BookPort Project 2005 - SET-BC
BookPort Project 2005
Student Lessons (Version 3)
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................... 2
THE BOOKPORT PROJECT 2005 .................................................................... 4
PROJECT PARTICIPANTS .................................................................................... 4
TRAINING AND SUPPORT ................................................................................... 4
EVALUATION ................................................................................................. 4
CONTRIBUTORS ............................................................................................. 5
ABOUT SET-BC............................................................................................. 5
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................ 6
LESSON 1: SETTING UP THE BOOKPORT...................................................... 7
ACTIVITY 1: INSTALLING THE BOOKPORT ACCESSORIES AND SOFTWARE ........................... 8
ACTIVITY 2: INSTALLING BOOKPORT ON YOUR PC ..................................................... 9
LESSON 1 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................11
LESSON 2: TRANSFERRING FILES TO THE BOOKPORT ............................... 12
ACTIVITY 1: SENDING FILES TO THE BOOKPORT USING SEND TO ..................................13
ACTIVITY 2: SENDING FILES TO THE BOOKPORT USING THE BOOKPORT TRANSFER WINDOW ..15
ACTIVITY 3: DELETING FILES FROM THE BOOKPORT .................................................19
LESSON 2 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................21
LESSON 3: SETTINGS ................................................................................ 22
ABOUT BOOKPORT SETTINGS ............................................................................22
ACTIVITY 1: ACCESS SETTINGS KEYPAD; REVIEW SETTING MENU OPTIONS........................23
ACTIVITY 2: SET DATE AND TIME TO CURRENT DATE AND TIME.......................................24
ACTIVITY 3: SET VOLUME .................................................................................24
ACTIVITY 4: SET PITCH ...................................................................................24
ACTIVITY 5: SET SPEED ...................................................................................25
ACTIVITY 6: SET VOICE OPTIONS .......................................................................25
ACTIVITY 7: SET MINUTES SPOKEN OPTIONS ..........................................................25
ACTIVITY 8: SET SLEEP TIMER OPTIONS ...............................................................25
ACTIVITY 9: SET LOCK BEEP OPTIONS ..................................................................26
ACTIVITY 10: SET AUTO FILE ADVANCEMENT SETTING................................................26
ACTIVITY 11: REVIEW PAGE NUMBER OF CURRENT FILE. ............................................26
ACTIVITY 12: SET PUNCTUATION SETTING. ............................................................27
ACTIVITY 13: SET LOCK FILE SETTING. .................................................................27
ACTIVITY 14: SET SENSITIVITY SETTING. ..............................................................28
LESSON 3 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................29
LESSON 4: NAVIGATING FILES AND FOLDERS........................................... 30
ACTIVITY 1: BOOKPORT KEYS AND CORRESPONDING NAVIGATION COMMANDS ..................31
ACTIVITY 2: MOVING BETWEEN FILES..................................................................31
ACTIVITY 3: USING THE READING KEY ..................................................................32
ACTIVITY 4: NAVIGATING A TEXT FILE IN READING MODE ...........................................32
ACTIVITY 5: NAVIGATING A TEXT FILE IN IDLE MODE (I.E. READING IS STOPPED) ...............32
ACTIVITY 6: THE 2ND FUNCTION FEATURES .............................................................33
LESSON 4 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................34
LESSON 5: BOOKMARKS ............................................................................ 35
ACTIVITY 1: CREATING A BOOKMARK ...................................................................35
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ACTIVITY 2: MOVING FORWARD AND BACK THROUGH BOOKMARKS ..................................35
ACTIVITY 3: CLEARING A BOOKMARK ...................................................................36
LESSON 5 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................37
LESSON 6: RECORDING VOICE MEMOS ...................................................... 38
ACTIVITY 1: CREATING A NEW VOICE MEMO ...........................................................38
ACTIVITY 2: NAVIGATING THE AUDIO MEMOS FOLDER ...............................................39
ACTIVITY 3: DELETING A VOICE MEMO .................................................................39
LESSON 6 SKILLS CHECKLIST ............................................................................40
LESSON 7: SUPPORTED FILE TYPES; K1000 AND BOOK PORT ................... 41
ACTIVITY 1: SENDING A FILE FROM KURZWEIL 1000 TO BOOK PORT ..............................43
ACTIVITY 2: SENDING A .PDF FILE TO BOOK PORT USING KURZWEIL 1000.......................45
KEY FUNCTIONS SUMMARY................................................................................48
QUICK REFERENCE LIST:..................................................................................48
LESSON 7 SKILLS CHECKLIST: ...........................................................................49
APPENDIX .................................................................................................. 50
BOOKPORT RESEARCH PROJECT..........................................................................50
INITIAL SURVEY OF PARTICIPANTS – FEBRUARY 2005 ................................................50
STUDENT SURVEY QUESTIONS ...........................................................................51
(TO BE DISTRIBUTED TWO MONTHS AFTER THE STUDENT HAS RECEIVED THEIR BOOKPORT) ......51
TEACHER SURVEY QUESTIONS............................................................................52
(TO BE DISTRIBUTED TWO MONTHS AFTER THE STUDENT HAS RECEIVED THEIR BOOKPORT) ......52
NAVIGATION OF AN AUDIO FILE ..........................................................................54
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR BOOKPORT STUDENT LESSONS RESOURCE BOOK ................55
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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THE BOOKPORT PROJECT 2005
Project Participants
The BookPort project will provide electronic tools and training for fifty students who
are blind or visually impaired in British Columbia. The students will be selected for
the project based on their educational goals and their need to access information
efficiently for study and research.
Collaborators on this project include: SET-BC, the Provincial Resource Program for
the Visually Impaired (PRCVI), the University of British Columbia, and the school
districts of British Columbia.
APSEA , the Atlantic Provinces Special Education Authority, will work in tandem with
the BC BookPort Project and will provide the BookPort and training for twenty-five
students who are blind or visually impaired in the Atlantic Provinces of New
Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward island.
Training and Support
SET-BC has developed this set of BookPort Student Lessons. The lessons are
student-focused, practical resources, specifically designed to help students and
teachers implement the technology. The students will receive training in communitybased workshops and will participate in a study on the device’s effectiveness for
preparation for post-secondary studies. The students will be invited to share their
successful strategies for using the device and mentor other students with similar
needs. The student training modules and a peer support forum will be available on
both the SET-BC and PRCVI websites.
Evaluation
Evaluation of the project will be conducted with consultation from the Education
Department of the University of British Columbia. Surveys will be completed during
two phases of the project and a final report will be published in September 2005.
Recommendations on the use of the BookPort for developing independence and
organizational skills will be shared on program websites and with the educational
community. A report on the project will be presented at the Canadian Vision
Conference in May, 2005.
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Contributors
The BookPort Student Lessons were developed by:
Mallory Burton; SET-BC Consultant; Region Six, Prince Rupert
Constance McAvoy; SET-BC Consultant, Provincial Resource Team
Michael Mizera; Vision Teacher, Vancouver School District 39
Dave Rathwell; SET-BC Consultant; Region Two, Fraser Valley
About SET-BC
Special Education Technology - British Columbia (SET-BC) is a provincial government
initiative established to assist school districts and group 1 and 2 independent schools
in educating students with physical disabilities, visual impairments or autism through
the use of technology.
