welding equipment set up. Welding variables can be grouped in the following categories:
Initial Welding Trials -- The “Look See” Tests
“Look see” welding tests are a series of mini welding experiments designed to provide a starting point
for further statistical development of the welding parameters. The user should adjust the key welding
variables (energy, force, time) in order to identify the likely good “weld window.” Close visual
inspection of the weld parts will promote better understanding of the heating characteristics of the
application.
The mini-experiments should also be used to understand the weld characteristics from both application
and process perspective. Key factors in this understanding are as follows:
Application Perspective
x Materials: Resistivity, melting point, thermal mass, shape, hardness, surface properties.
x Heat balance: Electrode materials, shape, Polarity, heating rate (upslope).
x Observation: visual criteria, cross section, and impact of variables on heat balance.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-8
990-370
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Process Perspective
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
What are the likely variables in a production process?
How will operators handle and align the parts?
What tooling or automation will be required?
How will operators maintain and change the electrodes?
What other parameters will operators be able to adjust?
What are the quality and inspection requirements?
What are the relevant production testing methods and test equipment?
Do we have adequate control over the quality of the materials?
Common Problems
During this stage of process development, it is important to understand that the majority of process
problems are related to either materials variation, or part-to-electrode positioning. Some examples are
shown below.
Material Control
Part-To-Part Positioning
Electrode-To-Part Positioning
The changes detailed above generally result in a change in contact resistance and always affect the heat
balance of the weld. During weld development these common problems must be carefully monitored so
as not to mislead the course and productivity of the welding experiments.
In summary, the “look see” welding experiments should be used to fix further variables from an
application and process perspective and also to establish a “weld window” for energy, time and force.
This part of weld development is critical in order to proceed to a statistical method of evaluation
(Design of Experiments or “DOEs”). Random explosions or unexpected variables will skew statistical
data and waste valuable time.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-9
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Poor Follow-up
(Sparks)
Insufficient Force
(Sparks)
Impact Force
(Variation)
TF << WF
(Variation sparks)
No Squeeze
(Sparks)
Squeeze
Heat
Hold
No Hold
(Variation)
Common welding problems can often be identified in the basic set up of the force, energy, and time
welding profile shown above. These problems can lead to weld splash, inconsistency, and variation
(contact Amada Miyachi America for further information and support).
What are Screening DOE’S?
The purpose of a Screening DOE is to establish the impact that welding and process parameters have on
the quality of the weld. Quality measurement criteria should be selected based on the requirements of
the application. A Screening DOE will establish a relative quality measurement for the parameters
tested and the variation in the welded result. This is important, as identifying variation in process is
critical in establishing the best production settings. Typically, welded assemblies are assessed for
strength of joint and variation in strength.
A Screening DOE tests the high, low settings of a parameter, and will help establish the impact of a
parameter on the process. A Screening DOE is a tool that allows the user to establish the impact of a
particular parameter by carrying out the minimum number of experiments to gain the information. A
five-factor screening DOE can be accomplished in as few as 24 welds, with three welds completed for
each of 8 tests. By comparison, it would take 96 welds to test every combination. The DOE promotes
understanding of many variables in a single experiment and allows the user to interpret results, thus
narrowing the variables for the next level of statistical analysis. If many variables are still not
understood, multiple Screening DOE’s may be required. Amada Miyachi America provides a simple
Screening DOE tool that is run in Excel® and is sufficient for the majority of possible applications
(contact Amada Miyachi America for details). Sophisticated software is also available from other
vendors designed specifically for this purpose.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-10
990-370
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Criteria for Success
Before running the series of experiments, the user must establish an acceptable window for energy, time,
and force, thus preventing voided results. It is common practice to include one or all of the above
variables in a Screening DOE. This is only recommended if sufficient understanding has been
established for the other application and process variables that can impact quality Users should first try
to screen out all common application and process variables that require further exploration from the
results of the “look see” mini experiments and then include the three key welding variables (energy,
force and time). Several Screening DOE’s may be required.