SET-BC’s mandate is:
•
•
To lend assistive technologies where required to facilitate students’ access to
educational programs
To assist school districts in providing the necessary consultation and training
for students and educators in the use of these technologies
SET-BC services to school districts include:
•
•
•
•
Consultation, planning and follow-up for school based teams
Loan and maintenance of assistive technology
Training
Provision of resources and information
SET-BC consultants are based in Regional Centres around the province, providing
community based services to all BC school districts. Each district has a SET-BC
District Partner who can provide information on how services are provided for eligible
students. For more information and resources on assistive technology, check SETBC’s Learning Centre at www.setbc.org.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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INTRODUCTION
BookPort is a flexible book reading device that can be used to read computer text,
web content, and and listen to digital audio – anywhere, anytime… This device
features both text-to-speech capabilities and digital audio support. This means you
may read electronic files (with synthetic speech) or digital recorded books (with
human speech). BookPort is a small, portable unit with a keypad and ear buds, plus
accompanying software.
The unit contains state-of-the-art hardware such as a universal serial bus (USB)
connector and a Compact Flash card slot for removable mass storage. BookPort also
acts as a recorder, letting you take audio notes on the material you read or to make
audio notes in general.
Features
• Read contracted Braille in Braille Ready Files
• Play MP3s in stereo
• Send web pages directly to BookPort from Internet Explorer ®
• Record audio memos
• Navigate among files or within a book
• Navigate by letter, word, sentence, paragraph, page, or section items (for
audio files, BookPort navigates by finding pauses in narration).
• Control pitch, speed, and volume of speech
• Choice of synthetic speech voices
• Hear the file name, size, current position (as a percentage) page number, and
the last modified date
• Add text to the search memory, then find every occurrence of that text in the
file]
• Delete files or lock to prevent deletion
• Sleep timer turns unit off after a set amount of time
• Lock keys so you can put it in your pocket or purse
• Read DAISY Digital Talking Books
Requirements to Run Software
• Windows ME or higher
• 64 MB of RAM
• 15 MB of hard disk space to install software
• Pentium 166 MHZ or faster processor
• CD-ROM drive
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LESSON 1: SETTING UP THE BOOKPORT
Objectives
• The student will be able to identify the BookPort, its ports, and its
accessories.
• The student will be able to connect the accessories correctly to the BookPort.
• The student will be able to install the batteries and check the battery level of
the BookPort.
• The student will be able to change the BookPort file naming options in the
BookPort Transfer window.
Brief review of necessary prerequisite skills
• The student will need to have general Windows file and folder management
and navigation.
Challenges and Tips
• Connecting the cables to the correct ports can be a challenge, and it can be
difficult to remove the memory card.
• Earbuds are supplied for listening to BookPort files. However, other
headphones and some brands of external speakers, e.g. the Sony portable
speakers, will also work.
Features
• There are over 1700 ebooks on the BookPort installation CD.
• The BookPort will work for approximately 60 hours on two AA batteries.
• The BookPort ships with a print manual, an audio tape, and a user’s manual
on the BookPort.
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Activity 1: Installing the BookPort Accessories and Software
Step 1: Unpack the BookPort Box
Open the BookPort Box and check to make sure the following have been shipped:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BookPort
Earbuds cable
USB transfer cable
64 MB Compact Flash Memory Card
2 Double A batteries
Training Tape
BookPort Software Installation CD
Quickstart Sheet and User’s Manual
Step 2: Install the BookPort Batteries
Popping the batteries out and putting them back in may solve the problem if your
BookPort quits talking, so knowing how to install the batteries independently is a
useful skill to have. Turn the BookPort over and locate the battery compartment on
the lower third of the device. Place your thumbs on the ridges at the top of the
battery door and pull towards you to slide the battery compartment door open.
Insert 2 Double A batteries into the battery compartment. You should be able to feel
the positive and negative indicators on the bottom of the battery cavity. There is
also a ribbon which lies in the centre of the cavity and under the batteries. The
ribbon protrudes after installing the batteries, making it easier to remove them. The
positive end of the battery is round and raised and the negative end of the battery is
flat. The positive end of the top battery will face right, and the positive end of the
bottom battery will face left. Replace the battery door. The BookPort should work
for approximately 60 hours on these batteries.
Step 3: Install the Earbuds
The earbuds cable has a stereo jack at one end and two plastic circles at the other.
Plug the earbuds cable into the port on the top left of the BookPort.
Step 4: Check the battery level
Hold one of the earbuds to your ear and press the two bottom corner keys (D+F) on
the front of the BookPort to verify that the batteries and earbuds are working. The
BookPort should announce the battery level.
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Step 5: Install the USB transfer cable
The long USB cable has a flat rectangular USB 2.0 A plug at one end and a square 5pin mini-B plug at the other. This is the cable that will be used to connect the
BookPort to the computer. Plug the square end of the USB transfer cable into the
recessed port on the top right of the BookPort. It is difficult to feel the difference
between the top and bottom plastic portion of this cable, and you may want to mark
the top of the cable with a locator dot. However, you may be able to feel that the
metal end that fits into the port is a little wider at the top.
Step 6: Install the Compact Flash card
Locate the rectangular 64 MB Compact Flash card, which may already be installed in
the BookPort. You should be able to feel a lip on one side of the card. Hold the
Compact Flash card by this edge with the lip down. Insert it into the port on the
right hand side of the BookPort. A little bit of the card will protrude. Removing this
card takes very strong fingers!
Step 7: Carrying the BookPort (optional)
Hook the BookPort on your belt loop using the clip on the back of the device.
Ready, Set, Draw!
Activity 2: Installing BookPort on your PC
Step 1: Install the BookPort software
Install the BookPort software on your PC using the installation CD. The software will
guide you through the installation process. If the software does not start
automatically, Go to the Start Menu and choose Run. At the Run Dialogue, type
d:\setup and press Enter.
Remove the CD and store it in a safe place in case you ever need to reinstall the
BookPort software. You may want to browse the CD at a later date as it contains
over 1700 electronic books.
Step 2: Change your BookPort file naming options
After installation, go to the desktop and tab to the Book Port transfer icon. Press
Enter to open the BookPort transfer window or you could open it through the Start
Menu/Programs/ Book Port Transfer/ Book Port Transfer.
In the BookPort transfer window, press Alt + O to open the Options Button menu.
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In the Options Dialogue on the General Page, Tab down to Send file name as title
and press spacebar to put a check inside the box. In newer versions of BookPort, if
you do not see this option on the General Tab, go to the Advanced tab to find this
option. Tab to OK and press Enter. If this box is unchecked, BookPort will use the
first few words of the document as its title during the transfer, and it may be difficult
for you to keep track of your files.
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Lesson 1 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
□
□
The student
The student
The student
The student
The student
Window.
is
is
is
is
is
able
able
able
able
able
to
to
to
to
to
connect earbuds and USB cable.
install and remove Compact Flash card.
install and remove batteries.
check BookPort battery level.
change file naming options in the BookPort Transfer
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LESSON 2: TRANSFERRING FILES TO THE BOOKPORT
Objectives
• The student will be able to transfer files from the computer to the BookPort
using the Send To command.
• The student will be able to transfer files directly from the computer to the
BookPort using the BookPort transfer window.
• The student will be able to transfer queued files from the computer to the
BookPort using the BookPort transfer window.
• The student will be able to verify that files have been sent to the BookPort.
• The student will be able to delete files from the BookPort.
Brief review of necessary prerequisite skills
• The student will need to have general Windows file and folder management
and navigation.
• The student will need to know how to select single and multiple files.
Challenges and Tips
• To select a single file, click or use the spacebar. To select several adjacent
files, select the first file, hold down the Shift key and select the last file in the
group. To select several non-adjacent files, hold down the Control key and
select the files you want. To check the selected file list with JAWS use Ins +
Shift + Down Arrow.
• You can view the contents of the BookPort as a removable drive in Windows
Explorer or My Computer. However, you cannot simply drag files from the
computer to the BookPort or you will get an error message that tells you that
unfiltered files cannot be read. You must pass through the BookPort software
to correctly filter files.
• Power users can send files to the BookPort using a little DOS, e.g. bp.exe
testfile.txt /bpfolder science
See the documentation for the command line parameters.
Features
• With BookPort software installed on a computer, you can easily send your
files to the BookPort.
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Activity 1: Sending Files to the BookPort using Send To
Step 1: Connect the BookPort to your PC using the USB cable
You should be able to feel the USB logo on the top of the USB plug.
Step 2: Locate a text file or Word file on your PC
Find a text or Word file on your PC that you would like to send to the BookPort.
A sighted person can recognize text and Word files by their distinctive icons. A JAWS
user will need to listen for the file’s details or for its extension. Text files are
identified by a .txt extension and Word files are identified by a .doc extension.
These extensions are not normally displayed in Windows. To display these
extensions, go to Start Menu/My Computer and open the C: drive. Under Tools,
select Folder Options. On the View Tab, uncheck the box beside Hide extensions for
known file types.
Step 3: Open the file’s Context Menu
Select the file (spacebar) and open its Context Menu in one of three ways. You can
right click the mouse, press the Applications Menu key on the keyboard (usually near
the Windows Key), or use the hot key Shift + F10.
Step 4: Send the file to BookPort
In the Context Menu, arrow down to
Send To. Use your right arrow to
expand the submenu, and then arrow
down to BookPort and press Enter.
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A window will indicate the sending progress:
If you have forgotten to plug in the BookPort, the file will be queued for sending
later. Plug the BookPort in and try again. Sending queued files will be explained in
Activity 2.
Step 5: Verify that the file has been sent to the BookPort
Listen through the earbud and press any key on the BookPort. Note that the
BookPort does not speak while it is still connected to the PC. Disconnect the USB
cable from the PC. (If this crashes your BP, pop the batteries out and put them back
in.)
On the front of the BookPort, go down to the 4th row of buttons. The three buttons
on this row are * , 0, and #, and they are used for navigating through the file list.
Press the left-most button (*) until you hear BookPort speak the words “first file”.
Then press the right-most button (#) to cycle through other files on the device. If
this is a new BookPort, the user manual and your file will probably be the only files
on the device.
Step 6: Understanding the limits of the Send To command
The Send To command is a quick way to send files, but you have no control over
where the files will be sent. If you want to send files to particular folders, you will
need to use the BookPort Transfer Window.
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Activity 2: Sending Files to the BookPort using the BookPort Transfer
Window
Step 1: Launch the BookPort Transfer Program
Installation places a BookPort icon on your desktop. You can launch BookPort from
the Desktop or from the Start Menu under Programs/ BookPort Transfer/ BookPort
Transfer.
Step 2: Explore the BookPort Transfer Window
Tab around the BookPort Transfer Window to explore its fields. Table 1 on the next
page provides an explanation for each field and gives its hot key.
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Table 1: BookPort Transfer Window Explanation and Hot Keys
Fields in Tab Order
File name:
Files of Type:
Send:
Favorites:
Preview:
BookPort Folder:
Files:
Queued:
Options:
Help...
About...
Close
Look in:
Folder button
File names list
Status Line at bottom of
window
Explanation
Name of current
highlighted PC file
Type of files currently
displayed in the PC file
names window;
This combo box lets you
limit the file type.
Arrow through the choices
Send button sends
selected files
Recent PC folders you
have browsed; arrow
through the choices
Shows beginning contents
of the file you’ve selected
BookPort Folder currently
open
BookPort File list for the
open folder
Button that opens the
options for Queued files
and allows you to browse
queued files
Button that opens the
Options Dialogue
Button that opens Help
Button that opens
description of BookPort
including current version
Button that closes the
BookPort Transfer Window
PC location you’re
browsing
Toggles to Back Arrow
PC file names in the
location you’re browsing
Tells you whether
BookPort is connected and
how much storage is
remaining
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
Hot Key
Alt + N
Alt + T
Alt + R
Alt + P
Alt + D
Alt + F
Alt + U
Alt + O
Alt + H
Alt + A
Alt + F4
Alt + I
Alt + L
JAWS Desktop Ins + 3
JAWS Laptop CAPS Lock +
Shift + N
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Step 3: Select a file to send to the BookPort
Read the Status Line at the bottom of the window (JAWS Desktop Ins + 3 or Laptop
CAPS Lock + Shift + N). It should tell you that the BookPort is not connected.
Unplug the BookPort if it’s connected. Select any file on your hard drive using the
Look In combo box (Alt + I) and the PC list of file names (Alt + L). Once you have
selected a file, tab down to ‘file name’ box to check that the correct file has been
selected. Continue to Tab to Send and press Enter.
Since the BookPort is not connected, you will get a message asking you to queue the
files for later transfer. Tab to Yes and press Enter.
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Step 4: Sending a Queued File
Note that the Queued button in the BookPort Transfer Window is no longer grayed
out. You can browse your list of Queued Files by tabbing to this button and pressing
Enter (Alt + U).
Plug in the BookPort. You will get a message that there are files waiting to be sent.
Tab to Send Now and press Enter.
Your file will now appear in the BookPort Files list (Alt + F). Read the Status Line at
the bottom of the Window (JAWS Desktop Ins + 3 or Laptop CAPS Lock + Shift + N).
Now that the BookPort is connected, the Status Line should tell you the amount of
space free on the BookPort.
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Step 5: Sending a Non-Queued File
With the BookPort plugged in, select a different file from the Look in combo box and
PC file names list (Alt + I and Alt + L). Tab to the Send Button and press Enter.
Another window will appear to show you the transfer progress. When transfer is
complete, your file will appear in the BookPort files list (Alt + F).
Activity 3: Deleting Files from the BookPort
Step 1: Launch the BookPort Transfer Program
Connect the BookPort to the computer and launch the BookPort Transfer program.
Step 2: Locate the file you want to delete
Tab to the BookPort Files window (Alt + F) and select the file you want to delete.
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Step 3: Delete the File
Press the Delete key on the computer keyboard. You will get a message asking for
confirmation of the delete. Tab to Yes or No depending on whether you want to keep
the file on your BookPort and press Enter.
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Lesson 2 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
□
□
The student is able
The student is able
Transfer Window
The student is able
Transfer Window
The student is able
The student is able
to send files to BookPort using the Send To
to send a queued file to BookPort using the BookPort
to send a file directly to BookPort using the BookPort
to delete files from the BookPort
to verify that file has been sent to the BookPort
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LESSON 3: SETTINGS
Objectives
• The student will be able to access the settings menus.
• The student will be able to adjust the settings as required according to
personal preference.
Brief review of necessary prerequisite skills
The student will know the keypad layout.
Challenges and Tips
If you press 0 to try to access the settings keypad menu items, but hear only set
date and time or a discouraging beep, press 5 until you hear full current date and
time setting, then you can press 2 to move through the setting options , or you can
press 0 to get back to the reading keypad
Features
Pressing the number zero toggles between “Reading Keypad” and “Settings Keypad.”