Results should be interpreted carefully. Typically, one would look for the highest result in terms of
quality with the least variation. A Screening DOE provides only a measurement that indicates the
relative importance of a parameter and not the ideal setting. Factorial DOE’s should be used to establish
the correct or best setting for a parameter once many of the other variables have been screened and
fixed. This is also the time to assess the measurement accuracy and consistency of the test method and
procedure. Variation in test method can invalidate the test and lead to misinterpretation of results.
What are Factorial DOE’s?
The purpose of a Factorial DOE is to narrow in on the optimal setting for a particular parameter. This
method is generally used when the critical or main key variables have been identified, and we need to
establish the best settings for the process. A factorial DOE may also give an indication as to how wide
the acceptable weld window is in relation to quality requirements. We recommend data be gathered
from a monitoring perspective so that this can provide a starting point for establishing a relationship
between quality and the monitored measurement parameter.
Criteria for Success
Critical parameters should be identified from the list of unfixed variables left from the Screening DOE’s.
A mini-experiment may be required establishing reasonable bounds for the combination of parameters to
be tested. This will prevent void data and wasted time. At this stage, it is useful to record multiple
relevant quality measurement or inspection criteria so that a balanced decision can be reached. For
example, if part marking and pull strength are the relevant criteria, a compromise in ideal setting may be
required.
As with all experiments, the test method should be carefully assessed as a potential source of variation
and inconsistency. Once the optimum parameters have been established in this series of experiments, a
validation study can be run which looks at the consistency of results over time. It is good practice to
build in variables such as electrode changes and cleaning, as well as equipment set up by different
personnel. This will ensure that the solution is one that can run in a real production environment.
Welded assemblies should be tested over time and under real use conditions to ensure that all functional
criteria will be met. Validation testing is usually required to prove the robustness of the process under
production conditions.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
G-11
APPENDIX G: DEFINING THE OPTIMUM PROCESS
Conclusion
The resistance welding process can deliver a reliable and repeatable joining solution for a wide range of
metal joining applications. Defining the optimum welding process and best production settings can be
achieved through a methodical and statistical approach. Time spent up front in weld development will
ensure a stable welding process and provide a substantial return in quality and long term consistency.
Welding problems can more easily be identified and solved if sufficient experimental work is carried out
to identify the impact of common variables on the quality and variation of the welded assembly. Amada
Miyachi America frequently uses the Screening DOE tool to establish the impact of key variables and to
assist customers with troubleshooting. Often, the testing described above will provide the information
and understanding to predict common failure modes and causes. A troubleshooting guide can be
requested in the form of a slide rule, to assist users in identification of welding problems and likely
causes.
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
G-12
990-370
APPENDIX H
Compatibility and Comparison
Compatibility
While the HF27 contains advanced technology and improved features, from an operational standpoint it
performs the same as older Miyachi Unitek Controls. Older HF27 Models (1-287-01, 1-287-01-01, 1-28701-02), require a different User’s Manual (Part Number 990-335). For information on getting that manual,
use the phone number or e-mail address listed under Contact Us in the front of this manual.
Below is a Quick Look comparison showing the differences between old HF25A / HF25DA / HF27A
(Models 1-280-xx, 1-285-xx, 1-287-xx) and new HF25 / HF27 (Models 1-315-xx, 1-320-xx). The HF25DA
features have been incorporated into the HF27.
FEATURES
OLD HF25A / HF25DA / HF27A
NEW HF25 / HF27
Supply voltages
240/400/480VAC
SAME
Footswitch connector
YES
SAME
Air Valve Driver connector
YES
SAME
Voltage Sense connector
YES
SAME
LVDT connector
HF25A: NO
HF25DA: YES
HF27A: YES
HF25: NO
HF25D: Not available
HF27: SAME
Weld Head connector
NO
YES, new 8-pin connector incorporating
Firing switch, voltage sense and 24VDC (!)
valve output for new plug-and-play weld
heads, used with new EZ-AIR plug-and-play
weld heads.
RS232/485
YES
SAME
Firing Switch cable
YES
SAME
Emergency Stop cable
YES
SAME
YES
Physically smaller size. Appendix B,
Electrical and Data Connections describes
YES
Eliminated, no longer necessary.
-10V to +10V
HF27 ONLY
0 to 10V and 0 to 5V
Force input range
HF25DA and HF27 ONLY
-10 to +10V
HF27 ONLY
0 to 10V and 0 to 5V
24VDC output for customer
use
YES, limited to about 500mA with
voltage drop
YES, polyfused to 1 amp without voltage drop
Upgrade from HF25 to HF27
N/A
YES, at factory
60-pin Phoenix connectors
Software selection for
polarity of input and
mech/opto type
Force output range
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
H-1
APPENDIX H: COMPABILITY AND COMPARISON
I/O Comparison
While most of the improvements in the Controls are transparent to the user, new technology and internal
components have changed some of the 60-pin I/O connections. As a result, they are not the same as
older models. To make these new connections quick and easy, “blank” (un-wired) connectors with
screw terminals are provided in the Ship Kit.
Below is a Quick Look comparison showing the differences between the old and new I/O connections.
See Appendix B, Electrical and Data Connections for complete details.
Pin
OLD HF25 / HF27
NEW HF25 / HF27
NOTES
1
Chassis GND
Chassis GND
Same
2
24V COMMON
24COM
Same
3
HEAD1+
HEAD_1
4
HEAD2+
NOT ACTIVE
5
HEAD3+
NOT ACTIVE
6
HDDT1
NOT ACTIVE
7
HDDT2
24VAC
8
HEAD4+ (air head)
NOT ACTIVE
Use pin 7 (24VAC) on new unit
9
HEAD4- (air head return)
NOT ACTIVE
Use pin 3 (HEAD_1, switched) on new unit
10
NOT ACTIVE
NOT ACTIVE
Same
11
FIRE_1
FIRE_1
Same
12
GND
24COM
Same
13
NOT ACTIVE
NOT ACTIVE
Same
14
OPTOP power (24VDC)
NOT ACTIVE
Use pin 20 or 21 (+24V_OUT) on new unit
15
CHASSIS GND
I/O COMMON
Use pin 1, 50 or 60 on new unit
16
FOOT_1
FOOT_1
Same
17
FOOT_2
FOOT_2
Same
18
GND
24COM
Same
19
SPOWER
FS1/FS2/FIRE_COM
Same
20
+24V OUT
+24V_OUT
Same
21
+24V OUT
+24V_OUT
Same
22
24V PULL UP
I/O COMMON
Same
23
24V COM
24COM
Same
24
SCH 0
SCHEDULE O
Same
25
SCH 1
SCHEDULE 1
Same
26
SCH 2
SCHEDULE 2
Same
27
SCH 4
SCHEDULE 4
Same
Old EZ AIR no longer supported
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
H-2
990-370
APPENDIX H: COMPABILITY AND COMPARISON
Pin
OLD HF25 / HF27
NEW HF25 / HF27
NOTES
28
SCH 8
SCHEDULE 8
Same
29
SCH 16
SCHEDULE 16
Same
30
SCH 32
SCHEDULE 32
Same
31
INHIBIT
WELD_INHIBIT
Same
32
STOP
CURRENT_STOP
Same
33
RELAY 1
RELAY_1
Same
34
RELAY 1R
RELAY_1R
Same
35
RELAY 2
RELAY_2
Same
36
RELAY 2R
RELAY_2R
Same
37
RELAY 3
RELAY_3
Same
38
RELAY 3R
RELAY_3R
Same
39
RELAY 4
RELAY_ 4
Same
40
RELAY 4R
RELAY_4R
Same
41
Con Ret for EMO
NOT ACTIVE
42
24VAC for EMO
NOT ACTIVE
43
NOT ACTIVE
FORCE SET 10
44
NOT ACTIVE
FORCE GROUND
45
NOT ACTIVE
FORCE READ 10 INPUT
Input range 0-10V, HF27 ONLY option
46
+ 15VDC power
NOT ACTIVE
No +15VDC available on new unit
47
- 15VDC power
NOT ACTIVE
No -15VDC available on new unit
48
FORCE INPUT
FORCE READ 5 INPUT
Different input range (0-5V), HF27 ONLY
option
49
GND
FORCE GROUND
Same
50
CHASSIS GND
CHASSIS GND
Same
51
NOT ACTIVE
NOT ACTIVE
Same
52
LVDTPRI1
LVDTGND
Different, HF27 ONLY option
53
LVDTPRI2
LVDTPRI1
Different, HF27 ONLY option
54
LVDTSEC1
LVDTPRI2
Different, HF27 ONLY option
55
LVDTSEC2
LVDTSEC1
Different, HF27 ONLY option
56
LVDTCG
LVDTSEC2
Different, HF27 ONLY option
57
NOT ACTIVE
LVDTGND
Different, HF27 ONLY option
58
FORSET
FORCE SET 5
Different output range (0-5V), HF27 ONLY
option
59
GND
FORCE GROUND
Same
60
CHASSIS GND
CHASSIS GND
Same
Use EMO cable on new unit
Output range 0-10V, HF27 ONLY option
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
H-3
Index
A
Active Part Conditioner (APC) ............................4-5
Active Part Conditioning ....................................5-13
Alarm Messages ...................................................6-1
Alarm Messages ...................................................6-3
Alarm State ........................................................3-21
Always
........................................................3-17
Application Perspective ....................................... G-8
Approach to Weld Development ......................... G-7
Ask
........................................................3-17
Auto
........................................................3-15
B
Basic Principles ................................................... G-4
Basics of Resistance Welding ............................. F-1
Electrode Maintenance ................................... F-5
Electrode Selection ......................................... F-2
Interaction of Welding Parameters ................. F-6
Resistance Welding Parameters ..................... F-1
Weld Schedule Development ......................... F-5
Weld Strength Profiles ................................... F-6
Weld Strength Testing .................................... F-6
Welding Parameter Interaction ....................... F-1
Baud Rate ..........................................................3-8
Before You Start ................................... 3-1, 5-1, C-4
Buzzer Loudness ................................................3-16
C
CAL Key ..........................................................1-9
Calibrating the Control ........................................ C-1
Calibrating the LVDT .......................................... C-4
Calibration ..................................................3-6, C-1