When you press 0 you will hear either “Reading Keypad”, or the current Settings
menu item. Also see challenges and tips.
About BookPort Settings
About the Settings Keypad: 0
The Settings keypad lets you adjust several aspects of BookPort’s behavior. When
you press 0 to access the Settings keypad, several things occur. First, if the unit was
reading, this command stops reading mode and places the unit in idle mode.
In addition to placing the unit in idle mode, pressing the 0 key redefines the
keyboard layout to make it more efficient for changing menu options. The 2 and 8
keys become an Up Arrow and Down Arrow respectively, and the 4 and 6 keys
become Left Arrow and Right Arrow. The 5 becomes Select and is used to open the
Date and Time sub menu.
BookPort remembers the last place in the settings menu that you visited, so when
you open the settings menu, BookPort puts you where you last adjusted parameters.
This makes it easy to fine tune some of the operating settings with minimum key
strokes. If, for instance, you adjust pitch more than other settings, and you had last
used the Settings menu to adjust the pitch, when you press 0 to access the Settings
menu, you may immediately use the Left and Right keys (4 and 6) to decrease or
increase the pitch of the synthesized speech.
When you use the Up Arrow and Down Arrows to reach a sub-menu, such as the
date and time menu, use the Select key (5) to open that menu. Once the menu is
open, it behaves exactly the same as its parent menu. To close the sub-menu and
return to the main menu, press the 5 key again.
Settings Keypad Layout
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Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Up
Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Left
Book Port Key Pad
Select
Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Right
Book Port Key Pad
Down
Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Book Port Key Pad
Reading
Keypad
Activity 1: Access Settings Keypad; Review setting menu options.
Press 0 to open Settings keypad.
To set the BookPort options as you prefer, press 0 to open the Settings keypad. O
toggles between “Reading Keypad” and “Settings Menu.” When you press 0 you will
hear either reading Keypad, or the current Settings menu item.
Press 2 to review/hear items in settings menu.
Volume
Speed
Pitch
Voice
Punctuation
Sensitivity
Minutes spoken
Sleep timer
Page #
Set date and time
File Lock
Automatic file advancement
Lock beep
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Activity 2: Set date and time to current date and time.
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 repeatedly until you hear “Set date and time.”
Press 5 to enter “date and time” submenu
Press 2 to hear “date and time” setting items: month, day of month, day of week,
year, hour,minute, am/pm.
Press 2 until you hear month. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and Right
Arrow to adjust the setting. Example: To choose January: when you hear January,
press 2 to accept setting and move to next date and time menu item.
Continue to set day of month, day of month, day of week, year, hour, minute,
am/pm.
Press 5 to confirm “date and time” settings and move out of date and time settings
menu.
Press 0 to Return to Reading Keypad.
About Set Date and Time
The date and time settings let you adjust the unit’s internal clock.
Activity 3: Set volume
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear volume. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and Right
Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Volume
The volume setting adjusts BookPort’s volume. This setting affects both the
synthesized speech and the audio files you read.
You can also adjust volume when in reading mode by pressing the D key for softer
and F key for louder.
Activity 4: Set pitch
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear pitch. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and Right
Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Pitch
The pitch setting lets you raise and lower the pitch of the synthesized voice.
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Activity 5: Set speed
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear speed. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and Right
Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Speed
The speed setting adjusts the rate of speech of the synthesized voice. The range is
from 0 to 9.
You can also adjust speed when in reading mode by pressing the A key for faster and
C key for slower.
Activity 6: Set Voice Options
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear voice setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and
Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Voice
The voice setting lets you change the personality of the synthesized speech.
Changing the personality is accomplished by changing several characteristics of the
voice including the pitch. These groups of settings have been given names to help
make it more convenient for you to recognize your favorite personality.
Activity 7: Set Minutes Spoken Options
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear minutes spoke. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow and
Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Minutes Spoken
The minutes spoken option in the settings menu is more for informational purposes
than it is a setting. It lets you know how many minutes the unit has spoken since the
last reset. This can be useful when gauging battery life.
Activity 8: Set Sleep Timer Options
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear sleep timer setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left Arrow
and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Sleep Timer
The sleep timer setting lets you control how long BookPort reads before it turns itself
off. This feature helps in those cases where you may fall asleep while reading. The
sleep timer prevents the unit from continuing to read throughout the night and
makes it easier to find your place when you do fall asleep. If you find the sleep timer
expiring too frequently, increase its setting. Set the sleep timer to 0 to turn it off.
The sleep timer resets itself with any key you press on the unit, so if you know you
are running out of time, you may press a key (such as the Say Time command) to
make the timer start again from the beginning.
Activity 9: Set Lock Beep Options
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear lock beep setting. Check setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as
Left Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Lock Beep
By default, BookPort’s keys beep when you press one of them while the unit is
locked. This is a useful indication to remind you why the unit seems to do nothing
when you press a key and nothing happens. Unfortunately, the keys can get
accidentally pressed while in a purse or bag, and you hear beeps each time that
happens.
If you prefer to turn off the feature that makes the keys beep when you press one of
them while the unit is locked, change the Beep Lock menu item to No.
Activity 10: Set Auto file Advancement setting
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear automatic file advancement setting. Check setting. Use the 4
and 6 keys as Left Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Automatic File Advancement
The automatic file advancement function lets BookPort begin reading the next file
when it reaches the end of the current file.
Activity 11: Review Page Number of Current File.
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Press 2 until you hear current page number. Check setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys
as Left Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Page Number
The menu’s Page Number option serves two purposes. First, it informs you of the
current page number. Second, it lets you move to another page in the current book.
To move to another page, press the 5 key to select the Page Number menu option,
then use the numbers on the keypad to type in the number of the desired page.
Finally, press the # key to complete your request or press the * key to cancel. When
you press #, BookPort will either move to the desired page or it will beep if you
entered a page number that is not valid for the current book. Note that the Page
Number function accepts only Arabic numbers, so if you want to turn to a page at
the beginning of a book that occurs before page 1, you will have to go to page 1
then use the Back Page key to move exactly to the desired page.
Be aware that not all books you send to BookPort contain page number information.
In the case of a file that does not contain any page information, BookPort uses an
approximation to represent pages.
The Page Number feature is a particularly useful command, and you may wish to
take advantage of the fact that BookPort remembers the menu option you last used,
so you may simply press the 0 key to access the menu and have the page number
immediately accessible.
Activity 12: Set Punctuation setting.
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear punctuation setting. Check setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as
Left Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Punctuation
The punctuation setting lets you alter the kind and amount of punctuation you hear
when reading with the synthesized speech. The choices are None, Some, Most, All,
None with Numbers, Some with Numbers, Most with Numbers, and All with Numbers.
The four selections that include the words “with numbers” let the synthesizer
announce numbers as you would normally say them. If you select one of the choices
without numbers, the synthesizer pronounces numbers as individual digits.
Activity 13: Set Lock file setting.
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear file lock setting. Check setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as Left
Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About File Lock
The file lock setting helps you prevent accidental file erasure. When a file is locked,
you cannot delete that file.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Activity 14: Set Sensitivity setting.
Steps:
Press 0 to access settings keypad.
Press 2 until you hear sensitivity setting. Check setting. Use the 4 and 6 keys as
Left Arrow and Right Arrow to adjust the setting.
Press 0 to return to Reading Keypad.