Calibrating the Control ................................... C-1
Calibration Equipment Required .............. C-1
Calibration Procedure ............................... C-2
Overview ................................................... C-1
Calibrating the LVDT .................................... C-4
Before You Start ....................................... C-4
Recommended Gauge Thickness .............. C-4
Force Calibration ............................................ C-9
Force Calibration ....................................... C-9
Overview .................................................... C-9
Set Force (tare) to Zero ........................... C-10
Full Calibration ......................................... C-5
Quick Calibration (Quick Cal) .................. C-6
Set New Electrodes to Zero ....................... C-7
Calibration Equipment Required ......................... C-1
Chain Schedules ................................................ 3-12
Changing from Inches to MM ........................... 5-25
COMBO Key ....................................................... 1-8
Combo Mode ....................................................... 4-2
Common Problems ............................................. G-9
Communication ................................................... 3-7
Communication Role ........................................... 3-7
Communications .................................................. E-1
Compatibility and Comparison ........................... H-1
Compressed Air ................................................... 5-1
Compressed Air & Cooling Water ...................... 2-2
Conductive Metals .............................................. G-3
Connections ......................................................... 5-1
Connections to External Equipment .................... 2-3
Contact Us ............................................................ix
Control Features .................................................. 1-1
Control Keys ........................................................ 1-7
Control Mode Selection Keys .............................. 1-8
Copy A Schedule ................................................. 3-5
Criteria for Success ................................. G-10, G-11
Current Mode ....................................................... 4-1
Current, Voltage, Power, & Resistance Limits .... 4-4
D
Declaration Of Conformity .....................................xi
Description ......................................................... 1-1
Features ......................................................... 1-1
Control Features
1-1
Weld Quality Process Tools 1-1
Introduction .................................................... 1-2
LVDT Capability .......................................... 1-11
Major Components ......................................... 1-4
Control Keys ............................................. 1-7
Control Mode Selection Keys .............. 1-8
kA Key ............................................ 1-8
V Key .............................................. 1-8
kW Key ........................................... 1-8
COMBO Key .................................. 1-8
Monitor Keys ....................................... 1-8
ȍ Key .............................................. 1-9
CAL Key ......................................... 1-9
DISTANCE Key ............................. 1-9
ENERGY Key .............................. 1-10
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
Index-1
INDEX
D (Continued)
ENVELOPE Key .............................1-9
FORCE Key .....................................1-9
kA Key .............................................1-8
kW Key ............................................1-9
TIME Key ......................................1-10
V Key ...............................................1-9
ZERO Key .......................................1-9
Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Keys ....1-7
Key Pad .................................................1-7
Mode Keys ............................................1-7
MENU Key ......................................1-7
RUN Key .........................................1-7
Front Panel Display & Display Controls ...1-4
Display ..................................................1-5
Display Controls ...................................1-6
SCHEDULE Key .............................1-6
Time/Energy Selector Keys .............1-6
Weld Period Selector Keys ..............1-6
Major Components .....................................1-4
WELD/NO WELD Switch .................1-10
Emergency Stop Switch Operation ..........1-10
Displacement ......................................................5-24
Display
..........................................................1-5
Display Contrast .................................................3-16
Display Controls ...................................................1-6
DISTANCE Key ...................................................1-9
Distance Limits .....................................................4-4
Distance Limits ...................................................5-24
Distance Monitor ................................................5-24
Do Test Weld ......................................................3-17
Dual-Pulse Weld Profile .....................................3-26
Dual-Pulse Weld Schedule ...................................5-7
Envelope Limits .................................................. 5-30
EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ........................ 2-7
E
I
Electrical & Thermal Conductivity ..................... G-3
Electrical and Data Connections ......................... B-1
Electrode Maintenance .......................................6-12
Electrode Maintenance ........................................ F-5
Electrode Selection .............................................. F-2
Emergency Stop Switch Operation ....................1-10
End Of Cycle Buzzer ..........................................3-16
ENERGY Key ....................................................1-10
Energy Limits .......................................................4-5
Energy Monitor ..................................................5-19
ENVELOPE Key ..................................................1-9
Envelope Limits ...................................................4-5
I.D. Number ......................................................... 3-8
Initial Setup ......................................................... 5-2
Initial Welding Trials .......................................... G-8
Installation and Setup .......................................... 2-1
Installation ...................................................... 2-1
Space Requirements .................................. 2-1
Unpacking ................................................. 2-1
Utilities ...................................................... 2-2
Compressed Air and Cooling Water .... 2-2
Power ................................................... 2-2
Setup
......................................................... 2-3
Connections to External Equipment .......... 2-3
F
Factorial DOE’s ................................................ G-11
Features
......................................................... 1-1
Firing Switch ..................................................... 3-15
Foot Pedal-Actuated Weld Head Connection ...... 2-6
Footswitch Weld Abort ..................................... 3-14
Force Calibration ................................................. C-9
Force Calibration ................................................. C-9
FORCE Key ......................................................... 1-9
Force Limits ........................................................ 4-4
Force Monitor .................................................... 5-28
Force Output ........................................................ 3-5
Force Units ......................................................... 3-5
Front Panel Data Entry and Mode Keys .............. 1-7
Front Panel Display & Display Controls ............. 1-4
Full Calibration .................................................... C-5
Fusion Joint ........................................................ G-2
G
General Kinds of Problems .................................. 6-1
Getting Started ..................................................... 3-1
H
Hardness
........................................................ G-3
High & Low Limits for Displacement ............... 5-27
High & Low Limits for Initial Thickness .......... 5-26
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
Index-2
990-370
INDEX
I (Continued)
M
EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ...............2-7
Foot Pedal-Actuated
Weld Head Connection ....................2-6
Non-EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ......2-9
Optional Load Cell Connection ...............2-10
Optional Proportional Valve Connection .2-10
Rear Panel Components and Connectors ...2-3
Weld Head Connections .............................2-4
Interaction of Welding Parameters ...................... F-6
Introduction to Feedback Modes & Monitoring ...4-1
Programmable Feedback Modes .....................4-1
Combo Mode .............................................4-2
Current Mode .............................................4-1
Introduction ................................................4-1
Power Mode ...............................................4-2
Voltage Mode .............................................4-1
Weld Monitoring .............................................4-3
Current, Voltage, Power,
& Resistance Limits ..............................4-4
Distance Limits ..........................................4-4
Energy Limits .............................................4-5
Envelope Limits .........................................4-5
Force Limits ..............................................4-4
Introduction ................................................4-3
PEAK & AVERAGE MONITORING ......4-3
Process Tools .............................................4-5
Active Part Conditioner (APC) .............4-5
Pre-Weld Check ....................................4-8
Resistance Set .......................................4-7
Weld Stop ...........................................4-10
Weld To A Limit ...................................4-9
Time Limits ................................................4-4
Main Menu ......................................................... 3-3
Maintenance ......................................................... 6-1
Introduction .................................................... 6-1
Alarm Messages ........................................ 6-1
General Kinds of Problems ....................... 6-1