About Sensitivity
The sensitivity setting lets you adjust the amount of time required to hold down a
key before the one beep function for that key is accessed.
Settings Menu Items
Name
Default
Function
Volume
44
Raise and lower the volume
Pitch
50
Raise and Lower pitch
Speed
4
Raise and lower synthesizer speed
Voice
Precise Pete
Select reading voice
Minutes Spoken
0(Select to
reset)
Shows how many minutes BookPort has
spoken since last reset
Sleep Timer
30 minutes
Adjusts amount of time before unit self
stops
Lock Beep
Yes
Adjusts the preference for having the keys
beep when the unit is locked
Automatic File
Advancement
No
Moves to the next file when at end of
current file
Date and Time
Current Time
sub menu that lets you set the date and
time
Page Number
Current Page
Shows and sets the page number
Punctuation
Some with
Numbers
How much punctuation gets spoken (on a
per file basis)
Lock File
no
Locks current file
Sensitivity
15 MS
Specifies how long to hold down a key
before the 1 beep function occurs
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Lesson 3 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
□
□
The student is able to
The student is able to
The student is able to
The student is able to
The student is able to
personal preference.
access the settings menu.
access the reading keypad.
set correct date and time.
set file advancement options.
adjust volume, speed, pitch, and voice settings to
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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LESSON 4: NAVIGATING FILES AND FOLDERS
Objectives
• The student will demonstrate location of all keys and their functions in
Reading mode and Idle mode
• The student will be able to move between folders
• The student will be able to start and stop reading in a file
• The student will be able navigate a file using all of the features in Reading
mode and Idle mode
• The student will understand the second function features of keys when they
are pressed until on beep is heard
Brief review of necessary skills
• The student is familiar with the BookPort Transfer program and can navigate
through the program using speech or screen magnification
• The student can transfer a file from the computer to the BookPort using the
BookPort Transfer program
Challenges and Tips
• When the BookPort is plugged into the computer, it may be recognized as a
removable disk. If this happens a window will open which shows the contents
of the disk (i.e. the BookPort). Note that the BookPort transfer program will
also open, but it won’t have focus. Close the Removable Disk with ALT+F4
and the focus will shift to the BookPort Transfer program
• Some navigation keys perform different tasks depending on whether you are
in a text file or an audio file
• Pressing a key until it beeps once, signals that the key will perform a second
function. Introduce this concept using the “Move to top of file” command
(press 1 key until it beeps once) and the “Move to the end of file” command
(press the 3 key until it beeps once)
• Checking “Send file name as title” (found in the Options menu of the BookPort
Transfer program) will cause the BookPort to read the file name that was
transferred to it. This may make it easier to identify files once they are
transferred to the BookPort. If this box is not checked it will read the file’s
title as the file name when you cycle through the files
Features:
• The BookPort turns itself off after 10 seconds of inactivity and gives 2 short
beeps to signal this. It will turn on when you press any key
• Some keys perform a second function when they are pressed until a single
beep is heard
Setup Step by Step:
• Load file(s) on the BookPort as per instructions in Lesson 1
• Unplug the BookPort when all files are loaded
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Activity 1: BookPort Keys and Corresponding Navigation Commands
Step 1:
Many BookPort keys function differently depending on whether the BookPort is in
Reading or Idle mode. The 2 key toggles between Reading and Idle mode. Press 2
to begin Reading mode. The BookPort is in Idle mode whenever the 2 key is pressed
and reading is stopped.
Refer to the chart below for a list of key commands:
Key #
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
*
0
#
A
B
C
D
E
F
Reading Mode
back sentence
stop sentence
next sentence
back paragraph
no function
next paragraph
back page
status
next page
back file
settings keypad
next file
speed slower
no function
speed faster
volume down
help
volume up
Idle Mode
back sentence
start reading
next sentence
back word
current word
next word
back character
current character
next character
back file
settings keypad
next file
speed slower
stop record
speed faster
volume down
help
volume up
Students should be able to show the location of all of the keys on the BookPort, and
recite their functions before moving to Step 2.
Activity 2: Moving Between Files
Step 1:
Load at least 3 text files on the BookPort.
Step 2:
Press the Star key (*) to move back through the file list to the first file. Note that the
BookPort says: “First File” and then reads either the file name or the file’s title
(depending on the setting in the Options menu).
Step 3:
Press the number sign key (#) to advance forward through the list of files. Note that
the BookPort says: “Last file” and then reads. either the file name or the file’s title
(depending on the setting in the Options menu).
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Activity 3: Using the Reading Key
Step 1:
Go the first file and begin reading (key 2). Let it read for a few sentences and stop
the reading (key 2 again).
Step 2:
Navigate to the second file and begin reading (key 2). Let it read for a few sentences
and stop the reading (key 2 again).
Step 3:
Navigate back to the first file and begin reading (key 2). Note how it begins reading
at the start of the sentence where you left off.
Activity 4: Navigating a Text File in Reading Mode
Step 1:
Read by sentence. While in reading mode, press the 3 key to jump forward by
sentence. Press the 1 key to jump back by sentence. Note how the BookPort jumps
by sentence and continues reading forward through the file.
Step 2:
Read by paragraph. While in reading mode, press the 6 key to jump forward by
paragraph. Press the 4 key to jump back by paragraph. Note how the BookPort
jumps by paragraph and continues reading forward through the file.
Step 3:
Read by page. While in reading mode, press the 9 key to jump forward by page.
Press the 7 key to jump back by page. Note how the BookPort jumps by page and
continues reading forward through the file.
Step 4:
Checking the status (i.e. how much of the document has been read). Press the 8 key
while reading and note how the BookPort tells you the percentage of the file that has
been read and then continues reading.
Activity 5: Navigating a Text File in Idle Mode (i.e. reading is stopped)
Step 1:
Read by sentence (when reading is stopped). Press the 3 key to read forward by
sentence. (Press the 1 key to read back by sentence.) Note how the BookPort moves
by sentence and waits for you to press the 3 (or 1) key before reading the sentence.
Practice reading forward through a document, one sentence at a time, by pressing
the 3 key repeatedly.
Step 2:
Read by word. Press the 6 key to read forward one word at a time. Press the 4 key
to read back one word at a time. Press the 5 key to hear the current word.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 3:
Read by character. Press the 9 key to hear the next character. Press the 7 key to go
back a character. Press the 8 key to hear the current character. If the letter is
capitalized the pitch will be raised.
Step 4:
Note that you can switch to continuous reading at any time by pressing the 2 key.
Activity 6: The 2nd Function Features
Some keys have second function when they are held for 2 seconds and a single beep
is heard.
Step 1:
Moving to the beginning of a file. Open a file where some reading has taken place
and continue reading.
Step 2:
Stop reading by pressing the 2 key. Press key 1 until a beep is heard. Note how the
BookPort says, “beginning of file” and reads the title of the file (not the file name).
It will begin reading when the reading key (2) is pressed.
Step 3:
Begin reading. Press key 1 while it is reading and wait for a beep. The BookPort will
return to the beginning of the file and immediately begin reading.
Step 4:
Learn the 2nd functions associated with all number keys as per the chart below.
Note that the Alphabet keys have no second function.
Key
#
Reading Mode
1
Back sentence
2
Stop sentence
3
4
5
6
7
Next sentence
Back paragraph
No function
Next paragraph
Back page
8
9
Status (% read)
Next page
2nd Function (one beep)
moves to start of file,
continues reading
date and time, continues
reading
moves to end of file and
says file name
no function
no function
no function
no function
provides additional
statistics
no function
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
Start reading
2nd Function (one beep)
moves to start of file,
stops reading
date and time, stops
reading
Next sentence
Back word
Current word
Next word
Back character
Current
character
Next character
moves to end of file
no function
spell word
no function
no function
military letter
correspondence
no function
Idle Mode
Back sentence
Page 33 of 57
Lesson 4 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
□
The student is able to demonstrate location of all keys and their functions in
both Reading and Idle modes
The student is able to move between folders
The student is able to navigate a file using all of the features of both Reading
and Idle mode
The student is able to demonstrate the second function features of keys
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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LESSON 5: BOOKMARKS
Objectives
• The student will be able to set bookmarks
• The students will be able to move between bookmarks
• The student will be able to clear a bookmark
Brief review of necessary skills
• The student understands what a bookmark is and the usefulness of creating it
• The student can navigate files by word, sentence, paragraph and page
• The student understands the concept of multi-key commands, and can
execute them
Challenges and Tips
• The same key command is used for both setting and clearing bookmarks
• Moving to an existing bookmark in Reading mode causes the BookPort to
move to that location and resume continuous reading
• Moving to an existing bookmark in Idle mode causes the BookPort to move to
that location and read only the sentence containing the bookmark
Features:
• An unlimited number of bookmarks can be created
• When you set a bookmark in a sentence, the bookmark begins at the start on
the sentence
Setup
•
•
•
Step by Step:
Create a new bookmark
Move between bookmarks
Clear a bookmark
Activity Step by Step Instructions:
Activity 1: Creating a Bookmark
Step 1:
Read in a file until you get to a place where you want to set a bookmark. Set the
bookmark by pressing keys 4 and 6 together and release. The BookPort beeps to let
you know that a bookmark has been set. When you set a bookmark (in either
Reading or Idle mode) the device will mark the beginning of the sentence as the
bookmark.
Step 2:
In preparation for moving through bookmarks, create at least two more bookmarks.
Activity 2: Moving forward and back through Bookmarks
*Note: Moving to a bookmark in Idle mode causes the BookPort to read only the
sentence containing the bookmark and then stop. Moving to a bookmark in Reading
mode causes the BookPort to move to the beginning of the sentence containing the
bookmark and then continue reading through the file.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 1:
Move to the beginning of your file by pressing key 1 until one beep is heard.
Step 2:
Press keys 5 and 6 together to move forward to the first bookmark. Note how the
BookPort reads the sentence containing the bookmark. Press the key sequence
again to move to the next bookmark. Continue to the end of your bookmarks and
note the double beep to signal there are no more bookmarks.
Step 3:
Move back one bookmark at a time by pressing keys 4 and 5 together. Return to the
first bookmark.
Activity 3: Clearing a Bookmark
Step 1:
Move to the book mark to be cleared as per the directions in Activity 2. As the device
is reading the marked text, press keys 4 + 6 again. When the sentence is finished
the BookPort will say “bookmark cleared”. You cannot clear a bookmark by stopping
the speech (key 2) during the sentence. You must clear it as it is reading the
bookmarked sentence.
Key Functions Summary
Quick Reference List:
Key
4+6
4+6
5+6
4+5
Function
Set bookmark
Clear bookmark (while the bookmarked sentence is being
read)
Move forward through bookmarks
Move back through bookmarks
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Lesson 5 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
The student is able to create a new bookmark.
The student is able to move forward and back between bookmarks.
The student is able to clear a bookmark.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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LESSON 6: RECORDING VOICE MEMOS
Objectives
• The student
• The student
• The student
folder
• The student
will be able to record voice memos
will be able to navigate to the Memos folder
will be able to navigate to voice recordings within the Memos
will be able to delete a voice memo
Brief review of necessary skills
• The student is familiar with the keypad layout
• The students can navigate to files on the BookPort
• The student understands, and can initiate, second key functions
Challenges and Tips
• The date and time must be set properly as this becomes the file name
• Playback voice quality varies, so some experimentation re: distance from mic
and movement while recording, is advisable
Features:
• The BookPort lets you record voice memos using its built in microphone
located on the top of the unit next to the USB port. Each voice recording is
stored as a separate file
• The BookPort uses the date and time of the recording as the file name.
• For playback, individual voice memos are saved in a default folder on the
device called “Memos”
• Unlike other files, which begin reading where you left off, memos are always
reset to the beginning of the file when it gets played back
• The amount of storage used for voice memos is approx 1 MB for each minute
and a half of recording time
Setup Step by Step:
• Record a voice memo
• Pause a voice memo
• Stop a voice memo
• Play back a voice memo
• Navigate to the voice memo folder
• Navigate to the voice memo files within the memo folder
• Delete a voice memo
Activity 1: Creating a New Voice Memo
Step 1: Recording
Press key E until one beep is heard; then release the key. This starts the recording.
Speak clearly in a normal voice, keeping the BookPort six to ten inches away.
Step 2: Pausing
To pause a voice recording press and release key E. The BookPort beeps twice to
signal a pause in the recording. Press E again to resume recording.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 3: Stop Recording
When you have finished recording press key B to stop it. Holding key B until one
beep is heard will stop the recording and then return you to the file you were in
before you started the voice recording.
Step 4: Playing Back Your New Voice Recording
Providing you have not moved out of the Memos Folder (i.e. you didn’t hold down
key B for one beep as mentioned above), press the reading key (key 2) to start, stop
and resume listening to your new voice recording.
Step 5: Exiting the Memo Folder
There are two ways to exit the Memos Folder. This exits the Memo folder and returns
you to where you left off in your previous file. The second way is to press the star
key (*) and key 0 together (i.e. +0). This exits the Memos Folder and returns
you to the list of files and /or folders. Navigate the list using the star (*) and
number sign (#) keys to move forward and back between files. Holding down the B
key for one beep takes you back one file.
Activity 2: Navigating the Audio Memos Folder
Step 1: Moving to the Memos Folder
You may move to the Memos folder through the normal navigation commands. That
is, use the star (*) and number sign (#) keys until the BookPort announces the
Memos Folder. Note that it says “backslash memo folder”. Now open the Memo
Folder by pressing either key 2 or holding down key 0 and the number sign keys
together (0+#). Either command will open the folder.
A shortcut to move directly to the Memos Folder and open it, is to hold down key B
for one beep. This will open the Memos Folder. Pressing key B again for one beep
(when you are in the Memos Folder) returns you to the last file you were reading.
Step 2: Moving within the Memos Folder
Once you have the Memos Folder open navigate between voice memos as you would
any file. That is, use the star key (*) and the number sign key (*) to move forward
and back between voice memo files. Listen to the voice memo using the reading key
(key 2).
Activity 3: Deleting a Voice Memo
Step 1:
Delete a voice memo as you would delete any file. That is navigate to it using the
star (*) or number sign (#) key. Then press keys B+E (i.e. B and E together). The
BookPort responds by asking you to press that key sequence again to confirm that
you want to delete it. Once pressed for the second time the BookPort says “file
deleted”. Note that you can cancel the deletion of any file after executing the first
delete command by pressing any other key.