Maintenance ................................................. 6-12
Electrode Maintenance ............................ 6-12
Parts Replacement ................................... 6-12
Repair Service .............................................. 6-13
Troubleshooting .............................................. 6-2
Alarm Messages ........................................ 6-3
Troubleshooting ........................................ 6-2
Major Components .............................................. 1-4
Material Properties ............................................. G-3
Material Variables .............................................. G-7
Melting Point ...................................................... G-3
MENU Key ......................................................... 1-7
Menu State ....................................................... 3-18
Menus
......................................................... 3-3
Mode Keys ......................................................... 1-7
Monitor Keys ....................................................... 1-8
Monitor State ..................................................... 3-20
K
kA Key
Key Pad
kW Key
..........................................................1-8
..........................................................1-7
.................................................. 1-8, 1-9
L
Language ........................................................3-17
LVDT Capability ................................................1-11
LVDT Main Screen ............................................5-24
N
No Weld State .................................................... 3-18
Non-EZ-AIR Weld Head Connections ................. 2-9
O
ȍ Key
......................................................... 1-9
Operating Instructions ......................................... 5-1
Active Part Conditioning .............................. 5-13
Distance Monitor .......................................... 5-24
Displacement ........................................... 5-24
LVDT Main Screen ............................ 5-24
Before You Start:
Set New Electrodes to “Zero” ....... 5-25
Changing from Inches to MM ............ 5-25
Distance Limits ....................................... 5-24
Force Monitor .......................................... 5-28
High & Low Limits
for Initial Thickness ........................... 5-26
High & Low Limits
for Displacement ................................ 5-27
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
Index-3
INDEX
O (Continued)
STOP ENERGY AT
(Weld to a Specific Displacement) .....5-27
Energy Monitor .............................................5-19
Envelope Limits .............................................5-30
Introduction .....................................................5-1
Before You Start ........................................5-1
Initial Setup .................................................5-2
Pre-Operational Checks .............................5-1
Compressed Air ....................................5-1
Connections ..........................................5-1
Power ....................................................5-1
Operation .........................................................5-3
Dual-Pulse Weld Schedule .........................5-7
Single-Pulse Weld Schedule ...........................5-3
Upslope/Downslope Weld Schedule ...............5-5
Pre-Weld Check ............................................5-17
Programming Relays ......................................5-31
Resistance Set ................................................5-15
Time Limits ....................................................5-29
Using the Weld Monitor ..................................5-9
Weld Stop ......................................................5-21
Weld To A Limit ...........................................5-19
Operational States ...............................................3-18
Optional Load Cell Connection ..........................2-10
Optional Proportional Valve Connection ...........2-10
P
Parts Replacement ..............................................6-12
PEAK & AVERAGE MONITORING .................4-3
Power
.................................................. 2-2, 5-1
Power Mode .........................................................4-2
Power Supply Variables ...................................... G-7
Pre-Operational Checks ........................................5-1
Pre-Weld Check .......................................... 4-8, 5-17
Process Perspective ............................................. G-8
Process Tools ........................................................4-5
Process Variables ................................................. G-7
Programmable Feedback Modes ..........................4-1
Programming Relays ...........................................5-31
Prop Valve (Proportional Valve) ..........................3-5
Q
Quality Requirements .......................................... G-7
Quality Resistance Welding Solutions
(Defining the Optimum Process) .............. G-1
Approach to Weld Development ................... G-7
Material Variables .................................... G-7
Power Supply Variables ........................... G-7
Process Variables ..................................... G-7
Quality Requirements ............................... G-7
Weld Head & Mechanical Variables ........ G-7