Key Functions Summary:
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
Page 39 of 57
Quick Reference List:
Key
Function
E (hold for 1 beep) Begins recording
E (no beep)
Pause recording, resume recording
B
Stop recording, remain in Memo folder
2
Read / stop reading voice memo
B (hold for 1 beep) Stop recording, close the Memos Folder and return to the previous file
B (hold for 1 beep) Move directly into the Memo folder from anywhere
Opens the Memos Folder when navigating to it using the * and /or #
keys
0+#
0+*
Closes the Memos Folder
Lesson 6 Skills Checklist
□
□
□
□
The student is able to record, pause and end a new voice memo.
The student is able to navigate to the Memos Folder.
The student is able to navigate to voice recordings (memos) within the
Memos folder and play them.
The student is able to delete a voice memo.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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LESSON 7: SUPPORTED FILE TYPES; K1000 AND BOOK PORT
Objectives
• The student will know which file types are supported by the Book Port.
• The student will know which file types are supported by K1000.
• The student will be able to scan a new file to Kurzweil 1000 and send it to the
Book Port.
• The student will be able to convert a .pdf file to a .kes or .txt file using
Kurzweil 1000 and send it to the Book Port.
Brief review of necessary prerequisite skills
• The student will need to know how to open existing documents in Kurzweil
1000.
• The student will need to know how to scan documents into Kurzweil 1000.
• The student will need to have general Windows file management, navigation,
and search skills.
• The student will need to know how to transfer files to the Book Port as per
Lesson 2 in this tutorial.
Challenges and Tips
• Windows does not normally display extensions such as .doc, .txt, or .kes
which identify the file type. To display these extensions, go to Start Menu/My
Computer and open the C: drive. Under Tools, select Folder Options. On the
View Tab, uncheck the box beside Hide extensions for known file types.
• If you find the Kurzweil 1000 Open and Save Dialogues confusing, switch to
the regular Windows Open and Save Dialogues. Go to
Settings/Configurations in the Kurzweil 1000 Menu. In the File Dialog Spin
Box, change from the Kurzweil 1000 view to Common.
• Audio files are much larger than their corresponding text files and have fewer
navigation options on the Book Port. So even though Kurzweil 1000 can
create audio files in .mp3 format, it is better to export files to Book Port in
.txt format.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Features:
• Kurzweil 1000 provides a convenient way for students to scan or import
documents and export them for use with the Book Port.
• Kurzweil 1000 can be used to convert .pdf format to .kes or .txt format so
that Book Port can read the file.
Setup Step by Step:
• Check to make sure the scanner is turned on and working with Kurzweil 1000.
• Do not connect the Book Port until you are ready to transfer files.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Activity 1: Sending a file from Kurzweil 1000 to Book Port
Step 1: Open an existing Kurzweil 1000 document
The .kes extension stands for Kurzweil Educational Systems and identifies files
created by Kurzweil 1000 or 3000. Since .kes is the default file type, Kurzweil 1000
does not read the .kes extension although it displays on the screen. If you have not
created any documents of your own, use the New Features.kes file located in the
Manuals Folder. Or use the ReadMe.txt files. Book Port can handle both of these file
types.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 2: Send the file to the Book Port
Plug in the Book Port and use the Send To Command under the File Menu to send
the file to the Book Port.
Step 3: Verify that the file has been sent.
Unplug the Book Port and use your reading commands to verify that the file has
been sent and is readable.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Activity 2: Sending a .pdf file to Book Port using Kurzweil 1000
Book Port cannot handle .pdf files because they are image files. Use Kurzweil 1000
to convert the .pdf file to a .kes or .txt file which Book Port can read.
Close Kurzweil 1000 before starting this activity.
Step 1: Open a .pdf file.
Locate a small .pdf file on your hard drive and open it using Open under the
Kurzweil File Menu.
A .pdf file is an image file created by the Adobe Acrobat program, commonly used for
user manuals and downloadable web documents. A sighted user can identify a .pdf
file by its Adobe Acrobat logo.
JAWS users can identify the file by its .pdf extension or by listening for Adobe
Acrobat Document in the file details. Windows does not normally display extensions
such as .pdf or .txt. To display these extensions, go to Start Menu/My Computer and
open the C: drive. Under Tools, select Folder Options. On the View Tab, uncheck
the box beside Hide extensions for known file types.
If you have trouble locating a .pdf file, use Windows Search from the Start Menu.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 2: Alternate way to open a .pdf file in Kurzweil 1000(optional)
If you have trouble opening a .pdf file within Kurzweil, try this method.
Make sure Kurzweil 1000 is closed. With the .pdf file open, choose Print under the
File Menu (Ctrl + P). The Print Dialogue will open.
In the Printer Name combo box, choose KESI Virtual printer.
Kurzweil 1000 will open. This may take several minutes, especially if you have
selected a large .pdf file.
Step 3: Save the document as a .kes file. (optional)
It is not necessary to save the document as a .kes file unless you also plan to work
with it in Kurzweil 1000. If you are planning to access the file only with Book Port,
skip this step.
Otherwise, choose .kes in the Save As File Type Spin Box.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Step 4: Transfer the file to Book Port.
Plug in the Book Port and transfer the file to the Book Port using the Send To
command under the File Menu. Unplug the Book Port and use your reading
commands to verify that the file has been sent and is readable.
Step 6: Change back to your default printer (if you used Step 2)
Sometimes the KESI Virtual printer will stay selected as your default printer after you
use it. The next time you try to print a document you will be extremely surprised
when a copy of your document opens automatically in Kurzweil 1000 instead of
printing . After using the KESI Virtual printer, it's a good idea to open any
document, choose Print and set your printer back to your normal printer.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Key Functions Summary
Ctrl + O
Ctrl + P
F9
Opens the Open Dialogue Box
Opens the Print Dialogue Box
Starts a new scan in K1000
Quick Reference List:
Book Port Supported File Types
Type
.txt
.htm
.html
.brf
.brl
.mp3
.wav
ncc.html
.opf
.doc
.kes
Description
Text
Web Pages – send directly from browser
Web Pages - send directly from browser
Contracted Formatted Braille
Contracted Unformatted Braille
Compressed Audio (smaller files)
Uncompressed Audio (large files)
DAISY 2.2 Digital Talking book
DAISY 3.X Digital Talking book
Microsoft Word – Word97 or later
Kurzweil 1000 and 3000
Kurzweil 1000 Supported File Types
Type
.brl
.htm
.kes
.xls
.doc
.rtf
.txt
.wpd
.pdf (will convert)
other
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
Description
Braille, Grade 2
Contracted unformatted Braille
Html 3
Web pages
KES
Kurzweil Educational Systems default file
type
MS Excel 5.0
MS Word for Windows 6.0 – 7.0
RTF
Rich Text Format (some formatting)
Text
Plain text (no formatting)
Word Perfect for Windows 6.1
Adobe Acrobat image file
Enter own extension
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Lesson 7 Skills Checklist:
o
o
o
o
Able to identify file types supported by the Book Port.
Able to identify file types supported by K1000.
Able to send a .kes or .txt file from K1000 to Book Port using the Send
To command.
Able to convert a .pdf file to a .kes or .txt file using Kurzweil 1000 and
send it to the Book Port.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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APPENDIX
BookPort Research Project
Initial Survey of Participants – February 2005
Name of Student: ___________________________________
Name of Teacher who supports students with Visual Impairments:
___________________________________
Your response to the following questions is greatly appreciated.
1. Do you currently use etext in your school work? Yes | No
Do you currently use etext in your recreational reading? Yes | No
2. Do you access the internet? Yes | No
If so how much time would you spend on the internet in an average month?
_____ hours.
What percentage of your time on the internet is used for school related work?
_____%
For leisure or recreational activities?
_____%
3. What reading modalities do you use to access the internet? (please check all
that apply)
□ read with regular font size
□ read with large font size
□ read with screen magnification software
□ read (listen) with speech software program
□ read with refreshable braille display
4. Do you currently download material from the internet? If so what do you
download? (please check all that apply)
□ E-text?
□ General information?
□ Music?
□ Other? Please write here ________________________________
5. Rate your access to instructional and leisure materials compared to your
classmates. (please check one only)
□ Same
□ More Challenging
Thank you for completing this survey!
Please return completed survey to:
Anne Wadsworth, Vision Outreach Coordinator
Provincial Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired
#106 1750 West 75 Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C. V6P 6G2
Fax 604 261 0778
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Student Survey Questions
(to be distributed two months after the student has received their BookPort)
How easy was it for you to learn BookPort for use with your school work?
□ Very easy to learn
□ A bit complicated
□ Too complicated to use
I use BookPort to help with studying and completing assignments:
□ Daily
□ Once or twice a week
□ A few times
□ Never
Does having a BookPort make you more independent (or less reliant on friends or family)
in completing assignments and study?
□ Not at all
□ Somewhat
□ A lot more independent
Which subjects have you used with the BookPort?
□ English
□ Social Studies
□ Geography
□ Science
□ Others. Please List ____________________________________________
I used the BookPort for reading, listening to music and pleasure:
□ Daily
□ Once or twice a week
□ A few times
□ Never
Describe anything that you were able to do using the BookPort that you couldn’t do using
your other technology:
I like to use the BookPort because:
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Teacher Survey Questions
(to be distributed two months after the student has received their BookPort)
How easy was it for your student to learn to use the BookPort for school work?
□ Very easy to learn
□ A bit complicated
□ Too complicated to use
How often did your student use the BookPort to help with studying and completing
assignments:
□ Daily
□ Once or twice a week
□ A few times
□ Never
Did having a BookPort make your student more independent (or less reliant on friends or
family) to help complete assignments and study?
□ Not at all
□ Somewhat
□ A lot more independent
Check the subjects where your student used the BookPort
□ English
□ Social Studies
□ Geography
□ Science
□ Others. Please List _____________________________________________
Describe any things that your student was able to do using the BookPort that he or she
couldn’t do using other technology.
In what grade levels do you think students should use BookPort s? What Educational
value?
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Comment on the BookPort’s effectiveness as an educational tool
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Navigation of an Audio file
(contribution by Nova Herring, APSEA)
Key
Reading
Idle
One Beep
#1
back by phrase
#2
stop reading
start reading
#3
forward by phrase
forward by phrase
#4
Back by paragraph
Back by paragraph
#5
-----------------------------no function---------------------------------------------
#6
forward by paragraph
forward by paragraph
#7
back by section
back by section
#8
-------------------------------% of book read & file info-----------------------(Over reading)
#9
forward by section
back by phrase beginning of file
says time and date
forward by section
Precision of movement in an audio file or digital talking book may vary
depending on how it was recorded.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Additional Information for BookPort Student Lessons Resource Book
1. About Lock and Unlock: 1+3
Lock and Unlock: 1+3
Pressing 1 and 3 together locks Book Port so that none of the other keys has any effect.
This may prove useful when transporting the unit to prevent accidental battery usage.
You may also wish to lock the unit while it is playing to let you move about without
accidentally hitting a key. Once the unit is locked, pressing any key makes the unit beep
to inform you that it is locked, but the normal function of the key is not used.
Press 1 and 3 together again to unlock the unit.
Lock Beep
By default, Book Port's keys beep when you press one of them while the unit is locked.
This is a useful indication to remind you why the unit seems to do nothing when you
press a key and nothing happens. Unfortunately, the keys can get accidentally pressed
while in a purse or bag, and you hear beeps each time that happens.
If you prefer to turn off the feature that makes the keys beep when you press one of
them while the unit is locked, change the Beep Lock menu item to No.
2. About Folders
The PC File List: Alt+L
When you start Book Port Transfer, you see a list of files that are candidates for transfer
to Book Port. Use the arrow keys to highlight the file or files to send to the unit, then
press Enter or use the Send button.
You may use the standard Windows commands to select more than one file at a time to
send to Book Port.
In addition to using the list to find files to send, you may use the list to move from folder
to folder. If you highlight a folder, you may open that folder by pressing Enter. You may
move to the parent of the current folder by pressing BackSpace.
Book Port Transfer remembers the last folder you used from which to select files to send
to Book Port, so you may begin selecting additional files from that folder when you first
start the program or you may move to any folder of your choice.
Using the File Name window to Change Folders
You may use the File Name window to type the name of another drive or folder from
which to select files. To select a different drive or folder, type the name of that drive or
folder, then press Enter. Once you change the name of the folder that the software is
pointing to, go back to the file list to select the files from that folder.
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Looking at the Contents of Book Port
Book Port Transfer shows you a list of the files currently on your Book Port. You may
use this list to navigate the Book Port file system, examine file properties, create new
folders on Book Port, and to delete files from the unit.
Book Port Folder: Alt+D
The Book Port Folder edit window provides two functions: It identifies the name of Book
Port's current folder, and it lets you type the name of another folder that you wish to
open on Book Port.
Book Port Files: Alt+F
The Book Port Files list shows you all the files and folders on Book Port.
In addition to the files on Book Port, the transfer tool shows you the folders on the unit.
As you highlight a folder, press Enter to open that folder. Press Backspace to close the
current folder and return to its parent.
Adding New Files to a Specific Folder on Book Port
The current folder is the place new books get added to Book Port, so, if you want to
place your technical manuals in a folder called "technical," you should navigate to that
folder before sending the new material.
Creating a New Folder on Book Port
To create a new folder on Book Port, connect your Book Port to the computer with the
supplied USB cable. Next, move to the Book Port file/folder list (Alt+F) and press the
Applications key on your computer keyboard. (This key is usually located to the right of
the Space Bar, just left of the right CTRL key and is equivalent to clicking the right
mouse button.)
Once you press the Applications key, Book Port Transfer shows you a context menu
with several options. Move down to the New Folder item and press Enter to select it,
then type in the name of the new folder you wish to create.
Queued: Alt+Q
The Queued button lets you send queued files that may still be in the queue. Files can
still be in the queue if you cancel the Send Queued Files dialog that appears at program
startup when there are files in the queue or if some files failed to get sent because of a
card full condition. You may decide not to send these queued files for a number of
reasons, and this button lets you send them at any time if they exist.
One reason for waiting to send queued files is the case where you may wish to change
the folder where you want to send the files. To do this, just change to the desired folder,
then press the Queued button.
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Default Book Port Folder
By default, Book Port Transfer sends files to the root (top level) folder when you first
connect the device to your computer. You may, of course, change the folder to which
files get sent every time you connect the device, but it is often more convenient to
specify a folder that gets used as the default, so you do not have to change to the same
folder every time you prepare to send files to Book Port.
Recall, it is a bad idea to send all of your files to the root folder, because there are limits
on the number of files that can be stored in the root folder. It is also a bad idea to store
too many files in any folder, but at least the folders can take them. Instead of a transfer
that fails from having too many files in the root folder, you will notice gradually degrading
performance when you attempt to store an excessive number of files in a sub folder.
The Default Book Port Folder control lets you specify an alternate folder that the
software treats as the default place to store files.
BookPort Project 2005: Student Lessons
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Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

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