Basic Principles ............................................. G-4
Common Problems ........................................ G-9
Criteria for Success ........................... G-10, G-11
Factorial DOE’s ........................................... G-11
Initial Welding Trials .................................... G-8
Application Perspective ............................ G-8
Process Perspective .................................. G-8
Introduction ................................................... G-1
Material Properties ........................................ G-3
Conductive Metals ................................... G-3
Electrical & Thermal Conductivity .......... G-3
Hardness ................................................... G-3
Melting Point ............................................ G-3
Refractory Metals ..................................... G-4
Resistive Metals ....................................... G-4
Resistance Welding ....................................... G-1
Fusion Joint .............................................. G-2
Solder or Braze Joint ................................ G-2
Solid-State Joint ....................................... G-2
Screening DOE’s ......................................... G-10
Weld Profiles ................................................. G-6
Quick Calibration (Quick Cal) ............................. C-6
R
Rear Panel Components and Connectors ............. 2-3
Recommended Gauge Thickness ......................... C-4
Refractory Metals ............................................... G-4
Relay
......................................................... 3-9
Remote
....................................................... 3-15
Repair Service .................................................... 6-13
Reset All Schedules ........................................... 3-11
Reset Schedule Limits ....................................... 3-12
Reset System Parameters ................................... 3-11
Reset To Defaults .............................................. 3-10
Resistance Set ............................................. 4-7, 5-15
Resistance Welding ............................................ G-1
Resistance Welding Parameters ........................... F-1
Resistive Metals .................................................. G-4
Revision Record ..................................................... ii
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
Index-4
990-370
INDEX
R (Continued)
RS232/485 Select .................................................3-8
RUN Key ..........................................................1-7
Run State ........................................................3-19
S
Safety Notes ............................................................ x
SCHEDULE Key ..................................................1-6
Schedule Lock ......................................................3-6
Screening DOE’s ............................................... G-10
Set Force (tare) to Zero ...................................... C-10
Set New Electrodes to “Zero” ............................5-25
Set New Electrodes to Zero ................................. C-7
Setup
..........................................................2-3
Setup
..........................................................3-3
Setup 1
........................................................3-14
Setup 2
........................................................3-16
Setup 3
........................................................3-17
Single-Pulse Weld Profile ..................................3-25
Single-Pulse Weld Schedule .................................5-3
Soft Touch Pressure ..............................................3-5
Soft Touch Time ...................................................3-5
Solder or Braze Joint ........................................... G-2
Solid-State Joint .................................................. G-2
Space Requirements .............................................2-1
Startup
..........................................................3-1
STOP ENERGY AT ...........................................5-27
Switch Debounce Time ......................................3-15
System Configuration ...........................................3-1
Getting Started .................................................3-1
Before You Start ........................................3-1
Startup ........................................................3-1
Menus ..........................................................3-3
Main Menu .................................................3-3
Chain Schedules ..................................3-12
Communication .....................................3-7
Baud Rate ........................................3-8
Communication Role .......................3-7
I.D. Number .....................................3-8
RS232/485 Select ............................3-8
Copy A Schedule ..................................3-5
Prop Valve (Proportional Valve) ..........3-5
Force Output ....................................3-5
Force Units ......................................3-5
Soft Touch Pressure .........................3-5
Soft Touch Time ..............................3-5
Relay .....................................................3-9
Reset To Defaults ............................... 3-10
Reset All Schedules ...................... 3-11
Reset Schedule Limits ............. 3-12
Setup .................................................... 3-3
System Security ................................... 3-6
Calibration ..................................... 3-6
Schedule Lock ................................ 3-6
System Lock ................................... 3-6
Weld Counter ....................................... 3-4
Reset System Parameters .............. 3-11
Operational States ................................... 3-18
Alarm State ........................................ 3-21
Menu State ......................................... 3-18
Monitor State ..................................... 3-20
No Weld State .................................... 3-18
Run State ............................................ 3-19
Test State ............................................ 3-18
Weld State .......................................... 3-20
Overview ................................................... 3-3
Setup 1 ............................................... 3-14
Auto .............................................. 3-15
Firing Switch ................................ 3-15
Footswitch Weld Abort ................. 3-14
None .............................................. 3-15
Remote .......................................... 3-15
Switch Debounce Time ................. 3-15
Setup 2 ..................................................... 3-16
Buzzer Loudness ................................ 3-16
Display Contrast ................................. 3-16
End Of Cycle Buzzer ......................... 3-16
Language ............................................ 3-17
Update Graph After Weld .................. 3-16
Setup 3 ..................................................... 3-17
Do Test Weld ..................................... 3-17
Always .......................................... 3-17
Ask ................................................ 3-17
Weld Functions ............................................. 3-22
Welding Applications ..................... 3-22, 3-25
Dual-Pulse Weld Profile .................... 3-26
Single-Pulse Weld Profile .................. 3-25
Upslope / Downslope Weld Profile ... 3-26
Weld Head Applicability ......................... 3-23
Weld Schedule Definition ....................... 3-24
Weld Sequence Timing ........................... 3-24
When To Use Functions .......................... 3-23
System Lock ........................................................ 3-6
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
990-370
Index-5
INDEX
S (Continued)
System Security ....................................................3-6
System Timing .................................................... D-1
T
Technical Specifications ...................................... A-1
Test State ........................................................3-18
TIME Key ........................................................1-10
Time Limits ..........................................................4-4
Time Limits ........................................................5-29
Time/Energy Selector Keys ..................................1-6
Troubleshooting ....................................................6-2
Unpacking ..........................................................2-1
Update Graph After Weld ..................................3-16
Upslope / Downslope Weld Profile ....................3-26
Upslope/Downslope Weld Schedule ....................5-5
Using the Weld Monitor .......................................5-9
Utilities
..........................................................2-2
V
V Key
..........................................................1-8
V Key
..........................................................1-9
Voltage Mode .......................................................4-1
Weld Head & Mechanical Variables .................. G-7
Weld Head Applicability ................................... 3-23
Weld Head Connections ...................................... 2-4
Weld Monitoring ................................................. 4-3
Weld Period Selector Keys .................................. 1-6
Weld Profiles ...................................................... G-6
Weld Quality Process Tools ................................ 1-1
Weld Schedule Definition ................................. 3-24
Weld Schedule Development .............................. F-5
Weld Sequence Timing ..................................... 3-24
Weld State ....................................................... 3-20
Weld Stop ....................................................... 4-10
Weld Stop ....................................................... 5-21
Weld Strength Profiles ......................................... F-6
Weld Strength Testing ......................................... F-6
Weld To A Limit ........................................ 4-9, 5-19
WELD/NO WELD Switch ................................ 1-10
Welding Applications ............................... 3-22, 3-25
Welding Parameter Interaction ............................ F-1
When To Use Functions .................................... 3-23
Z
ZERO Key ......................................................... 1-9
W
Weld Counter .......................................................3-4
Weld Functions ...................................................3-22
HF27 DC RESISTANCE WELDING SYSTEM
Index-6
990-370
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement