336_Manual 6597KB Feb 16 2012 12:36:17 PM
User’s Manual
Model 336
Temperature Controller
Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc.
575 McCorkle Blvd.
Westerville, Ohio 43082-8888 USA
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.lakeshore.com
Fax: (614) 891-1392
Telephone: (614) 891-2243
Methods and apparatus disclosed and described herein have been developed solely on company funds of
Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. No government or other contractual support or relationship whatsoever has existed
which in any way affects or mitigates proprietary rights of Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. in these developments.
Methods and apparatus disclosed herein may be subject to U.S. Patents existing or applied for.
Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. reserves the right to add, improve, modify, or withdraw functions, design modifications,
or products at any time without notice. Lake Shore shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or
consequential damages in connection with furnishing, performance, or use of this material.
Rev. 1.5
P/N 119-048
6 April 2011
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LIMITED WARRANTY STATEMENT
WARRANTY PERIOD: ONE (1) YEAR
1.Lake Shore warrants that this Lake Shore product (the "Product")
will be free from defects in materials and workmanship for the Warranty Period specified above (the "Warranty Period"). If Lake Shore
receives notice of any such defects during the Warranty Period and
the Product is shipped freight prepaid, Lake Shore will, at its option,
either repair or replace the Product if it is so defective without charge
to the owner for parts, service labor or associated customary return
shipping cost. Any such replacement for the Product may be either
new or equivalent in performance to new. Replacement or repaired
parts will be warranted for only the unexpired portion of the original
warranty or 90 days (whichever is greater).
2.Lake Shore warrants the Product only if it has been sold by an authorized Lake Shore employee, sales representative, dealer or original
equipment manufacturer (OEM).
3.The Product may contain remanufactured parts equivalent to new
in performance or may have been subject to incidental use.
4.The Warranty Period begins on the date of delivery of the Product or
later on the date of installation of the Product if the Product is
installed by Lake Shore, provided that if you schedule or delay the Lake
Shore installation for more than 30 days after delivery the Warranty
Period begins on the 31st day after delivery.
5.This limited warranty does not apply to defects in the Product
resulting from (a) improper or inadequate maintenance, repair or calibration, (b) fuses, software and non-rechargeable batteries, (c) software, interfacing, parts or other supplies not furnished by Lake Shore,
(d) unauthorized modification or misuse, (e) operation outside of the
published specifications or (f) improper site preparation or maintenance.
6. TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY APPLICABLE LAW, THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE EXCLUSIVE AND NO OTHER WARRANTY OR CONDITION,
WHETHER WRITTEN OR ORAL, IS EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED. LAKE
SHORE SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF MERCHANTABILITY, SATISFACTORY QUALITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE WITH RESPECT TO THE PRODUCT.
Some countries, states or provinces do not allow limitations on an
implied warranty, so the above limitation or exclusion might not
apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you
might also have other rights that vary from country to country, state
to state or province to province.
7.TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY APPLICABLE LAW, THE REMEDIES IN
THIS WARRANTY STATEMENT ARE YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES.
8.EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT PROHIBITED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO
EVENT WILL LAKE SHORE OR ANY OF ITS SUBSIDIARIES, AFFILIATES OR
SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR DIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR OTHER DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOST PROFIT, LOST DATA
OR DOWNTIME COSTS) ARISING OUT OF THE USE, INABILITY TO USE
OR RESULT OF USE OF THE PRODUCT, WHETHER BASED IN WARRANTY, CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHER LEGAL THEORY, AND WHETHER
OR NOT LAKE SHORE HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGES. Your use of the Product is entirely at your own risk.
Some countries, states and provinces do not allow the exclusion of liability for incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation
may not apply to you.
9.EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT ALLOWED BY APPLICABLE LAW, THE TERMS
OF THIS LIMITED WARRANTY STATEMENT DO NOT EXCLUDE, RESTRICT
OR MODIFY, AND ARE IN ADDITION TO, THE MANDATORY STATUTORY
RIGHTS APPLICABLE TO THE SALE OF THE PRODUCT TO YOU.
CERTIFICATION
Lake Shore certifies that this product has been inspected and tested in
accordance with its published specifications and that this product
met its published specifications at the time of shipment. The accuracy
and calibration of this product at the time of shipment are traceable
to the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology
(NIST); formerly known as the National Bureau of Standards (NBS).
FIRMWARE LIMITATIONS
Lake Shore has worked to ensure that the Model 336 firmware is as
free of errors as possible, and that the results you obtain from the
instrument are accurate and reliable. However, as with any computer-based software, the possibility of errors exists.
In any important research, as when using any laboratory equipment,
results should be carefully examined and rechecked before final conclusions are drawn. Neither Lake Shore nor anyone else involved in the
creation or production of this firmware can pay for loss of time, inconvenience, loss of use of the product, or property damage caused by
this product or its failure to work, or any other incidental or consequential damages. Use of our product implies that you understand the
Lake Shore license agreement and statement of limited warranty.
FIRMWARE LICENSE AGREEMENT
The firmware in this instrument is protected by United States copyright law and international treaty provisions. To maintain the warranty, the code contained in the firmware must not be modified. Any
changes made to the code is at the user's risk. Lake Shore will assume
no responsibility for damage or errors incurred as result of any
changes made to the firmware.
Under the terms of this agreement you may only use the Model 336
firmware as physically installed in the instrument. Archival copies are
strictly forbidden. You may not decompile, disassemble, or reverse
engineer the firmware. If you suspect there are problems with the
firmware, return the instrument to Lake Shore for repair under the
terms of the Limited Warranty specified above. Any unauthorized
duplication or use of the Model 336 firmware in whole or in part, in
print, or in any other storage and retrieval system is forbidden.
TRADEMARK ACKNOWLEDGMENT
Many manufacturers and sellers claim designations used to distinguish their products as trademarks. Where those designations appear
in this manual and Lake Shore was aware of a trademark claim, they
appear with initial capital letters and the ™ or ® symbol.
Alumel™ and Chromel™ are trademarks of
Conceptech, Inc., Corporation
Apiezon™ is a registered trademark of M&I Materials, Ltd.
CalCurve™, Cernox™, SoftCal™, Rox™, Curve Handler™ are trademarks
of Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc.
Java™ is a registered trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
of Santa Clara, CA
LabVIEW® is a registered trademark of National Instruments.
Mac® is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc., registered in the U.S and
other countries.
Microsoft Windows®, Excel®, and Windows Vista® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Stycast® is a trademark of Emerson & Cuming.
WinZip™ is a registered trademark of Nico Mak of Connecticut.
Copyright 2009-11 Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. All rights reserved. No portion of this manual may be reproduced,
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,
recording, or otherwise, without the express written permission of Lake Shore.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
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Note: The Model 336 is considered Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Category 9 equipment,
therefore falling outside the current scope of the RoHS directive. However, in recognition that RoHS compliance is in
the best interest of our customers, employees, and the environment, Lake Shore has designed the Model 336 to
eliminate the hazardous substances covered in the RoHS directive.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) for the Model 336 Temperature Controller
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) of electronic equipment is a growing concern worldwide. Emissions of and
immunity to electromagnetic interference is now part of the design and manufacture of most electronics. To qualify
for the CE Mark, the Model 336 meets or exceeds the requirements of the European EMC Directive 89/336/EEC as a
CLASS A product. A Class A product is allowed to radiate more RF than a Class B product and must include the following warning:
WARNING:This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment, this product may cause radio interference in which
case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
The instrument was tested under normal operating conditions with sensor and interface cables attached. If the
installation and operating instructions in the User's Manual are followed, there should be no degradation in EMC
performance.
This instrument is not intended for use in close proximity to RF Transmitters such as two-way radios and cell
phones. Exposure to RF interference greater than that found in a typical laboratory environment may disturb the
sensitive measurement circuitry of the instrument.
Pay special attention to instrument cabling. Improperly installed cabling may defeat even the best EMC protection.
For the best performance from any precision instrument, follow the grounding and shielding instructions in the
User's Manual. In addition, the installer of the Model 336 should consider the following:
D
D
D
D
Shield measurement and computer interface cables.
Leave no unused or unterminated cables attached to the instrument.
Make cable runs as short and direct as possible. Higher radiated emissions are possible with long cables.
Do not tightly bundle cables that carry different types of signals.
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Model 336 Temperature Controller
i
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction
1.1 Product Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1.1 Sensor Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1.2 Temperature Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1.3 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.1.4 Configurable Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.1.5 Model 3060 Thermocouple Input Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2 Sensor Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 Model 336 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.3.1 Input Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.3.2 Sensor Input Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.3.3 Thermometry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.3.4 Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.3.4.1 Heater Outputs (Outputs 1 and 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.3.4.2 Unpowered Analog Outputs (Outputs 3 and 4) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.3.5 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.3.6 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.3.7 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.4 Safety Summary and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 2
Cooling System
Design and
Temperature
Control
2.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
2.2 Temperature Sensor Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.1 Temperature Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.2 Sensor Sensitivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.2.3 Environmental Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.4 Measurement Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.2.5 Sensor Package. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3 Sensor Calibrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3.1 Precision Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3.2 SoftCal™. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3.3 Sensors Using Standard Curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3.4 Curve Handler™. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.4 Sensor Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.1 Mounting Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.2 Sensor Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.3 Thermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.4 Contact Area. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.4.5 Contact Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.4.6 Lead Wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.4.7 Lead Soldering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.4.8 Thermal Anchoring Leads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.4.9 Thermal Radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.5 Heater Selection and Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.5.1 Heater Resistance and Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.5.2 Heater Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.5.3 Heater Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.5.4 Heater Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
2.6 Consideration for Good Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.6.1 Thermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.6.2 Thermal Lag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.6.3 Two-Sensor Approach. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.6.4 Thermal Mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
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2.6.5 System Non-Linearity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.7 PID Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.7.1 Proportional (P) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.7.2 Integral (I) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.7.3 Derivative (D). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.7.4 Manual Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.8 Manual Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.8.1 Setting Heater Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.8.2 Tuning Proportional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.8.3 Tuning Integral. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.8.4 Tuning Derivative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.9 Autotuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.10 Zone Tuning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 3
Installation
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Inspection and Unpacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Rear Panel Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Line Input Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.4.1 Line Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.4.2 Line Fuse and Fuse Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.4.3 Power Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4.4 Power Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.5 Diode/Resistor Sensor Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.5.1 Sensor Input Connector and Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.5.2 Sensor Lead Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.5.3 Grounding and Shielding Sensor Leads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.5.4 Sensor Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.5.5 Four-Lead Sensor Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.5.6 Two-Lead Sensor Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.5.7 Lowering Measurement Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.6 Thermocouple Sensor Inputs (Thermocouple Model 3060-F) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.6.1 Sensor Input Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.6.2 Thermocouple Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.6.3 Grounding and Shielding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.7 Heater Output Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.7.1 Heater Output Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.7.2 Heater Output Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.3 Heater Output Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.4 Heater Output Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.5 Powering Outputs 3 and 4 Using an External Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.5.1 Choosing a Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.5.2 Power Supply Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.5.3 Connecting to the Model 336 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.7.5.4 Programming Voltages Under 10 V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Chapter 4
Operation
4.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4.1.1 Understanding Menu Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4.2 Front Panel Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2.1 Keypad Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2.1.1 Direct Operation Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
4.2.1.2 Menu/Number Pad Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.2 Annunciators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.3 General Keypad Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.3 Display Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.3.1 Display Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.3.1.1 Four Loop Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
4.3.1.2 Input Display Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Model 336 Temperature Controller
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
iii
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
Chapter 5
Advanced
Operation
4.3.1.3 Custom Display Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.3.2 Display Contrast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Input Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.4.1 Diode Sensor Input Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.4.2 Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) Resistor Sensor Input Setup . . . . . . . 47
4.4.3 Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) Resistor Sensor Input Setup . . . . . . 47
4.4.4 Range Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.4.5 Thermal Electromotive Force (EMF) Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.4.6 Thermocouple Sensor Input Setup (Model 3060-F Only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
4.4.6.1 Internal Room Temperature Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.4.6.2 Internal Room Temperature Compensation Calibration Procedure 49
4.4.7 Curve Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
4.4.8 Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.4.9 Input Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.4.10 Temperature Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
4.4.11 Preferred Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
4.4.12 Max/Min . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Output and Control Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.5.1 Heater Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.5.1.1 Max Current and Heater Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.5.1.1.1 User Max Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.5.1.2 Power Up Enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.5.1.3 Heater Out Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.5.1.4 Output Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.5.1.4.1 Closed Loop PID Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.5.1.4.2 Zone Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
4.5.1.4.3 Open Loop Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.5.1.5 Control Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.5.1.5.1 Control Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.5.1.5.2 Proportional (P) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.5.1.5.3 Integral (I) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.5.1.5.4 Derivative (D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.5.1.5.5 Manual Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
4.5.1.5.6 Setpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
4.5.1.5.7 Setpoint Ramping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.5.1.5.8 Heater Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.5.1.5.9 ALL OFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.5.2 Unpowered Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.5.2.1 Warm Up Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.5.2.2 Monitor Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.6.1 USB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
4.6.2 Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.6.3 IEEE-488 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.6.3.1 Remote/Local . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Locking and Unlocking the Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Autotune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Zone Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Warm Up Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.4.1 Warm Up Percentage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.4.2 Warm Up Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
5.5 Monitor Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
5.5.1 Monitor Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
5.5.1.1 Polarity and Monitor Out Scaling Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
5.6 Alarms and Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
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5.6.1 Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5.6.1.1 Alarm Annunciators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.6.1.2 Alarm Latching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.6.2 Relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
5.7 Curve Numbers and Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.7.1 Curve Header Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.7.2 Curve Breakpoints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.8 Front Panel Curve Entry Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.8.1 Edit Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
5.8.1.1 Edit a Breakpoint Pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
5.8.1.2 Add a New Breakpoint Pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.8.1.3 Delete a Breakpoint Pair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.8.1.4 Thermocouple Curve Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.8.2 View Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
5.8.3 Erase Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
5.8.4 Copy Curve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
5.9 SoftCal™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.9.1 SoftCal™ With Silicon Diode Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
5.9.2 SoftCal™ Accuracy With DT-400 Series Silicon Diode Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
5.9.3 SoftCal™ With Platinum Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
5.9.4 SoftCal™ Accuracy With Platinum Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
5.9.5 SoftCal™ CalibrationCurve Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Chapter 6
Computer
Interface Operation
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
6.2 IEEE-488 Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
6.2.1 Changing IEEE-488 Interface Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
6.2.2 Remote/Local Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
6.2.3 IEEE-488.2 Command Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
6.2.3.1 Bus Control Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
6.2.3.2 Common Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.2.3.3 Device Specific Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.2.3.4 Message Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.2.4 Status System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.2.4.1 Condition Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.2.4.2 Event Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.2.4.3 Enable Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
6.2.4.4 Status Byte Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.2.4.5 Service Request Enable Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.2.4.6 Reading Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.2.4.7 Programming Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
6.2.4.8 Clearing Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.2.5 Status System Detail: Status Register Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.2.5.1 Standard Event Status Register Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
6.2.5.2 Operation Event Register Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
6.2.6 Status System Detail: Status Byte Register and Service Request . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.2.6.1 Status Byte Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
6.2.6.2 Service Request Enable Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.2.6.3 Using Service Request (SRQ) and Serial Poll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.2.6.4 Using Status Byte Query (*STB?) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.2.6.5 Using the Message Available (MAV) Bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.2.6.6 Using Operation Complete (*OPC) and Operation
Complete Query (*OPC?) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.3 USB Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.3.1 Physical Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.3.2 Hardware Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.3.3 Installing the USB Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
6.3.3.1 Installing the Driver From Windows® Update in Windows Vista® . . 96
v
6.3.3.2 Installing the Driver From Windows® Update in Windows® XP . . . . . 97
6.3.3.3 Installing the Driver From the Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
6.3.3.3.1 Download the driver: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
6.3.3.3.2 Extract the driver: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
6.3.3.3.3 Manually install the driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
6.3.3.4 Installing the USB Driver from the Included CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3.4 Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3.4.1 Character Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
6.3.4.2 Message Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
6.3.5 Message Flow Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
6.4 Ethernet Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.4.1 Ethernet Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.4.1.1 Network Address Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.4.1.2 Network Addresss Configuration Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
6.4.1.3 DNS Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
6.4.2 Viewing Ethernet Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
6.4.2.1 LAN Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
6.4.2.2 MAC Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.4.2.3 Viewing Network Configuration Parameters and
DNS Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.4.3 TCP Socket Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
6.4.4 Embedded Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
6.4.4.1 Connecting to the Web Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
6.4.4.2 Web Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
6.5 Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
6.5.1 Embedded Curve Handler™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
6.5.2 Ethernet Firmware Updater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
6.5.3 Instrument Configuration Backup Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
6.6 Command Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
6.6.1 Interface Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Chapter 7
Options and
Accessories
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
Chapter 8
Service
8.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.2 USB Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.2.1 New Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.2.2 Existing Installation No Longer Working . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.2.3 Intermittent Lockups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
8.3 IEEE Interface Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.3.1 New Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.3.2 Existing Installation No Longer Working . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.3.3 Intermittent Lockups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.4 Fuse Drawer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.5 Line Voltage Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
8.6 Fuse Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
8.7 Factory Reset Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
8.7.1 Default Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
8.7.2 Product Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
8.8 Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
8.9 Calibration Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
8.10 Rear Panel Connector Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Rack Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Model 3060-F Thermocouple Input Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Model 3003 Heater and Output Conditioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
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8.10.1 IEEE-488 Interface Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11 Electrostatic Discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.11.1 Identification of Electrostatic Discharge Sensitive Components . . . . . . . .
8.11.2 Handling Electrostatic Discharge Sensitive Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.12 Enclosure Top Remove and Replace Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13 Technical Inquiries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13.1 Contacting Lake Shore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13.2 Return of Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13.3 RMA Valid Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13.4 Shipping Charges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8.13.5 Restocking Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
148
149
149
150
150
152
152
152
152
153
153
Appendix A
Temperature Scales
A.1 Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
A.2 Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
A.3 Conversions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Appendix B
Handling Liquid
Helium and
Nitrogen
B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
Appendix C
Curve Tables
C.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Model 336 Temperature Controller
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling Cryogenic Storage Dewars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Liquid Helium and Nitrogen Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommended First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
157
157
157
157
158
1.1 Product Description
1
Chapter 1: Introduction
FIGURE 1-1
1.1 Product
Description
Model 336 front view
Features:
D Operates down to 300 mK with appropriate NTC RTD sensors
D Four sensor inputs and four independent control outputs
D Two PID control loops: 100 W and 50 W into a 50 ) or 25 ) load
D Autotuning automatically collects PID parameters
D Automatically switch sensor inputs using zones to allow continuous measurement and control from 300 mK to 1505 K
D Custom display setup allows you to label each sensor input
D Ethernet, USB, and IEEE-488 interfaces
D Supports diode, RTD, and thermocouple temperature sensors
D Sensor excitation current reversal eliminates thermal EMF errors for
resistance sensors
D ±10 V analog voltage outputs, alarms, and relays
The first of a new generation of innovative temperature measurement and control
solutions by Lake Shore, the Model 336 temperature controller comes standard
equipped with many advanced features promised to deliver the functionality and
reliable service you’ve come to expect from the world leader in cryogenic thermometry. The Model 336 is the only temperature controller available with four sensor
inputs, four control outputs, and 150 W of low noise heater power. Two independent
heater outputs providing 100 W and 50 W can be associated with any of the four sensor inputs and programmed for closed loop temperature control in proportional-integral-derivative (PID) mode. The improved autotuning feature of the Model 336 can be
used to automatically collect PID parameters, so you spend less time tuning your controller and more time conducting experiments.
The Model 336 supports the industry’s most advanced line of cryogenic temperature
sensors as manufactured by Lake Shore, including diodes, resistance temperature
detectors (RTDs) and thermocouples. The controller’s zone tuning feature allows you
to measure and control temperatures seamlessly from 300 mK to over 1,500 K by
automatically switching temperature sensor inputs when your temperature range
goes beyond the usable range of a given sensor. You’ll never again have to be concerned with temperature sensor over or under errors and measurement continuity
issues. Alarms, relays, and ±10 V analog voltage outputs are available to help automate secondary control functions.
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cHAPTER 1: Introduction
Another innovative first from Lake Shore, the ability to custom label sensor inputs
eliminates the guesswork in remembering or determining the location to which a
sensor input is associated. As we strive to maintain increasingly demanding workloads, ease of use and the ability to stay connected from anywhere in the world are
critical attributes. With standard Ethernet, USB, and IEEE-488 interfaces and an intuitive menu structure and logic, the Model 336 was designed with efficiency, reliable
connectivity, and ease of use in mind. While you may need to leave your lab, Ethernet
ensures you’ll always be connected to your experiments. The new intuitive front
panel layout and keypad logic, bright graphic display, and LED indicators enhance the
user friendly front panel interface of the Model 336.
In many applications, the unparalleled feature set of the Model 336 allows you to
replace several instruments with one, saving time, money and valuable laboratory
space. Delivering more feedback, tighter control, and faster cycle times, the
Model 336 keeps up with increasingly complex temperature measurement and control applications. It is the ideal solution for general purpose to advanced laboratory
applications. Put the Model 336 temperature controller to use in your lab and let it
take control of your measurement environment.
1.1.1 Sensor Inputs
The Model 336 offers 4 standard sensor inputs that are compatible with diode and
RTD temperature sensors. The field installable Model 3060 thermocouple input
option provides support for up to two thermocouple inputs by adding thermocouple
functionality to inputs C and D.
Sensor inputs feature a high-resolution 24-bit analog-to-digital converter; each
input has its own current source, providing fast settling times. All four sensor inputs
are optically isolated from other circuits to reduce noise and to provide repeatable
sensor measurements. Current reversal eliminates thermal electromotive force
(EMF) errors in resistance sensors. Nine excitation currents facilitate temperature
measurement and control down to 300 mK using appropriate negative temperature
coefficient (NTC) RTDs. Autorange mode automatically scales excitation current in
NTC RTDs to reduce self heating at low temperatures as sensor resistance changes by
many orders of magnitude. Temperatures down to 1.4 K can be measured and controlled using silicon or GaAlAs diodes. Software selects the appropriate excitation current and signal gain levels when the sensor type is entered via the instrument front
panel. The unique zone setting feature automatically switches sensor inputs,
enabling you to measure temperatures from 300 mK to over 1,500 K without interrupting your experiment.
The Model 336 includes standard temperature sensor response curves for silicon
diodes, platinum RTDs, ruthenium oxide RTDs, and thermocouples. Non-volatile
memory can also store up to 39 200-point CalCurves for Lake Shore calibrated temperature sensors or user curves. A built-in SoftCal™ algorithm can be used to generate curves for silicon diodes and platinum RTDs that can be stored as user curves.
Temperature sensor calibration data can be easily uploaded and manipulated using
the Lake Shore curve handler software.
1.1.2 Temperature
Control
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Providing a total of 150 W of heater power, the Model 336 is the most powerful temperature controller available. Delivering very clean heater power, it precisely controls
temperature throughout the full scale temperature range for excellent measurement
reliability, efficiency, and throughput. Two independent PID control outputs supplying 100 W and 50 W of heater power can be associated with any of the four standard
sensor inputs. Precise control output is calculated based on your temperature setpoint and feedback from the control sensor. Wide tuning parameters accommodate
most cryogenic cooling systems and many high-temperature ovens commonly used
in laboratories. PID values can be manually set for fine control, or the improved auto-
1.1.3 Interface
3
tuning feature can automate the tuning process. Autotune collects PID parameters
and provides information to help build zone tables. The setpoint ramp feature provides smooth, continuous setpoint changes and predictable setpoint approaches
without the worry of overshoot or excessive settling times. When combined with the
zone setting feature, which enables automatic switching of sensor inputs and scales
current excitation through 10 different preloaded temperature zones, the Model 336
provides continuous measurement and control from 300 mK to 1505 K.
Control outputs 1 and 2 are variable DC current sources referenced to chassis ground.
Output 1 can provide 100 W of continuous power to a 25 ) load or 50 W to a 50 ) or
25 ) load. Output 2 provides 50 W to 25 ) or 50 ) heater loads. Outputs 3 and 4 are
variable DC voltage source outputs providing two ±10 V analog outputs. When not in
use to extend the temperature controller heater power, these outputs can function as
manually controlled voltage sources.
Temperature limit settings for inputs are provided as a safeguard against system
damage. Each input is assigned a temperature limit, and if any input exceeds that
limit, all control channels are automatically disabled.
1.1.3 Interface
The Model 336 is standard equipped with Ethernet, universal serial bus (USB) and
parallel (IEEE-488) interfaces. In addition to gathering data, nearly every function of
the instrument can be controlled through a computer interface. You can download
the Lake Shore curve handler software to your computer to easily enter and manipulate sensor calibration curves for storage in the instrument’s non-volatile memory.
Ethernet provides the ability to access and monitor instrument activities via the
internet from anywhere in the world. The USB interface emulates an RS-232 serial
port at a fixed 57,600 baud rate, but with the physical plug-ins of a USB. It also allows
you to download firmware upgrades, ensuring the most current firmware version is
loaded into your instrument without having to physically change anything.
Each sensor input has a high and low alarm that offer latching and non-latching operation. The 2 relays can be used in conjunction with the alarms to alert you of a fault
condition and perform simple on/off control. Relays can be assigned to any alarm or
operated manually.
The ±10 V analog voltage outputs on outputs 3 and 4 can be configured to send a voltage proportional to temperature to a strip chart recorder or data acquisition system.
You may select the scale and data sent to the output, including temperature or
sensor units.
bSensor input connectors
cTerminal block
dEthernetinterface
e USB interface
FIGURE 1-2
f IEEE-488 interface
g Line input assembly
h Output 2 heater
i Output 1 heater
j Thermocouple
option inputs
Model 336 rear panel
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cHAPTER 1: Introduction
The Model 336 offers a bright, graphic liquid crystal display with an LED backlight
that simultaneously displays up to 8 readings. You can show all 4 loops, or if you need
to monitor 1 input, you can display just that one in greater detail. Or you can custom
configure each display location to suit your experiment. Data from any input can be
assigned to any of the locations, and your choice of temperature or sensor units can
be displayed. For added convenience, you can also custom label each sensor input,
eliminating the guesswork in remembering or determining the location to which a
sensor input is associated.
1.1.4 Configurable
Display
FIGURE 1-3
Displays showing four loop mode, input display mode and custom display mode
1.1.5 Model 3060
Thermocouple Input
Option
The field installable Model 3060 thermocouple input option adds thermocouple
functionality to inputs C and D. While the option can be easily removed, this is not
necessary as the standard inputs remain fully functional when they are not being
used to measure thermocouple temperature sensors. Calibration for the option is
stored on the card so it can be installed in the field and used with multiple Model 336
temperature controllers without recalibration.
1.2 Sensor
Selection
Silicon diodes are the best choice for general cryogenic use from 1.4 K to above room
temperature. Diodes are economical to use because they follow a standard curve and
are interchangeable in many applications. They are not suitable for use in ionizing
radiation or magnetic fields.
Cernox™ thin-film RTDs offer high sensitivity and low magnetic field-induced errors
over the 0.3 K to 420 K temperature range. Cernox sensors require calibration.
Platinum RTDs offer high uniform sensitivity from 30 K to over 800 K. With excellent
reproducibility, they are useful as thermometry standards. They follow a standard
curveabove 70 K and are interchangeable in many applications.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
1.2 Sensor Selection
Diodes
Positive Temperature
Coefficient RTDs
Negative
Temperature
Coefficient RTDs
Thermocouples
3060-F
Model
Useful Range
Magnetic Field Use
Silicon Diode
DT-670-SD
1.4 K to 500 K
T # 60 K & B " 3 T
Silicon Diode
DT-670E-BR
30 K to 500 K
T# 60 K & B " 3 T
Silicon Diode
DT-414
1.4 K to 375 K
T # 60 K & B " 3 T
Silicon Diode
DT-421
1.4 K to 325 K
T # 60 K & B " 3 T
Silicon Diode
DT-470-SD
1.4 K to 500 K
T # 60 K & B " 3 T
Silicon Diode
DT-471-SD
10 K to 500 K
T # 60 K & B " 3 T
GaAlAs Diode
TG-120-P
1.4 K to 325 K
T > 4.2 K & B " 5 T
GaAlAs Diode
TG-120-PL
1.4 K to 325 K
T > 4.2 K & B " 5 T
GaAlAs Diode
TG-120-SD
1.4 K to 500 K
T > 4.2 K & B " 5 T
100 ) Platinum
PT-102/3
14 K to 873 K
T > 40 K & B " 2.5 T
100 ) Platinum
PT-111
14 K to 673 K
T > 40 K & B " 2.5 T
Rhodium-Iron
RF-800-4
1.4 K to 500 K
T > 77 K & B " 8 T
Rhodium-Iron
RF-100T/U
1.4 K to 325 K
T > 77 K & B " 8 T
Cernox™
CX-1010
0.3 K to 325 K1
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Cernox™
CX-1030-HT
0.3 K to 420 K1, 3
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Cernox™
CX-1050-HT
1.4 K to 420 K1
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Cernox™
CX-1070-HT
4 K to 420 K1
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Cernox™
CX-1080-HT
20 K to 420 K1
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Germanium
GR-200A-100
0.3 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Germanium
GR-200A-250
0.5 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Germanium
GR-200A/B-500
1.4 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Germanium
GR-200A/B-1000
1.4 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Germanium
GR-200A/B-1500
1.4 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Germanium
GR-200A/B-2500
1.4 K to 100 K
Not recommended
Carbon-Glass
CGR-1-500
1.4 K to 325 K
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Carbon-Glass
CGR-1-1000
1.7 K to 325 K2
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Carbon-Glass
CGR-1-2000
2 K to 325 K2
T > 2 K & B " 19 T
Rox™
RX-102
0.3 K to 40 K3
T > 2 K & B " 10 T
Rox™
RX-103
1.4 K to 40 K
T > 2 K & B " 10 T
Rox™
RX-202
0.3 K to 40 K3
T > 2 K & B " 10 T
Type K
9006-006
3.2 K to 1505 K
Not recommended
Type E
9006-004
3.2 K to 934 K
Not recommended
Chromel-AuFe 0.07%
9006-002
1.2 K to 610 K
Not recommended
5
1 Non-HT version maximum temperature: 325 K
2 Low temperature limited by input resistance range
3 Low temperature specified with self-heating error: " 5 mK
TABLE 1-1 Sensor temperature range
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6
cHAPTER 1: Introduction
Temperature
Electronic
Accuracy
Electronic
Control
including
Accuracy:
Stability5:
Electronic
Temperature
Temperature
Accuracy,
Equivalents
Equivalents
CalCurve and
Calibrated Sensor
Example
Lake Shore
Sensor
Temperature
Nominal
Resistance/
Voltage
Typical
Sensor
Sensitivity4
Measurement
Resolution:
Temperature
Equivalents
Silicon Diode
DT-670-CO-13
with 1.4H
calibration
1.4 K
77 K
300 K
500 K
1.664 V
1.028 V
0.5597 V
0.0907 V
-12.49 mV/K
-1.73 mV/K
-2.3 mV/K
-2.12 mV/K
0.8 mK
5.8 mK
4.4 mK
4.8 mK
±13 mK
±76 mK
±47 mK
±40 mK
±25 mK
±98 mK
±79 mK
±90 mK
±1.6 mK
±11.6 mK
±8.8 mK
±9.6 mK
Silicon Diode
DT-470-SD-13
with 1.4H
calibration
1.4 K
77 K
300 K
475 K
1.6981 V
1.0203 V
0.5189 V
0.0906 V
-13.1 mV/K
-1.92 mV/K
-2.4 mV/K
-2.22 mV/K
0.8 mK
5.2 mK
4.2 mK
4.5 mK
±13 mK
±69 mK
±45 mK
±38 mK
±25 mK
±91 mK
±77 mK
±88 mK
±1.6 mK
±10.4 mK
±8.4 mK
±9 mK
GaAlAs Diode
TG-120-SD
with 1.4H
calibration
1.4 K
77 K
300 K
475 K
5.391 V
1.422 V
0.8978 V
0.3778 V
-97.5 mV/K
-1.24 mV/K
-2.85 mV/K
-3.15 mV/K
0.2 mK
16 mK
7 mK
6.3 mK
±7 mK
±180 mK
±60 mK
±38 mK
±19 mK
±202 mK
±92 mK
±88 mK
±0.4 mK
±32 mK
±14 mK
±13 mK
100 ) Platinum RTD
500 ) Full Scale
PT-103 with 14J
calibration
30 K
77 K
300 K
500 K
3.660 )
20.38 )
110.35 )
185.668 )
0.191 )/K
0.423 )/K
0.387 )/K
0.378 )/K
5.3 mK
2.4 mK
2.6 mK
2.7 mK
±13 mK
±10 mK
±39 mK
±60 mK
±23 mK
±22 mK
±62 mK
±106 mK
±10.6 mK
±4.8 mK
±5.2 mK
±5.4 mK
Cernox™
CX-1010-SD
with 0.3L
calibration
0.3 K
0.5 K
4.2 K
300 K
2322.4 )
1248.2 )
277.32 )
30.392 )
-10785 )/K
-2665.2 )/K
-32.209 )/K
-0.0654 )/K
6 µK
17 µK
62 µK
16 mK
±0.1 mK
±0.2 mK
±3.8 mK
±339 mK
±3.6 mK
±4.7 mK
±8.8 mK
±414 mK
±12 µK
±34 µK
±124 µK
±32 mK
Cernox™
CX-1050-SD-HT6
with 1.4M
calibration
1.4 K
4.2 K
77 K
420 K
26566 )
3507.2 )
205.67 )
45.03)
-48449 )/K
-1120.8 )/K
-2.4116 )/K
-0.0829 )/K
15 µK
152 µK
830 µK
12 mK
±0.3 mK
±2.1 mK
±38 mK
±338 mK
±5.3 mK
±7.1 mK
±54 mK
±403 mK
±30 µK
±304 µK
±1.6 mK
±24 mK
Germanium
GR-200A-250
with 0.5D
calibration
0.5 K
1.4 K
4.2 K
100 K
29570 )
1376 )
198.9 )
2.969 )
-221000 )/K
-2220 )/K
-68.9 )/K
-0.025 )/K
4 µK
22 µK
29 µK
8 mK
±0.1 mK
±0.3 mK
±1.3 mK
±151 mK
±4.4 mK
±4.3 mK
±5.3 mK
±167mK
±8 µK
±44 µK
±58 µK
±16 mK
Germanium
GR-200A-500
with 0.5D
calibration
1.4 K
4.2 K
10 K
100 K
8257 )
520 )
88.41 )
1.751 )
-19400 )/K
-245 )/K
-19.5)/K
-0.014 )/K
14 µK
84 µK
52 µK
15 mK
±0.3 mK
±1.3 mK
±2.3 mK
±218 mK
±4.3 mK
±5.3 mK
±7.3 mK
±234 mK
±28 µK
±168 µK
±104 µK
±30 mK
Carbon-Glass
CGR-1-500
with 1.4L
calibration
1.4 K
4.2 K
77 K
300 K
103900 )
584.6 )
14.33 )
8.55 )
-520000 )/K
-422.3 )/K
-0.098 )/K
-0.0094 )/K
12 µK
52 µK
2 mK
22 mK
±0.1 mK
±0.8 mK
±108 mK
±760 mK
±4.1 mK
±4.8 mK
±133 mK
±865 mK
±24 µK
±104 µK
±4 mK
±44 mK
Rox™
RX-102A-AA
with 0.3B
calibration
0.5 K
1.4 K
4.2 K
40 K
3701 )
2005 )
1370 )
1049 )
-5478 )/K
-667 )/K
-80.3 )/K
-1.06 )/K
32 µK
90 µK
590 µK
39 mK
±0.5 mK
±1.4 mK
±8 mK
±500 mK
±5 mK
±6.4 mK
±24 mK
±537 K
±64 µK
±180 µK
±1.2 mK
±78 mK
Type K
75 K
300 K
600 K
1505 K
-5862.9 µV
1075.3 µV
13325 µV
49998.3 µV
15.6 µV/K
40.6 µV/K
41.7 µV/K
36.006 µV/K
26 mK
10 mK
10 mK
12 mK
±0.25 K7
±0.038 K7
±0.184 K7
±0.73 K7
Calibration not
available from
Lake Shore
±52 mK
±20 mK
±20 mK
±24 mK
Thermocouple
50 mV
3060-F
4 Typical sensor sensitivities were taken from representative calibrations for the sensor listed
5 Control stability of the electronics only, in an ideal thermal system
6 Non-HT version maximum temperature: 325 K
7 Accuracy specification does not include errors from room temperature compensation
TABLE 1-2 Typical sensor performance
Model 336 Temperature Controller
1.3 Model 336 Specifications
7
1.3 Model 336
Specifications
1.3.1 Input
Specifications
Diode
PTC RTD
NTC RTD
10 mV
Thermocouple
Sensor
Temperature
Coefficient
Input Range
Excitation
Current
Display
Resolution
Measurement
Resolution
Electronic
Accuracy
(at 25 °C)
Measurement Temperature
Coefficient
Electronic
Stability8
Negative
0 V to 2.5 V
10 µA ±0.05%9,10
100 µV
10 µV
±80 µV ±0.005%
of rdg
(10 µV + 0.0005% of rdg)/°C
±20 µV
Negative
0 V to 10 V
10 µA ±0.05%9,10
100 µV
20 µV
±80 µV ±0.01%
of rdg
(20 µV + 0.0005% of rdg)/°C
±40 µV
Positive
0 ) to 10 )
1 mA11
0.1 m)
0.2 m)
±0.002 )
±0.01% of rdg
(0.01 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±0.2 m)
0 ) to 30 )
1 mA11
0.1 m)
0.2 m)
±0.002 )
±0.01% of rdg
(0.03 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±0.4 m)
0 ) to 100 )
1 mA11
1 m)
2 m)
±0.004 )
±0.01% of rdg
(0.1 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±4 m)
0 ) to 300 )
1 mA11
1 m)
2 m)
±0.004 )
±0.01% of rdg
(0.3 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±4 m)
0 ) to 1 k)
1 mA11
10 m)
20 m)
±0.04 )
±0.02% of rdg
(1 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±40 m)
0 ) to 3 k)
1 mA11
10 m)
20 m)
±0.04 )
±0.02% of rdg
(3 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±40 m)
0 ) to 10 k)
1 mA11
100 m)
200 m)
±0.4 )
±0.02% of rdg
(10 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±40 m)
0 ) to 10 )
1 mA11
0.1 m)
0.2 m)
±0.002) ±0.06% (0.01 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
of rdg
±0.4 m)
0 ) to 30 )
300 µA11
0.1 m)
0.2 m)
±0.002 ) ±0.06% (0.03 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
of rdg
±0.4 m)
0 ) to 100 )
100 µA11
1 m)
1 m)
0 ) to 300 )
30µA11
1 m)
2 m)
0 ) to 1 k)
10 µA11
10 m)
10 m) +0.002%
of rdg
±0.1 ) ±0.04%
of rdg
(1 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±20 m) ±0.004%
of rdg
0 ) to 3 k)
3 µA11
10 m)
20 m) +0.002%
of rdg
±0.1 ) ±0.04%
of rdg
(3 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±40 m) ±0.004%
of rdg
0 ) to 10 k)
1 µA11
100 m)
100 m) +0.002%
of rdg
±1.0 ) ±0.04%
of rdg
(10 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±200 m)
±0.004% of rdg
0 ) to 30 k)
300 nA11
100 m)
200 m) +0.002%
of rdg
±2.0 ) ±0.04%
of rdg
(30 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±400 m)
±0.004% of rdg
0) to 100 k)
100 nA11
1)
1) +0.005% of rdg ±10.0 ) ±0.04% (100 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
of rdg
±2 ) ±0.01% of
rdg
±50 mV
NA
0.1 µV
Negative
Positive
0.4µV
±0.01 ) ±0.04%
of rdg
(0.1 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±2 m)
±0.01 ) ±0.04% of (0.3 m) + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
rdg
±4 m)
±1 µV ±0.05%
of rdg12
(0.1 µV + 0.001% of rdg)/°C
±0.8µV
8 Control stability of the electronics only, in ideal thermal system
9 Current source error has negligible effect on measurement accuracy
10 Diode input excitation can be set to 1 mA
11 Current source error is removed during calibration
12 Accuracy specification does not include errors from room temperature compensation
TABLE 1-3 Input specifications
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cHAPTER 1: Introduction
1.3.2 Sensor Input
Configuration
Diode/RTD
Thermocouple
4-lead differential
2-lead differential, room
temperature compensated
Constant current with
current reversal for RTDs
NA
Diodes: Silicon, GaAlAs
RTDs: 100 ) Platinum, Germanium,
Carbon-Glass, Cernox™, and Rox™
Most thermocouple types
Standard curves
DT-470, DT-670, DT-500-D, DT-500-E1,
PT-100, PT-1000, RX-102A, RX-202A
Type E, Type K, Type T, AuFe
0.07% vs. Cr, AuFe 0.03% vs. CR
Input connector
6-pin DIN
Screw terminals in a ceramic
isothermal block
Measurement
type
Excitation
Supported sensors
TABLE 1-4 Sensor input configuration
1.3.3 Thermometry
1.3.4 Control
Number of inputs
4
Input configuration
Inputs can be configured from the front panel to accept any of the supported
input types. Thermocouple inputs require an optional input card that can be
installed in the field. Once installed, the thermocouple input can be selected from
the front panel like any other input type.
Isolation
Sensor inputs optically isolated from other circuits but not each other
A/D resolution
24-bit
Input accuracy
Sensor dependent, refer to Input Specifications table
Measurement resolution
Sensor dependent, refer to Input Specifications table
Maximum update rate
10 rdg/s on each input, 5 rdg/s when configured as 100 k) NTC RTD
with reversal on
Autorange
Automatically selects appropriate NTC RTD or PTC RTD range
User curves
Room for 39 200-point CalCurves™ or user curves
SoftCal™
Improves accuracy of DT-470 diode to ±0.25 K from 30 K to 375 K; improves
accuracy of platinum RTDs to ±0.25 K from 70 K to 325 K; stored as user curves
Math
Maximum and minimum
Filter
Averages 2 to 64 input readings
There are 4 control outputs.
1.3.4.1 Heater Outputs (Outputs 1 and 2)
Control type
Closed loop digital PID with manual heater output or open loop
Update rate
10/s
Tuning
Autotune (one loop at a time), PID, PID zones
Control stability
Sensor dependent, see Input Specifications table
PID control settings
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Proportional (gain)
0 to 1000 with 0.1 setting resolution
Integral (reset)
1 to 1000 (1000/s) with 0.1 setting resolution
Derivative (rate)
1 to 200% with 1% resolution
Manual output
0 to 100% with 0.01% setting resolution
Zone control
10 temperature zones with P, I, D, manual heater out,
heater range, control channel, ramp rate
Setpoint rampin
0.1 K/min to 100 K/min
1.3.4 Control
25 ) setting
Type
50 ) setting
Variable DC current source
D/A resolution
16-bit
Max power
100 W
Max current
2A
1A
Compliance voltage
50 V
50 V
Heater load for max power
25 )
50 W
50 )
Heater load range
10 ) to 100 )
Ranges
3 (decade steps in power)
Heater noise
0.12 µA RMS (dominated by line frequency and its harmonics)
Grounding
Output referenced to chassis ground
Heater connector
Safety limits
9
Dual banana
Curve temperature, power up heater off, short circuit protection
TABLE 1-5 Output 1
25 ) setting
Type
50 ) setting
Variable DC current source
D/A resolution
16-bit
Max power
50 W
Max current
1.41 A
1A
Compliance voltage
35.4 V
50 V
Heater load for max power
25 )
50 W
50 )
Heater load range
10 ) to 100 )
Ranges
3 (decade steps in power)
Heater noise
0.12 µA RMS (dominated by line frequency and its harmonics)
Grounding
Output referenced to chassis ground
Heater connector
Safety limits
Dual banana
Curve temperature, power up heater off, short circuit protection
TABLE 1-6 Output 2
1.3.4.2 Unpowered Analog Outputs (Outputs 3 and 4)
Control type
Warm up heater mode, manual output, or monitor out
Warm up heater mode settings
Warm up percentage
0 to 100% with 1% resolution
Warm up mode
Continuous control or auto-off
Monitor Out settings
Scale
User selected
Data source
Temperature or sensor units
Settings
Input, source, top of scale, bottom of scale or manual
Type
Variable DC voltage source
Update rate
10/s
Range
±10 V
Resolution
16-bit, 0.3 mV
Accuracy
±2.5 mV
Noise
0.3 mV RMS
Minimum load resistance
1 k) (short-circuit protected)
Connector
Detachable terminal block
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10
cHAPTER 1: Introduction
1.3.5 Front Panel
Display
8-line by 40-character (240 × 64 pixel) graphic LCD display module with
LED backlight
Number of reading displays
1 to 8
Display units
K, °C, V, mV, )
Reading source
Temperature, sensor units, max, and min
Display update rate
2 rdg/s
Temperature display resolution 0.0001° from 0° to 99.9999°, 0.001° from 100° to 999.999°,
0.01° above 1000°
Sensor units display resolution
Sensor dependent, to 6 digits
Other displays
Input name, setpoint, heater range, heater output, and PID
Setpoint setting resolution
Same as display resolution (actual resolution is sensor dependent)
Heater output display
Numeric display in percent of full scale for power or current
Heater output resolution
0.01%
Display annunciators
Control input, alarm, tuning
LED annunciators
Remote, Ethernet status, alarm, control outputs
Keypad
27-key silicone elastomer keypad
Front panel features
Front panel curve entry, display contrast control, and keypad lock-out
1.3.6 Interface
IEEE-488.2
Capabilities
SH1, AH1, T5, L4, SR1, RL1, PP0, DC1, DT0, C0, E1
Reading rate
To 10 rdg/s on each input
Software support
LabVIEW™ driver (contact Lake Shore for availability)
USB
Function
Emulates a standard RS-232 serial port
Baud Rate
57,600
Connector
B-type USB connector
Reading rate
To 10 rdg/s on each input
Software support
LabVIEW™ driver (contact Lake Shore for availability)
Ethernet
Function
TCP/IP web interface, curve handler
Connector
RJ-45
Reading rate
To 10 rdg/s on each input
Software support
LabVIEW™ driver (contact Lake Shore for availability)
Alarms
Number
4, high and low for each input
Data source
Temperature or sensor units
Settings
Source, high setpoint, low setpoint, deadband, latching or
non-latching, audible on/off, and visible on/off
Actuators
Display annunciator, beeper, and relays
Relays
Number
2
Contacts
Normally open (NO), normally closed (NC), and common (C)
Contact rating
30 VDC at 3 A
Operation
Activate relays on high, low, or both alarms for any input, or
manual mode
Connector
Detachable terminal block
1.3.7 General
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Ambient temperature
15 °C to 35 °C at rated accuracy;
5 °C to 40 °C at reduced accuracy
Power requirement
100, 120, 220, 240, VAC, ±10%, 50 or 60 Hz, 250 VA
Size
435 mm W × 89 mm H × 368 mm D
(17 in × 3.5 in × 14.5 in), full rack
Weight
7.6 kg (16.8 lb)
Approval
CE mark
1.4 Safety Summary and Symbols
1.4 Safety
Summary and
Symbols
11
Observe these general safety precautions during all phases of instrument operation,
service, and repair. Failure to comply with these precautions or with specific warnings elsewhere in this manual violates safety standards of design, manufacture, and
intended instrument use. Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. assumes no liability for Customer failure to comply with these requirements.
The Model 336 protects the operator and surrounding area from electric shock or
burn, mechanical hazards, excessive temperature, and spread of fire from the instrument. Environmental conditions outside of the conditions below may pose a hazard
to the operator and surrounding area.
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
Indoor use
Altitude to 2000 m
Temperature for safe operation: 5 °C to 40 °C
Maximum relative humidity: 80% for temperature up to 31 °C decreasing
linearly to 50% at 40 °C
Power supply voltage fluctuations not to exceed ±10% of the nominal voltage
Overvoltage category II
Pollution degree 2
Ground the Instrument
To minimize shock hazard, the instrument is equipped with a 3-conductor AC power
cable. Plug the power cable into an approved 3-contact electrical outlet or use a
3-contact adapter with the grounding wire (green) firmly connected to an electrical
ground (safety ground) at the power outlet. The power jack and mating plug of the
power cable meet Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and International Electrotechnical
Commission (IEC) safety standards.
Ventilation
The instrument has ventilation holes in its side covers. Do not block these holes when
the instrument is operating.
Do Not Operate in an Explosive Atmosphere
Do not operate the instrument in the presence of flammable gases or fumes. Operation of any electrical instrument in such an environment constitutes a definite safety
hazard.
Keep Away from Live Circuits
Operating personnel must not remove instrument covers. Refer component replacement and internal adjustments to qualified maintenance personnel. Do not replace
components with power cable connected. To avoid injuries, always disconnect power
and discharge circuits before touching them.
Do Not Substitute Parts or Modify Instrument
Do not install substitute parts or perform any unauthorized modification to the
instrument. Return the instrument to an authorized Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. representative for service and repair to ensure that safety features are maintained.
Cleaning
Do not submerge instrument. Clean only with a damp cloth and mild detergent. Exterior only.
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12
Equipment protected throughout
by double insulation or reinforces
insulation (equivalent to Class II of
IEC 536—see Annex H)
Direct current (power line)
Alternating current (power line)
Alternating or direct current (power line)
3
CAUTION: High voltages; danger of
electric shock; background color:
yellow; symbol and outline: black
Three-phase alternating current (power line)
Earth (ground) terminal
!
Protective conductor terminal
Frame or chassis terminal
On (supply)
Off (supply)
FIGURE 1-4
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Safety symbols
CAUTION or WARNING: See
instrument documentation;
background color: yellow;
symbol and outline: black
2.2.1 Temperature Range
13
Chapter 2: Cooling System Design
and Temperature Control
2.1 General
Selecting the proper cryostat or cooling source is probably the most important decision in designing a temperature control system. The cooling source defines minimum
temperature, cool-down time, and cooling power. Information on choosing a cooling
source is beyond the scope of this manual. This chapter provides information on how
to get the best temperature measurement and control from cooling sources with
proper setup including sensor and heater installation.
2.2 Temperature
Sensor Selection
This section attempts to answer some of the basic questions concerning temperature
sensor selection. Additional useful information on temperature sensor selection is
available in the Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and Control Catalog. The catalog has a large reference section that includes sensor characteristics and sensor
selection criteria.
2.2.1 Temperature
Range
You must consider several important sensor parameters when choosing a sensor. The
first is experimental temperature range. Some sensors can be damaged by temperatures that are either too high or too low. Manufacturer recommendations should
always be followed.
Sensor sensitivity changes with temperature and can limit the useful range of a sensor. It is important not to specify a range larger than necessary. If you perform an
experiment at liquid helium temperature, a very high sensitivity is needed for good
measurement resolution at that temperature. That same resolution may not be
required to monitor warm up to room temperature. Two different sensors may be
required to tightly cover the range from base temperature to room temperature, but
lowering the resolution requirement on warm up may allow a less expensive,
1 sensor solution.
Another thing to consider when choosing a temperature sensor is that instruments
like the Model 336 are not able to read some sensors over their entire temperature
range. Lake Shore sells calibrated sensors that operate down to 20 millikelvin (mK),
but the Model 336 is limited to above 300 mK in its standard configuration.
2.2.2 Sensor Sensitivity
Temperature sensor sensitivity is a measure of how much a sensor signal changes
when the temperature changes. It is an important sensor characteristic because so
many measurement parameters are related to it. Resolution, accuracy, noise floor,
and even control stability depend on sensitivity. Many sensors have different sensitivities at different temperatures. For example, a platinum sensor has good sensitivity at
higher temperatures, but it has limited use below 30 K because its sensitivity drops
sharply. It is difficult to determine if a sensor has adequate sensitivity over the experimental temperature range. This manual has specifications (section 1.3) that include
sensor sensitivity translated into temperature resolution and accuracy at different
points. This is typical sensor response and can be used as a guide when choosing a
sensor to be used with the Model 336.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
2.2.3 Environmental
Conditions
The experimental environment is also important when choosing a sensor. Environmental factors such as high vacuum, magnetic field, corrosive chemicals, or even
radiation can limit the use of some types of sensors. Lake Shore has devoted much
time to developing sensor packages that withstand the temperatures, vacuum levels,
and bonding materials found in typical cryogenic cooling systems.
Experiments done in magnetic fields are very common. Field dependence of temperature sensors is an important selection criteria for sensors used in these experiments.
This manual briefly qualifies the field dependence of most common sensors in the
specifications (section 1.3). Detailed field dependence tables are included in the
Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and Control Catalog. When available, specific
data on other environmental factors is also included in the catalog.
2.2.4 Measurement
Accuracy
Temperature measurements have several sources of uncertainty that reduce accuracy. Be sure to account for errors induced by both the sensor and the instrumentation when computing accuracy. The instrument has measurement error in reading
the sensor signal, and error in calculating a temperature using a temperature
response curve. Error results when the sensor is compared to a calibration standard
and the temperature response of a sensor will shift with time and with repeated thermal cycling (from very cold temperatures to room temperature). Instrument and sensor manufacturers specify these errors, but there are things you can do to maintain
good accuracy. For example, choose a sensor that has good sensitivity in the most
critical temperature range, as sensitivity can minimize the effect of most error
sources. Install the sensor properly following guidelines in section 2.4. Calibrate the
sensor and instrument periodically, or in some other way null the time dependent
errors. Use a sensor calibration that is appropriate for the accuracy requirement.
2.2.5 Sensor Package
There are different packages for the various types of sensors. Some types of sensors
can even be purchased as bare chips without any package. A sensor package generally
determines its size, thermal and electrical contact to the outside, and sometimes limits temperature range. When different packages are available for a sensor, you should
consider the mounting surface for the sensor and how the leads will be thermally
anchored when choosing.
2.3 Sensor
Calibrations
It can sometimes be confusing to choose the right sensor, get it calibrated, translate
the calibration data into a temperature response curve that the Model 336 can
understand, and then load the curve into the instrument. Lake Shore provides a variety of calibration services to fit different accuracy requirements and budgets.
Best
Precision calibration
All sensors can be calibrated over various temperature ranges.
Lake Shore has defined calibration ranges available
for each sensor type.
Better
SoftCal™
An abbreviated calibration (2-point: 77 K and 305 K; 3-point: 4.2 K,
77 K, and 305 K; or 3-point: 77 K, 305 K, and 480 K), which is available for 400 Series silicon diodes and platinum sensors
Good
Sensors using standard curves
Silicon diodes follow standard curves
Platinum resistors follow standard curves
Ruthenium oxide (Rox™) resistors follow standard curves
Thermocouples follow standard curves
GaAlAs diode, carbon-glass, Cernox™, germanium, and rhodiumiron sensors can be purchased uncalibrated, but must be calibrated
to accurately read in temperature units
TABLE 2-1 Sensor diode sensor calibrations
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.3.1 Precision Calibration
2.3.1 Precision
Calibration
15
To calibrate, Lake Shore compares a sensor with an unknown temperature response
to an accepted standard. Lake Shore temperature standards are traceable to the
U.S. National Institute of Standards and Testing (NIST) or the National Physical Laboratory in Great Britain. These standards allow Lake Shore to calibrate sensors from
20 mK to above room temperature. Calibrated sensors are more expensive than
uncalibrated sensors of the same type because of the labor, cryogen use, and capitol
equipment used in the process.
Precision calibration provides the most accurate temperature sensors available from
Lake Shore. Uncertainty from sensor calibration is almost always smaller than the
error contributed by the Model 336. The Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and
Control Catalog has complete accuracy specifications for calibrated sensors.
Calibrated sensors include the measured test data printed and plotted, the coefficients of a Chebychev polynomial that have been fitted to the data, and two tables of
data points to be used as interpolation tables. Both interpolation tables are optimized to allow accurate temperature conversion. The smaller table, called a breakpoint interpolation table, is sized to fit into instruments like the Model 336 where it is
called a temperature response curve.
It is important to look at instrument specifications before ordering calibrated sensors. A calibrated sensor is required when a sensor does not follow a standard curve if
you wish to display in temperature. Otherwise the Model 336 will operate in sensor
units like ohms or volts. The Model 336 may not work over the full temperature range
of some sensors. The standard inputs in are limited to operation above 300 mK even
with sensors that can be calibrated to 20 mK.
2.3.2 SoftCal™
SoftCal™ is a good solution for applications that do not require the accuracy of a precision calibration. The SoftCal™ algorithm uses the well-behaved nature of sensors
that follow a standard curve to improve the accuracy of individual sensors. A few
known temperature points are required to perform SoftCal™. The Model 336 can also
perform a SoftCal™ calibration. You need to provide one, two, or three known temperature reference points. The range and accuracy of the calibration is based on these
points (section 5.9).
Lake Shore offers two or three point SoftCal™ calibrated sensors that include both
the large interpolation table and the smaller breakpoint interpolation table for 400
series diode and Platinum sensors.
2.3.3 Sensors Using
Standard Curves
Some types of sensors behave in a very predictable manner and a standard temperature response curve can be created for them. Standard curves are a convenient and
inexpensive way to get reasonable temperature accuracy. Sensors that have a standard curve are often used when interchangeability is important. Some individual sensors are selected for their ability to match a published standard curve, but in general
these sensors do not provide the accuracy of a calibrated sensor. For convenience, the
Model 336 has several standard curves included in firmware.
2.3.4 Curve Handler™
Lake Shore provides a software application, called Curve Handler™, which makes
loading temperature curves into the Model 336 a very simple process. The program
can copy curves from properly formatted files into the Model 336 user curve locations. You can also use it to read curves from the Model 336 and save them to files.
Lake Shore calibrated sensors are provided with a CD containing all the proper formats to load curves using the Curve Handler™ software program.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
There are two versions of the Curve Handler™ application. The fully featured version
is a 32-bit Microsoft Windows™ application that must be installed on a Windows™
PC. This version works with the IEEE-488 and USB computer interfaces on the
Model 336, and allows you to manipulate the temperature curves directly in the program window. This version will also work with all existing Lake Shore temperature
controller and temperature monitor instruments. The Windows™ version of the
Curve Handler™ application is available, free of charge, from the Lake Shore website
at www.lakeshore.com.
The second version of Curve Handler™ is written in the Java™ programming language
and is available through the Ethernet web interface on the Model 336. This version
allows you to copy curves from files to the Model 336, and vice versa, but it does not
allow manipulation of curve data and only works using the Ethernet interface. Refer
to section 6.4.4 for details on connecting to the web interface and opening the
embedded Curve Handler™ application.
2.4 Sensor
Installation
This section highlights some of the important elements of proper sensor installation.
For more detailed information, Lake Shore sensors are shipped with installation
instructions that cover that specific sensor type and package. The Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and Control Catalog includes an installation section as well. To
further help you properly install sensors, Lake Shore offers a line of cryogenic accessories. Many of the materials discussed are available through Lake Shore and can be
ordered with sensors or instruments.
2.4.1 Mounting
Materials
Choosing appropriate mounting materials is very important in a cryogenic environment. The high vacuum used to insulate cryostats is one consideration. Materials
used in these applications should have a low vapor pressure so they do not evaporate
or out-gas and spoil the vacuum insulation. Metals and ceramics do not have this
problem, but greases and varnishes must be checked. Another consideration is the
wide extremes in temperature most sensors are exposed to. The linear expansion
coefficient of materials becomes important when temperature changes are large.
Never try to permanently bond materials with linear expansion coefficients that differ by more than three. Use a flexible mounting scheme or the parts will break apart,
potentially damaging them. The thermal expansion or contraction of rigid clamps or
holders could crush fragile samples or sensors that do not have the same coefficient.
Thermal conductivity is a property of materials that can change with temperature. Do
not assume that a thermal anchor grease that works well at room temperature and
above will do the same job at low temperatures.
2.4.2 Sensor Location
Finding a good place to mount a sensor in an already crowded cryostat is never easy.
There are fewer problems if the entire load and sample holder are at the same temperature. Unfortunately, this not the case in many systems. Temperature gradients
(differences in temperature) exist because there is seldom perfect balance between
the cooling source and heat sources. Even in a well-controlled system, unwanted heat
sources like thermal radiation and heat conducting through mounting structures can
cause gradients. For best accuracy, position sensors near the sample, so that little or
no heat flows between the sample and sensor. This may not, however, be the best
location for temperature control as discussed below.
2.4.3 Thermal
Conductivity
The ability of heat to flow through a material is called thermal conductivity. Good
thermal conductivity is important in any part of a cryogenic system that is intended
to be the same temperature. Copper and aluminum are examples of metals that have
good thermal conductivity, while stainless steel does not. Non-metallic, electricallyinsulating materials like alumina oxide and similar ceramics have good thermal con-
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.4.4 Contact Area
17
ductivity, while G-10 epoxy-impregnated fiberglass does not. Sensor packages, cooling loads, and sample holders should have good thermal conductivity to reduce
temperature gradients. Surprisingly, the connections between thermally conductive
mounting surfaces often have very poor thermal conductivity (refer to section 2.4.4
and section 2.4.5).
2.4.4 Contact Area
Thermal contact area greatly affects thermal conduction because a larger area has
more opportunity to transfer heat. Even when the size of a sensor package is fixed,
thermal contact area can be improved with the use of a gasket material like indium
foil and cryogenic grease. A soft gasket material forms into the rough mating surface
to increase the area of the two surfaces that are in contact. Good gasket materials are
soft, thin, and have good thermal conductivity. They must also withstand the environmental extremes. Indium foil and cryogenic grease are good examples.
2.4.5 Contact Pressure
When sensors are permanently mounted, the solder or epoxy used to hold the sensor
act as both gasket and adhesive. Permanent mounting is not a good solution for
everyone because it limits flexibility and can potentially damage sensors. Much care
should be taken not to over heat or mechanically stress sensor packages. Less permanent mountings require some pressure to hold the sensor to its mounting surface.
Pressure greatly improves the action of gasket material to increase thermal conductivity and reduce thermal gradients. A spring clamp is recommended so that different
rates of thermal expansion do not increase or decrease pressure with temperature
change.
2.4.6 Lead Wire
Different types of sensors come with different types and lengths of electrical leads. In
general a significant length of lead wire must be added to the sensor for proper thermal anchoring and connecting to a bulk head connector at the vacuum boundary. The
lead wire must be a good electrical conductor, but should not be a good thermal conductor, or heat will transfer down the leads and change the temperature reading of
the sensor. Small 30 AWG to 40 AWG wire made of an alloy like phosphor bronze is
much better than copper wire. Thin wire insulation is preferred, and twisted wire
should be used to reduce the effect of RF noise if it is present. The wire used on the
room temperature side of the vacuum boundary is not critical, so copper cable is
normally used.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
To room
temperature
Vacuum shroud
Refrigerator
first stage
Vacuum space
Radiation shield
Dental floss
tie-down
-or-
Thermal anchor
Cryogenic
tape
(bobbin)
Thermal anchor
(bobbin)
Cryogenic wire
(small diameter, large AWG)
Sensor
Second stage and
sample holder
Heater
(wiring not shown
for clarity)
Drawing not to scale
Optical window
(if required)
FIGURE 2-1 Typical sensor installation in a mechanical refrigerator
2.4.7 Lead Soldering
When you solder additional wire to short sensor leads, be careful not to overheat the
sensor. A thermal anchor such as a metal wire clamp or alligator clip will anchor the
leads and protect the sensor. Leads should be tinned before bonding to reduce the
time that heat is applied to the sensor lead. Clean the solder flux after soldering to
prevent corrosion or outgassing in vacuum .
2.4.8 Thermal
Anchoring Leads
Sensor leads can be a significant source of error if they are not properly anchored.
Heat will transfer down even small leads and alter the sensor reading. The goal of
thermal anchoring is to cool the leads to a temperature as close to the sensor as possible. This can be accomplished by putting a significant length of lead wire in thermal
contact with every cooled surface between room temperature and the sensor. You
can adhere lead wires to cold surfaces with varnish over a thin electrical insulator like
cigarette paper. They can also be wound onto a bobbin that is firmly attached to the
cold surface. Some sensor packages include a thermal anchor bobbin and wrapped
lead wires to simplify thermal anchoring.
2.4.9 Thermal
Radiation
Thermal (black body) radiation is one of the ways heat is transferred. Warm surfaces
radiate heat to cold surfaces even through a vacuum. The difference in temperature
between the surfaces is one thing that determines how much heat is transferred.
Thermal radiation causes thermal gradients and reduces measurement accuracy.
Many cooling systems include a radiation shield. The purpose of the shield is to surround the sample stage, sample, and sensor with a surface that is at or near their temperature to minimize radiation. The shield is exposed to the room temperature
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.5.1 Heater Resistance and Power
19
surface of the vacuum shroud on its outer surface, so some cooling power must be
directed to the shield to keep it near the load temperature. If the cooling system does
not include an integrated radiation shield (or one cannot be easily made), one
alternative is to wrap several layers of super-insulation (aluminized mylar) loosely
between the vacuum shroud and load. This reduces radiation transfer to the
sample space.
2.5 Heater
Selection and
Installation
There is a variety of resistive heaters that can be used as the controlled heating source
for temperature control. The mostly metal alloys like nichrome are usually wire or foil.
Shapes and sizes vary to permit installation into different systems.
2.5.1 Heater Resistance
and Power
Cryogenic cooling systems have a wide range of cooling power. The resistive heater
must be able to provide sufficient heating power to warm the system. The Model 336
can provide up to 100 W of power from Output 1 and up to 50 W of power from
Output 2. TABLE 2-2 provides the current and voltage limits, as well as the resulting
maximum power for each output for the 25 ) and 50 ) settings, using nominal
heater load values.
25) setting (25 ) heater)
Output 1
Output 2
50 ) setting (50 ) heater)
Current limit
2A
1A
Voltage limit
50 V
50 V
50 W
Max power
100 W
Current limit
1.41 A
1A
Voltage limit
50 V
50 V
Max power
50 W
50 W
TABLE 2-2 Current and voltage limits with resulting max power
Even though the Model 336 heater outputs are current sources, they have a limit of
50 V (called the compliance voltage). This compliance voltage also limits maximum
power. So for heaters values other than 25 ) or 50 ), calculate the maximum power
using the following equations: P = I2R and P = V2/R, where P is maximum power, I is
max current, V is max voltage, and R is the heater resistance. The current and voltage
limits are in place at the same time, so the smaller of the two computations gives the
maximum power available to the heater.
Example 1: A 20 ) heater is connected to Output 1, and the heater resistance setting
is set to 25 ), which can provide up to 2 A of current, and up to 50 V.
Current Limit
P = I2R
P = (2 A)2 x (20 ))
P = 80 W
Voltage Limit:
P = V2/R
P = (50 V)2/(20 ))
P = 125 W
The power limit is the smaller of the two, or 80 W, limited by current.
Example 2: A 60 ) heater is connected to Output 2, and the heater resistance setting
is set to 50 ), which can provide up to 1 A of current, and up to 50 V.
Current Limit
P = I2R
P = (1 A)2 x (60 ))
P = 60 W
Voltage Limit:
P = V2/R
P = (50 V)2/(60 ))
P = 41.7 W
The power limit is the smaller of the two, or 41.7 W, limited by voltage.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
It is possible to choose a heater value that results in a maximum power greater than the
power rating of 50 W for output 2, but doing so can cause the Model 336 to work improperly. In this situation the max user current setting should be used to limit the power. Refer
to section 4.5.1.1.1 for details on using the max user current setting.
The resistor chosen as a heater must be able to withstand the power being dissipated
in it. Pre-packaged resistors have a power specification that is usually given for the
resistor in free air. This power may need to be derated if used in a vacuum where convection cooling cannot take place and it is not adequately anchored to a cooled surface. The Model 336 has a current limit feature which allows you to specify the
maximum output current for each heater output (section 4.5.1.1), which when set
appropriately will help protect the heater from being over heated.
2.5.2 Heater Location
For best temperature measurement accuracy, position the heater so that temperature gradients across the sample is minimized. For best control the heater should be
in close thermal contact with the cooling power. Geometry of the load can make one
or both of these difficult to achieve. That is why there are several heater shapes and
sizes.
2.5.3 Heater Types
Resistive wire like nichrome is the most flexible type of heater available. The wire can
be purchased with electrical insulation and has a predictable resistance per given
length. This type of heater wire can be wrapped around a load to give balanced, even
heating of the area. Similar to sensor lead wire, the entire length of the heater wire
should be in good thermal contact with the load to allow for thermal transfer. Thermal anchoring also protects the wire from over heating and burning out.
Resistive heater wire is also wound into cartridge heaters. Cartridge heaters are more
convenient, but are bulky and more difficult to place on small loads. A typical cartridge is 6.35 mm (0.25 in) in diameter and 25.4 mm (1 in) long. The cartridge should
be snugly held in a hole in the load or clamped to a flat surface. Thermal anchoring for
good thermal contact is again important.
Foil heaters are thin layers of resistive material adhered to, or screened onto, electrically insulating sheets. There are a variety of shapes and sizes. The proper size heater
can evenly heat a flat surface or around a round load. The entire active area should be
in good thermal contact with the load, not only for maximum heating effect, but to
keep spots in the heater from over heating and burning out.
2.5.4 Heater Wiring
Model 336 Temperature Controller
When wiring inside a vacuum shroud, we recommend using 30 AWG copper wire for
heater leads. Too much heat can transfer in when larger wire is used. Thermal anchoring, similar to that used for the sensor leads, should be included so that any heat
transfer does not warm the load when the heater is not running. The lead wires
should be twisted to minimize noise coupling between the heater and other leads in
the system. When wiring outside the vacuum shroud, you can use larger gage copper,
and twisting is still recommended.
2.6.1 Thermal Conductivity
21
2.6 Consideration
for Good Control
Most of the techniques discussed in section 2.4 and section 2.5 to improve cryogenic
temperature accuracy apply to control as well. There is an obvious exception in sensor location. A compromise is suggested below in section 2.6.3.
2.6.1 Thermal
Conductivity
Good thermal conductivity is important in any part of a cryogenic system that is
intended to be at the same temperature. Most systems begin with materials that
have good conductivity themselves, but as sensors, heaters, sample holders, etc., are
added to an ever more crowded space, the junctions between parts are often overlooked. In order for control to work well, junctions between the elements of the control loop must be in close thermal contact and have good thermal conductivity.
Gasket materials should always be used along with reasonable pressure (section
2.4.4 and section 2.4.5).
2.6.2 Thermal Lag
Poor thermal conductivity causes thermal gradients that reduce accuracy and also
cause thermal lag that make it difficult for controllers to do their job. Thermal lag is
the time it takes for a change in heating or cooling power to propagate through the
load and get to the feedback sensor. Because the feedback sensor is the only thing
that lets the controller know what is happening in the system, slow information to
the sensor slows the response time. For example, if the temperature at the load drops
slightly below the setpoint, the controller gradually increases heating power. If the
feedback information is slow, the controller puts too much heat into the system
before it is told to reduce heat. The excess heat causes a temperature overshoot,
which degrades control stability. The best way to improve thermal lag is to pay close
attention to thermal conductivity both in the parts used and their junctions.
2.6.3 Two-Sensor
Approach
There is a conflict between the best sensor location for measurement accuracy and
the best sensor location for control. For measurement accuracy the sensor should be
very near the sample being measured, which is away from the heating and cooling
sources to reduce heat flow across the sample and thermal gradients. The best control stability is achieved when the feedback sensor is near both the heater and cooling
source to reduce thermal lag. If both control stability and measurement accuracy are
critical it may be necessary to use two sensors, one for each function. Many temperature controllers including the Model 336 have multiple sensor inputs for this reason.
2.6.4 Thermal Mass
Cryogenic designers understandably want to keep the thermal mass of the load as
small as possible so the system can cool quickly and improve cycle time. Small mass
can also have the advantage of reduced thermal gradients. Controlling a very small
mass is difficult because there is no buffer to adsorb small changes in the system.
Without buffering, small disturbances can very quickly create large temperature
changes. In some systems it is necessary to add a small amount of thermal mass such
as a copper block in order to improve control stability.
2.6.5 System
Non-Linearity
Because of nonlinearities, a system controlling well at one temperature may not control well at another temperature. While nonlinearities exist in all temperature control
systems, they are most evident at cryogenic temperatures. When the operating temperature changes the behavior of the control loop, the controller must be retuned. As
an example, a thermal mass acts differently at different temperatures. The specific
heat of the load material is a major factor in thermal mass. The specific heat of
materials like copper change as much as three orders of magnitude when cooled from
100 K to 10 K. Changes in cooling power and sensor sensitivity are also sources
of nonlinearity.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
The cooling power of most cooling sources also changes with load temperature. This
is very important when operating at temperatures near the highest or lowest temperature that a system can reach. Nonlinearities within a few degrees of these high and
low temperatures make it very difficult to configure them for stable control. If difficulty is encountered, it is recommended to gain experience with the system at temperatures several degrees away from the limit and gradually approach it in small
steps.
Keep an eye on temperature sensitivity. Sensitivity not only affects control stability,
but it also contributes to the overall control system gain. The large changes in sensitivity that make some sensors so useful may make it necessary to retune the control
loop more often.
2.7 PID Control
For closed-loop operation, the Model 336 temperature controller uses an algorithm
called PID control. The control equation for the PID algorithm has three variable
terms: proportional (P), integral (I), and derivative (D). See FIGURE 2-2. Changing
these variables for best control of a system is called tuning. The PID equation in the
Model 336 is:
Heater Output =
P e + I ( e ) dt + D de
-----
dt
where the error (e) is defined as: e = Setpoint – Feedback Reading.
Proportional is discussed in section 2.7.1. Integral is discussed in section 2.7.2. Derivative is discussed in section 2.7.3. Finally, the manual heater output is discussed in
section 2.7.4.
2.7.1 Proportional (P)
The Proportional term, also called gain, must have a value greater than 0 for the control loop to operate. The value of the proportional term is multiplied by the error (e)
which is defined as the difference between the setpoint and feedback temperatures,
to generate the proportional contribution to the output: Output (P) = Pe. If proportional is acting alone, with no integral, there must always be an error or the output
will go to 0. A great deal must be known about the load, sensor, and controller to compute a proportional setting (P). Most often, the proportional setting is determined by
trial and error. The proportional setting is part of the overall control loop gain, and so
are the heater range and cooling power. The proportional setting will need to change
if either of these change.
2.7.2 Integral (I)
In the control loop, the integral term, also called reset, looks at error over time to build
the integral contribution to the output:
Output (I) = PI
 ( e ) dt
By adding the integral to proportional contributions, the error that is necessary in a
proportional only system can be eliminated. When the error is at 0, controlling at the
setpoint, the output is held constant by the integral contribution. The integral setting
(I) is more predictable than the gain setting. It is related to the dominant time constant of the load. As discussed in section 2.8.3, measuring this time constant allows a
reasonable calculation of the integral setting. In the Model 336, the integral term is
not set in seconds like some other systems. The integral setting can be derived by
dividing 1000 by the integral seconds: Isetting = 1000 / Iseconds.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.7.3 Derivative (D)
2.7.3 Derivative (D)
23
The derivative term, also called rate, acts on the change in error with time to make its
contribution to the output:
de
dt
Output (D) = PD ------
By reacting to a fast changing error signal the derivative can work to boost the output
when the setpoint changes quickly, reducing the time it takes for temperature to
reach the setpoint. It can also see the error decreasing rapidly when the temperature
nears the setpoint and reduce the output for less overshoot. The derivative term can
be useful in fast changing systems, but it is often turned off during steady state control because it reacts too strongly to small disturbances. The derivative setting (D) is
related to the dominant time constant of the load similar to the I-setting and is therefore set relative to I-setting when used.
2.7.4 Manual Output
The Model 336 has a control setting that is not a normal part of a PID control loop.
Manual Output can be used for open loop control, meaning feedback is ignored and
the heater output stays at the user's manual setting. This is a good way to put constant heating power into a load when needed. The Manual Output term can also be
added to the PID output. Some users prefer to set a power near that necessary to control at a setpoint and let the closed loop make up the small difference. Manual Output
is set in percent of full scale current or power for a given heater range
(section 4.5.1.5.5).
Manual Output should be set to 0% when not in use.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
FIGURE 2-2 Examples of PID control
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.8.1 Setting Heater Range
25
2.8 Manual Tuning
There has been a lot written about tuning closed loop control systems and specifically
PID control loops. This section does not attempt to compete with control theory
experts. It describes a few basic rules of thumb to help less experienced users get
started. This technique will not solve every problem, but it has worked for many others in the field. This section assumes you have worked through the operation sections
of this manual, have a good temperature reading from the sensor chosen as a control
sensor, and are operating Loop 1. It is also a good idea to begin at the center of the
temperature range of the cooling system (not close to its highest or lowest temperature). Autotune (section 2.9) is another good place to begin, and do not forget the
power of trial and error.
2.8.1 Setting Heater
Range
Setting an appropriate heater output range is an important first part of the tuning
process. The heater range should allow enough heater power to comfortably overcome the cooling power of the cooling system. If the heater range will not provide
enough power, the load will not be able to reach the setpoint temperature. Conversely, if the range is set too high, the load may have very large temperature changes
that take a long time to settle out. Delicate loads can even be damaged by too
much power.
Often there is little information on the cooling power of the cooling system at the
desired setpoint. If this is the case, try the following: allow the load to cool completely
with the heater off. Set Manual Output to 50% while in Open Loop control mode. Turn
the heater to the lowest range and write down the temperature rise (if any). Select
the next highest heater range and continue the process until the load warms up to
room temperature. Do not leave the system unattended; the heater may have to be
turned off manually to prevent overheating. If the load never reaches room temperature, some adjustment may be needed in heater resistance or load.
The list of heater range versus load temperature is a good reference for selecting the
proper heater range. It is common for systems to require two or more heater ranges
for good control over their full temperature. Lower heater ranges are normally
needed for lower temperature. The Model 336 is of no use controlling at or below the
temperature reached when the heater was off. Many systems can be tuned to control
within a degree or two above that temperature.
2.8.2 Tuning
Proportional
The proportional setting is so closely tied to heater range that they can be thought of
as fine and course adjustments of the same setting. An appropriate heater range must
be known before moving on to the proportional setting.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Allow the cooling system to cool and stabilize with the heater off.
Place the Model 336 in closed loop PID mode tuning,
Turn integral, derivative and manual output settings to 0.
Enter a setpoint several degrees above the cooling system’s lowest temperature.
Enter a low proportional setting of approximately 5 or 10, and enter the appropriate heater range as described in section 2.8.1.
6. The load temperature should stabilize at a temperature below the setpoint. The
heater display should show a value greater than 0% and less than 100%. If the
load temperature does not stabilize below the setpoint, do one of the following:
a.
If the load temperature and heater display reading swing rapidly, the
proportional setting or possibly the heater range may be set too high.
Reduce the proportional setting or the heater range, and go back
to step 6.
b. If the load temperature and heater display reading change very slowly, a
condition described as drift, it is an indication of a proportional setting
that is too low. Increase the proportional setting and go back to step 6.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
7. Gradually increase the proportional setting by doubling it each time. At each new
setting, allow time for the temperature of the load to stabilize.
8. Repeat step 7 until you reach a setting in which the load temperature begins a
sustained and predictable oscillation, rising and falling in a consistent period of
time. See FIGURE 2-2(a).
The goal is to find the proportional value in which the oscillation begins, do not turn the
setting so high that temperature and heater output changes become extreme.
9. If step 8 is achieved, complete steps 10 and 11, if not skip to step 12.
10. Record the proportional setting and the amount of time it takes for the load to
change from one temperature peak to the next. The time is called the oscillation
period of the load. It helps describe the dominant time constant of the load,
which is used in setting integral.
11. Reduce the proportional setting by half. The appropriate proportional setting is
one half of the value required for sustained oscillation in step 8. See
FIGURE 2-2(b). Continue to Tuning Integral section 2.8.3.
12. There are a few systems that will stabilize and not oscillate with a very high proportional setting and a proper heater range setting. For these systems, setting a
proportional setting of one half of the highest setting is a good starting point.
Continue to the Tuning Integral section 2.8.3.
2.8.3 Tuning Integral
When the proportional setting is chosen and the integral is set to 0 (off), the
Model 336 controls the load temperature below the setpoint. Setting the integral
allows the Model 336 control algorithm to gradually eliminate the difference in temperature by integrating the error over time. See FIGURE 2-2(d). An integral setting
that is too low causes the load to take too long to reach the setpoint. An integral
setting that is too high creates instability and can cause the load temperature
to oscillate.
1. Begin this part of the tuning process with the system controlling in proportional
only mode.
2. Use the oscillation period of the load that was measured in section 2.8.2 in seconds. Divide 1000 by the oscillation period to get the integral setting.
3. Enter the integral setting into the Model 336 and watch the load temperature
approach the setpoint.
4. Adjust the integral setting if necessary:
a.
If the temperature does not stabilize and begins to oscillate around the
setpoint, the integral setting is too high and should be reduced by
one half.
b. If the temperature is stable but never reaches the setpoint, the integral
setting is too low and should be doubled.
5. Verify the integral setting by making a few small (2 K to 5 K) changes in setpoint,
and watch the load temperature react.
Trial and error can help improve the integral setting by optimizing for experimental
needs. Faster integrals, for example, get to the setpoint more quickly at the expense
of greater overshoot. In most systems, setpoint changes that raise the temperature
act differently than changes that lower the temperature.
If it was not possible to measure the oscillation period of the load during proportional
setting, start with an integral setting of 20. If the load becomes unstable, reduce the
setting by half. If the load is stable, make a series of small, two to five degree changes
in the setpoint and watch the load react. Continue to increase the integral setting
until the desired response is achieved.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
2.8.4 Tuning Derivative
2.8.4 Tuning Derivative
27
If an experiment requires frequent changes in setpoint, derivative should be considered. See FIGURE 2-2(e). A derivative setting of 0, off, is recommended when the control system is seldom changed and data is taken when the load is at steady state.
The derivative setting is entered into the Model 336 as a percentage of the integral
time constant. The setting range is 0–200% where 100% = ¼ I seconds. Start with a
setting of 50% to 100%.
Again, do not be afraid to make some small setpoint changes; halving or doubling this
setting to watch the affect. Expect positive setpoint changes to react differently from
negative setpoint changes.
2.9 Autotuning
Choosing appropriate PID control settings can be tedious. Systems can take several
minutes to complete a setpoint change, making it difficult to watch the display for
oscillation periods and signs of instability. With the Autotune feature, the Model 336
automates the tuning process by measuring system characteristics and, along with
some assumptions about typical cryogenic systems, computes setting values for P, I,
and D. Autotune works only with one control loop at a time and does not set the manual output or heater range. Setting an inappropriate heater range is potentially dangerous to some loads, so the Model 336 does not automate that step of the tuning
process.
When Autotune is initiated, step changes are applied to the setpoint and the system
response is observed to determine the best tuning parameters.
The Autotuning message appears when autotuning, and the display is configured to
show the output of the control loop being tuned. The message blinks to indicate that
the algorithm is still processing, and displays the current stage of the process, such as
Stage 3 of 7. If the tuning process completes successfully, then the message is
removed and the new PID parameters are configured. If the algorithm fails, the message stops blinking to indicate that it is no longer processing, and a failure message
appears to indicate which stage of the process failed.
There are situations where Autotune is not the answer. The algorithm can be fooled
when cooling systems are very fast, very slow, have a large thermal lag, or have a nonlinear relationship between heater power and load temperature. If a load can reach a
new setpoint in under 10 sec (with an appropriate I-setting >500), the cooling system
is too fast for Autotuning. Systems with a very small thermal mass can be this fast.
Adding mass is a solution, but is unappealing to users who need the speed for fast
cycle times. Manual tuning is not difficult on these systems because new settings can
be tested very quickly. Some systems are too slow for the Autotune algorithm. Any
system that takes more than 15 min to stabilize at a new setpoint is too slow (with an
appropriate I-setting <5).
Thermal lag can be improved by using the sensor and heater installation techniques
discussed in section 2.4 to section 2.6. Lag times up to a few seconds should be
expected; much larger lags can be a problem. System nonlinearity is a problem for
both autotune and manual tuning. It is most commonly noticed when controlling
near the maximum or minimum temperature of a temperature control system. It is
not uncommon; however, for a user to buy a cryogenic cooling system specifically to
operate near its minimum temperature. If this is the case, try to tune the system at 5
degrees above the minimum temperature and gradually reduce the setpoint, manually adjusting the control settings with each step. Any time the mechanical cooling
action of a cryogenic refrigerator can be seen as periodic temperature fluctuations,
the mass is too small or temperature too low to autotune.
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cHAPTER 2: Cooling System Design and Temperature Control
2.10 Zone Tuning
Once the PID tuning parameters have been chosen for a given setpoint, the whole
process may have to be done again for other setpoints significantly far away that
have different tuning needs. Trying to remember when to use which set of tuning
parameters can be difficult. The Model 336 has a Zone feature as one of its tuning
modes that can help.
To use the Zone feature, you must determine the best tuning parameters for each part
of the temperature range of interest. Then enter the parameters into the Model 336
where up to 10 zones can be defined with different P, I, D, heater range, manual output, ramp rate, and control input settings. An upper boundary setting is assigned as
the maximum temperature for that zone. The minimum temperature for a zone is the
upper boundary for the previous zone, and 0 K is the starting point for the first zone.
When Zone tuning is on, each time the setpoint changes, appropriate control parameters are chosen automatically. Zone tuning works best when used in conjunction
with setpoint ramping (section 4.5.1.5.7).
You can determine control parameters manually or you can use the Autotune feature.
Autotune is a good way to determine a set of tuning parameters for the control system that can then be entered as zones (section 2.9).
Model 336 Temperature Controller
3.1 General
29
Chapter 3: Installation
3.1 General
This chapter provides general installation instructions for the Model 336 temperature controller. Please read this entire chapter before installing the instrument and
powering it on to ensure the best possible performance and maintain operator safety.
For instrument operating instructions refer to Chapter 4 and Chapter 5. For computer
interface installation and operation refer to Chapter 6.
3.2 Inspection and
Unpacking
Inspect shipping containers for external damage before opening them. Photograph
any container that has significant damage before opening it. Inspect all items for
both visible and hidden damage that occurred during shipment. If there is visible
damage to the contents of the container, contact the shipping company and
Lake Shore immediately, preferably within five days of receipt of goods, for instructions on how to file a proper insurance claim. Lake Shore products are insured against
damage during shipment, but a timely claim must be filed before Lake Shore will take
further action. Procedures vary slightly with shipping companies. Keep all damaged
shipping materials and contents until instructed to either return or discard them.
Open the shipping container and keep the container and shipping materials until all
contents have been accounted for. Check off each item on the packing list as it is
unpacked. Instruments themselves may be shipped as several parts. The items
included with the Model 336 are listed below. Contact Lake Shore immediately if
there is a shortage of parts or accessories. Lake Shore is not responsible for any missing items if not notified within 60 days of shipment.
If the instrument must be returned for recalibration, replacement or repair, a Return
Authorization (RMA) number must be obtained from a factory representative before
it is returned. Refer to section 8.13.2 for the Lake Shore RMA procedure.
Items Included with Model 336 temperature controller:
D 1 Model 336 instrument
D 1 Model 336 user's manual
D 4 sensor input mating connector, 6-pin DIN (G-106-233)
D 2 heater output connectors, dual banana, for heater Outputs 1 and 2
D 1 terminal block mating connector, 10-pin terminal block, for Outputs 3 and 4,
and relays 1 and 2
D 1 line power cord
D 1 line power cord for alternative voltage*
* Included only when purchased with VAC-120-ALL power option.
3.3 Rear Panel
Definition
This section provides a description of the Model 336 rear panel connections. The rear
panel consists of the Input A, B, C, and D sensor input connectors (#1 in FIGURE 3-1),
Output 3 and 4 analog voltage output and relays 1 and 2 terminal block connector
(2), RJ-45 ethernet connector (3), USB B-type connector (4), IEEE-488 interface connector (5), line input assembly (6), Output 1 and 2 heater output connectors (7 and 8),
and the thermocouple option card inputs (9) . Refer to section 8.10 for rear panel connector pin-out details.
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cHAPTER 3: Installation
Always turn off the instrument before making any rear panel connections. This is especially critical when making sensor to instrument connections.
FIGURE 3-1 Model 336 rear panel
3.4 Line Input
Assembly
This section describes how to properly connect the Model 336 to line power. Please
follow these instructions carefully to ensure proper operation of the instrument and
the safety of operators.
FIGURE 3-2 Line input assembly
3.4.1 Line Voltage
The Model 336 has four different AC line voltage configurations so that it can be operated from line power anywhere in the world. The nominal voltage and voltage range
of each configuration is shown below. (The recommended setting for 230 V operation
is 240 V.)
Nominal
Minimum
100 V
90 V
Maximum
110 V
120 V
108 V
132 V
220 V
198 V
242 V
240 V
216 V
264 V
TABLE 3-1 Line voltage
AC line voltage is set at Lake Shore, but it is good to verify that the AC line voltage indicator in the fuse drawer window is appropriate before turning the instrument on. The
instrument may be damaged if turned on with the wrong voltage selected. Also remove
and verify that the proper fuse is installed before plugging in and turning on the instrument. Refer to section 8.5 for instructions on changing the line voltage configuration.
3.4.2 Line Fuse and
Fuse Holder
Model 336 Temperature Controller
The line fuse is an important safety feature of the Model 336. If a fuse ever fails, it is
important to replace it with the value and type indicated on the rear panel for the line
voltage setting. The letter T on the fuse rating indicates that the instrument requires
a time-delay or slow-blow fuse. Fuse values should be verified any time line voltage
configuration is changed. Refer to section 8.6 for instructions for changing and verifying a line fuse.
3.4.3 Power Cord
3.4.3 Power Cord
31
The Model 336 includes a 3-conductor power cord that mates with the IEC 320-C14
line cord receptacle. Line voltage is present on the two outside conductors and the
center conductor is a safety ground. The safety ground attaches to the instrument
chassis and protects the user in case of a component failure. A CE approved power
cord is included with instruments shipped to Europe; a domestic power cord is
included with all other instruments (unless otherwise specified when ordered).
Always plug the power cord into a properly grounded receptacle to ensure safe instrument operation.
The delicate nature of measurements being taken with this instrument may necessitate additional grounding including ground strapping of the instrument chassis. In
these cases the operators safety should remain the highest priority and low impedance from the instrument chassis to safety ground should always be maintained.
3.4.4 Power Switch
The power switch is part of the line input assembly on the rear panel of the Model 336
and turns line power to the instrument on and off. When the circle is depressed,
power is off. When the line is depressed, power is on.
3.5 Diode/Resistor
Sensor Inputs
This section details how to connect diode and resistor sensors to the Model 336
inputs. Refer to section 4.4 to configure the inputs. Refer to section 3.6 for a description of the optional thermocouple input.
3.5.1 Sensor Input
Connector and Pinout
The input connectors are 6-pin DIN 45322 sockets. The sensor connector pins are
defined in FIGURE 3-3 and TABLE 3-2. Four mating connectors (6-pin DIN plugs) are
included in the connector kit shipped with the instrument. These are common connectors, so additional mating connectors can be purchased from local electronics
suppliers. They can also be ordered from Lake Shore as G-106-233.
FIGURE 3-3 Sensor input connector
Pin
Symbol
Description
1
I–
–Current
2
V–
–Voltage
3
None
Shield
4
V+
+Voltage
5
I+
+Current
6
None
Shield
TABLE 3-2 Diode/resistor input connector details
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cHAPTER 3: Installation
3.5.2 Sensor Lead Cable
The sensor lead cable used outside the cooling system can be much different from
what is used inside. Between the instrument and vacuum shroud, heat leak is not a
concern. In this case, choose cabling to minimize error and noise pick up. Larger conductor, 22 AWG to 28 AWG stranded copper wire is recommended because it has low
resistance yet remains flexible when several wires are bundled in a cable. The
arrangement of wires in a cable is also important. For best results, voltage leads, V+
and V- should be twisted together and current leads I+ and I- should be twisted
together. The twisted pairs of voltage and current leads should then be covered with a
braided or foil shield that is connected to the shield pin of the instrument. This type of
cable is available through local electronics suppliers. Instrument specifications are
given assuming 3 m (10 ft) of sensor cable. Longer cables, 30 m (100 ft) or more, can
be used, but environmental conditions may degrade accuracy and noise specifications. Refer to section 2.4.6 for information about wiring inside the cryostat.
3.5.3 Grounding and
Shielding Sensor Leads
The sensor inputs are isolated from earth ground to reduce the amount of earth
ground referenced noise that is present on the measurement leads. Connecting sensor leads to earth ground on the chassis of the instrument or in the cooling system
will defeat that isolation. Grounding leads on more than one sensor prevents the sensor excitation current sources from operating.
Shielding the sensor lead cable is important to keep external noise from entering the
measurement. A shield is most effective when it is near the measurement potential so
the Model 336 offers a shield at measurement common. The shield of the sensor
cable should be connected to the shield pin of the input connector. The shields should
not be connected to earth ground on the instrument chassis. One shield should be
connected to the cryostat’s ground as long as it is near earth ground. Connecting at
more than one point will cause a ground loop, which adds noise to the measurement.
The shells of the input connectors are at the same potential as the shield pin on the
Model 336. Older Lake Shore controllers are not configured this way.
3.5.4 Sensor Polarity
Lake Shore sensors are shipped with instructions that indicate which sensor leads are
which. It is important to follow these instructions for plus and minus leads (polarity)
as well as voltage and current when applicable. Diode sensors do not operate in the
wrong polarity. They look like an open circuit to the instrument. Two-lead resistors
can operate with any lead arrangement and the sensor instructions may not specify.
Four-lead resistors can be more dependent on lead arrangement. Follow any specified lead assignment for four-lead resistors. Mixing leads could give a reading that
appears correct but is not the most accurate.
Cathode
Anode
FIGURE 3-4 DT-670-SD Diode sensor leads
Model 336 Temperature Controller
3.5.5 Four-Lead Sensor Measurement
3.5.5 Four-Lead Sensor
Measurement
33
All sensors, including both two-lead and four-lead can be measured with a four-lead
technique. The purpose of a four-lead measurement is to eliminate the effect of lead
resistance on the measurement. If it is not taken out, lead resistance is a direct error
when measuring a sensor.
In a four-lead measurement, current leads and voltage leads are run separately up to
the sensor. With separate leads there is little current in the voltage leads, so their
resistance does not enter into the measurement. Resistance in the current leads will
not change the measurement as long as the voltage compliance of the current source
is not reached. When two-lead sensors are used in four-lead measurements, the short
leads on the sensor have an insignificant resistance.
I+
V+
I+
V+
V–
I–
V–
I–
FIGURE 3-5 4-lead measurement
3.5.6 Two-Lead Sensor
Measurement
There are times when crowding in a cryogenic system forces users to read sensors in a
two-lead configuration because there are not enough feedthroughs or room for lead
wires. If this is the case, plus voltage to plus current and minus voltage to minus current leads are attached at the back of the instrument or at the vacuum feedthrough.
The error in a resistive measurement is the resistance of the lead wire run with current and voltage together. If the leads contribute 2 ) or 3 ) to a 10 k) reading, the
error can probably be tolerated. When measuring voltage for diode sensors, you can
calculate the error in voltage as the lead resistance times the current, typically 10 µA.
For example: a 10 ) lead resistance times 10 µA results in a 0.1 mV error in voltage.
Given the sensitivity of a silicon diode at 4.2 K, the error in temperature would be only
3 mK. At 77 K the sensitivity of a silicon diode is lower so the error would be close to
50 mK. Again, this may not be a problem for every user. Connectors are also a big
source of error when making two-lead measurements. Connector contact resistance
is unpredictable and changes with time and temperature. Minimize interconnections
when making two-lead measurements. Refer to FIGURE 3-6 for an image of a twolead sensor measurement.
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cHAPTER 3: Installation
I+
V+
V–
I–
FIGURE 3-6 2-lead sensor measurement
3.5.7 Lowering
Measurement Noise
Good instrument hardware setup technique is one of the least expensive ways to
reduce measurement noise. The suggestions fall into two categories: (1) do not let
noise from the outside enter into the measurement, and (2) let the instrument
isolation and other hardware features work to their best advantage. Here are some
further suggestions:
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
3.6 Thermocouple
Sensor Inputs
(Thermocouple
Model 3060-F)
Use four-lead measurement whenever possible
Do not connect sensor leads to chassis or earth ground
Use twisted shielded cable outside the cooling system
Attach the shield pin on the sensor connector to the cable shield
Do not attach more than one cable shield at the other end of the cable
Run different inputs and outputs in their own shielded cable
Use twisted wire inside the cooling system
Use similar technique for heater leads
Use a grounded receptacle for the instrument power cord
Consider ground strapping the instrument chassis to other
instruments or computers
The information in this section is for a Model 336 configured with thermocouple sensor inputs. Thermocouple inputs are not installed on the standard Model 336, but can
be added by purchasing the Model 3060-F dual thermocouple input option. Refer to
section 7.6 for installation of the Model 3060-F.
Do not leave thermocouple inputs unconnected. Short inputs when not in use.
3.6.1 Sensor Input
Terminals
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Attach sensor leads to the screws on the off-white ceramic terminal blocks. Sensor
connection is important when using thermocouples because the measured signal is
small. Many measurement errors can be avoided with proper sensor installation. The
block has two thermocouple inputs and each input has two screw terminals; one positive, one negative. See FIGURE 3-7.
3.6.2 Thermocouple Installation
35
Remove all insulation, then tighten the screws on the thermocouple wires. Keep the
ceramic terminal blocks away from heat sources including sunlight and shield them
from fans or room drafts.
FIGURE 3-7 Thermocouple input definition and
common connector polarities (inputs shown shorted)
3.6.2 Thermocouple
Installation
Thermocouples are commonly used in high-temperature applications. Cryogenic use
of thermocouples offers some unique challenges. A general installation guideline is
provided in section 2.4. Consider the following when using thermocouples at low
temperatures:
D Thermocouple wire is generally more thermally conductive than other sensor
D
D
D
lead wire. Smaller gauge wire and more thermal anchoring may be needed to
prevent leads from heating the sample.
Attaching lead wires and passing them through vacuum tight connectors is often
necessary in cryogenic systems. Remember, the thermocouple wire is the sensor;
any time it joins or contacts other metal, there is potential for error.
Temperature verification and calibration of room temperature compensation is
difficult after the sensor is installed. When possible, keep a piece of scrap wire
from each installation for future use.
Thermocouples can be spot-welded to the cryostat for good thermal anchoring as
long as the cryostat has a potential close to earth ground.
3.6.3 Grounding and
Shielding
Care must be taken to minimize the amount of noise contributed by ground loops,
when grounding thermocouple inputs. For lowest measurement noise, do not ground
thermocouple sensors. The instrument operates with slightly more noise if one of the
thermocouples is grounded. Be sure to minimize loop area when grounding both
thermocouples. The instrument does not offer a shield connection on the terminal
block. Twisting the thermocouple wires helps reject noise. If shielding is necessary,
extend the shield from the oven or cryostat to cover the thermocouple wire, but do
not attach the shield to the instrument.
3.7 Heater Output
Setup
The following section covers the heater wiring from the vacuum shroud to the instrument for both heater outputs. Specifications are detailed in section 1.3. For help on
choosing and installing an appropriate resistive heater, refer to section 2.5.
3.7.1 Heater Output
Description
Both powered heater outputs (Outputs 1 and 2) are traditional control outputs for a
cryogenic temperature controller. Both are variable DC current sources with software
settable ranges and limits. Both are configurable for optimization using either a 25 )
or a 50 ) heater resistance. At the 50 ) setting, both outputs are limited to a maximum output current of 1 A. At the 25 ) setting, the maximum heater output current
is 2 A for Output 1, and 1.41 A for Output 2. The compliance voltage of each output is
50 V minimum, but can reach as high as 58 V if the heater resistance is higher than
the nominal setting. Heater power is applied in one of three ranges: high, med, or low.
Each range is one decade lower in power. Refer to TABLE 4-11 for maximum current
and power ratings into different heater resistance.
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cHAPTER 3: Installation
3.7.2 Heater Output
Connectors
Dual banana jacks on the rear panel of the instrument are used for connecting wires
to the heater outputs. Two standard dual banana plug mating connectors are
included in the connector kit shipped with the instrument. This is a common jack and
additional mating connectors can be purchased from local electronic suppliers, or
from Lake Shore as P/N 106-009. The heater is connected between the HI
and LO terminals.
FIGURE 3-8 Rear panel showing heater output connectors
3.7.3 Heater Output
Wiring
Heater output current is what determines the size (gauge) of wire needed to connect
the heater. The maximum current that can be sourced from heater Output 1 is 2 A.
When less current is needed to power a cooling system, it can be limited with range
settings.
When setting up a temperature control system, the lead wire for the heater must be
capable of carrying a continuous current that is greater than the maximum current.
Wire manufacturers recommend 26 AWG or larger wire to carry 2 A of current, but
there is little advantage in using wire smaller than 20 AWG to 22 AWG outside the
cryostat. Inside the cryostat, smaller gauge wire is often desirable.
It is recommended to use twisted heater leads. Large changes in heater current can
induce noise in measurement leads and twisting reduces the effect. It is also recommended to run heater leads in a separate cable from the measurement leads to further reduce interaction.
There is a chassis ground point at the rear panel of the instrument for shielding the
heater cable if necessary. The cable shield can be tied to this point using a 3.18 mm
(#4) spade terminal, or ring connector. The shield should not be connected at the
opposite end of the cable and should never be tied to the heater output leads.
For best noise performance, do not connect the resistive heater or its leads to ground.
Also avoid connecting heater leads to sensor leads or any other instrument inputs or
outputs.
3.7.4 Heater Output
Noise
Model 336 Temperature Controller
The heater output circuitry in the Model 336 is capable of sourcing 100 W of power.
This type of circuitry can generate some electrical noise. The Model 336 was designed
to generate as little noise as possible, but even noise that is a small percentage of the
output voltage or current can be too much when sensitive measurements are being
made near by. If the Model 336 heater leads are too noisy and the above wiring techniques do not help, Lake Shore offers the Model 3003 Heater Output Conditioner that
may help (section 7.7).
3.7.5 Powering Outputs 3 and 4 Using an External Power Supply
3.7.5 Powering Outputs
3 and 4 Using an
External Power Supply
37
Outputs 3 and 4 cannot power heaters directly when used in warm up control mode.
These unpowered outputs must be used to program an external power supply which
in turn powers the heater. This section describes choosing and installing an external
supply. Section 5.4 describes operation of warm up control mode.
3.7.5.1 Choosing a Power Supply
D Voltage Programmable: the power supply must be voltage programmable so that
D
D
D
D
Outputs 3 or 4 (control output) can control it. Ideally the supply’s programming
input should have a range of 0 to 10 V that corresponds to 0 to 10 V range of the
control output. This guarantees that 0 to 100% of the control output scales to
0 to 100% power out of the supply. Supplies with different programming input
ranges can be used as described in section 3.7.5.4.
DC Output Capable: the power supply must be capable of continuous DC output.
Most commercial audio amplifiers are not suitable because they are AC coupled
and cannot provide a DC output.
Output Type: most available voltage programmable power supplies are configured
for voltage output. This is different than Outputs 1 and 2 on the 336 which are
configured for current output. The differences between the two are not significant when used in warm up mode.
Output Voltage: Lake Shore recommends supplies with a working output voltage
between 10 V and 50 V. Voltage higher than 50 V poses a shock hazard and
should only be used if operator safety can be assured by the installer. Voltage
lower than 10 V becomes impractical because the current necessary provide any
meaningful power is too high for most cryogenic wiring.
Output Power: there is no limit to the maximum power of the supply. Typical warm
up applications normally range between 25 W and 200 W.
3.7.5.2 Power Supply Setup
Follow all operation and safety instruction in the power supply manual during setup.
Consider the following suggestions for protecting the power supply and heater load.
D Short circuits are common in cryogenic lead wiring. If the power supply does not
D
D
D
specify that it is short circuit protected the power output should be wired with a
fuse in series to prevent damage.
Unipolar power supplies are designed to use a positive programming voltage and
some can be damaged if the programming voltage is negative. Be careful when
wiring the system to maintain the correct polarity. Also, never set the control
output of the Model336 to bipolar mode.
Some power supplies can be damaged if there is a programming voltage present
at their input when they are turned off. This can happen if the Model 336 and
power supply use a different source of line power or are turned on and off individually. It can be avoided if the two instruments share a switched power strip.
The heater and wiring in the system must be rated for both the maximum current
and maximum voltage provided by the power supply. The Model 336 can be set
to warm up using less than full power if the load will not tolerate the full power of
the supply.
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cHAPTER 3: Installation
3.7.5.3 Connecting to the Model 336
The voltage programming cable attaches to the removable terminal block on the rear
panel of the Model 336 (FIGURE 3-9). Output number and polarity of the output
leads are indicated on the silk screen. The negative (–) terminals are connected internally to the instrument chassis to provide a ground reference.
FIGURE 3-9 Output terminal block
In the most basic configuration, a two-conductor cable connects directly from the
output terminals to the power supply programming input. Copper wire size
20 AWG to 26 AWG is recommended.
3.7.5.4 Programming Voltages Under 10 V
A voltage divider FIGURE 3-10 can be used to reduce the control output voltage if the
programming input of the power supply has a range of less than 0 V to 10 V to ensure
full output resolution, and protection against overloading the external supply programming inputs. The output voltage is proportional to the ratio of resistors
R1 to R2: Vout = 10V x R1/(R1+R2). It is also important to keep the sum of R1 + R2 >
1000 ) or the Model 336 output may not reach the output voltage setting due to
internal overload protection. For a programming input range of 0 V to 5 V, recommended values are: R1 = R2 = 2000 ). For a programming input range of 0 V to 1 V,
recommended values are: R1 = 500 ), R2 = 4500 ). Exact resistor value, type and tolerance are generally not important for this application.
Model 336
Power supply
Output 3+
R2
Program input+
R1
Output 3–
Program input–
FIGURE 3-10 Voltage divider circuit for Output 3
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.1 General
39
Chapter 4: Operation
4.1 General
This chapter provides instructions for the general operating features of the
Model 336 temperature controller. Advanced operation is in Chapter 5. Computer
interface instructions are in Chapter 6.
FIGURE 4-1 Model 336 front panel
4.1.1 Understanding
Menu Navigation
Each feature that is discussed in this chapter will include a menu navigation section.
This section is intended to be a quick guide through the necessary key presses to
arrive at and set the desired features. See FIGURE 4-2 and TABLE 4-1 for an explanation of the conventions used in the menu navigation.
B
A
C
D
Input Setup Q Input (A or B) Q
E
Enter
Room Compensation Q (Off or On)
FIGURE 4-2 Menu navigation example
Item
Convention
Explanation
A
Bold
Typically, the first word in the menu navigation is in bold type, which indicates the first
key you will need to press.
B
Q
The arrow indicates that the screen is advancing to the next screen. In the menu navigation, the item that follows the arrow is the next item you would see on the screen or
the next action that you will need to perform.
C
Italic type
Often, the words that follow the arrow are in italic type. The italic type indicates that
there is a setting that needs to be selected.
D
(Parentheses)
The items that follow the italicized word and which are in parentheses, are the available selections to which you can set the desired feature.
TABLE 4-1 Menu navigation key
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
4.2 Front Panel
Description
This section provides a description of the front panel controls and indicators for the
Model 336.
4.2.1 Keypad
Definitions
The keypad is divided into two sections. The Direct Operation section includes all keys
to the left of the number-pad, and the Menu/Number Pad section includes the
standard 12 number-pad keys and the Up, Down, Escape, and Enter keys
(FIGURE 4-1). The Direct Operation keys provide one touch access to the most often
used functions of the Model 336. The Number Pad keys, with the exception of the decimal point key, are dual function keys. If the instrument is in the number entry mode,
the keys are used to enter numbers. If it is in normal operating mode, the number keys
provide menu entry points. An abbreviated description of each key is provided as follows. A more detailed description of each function is provided in section 4.3
to section 4.5.
4.2.1.1 Direct Operation Keys
Key
Function
Refer to section:
A, B, C, and D
Press these keys for quick access to the display screens for the associated sensor input, or Input
Display mode. Press once for a temporary display that will time-out in 10 s, at which point the display returns to the assigned Display Mode setting. Press the same key again, or press Escapebefore the timeout period, to return the display to the previous Display Mode setting. Pressing and
holding one of these keys for 3 s causes the associated Input Display to become the new permanent Display Mode setting, indicated by an audible beep.
4.3.1.2
Setpoint
Press this key to enter the control setpoint for the currently displayed loop, if applicable.
4.5.1.5.6
Proportional (P)
Press this key to manually adjust the Proportional control parameter for the currently displayed
loop, if applicable.
4.5.1.5.2
Integral (I)
Press this key to manually adjust the Integral control parameter for the currently displayed loop, if
applicable.
4.5.1.5.3
Derivative (D)
Press this key to manually adjust the Derivative control parameter for the currently displayed
loop, if applicable.
4.5.1.5.4
Heater Range
For Outputs 1 and 2, this key allows selection of High, Med, or Low heater range. For Outputs 3 and
4, this key allows selection of Output On/Off (except when in Monitor Out mode).
4.5.1.5.8
Manual Out
Press this key to adjust the Manual Output setting of the currently displayed output, if applicable.
4.5.1.5.5
All Off
Press this key to set the range for all Outputs to Off (not applicable for Monitor Out mode).
TABLE 4-2 Direct operation keys
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.5
4.2.2 Annunciators
41
4.2.1.2 Menu/Number Pad Keys
Key
Input setup
Function
Refer to section
Press this key to configure features related to the inputs.
4.4 for sensor input setup
4.4.7 for curve selection.
Output setup
Press this key to configure features related to the outputs, including configuration of
control loops.
4.5
Display setup
Press this key to configure the display.
4.3
Max/Min reset
Press this key to reset the maximum and minimum readings for all inputs.
4.4.12
Curve entry
Press this key to view, edit, copy, and erase temperature curves, and to generate SoftCal
curves.
Section 5.2 Front Panel Curve Entry
Operations.
Zone settings
Press this key to enter user-specified control parameters for up to ten temperature zones.
5.3.
Autotune
Press this key to configure and execute the Autotune algorithm.
5.2.
Remote/local
Press this key to toggle the IEEE-488 Remote mode.
4.6.3.1
Interface
Press this key to configure the USB, Ethernet, and IEEE-488 interfaces.
4.6.1 for USB; 4.6.2 for Ethernet; 4.6.3
for IEEE-488
Relays
Press this key to configure the two rear-panel relays.
5.6.2.
Alarm
Press this key to configure the Alarm feature.
5.6.1.

Press this key to navigate menus, and to select parameters.
N/A

Press this key to navigate menus, and to select parameters.
N/A
Escape (exit
menu)
Press this key to cancel a number entry, or parameter selection. You can also use this key to
navigate up one level in a setting menu, which exits the menu if at the top level. Press and
hold for 3 s to reset instrument parameters to factory default values.
N/A
Enter
Press this key to accept a number entry, or a parameter selection. You can also use it to navigate deeper into a menu setting screen. Press and hold for 3 s to lock or unlock the keypad.
N/A
0 – 9, +/-,.
Press this key to enter numeric data. This includes a key to toggle plus (+) or minus (-), and a
key for entry of a decimal point.
4.2.3.
TABLE 4-3 Menu/number pad keys
4.2.2 Annunciators
LED annunciators: three blue four red LED annunciators are included to provide visual
feedback of the following operation.
LED
Function
Refer to section
Remote
On steady when the instrument is in Remote mode (may be controlled via the IEEE-488 Interface).
If the LED is not illuminated, the instrument is in Local mode.
4.6.3.1
Ethernet
On steady when Ethernet is connected and properly configured. Blinks at a slow pace when
attempting to acquire an IP address. Blinks rapidly when in an error state.
4.6.2
Alarm
On steady when the alarm feature for any sensor input is turned on and the input’s Visual parameter is set to On. Blinks when any input sensor alarms are in the alarming state and the alarming
input's Visual parameter is set to On.
5.6
Control outputs
On steady when the corresponding output is in the On state (does not apply to Monitor Out mode).
Off when corresponding output is in the Off state, or when it is set to Monitor Out mode.
4.5.1.4
TABLE 4-4 LED annunciators
Display annunciators: include symbols for sensor inputs and their respective temperatures and units.
Annunciator
Function
A
Sensor input A
B
Sensor input B
C
Sensor input C
D
Sensor input D
K
Temperature in kelvin
C
Temperature in degrees Celsius
V
Sensor units of volts
)
Sensor units of ohms
k)
Sensor units of kilohms
mV
Sensor units of millivolts
TABLE 4-5 Display annunciators
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
4.2.3 General Keypad
Operation
There are five basic keypad operations: direct operation, menu navigation, number
entry, alpha-numeric entry and setting selection.
D
D
D
D
D
Direct Operation: the key function occurs as soon as you press the key; these
include the Setpoint, P, I, D, Manual Out, and All Off keys.
Menu Navigation: each menu has a list of configurable parameters. Menus that
apply to multiple entities (for example, Input Setup could apply to Input A, B, C, or
D) have a first level selection to determine which entity to configure (for instance,
Input C). Once the first level selection is made, the list of menu parameters is displayed. The parameter labels are displayed on the left, and the current value of
each parameter is displayed on the right. In this screen, use the  and  keys to
move the highlight up or down, respectively. Press Enter to enter the setting
mode for the highlighted parameter. The type of setting mode depends on the
type of parameter highlighted. The possible setting modes are: Number Entry,
Alpha-Numeric Entry, and Setting Selection. Refer to the respective entry mode
descriptions below. During menu navigation, press Escape (Exit Menu) to perform the Exit Menu function; this will not cancel any setting changes.
Number Entry: allows you to enter number data using the number pad keys. Number pad keys include the numbers 0–9, +/-, and the decimal point. The proportional control parameter is an example of a parameter that requires number
entry. During a number entry sequence use the number entry keys to enter the
number value, press Enter to accept the new data. Press Escape once to clear the
entry, and twice to return to the Menu Navigation mode.
Alpha-Numeric Entry: allows you to enter character data using the number pad
keys, and the  andkeys. The input sensor name is an example of a parameter
that requires Alpha-Numeric Entry. Press  or to cycle through the upper and
lower case English alphabet, numerals 0 through 9, and a small selection of common symbols. Press Enter toadvance the cursor to the next position, or to save
the string and return from Alpha-Numeric Entry mode if in the last position. Press
Escape to move the cursor back one position, or tocancel all changes and return
from Alpha-Numeric Entry mode if at the first position. Press any of the number
pad keys, except for +/-, to enter that character into the string and advance the
cursor to the next position automatically, or to save the string and return to
Menu Navigation mode if in the last position. Use the +/- key to enter the
whitespace character.
Setting Selection: allows you to select from a list of values. During a selection
sequence, use the  or  keys to select a parameter value. To select the highlighted parameter as the new setting, press Ente;. the setting is saved and the
mode returns to Menu Navigation. Press Escape at any time while the parameter
list is displayed tocancel any changes and return to Menu Navigation mode.
4.3 Display Setup
The intuitive front panel layout and keypad logic, bright, graphic display, and LED
indicators enhance the user-friendly front panel interface of the Model 336. The
Model 336 offers a bright, graphic, liquid, crystal display, with an LED backlight that
simultaneously displays up to eight readings.
4.3.1 Display Modes
The Model 336 provides several display modes designed to accommodate different
instrument configurations and user preferences. The Four Loop display mode offers
large format sensor readings of each of the four sensor inputs, as well as setpoint and
heater output information for associated outputs, all on one screen. The Input display
modes provide detailed information about the relevant sensor input, and the associated output. The Custom display mode provides a means for you to assign different
types of information to specific sections of the display.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQ Display Mode Q(Four Loop, Custom, Input A, Input B, Input C, Input D)
Default: Custom
Interface Command: DISPLAY
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.3.1 Display Modes
43
4.3.1.1 Four Loop Mode
Four Loop mode provides a limited amount of information about each of the four sensor inputs, and the associated control loops. Each quadrant of the display is dedicated
to one sensor input and the associated loop, if applicable. The top line of each quadrant contains the input letter (A, B, C, or D) followed by the user-assignable sensor
name. The sensor readings are presented just below the sensor name in the large
character format for easier viewing from a distance. The sensor reading is displayed in
the units assigned to the respective sensor input's Preferred Units setting, which can
be found under the Input Setup menu (section 4.4). If the input is assigned as the Control Input of a control loop, then the control Setpoint and Heater Output parameters
are displayed under the sensor reading. If the output is in Open Loop mode, then the
Setpoint parameter is not shown.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQDisplay ModeQFour Loop Mode
Interface Command: DISPLAY
FIGURE 4-3 Four loop mode
4.3.1.2 Input Display Modes
An Input Display mode exists for each of the four sensor inputs on the Model 336.
These modes are referenced as Input A, Input B, Input C, and Input D in the Display
Mode parameter list. Each of these modes provides detailed information relevant to
the respective sensor input.
FIGURE 4-4 Input display mode
The top half of the display provides information related to the sensor input. The input
letter is displayed, followed by the user-assignable input name. The sensor reading is
displayed in large character format, using the units assigned to the respective input’s
Input Units parameter. The top half of the display also shows the maximum and the
minimum sensor reading since the last Max/Min reset.
The bottom half of the display contains information related to the control loop that is
using the sensor input (provided in the top half of the display) as its Control Input
parameter. Only the items applicable to the control loop will be displayed. Specifically, the number of the control loop output, followed by the Output Mode setting is
displayed. The P, I, D, Manual Output, Setpoint, and Heater Output information of the
control loop are also displayed. If no control loop uses the sensor input, then no information is applicable.
The input display modes are unique in that they can be set temporarily by pressing
the A, B, C, or D front panel keys. After the key is pressed, the respective input display
mode becomes active for approximately 10 s before returning to the configured display mode. This provides quick access to each input and each associated control loop
for gathering information, or changing control loop parameters. Press any active keys
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
while the temporary display mode is active to reset the timeout period of the temporary display. Press Escape, or the same temporary display key again, to manually
return the display to the configured display mode. Press and hold a temporary display
key until an audible beep is heard (about 3 s) to cause the configured display mode to
change to the input display mode associated with that key.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQDisplay ModeQInput (A, B, C, D)
(Each input can also be accessed by pressing and holding A, B, C, or D.)
Interface Command: DISPLAY
4.3.1.3 Custom Display Mode
The custom display mode provides the ability to customize the displayed front panel
information to your preference. As with the input display modes, the custom display
mode shows sensor input information in the top half of the screen, and control loop
information in the bottom half. The sensor input information can be customized to
display two large character sensor readings with names, four large character sensor
readings without names, or eight small character format sensor readings without
names. Each displayed reading can use any sensor as the input, and can be displayed
in units of kelvin, Celsius, sensor, min, or max.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQDisplay ModeQCustom
Interface Command: DISPLAY
D
Locations: depending on the Number of Displays parameter, there can be anywhere from two to eight display locations for displaying sensor readings. The
placement of a given display location on the front panel LCD depends on the
Number of Displays setting (FIGURE 4-5).
FIGURE 4-5 Top to bottom: Model 336 screen images showing 2, 4 and 8 display locations
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.3.1 Display Modes
D
45
Number of Custom display locations: the Number of Displays parameter determines
how many sensor readings are displayed, as well as the character size of the displayed readings. If “2 (Large)” is selected, then two large character readings are
displayed, along with sensor names. If “4 (Large)” is selected, then four large
character readings are displayed, without sensor names. If “8 (Small)” is selected,
then eight small character readings are displayed, without
sensor names.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQNumber of LocationsQ(2 Large, 4 Large, 8 Small)
D
Input and Units: each available display location has an associated Input and Units
setting. The Input parameter determines which sensor will be used as the input
of the displayed data. The Input can be any of the four sensor inputs, or None. If
None is selected, then the display location will be blank. The Units parameter
determines which units to display the reading in.
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQLocation (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) InputQ(None, Input A, Input B,
Input C, Input D)
Display SetupQLocation (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8) UnitsQ(Kelvin, Celsius, Sensor,
Min, Max)
Interface Command: DISPFLD
Location
Input
1
Input A
2
Input B
3
Input C
4
Input D
5
Input A
6
Input B
7
Input C
8
Units
Kelvin
Sensor
Input D
TABLE 4-6 Defaults
D
Displayed Output: in the Custom Display mode the bottom half of the display is
dedicated for output and control loop information for one of the four outputs.
The source of this information depends on the output selected for the Displayed
Output parameter. If the selected output is configured as a control loop output,
then all associated control loop parameters will be displayed.
When viewing the Custom Display screen, the configured Displayed Output is
signified by L1, L2, L3 or L4, followed by the control loop input, if applicable. The L
character stands for Loop, but will be displayed even for outputs that are not configured as control loop outputs.
Menu Navigation:
Display Setup QDisplayed OutputQOutput (1, 2, 3, 4)
D
Default: Output 1
Interface Command: DISPLAY
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
The front panel LCD display contrast can be adjusted for optimal viewing. The default
value should work well in most standard room temperature environments, but deviations from room temperature, and extreme viewing angles can cause the display contrast to require adjustment for optimal viewing.
4.3.2 Display Contrast
Menu Navigation:
Display SetupQDisplay ContrastQ(1 to 32)
Default: 28
Interface Command: BRIGT
4.4 Input Setup
The Model 336 supports a variety of temperature sensors manufactured by
Lake Shore and other manufacturers. An appropriate sensor type must be selected for
each input. If the exact sensor model is not shown, use the sensor input performance
chart in TABLE 4-7 to choose an input type with similar range and excitation. For
additional details on sensors, refer to the Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and
Control Catalog or visit our website at www.lakeshore.com.
The unused input should be set to disabled.
Display
Message
Input Range
Excitation
Coefficient
Curve
Format
Lake Shore Sensors*
Silicon Diode
Diode
0 V–2.5 V
10 µA, 1 mA
Negative
V/K
DT-4XX, DT-500,
DT-670 Series
Gallium Aluminum
Arsenide Diode
Diode
0 V– 10 V
10 µA, 1 mA
Negative
V/K
TG-120 Series
Platinum RTD,
Rhodium-Iron RTD
PTC RTD
(Platinum)
0 ) to 10 k)
(7 ranges)
1 mA
Positive
)/K
PT-100 Series Platinum,
RF-800 Rhodium-Iron,
RF-100 Rhodium-Iron
Negative Temperature
Coefficient (NTC) RTD
NTC RTD
(Cernox™)
0 ) to 100 k)
(9 Ranges)
100 nA to 1 mA
(decade steps in
power, autorange
maintains <10 mV)
Negative
log
)/K
Cernox™, Carbon Glass,
Germanium, Rox™,
and Thermox™
mV/K
Chromel-AuFe (0.07%),
Type E (Chromel-Constantan),
Type K (Chromel-Alumel),
Type T (Copper-Constantan)
Sensor Type
Thermocouple
(Opton 3060-F only)
Thermocouple
±50 mV
NA
Positive
Refer to the Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and Control Catalog for details on Lake Shore temperature sensors.
TABLE 4-7 Sensor input types
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QSensor Type Q(Disabled, Diode, PTC RTD [Platinum],
NTC RTD [Cernox], Thermocouple)
Default: Diode
Interface Command: INTYPE
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.4.1 Diode Sensor Input Setup
4.4.1 Diode Sensor
Input Setup
47
Diode sensors include the silicon and the gallium aluminum arsenide sensors
detailed in TABLE 4-7. Input ranges are selectable to 0–2.5 V or 0–10 V, and standard
excitation current is 10 µA.
As an alternative to the standard diode excitation current of 10 µA, you may select a 1
mA excitation. The 1 mA excitation current is not calibrated, and will not work properly with standard Lake Shore diode sensors. For protection against accidentally setting the 1 mA excitation current, the Diode Current setting is automatically set to 10
µA every time the Sensor Type is set to Diode.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QSensor TypeQDiode
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QDiode CurrentQ(10 µA or 1 mA)
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QRange Q(2.5 V [Silicon] or 10 V [GaAlAs])
Default: Sensor TypeQDiode
Diode Current Q10 µA
RangeQ2.5 V (Silicon)
Interface Command: INTYPE, DIOCUR
4.4.2 Positive
Temperature
Coefficient (PTC)
Resistor Sensor Input
Setup
PTC resistor sensors include the platinum and rhodium-iron sensors detailed in
TABLE 4-7. More detailed specifications are provided in TABLE 1-2. The Model 336
supplies a 1 mA excitation current for the PTC resistor sensor type. A resistance range
selection is available in order to achieve better reading resolution. Autorange is
enabled by default in order to provide the best possible reading resolution, but does
not affect the sensor current excitation. Refer to section 4.4.4 for details on manually
selecting the range. Current Reversal is also enabled by default in order to compensate for thermal EMF voltages. Refer to section 4.4.5 for details on the Thermal EMF
Compensation (Current Reversal) feature.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QSensor TypeQPTC RTD (Platinum)
Interface Command: INTYPE
4.4.3 Negative
Temperature
Coefficient (NTC)
Resistor Sensor Input
Setup
NTC resistor sensors include Cernox™, Rox, Thermox and others detailed in TABLE 4-7.
More detailed specifications are provided in TABLE 1-2. The excitation current for the
NTC RTD sensor type can vary between 100 nA and 1 mA, depending on resistance
range. When autoranging is enabled, the range will be automatically selected so that
the excitation voltage is below 10 mV. This keeps the power dissipated in the sensor at
a minimum, yet still enough to provide accurate measurements. Current Reversal is
also enabled by default in order to compensate for thermal EMF voltages. Refer to
section 4.4.5 for details on the Thermal EMF Compensation (Current Reversal) feature.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D) QSensor TypeQNTC RTD (Cernox)
Interface Command: INTYPE
4.4.4 Range Selection
The Model 336 is equipped with an autoranging feature that will automatically
select the appropriate resistance range for the connected resistive temperature
device. In some cases it may be desirable to manually select the resistance range. To
manually select a resistance range, set the Autorange parameter to Off, then use the
Range parameter to select the desired range. Autorange will be On by default whenever the Sensor Type parameter is set to PTC RTD or NTC RTD. Autorange is not available for the Diode sensor type.
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QAutorangeQ(Off or On)
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QRangeQ(See table below)
Default: On
Interface Command: INTYPE
Sensor Type
Diode
PTC RTD (Platinum)
NTC RTD (Cernox)
Available Range Settings
Maximum Sensor Power
Sensor Excitation
2.5 V (Silicon)
25 µW (at 10 µA exictation)
10 µA, 1 mA
10 V (GaAlAs)
100 µW (at 10 µA excitation)
10 µA, 1 mA
10 )
10 µW
30 )
30 µW
100 )
100 µW
300 )
300 µW
1 k)
1 mW
3 k)
3 mW
10 k)
10 mW
1 mA
10 )
10 µW
1 mA
30 )
2.7 µW
300 µA
100 )
1 µW
100 µA
300 )
270 nW
30 µA
1 k)
100 nW
10 µA
3 µA
3 k)
27 nW
10 k)
10 nW
1 µA
30 k)
2.7 nW
300 nA
100 k)
1 nW
100 nA
TABLE 4-8 Range and sensor power
4.4.5 Thermal
Electromotive Force
(EMF) Compensation
To keep power low and avoid sensor self heating, the sensor excitation is kept low.
There are two major problems that occur when measuring the resulting small DC
voltages. The first is external noise entering the measurement through the sensor
leads, which is discussed with sensor setup. The second is the presence of thermal
EMF voltages, or thermocouple voltages, in the lead wiring. Thermal EMF voltages
appear when there is a temperature gradient across a piece of voltage lead. Thermal
EMF voltages must exist because the sensor is almost never the same temperature as
the instrument. To minimize them, use careful wiring, make sure the voltage leads are
symmetrical in the type of metal used and how they are joined, and keep unnecessary
heat sources away from the leads. Even in a well-designed system thermal EMF voltages can be an appreciable part of a low voltage sensor measurement.
The Model 336 can help with a thermal compensation algorithm. The instrument will
automatically reverse the polarity of the current source every other reading. The
average of the positive and negative sensor readings will cancel the thermal EMF
voltage that is present in the same polarity, regardless of current direction. This correction algorithm is enabled by default for RTD sensor types, but can be turned off
using the Current Reversal parameter.
The Current Reversal parameter defaults to On anytime the Sensor Type parameter is
changed to PTC RTD or NTC RTD.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C, or D)QCurrent ReversalQ(Off or On)
Default: On
Interface Command: INTYPE
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.4.6 Thermocouple Sensor Input Setup (Model 3060-F Only)
4.4.6 Thermocouple
Sensor Input Setup
(Model 3060-F Only)
49
When a Model 3060-F Thermocouple option is installed in the Model 336, a setting of
Thermocouple becomes available under the Sensor Type parameter in the Input
Setup menu. The standard diode/RTD sensor inputs can still be used when the Thermocouple option is installed, but the Thermocouple and standard inputs cannot be
used simultaneously. Refer to section 7.6.1 to install the Model 3060-F.
Thermocouples include a variety of commercial (such as E, K, T) and specialty types
such as cryogenic (Chromel–AuFe). Standard curves are included in the Model 336 for
the types listed in TABLE 4-7. Other types can be used as long as an appropriate temperature response curve is loaded as a user curve. Representative thermocouple
specifications are given in TABLE 1-2. The Model 336 provides one thermocouple
range and no excitation because thermocouples do not require it. Internal room temperature compensation is included for convenience (section 4.4.6.2) and should be
calibrated before use. Room temperature compensation is enabled by default, but
can be turned off if external compensation is being used.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (C or D)QSensor TypeQThermocouple
Interface Command: INTYPE
4.4.6.1 Internal Room Temperature Compensation
Room-temperature compensation is required to give accurate temperature measurements with thermocouple sensors. It corrects for the temperature difference
between the instrument thermal block and the curve normalization temperature of
0 °C. An external ice bath is the most accurate form of compensation, but is often
inconvenient. The Model 336 has internal room-temperature compensation that is
adequate for most applications. You can turn internal compensation on or off. It operates with any thermocouple type that has an appropriate temperature response
curve loaded. Room-temperature compensation is not meaningful for sensor units
measurements.
Room temperature compensation should be calibrated as part of every installation
(section 4.4.6.2)
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (C or D)QRoom CompensationQ(Off or On)
Default: On
Interface Command: INTYPE
4.4.6.2 Internal Room Temperature Compensation Calibration Procedure
Factory calibration of the instrument is accurate to within approximately ±1 K. Differences in thermocouple wire and installation technique create errors greater than the
instrument errors. To achieve the best accuracy, calibrate with the thermocouple
actually being used, because it eliminates most sources of error. If that is not possible,
use a thermocouple made from the same wire.
It is best practice to use the same material for thermocouple wires; if it is at all possible, it
is also best to avoid splices. When splices are necessary, continue the splice with the same
type of material.
For less demanding applications, a short across the input terminals will suffice. Both
thermocouple inputs should be calibrated, even if they use the same type of thermocouple. An appropriate curve must be selected and room temperature compensation
must be turned on before calibration can be started.
Follow this procedure to calibrate room temperature compensation:
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
For best results, the calibration temperature should be close to the measurement temperature that requires best accuracy.
1. Attach a thermocouple sensor or direct short across the input terminals of the
thermocouple input. See FIGURE 3-7 for polarity.
2. Place the instrument away from drafts. If calibrating using a short, place an accurate room-temperature thermometer near the terminal block.
3. Allow the instrument to warm up for at least ½ hr without moving or handling
the sensor.
4. If calibrating with a short, skip to step 6, otherwise insert the thermocouple into
the ice-bath, liquid nitrogen, helium Dewar, or other known, fixed temperature.
5. Read the displayed temperature. If the temperature display is not as expected,
check to be sure that the thermocouple is making good thermal contact. If possible, add a thermal mass to the end of the thermocouple.
6. Press Input Setupand select the corresponding sensor input. Scroll down to the
Room Calibration parameter and press Enter.
7. The current temperature reading is displayed in kelvin. Press Enter to enter Number Entry mode. Enter the true temperature that the thermocouple should read.
If input is shorted, then enter the actual room temperature measured by the
thermometer. Press Enter to save the value.
8. To verify calibration, check that the temperature reading for the calibrated input
matches the room temperature calibration setting value.
Any previous calibration can be cleared using the Clear Calibration submenu.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQRoom CalibrationQClear CalibrationQ(Yes or No)
Default: Room calibration cleared
4.4.7 Curve Selection
The Model 336 supports a variety of temperature sensors manufactured by
Lake Shore and other manufacturers. After the appropriate sensor type is selected
(section 2.2), an appropriate curve may be selected. The Model 336 can use curves
from several sources. Standard curves are preloaded with every instrument and numbered 1 to 20. User curves, numbered 21 to 59, can be used when a sensor does not
match a standard curve. SoftCal™ calibrations are stored as user curves, or you can
enter your own curves from the front panel (section 5.7) or computer interface (section 6.4). The complete list of sensor curves preloaded in the Model 336 is provided in
TABLE 4-9.
During normal operation, only the curves that share the input type you have selected
are displayed. If the curve you wish to select does not appear in the selection
sequence make sure the curve format matches the recommended format for the
input type selected. Refer to TABLE 4-7.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.4.8 Filter
51
The sensor reading of the instrument can always be displayed in sensor units. If a temperature response curve is selected for an input, its readings may also be displayed in temperature.
Curve
Number
Curve Name
Sensor Type
Model Number
Temperature Range**
For Data Points, Refer To:
01
DT-470
Diode
DT-470
1.4 - 475 K
Table D-1
02
DT-670
Diode
DT-670
1.4 - 500 K
Table D-2
03
DT-500-D*
Diode
DT-500-D
1.4 - 365 K
Table D-3
04
DT-500-E1*
Diode
DT-500-E1
1.1 - 330 K
Table D-3
05
Reserved
—
—
—
—
06
PT-100
PTC RTD
PT-100
30 - 800 K
Table D-4
07
PT-1000*
PTC RTD
PT-1000
30 - 800 K
Table D-4
08
RX-102A-AA
NTC RTD
Rox RX-102A
0.05 - 40 K
Table D-5
09
RX-202A-AA
NTC RTD
Rox RX-202A
0.05 - 40 K
Table D-6
10
Reserved
—
—
—
—
11
Reserved
—
—
—
—
12
Type K
Thermocouple
Type K
3 - 1645 K
Table D-7
13
Type E
Thermocouple
Type E
3 - 1274 K
Table D-8
14
Type T
Thermocouple
Type T
3 - 670 K
Table D-9
15
AuFe 0.03%*
Thermocouple
AuFe 0.03%*
3.5 - 500 K
Table D-10
16
AuFe 0.07%
Thermocouple
AuFe 0.07%
3.15 - 610 K
Table D-11
17
Reserved
—
—
—
—
18
Reserved
—
—
—
—
19
Reserved
—
—
—
—
20
Reserved
—
—
—
—
User Curves
—
—
—
—
21 - 59
*No longer offered by Lake Shore
**Instrument may not support the sensor over its entire range
TABLE 4-9 Sensor curves
Once the input is configured (section 4.4), you may choose a temperature curve. Any
standard or user curve that matches the format of the sensor type configured for a
given input will be available under the Curve parameter in the Input Setup menu for
that input. You are also given the choice of None. When set to None, front panel readings configured for kelvin or Celsius will display the NOCURV message and the interface will report 0 K and –273.15 °C for KRDG and CRDG queries, respectively. Data
points for standard curves are detailed in Appendix C.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QCurveQ(Any curve of matching type)
4.4.8 Filter
The reading filter applies exponential smoothing to the sensor input readings. If the
filter is turned on for a sensor input, all reading values for that input are filtered. The
filter is a running average so it does not change the update rate of an input. Filtered
readings are not used for control functions but they are used for all input features
including Max/Min.
The number of filter points determines filter bandwidth. One filter point corresponds
to one new reading on that input. A larger number of points does more smoothing,
but also slows the instruments response to real changes in temperature. The default
number of filter points is 8, which settles to within six time constants of a step
change value in 45 readings, or 4.5 s.
The time constant (time it takes to settle to within 36.8% of the step value after a step
change) for a given number of filter points can be derived using the following formula:
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
TC = 0.1 / (ln (N / (N - 1)), where TC is one time constant, and N is the number of filter
points. A reading is usually considered settled after six time constants. TABLE 4-10
shows a sampling of filter settings and the resulting time constant, settle time, and
equivalent noise bandwidth.
Filter points
Time constant
Settle time
(6 time constants)
Equivalent noise
bandwidth (p TC)
2
0.14 s
0.9 s
1.733 Hz
4
0.35 s
2.1 s
0.719 Hz
8
0.75 s
4.5 s
0.334 Hz
16
1.55 s
9.3 s
0.161 Hz
32
3.15 s
18.9 s
0.079 Hz
64
6.35 s
38.1 s
0.039 Hz
TABLE 4-10 Filter settle time and bandwidth
The filter window is a limit for restarting the filter. If a single reading is different from
the filter value by more than the limit, the instrument will assume the change was
intentional and restart the filter. Filter window is set in percent of full scale range.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QFilterQ(Off or On)
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QFilter PointsQ(2 to 64)
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QFilter WindowQ(1% to 10%)
Default: FilterQ(Off)
Filter PointsQ8
Filter WindowQ10%
4.4.9 Input Name
To increase usability and reduce confusion, the Model 336 provides a means of
assigning a name to each of the four sensor inputs. The designated input name is used
on the front panel display whenever possible to indicate which sensor reading is
being displayed. It is also used in the output section of the custom display mode to
denote which sensor input is associated with the displayed output to form a control
loop. Refer to section 4.2.3 for Alpha-Numeric entry.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QInput NameQ(15 Character String)
Default: Input (A, B, C, D)
Interface Command: INNAME
4.4.10 Temperature
Limit
The Temperature Limit parameter provides a means of protecting your equipment
from damage by shutting down all control outputs when the assigned temperature
limit is exceeded on any sensor input. The parameter is available for each of the four
sensor inputs. A temperature limit of 0 K (default value) turns this feature off.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QTemperature LimitQ(0K to 2999K)
Default: 0.0000 K
Interface Command: TLIMIT
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.4.11 Preferred Units
4.4.11 Preferred Units
53
The Preferred Units parameter setting determines which units are used to display
setpoint and max/min parameters whenever these parameters are displayed in any
display mode. The sensor reading is also displayed in Preferred Units in all display
modes except for the Custom display mode, where each sensor location can be
assigned specific display units.
Menu Navigation:
Input SetupQInput (A, B, C or D)QPreferred UnitsQ(K, C, or Sensor)
4.4.12 Max/Min
The Max/Min feature captures and stores the highest (Max) and lowest (Min) reading
taken since the last reset. The Preferred Units parameter, under the Input Setup
menu, determines the units used for capturing Max and Min.
Max and Min are always being captured, so there is no need to turn the feature on or
off. The readings are reset when the instrument is turned off, sensor input parameters
are changed, or the Max/Min Reset key is pressed.
Menu Navigation:
Max/Min Reset
4.5 Output and
Control Setup
Once the sensor inputs have been configured (section 4.4), the outputs can be configured. The Output Setup menu is used to create control loops for controlling temperature, whether using feedback (closed loop) or manually setting the output (open
loop). This section describes how to operate the output and control features, and how
to set control parameters. Each control parameter should be considered before turning on a control loop output or the instrument may not be able to perform the most
simple control functions. A good starting point is deciding which control loop to use,
whether to operate in open or closed control mode and which tuning mode is best for
the application. Other parameters fall into place once these have been chosen.
Section 2.7 of this manual describes the principals of closed loop proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control.
4.5.1 Heater Outputs
Heater Outputs 1 and 2 are traditional control loop heater outputs for a cryogenic
temperature controller. The two outputs are identical except in the amount of power
available. Output 1 can provide up to 100 W, and Output 2 can provide up to 50 W.
They each include a large set of hardware and software features making them very
flexible and easy to use. The heater outputs are well-regulated DC outputs. This provides quiet, stable control for a broad range of temperature control systems in a fully
integrated package. The power ranges for each output provide decade steps in power.
4.5.1.1 Max Current and Heater Resistance
The Model 335 heater outputs are designed to work optimally into a 25 ) or 50 )
heater. The Heater Resistance and Max Current parameters work together to limit the
maximum available power into the heater. This is useful for preventing heater damage or limiting the maximum heater power into the system. When using a 25 ) or
50 ) heater, set the Heater Resistance parameter accordingly. The Max Current setting will then provide multiple discrete current limit values that correspond to common heater power ratings. The available current limits keep the output operating
within the voltage compliance limit to ensure the best possible resolution. These
parameters work with the Heater Range parameter (section 4.5.1.5.8) to provide
safety and flexibility.
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If you are not using a standard heater resistance, set the Heater Resistance setting to
25 ) for any resistance less than 50 ), or to 50 ) for any higher heater resistance. The
user max current setting is useful when using a non-standard heater resistance value.
Refer to section 4.5.1.1.1 for more information on User Max Current. TABLE 4-11 provides examples of different heater resistances and max current settings, and the
resulting maximum heater power. The maximum heater powers in bold represent the
discrete current limits available under the Max Current setting for 25 ) and 50 )
heaters.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QHeater ResistanceQ(25 ) or 50 ))
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QMax CurrentQ(User, 0.707 A, 1 A, 1.414 A, or 2 A)
Default:
Heater ResistanceQ25 )
Output 1 QMax CurrentQ2 A
Output 2QMax CurrentQ1.414 A
Interface Command: HTRSET
4.5.1.1.1 User Max Current
When using a heater that is not 25 ), 100 W or 50 ), 50 W the provided discrete current limits may not be appropriate. The User Max Current setting is available for this
case. The optimal maximum current value should be calculated based on the heater’s
power rating, or the maximum desired heater output power, whichever is lower. The
heater output compliance voltage (50 V for both heater outputs) should also be taken
into account in order to maximize heater setting resolution. This calculated current
limit can then be entered using the User Max Current setting.
To calculate the Max Current setting based on a heater or load power limit, calculate
current, I, using both of the following equations: I = Sqrt(P/R) and I = 50 V/ R where P is
the maximum allowable power, R is the heater resistance. The load power limit and
voltage compliance limit of the heater output (50 V) are in place at the same time, so
the lower calculated current is the correct Max Current setting.
Example 1: A 50 ), 30 W heater is connected to Output 1.
Power Limit
I = Squrt(P/R)
I = Squrt(30 W/50))
I = 0.77 A
Voltage Compliance Limit
I = 50 V/R
I = 50 V/ 50 )
I=1A
User Max Current should be set to the smaller of the two or 0.77 A. In this example,
the desired 30 W of power is available to the heater.
Example 2: A 75 ), 50 W heater is connected to Output 1.
Power Limit
I = Squrt(P/R)
I = Squrt(50 W/75))
I = 0.81 A
Voltage Compliance Limit
I = 50 V/R
I = 50 V/ 75) )
I = 0.66 A
User Max Current should be set to the smaller of the two or 0.66 A. In this example,
only 33 W of the desired 50 W of power is available to the heater.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.5.1 Heater Outputs
55
To enter a User Max Current, first set the Heater Resistance setting to 25 ) for any
resistance less than 50 ), or to 50 ) for any higher heater resistance. Set the Max Current setting to User. The User Max Current setting now becomes available in the Output Setup menu. Enter the calculated current limit value in the User Max Current
parameter.
Heater Resistance
Max Current
10 )
25 )
30 )
40 )
50 )
100 )
2A
40 W
100 W
x
x
x
x
1.667 A (User)
28 W
69.5 W
83 W
x
x
x
1.414 A
20 W
50 W
60 W
x
x
x
1.25 A (User)
15 W
39 W
46 W
62.5 W
x
x
1A
10 W
25 W
30 W
40 W
50 W
x
0.707 A
5W
12.5 W
15 W
20 W
25 W
x
2.5 W
6W
7.5 W
10 W
12.5 W
25 W
0.5 A (User)
Shaded black: Max current too high for these resistances due to voltage compliance limit
Lightly shaded: Maximum current/power only available on heater output 1
Bold: Discrete options available for 25 ) and 50 ) heaters under the Max Current setting
TABLE 4-11 User Max Current
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QUser Max CurrentQ(0.1 A to 2 A)
Default:
Output 1QUser Max CurrentQ2 A
Output 2QUser Max CurrentQ1.414 A
4.5.1.2 Power Up Enable
All configuration parameters of the Model 336 can be retained through a power cycle.
Some systems require that the Heater Range is turned off when power is restored. The
power up enable feature allows you to choose whether or not the heater range is
turned off each time the instrument power is cycled. Set the Power Up Enable parameter to Off to ensure that the heater range is turned off on power up. Set it to On to
return the Heater Range to its previous setting when power is restored.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1, 2, 3, or 4)QPower Up EnableQ(Off or On)
Default: Off
Interface Command: OUTMODE
4.5.1.3 Heater Out Display
The heater output can be displayed in units of percent of full scale current or percent
of full scale power. The heater output display on the front panel is displayed in these
units, and the Manual Output parameter is set in these units. Available full scale current and power are determined by the heater resistance, max current setting, and
heater range.
The heater output display is a calculated value intended to aid in system setup and tuning. It is not a measured value, and may not accurately represent actual power in the
heater.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1, 2)QHeater Out DisplayQ(Current or Power)
Default: Current
Interface Command: HTRSET
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
4.5.1.4 Output Modes
The heater outputs can be configured in one of four output modes: Off, Closed Loop
PID, Zone, or Open Loop. The Off mode prevents current from being sourced to the
given output. Closed Loop PID is the mode most often used for controlling temperature. Zone mode builds on the Closed Loop mode by providing automatic changing of
control parameters at up to ten different temperature zones. Open Loop mode provides a means of applying a constant current to the output.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QOutput ModeQ(Off, Closed Loop PID, Zone,
Open Loop)
Default: Off
Interface Command: OUTMODE
4.5.1.4.1 Closed Loop PID Mode
The Closed Loop PID mode is the most commonly used closed loop control mode for
tightly controlling temperature using the heater outputs of the Model 336. In this
mode the controller attempts to keep the load at exactly the user-entered setpoint
temperature. To do this, it uses feedback from the control input sensor to calculate
and actively adjust the control output setting. The Model 336 uses a control algorithm called PID that refers to the three terms used to tune the control. Refer to section 4.4.9 for details on assigning a Control Input for the closed loop feedback. Refer
to section 2.7 and section 2.8 for a detailed discussion of PID control and
manual tuning.
In Closed Loop PID mode, the controller will accept user-entered Proportional, Integral, and Derivative parameters to provide 3-term PID control. Manual output can be
used during closed loop control to add to the calculated PID control output.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QOutput ModeQClosed Loop PID
4.5.1.4.2 Zone Mode
Optimal control parameter values are often different at different temperatures
within a system. Once control parameter values have been chosen for each temperature range (or zone), the instrument will update the control settings each time the
setpoint crosses into a new zone.
If desired, the control parameters can be changed manually, just like Closed Loop PID
mode, but they will be automatically updated once the setpoint crosses a zone boundary.
The control algorithm used for each zone is identical to that used in Closed Loop PID
mode. The Zone feature is useful by itself, but it is even more powerful when used
with other features. We recommend using zone mode with setpoint ramping (section
4.5.1.5.7). Refer to section 5.3 for details on setting up zones. Refer to section 2.7 for a
detailed discussion of PID control.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QOutput ModeQZone
4.5.1.4.3 Open Loop Mode
Open Loop output mode allows you to directly set the output using only the
Manual Output and Range parameters. This guarantees constant current to the load,
but it does not actively control temperature. Any change in the characteristics of the
load will cause a change in temperature.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.5.1 Heater Outputs
57
You can configure any output to Open Loop mode. When an output is configured in
this mode, the Manual Output and Heater Range parameters become available in the
Output Setup menu for setting the output. For convenience, the Control Input parameter can be used to assign a sensor input, which then allows the output to be displayed on the front panel when using that sensor input’s display mode. When
displayed on the front panel, the Manual Output and Heater Range direct operation
keys can be used for one touch access to these settings. Refer to section 4.3.1 for
details on configuring display modes.
Since there is no sensor feedback in open loop mode, there is nothing to prevent the system from being overheated. We recommend using the Temperature Limit feature to help
protect the system from overheating. Refer to section 4.4.10 for temperature limits.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1, 2, 3, or 4)QOutput ModeQOpen Loop
4.5.1.5 Control Parameters
Once the output mode is chosen, the control parameters can be used to begin controlling temperature. Control Input is used to create a control loop. The P, I, and D
parameters provide fine tuning of the control algorithm. Manual Output provides a
baseline output power about which to control. Setpoint is used to set the desired target temperature, and Heater Range is used to turn on the control output, as well as to
set the power range of the output. These parameters are described in detail in section
4.5.1.5.1 to section 4.5.1.5.8.
4.5.1.5.1 Control Input
For closed loop control (Closed Loop PID, Zone, Warm Up Supply) a control loop must
be created. A control loop consists of a control output for controlling the temperature,
and an input for feedback into the control algorithm. Use the Control Input parameter to assign the control input sensor to the desired output.
In the Monitor Out mode the Control Input parameter is used to determine the source
of the output voltage. In the Open Loop mode, the Control Input parameter can be set
simply for convenience in order to easily access the associated output’s Manual Output and Heater Range parameters using the Direct Operation keys. Refer to
section 4.2.1.1 for details on Direct Operation keys.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1, 2, 3, or 4)QControl InputQ(None, Input A, Input B,
Input C, Input D)
Default: Output 1QControl InputQ(Input A)
Output 2QControl InputQ(Input B)
Output (3, 4)QOff
Interface Command: HTRSET
4.5.1.5.2 Proportional (P)
The proportional parameter (also called gain) is the P part of the PID control equation.
It has a range of 0 to 1000 with a resolution of 0.1. The default value is 50. Enter a
value greater than 0 for P when using closed loop control.
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
To set P, first configure the front panel display to show the desired control loop information, then use the P key on the front panel. A quick way to access the setting if the
control loop information is not already being displayed, is to press A, B, C, or D on the
front panel to temporarily display the control loop information while the new setting
is entered. Refer to section 4.3 for details on configuring the front panel display.
Menu Navigation:
PQ(0 to 1000)
Default: 50
Interface Command: PID
4.5.1.5.3 Integral (I)
The integral parameter (also called reset) is the I part of the PID control equation. It
has a range of 0 to 1000 with a resolution of 0.1. The default value is 20. Setting I to 0
turns the reset function off. The I setting is related to seconds by:
Isetting =1000/Iseconds
For example, a reset number setting of 20 corresponds to a time constant of 50 s. A
system will normally take several time constants to settle into the setpoint. The 50 s
time constant, if correct for the system being controlled, would result in a system that
stabilizes at a new setpoint in between 5 min and 10 min.
To set I, first configure the front panel display to show the desired control loop information, then use the I key on the front panel. A quick way to access the setting if the
control loop information is not already being displayed is to press A, B, C, or D on the
front panel to temporarily display the control loop information while the new setting
is entered. Refer to section 4.3 for details on configuring the front panel display.
Menu Navigation:
IQ(0 to 1000)
Default: 20
Interface Command: PID
4.5.1.5.4 Derivative (D)
The derivative parameter (sometimes called rate) is the D part of the PID control
equation. The derivative time constant should normally be somewhere between p
and 1/i the integral time in seconds, if used at all. As a convenience to the operator,
the Model 336 derivative time constant is expressed in percent of ¼ the integral
time. The range is between 0% and 200%. Start with settings of 0%, 50%, or 100%,
and determine which setting gives you the type of control you desire. Do not be surprised if the setting you prefer is 0%. Note that by using a percent of integral time,
derivative scales automatically with changes in the integral value and does not have
to be revisited frequently.
To set D, first configure the front panel display to show the desired control loop information, then use the D key on the front panel. A quick way to access the setting if the
control loop information is not already being displayed is to press A, B, C, or D on the
front panel to temporarily display the control loop information while the new setting
is entered. Refer to the section 4.3 for details on configuring the front panel display.
Menu Navigation:
DQ(0% to 200%)
Default: 0%
Interface Command: PID
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.5.1 Heater Outputs
59
4.5.1.5.5 Manual Output
Manual Output is a manual setting of the control output. It can function in two different ways depending on control mode. In open loop control mode, the Manual Output
is the only output to the load. You can directly set the control output from the front
panel or over the computer interface. In closed loop control mode, Manual Output is
added directly to the output of the PID control equation. In effect, the control equation operates about the Manual Output setting.
The Manual Output setting is in percent of full scale. Percent of full scale is defined as
percent of full-scale current or power on the selected heater range. Refer to
section 4.5.1.3 to set the Heater Out display. Available full scale current and power
are determined by the heater resistance, Max Current setting, and Heater Range.
Manual Output setting range is 0% to 100% with a resolution of 0.01%.
To set Manual Output, first configure the front panel display to show the desired control loop information, and then press Manual Output on the front panel. A quick way
to access the setting if the control loop information is not already being displayed is
to press A, B, C, or D on the front panel to temporarily display the control loop information while the new setting is entered. Refer to section 4.3 for details on configuring
the front panel display.
When an output is configured for Open Loop mode, the Manual Output setting is
available in the Output Setup menu. This is because in the Open Loop mode no Control Input (feedback sensor) is required, and if none is set then there would be no way
to use the Manual Output front panel key to set the output unless using the Custom
Display mode. The Control Input parameter can be assigned to a sensor input (that is
not being used for control) as a means of quickly accessing the Manual Output setting
using the Manual Output front panel key.
Menu Navigation:
Manual OutputQ(0% to 100%)
Default: 0%
Interface Command: MOUT
4.5.1.5.6 Setpoint
Use the Setpoint parameter to set the desired load temperature for a control loop.
Before entering a setpoint, a control loop must be created by configuring an input
sensor and assigning it to a control output using the Control Input parameter. The
Setpoint can be entered in either temperature units or sensor units, based on the sensor input’s Preferred Units setting. The Setpoint Ramping feature is available when
controlling in temperature units to provide smooth, continuous control from one
temperature to the next. Refer to section 4.4 for details on Input Setup. Refer to section 4.5.1.5.1 for details on assigning a Control Input. Refer to section 4.5.1.5.7 for
details on the Setpoint Ramping feature.
Most applications require control in units of temperature. To control in units of temperature, set the Preferred Units parameter of the control input sensor to either kelvin or Celsius. When controlling in temperature, the available setting range of the
setpoint is limited by the Setpoint Limit parameter of the assigned temperature
curve. Refer to section 4.4.11 for details on setting the Preferred Units parameter.
Refer to section 5.7.1 for details on setting a curve Setpoint Limit.
The Setpoint Limit feature only limits the Setpoint entry. For even greater protection, the
Temperature Limit feature can be used to turn off all heater outputs if a sensor reading
above the specified temperature is observed. Refer to section 4.4.10 for details on the
Temperature Limit feature.
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
There are some instances when temperature control in sensor units may be desired,
for example when a temperature curve is not available. For these applications the
Model 336 can control temperature in sensor units. To control in sensor units, set the
Preferred Units parameter to Sensor. When controlling in sensor units, the Setpoint
resolution matches the display resolution for the sensor input type given in the specifications (section 1.3).
Temperature control in sensor units can be unpredictable since most sensors do not have
a linear response to temperature, and therefore have can have different sensitivity in different temperature ranges.
If you change the Preferred Units from Sensor to temperature (Kelvin or Celsius), or
from temperature to Sensor, the Model 336 uses the assigned temperature curve to
convert the Setpoint to the new control units. This provides minimal disruption in the
control output if you change the Preferred Units parameter while the control loop is
active.
Menu Navigation:
SetpointQ(See note below)
Default: 0.0000 K
Interface Command: SETP
When controlling in temperature, setpoint is limited by the control input temperature
curve’s Setpoint Limit. When controlling in sensor units, setpoint is limited by the limits of
the configured control sensor.
4.5.1.5.7 Setpoint Ramping
The Model 336 can generate a smooth setpoint ramp when the setpoint units are
expressed in temperature. You can set a ramp rate in degrees per minute with a range
of 0 to 100 and a resolution of 0.1. Once the ramping feature is turned on, its action is
initiated by a setpoint change. When you enter a new setpoint the instrument
changes the setpoint temperature from the old value to the new value at the ramp
rate. A positive ramp rate is always entered; it is used by the instrument to ramp
either up or down in temperature.
Always use the ramping feature to minimize temperature overshoot and undershoot.
When ramping is not used, a setpoint change can cause the error used by the PID
equation to become very large, which causes the I contribution of the control output
equation to become larger the longer the error exists. This will result in a large overshoot or undershoot once the setpoint temperature is reached, since the I contribution will only decrease when the error polarity is reversed. Use a ramp rate that keeps
the control output from reaching the extremes of 100% or 0% while ramping for
optimal results.
The ramping feature is useful by itself, but it is even more powerful when used with
other features. Setpoint ramps are often used with zone control mode. As temperature is ramped through different temperature zones, control parameters are automatically selected for best control. Ramps can be initiated and status read back using
a computer interface. During computer-controlled experiments, the instrument generates the setpoint ramp while the computer is busy taking necessary data.
When an incomplete ramp is shut off, the setpoint will remain on the most current setting
(the reading will not jump to the end of the ramp).
If the input type or input curve is changed while a ramp is in progress, both ramping and
the heater are turned off.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.5.1 Heater Outputs
61
If Ramp is on and the setpoint is set to sensor units, the ramping function will remain on
but when another setpoint is entered, the setpoint goes directly to the new setpoint
value.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (1 or 2)QSetpoint RampingQ(Off or On)
Default: Off
Interface Command: RAMP
To stop a ramp, when the desired control loop is displayed, press Setpoint, then
immediately press Enter. This stops the ramp at the current setpoint, but leaves the
ramping function activated. To continue the ramp, enter a new setpoint. Refer to section 4.5.1.5.6 for details on setting the Setpoint parameter.
4.5.1.5.8 Heater Range
The Heater Range setting is used for turning a control output on, as well as setting the
output power range for the heater outputs. All four outputs provide an Off setting for
turning the output off. The heater outputs, 1 and 2, provide Low, Medium (Med), and
High settings which provide decade steps in power, based on the maximum output
power available to the connected heater. The High range provides the maximum
power, the Med range provides (maximum power)/10 and the Low range provides
(maximum power)/100. Refer to section 2.5.1 for details on how to calculate the maximum output power. The unpowered analog outputs, 3 and 4, do not have multiple
output ranges, and only provide an On setting for enabling the output.
While controlling tempertature, the following will cause the heater range to automatically turn off:
D Exceeding the Temperature Limit setting
D Setup changes to the control input
D Power loss with Power Up Enable feature turned off
D Input errors such as T. Over, T. Under, S. Over, and S. Under
Available full scale current and power are determined by the heater resistance, Max Current setting, and Heater Range.
Specifications of the heater outputs are provided in section 1.3. Heater theory of
operation is provided in section 2.5. Various heater installation considerations are
provided in section 3.7.
To set Heater Range, first configure the front panel display to show the desired control
loop information, then use the Heater Range key on the front panel. A quick way to
access the setting if the control loop information is not already being displayed is to
press A, B, C, or D on the front panel to temporarily display the control loop information while the new setting is entered. Refer to section 4.2 for details on configuring
the front panel display.
Menu Navigation:
Heater RangeQ(Off, On, Low, Med, High)
Default: Off
Interface Command: RANGE
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
4.5.1.5.9 ALL OFF
The ALL OFF key is provided as a means of shutting down all control outputs with one
key. It is equivalent to setting the Heater Range parameter of all outputs to Off.
This function is always active even if the keypad is locked or when it is in remote mode.
4.5.2 Unpowered
Analog Outputs
The unpowered analog outputs, 3 and 4, are variable DC voltage sources that can
have a range from –10 V to +10 V. The voltage is generated by a 16-bit D/A converter
with resolution of 0.3 mV or 0.003% of full scale. These outputs can be configured to
Open Loop, Warm Up Supply, or Monitor Out modes. The Open Loop mode can be used
to set the output to a specific, constant value. Refer to section 4.5.1.4.3 for details on
the Open Loop Mode. The Warm Up Supply mode uses the output to drive the programming input for an external power supply for the purpose of rapidly warming a
system to a user-specified temperature. The Monitor Out mode uses the output to
provide a voltage proportional to an input sensor reading to be used by an external
device such as a data logger.
The unpowered analog outputs are not designed to provide heater power, and although
they are short-protected, should not be used to drive a resistance lower than 1 k).
4.5.2.1 Warm Up Supply
Warm Up Supply mode is designed for controlling an external power supply used for
rapidly increasing the temperature in the controlled system, for example, to bring a
system to room temperature in order to change samples. Refer to section 5.4 for more
information on warm up supply operation. Refer to section 3.7.5 for the procedure to
install an external power supply for warm up supply mode.
4.5.2.2 Monitor Out
Refer to section 5.5 for more information on Monitor Out mode.
4.6 Interface
The Model 336 has three computer interfaces: IEEE-488, USB, and Ethernet. Only one
of these interfaces can be actived at one time. Use the Interface menu to configure
which interface is active, and to configure the parameters related to the selected
interface.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQ EnabledQ (USB, Ethernet, IEEE-488)
Default: USB
4.6.1 USB
The USB interface is provided as a convenient way to connect to most modern computers, as a USB interface is provided on nearly all new PCs as of the writing of this
manual. The Model 336 USB driver, which must be installed before using the interface (section 6.3.3), creates a virtual serial com port, which can be used in the same
way as a traditional serial com port. Refer to Chapter 6 for details on computer interface operation.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQEnabledQUSB
Model 336 Temperature Controller
4.6.2 Ethernet
4.6.2 Ethernet
63
The Ethernet interface is provided to allow the Model 336 to connect to a computer
network. A direct connection to a PC can also be achieved using a cross-over Ethernet
cable. The advantages of using the Ethernet interface include the ability to communicate directly with the Model 336 from any PC on the same local network, and even
from around the world via the internet. Refer to section 6.4.1 for details on Ethernet
configuration.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQEnabledQEthernet
4.6.3 IEEE-488
An IEEE 488 (GPIB) interface is provided for compatibility with legacy systems. Refer
to Chapter 6 for details on computer interface operation.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQEnabledQIEEE-488
4.6.3.1 Remote/Local
Local refers to operating the Model 336 from the front panel. Remote refers to operating the controller via the IEEE 488 Interface. The keypad is disabled during remote
operation, except for the Remote/Local key and the All Off key. When in remote mode,
the Remote front panel LED will be illuminated. When in local mode, the Remote LED
will not be illuminated.
Menu Navigation:
Remote/Local (LED On = Remote mode, LED Off = Local mode)
4.7 Locking and
Unlocking the
Keypad
The keypad lock feature prevents accidental changes to parameter values. When the
keypad is locked, some parameter values may be viewed, but most cannot be changed
from the front panel. All Off is the only keypad function that remains active when the
keypad is locked.
A three-digit keypad lock code locks and unlocks the keypad. The factory default code
is 123. The code can be changed only through the computer interface. If instrument
parameters are reset to default values, the lock code resets also. The instrument cannot reset from the front panel with the keypad locked.
To lock the keypad, press and hold Enter for 5 s. Use the numeric keypad to enter the
three-digit lock code. If the lock code is accepted, *** Keypad Locked *** will be displayed for 3 s, and the display will return to normal. Changes attempted to any
parameters result in a brief display of the *** Keypad Locked *** message.
To unlock the keypad, press and hold Enter for 5 s. Use the numeric keypad to enter
the three-digit lock code. If the lock code is accepted, *** Keypad Unlocked *** will be
displayed for 3 s and the display will return to normal. All Model 336 parameters are
now accessible.
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cHAPTER 4: Operation
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.1 General
65
Chapter 5: Advanced Operation
5.1 General
This chapter provides information on the advanced operation of the Model 336 temperature controller.
5.2 Autotune
The Model 336 can automate the tuning process of typical cryogenic systems with
the Autotune feature. For additional information about the algorithm refer
to section 2.9.
Before initiating the Autotune process, properly configure the cooling system with
control input sensor and heater output to make it capable of closed-loop control.
Assign the control sensor with a valid temperature response curve. Also determine an
appropriate heater range as described in section 2.8.1. The system must be coarsely
maintaining temperature within 5 K of the setpoint where new tuning parameters
are desired in order for the Autotuning process to initiate. Autotune works only with
one control loop at a time and does not set the manual output or heater range.
To initiate the Autotune process, press Autotune, then select an Autotune mode.
There are three Autotune modes available. They result in slightly different system
characteristics. Autotune PI is recommended for most applications.
D
D
D
Autotune P: sets only the P parameter value. I and D are set to 0 no matter what
the initial values are. This mode is recommended for systems that have very long
lag times or nonlinearity that prevents stable PI control. Expect some overshoot
or undershoot of the setpoint and stable temperature control below the setpoint
value.
Autotune PI: sets values for both P and I parameters. D is set to 0. This mode is
recommended for stable control at a constant temperature. It may take slightly
longer to stabilize after setpoint change than Auto PID. Expect some overshoot or
undershoot of the setpoint and stable temperature control at the setpoint value.
Autotune PID: sets values for P, I and D parameters. D is always set to 100%. This
mode is recommended when setpoint changes are frequent, but temperature is
allowed to stabilize between changes. Stability at setpoint may be worse than
Autotune PI in noisy systems. Expect slightly less overshoot or undershoot than
the other modes and control at the setpoint value.
When the Autotune process is initiated, the P, I, D, and Manual Output parameters are
removed from the display and the “Autotuning” message appears in the lower right
corner. Below the Autotuning message, the current status of the process is displayed.
The status message blinks to indicate that the algorithm is still processing. If an error
occurs, the status message stops blinking and displays an error message containing
the stage in which Autotune failed. See TABLE 5-1 for a description of the Autotune
stages, reasons for failure, and possible solutions. When the process completes successfully, the previous P, I, and D parameters are replaced by the newly acquired values. To cancel the Autotune process, press Autotune, and choos Yes to the “cancel
Autotune” prompt.
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Stage
cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
Description
Purpose for Stage
Reason for Failure
Possible Solution
Ensure curve is assigned to
input, heater is on, and
temperature is within
5 K of setpoint
Allow the temperature to
settle more before initiating
Autotune
0
Testing initial conditions
Curve not assigned to Input, heater not
Determine if Autotuning can be initiated on, or temperature not within
5 K of setpoint
1
Waiting for temperature to settle
Ensures that temperature is not still
settling toward the setpoint, or drifting
away from the setpoint
Temperature was moving too much to
properly Autotune
2
Testing for temperature stability
Ensures that there is no temperature
oscillation, or excessive noise in the
temperature reading
May indicate that the initial P value is too
Use a smaller initial P value
high
3
Observing system response to
setpoint change
Control parameters are changed based
on observation
System response is too slow, or the heater If not already using High
is too underpowered for the system to
range, increase initial
Autotune
heater range
4
Waiting for temperature to settle
after returning setpoint to
original value
Provides a baseline for
subsequent stages
System response is too slow to Autotune,
or the new control parameters are caus- Use a smaller initial P value
ing instability in the control
5
Testing for temperature stability
Ensures that there is no temperature
oscillation or excessive noise in the
temperature reading after control
parameter adjustment
System response is too slow to Autotune,
or the new control parameters are
Use a smaller initial P value
causing instability in the control
6
Observing system response to
Control parameters are changed again
setpoint change using new control based on observation. This is the final
parameters
stage of P only Autotuning
7
Waiting for temperature to settle
System response is too slow to Autotune,
after returning setpoint to original Provides a baseline for subsequent stages or the new control parameters are caus- Use a smaller initial P value
value
ing instability in the control
8
Testing for temperature stability
Ensures that there is no temperature
System response is too slow to Autotune,
oscillation, or excessive noise in the temor the new control parameters are caus- Use a smaller initial P value
perature reading after control parameter
ing instability in the control
adjustment
9
First of 2 stages of observing
system response to setpoint
change using new control
parameters
Compiles data for characterizing
the system
Will not fail in this stage
10
Second of 2 stages of observing
system response to setpoint
change using new
control parameters
Control parameters are changed again
based on observation. This is the final
stage of PI and PID Autotuning
System response is too slow, or the heater If not already using High
is too underpowered for the system to
range, increase initial
Autotune
heater range
System response is too slow to Autotune, If not already using High
or the heater is too underpowered for the range, increase initial
system to Autotune
heater range
Not applicable
TABLE 5-1 Autotune stages
Menu Navigation:
AutotuneQInput (A, B, C, D)Q(Autotune P, Autotune PI, Autotune PID)
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.3 Zone Settings
5.3 Zone Settings
67
The Model 336 allows you to establish up to ten custom contiguous temperature
zones where the controller will automatically use pre-programmed values for PID,
heater range, manual output, ramp rate, and control input. Zone control can be active
for both control loops at the same time. Configure the zones using 1 as the lowest to
10 as the highest zone. Zone boundaries are always specified in kelvin (K). The bottom
of the first zone is always 0 K; therefore, only the upper limit is required for all subsequent zones. Make a copy of FIGURE 5-1 to plan your zones.
To use the programmed zones, the output mode must be set to Zone (refer to section
4.5.1.4.2 to set up Zone mode). In Zone mode, the instrument will update the control
settings each time the setpoint crosses into a new zone. If you change the settings
manually, the controller will use the new setting while it is in the same zone, and will
update to the programmed zone table settings when the setpoint crosses into a
new zone.
The zone settings include a Control Input parameter for each temperature zone. This
allows a different feedback sensor to be used for each temperature zone. For example, a diode sensor can be used while cooling down from room temperature to 10 K, at
which point the Control Input could be switched to a Cernox™ sensor for temperatures under 10 K.
To illustrate how the control parameters are updated in Zone mode, consider the
zone settings from the table below. Starting from room temperature (about 300 K),
and setting a setpoint of 2 K (with Setpoint Ramping turned On), the setpoint will
begin ramping at the current setpoint Ramp Rate, then once the setpoint crosses
100 K, the control parameters from Zone 8 will be used. The setpoint ramp will then
continue toward 2 K at a rate of 20 K/min until crossing 50 K, when the control
parameters from Zone 7 are loaded. This pattern will continue until the final setpoint
value of 2 K is reached, or another setpoint is entered. Note that Input B will be used in
all zones greater than 10 K (zones 4 to 8), and Input A will be used in all zones below
10 K (zones 1-3).
Zone
Lower Boundary
(Implied)
Upper
Boundary
P
I
D
Manual
Output
Range
Ramp Rate
Control Input
10
n/a
0K
50
20
0
0.0%
Off
0.1 K/Min
Default
9
n/a
0K
50
20
0
0.0%
Off
0.1 K/Min
Default
8
100.001 K
500 K
200
20
0
0.0%
High
30 K/Min
Input B
7
50.001 K
100 K
185
25
0
0.0%
Med
20 K/Min
Input B
6
25.001 K
50 K
150
30
0
0.0%
Med
10 K/Min
Input B
5
15.001 K
25 K
100
30
0
0.0%
Med
5 K/Min
Input B
4
10.001 K
15 K
85
35
0
0.0%
Med
2 K/Min
Input B
3
7.001K
10 K
85
35
0
0.0%
Med
0.9 K/Min
Input A
2
4.001 K
7K
70.0
40.0
0
0.0%
Low
0.7 K/Min
Input A
1
0K
4K
50.0
50.0
0
0.0 %
Low
0.5 K/Min
Input A
TABLE 5-2 Zone settings example
Sensor accuracy and placement will affect how smoothly the transition from one feedback sensor to another is performed. A large difference between the temperature readings of each sensor at the time of transition could cause a temporary instability in the
temperature control due to the sudden large error introduced into the control equation.
It is highly recommended to use the Setpoint Ramping feature when using the Control
Input zone parameter to change sensor inputs. Otherwise a setpoint change may cause a
control input sensor to be used outside of its usable range, which will cause an overload
condition to shut down the control loop.
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 10
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 09
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 08
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 07
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 06
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 05
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 04
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 03
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 02
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
K
Upper boundary:
Zone 01
Proportional
Integral
Derivative
MHP Output
(0.1–1000)
(0.1–1000)
(0–200)
(0–100%)
Heater Range
A Off
A Low
A Med
A High
FIGURE 5-1 Record of Zone settings
Menu Navigation:
ZonesQOutput (1 or 2)QZonesQ(1 to 10)
Interface Command: ZONE
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Ramp Rate
(0.1–100 K/min)
Control Input
A Default
AA AB AC AD
0K
5.4 Warm Up Supply
5.4 Warm Up
Supply
69
Warm Up Supply mode is designed for controlling an external power supply used for
rapidly increasing the temperature in the controlled system, for example, to bring a
system to room temperature in order to change samples. Refer to section 3.7.5 for
information on using an external power supply for warm up supply mode.
The Control Input parameter determines which sensor is used for feedback in the
Warm Up Supply mode. Refer to section 4.5.1.5 for details on the
Control Input parameter.
Once Warm Up Supply Mode is configured, press Setpoint and set the desired temperature, then press Heater Range and set the range to On to activate the output. The
front panel display must be configured to show the Warm Up control loop for the Setpoint and Heater Range keys to be used. Refer to section 4.2 and section 4.3 for
details on front panel keypad operation and display setup.
The Power Up Enable feature determines if the output will remain on after power is
cycled. Refer to section 4.5.1.2 for details on the Power Up Enable feature.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QOutput ModeQWarm Up Supply
Interface Command: OUTMODE
5.4.1 Warm Up
Percentage
The Warm Up Percentage parameter is used to determine the amount of voltage to
apply to the unpowered output (3 or 4) when using Warm Up mode to control an
external power supply. The voltage applied will be the full scale output (+10 V) times
the Warm Up Percentage. For example, if the Warm Up Percentage is set to 50%, the
control output voltage for the given unpowered output will be 50% of 10 V, or 5 V,
when the output is on.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3, or 4)QWarm Up PercentageQ(0% to 100%)
Default: 100%
Interface Command: WARMUP
5.4.2 Warm Up Control
The Warm Up Control parameter determines what happens when the control setpoint is reached. The options are:
D
Auto-Off: once the Heater Range is set to on, the Warm Up Percentage voltage is
applied to the output (section 5.4.1) and the output stays on until the control
input temperature reaches the control setpoint. The output will then be turned
off (0 V), and the Heater Range setting will automatically be set to Off, effectively
turning off all temperature control for the control loop. If the Heater Range is
again manually set to On, the cycle will begin again, and the output will turn on
and stay on until the control input temperature reaches the setpoint again.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QWarmup ModeQAuto-Off
D
Continuous: this mode implements what is often referred to as On/Off control.
Once the Heater Range is set to on, the Warm Up Percentage voltage is applied to
the output until the control input temperature reaches the setpoint. Then the
output will turn off (0 V) until the temperature falls 1 K below the setpoint, at
which point the the Warm Up Percentage voltage is again applied to the output.
The Heater Range will never be automatically set to Off in this mode.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QWarm Up ControlQ(Auto-Off, Continuous)
Default: Continuous
Interface Command: WARMUP
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.5 Monitor Out
In Monitor Out mode, the unpowered analog output (3 or 4) will track the assigned
control input according to the scaling parameters you enter. A common use for this
function would be to send a voltage proportional to temperature to a data acquisition
system.
The Control Input parameter setting determines which sensor input is tracked by the
output. The remaining parameters detailed in this section dictate how the output
value is determined.
An output configured to Monitor Out mode is not affected by the ALL OFF key, as it does
not have a Heater Range setting, and by design is always enabled.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QOutput ModeQMonitor Out
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QControl Input Q(None, Input A, Input B,
Input C, Input D)
Default: Control InputQNone
Interface Command: OUTMODE
5.5.1 Monitor Units
The Monitor Units parameter determines the units of the Control Input sensor to use
for creating the proportional voltage output. The Monitor Out scaling parameter settings are entered using the units chosen for this parameter.
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QMonitor UnitsQ(K, C, or Sensor)
Default: K
Interface Command: ANALOG
5.5.1.1 Polarity and Monitor Out Scaling Parameters
In the Monitor Out and Open Loop modes, the unpowered analog outputs can be configured as either unipolar (0 V to +10 V) or bipolar (–10 V to +10 V) outputs. In bipolar
mode, the Monitor Out –10 V setting determines the temperature or sensor value at
which the output should be –10 V. In unipolar mode, the Monitor Out 0 V setting
determines the temperature or sensor value at which the output should be 0 V. The
Monitor Out +10 V setting determines the temperature or sensor value at which the
output should be +10 V in either unipolar or bipolar modes.
Bipolar
Lowest
Input
Middle
Highest
–10 V
Output
0V
+10 V
Input mode
Unipolar
Lowest
Middle
Input
Highest
0V
+5 V
Output
+10 V
FIGURE 5-2 Unipolar and bipolar mode
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.6 Alarms and Relays
71
For example, if Polarity is set to Bipolar, then setting the Monitor Out –10 V parameter
to 0 K and the Monitor Out +10 V parameter to 100 K will cause the analog output to
correspond to the input temperature as shown in FIGURE 5-3. In this case if the actual
reading was 50 K, then the output would be at 0 V (middle of the scale).
Bipolar
0K
Input
50 K
100 K
–10 V
Output
0V
+10 V
FIGURE 5-3 Analog output with polarity set to bipolar
If we set the Polarity parameter to Unipolar, the output would be as shown in
FIGURE 5-4. In this case if the actual reading was 50 K, the analog output would be
+5 V (middle of the scale).
Unipolar
0K
50 K
Input
100 K
0V
+5 V
Output
+10 V
FIGURE 5-4 Output with polarity parameter set to unipolar
Menu Navigation:
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QPolarityQ(Unipolar or Bipolar)
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QMonitor Out –10 VQ(See note below)
Output SetupQOutput (3 or 4)QMonitor Out 0 VQ(See note below)
Output SetupQ Output (3 or 4)QMonitor Out +10 VQ(See note below)
Monitor Out -10 V, 0 V, and +10 V settings depend on the Monitor Units selected, and are
limited to the acceptable values of the selected units.
Default: PolarityQUnipolar
Monitor Out -10 VQ0.0000 K
Monitor Out 0 VQ0.0000 K
Monitor Out +10 VQ1000 K
Interface Command: ANALOG
5.6 Alarms and
Relays
5.6.1 Alarms
Each input of the Model 336 has high and low alarm capability. Input reading data
from any source can be compared to the alarm setpoint values. A reading higher than
the high alarm setpoint triggers the high alarm for that input. A reading lower than
the low alarm setpoint triggers the low alarm for that input.
Menu Navigation:
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QAlarmQ(Off, On)
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QLow SetpointQ(see note below)
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QHigh SetpointQ(see note below)
Low and High Setpoint limits are determined by the Preferred Units of the associated sensor input.
Defaults: AlarmQOff
Low SetpointQ0.0000 K
High SetpointQ1000 K
Interface Command: ALARM
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.6.1.1 Alarm Annunciators
The Alarm LED annunciator steadily displays when any alarm that is enabled also has
the Visible parameter enabled. The annunciator flashes when any alarm that has the
Visible parameter enabled activates. An input need not be displayed for the system
Alarm annunciator to indicate input alarm status, but if the input is displayed on the
front panel, then the reading will alternate between the alarm status message and
the actual reading. If the Audible parameter is set to On for an enabled alarm, then
the beeper inside the instrument will sound when the alarm activates. The two relays
on the Model 336 can also be tied to alarm functions as described in section 5.6.2.
You may want to set the Visible parameter to Off if there is no need for showing the
alarm state on the front panel, for instance, if you are using the alarm function to trigger a relay. The Audible parameter can be set to Off as well to keep the audible alarm
from sounding when an alarm is triggered.
Menu Navigation:
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QVisibleQ(Off, On)
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QAudibleQ(Off, On)
Default: VisibleQOn
AudibleQOn
Interface Command: ALARM
5.6.1.2 Alarm Latching
D
D
Latching Alarms: often used to detect faults in a system or experiment that
requires operator intervention. The alarm state remains visible to the operator
for diagnostics even if the alarm condition is removed. Relays often signal remote
monitors, or for added safety take critical equipment off line. You can clear a
latched alarm by pressing Alarm and selecting Yes to the Reset Alarm prompt.
Select No to the Reset Alarm prompt to enter the Alarm Setup menu.
Non-Latching Alarms: often tied to relay operation to control part of a system or
experiment. The alarm state follows the reading value. The dead band parameter
can prevent relays from turning on and off repeatedly when the sensor input
reading is near an alarm setpoint.
FIGURE 5-5 illustrates the interaction between alarm setpoint and dead band in
non-latching operation. With the high alarm setpoint at 100 K and the dead band
at 5 K, the high alarm triggers when sensor input temperature increases to 100 K,
and it will not deactivate until temperature drops to 95 K. In addition, the same
5 K dead band is applied to the low alarm setpoint as well.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.6.1 Alarms
High alarm activated
73
High alarm deactivated
100 K
High alarm setpoint
95 K
Temperature reading
Alarm latching off
Deadband = 5 K
55 K
Low alarm setpoint
50 K
Low alarm deactivated
Low alarm activated
FIGURE 5-5 Dead band example
To setup an alarm, enter the Alarm Setup menu by pressing the Alarm key. If a latching
alarm has been activated, you will be prompted with a Reset Alarm? message. Select
No to enter the Alarm Setup menu.
Menu Navigation:
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QLatchingQ(Off, On)
AlarmQInput (A, B, C, D)QDeadbandQ(see note below)
Low and High Setpoint limits are determined by the Preferred Units of the associated
sensor input.
Default: LatchingQOff
DeadbandQ1.0000 K
Interface Command: ALARM
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.6.2 Relays
There are two relays on the Model 336 numbered 1 and 2. They are most commonly
thought of as alarm relays, butthey may be manually controlled also. Relay assignments are configurable as shown in FIGURE 5-6. Two relays can be used with one sensor input for independent high and low operation, or each can be assigned to a
different input.
Relay 1
Off
On
Manual off
Manual on
relay remains in
normal state
relay remains in
active state
Relay 2
A Alarm B Alarm
Follows
Input A
Both
Alarms
Follows
Input B
Low
Alarm
Off
On
Manual off
Manual on
relay remains in
normal state
relay remains in
active state
High
Alarm
A Alarm B Alarm
Follows
Input A
Both
Alarms
Follows
Input B
Low
Alarm
Off
Manual off—relay remains in the normal state.
On
Manual on—relay remains in the active state.
A Alarm
Relay will follow Input A alarms
Both Alarms Relay active when either the High or Low Alarm is active
Low Alarms Relay active only when the Low Alarm is active
High Alarms Relay active only when the High Alarm is active
B Alarm
Relay will follow Input B alarms
Both Alarms Relay active when either the High or Low Alarm is active
Low Alarms Relay active only when the Low Alarm is active
High Alarms Relay active only when the High Alarm is active
High
Alarm
FIGURE 5-6 Relay settings
When using relays with alarm operation, set up alarms first. The relays are rated for
30 VDC and 3 A. Their terminals are in the detachable terminal block on the
Model 336 rear panel.
In the Off mode, the relay is un-energized, leaving the normally open (NO) contacts
open and the normally closed (NC) contacts closed. In the On mode, the relay is energized, so the NO contacts will be closed and the NC contacts will be open. In the Alarm
mode the relay will activate based on the state of the configured Alarm Input sensor.
When the Alarm to Follow parameter is set to Low, the relay will energize if the configured Alarm Input sensor goes into a low alarm state. If it is set to High, the relay will
energize if the configured Alarm Input sensor goes into a high alarm state. If the
Alarm to Follow parameter is set to Both, the relay will energize if the configured
Alarm Input sensor goes into either a low alarm or a high alarm state.
Menu Navigation:
RelaysQ(Relay 1, Relay 2)QModeQ(Off, On, Alarm)
RelaysQ(Relay 1, Relay 2)QAlarm InputQInput (A, B, C, D)
RelaysQ(Relay 1, Relay 2)QAlarm to FollowQ(Low, High, Both)
Default: ModeQOff
Alarm InputQInput A
Alarm to FollowQBoth
Interface Command: RELAY
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.7 Curve Numbers and Storage
5.7 Curve
Numbers and
Storage
75
The Model 336 has 20 standard curve locations, numbered 1 through 20. At present,
not all locations are occupied by curves; the others are reserved for future updates. If
a standard curve location is in use, the curve can be viewed using the view operation.
Standard curves cannot be changed by the user, and reserved locations are not available for user curves.
The Model 336 has 39 user curve locations, numbered 21 through 59. Each location
can hold from 2 to 200 data pairs (breakpoints), including a value in sensor units and
a corresponding value in kelvin. Using fewer than 200 breakpoints will not increase
the number of available curve locations. SoftCal™-generated curves are stored in
user curve locations.
5.7.1 Curve Header
Parameters
Each curve has parameters that are used for identification and to allow the instrument to use the curve effectively. The parameters must be set correctly before a curve
can be used for temperature conversion or temperature control.
D
D
D
D
Curve Number: 1 to 59.
Name: defaults to the name User Curve for front panel entry. A curve name of up to
fifteen characters can be entered from either the front panel or from the computer interface. Refer to section 4.2.3 for Alpha-Numeric entry.
Serial Number: a sensor serial number of up to ten characters (letters or numbers)
can be entered from either the front panel or from the computer interface. Refer
to section 4.2.3 for Alpha-Numeric entry. The default is blank.
Format: the format parameter tells the instrument what breakpoint data format
to expect. Different sensor types require different formats. Formats for
Lake Shore sensors are described in TABLE 5-3.
Description
Sensor Units
Full Scale Range
Sensor Units
Maximum Resolution
V/K
Volts vs. kelvin
10 V
0.00001 V
)/K
Resistance vs. kelvin for
platinum RTD sensors
10 K)
0.001 )
Log resistance vs. kelvin for
NTC resistive sensors
4 log )
0.00001 log )
Millivolts vs. kelvin for
thermocouple sensors
±100 mV
0.0001 mV
Format
Log )/K
mV/K
TABLE 5-3 Curve header parameter
D
D
5.7.2 Curve
Breakpoints
Setpoint Limit: limits the control setpoint to values less than or equal to this setting. A setpoint limit can be included with every curve. Default is 375 K. Enter a
setting of 9999 K if no limit is needed.
Temperature Coefficient: the temperature coefficient is derived by the Model 336
from the first two breakpoints. The user does not enter this setting. If it is not correct, check for proper entry of the first two breakpoints. A positive coefficient
indicates that the sensor signal increases with increasing temperature. A
negative coefficient indicates that the sensor signal decreases with increasing
temperature.
Temperature response data of a calibrated sensor must be reduced to a table of
breakpoints before entering it into the instrument. A curve consists of 2 to 200 breakpoints and each breakpoint consists of one value in sensor units and one temperature
value in kelvin. The Model 336 uses linear interpolation to calculate temperature
between breakpoints. The instrument will show T.OVER or T.UNDER on the display if
the sensor reading is outside the range of the breakpoints. Sensor units are defined by
the format setting in TABLE 5-3.
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
Breakpoint setting resolution is six digits in temperature. Most temperature values
are entered with 0.001 resolution. Temperature values of 1000 K and greater can be
entered to 0.01 resolution. Temperature values below 10 K can be entered with
0.0001 resolution. Temperature range for curve entry is 0K to 9999.99 K.
Typical Lake Shore
Model
Format
Limit (K)
Temperature
Coefficient
Typical Sensor
Resolution
Silicon Diode
DT-670
V/K
475
Negative
0.00001 V
GaAlAs Diode
TG-120
V/K
325
Negative
0.00001 V
Platinum 100
PT-100
)/K
800
Positive
0.001 )
Platinum 1000
–*
)/K
800
Positive
0.01 )
Rhodium-Iron
RF-800
)/K
325
Positive
0.001 )
Carbon-Glass
CGR-1-1000
log )/K
325
Negative
0.00001 log )
CX-1050
log )/K
325
Negative
0.00001 log )
GR-200A-100
log )/K
325
Negative
0.00001 log )
Rox™
RX-102A
log )/K
40
Negative
0.00001 log )
Type K
9006-005
mV/K
1500
Positive
0.0001 mV
Type E
9006-003
mV/K
930
Positive
0.0001 mV
Type T
9006-007
mV/K
673
Positive
0.0001 mV
Au-Fe 0.03%
–*
mV/K
500
Positive
0.0001 mV
Au-Fe 0.07%
9006-001
mV/K
610
Positive
0.0001 (mV)
Sensor Type
Cernox™
Germanium
*Not offered by Lake Shore
TABLE 5-4 Typical curve parameters
Setting resolution is also six digits in sensor units. The curve format parameter
defines the range and resolution in sensor units as shown in TABLE 5-3. The sensor
type determines the practical setting resolution. TABLE 5-4 lists recommended sensor units resolutions.
Enter the breakpoints with the sensor units value increasing as point number
increases. There should not be any breakpoint locations left blank in the middle of a
curve. The search routine in the Model 336 interprets a blank breakpoint as the end of
the curve.
5.8 Front Panel
Curve Entry
Operations
There are five operations associated with front panel curve entry: Edit curve, View
Curve, Erase Curve, Copy Curve, and SoftCal; as detailed below.
Operation
Description
Refer to section:
Edit Curve
Edit Curve allows you to edit curves at any user curve location. Standard curves cannot be changed.
5.8.1
View Curve
View Curve allows you to view any curve at any curve location. No
curves can be changed.
5.8.2
Erase Curve
Erase Curve allows you to delete a curve from any user curve location.
Standard curves cannot be erased.
5.8.3
Copy Curve
Copy Curve allows you to copy a curve from any location to any user
curve location. Curves cannot be copied into standard curve locations.
5.8.4
SoftCal
SoftCal allows you to create a new temperature curve from a standard
curve and known data points entered by the user.
5.9
TABLE 5-5 Front panel curve entry operations
Menu Navigation:
Curve EntryQ(Edit Curve, View Curve, Erase Curve, Copy Curve, SoftCal)
5.8.1 Edit Curve
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Use the Edit Curve operation to enter a new curve or edit an existing user curve. Only
user curves (21 to 59) can be edited. Entering the identification parameters associated with the curve is as important as entering the breakpoints. Curve header parameters are listed in TABLE 5-3. Typical curve parameters for common sensors are listed
in TABLE 5-4. Read this section completely and gather all necessary data before
beginning the process.
5.8.1 Edit Curve
77
If the curve you wish to enter has similar parameters as an existing curve, first copy the
similar curve (as described in Section 5.2.4) to a new location, then edit the curve to the
desired parameters.
To perform the Edit Curve operation, follow this procedure.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press Curve Entry.
Scroll to Edit Curve, and press Enter.
Scroll to the desired curve and press Enter again.
Edit the curve header parameters using the standard keypad operation methods
described in section 4.2.3. The curve breakpoints are entered in a slightly different way than other menu parameters.
5. To access the breakpoint data, highlight Curve Points in the Curve Edit menu
screen and press Enter to enter the Curve Point entry screen.
The Curve Point entry screen contains a scrollable list of all curve breakpoint pairs in
the selected curve. There are three columns in the list. From left to right the columns
are: breakpoint number, breakpoint sensor value, breakpoint temperature value. Initially the highlight is on the first breakpoint number.
Menu Navigation:
Curve Entry QEdit Curve
Interface Command: CRVHDR
5.8.1.1 Edit a Breakpoint Pair
To edit a breakpoint pair, follow this procedure.
1. Select a breakpoint pair to edit. Do this by scrolling to the desired breakpoint
number and press Enter. The highlight moves to the sensor value of the selected
pair.
2. Use the Number Entry method to edit the value. Refer to section 4.2.1.1 for
details on the Number Entry method.
3. Once the new sensor value is entered, press Enter to highlight the temperature
value.
4. Use the Number Entry method to enter the new temperature value.
5. Press Enter at this point to store the new breakpoint pair.
6. Press Escape at any time when a sensor or temperature value is highlighted to
cancel any changes to either of the values and return the highlight to the breakpoint number.
If the sensor value entered is not between the previous breakpoint sensor value and
the following breakpoint sensor value, then the new breakpoint pair will be moved to
the position in the curve that bounds the sensor value of the new breakpoint pair. If
the pair is moved, a message will be displayed to indicate to the location to which the
breakpoint pair was moved.
FIGURE 5-7 Left: Scroll to highlight a breakpoint number; Middle: Press the enter key to highlight the sensor value of the selected pair ;
Right: Press the enter key again, and the temperature value is highlighted
Menu Navigation:
Curve Entry QEdit CurveQ (21–59)QCurve Points Q(1–200)
Interface Command: CRVPT
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.8.1.2 Add a New Breakpoint Pair
The last breakpoint of a curve is signified by the first pair that contains a 0 value for
both the temperature and sensor portions. Curves are limited to 200 breakpoint
pairs, so if 200 pairs already exist, then the 200th pair will be the last pair in the list.
To add a new breakpoint pair to a curve that has less than 200 pairs, scroll to the end
of the list and edit the 0 value pair by following the procedure for editing a breakpoint
pair in section 5.8.1.1. If the curve still contains less than 200 pairs, a new 0 value
breakpoint will be added to the end of the list for entering another new
breakpoint pair.
Menu Navigation:
Curve Entry QEdit Curve Q (21–59)QCurve PointsQ (1–200)
Interface Command: CRVPT
5.8.1.3 Delete a Breakpoint Pair
To delete a breakpoint pair, scroll to the desired breakpoint number, then enter a 0
value for both the sensor and temperature values by following the procedure for editing a breakpoint pair in section 5.8.1.1.
If you are not entering 0 for both sensor and temperature values, then entering new values over an existing breakpoint pair will replace that pair with the new value when you
press Enter.
After editing, adding, or deleting all desired breakpoint pairs, press Escape (Exit
Menu) while the highlight is on a breakpoint number. All breakpoint pair changes,
additions, and deletions will be saved when exiting the menu.
When curve entry is complete, you must assign the new curve to an input. The
Model 336 does not automatically assign the new curve to any input. Refer to section
4.4.9 for details on assigning a curve to a sensor input.
Menu Navigation:
Curve EntryQEdit CurveQ (21–59)QCurve PointsQ(1– 200)
Interface Command: CRVPT
5.8.1.4 Thermocouple Curve Considerations
The following are things to consider when generating thermocouple curves.
D
D
D
D
D
Model 336 Temperature Controller
You may enter temperature response curves for all types of thermocouples. Enter
curve data in mV/K format with thermocouple voltage in millivolts and temperature in kelvin.
The curve must be normalized to 0 mV at 273.15 K (0 °C). Thermocouple voltages
in millivolts are positive when temperature is above 273.15 K, and negative
when temperature is below that point.
To convert curves published in Celsius to kelvin, add 273.15 to the temperature in
Celsius.
The input voltage of the Model 336 is limited to ±50 mV, so any part of the curve
that extends beyond ±50 mV is not usable by the instrument.
A message of S.OVER or S.UNDER on the display indicates that the measured thermocouple input is over or under the ±50 mV range.
5.8.2 View Curve
5.8.2 View Curve
79
The View Curve operation provides read-only access to all standard and user curves.
To perform the View Curve operation follow this procedure.
1. Press Curve Entry, scroll to View Curve, then press Enter.
2. Scroll to the desired curve and press Enter again to view the curve header information.
3. To view the curve breakpoints, highlight the Curve Points parameter and press
Enter. The list of breakpoint pairs is scrollable, but data cannot be edited.
4. Press Escape (Exit Menu) to return to the curve header parameter list.
5. Press Escape (Exit Menu) again to exit the Curve Entry menu and return to normal operation.
Menu Navigation:
Curve EntryQView Curve
Interface Command: CRVHDR, CRVPT
5.8.3 Erase Curve
You can erase user curves that are no longer needed. Erase Curve sets all identification parameters to default and blanks all breakpoint values.
To perform the Erase Curve operation follow this procedure.
1. Press Curve Entry, scroll to Erase Curve, then press Enter.
2. Scroll to the desired curve and press Enter.
3. Choose Yes at the confirmation message to finalize the operation.
4. To cancel the operation, either choose No to the confirmation message, or press
Escape.
Menu Navigation:
Curve EntryQErase Curve Q (21–59)
Interface Command: CRDEL
5.8.4 Copy Curve
Temperature curves can be copied from one location inside the Model 336 to another.
This is a good way to make small changes to an existing curve. Curve copy may also be
necessary if you need the same curve with two different temperature limits or if you
need to extend the range of a standard curve. The curve that is copied from is always
preserved.
The copy routine allows you to overwrite an existing user curve. Please ensure the curve
number you are writing to is correct before proceeding with the copy curve operation.
1. To perform the Copy Curve operation press Curve Entry , scroll to Copy Curve,
then press Enter.
2. Scroll to the desired curve to copy, and press Enter. A list of user curves is displayed.
3. Scroll to the desired user curve location to copy to, and press Enter.
4. Choose Yes at the confirmation message to finalize the operation.
5. To cancel the operation, either choose No to the confirmation message, or press
Escape .
Menu Navigation:
Curve Entry QCopy Curve Q (1–59) Q (21–59)
Interface Command: (No interface command directly corresponds to the copy curve
operation. You can use the CRVHDR and CRVPT commands to read curve information
from one curve location and write that information to another curve location.)
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.9 SoftCal™
The Model 336 allows you to perform inexpensive sensor calibrations with a set of
algorithms called SoftCal™. The two SoftCal™ algorithms in the Model 336 work with
DT-400 Series silicon diode sensors and platinum sensors. They create a new temperature response curve from the standard curve and known data points that you
entered. The new curve loads into one of the user curve locations (21 to 59) in the
instrument. The following sections describe the data points you need to supply and
the expected accuracy of the resulting curves.
A feature similar to SoftCal™ is available for compensating thermocouples using the
Curve Handler® program.
Both DT-400 Series and platinum SoftCal™ algorithms require a standard curve that
is already present in the Model 336. When you enter the type of sensor being calibrated, the correct standard curve must be selected. When calibration is complete,
you must assign the new curve to an input. The Model 336 does not automatically
assign the newly generated curve to either input.
Calibration data points must be entered into the Model 336. These calibration points
are normally measured at easily obtained temperatures like the boiling point of cryogens. Each algorithm operates with 1, 2, or 3 calibration points. The range of
improved accuracy increases with more points.
There are two ways to get SoftCal™ calibration data points: you can record the
response of an unknown sensor at well controlled temperatures, or you can purchase
a SoftCal™ calibrated sensor from Lake Shore. There are advantages to both methods.
D
D
5.9.1 SoftCal™ With
Silicon Diode Sensors
User: when you can provide stable calibration temperatures with the sensor
installed, SoftCal™ calibration eliminates errors in the sensor measurement as
well as the sensor. Thermal gradients, instrument accuracy, and other measurement errors can be significant to some users. Calibration can be no better than
user-supplied data.
Purchased: Lake Shore sensors with SoftCal™ calibration include a set of calibration points in the calibration report. The SoftCal™ calibration points are generated in a controlled calibration facility at Lake Shore for best accuracy. The
calibration points can be entered into the Model 336 so it can generate a curve. If
the CalCurve™ service is purchased with the calibrated sensor, the curve is also
generated at the factory and can be entered like any other curve.
Lake Shore silicon diode sensors incorporate remarkably uniform sensing elements
that exhibit precise, monotonic, and repeatable temperature response. For example,
the Lake Shore DT-400 Series of silicon diode sensors have a repeatable temperature
response from 2 K to 475 K. These sensors closely follow a standard curve . SoftCal™ is
an inexpensive way to improve the accuracy of an already predictable sensor.
A unique characteristic of DT-400 Series diodes is that their temperature responses
pass through 28 K at almost exactly the same voltage. This improves SoftCal™ algorithm operation by providing an extra calibration data point. It also explains why
SoftCal™ calibration specifications are divided into two temperature ranges, above
and below 28 K. See FIGURE 5-8.
D
D
D
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Point 1: calibration data point at or near the boiling point of helium, 4.2 K. Acceptable temperature entries are 2 K to 10 K. This data point improves between the
calibration data point and 28 K. Points 2 and 3 improve temperatures above 28 K.
Point 2: calibration data point at or near the boiling point of nitrogen (77.35 K).
Temperatures outside 50 K to 100 K are not allowed. This data point improves
accuracy between 28 K and 100 K. Points 2 and 3 together improve accuracy to
room temperature and above.
Point 3: calibration data point near room temperature (305 K). Temperatures outside the range of 200 K to 350 K are not allowed.
5.9.2 SoftCal™ Accuracy With DT-400 Series Silicon Diode Sensors
SoftCal™ Point 1 SoftCal™ Point 2
Liquid helium
Liquid nitrogen
boiling point
boiling point
4.2 K
77.35 K
0
25
2 – 10 K
50
75
100
81
SoftCal™ Point 3
Room temperature
point
305 K
125
50 – 100 K
150
175
200
225
250
275
300
325
350
200 – 325 K
FIGURE 5-8 Acceptable temperature range for DT-400 series silicon diode SoftCal™ sensors
5.9.2 SoftCal™
Accuracy With DT-400
Series Silicon Diode
Sensors
A SoftCal™ calibration is only as good as the accuracy of the calibration points. The
accuracies listed for SoftCal™ assume ±0.01 K for 4.2 K (liquid helium), ±0.05 K for
77.35 K (liquid nitrogen), and 305 K (room temperature) points. Users performing the
SoftCal™ with Lake Shore instruments should note that the boiling point of liquid
cryogen, though accurate, is affected by atmospheric pressure. Use calibrated standard sensors if possible.
One-point SoftCal™ calibrations for applications under 30 K are performed at liquid
helium (4.2 K) temperature. Accuracy for the DT-470-SD-13 diode is ±0.5 K from 2 K
to <30 K with no accuracy change above 30 K.
Two-point SoftCal™ calibrations for applications above 30 K are performed at liquid
nitrogen (77.35 K) and room temperature (305 K). Accuracy for the DT-470-SD-13
diode sensor is as follows:
±1.0 K
2 K to <30 K (no change below 30 K)
±0.25 K
30 K to <60 K
±0.15 K
60 K to <345 K
±0.25 K
345 K to <375 K
±1.0 K
375 to 475 K
TABLE 5-6 2-point SoftCal™ calibration
accuracy for DT-470-SD-13 diode sensors
Three-point SoftCal™ calibrations are performed at liquid helium (4.2 K), liquid nitrogen (77.35 K), and room temperature (305 K). Accuracy for the DT-470-SD-13 diode
sensor is as follows:
±0.5 K
2 K to <30 K
±0.25 K
30 K to <60 K
±0.15 K
60 K to <345 K
±0.25 K
345 K to <375 K
±1.0 K
375 to 475 K
TABLE 5-7 3-point SoftCal™ calibration
accuracy for DT-470-SD-13 diode sensors
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
5.9.3 SoftCal™ With
Platinum Sensors
The platinum sensor is a well-accepted temperature standard because of its consistent and repeatable temperature response above 30 K. SoftCal™ gives platinum sensors better accuracy than their nominal matching to the DIN 43760 curve.
SoftCal™ Point 1
Liquid nitrogen
boiling point
77.35 K
0
50
100
150
50 – 100 K
SoftCal™ Point 2
Room temperature
point
305 K
200
250
300
200 – 325 K
350
SoftCal™ Point 3
High temperature
point
480 K
400
450
500
550
600
650
400 – 600 K
FIGURE 5-9 Acceptable temperature range for platinum SoftCal™ sensors
One, two, or three calibration data points can be used. If you are using one point, the
algorithm shifts the entire curve up or down to meet the single point. If you are using
two points, the algorithm has enough information to tilt the curve, achieving good
accuracy between the data points. The third point extends the improved accuracy to
span all three points.
D
D
D
5.9.4 SoftCal™
Accuracy With
Platinum Sensors
Point 1: calibration data point at or near the boiling point of nitrogen (77.35 K).
Acceptable temperature entries are 50 K to 100 K.
Point 2: calibration data point near room temperature (305 K). Acceptable temperature entries are 200 K to 300 K.
Point 3: calibration data point at a higher temperature (480 K). Acceptable temperature entries are 400 K to 600 K.
A SoftCal™ calibration is only as good as the accuracy of the calibration points. The
accuracies listed for SoftCal™ assume ±0.05 K for 77.35 K (liquid nitrogen) and 305 K
(room temperature) points. If you are performing the SoftCal™ with Lake Shore
instruments, note that the boiling point of liquid cryogen, though accurate, is
affected by atmospheric pressure. Use calibrated standard sensors if possible.
One-point SoftCal™ calibrations with platinum sensors have no specified accuracy.
Two-point SoftCal™ calibrations for applications above 70 K are performed at liquid
nitrogen (77.35 K) and room temperature (305 K). Accuracy for the PT-102, PT-103, or
PT-111 platinum sensor is as follows:
±250 mK
70 K to 325 K
±500 mK
325K to ±1400 mK at 480 K
(DIN class A or class B tolerance
TABLE 5-8 Three-point SoftCal™ calibration
accuracy for DT-470-SD-13 diode sensors
Three-point SoftCal™ calibrations are performed at liquid nitrogen (77.35 K), room
temperature (305 K), and high temperature (480 K). Accuracy for the PT-102, PT-103,
or PT-111 platinum sensor is ±250 mK from 70 K to 325 K, and ±250 mK from
325 K to 480 K.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
5.9.5 SoftCal™ CalibrationCurve Creation
5.9.5 SoftCal™
CalibrationCurve
Creation
83
Once the calibration data points have been obtained, you may create a SoftCal™ calibration. Press Curve Entry, then scroll to Softcal and press Enter. A list of sensor types
is displayed containing DT-470, PT-100, and PT 1000. Scroll to the desired sensor type
and press Enter . A list of SoftCal™ parameters is displayed.
Use the Store Location parameter to choose the user curve location in which to store
the newly generated curve. If desired, use the Serial Number parameter to enter a
serial number for the newly generated curve. Use the Point X Temp and Point X Sensor
parameters to enter calibration data point X, where X can be point 1, 2, or 3. If only 1
or 2 data points were acquired, only enter those data points and leave the others at
their default values. Note the acceptable temperature ranges for each calibration
data point in FIGURE 5-8 and FIGURE 5-9. If a temperature value outside of the
acceptable range is entered, the value will be limited to the closest acceptable value.
Once the data points are entered, highlight Generate Softcal and press Enter. Choose
Yes at the confirmation message to finalize the operation. To cancel the operation,
either choose No to the confirmation message, or press Escape. When the Softcal™
curve has been generated, the following message will appear on the display:
*** SoftCal curve has been generated ***.
The Generate Softcal operation will overwrite an existing user curve. Please ensure the
curve number you are writing to is correct before generating the calibrated curve.
You can check the new curve using the View Curve instructions in section 5.8.2. The
curve is not automatically assigned to any input, so you will need to assign it to an
input. Refer to section 4.4.9 for details on assigning a curve to a sensor input.
Menu Navigation:
Curve Entry QSoftcalQ(DT-470, Platinum 100, Platinum 1000)QData Entry (see note
below)Q(Generate Softcal)Q (Yes)
Interface Command: SCAL
Data entry includes new curve serial number and calibration points.
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cHAPTER 5: Advanced Operation
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.1 General
85
Chapter 6: Computer Interface
Operation
6.1 General
This chapter provides operational instructions for the computer interface for the
Lake Shore Model 336 temperature controller. Each of the three computer interfaces
provided with the Model 336 permit remote operation. The first is the IEEE–488
interface described in section 6.2. The second is the USB interface described in
section 6.3. The third is the Ethernet interface described in section 6.4. The three
interfaces share a common set of commands detailed in section 6.6. Only one of the
interfaces can be used at a time.
6.2 IEEE-488
Interface
The IEEE–488 interface is an instrumentation bus with hardware and programming
standards that simplify instrument interfacing. The Model 336 IEEE–488 interface
complies with the IEEE-488.2 standard and incorporates its functional, electrical,
and mechanical specifications unless otherwise specified in this manual.
All instruments on the interface bus perform one or more of the interface functions of
Talker, Listener, or Bus Controller. A Talker transmits data onto the bus to other
devices. A Listener receives data from other devices through the bus. The Bus Controller designates to the devices on the bus which function to perform. The Model 336
performs the functions of Talker and Listener, but it cannot be a Bus Controller. The
Bus Controller is the digital computer that tells the Model 336 which functions to
perform.
TABLE 6-1 defines the IEEE–488 capabilities and subsets for the Model 336:
Subset
Capabilities
SH1:
Source handshake capability
RL1:
Complete remote/local capability
DC1:
Full device clear capability
DT0:
No device trigger capability
C0:
No system controller capability
T5:
Basic Talker, serial poll capability, talk only,
unaddressed to talk if addressed to listen
L4:
Basic Listener, unaddressed to listen if
addressed to talk
SR1:
Service request capability
AH1:
Acceptor handshake capability
PP0:
No parallel poll capability
E1:
Open collector electronics
TABLE 6-1 Model 336 IEEE-488 interface capabilities
and their subsets
Instruments are connected to the IEEE–488 bus by a 24-conductor connector cable
as specified by the standard (section 8.10.1). Cables can be ordered from Lake Shore
as IEEE-488 Cable Kit 4005, or they can be purchased from other electronic suppliers.
Cable lengths are limited to 2 m (6.6 ft) for each device and 20 m (65.6 ft) for the
entire bus. The Model 336 can drive a bus with up to ten loads. If more instruments or
cable length is required, a bus expander must be used.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.2.1 Changing
IEEE-488 Interface
Parameters
The IEEE-488 address must be set from the front panel before communication with
the instrument can be established.
6.2.2 Remote/Local
Operation
Normal operations from the keypad are referred to as local operations. The
Model 336 can also be configured for remote operations via the IEEE-488 interface or
the Remote/Local key. The Remote/Local key will toggle between remote and local
operation. During remote operations, the remote annunciator LED will be illuminated, and operations from the keypad will be disabled.
6.2.3 IEEE-488.2
Command Structure
The Model 336 supports several command types. These commands are divided
into four groups.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQEnabledQIEEE-488
InterfaceQIEEE-488 Address Q(1 to 31)
Default: IEEE-488
1. Bus Control (section 6.2.3.1).
a.
b.
Universal
D Uniline
D Multiline
Addressed bus control
2. Common (section 6.2.3.2).
3. Device Specific (section 6.2.3.3).
4. Message Strings (section 6.2.3.4).
6.2.3.1 Bus Control Commands
A bus control command can either be a universal or an addressed bus control. A universal command addresses all devices on the bus. Universal commands include uniline and multiline commands. A uniline command (message) asserts only a single
signal line. The Model 336 recognizes two of these messages from the Bus Controller:
Remote (REN) and Interface Clear (IFC). The Model 336 sends one uniline command:
Service Request (SRQ).
D
D
D
REN (Remote): puts the Model 336 into remote mode
IFC (Interface Clear): stops current operation on the bus
SRQ (Service Request): tells the bus controller that the Model 336 needs interface
service
A multiline command asserts a group of signal lines. All devices equipped to implement such commands do so simultaneously upon command transmission. These
commands transmit with the Attention (ATN) line asserted low. The Model 336 recognizes two multiline commands:
D
D
LLO (Local Lockout): prevents the use of instrument front panel controls
DCL (Device Clear): clears Model 336 interface activity and puts it into a bus idle
state
Finally, addressed bus control commands are multiline commands that must include
the Model 336 listen address before the instrument responds. Only the addressed
device responds to these commands. The Model 336 recognizes three of the
addressed bus control commands:
D
D
Model 336 Temperature Controller
SDC (Selective Device Clear): the SDC command performs essentially the same
function as the DCL command, except that only the addressed device responds
GTL (Go To Local): the GTL command is used to remove instruments from the
remote mode. With some instruments, GTL also unlocks front panel controls if
they were previously locked out with the LLO command.
6.2.3 IEEE-488.2 Command Structure
D
87
SPE (Serial Poll Enable) and SPD (Serial Poll Disable): serial polling accesses the
Service Request Status Byte Register. This status register contains important
operational information from the unit requesting service. The SPD command
ends the polling sequence.
6.2.3.2 Common Commands
Common commands are addressed commands that create commonality between
instruments on the bus. All instruments that comply with the IEEE-488 standard
share these commands and their format. Common commands all begin with an asterisk. They generally relate to bus and instrument status and identification. Common
query commands end with a question mark (?). Model 336 common commands are
detailed in section 6.6.1 and summarized in TABLE 6-6.
6.2.3.3 Device Specific Commands
Device specific commands are addressed commands. The Model 336 supports a variety of device specific commands to program instruments remotely from a digital
computer and to transfer measurements to the computer. Most device specific commands also work if performed from the front panel. Model 336 device specific commands are detailed in section 6.6.1 and summarized in TABLE 6-6.
6.2.3.4 Message Strings
A message string is a group of characters assembled to perform an interface function.
There are three types of message strings: commands, queries and responses. The
computer issues command and query strings through user programs, and the instrument issues responses. Two or more command strings or queries can be chained
together in one communication, but they must be separated by a semi-colon (;). The
total communication string must not exceed 255 characters in length.
A command string is issued by the computer and instructs the instrument to perform
a function or change a parameter setting. When a command is issued, the computer
is acting as talker and the instrument as listener. The format is:
<command mnemonic><space><parameter data><terminator>.
Command mnemonics and parameter data necessary for each one is described in
section 6.6.1. A terminator must be sent with every message string.
A query string is issued by the computer and instructs the instrument which response
to send. Queries are issued similar to commands with the computer acting as talker
and the instrument as listener. The query format is:
<query mnemonic><?><space><parameter data><terminator>.
Query mnemonics are often the same as commands with the addition of a question
mark. Parameter data is often unnecessary when sending queries. Query mnemonics
and parameter data if necessary is described in section 6.6.1. A terminator must be
sent with every message string. Issuing a query does not initiate a response from the
instrument.
A response string is sent by the instrument only when it is addressed as a talker and
the computer becomes the listener. The instrument will respond only to the last query
it receives. The response can be a reading value, status report or the present value of a
parameter. Response data formats are listed along with the associated queries
in section 6.6.1.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.2.4 Status System
Overview
The Model 336 implements a status system compliant with the IEEE-488.2 standard.
The status system provides a method of recording and reporting instrument information and is typically used to control the Service Request (SRQ) interrupt line. A diagram of the status system is shown in FIGURE 6-1. The status system is made up of
status register sets, the Status Byte register, and the Service Request Enable register.
Each register set consists of three types of registers: condition, event, and enable.
6.2.4.1 Condition Registers
Each register set (except the Standard Event Register set) includes a condition register as shown in FIGURE 6-1. The condition register constantly monitors the instrument status. The data bits are real-time and are not latched or buffered. The register
is read-only.
6.2.4.2 Event Registers
Each register set includes an event register as shown in FIGURE 6-1. Bits in the event
register correspond to various system events and latch when the event occurs. When
an event bit is set, subsequent events corresponding to that bit are ignored. Set bits
remain latched until the register is cleared by a query command (such as *ESR?) or a
*CLS command. The register is read-only.
6.2.4.3 Enable Registers
Each register set includes an enable register as shown in FIGURE 6-1. An enable register determines which bits in the corresponding event register will set the summary
bit for the register set in the Status Byte. You may write to or read from an enable register. Each event register bit is logically ANDed to the corresponding enable bit of the
enable register. When you set an enable register bit, and the corresponding bit is set
in the event register, the output (summary) of the register will be set, which in turn
sets the summary bit of the Status Byte register.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.2.4 Status System Overview
Standard event
Status register
*ESR?
89
– Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
PON
Not
used
CME
EXE
Not
used
QYE
Not
used
OPC
– Name
Output
buffer
AND
AND
OR
AND
AND
AND
Standard event
Status enable register
*ESE, *ESE?
7
6
PON
Not
used
5
CME
4
3
EXE
Not
used
1
0
QYE
Not
used
OPC
PON = Power on
CME = Command error
EXE = Execution error
QYE = Query error
OPC = Operation complete
RQS
– Bit
2
– Name
Status byte register
*STB?
7
6
OSB
Generate service
request—reset by
serial poll
RQS MSS
5
ESB
4
3
2
1
0
MAV
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
OR
AND
Read by *STB?
Service request
enable register
*SRE, *SRE?
Operation
condition register
OPST?
Operation
event register
OPSTR?
7
6
COM
5
3
2
1
6
5
4
3
2
0
1
7
OSB
6
Not used
5
ESB
4
3
2
1
0
MAV
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
– Bit
– Name
OSB = Operation summary bit
RQS = Service request
MSS = Master summary status bit
ESB = Event status summary bit
MAV = Message available summary bit
– Bit
0
CAL ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
7
COM
4
– Name
AND
AND
MSS
– Bit
– Name
– Bit
CAL ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
– Name
AND
AND
AND
AND
OR
AND
AND
AND
AND
Operation event
enable register
OPSTE, OPSTE?
7
COM
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
CAL ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
– Bit
– Name
COM = Processor communication error
CAL = Calibration error
ATUNE = Autotune process completed
NRDG = New sensor reading
RAMP1 = Loop 1 ramp done
RAMP2 = Loop 2 ramp done
OVLD = Sensor overload
ALARM = Sensor alarming
FIGURE 6-1 Model 336 status system
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.2.4.4 Status Byte Register
The Status Byte register, typically referred to as the Status Byte, is a non-latching,
read-only register that contains all of the summary bits from the register sets. The
status of the summary bits are controlled from the register sets as explained in section 6.2.4.1 to section 6.2.4.3. The Status Byte also contains the Request for Service
(RQS)/Master Summary Status (MSS) bit. This bit is used to control the Service
Request hardware line on the bus and to report if any of the summary bits are set via
the *STB? command. The status of the RQS/MSS bit is controlled by the summary bits
and the Service Request Enable Register.
6.2.4.5 Service Request Enable Register
The Service Request Enable Register determines which summary bits in the Status
Byte will set the RQS/MSS bit of the Status Byte. You may write to or read from the Service Request Enable Register. Each Status Byte summary bit is logically ANDed to the
corresponding enable bit of the Service Request Enable Register. When you set a Service Request Enable Register bit, and the corresponding summary bit is set in the Status Byte, the RQS/MSS bit of the Status Byte will be set, which in turn sets the Service
Request hardware line on the bus.
6.2.4.6 Reading Registers
You can read any register in the status system using the appropriate query command.
Some registers clear when read, others do not (section 6.2.4.8). The response to a
query will be a decimal value that corresponds to the binary-weighted sum of all bits
in the register (TABLE 6-2). The actual query commands are described later throughout section 6.2.4.
Position
B7
B6
B5
B4
B3
B2
B1
Decimal
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
Weighting
B0
Example: If bits 0, 2, and 4 are set, a query of the register will return a decimal value of 21 (1+4+16).
TABLE 6-2 Binary weighting of an 8-bit register
6.2.4.7 Programming Registers
The only registers that may be programmed by the user are the enable registers. All
other registers in the status system are read-only registers. To program an enable
register, send a decimal value that corresponds to the desired binary-weighted sum
of all bits in the register (TABLE 6-2). The actual commands are described throughout
(section 6.2.4).
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.2.5 Status System Detail: Status Register Sets
91
6.2.4.8 Clearing Registers
The methods to clear each register are detailed in TABLE 6-3.
Register
Method
Condition registers
Event registers:
Standard event status register
Operation event register
Enable registers
Standard Event Status Enable Register
Operation Event Enable Register
Service Request Enable Register
Status byte
Example
None. Registers are not latched
—
Query the event register
*ESR? (clears Standard Event
Status Register
Send *CLS
*CLS (clears both registers)
Power on instrument
—
Write 0 to the
enable register
*ESE 0 (clears Standard Event
Status Enable register)
Power on instrument
—
There are no commands that directly clear the status byte as the bits are
non-latching; to clear individual summary bits clear the event register that
corresponds to the summary bit—sending *CLS will clear all event
registers which in turn clears the status byte
If bit 5 (ESB) of the status byte is
set, send *ESR? to read the
standard event status register
and bit 5 will clear
Power on instrument
—
TABLE 6-3 Register clear methods
6.2.5 Status System
Detail: Status Register
Sets
As shown in FIGURE 6-1, there are two register sets in the status system of the
Model 336: Standard Event Status Register and Operation Event Register.
6.2.5.1 Standard Event Status Register Set
The Standard Event Status Register reports the following interface related instrument events: power on detected, command syntax errors, command execution errors,
query errors, operation complete. Any or all of these events may be reported in the
standard event summary bit through the enable register (FIGURE 6-2). The Standard
Event Status Enable command (*ESE) programs the enable register and the query
command (*ESE?) reads it. *ESR? reads and clears the Standard Event Status Register.
The used bits of the Standard Event Register are described as follows:
D
D
D
D
D
Power On (PON), Bit (7): this bit is set to indicate an instrument off-on
transition.
Command Error (CME), Bit (5): this bit is set if a command error has been detected
since the last reading. This means that the instrument could not interpret the
command due to a syntax error, an unrecognized header, unrecognized terminators, or an unsupported command.
Execution Error (EXE), Bit (4): this bit is set if an execution error has been
detected. This occurs when the instrument is instructed to do something not
within its capabilities.
Query Error (QYE), Bit (2): this bit indicates a query error. It occurs rarely and
involves loss of data because the output queue is full.
Operation Complete (OPC), Bit (0): when *OPC is sent, this bit will be set when the
instrument has completed all pending operations. The operation of this bit is not
related to the *OPC? command, which is a separate interface feature
(section 6.2.6.6).
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
7
6
5
4
Standard event 128 64 32 16
Status register
Not
*ESR? PON used CME EXE
(*ESR? reads and
clears the register)
– Bit
3
8
2
4
1
2
0
1
Not
used
QYE
Not
used
OPC
– Decimal
– Name
AND
AND
OR
AND
AND
AND
Standard event 7
6
Status enable register
128 64
*ESE, *ESE?
PON
Not
used
5
32
4
16
3
8
2
4
1
2
0
1
CME
EXE
Not
used
QYE
Not
used
OPC
To event summary
bit (ESB) of status
byte register
– Decimal (see FIGURE 6-1)
– Name
– Bit
FIGURE 6-2 Standard event status register
6.2.5.2 Operation Event Register Set
The Operation Event Register reports the interface related instrument events listed
below. Any or all of these events may be reported in the operation event summary bit
through the enable register (FIGURE 6-3). The Operation Event Enable command
(OPSTE) programs the enable register and the query command (OPSTE?) reads it.
OPSTR? reads and clears the Operation Event Register. OPST? reads the Operation
Condition register. The used bits of the Operation Event Register are described as follows:
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Processor Communication Error (COM), Bit (7): this bit is set when the main processor cannot communicate with the sensor input processor
Calibration Error (CAL), Bit (6): this bit is set if the instrument is not calibrated or
the calibration data has been corrupted
Autotune Done (ATUNE), Bit (5): this bit is set when the Autotuning algorithm is
NOT active
New Sensor Reading (NRDG), Bit (4): this bit is set when there is a new
sensor reading
Loop 1 Ramp Done (RAMP1), Bit (3): this bit is set when a loop 1 setpoint ramp
is completed
Loop 2 Ramp Done (RAMP2), Bit (2)—: this bit is set when a loop 2 setpoint ramp
is completed
Sensor Overload (OVLD), Bit (1): this bit is set when a sensor reading is in the overload condition
Alarming (ALARM), Bit (0): this bit is set when an input is in an alarming state, and
the Alarm Visible parameter is on
6.2.6 Status System Detail: Status Byte Register and Service Request
6
Operation 7
condition register 128 64
OPST? COM CAL
6
Operation 7
event register 128 64
OPSTR? COM CAL
5
32
4
16
3
8
2
4
1
2
– Bit
0
1
– Decimal
ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
5
32
4
16
3
8
2
4
– Name
– Bit
0
1
1
2
93
– Decimal
ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
– Name
AND
(OPSTR? reads and
clears the register)
AND
AND
AND
OR
AND
AND
AND
To operation
event summary
bit (OSB) of
status byte
register
(see FIGURE 6-1)
AND
7
6
Operation event
enable register 128 64
OPSTE, OPSTE? COM CAL
5
4
3
2
1
0
– Bit
32
16
8
4
2
1
– Decimal
ATUNE NRDG RAMP1 RAMP2 OVLD ALARM
– Name
FIGURE 6-3 Operation event register
6.2.6 Status System
Detail: Status Byte
Register and Service
Request
As shown in FIGURE 6-1, the Status Byte Register receives the summary bits from the
two status register sets and the message available summary bit from the output
buffer. The status byte is used to generate a service request (SRQ). The selection of
summary bits that will generate an SRQ is controlled by the Service Request Enable
Register.
6.2.6.1 Status Byte Register
The summary messages from the event registers and output buffer set or clear the
summary bits of the Status Byte Register (FIGURE 6-4). These summary bits are not
latched. Clearing an event register will clear the corresponding summary bit in the
Status Byte Register. Reading all messages in the output buffer, including any pending
queries, will clear the message available bit. The bits of the Status Byte Register are
described as follows:
D
D
Operation Summary (OSB), Bit (7): this bit is set when an enabled operation event
has occurred
Request Service (RQS)/Master Summary Status (MSS), Bit (6): this bit is set when a
summary bit and the summary bit’s corresponding enable bit in the Service
Request Enable Register are set. Once set, the user may read and clear the bit in
two different ways, which is why it is referred to as both the RQS and the MSS bit.
When this bit goes from low to high, the Service Request hardware line on the bus
is set; this is the RQS function of the bit (section 6.2.6.3). In addition, the status of
the bit may be read with the *STB? query, which returns the binary weighted sum
of all bits in the Status Byte; this is the MSS function of the bit.
Performing a serial poll will automatically clear the RQS function, but it will not clear
the MSS function. A *STB? will read the status of the MSS bit (along with all of the
summary bits), but also will not clear it. To clear the MSS bit, either clear the event
register that set the summary bit or disable the summary bit in the
Service Request Enable Register.
D
Event Summary (ESB), Bit (5): this bit is set when an enabled standard event has
occurred
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
D
Message Available (MAV), Bit (4): this bit is set when a message is available in the
output buffer
6.2.6.2 Service Request Enable Register
The Service Request Enable Register is programmed by the user and determines
which summary bits of the Status Byte may set bit 6 (RQS/MSS) to generate a Service
Request. Enable bits are logically ANDed with the corresponding summary bits
(FIGURE 6-4). Whenever a summary bit is set by an event register and its corresponding enable bit is set by the user, bit 6 will set to generate a service request. The Service
Request Enable command (*SRE) programs the Service Request Enable Register and
the query command (*SRE?) reads it.
From operation event register
From standard event status register
From operation event register
7
6
64
5
32
4
16
3
8
2
4
1
2
0
1
OSB
RQS MSS
ESB
MAV
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
Status byte register
*STB? 128
RQS
Generate service
request—reset by
serial poll
– Decimal
– Name
AND
OR
AND
MSS
– Bit
AND
Read by *STB?
7
Service request
enable register 128
*SRE, *SRE? OSB
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
– Bit
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
– Name
Not used
ESB
MAV
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
Not
used
FIGURE 6-4 Status byte register and service request enable register
6.2.6.3 Using Service Request (SRQ) and Serial Poll
When a Status Byte summary bit (or MAV bit) is enabled by the Service Request
Enable Register and goes from 0 to 1, bit 6 (RQS/MSS) of the status byte will be set.
This will send a service request (SRQ) interrupt message to the bus controller. The
user program may then direct the bus controller to serial poll the instruments on the
bus to identify which one requested service (the one with bit 6 set in its status byte).
Serial polling will automatically clear RQS of the Status Byte Register. This allows subsequent serial polls to monitor bit 6 for an SRQ occurrence generated by other event
types. After a serial poll, the same event or any event that uses the same Status Byte
summary bit, will not cause another SRQ unless the event register that caused the
first SRQ has been cleared, typically by a query of the event register.
The serial poll does not clear MSS. The MSS bit stays set until all enabled Status Byte
summary bits are cleared, typically by a query of the associated event register
(section 6.2.6.4).
The programming example in TABLE 6-4 initiates an SRQ when a command error is
detected by the instrument.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.2.6 Status System Detail: Status Byte Register and Service Request
Command or Operation
95
Description
*ESR?
Read and clear the Standard Event Status Register
*ESE 32
Enable the Command Error (CME) bit in the Standard Event Status Register
*SRE 32
Enable the Event Summary Bit (ESB) to set the RQS
*ABC
Send improper command to instrument to generate a command error
Monitor bus
Monitor the bus until the Service Request interrupt (SRQ) is sent.
Initiate serial poll
Serial poll the bus to determine which instrument sent the interrupt
and clear the RQS bit in the Status Byte.
*ESR?
Read and clear the Standard Event Status Register allowing
an SRQ to be generated on another command error.
TABLE 6-4 Programming example to generate an SRQ
6.2.6.4 Using Status Byte Query (*STB?)
The Status Byte Query (*STB?) command is similar to a serial poll except it is processed like any other instrument command. The *STB? command returns the same
result as a serial poll except that the Status Byte bit 6 (RQS/MSS) is not cleared. In this
case, bit 6 is considered the MSS bit. Using the *STB? command does not clear any bits
in the Status Byte Register.
6.2.6.5 Using the Message Available (MAV) Bit
Status Byte summary bit 4 (MAV) indicates that data is available to read into the bus
controller. This message may be used to synchronize information exchange with the
bus controller. The bus controller can, for example, send a query command to the
Model 336 and then wait for MAV to set. If the MAV bit has been enabled to initiate an
SRQ, the user’s program can direct the bus controller to look for the SRQ leaving the
bus available for other use. The MAV bit will be clear whenever the output buffer is
empty.
6.2.6.6 Using Operation Complete (*OPC) and Operation Complete Query (*OPC?)
The Operation Complete (*OPC) and Operation Complete Query (*OPC?) are both
used to indicate when pending device operations complete. However, the commands
operate with two distinct methods.
The *OPC command is used in conjunction with bit 0 (OPC) of the Standard Event Status Register. If *OPC is sent as the last command in a command sequence, bit 0 will be
set when the instrument completes the operation that was initiated by the command
sequence. Additional commands may be sent between the instrument and the bus
controller while waiting for the initial pending operation to complete. A typical use of
this function would be to enable the OPC bit to generate an SRQ and include the *OPC
command when programming the instrument. The bus controller could then be
instructed to look for an SRQ allowing additional communication with the instrument while the initial process executes.
The *OPC? query has no interaction with bit 0 (OPC) of the Standard Event Status Register. If the *OPC? query is sent at the end of a command sequence, the bus will be
held until the instrument completes the operation that was initiated by the command sequence. Additional commands (except *RST) should not be sent until the
operation is complete, as erratic operation will occur. Once the sequence is complete
a 1 will be placed in the output buffer. This function is typically used to signal a completed operation without monitoring the SRQ. It is also used when it is important to
prevent any additional communication on the bus during a pending operation.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.3 USB Interface
The Model 336 USB interface provides a convenient way to connect to most modern
computers, as a USB interface is provided on nearly all new PCs as of the writing of
this manual. The USB interface is implemented as a virtual serial com port connection. This implementation provides a simple migration path for modifying existing
RS-232 based remote interface software. It also provides a simpler means of communicating than a standard USB implementation.
6.3.1 Physical
Connection
The Model 336 has a B-type USB connector on the rear panel. This is the standard
connector used on USB peripheral devices, and it allows the common USB A-type to
B-type cable to be used to connect the Model 336 to a host PC. The pin assignments
for A-type and B-type connectors are shown in section 8.10. The maximum length of a
USB cable, as defined by the USB 2.0 standard, is 5 m (16.4 ft). This length can be
extended using USB hubs every 5 m (16.4 ft) up to five times, for a maximum total
length of 30 m (98.4 ft).
6.3.2 Hardware
Support
The USB interface emulates an RS-232 serial port at a fixed 57,600 baud rate, but
with the physical connections of a USB. This programming interface requires a certain configuration to communicate properly with the Model 336. The proper configuration parameters are listed in TABLE 6-5.
Baud rate
57,600
Data bits
7
Start bits
1
Stop bits
1
Parity
Odd
Flow control
None
Handshaking
None
TABLE 6-5 Host com port
configuration
The USB hardware connection uses the full speed (12,000,000 bits/sec) profile of the
USB 2.0 standard; however, since the interface uses a virtual serial com port at a fixed
data rate, the data throughput is still limited to a baud rate of 57,600 bits/s.
6.3.3 Installing the USB
Driver
The Model 336 USB driver has been made available through Windows® Update. This
is the recommended method for installing the driver, as it will ensure that you always
have the latest version of the driver installed. If you are unable to install the driver
from Windows® Update, refer to section 6.3.3.3 to install the driver from the web or
from the disc provided with the Model 336.
These procedures assume that you are logged into a user account that has administrator privileges.
6.3.3.1 Installing the Driver From Windows® Update in Windows Vista®
1. Connect the USB cable from the Model 336 to the computer.
2. Turn on the Model 336.
3. When the Found New Hardware wizard appears, select Locate and install driver
software (recommended).
4. If User Account Control(UAC) is enabled, a UAC dialog box may appear asking if
you want to continue. Click Continue.
5. The Found New Hardware wizard should automatically connect to Windows®
Update and install the drivers.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.3.3 Installing the USB Driver
97
If the Found New Hardware wizard is unable to connect to Windows® Update or find the
drivers, a message to “Insert the disc that came with your Lake Shore Model 336” will be
displayed. Click Cancel and refer to section 6.3.3.3 to install the driver from the web.
6. When the Found New Hardware wizard finishes installing the driver, a confirmation message stating “the software for this device has been successfully
installed” will appear. Click Close to complete the installation.
6.3.3.2 Installing the Driver From Windows® Update in Windows® XP
1. Connect the USB cable from the Model 336 to the computer.
2. Turn on the Model 336.
3. When the Found New Hardware wizard appears, select Yes, this time only and
click Next.
4. Select Install the software automatically (Recommended) and click Next.
5. The Found New Hardware wizard should automatically connect to Windows®
Update and install the drivers.
If the Found New Hardware wizard is unable to connect to Windows® Update or find the
drivers, a message saying Cannot Install this Hardware will be displayed. Click the Cancel
button and refer to section 6.3.3.3 to install the driver from the web.
6. When the Found New Hardware wizard finishes installing the driver a confirmation message stating “the wizard has finished installing the software for
Lake Shore Model 336 Temperature Controller” will appear. Click Finish to complete the installation.
6.3.3.3 Installing the Driver From the Web
The Model 336 USB driver is available on the Lake Shore website. To install the driver
it must be downloaded from the website and extracted. Use the procedure in section
6.3.3.1 through section 6.3.3.4 to download, extract, and install the driver using
Windows Vista® and XP.
6.3.3.3.1 Download the driver:
1. Locate the Model 336 USB driver on the downloads page on the Lake Shore
website.
2. Right-click on the USB driver download link, and select save target/link as.
3. Save the driver to a convenient place, and take note as to where the driver was
downloaded.
6.3.3.3.2 Extract the driver:
The downloaded driver is in a ZIP compressed archive. The driver must be extracted
from this file. Windows® provides built-in support for ZIP archives. If this support is
disabled, a third-party application, such as WinZip™ or 7-Zip, must be used.
For Windows Vista®:
1. Right click on the file and click extract all.
2. An Extract Compressed (Zipped) Folders dialog box will appear. It is recommended the default folder is not changed. Take note of this folder location.
3. Click to clear the Show extracted files when complete checkbox, and click
Extract.
For Windows® XP
1. Right-click on the file and click extract all.
2. The Extraction wizard will appear. Click Next.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
3. It is recommended to keep the same default folder. Take note of this folder location and click Next.
4. An “Extraction complete” message will be displayed. Click to clear the Show
extracted files checkbox, and click Finish.
6.3.3.3.3 Manually install the driver
Manually installing drivers differ between versions of Windows®. The following
sections describe how to manually install the driver using Windows Vista® and XP.
To install the driver you must be logged into a user account that has
administrator privileges.
For Windows Vista®
1. Connect the USB cable from the Model 336 to the computer.
2. Turn on the Model 336.
3. If the Found New Hardware wizard appears, click Ask me again later.
4. Open Device Manager. Use this procedure to open Device Manager.
a.
Click the Windows® Start button and type Device Manager in the
Start Search box.
b. Click on the Device Manager link in the Search Results Under Programs
dialog box.
c. If User Account Control is enabled click Continue on the User Account
Control prompt.
5. Click View and ensure the Devices by Type check box is selected.
6. In the main window of Device Manager, locate Other Devices in the list of device
types. In many instances this will be between Network adapters and Ports (COM
& LPT). If the Other Devices item is not already expanded, click the + icon.
Lake Shore Model 336 should appear indented underneath Other Devices. If it is
not displayed as Lake Shore Model 336, it might be displayed as USB Device. If
neither are displayed, click Action and then Scan for hardware changes, which
may open the Found New Hardware wizard automatically. If the Found New
Hardware wizard opens, click Cancel.
7. Right-click on Lake Shore Model 336 and click Update Driver Software.
8. Click Browse my computer for driver software.
9. Click Browse and select the location of the extracted driver.
10. Ensure the Include subfolders check box is selected and click Next.
11. When the driver finishes installing a confirmation message stating “Windows has
successfully updated your driver software” should appear. Click Close to complete the installation.
For Windows® XP
1. Connect the USB cable from the Model 336 to the computer.
2. Turn on the Model 336.
3. The Found New Hardware wizard should appear. If the Found New Hardware
wizard does not appear, the following procedure can be used to open the Hardware Update wizard which can be used instead:
a. Open Device Manager. Use this procedure to open the Device Manager:
D Right-click on My Computer and then click Properties. This will open
the System Properties dialog.
D Click the Hardware tab and then click Device Manager.
b.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Click View and ensure the Devices by Type check box is selected.
6.3.4 Communication
99
c.
In the main window of Device Manager, locate the Ports (COM & LPT)
device type. In many instances this will be between the Network adapters and Processors items. If the Ports (COM & LPT) item is not already
expanded, click the + icon. Lake Shore Model 336 should appear
indented underneath Ports (COM & LPT). If it is not displayed as
Lake Shore Model 336, it might be displayed as USB Device. If neither are
displayed, click Action and then select Scan for hardware changes,
which may open the Found New Hardware wizard automatically. If the
Found New Hardware wizard opens, continue to step 4.
d. Right-click on Lake Shore Model 336 and click Update Driver.
4. Select No, not at this time and click Next.
5. Select Search for the best driver in these locations, click to clear the Search
removable media (floppy, CD-ROM…) check box, and click the Include this location in the search check box.
6. Click Browse and open the location of the extracted driver.
7. Click Next.
8. When the driver finishes installing a confirmation message stating “The wizard
has finished installing the software for Lake Shore Model 336 Temperature Controller” should appear. Click Finish to complete the installation.
6.3.3.4 Installing the USB Driver from the Included CD
The Model 336 USB driver is available on the included CD. The following section
describes the process of installing the driver from the CD. To install the driver you
must be logged into a user account that has administrator privileges.
For Windows Vista®
1. Insert the CD into the computer.
2. Follow steps 1–9 of the Windows Vista® procedure in section 6.3.3.3.3.
3. Click Browse and select the drive containing the included CD.
4. Ensure the Include subfolders check box is selected and click Next.
5. When the driver finishes installing a confirmation message stating “Windows has
successfully updated your driver software” should appear. Click Close to complete the installation.
For Windows® XP
1. Insert the CD into the computer.
2. Connect the USB cable from the Model 336 to the computer.
3. Turn on the Model 336.
4. When the Found New Hardware wizard appears select No, not at this time and
click Next.
5. Select Install the software automatically (recommended) and click Next.
6. The Found New Hardware wizard should automatically search the CD and install
the drivers.
7. When the Found New Hardware Wizard finishes installing the drivers a message
stating “the wizard has finished installing the software for Lake Shore Model 336
Temperature Controller” should appear. Click Finish to complete the installation.
6.3.4 Communication
Communicating via the USB interface is done using message strings. The message
strings should be carefully formulated by the user program according to some simple
rules to establish effective message flow control.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.3.4.1 Character Format
A character is the smallest piece of information that can be transmitted by the interface. Each character is ten bits long and contains data bits, bits for character timing,
and an error detection bit. The instrument uses seven bits for data in the American
Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format. One start bit and one stop
bit are necessary to synchronize consecutive characters. Parity is a method of error
detection. One parity bit configured for odd parity is included in each character.
ASCII letter and number characters are used most often as character data. Punctuation characters are used as delimiters to separate different commands or pieces of
data. A special ASCII character, line feed (LF 0AH), is used to indicate the end of a message string. This is called the message terminator.
6.3.4.2 Message Strings
A message string is a group of characters assembled to perform an interface function.
There are three types of message strings: commands, queries, and responses. The
computer issues command and query strings through user programs, the instrument
issues responses. Two or more command or query strings can be chained together in
one communication, but they must be separated by a semi-colon (;). The total communication string must not exceed 255 characters in length.
A command string is issued by the computer and instructs the instrument to perform
a function or change a parameter setting. The format is:
<command mnemonic><space><parameter data><terminators>.
Command mnemonics and parameter data necessary for each one is described in
section 6.6. Terminators must be sent with every message string.
A query string is issued by the computer and instructs the instrument to send a
response. The query format is:
<query mnemonic><?><space><parameter data><terminators>.
Query mnemonics are often the same as commands with the addition of a question
mark. Parameter data is often unnecessary when sending queries. Query mnemonics
and parameter data if necessary is described in section 6.6. Terminators must be sent
with every message string. The computer should expect a response very soon after a
query is sent.
A response string is the instrument’s response or answer to a query string. The
response can be a reading value, status report or the present value of a parameter.
Response data formats are listed along with the associated queries in section 6.6. The
response is sent as soon as possible after the instrument receives the query.
6.3.5 Message Flow
Control
It is important to remember that the user program is in charge of the USB communication at all times. The instrument cannot initiate communication, determine which
device should be transmitting at a given time, or guarantee timing between messages. All of this is the responsibility of the user program.
When issuing commands the user program alone should:
D
D
D
Properly format and transmit the command including the terminator as 1 string
Guarantee that no other communication is started for 50 ms after the last character is transmitted
Not initiate communication more than 20 times per second
When issuing queries or queries and commands together, the user program should:
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.4 Ethernet Interface
D
D
D
D
D
101
Properly format and transmit the query including the terminator as 1 string
Prepare to receive a response immediately
Receive the entire response from the instrument including the terminator
Guarantee that no other communication is started during the response or for
50 ms after it completes
Not initiate communication more than 20 times per second
Failure to follow these simple rules will result in inability to establish communication
with the instrument or intermittent failures in communication.
6.4 Ethernet
Interface
The Ethernet interface provides a means of connecting the Model 336 to an Ethernet
based computer network. Ethernet networks provide the ability to communicate
across large distances, often using existing equipment (the internet, pre-existing
local networks). The Ethernet interface of the Model 336 provides the ability to use
TCP socket connections (section 6.4.3) to send commands and queries to the instrument using the common command set detailed in section 6.6. The Model 336 has an
embedded web interface that provides status information and
additional utilities (section 6.5).
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQEnabledQEthernet
6.4.1 Ethernet
Configuration
There are several parameters for configuring the Model 336 Ethernet interface and
three methods for configuring these parameters. This section contains a brief explanation of each of these. A comprehensive discussion of computer networking is
beyond the scope of this manual. These settings may depend on your network configuration; contact your network administrator for assistance.
6.4.1.1 Network Address Parameters
Network address parameters include the IP address, the subnet mask, and the gateway address. The network address parameters of the Model 336 can be configured
using one of three methods: DHCP, Auto-IP, or Static-IP. See section 6.4.1.2 for details
on each of these configuration methods.
D
IP Address: an IP address is required for a device to communicate using TCP/IP,
which is the protocol generally used for Ethernet devices and the Model 336. The
IP version used by the Model 336 is IPv4. The IPv6 standard is not supported. All
references to the IP protocol from this point forward will be referring to IPv4.
An IP address is a 32-bit logical address used to differentiate devices on a network. It is most often given in dotted decimal notation, such as nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
where nnn is a decimal number from 0 to 255.
D
Subnet Mask: a sub network, or subnet, is a group of devices within a network that
have a common, designated IP address routing prefix. A subnet mask is a 32-bit
“bit mask” that signifies which part of the IP address represents the subnet routing prefix, and which part represents the device’s address on the subnet. A subnet
mask is most often given in dotted decimal notation, such as nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn
where nnn is a decimal number from 0 to 255. When converted to a binary notation, the 32-bit subnet mask should consist of a contiguous group of ones, followed by a contiguous group of zeros. The ones represent which bits in the IP
address refer to the subnet, and the zeros represent which bits refer to the device
address. For example, the default Static-IP Address of the Model 336 is
192.168.0.12, and the default Static Subnet Mask is 255.255.255.0. Converting
this subnet mask to binary shows that the first 24 bits are ones, and the last 8 bits
are zeros. This means that the first 24 bits of the Static-IP Address (192.168.0)
represent the subnet, and the last 8 bits (12) represent the device.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
D
Gateway Address: a gateway is a network traffic routing device that is used to route
communication between networks. If a gateway is not used, then devices on a
network can only communicate with other devices on that same network. A
Gateway Address is the IP address of the gateway on a network. Contact the network administrator for the gateway address for your network.
6.4.1.2 Network Addresss Configuration Methods
The network address parameters of the Model 336 can be configured using one of
three methods: DHCP, Auto-IP, or Static-IP. DHCP and Auto-IP are automatic configuration methods, and Static-IP requires manual configuration. If supported by the
server, DHCP can also be used to automatically configure DNS server addresses, as
well as IP address parameters.
An order of precedence is followed when the Model 336 attempts to acquire IP
address parameters. If enabled, the DHCP method will be used first. If DHCP is disabled, or if the attempt to acquire parameters from the DHCP server fails, the
Model 336 then checks if Auto-IP is enabled. If Auto-IP is enabled, this method will be
used. If disabled, or if this attempt fails, the Static-IP method will be used. If the
Static-IP method fails, the IP address parameters will not be configured and the
Ethernet status will enter an error state. Refer to section 6.4.2.1 if you receive an error
message.
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP): DHCP is a method of automatically configuring the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway of Ethernet devices on a network. This
method provides simple automatic configuration for users connecting to a network
that provides a DHCP server. The network DHCP server will provide an IP address, subnet mask, and gateway address. Depending on the DHCP server configuration, it may
also provide primary DNS and secondary DNS addresses as well. DHCP is the simplest
method of IP configuration. DHCP does have the disadvantage of not necessarily preserving the IP address through a device reconfiguration, as well as the possibility of
being automatically reconfigured when the DHCP “lease” expires. Contact your network administrator to find out the DHCP lease policy on your network.
To use DHCP to automatically configure the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway of
the Model 336, simply connect the Model 336 to a network that provides a DHCP
server, and set the DHCP parameter to On. By default, the DHCP feature of the
Model 336 is On.
Menu Navigation:
Interface QModify IP ConfigQDHCPQ(Off or On)
Auto-IP: Auto-IP is a method of automatically configuring the IP address and subnet
mask parameters of Ethernet devices on a link-local network. This configuration is
performed by the Model 336 and does not require any external device. Auto-IP is
defined in RFC 3927 “Dynamic Configuration of IPv4 Link-Local Addresses” and can
be found at The Internet Engineering Task Force website at www.ietf.org. The automatically configured address will be in the link-local address group of 169.254.1.0 to
169.254.254.255. This group is reserved for independent, local networks that do not
connect to other networks. This method chooses an IP address that is not already
active on the network, which eliminates IP address conflicts. A gateway address is not
applicable when using Auto-IP, since the purpose of a gateway address is to commu-
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.4.1 Ethernet Configuration
103
nicate with outside networks, and by definition Auto-IP only works on link-local networks. A disadvantage of Auto-IP is the limitation of only working with a link-local
network, which cannot connect to other networks, including the internet. Another
disadvantage lies in the fact that an Auto-IP assigned address will not be preserved
through a device reconfiguration, such as a power cycle.
To use Auto-IP to automatically configure a link-local IP address and subnet mask, set
the DHCP parameter to Off, then set the Auto-IP parameter to On. By default, the
Auto-IP feature of the Model 336 is Off.
Menu Navigation:
Interface QModify IP ConfigQAuto-IP Q(Off or On)
Static-IP: Static-IP is a method of manually configuring the IP address, subnet mask,
and gateway of Ethernet enabled devices. When using the Static-IP method, the IP
address, subnet mask, and gateway must be configured appropriately for the connected network, or for the connected PC, in order to establish connection to the network. A major advantage to the Static-IP method is that the IP address will not
change during device reconfiguration (power cycle). Disadvantages of using the
Static-IP method include the requirement of knowing how your network is configured in order to choose the correct configuration parameters.
The Static-IP method is always enabled, and therefore will default to this method
when both automatic configuration methods (DHCP and Auto-IP) are disabled, or if
all enabled automatic configuration methods fail. To use Static-IP to manually configure the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway of the Model 336, set the DHCP and the
Auto-IP parameters to Off. Refer to the paragraphs above for details on turning off
DHCP and Auto-IP. The Model 336 will now use the Static-IP Address, Static Subnet
Mask, Static Gateway, Static Primary DNS, and Static Secondary DNS parameters to
attempt to configure the Ethernet interface connection. Refer to section 6.4.1.3 for
details on DNS parameters. Contact your network administrator for the appropriate
Static-IP parameters for your network.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQModify IP ConfigQStatic-IPQ(Valid IP Address)
InterfaceQModify IP ConfigQ Static Subnet MaskQ (Valid Subnet Mask)
InterfaceQModify IP ConfigQStatic GatewayQ(Valid IP Address)
InterfaceQModify IP ConfigQStatic Pri DNSQ(Valid IP Address)
InterfaceQModify IP ConfigQStatic Sec DNSQ (Valid IP Address)
6.4.1.3 DNS Parameters
The parameters discussed in this section exist to facilitate the use of the Domain
Name System (DNS) to connect to the Model 336 using assignable names rather than
cryptic IP addresses. This functionality is provided for convenience only, and is not
critical to the connectivity of the Ethernet interface.
DNS Address: A Domain Name System (DNS) is a service that translates names into IP
addresses. This service allows for using human readable names for devices on a network. As an example, when a web browser attempts to retrieve the web page at
www.lakeshore.com, the browser first performs a forward-lookup on the assigned
DNS server to attempt to retrieve the IP address that is represented by the name
www.lakeshore.com. If successful, the web browser then uses the retrieved IP address
to communicate with the web server that hosts the website at www.lakeshore.com.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
The Model 336 can be configured to communicate with a primary and a secondary
DNS server using the Primary DNS Address and the Secondary DNS Address parameters. Multiple DNS servers are sometimes used for redundancy, but multiple servers
are not required, and not all networks provide a DNS server. DNS addresses can be
configured automatically using the DHCP method if the network DHCP server is configured to do so.
Your DHCP server must be configured appropriately to provide DNS server addresses. Not
all DHCP servers provide this functionality on your network.
Hostname: A hostname is a name that is assigned to a device on a network. On a
Domain Name System (DNS) enabled network, a hostname can be used alone when
connecting from another device on the same domain, or it can be combined with a
domain name to connect to devices outside of the local domain. For example,
www.lakeshore.com refers to the Lake Shore web server on the Internet, which is a
DNS enabled network. The web server hostname is “www”, and it resides on the
domain “lakeshore.com”. To connect to the web server from another device on the
lakeshore.com domain, only the hostname “www” must be used. To connect from any
other domain on the Internet, the entire fully-qualified name, consisting of the hostname and the domain name (www.lakeshore.com) must be used. Hostnames can
only contain alpha-numeric characters and hyphens, but cannot begin or end with a
hyphen.
A hostname can be assigned by a network administrator, or if the Model 336 is connected to a network with Dynamic DNS (DDNS) capability, a DNS entry is automatically created for it using the Preferred Hostname and Preferred Domain Name
parameters and the assigned IP address.
Menu Navigation:
InterfaceQModify IP Config QPreferred HostnameQ(Valid Hostname String)
If DNS reverse-lookup is enabled on the network DNS server, and the DNS address
parameters are correctly configured, the Model 336 will perform a reverse-lookup to
determine if a hostname is assigned for the Model 336’s configured IP address. This
will occur regardless of whether the hostname was configured dynamically using
DDNS, or manually by the network administrator. The returned hostname will appear
in the Actual Hostname parameter, in the View IP Config submenu of the Interface
Setup menu.
Menu Navigation (Read Only):
Interface QView IP Config QActual Hostname
When using naming systems other than DNS, the Model 336 cannot assign the Preferred
Hostname or retrieve the Actual Hostname.
Domain Name: A domain is a collection of network devices that are managed according
to some common characteristic of its members. Domains can contain subdomains
which are subsets within the domain. The hierarchy can contain several dot separated levels which flow from right to left. For example, lakeshore.com contains the
top-level-domain “com” and the subdomain “lakeshore”. When using the Domain
Name System (DNS) to connect to a specific host device on a network, the device's
hostname is tacked onto the left of the domain name. For example, the “www” in
www.lakeshore.com refers to the Lake Shore web server, located within the internet
domain “lakeshore.com.”
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.4.2 Viewing Ethernet Configuration
105
If the Model 336 is connected to a network with Dynamic DNS (DDNS) capability, a
DNS entry is automatically created using the Preferred Hostname and Preferred
Domain Name parameters and the assigned IP address. The Preferred Domain Name
parameter can only be accessed using the NET interface command (section 6.6.1), or
by using the Ethernet configuration page (section 6.4.2) of the embedded website on
the Model 336.
If DNS reverse-lookup is enabled on the network DNS server, and the DNS address
parameters are correctly configured, the Model 336 will perform a reverse-lookup to
determine if a domain name is assigned for the Model 336’s configured IP address.
This will occur regardless of whether the domain name was configured dynamically
using DDNS, or manually by the network administrator. The returned domain name
will appear in the Actual Hostname parameter, in the View IP Config submenu of the
Interface Setup menu.
When using naming systems other than DNS, the Model 336 cannot assign the Preferred
Domain Name or retrieve the Actual Domain Name.
Menu Navigation:
The Preferred Domain name can only be entered using a computer interface NET
command, and viewed using the NET? query. Refer to section 6.6.1 for details on the
NET command and query.
6.4.2 Viewing Ethernet
Configuration
When the Ethernet interface is enabled, two submenus become available: Modify IP
Config, and View IP Config. All configurable settings are available under the Modify IP
Config submenu, and the current state of the Ethernet configuration is detailed in the
View IP Config submenu. This is designed to eliminate confusion as to which are the
configurable Static-IP settings, and which are the currently configured settings that
could have been configured using any of the three configuration methods (DHCP,
Auto-IP, or Static-IP). The method used for the currently established connection is
shown in the LAN Status parameter of the View IP Confi submenu (section 6.4.2.1).
6.4.2.1 LAN Status
The LAN Status parameter indicates the current status of the Ethernet configuration.
This read-only parameter can be accessed using the View IP Config menu.
The possible LAN Status states are:
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
Connected–Static: the IP address parameters have been successfully configured
using the Static-IP method
Connected–DHCP: the IP address parameters have been successfully configured
using the DHCP method
Connected–AutoIP: the IP address parameters have been successfully configured
using the AutoIP method
Addr Not Acquired: the IP address parameters were not successfully configured.
Duplicate Init IP: when initially attempting to connect to the network, the StaticIP address was found to be in use by another device already configured on the
network. The Model 336 interface will remain unconfigured until an available
Static-IP address is entered.
Duplicate Ong IP: an ongoing conflict occurred after being successfully connected to the network, because another device on the network was configured
using the same IP address. The Model 336 will automatically unconfigure and
remain unconfigured until an available IP address is entered.
Cable Unplugged: the Ethernet cable is either unplugged at one end, or has been
damaged
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
D
D
Module Error: the Model 336 has lost contact with the Ethernet module; this may
indicate a damaged Ethernet module
Acquiring Address: the Model 336 is attempting to configure the IP address
parameters using the enabled methods
6.4.2.2 MAC Address
The Media Access Controller (MAC) Address is a physical hardware address assigned
to all Ethernet devices. MAC addresses are 48-bits and are generally written as six
groups of two hexidecimal digits separated by colons, for example
“01:23:45:67:89:AB”. Unlike IP addresses, MAC addresses are tied to the device hardware and cannot be changed.
Menu Navigation (Read-Only):
InterfaceQView IP ConfigQMAC Address
6.4.2.3 Viewing Network Configuration Parameters and DNS Parameters
The currently configured network parameters are displayed individually in the View
IP Config submenu. These parameters could have been configured using either DHCP,
Auto-IP, or Static-IP. The LAN Status parameter shows which method was used for the
current configuration. When in an error state, or in the intermediate Acquiring
Address state, the network configuration parameters will all be displayed as 0.0.0.0.
Refer to section 6.4.1.1 through section 6.4.1.3 for details on network configuration
parameters and DNS parameters.
Menu Navigation (Read-Only):
InterfaceQView IP Config QIP
InterfaceQView IP Config QSubnet Mask
InterfaceQView IP ConfigQGateway IP
InterfaceQView IP ConfigQPrimary DNS IP
InterfaceQView IP Config QSecondary DNS IP
InterfaceQView IP ConfigQActual Hostname
InterfaceQView IP ConfigQTCP Socket Port
6.4.3 TCP Socket
Communication
A TCP socket connection interface is provided as the communication medium for the
Ethernet interface of the Model 336. A TCP socket connection, or simply “socket connection”, is a common connection protocol used by Ethernet devices. The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is commonly used for creating a communication channel
between one program on one computer and one program on another computer, for
example a web browser on a PC and a web server on the Internet. In the case of the
Model 336, the protocol is used to create a communication channel between one
program on one computer and the command line interface of the Model 336. TCP
uses error correction and collision avoidance schemes that make it a very reliable
form of Ethernet communication, but has drawbacks of having nondeterministic timing, and can encounter relatively large delays depending on network conditions.
These delays can be on the order of seconds. Sockets use port numbers to identify
sending and receiving endpoints on network devices. This allows for multiple separate communication links to exist on each device. The port number used for TCP socket
connections on the Model 336 is 7777.
A maximum of two simultaneous socket connections can be made to the Model 336. Any
attempts to open a new socket while two socket connections are already open on a
Model 336 will fail.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.4.4 Embedded Web Interface
6.4.4 Embedded Web
Interface
107
The Model 336 provides a web interface via an embedded web server that runs on the
instrument. Once the Model 336 is properly connected, and the IP parameters properly configured, the web interface can be opened using a web browser. The web interface should be accessible using any modern web browser, but has only been tested
with Microsoft™ Internet Explorer version 6.0 and 7.0.
6.4.4.1 Connecting to the Web Interface
To connect to the web interface, type “http://” followed by the IP address assigned to
the Model 336 that you are attempting to connect to. If connecting from a device on
the same local network, and a hostname is properly assigned to the Model 336 via a
naming service on the network (section 6.4.1.3), then the IP address can be replaced
by the hostname. If connecting from a device not on the same local network, but on a
network which is connected to the local network of the Model 336, and a hostname
and a domain name are properly assigned, the IP address can be replaced by the hostname followed by the domain name, with a dot separator between them. For example if the hostname LSCI-3360001, and the domain name yourdomain.com were
assigned via a naming service, then typing “http://LSCI-3360001.yourdomain.com”
would open the home web page of the Model 336 embedded website.
6.4.4.2 Web Pages
Each web page contains detailed help information in the form of tool-tips. You can
access these tool-tips by hovering the mouse pointer over the various help icons
(show help icon image here) located throughout the embedded website.
Home Page: provides a summary of information specific to the Model 336.
FIGURE 6-5 Model 336 home page
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
Ethernet Configuration Page: provides a means of reconfiguring the Ethernet configuration parameters of the Model 336.
FIGURE 6-6 Ethernet configuration page
Ethernet Status Page: provides status and statistics related to the current Ethernet
connection.
FIGURE 6-7 Ethernet status page
Utilities Page: provides links to launch the embedded curve handler application, the
embedded Ethernet firmware updater, and the instrument configurator backup
utilities
FIGURE 6-8 Utilities page
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.5 Utilities
109
Security Settings: provides a means of changing the website security settings by
allowing the user to enter a new username and password for the website, or to
remove password protection from the website. The username and password parameters are available for viewing and editing from the front panel under the Modify IP
Config submenu of the Interface menu.
Password protection only protects access to the embedded web pages and does not provide any kind of security for TCP Socket access (section 6.4.3).
The website username and password are available from the front panel menu, and therefore can easily be obtained by anyone with access to the Model 336 front panel.
Contact Us: provides information regarding how to contact representatives of
Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc.
6.5 Utilities
The utilities embedded on the Model 336 are written using the Java™ programming
language. This theoretically allows the applications to run properly on many different
platforms (Windows®, Mac®, Linux™, etc.), although the applications are only supported on Microsoft Windows® XP or Windows Vista®, and have been designed to
work with the Java™ Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.6. To download Java ™ JRE
please visit www.java.com.
Please note that without the proper JRE installed the utilities will not run properly.
The applications are launched from the Utilities web page using Java™ Web Start
technology. This allows the application to run outside of the web browser in a standalone window. The application can only be launched using the link in the embedded
web page, and cannot be permanently installed. When launching the application,
multiple security warning messages may appear. These messages are meant to protect youfrom malicious software that can cause harm to, or compromise the security
of, your computer or your data. The applications have been thoroughly tested and are
considered by Lake Shore to be safe.
All software is imperfect and any software may be used by a malicious user for malicious
purposes.
6.5.1 Embedded
Curve Handler™
The Embedded Curve Handler™ utility is provided for uploading temperature curve
files to the Model 336. The utility is also capable of reading curves from the
Model 336 and writing them to a file for storage, or manipulation in a third party program. The Embedded Curve Handler™ supports standard Lake Shore temperature
curve files in the “.340” file format, and the Microsoft Excel® ".XLS" (Excel® 97 - 2003)
file format. Curve files are provided with calibrated sensors purchased from
Lake Shore in the “.340” file format.
To read a temperature curve from a file: click Read from File. Select a properly formatted temperature curve (*.340 or *.XLS) file using the Open Browser dialog box. The
curve will be loaded into the program and the curve points and graph will be displayed.
To read a temperature curve from the Model 336: click Read from Instrument. The
Read Curve from Instrument dialog box appears. Select a curve from the drop-down
box and click OK. The curve will be loaded into the program and the curve points and
graph will be displayed.
Once a curve is loaded into the Embedded Curve Handler™ using either the Read
from File or Read from Instrument buttons, the loaded curve can be stored either to a
user curve location (21 to 59) in the Model 336, or to a file.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
To store the curve to a user curve location in the Model 336: click Write to Instrument. The Write Curve to Instrument dialog box appears. Select a user curve location
to write the loaded temperature curve to, and click OK.
To write the currently loaded curve to a file: click Write to File. A Save Browser dialog
box appears. First use the Files of Type drop-down box to select the file format in
which to save the curve. Then choose a directory and a file name, and click Save .
The .340 file format is an ASCII text file which can be read and altered using a standard ASCII text editor. Care must be taken when altering the .340 text files to ensure
that all of the values are stored in the same position in the file as the original values,
using the same number of digits. To alter curve files, it is recommended to use the .XLS
file format, which can be altered using Microsoft Excel®. If using formulas to alter
curves, you must copy the results of the formulas and paste them back into the original cells of the breakpoint values. The Embedded Curve Handler™ cannot interpret
formulas in cells. In most versions of Excel®, this can be done by copying the formula
results, then pasting them in the appropriate cells using the Paste Special command,
and selecting Paste Values. Refer to the appropriate Microsoft Excel® documentation
for details on the Paste Special operation.
The Embedded Curve Handler™ cannot read files in the Microsoft Excel® ".XLSX" (Excel®
2007 or newer) format. When saving files from Excel®, be sure to save them in the ".XLS"
(Excel® 97 - 2003) format so that the file can be read using the
Embedded Curve Handler™ utility.
FIGURE 6-9 Screen shot of the Curve Handler
6.5.2 Ethernet
Firmware Updater
The Ethernet Firmware Updater utility provides a means of updating the firmware
that controls the Ethernet functionality of the Model 336. It also updates the embedded website and the Java™ utilities found on the Utilities web page. Please visit
www.lakeshore.com for the latest firmware updates.
FIGURE 6-10 Screenshot of
the Ethernet Firmware
Updater
This utility only updates the Ethernet firmware and not the instrument firmware.
Another utility is provided at the Lake Shore website (www.lakeshore .com) for updating
the instrument firmware.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.5.3 Instrument Configuration Backup Utility
111
To use the Ethernet Firmware Updater utility: first ensure that your Java™ Runtime
Environment is at version 1.6.0 or higher and then use this procedure to download
the Ethernet firmware Updater utility.
1. Download the latest Model 336 Ethernet Firmware file from
www.lakeshore.com.
2. Once the firmware files have been downloaded, connect to the embedded website (section 6.4.4), and navigate to the Utilities page.
3. Click Launch Ethernet Firmware Updater.
4. Accept any security warning messages that are presented (refer to section 6.5 for
an explanation of these security warnings). The Ethernet Firmware Updater
application window should now be open.
5. Click Upload New Ethernet Firmware, and a file browser window will open.
6. Navigate to the directory where the Model 336 Ethernet firmware is stored.
Select the file and click Open.
At this point the application should check to see if the firmware you are attempting to
update to is newer than what is already installed on the Model 336. If it is, then the
firmware should immediately begin uploading, and the progress of the firmware
update operation should be displayed using the two progress bars in the application
window.
6.5.3 Instrument
Configuration Backup
Utility
The instrument configuration backup utility provides the means to export the current
configuration of the Model 336 to a file, or to import a saved configuration from a file
to the Model 336. The utility is useful in situations where the instrument is shared
with users who require different configurations, or when the instrument is often
moved between systems requiring different configurations. All instrument configuration settings are exported or imported by the utility except for the setpoint and
heater range, network settings, and web login settings. These settings are ignored to
prevent the outputs from unintentionally turning on and to prevent interrupting
communication with the instrument.
To export the current configuration of the Model 336 to a file:
1. On the Utilities page in the Model 336 embedded website, click Export config
(FIGURE 6-8).
2. In the Save File dialog box, select the location and file name to which you want to
export the current instrument configuration. Click Save.
The utility will export the current configuration from the Model 336 and save it to the
specified file.
To import a saved configuration from a file to the Model 336:
1. On the Utilities page in the Model 336 embedded website, click Import config
(FIGURE 6-8).
2. In the Save File dialog box, select the file name from which you want to import
the saved instrument configuration settings. Click Open.
3. Click Yes, import settings in the confirmation box that appears.
The utility will read the configuration from the specified file and import it to the
Model 336.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
6.6 Command
Summary
This section provides a listing of the interface commands. A summary of all the commands is provided in TABLE 6-6. All the commands are detailed in section 6.6.1, and
are presented in alphabetical order.
Command name
Brief description of command
Form of the command input
INCRV
Syntax of user parameter input
Input:
Format:
see key below
Definition of first parameter
Definition of second parameter
Input Curve Number Command
INCRV <input>, <curve number>[term]
a, nn
<input>
Specify input: A–D
<curve number> Specify input curve:
0 = none, 1–20 = std curves,
21–59 = user curves
FIGURE 6-11 Sample command format
Query name
Form of the query input
Syntax of user parameter input*
see key below
Definition of returned parameter
Syntax of returned parameter
Brief description of query
INCRV?
Input:
Format:
Input Curve Number Query
INCRV? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specify input: A–D
Returned: <curve number>[term]
Format: nn
FIGURE 6-12 Sample query format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
6.6 Command Summary
Command
Function
Page
Command
Function
CLS
Clear Interface Cmd
114
INNAME?
Sensor Input Name Query
123
ESE
Event Status Enable Register Cmd
114
INTSEL
Interface Select Cmd
123
123
113
Page
ESE?
Event Status Enable Register Query
114
INTSEL?
Interface Select Query
ESR?
Standard Event Status Register Query
114
INTYPE
Input Type Parameter Cmd
124
IDN?
Identification Query
115
INTYPE?
Input Type Parameter Query
124
OPC
Operation Complete Cmd
115
KRDG?
Kelvin Reading Query
125
OPC?
Operation Complete Query
115
LEDS
Front Panel LEDS Cmd
125
RST
Reset Instrument Cmd
115
LEDS?
Front Panel LEDS Query
125
SRE
Service Request Enable Register Cmd
115
LOCK
Front Panel Keyboard Lock Cmd
125
SRE?
Service Request Enable Register Query
115
LOCK?
Front Panel Keyboard Lock Query
125
STB?
Status Byte Query
116
MDAT?
Minimum/Maximum Data Query
125
TST?
Self-Test Query
116
MNMXRST
Minimum and Maximum Function Reset Cmd
125
WAI
Wait-to-Continue Cmd
116
MODE
Remote Interface Mode Cmd
126
ALARM
Input Alarm Parameter Cmd
116
MODE?
Remote Interface Mode Query
126
ALARM?
Input Alarm Parameter Query
117
MOUT
Manual Output Cmd
126
ALARMST?
Input Alarm Status Query
117
MOUT?
Output Manual Heater Power (MHP) Output Query
126
ALMRST
Reset Alarm Status Cmd
117
NET
Network Settings Cmd
126
ANALOG
Monitor Out Parameter Cmd
117
NET?
Network Settings Query
126
ANALOG?
Monitor Out Parameter Query
117
NETID?
Network Configuration Query
127
AOUT?
Analog Output Data Query
118
OUTMODE
Output Mode Command
128
ATUNE
Autotune Cmd
118
OUTMODE?
Output Mode Query
128
BRIGT
Display Contrast Cmd
118
PID
Control Loop PID Values Cmd
128
BRIGT?
Display Contrast Query
118
PID?
Control Loop PID Values Query
129
CRDG?
Celsius Reading Query
118
RAMP
Control Setpoint Ramp Parameter Cmd
129
CRVDEL
Curve Delete Cmd
118
RAMP?
Control Setpoint Ramp Parameter Query
129
CRVHDR
Curve Header Cmd
119
RAMPST?
Control Setpoint Ramp Status Query
129
CRVHDR?
Curve Header Query
119
RANGE
Heater Range Cmd
129
CRVPT
Curve Data Point Cmd
119
RANGE?
Heater Range Query
129
CRVPT?
Curve Data Point Query
119
RDGST?
Input Reading Status Query
130
DFLT
Factory Defaults Cmd
119
RELAY
Relay Control Parameter Cmd
130
DIOCUR
Diode Excitation Current Parameter Cmd
120
RELAY?
Relay Control Parameter Query
130
DIOCUR?
Diode Excitation Current Parameter Query
120
RELAYST?
Relay Status Query
130
DISPFLD
Custom ModeDisplay Field Cmd
120
SCAL
Generate SoftCal Curve Cmd
131
DISPFLD?
Custom Mode Display Field Query
120
SETP
Control Setpoint Cmd
131
DISPLAY
Display Setup Cmd
121
SETP?
Control Setpoint Query
131
DISPLAY?
Display Setup Query
121
SRDG?
Sensor Units Input Reading Query
131
FILTER
Input Filter Parameter Cmd
121
TEMP?
Thermocouple Junction Temperature Query
131
FILTER?
Input Filter Parameter Query
121
TLIMIT
Temperature Limit Cmd
132
HTR?
Heater Output Query
121
TLIMIT?
Temperature Limit Query
132
HTRSET
Heater Setup Cmd
122
TUNEST?
Control Tuning Status Query
132
HTRSET?
Heater Setup Query
122
WARMUP
Warmup Supply Parameter Cmd
132
HTRST?
Heater Status Query
122
WARMUP?
Warmup Supply Parameter Query
133
IEEE
IEEE-488 Parameter Cmd
122
WEBLOG
Website Login Parameters
133
IEEE?
IEEE-488 Interface Parameter Query
122
WEBLOG?
Website Login Parameter Query
133
INCRV
Input Curve Number Cmd
123
ZONE
Control Loop Zone Table Parameter Cmd
133
INCRV?
Input Curve Number Query
123
ZONE?
Output Zone Table Parameter Query
134
INNAME
Sensor Input Name Cmd
123
TABLE 6-6 Command summary
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
This section lists the interface commands in alphabetical order.
6.6.1 Interface
Commands

?
s[n]
nn…
dd
[term]
<…>
<state>
<value>
Begins common interface command
Required to identify queries
String of alphanumeric characters with length “n.” Send these strings
using surrounding quotes. Quotes enable characters such as commas
and spaces to be used without the instrument interpreting them as
delimiters.
String of number characters that may include a decimal point.
Dotted decimal format, common with IP addresses. Always contains 4
dot separated 3-digit decimal numbers, such as 192.168.000.012.
Terminator characters
Indicated a parameter field, many are command specific.
Parameter field with only On/Off or Enable/Disable states.
Floating point values have varying resolution depending on the type of
command or query issued.
TABLE 6-7 Interface commands key
CLS
Input
Remarks
ESE
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
ESE?
Input
Returned
Format
ESR?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Clear Interface Command
CLS[term]
Clears the bits in the Status Byte Register, Standard Event Status Register, and Operation Event Register, and terminates all pending operations. Clears the interface, but
not the controller. The related controller command is *RST.
Event Status Enable Register Command
ESE <bit weighting>[term]
nnn
Each bit is assigned a bit weighting and represents the enable/disable mask of the
corresponding event flag bit in the Standard Event Status Register. To enable an event
flag bit, send the command ESE with the sum of the bit weighting for each desired
bit. Refer to section 6.2.5 for a list of event flags.
To enable event flags 0, 4, and 7, send the command *ESE 145[term]. 145 is the sum of
the bit weighting for each bit.
Bit
Bit Weighting
Event Name
0
1
OPC
2
4
QXE
4
16
EXE
5
32
CME
7
128
PON
Total:
181
Event Status Enable Register Query
ESE?[term]
<bit weighting>[term]
nnn (Refer to section 6.2.5 for a list of event flags)
Standard Event Status Register Query
ESR?[term]
<bit weighting>
nnn
The integer returned represents the sum of the bit weighting of the event flag bits in
the Standard Event Status Register. Refer to section 6.2.5 for a list of event flags.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
IDN?
Identification Query
Example
IDN?[term]
<manufacturer>,<model>,<instrument serial>/<option serial>,
<firmware version>[term]
s[4],s[8],s[7]/s[7],n.n
<manufacturer>
Manufacturer ID
<model>
Instrument model number
<instrument serial> Instrument serial number
<option card serial> Option card serial number
<firmware version> Instrument firmware version
LSCI,MODEL336,1234567/1234567,1.0
OPC
Operation Complete Command
Input
Returned
Format
115
Input
Remarks
OPC[term]
Generates an Operation Complete event in the Event Status Register upon completion of all pending selected device operations. Send it as the last command in a command string.
OPC?
Operation Complete Query
Returned
Remarks
RST
Input
Remarks
SRE
OPC?[term]
1[term]
Places a 1 in the controller output queue upon completion of all pending selected
device operations. Send as the last command in a command string.
Not the same as OPC.
Reset Instrument Command
RST[term]
Sets controller parameters to power-up settings.
Service Request Enable Register Command
Example
SRE <bit weighting>[term]
nnn
Each bit has a bit weighting and represents the enable/disable mask of the corresponding status flag bit in the Status Byte Register. To enable a status flag bit, send
the command *SRE with the sum of the bit weighting for each desired bit. Refer to
section 6.2.6 for a list of status flags.
To enable status flags 4, 5, and 7, send the command *SRE 208[term]. 208 is the sum
of the bit weighting for each bit.
Bit
Bit Weighting
Event Name
4
16
MAV
5
64
ESB
7
128
OSB
Total:
208
SRE?
Service Request Enable Register Query
Input
Format
Remarks
Input
Returned
Format
SRE?[term]
<bit weighting>[term]
nnn (Refer to section 6.2.6 for a list of status flags)
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
STB?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
TST?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
WAI
Status Byte Query
STB?[term]
<bit weighting>[term]
nnn
Acts like a serial poll, but does not reset the register to all zeros. The integer returned
represents the sum of the bit weighting of the status flag bits that are set in the Status
Byte Register. Refer to section 6.2.6 for a list of status flags.
Self-Test Query
TST?[term]
<status>[term]
n
<status>
0 = no errors found, 1 = errors found
The Model 336 reports status based on test done at power up.
Wait-to-Continue Command
Input
Remarks
WAI[term]
Causes the IEEE-488 interface to hold off until all pending operations have been completed. This is the same function as the *OPC command, except that it does not set the
Operation Complete event bit in the Event Status Register.
ALARM
Input Alarm Parameter Command
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
Model 336 Temperature Controller
ALARM <input>,<off/on>,<high value>,<low value>,
<deadband>,<latch enable>,
<audible>,<visible> [term]
a,n, ±nnnnnn, ±nnnnnn, +nnnnnn,n,n,n
<input>
Specifies which input to configure: A - D.
<off/on>
Determines whether the instrument checks the alarm for this input,
where 0 = off and 1 = on.
<high setpoint> Sets the value the source is checked against to activate the
high alarm.
<low setpoint> Sets the value the source is checked against to activate low alarm.
<deadband>
Sets the value that the source must change outside of an alarm
condition to deactivate an unlatched alarm.
<latch enable> Specifies a latched alarm (remains active after alarm
condition correction)
where 0 = off (no latch) and 1 = on.
<audible>
Specifies if the internal speaker will beep when an alarm condition
occurs. Valid entries: 0 = off, 1 = on.
<visible>
Specifies if the Alarm LED on the instrument front panel will blink
when an alarm condition occurs.
Valid entries: 0 = off, 1 = on
Configures the alarm parameters for an input.
ALARM A,0[term]—turns off alarm checking for Input A.
ALARM B,1,270.0,0,0,1,1,1[term]—turns on alarm checking for input B, activates
high alarm if kelvin reading is over 270, and latches the alarm when kelvin reading
falls below 270. Alarm condition will cause instrument to beep and the front panel
Alarm LED to blink.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
ALARM?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Input Alarm Parameter Query
ALARM? <input>[term]
a
<input>
A–D
<off/on>,<high value>,<low value>,<deadband>,<latch enable>,<audible>,<visible>
[term]
n,±nnnnnn,±nnnnnn,+nnnnnn,n,n,n (refer to command for description)
ALARMST?
Input Alarm Status Query
Input
Format
ALARMST? <input>[term]
a
<input>
A-D
<high state>,<low state>[term]
n,n
<high state> 0 = Off, 1 = On
<low state> 0 = Off, 1 = On
Returned
Format
ALMRST
Input
Remarks
ANALOG
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
ANALOG?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
117
Reset Alarm Status Command
ALMRST[term]
Clears both the high and low status of all alarms, including latching alarms.
Monitor Out Parameter Command
ANALOG <output>,<input>,<units>,
<high value>,<low value>,<polarity>[term]
n,n,n,±nnnnn,±nnnnn,n
<output>
Unpowered analog output to configure: 3 or 4
<input>
Specifies which input to monitor. 0 = none, 1 = Input A, 2 =Input B,
3 = Input C, 4 = Input D
<units>
Specifies the units on which to base the output voltage: 1 = kelvin, 2 =
Celsius, 3 = sensor units
<high value> If output mode is Monitor Out , this parameter represents the data at
which the Monitor Out reaches +100% output.Entered in the units
designated by the <units> parmeter. Refer to OUTMODE command.
<low value> If output mode is Monitor Out, this parameter represents the data at
which the analog output reaches -100% output if bipolar, or 0% output
if positive only. Entered in the units designated by the <units> parmeter.
<polarity> Specifies output voltage is 0 = unipolar (positive output only) or
1 = bipolar (positive or negative output)
ANALOG 4,1,1,100.0,0.0,0[term]—sets output 4 to monitor Input A kelvin reading
with 100.0 K at +100% output (+10.0 V) and 0.0 K at 0% output (0.0 V).
Use the OUTMODE command to set the output mode to Monitor Out. The <input>
parameter in the ANALOG command is the same as the <input> parameter in the OUTMODE command. It is included in the ANALOG command for backward compatibility
with previous Lake Shore temperature monitors and controllers. The ANALOG command name is also named as such for backward compatibility.
Monitor Out Parameter Query
ANALOG? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which unpowered analog output to query the Monitor Out
parameters for: 3 or 4.
<input>,<units>,<high value>,<low value>,<polarity>[term]
n,n,±nnnnn,±nnnnn,n (refer to command for definition)
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
AOUT?
Analog Output Data Query
Input
Format
AOUT? <output>[term]
n
<output> Specifies which unpowered analog output to query: 3 or 4.
<output percentage>[term]
±nnn.n
Returns the output percentage of the unpowered analog output.
Returned
Format
Remarks
ATUNE
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
Autotune Command
ATUNE <output>,<mode>,[term]
n,n
<output>
Specifies the output associated with the loop to be Autotuned: 1 or 2.
<mode>
Specifies the Autotune mode. Valid entries: 0 = P Only, 1 = P and I,
2 = P, I, and D.
ATUNE 2,1 [term]—initiates Autotuning of control loop associated with output 2, in
P and I mode.
If initial conditions required to Autotune the specified loop are not met, an Autotune
initialization error will occur and the Autotune process will not be performed. The
TUNEST? query can be used to check if an Autotune error occurred.
BRIGT
Display Contrast Command
Input
Format
Remarks
BRIGT <contrast value>[term]
nn
<contrast value> 1–32
Sets the display contrast for the front panel LCD.
BRIGT?
Display Contrast Query
Input
Returned
Format
CRDG?
Input
Format
BRIGT?[term]
<contrast value>[term]
nn (refer to command for description)
Celsius Reading Query
Returned
Format
Remarks
CRDG? <input>[term]
a
<input> A–D
<temp value>[term]
±nnnnnn
Also see the RDGST? command.
CRVDEL
Curve Delete Command
Input
Format
Example
Model 336 Temperature Controller
CRVDEL <curve>[term]
nn
<curve> Specifies a user curve to delete. Valid entries: 21–59.
CRVDEL 21[term]—deletes User Curve 21.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
CRVHDR
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
CRVHDR?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
CRVPT
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
CRVPT?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
DFLT
Input
Remarks
119
Curve Header Command
CRVHDR <curve>,<name>,<SN>,<format>,<limit value>,<coefficient>[term]
nn,s[15],s[10],n,+nnn.nnn,n
<curve>
Specifies which curve to configure. Valid entries: 21–59.
<name>
Specifies curve name. Limited to 15 characters.
<SN>
Specifies the curve serial number. Limited to 10 characters.
<format>
Specifies the curve data format. Valid entries: 1 = mV/K, 2 = V/K,
3 = )/K, 4 = log )/K.
<limit value>Specifies the curve temperature limit in kelvin.
<coefficient>Specifies the curves temperature coefficient. Valid entries:
1 = negative, 2 = positive.
Configures the user curve header. The coefficient parameter will be calculated automatically based on the first 2 curve datapoints. It is included as a parameter for compatability with the CRVHDR? query.
CRVHDR 21,DT-470,00011134,2,325.0,1[term]—configures User Curve 21 with a
name of DT-470, serial number of 00011134, data format of volts versus kelvin, upper
temperature limit of 325 K, and negative coefficient.
Curve Header Query
CRVHDR? <curve>[term]
nn
<curve>
Valid entries: 1–59.
<name>,<SN>,<format>,<limit value>,<coefficient>[term]
s[15],s[10],n,+nnn.nnn,n (refer to command for description)
Curve Data Point Command
CRVPT <curve>,<index>,<units value>,<temp value>[term]
nn,nnn,±nnnnnn,+nnnnnn
<curve>
Specifies which curve to configure. Valid entries: 21–59.
<index>
Specifies the points index in the curve. Valid entries: 1–200.
<units value>Specifies sensor units for this point to 6 digits.
<temp value>Specifies the corresponding temperature in kelvin for this
point to 6 digits.
Configures a user curve data point.
CRVPT 21,2,0.10191,470.000,N[term]—sets User Curve 21 second data point to
0.10191 sensor units and 470.000 K.
Curve Data Point Query
CRVPT? <curve>,<index>[term]
nn,nnn
<curve>
Specifies which curve to query: 1–59.
<index>
Specifies the points index in the curve: 1–200.
<units value>,<temp value>[term]
±nnnnnn,+nnnnnn (refer to command for description)
Returns a standard or user curve data point.
Factory Defaults Command
DFLT 99[term]
Sets all configuration values to factory defaults and resets the instrument. The “99” is
included to prevent accidentally setting the unit to defaults.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
DIOCUR
Input
Format
Remarks
DIOCUR?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
DISPFLD
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
DISPFLD?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Diode Excitation Current Parameter Command
DIOCUR <input>,<excitation>[term]
a,n
<input>
Specifies which input to configure: A–D.
<excitation > Specifies the Diode excitation current: 0 = 10 µA, 1 = 1 mA.
The 10 µA excitation current is the only calibrated excitation current, and is used in
almost all applications. Therefore the Model 336 will default the 10 µA current setting any time the input sensor type is changed in order to prevent an accidental
change. If using a current that is not 10 µA, the input sensor type must first be configured to Diode (INTYPE command). If the sensor type is not set to Diode when the
DIOCUR command is sent, the command will be ignored.
Diode Excitation Current Parameter Query
DIOCUR? <input>[term]
a
<input>
A–D
<excitation> [term]
n (refer to command for description)
Custom Mode Display Field Command
DISPFLD <field>,<source>,<units>[term]
n,n,n
<field>
Specifies field (display location) to configure: 1–8.
<input>
Specifies item to display in the field: 0 = None, 1 = Input A,
2 = Input B, 3 = Input C, 4 = Input D
<units>
Valid entries: 1 = kelvin, 2 = Celsius, 3 = sensor units,
4 = minimum data, and 5 = maximum data.
DISPFLD 2,1,1[term]—displays kelvin reading for Input A in display field 2 when display mode is set to Custom.
This command only applies to the readings displayed in the Custom display mode. All
other display modes have predefined readings in predefined locations, and will use
the Preferred Units parameter to determine which units to display for each sensor
input. Refer to section 4.3 for details on display setup
Custom Mode Display Field Query
DISPFLD? <field>[term]
n
<field>
Specifies field (display location) to query: 1–8.
<input>,<units>[term]
n,n (refer to command for description)
6.6.1 Interface Commands
DISPLAY
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
DISPLAY?
Input
Returned
Format
FILTER
Input
Format
Example
FILTER?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
HTR?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
121
Display Setup Command
DISPLAY <mode>,<num fields>,<output source>[term]
n,n,n
<mode>
Specifies display mode: 0 = Input A, 1 = Input B, 2 = Input C,
3 = Input D, 4 = Custom, 5 = Four Loop
<num fields>
Specifies number of fields (display locations) to display
when mode set to Custom: 0 = 2 large, 1 = 4 large,
2 = 8 small
<displayed output> Specifies which output, and associated loop information, to
display in the bottom half of the custom display screen:
1 = Output 1, 2 = Output 2, 3 = Output 3, 4 = Output 4
DISPLAY 4,0,1[term]—set display mode to Custom with 2 large display fields, and set
custom output display source to Output 1.
The <num fields> and <displayed output> commands are ignored in all display modes
except for Custom.
Display Setup Query
DISPLAY?[term]
<mode>,<num fields>,<output source>[term]
n,n,n (refer to command for description)
Input Filter Parameter Command
FILTER <input>,<off/on>,<points>,<window>[term]
a,n,nn,nn
<input>
Specifies input to configure: A–D.
<off/on>
Specifies whether the filter function is 0 = Off or 1 = On.
<points>
Specifies how many data points the filtering function uses.
Valid range = 2 to 64.
<window> Specifies what percent of full scale reading limits the filtering function.
Reading changes greater than this percentage reset the filter. Valid
range = 1 to 10%.
FILTER B,1,10,2[term]—filter input B data through 10 readings with 2% of
full scale window.
Input Filter Parameter Query
FILTER? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies input to query: A–D.
<off/on >,<points>,<window>[term]
n,nn,nn (refer to command for description)
Heater Output Query
HTR? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Heater output to query: 1 = Output 1, 2 = Output 2
<heater value>[term]
+nnn.n
<heater value>Heater output in percent (%).
HTR? is for the Heater Outputs, 1 and 2, only. Use AOUT? for Outputs 3 and 4.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
HTRSET
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
HTRSET?
Input
Format
Heater Setup Command
HTRSET <output>,<heater resistance>,<max current>,<max user
current>,<current/power>[term]
n,n,n,+n.nnn,n
<output>
Specifies which heater output to configure: 1 or 2.
<htr resistance>
Heater Resistance Setting: 1 = 25 ), 2 = 50 ) .
<max current>
Specifies the maximum heater output current:
0 = User Specified, 1 = 0.707 A, 2 = 1 A, 3 = 1.141 A, 4 = 2 A
<max user current>
Specifies the maximum heater output current if
max current is set to User Specified.
<current/power>
Specifies whether the heater output displays in current or
power. Valid entries: 1 = current, 2 = power.
HTRSET 1,1,2,0,1[term]—Heater output 1 will use the 25 ) heater setting, has a
maximum current of 1 A, the maximum user current is set to 0 A because it is not
going to be used since a discrete value has been chosen, and the heater output will be
displayed in units of current.
Max current will be limited to 1.414 A on output 2 if the heater resistance is set to
25 ), and will be limited to 1 A on both outputs 1 and 2 if the heater resistance is set
to 50 ) .
Heater Setup Query
Returned
Format
HTRSET? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which heater output to query: 1 or 2.
<htr resistance>,<max current>,<max user current>,<current/power>[term]
n,n,+n.nnn,n
HTRST?
Heater Status Query
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
IEEE
Input
Format
Example
IEEE?
Input
Returned
Format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
HTRST? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which heater output to query: 1 or 2.
<error code>[term]
n
<error code> Heater error code: 0 = no error, 1 = heater open load, 2 = heater short.
Error condition is cleared upon querying the heater status, which will also clear the
front panel error message
IEEE-488 Interface Parameter Command
IEEE <address>[term]
nn
<address> Specifies the IEEE address: 1–30. (Address 0 and 31 are reserved.)
IEEE 4[term]—after receipt of the current terminator, the instrument responds to
address 4.
IEEE-488 Interface Parameter Query
IEEE?[term]
<address>[term]
nn (refer to command for description)
6.6.1 Interface Commands
123
INCRV
Input Curve Number Command
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
INCRV <input>,<curve number>[term]
a,nn
<input>
Specifies which input to configure: A –D.
<curve number> Specifies which curve the input uses. If specified curve type does not
match the configured input type, the curve number
defaults to 0. Valid entries: 0 = none, 1–20 = standard
curves, 21–59 = user curves.
Specifies the curve an input uses for temperature conversion.
INCRV A,23[term]—Input A uses User Curve 23 for temperature conversion.
INCRV?
Input Curve Number Query
Input
Format
Returned
Format
INNAME
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
INNAME?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
INTSEL
Input
Format
Remarks
INCRV? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A–D.
<curve number>[term]
nn (refer to command for description)
Sensor Input Name Command
INNAME <input>,<name>[term]
a,s[15]
<input>
Specifies input to configure: A–D.
<name>
Specifies the name to associate with the sensor input.
INNAME A, “Sample Space”[term]—the string “Sample Space” will appear on the
front panel display when possible to identify the sensor information being displayed.
Be sure to use quotes when sending strings, otherwise characters such as spaces, and
other non alpha-numeric characters, will be interpreted as a delimiter and the full
string will not be accepted. It is not recommended to use commas or semi-colons in
sensor input names as these characters are used as delimiters for query responses.
Sensor Input Name Query
INNAME? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies input to query: A–D.
<name>[term]
s[15] (refer to command for description)
Interface Select Command
INTSEL <interface>[term]
n
<interface> Specifies the remote interface to enable: 0 = USB, 1 = Ethernet,
2 = IEEE-488.
The Ethernet interface will attempt to configure itself based on the current configuration parameters, which can be set using the NET command. Configuring the Ethernet interface parameters prior to enabling the interface is recommended.
INTSEL?
Interface Select Query
Input
Returned
Format
INTSEL?[term]
<interface>[term]
n (refer to command for description)
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
INTYPE
Input
Format
Input Type Parameter Command
INTYPE <input>,<sensor type>,<autorange>,<range>,<compensation>,<units> [term]
a,n,n,n,n,n
<input>
Specifies input to configure: A–D
<sensor type>
Specifies input sensor type:
0 = Disabled
1 = Diode
2 = Platinum RTD
3 = NTC RTD
4 = Thermocouple
<autorange>
Specifies autoranging: 0 = off and 1 = on.
<range>
Specifies input range when autorange is off:
Diode
0 = 2.5 V
PTC RTD
0 = 10 )
1 = 10 V
1 = 30 )
2 = 100 )
3 = 300 )
4 = 1 k)
5 = 3 k)
6 = 10 k)
NTC RTD
0 = 10 )
1 = 30 )
2 = 100 )
3 = 300 )
4 = 1 k)
5 = 3 k)
6 = 10 k)
7 = 30 k)
8 = 100 k)
Thermocouple
0 = 50 mV
TABLE 6-8 Input range
Example
Remarks
INTYPE?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
Model 336 Temperature Controller
<compensation> Specifies input compensation where 0 = off and 1 = on. Reversal for
thermal EMF compensation if input is resistive, room compensation
if input is thermocouple. Always 0 if input is a diode.
<units>
Specifies the preferred units parameter for sensor readings and for
the control setpoint: 1 = kelvin, 2 = Celsius, 3 = Sensor
INTYPE A,2,1,0,1,1[term]—sets Input A sensor type to Platinum RTD, autorange on,
thermal compensation on, and preferred units to kelvin.
The <autorange> and <range> parameters do not apply to Thermocouple sensor type,
and the <autorange> and <compensation> parameters do not apply to Diode sensor
type. When configuring diode or thermocouple sensor types, these parameters must
be included, but are ignored. A setting of 0 for each is recommended in this case.
Input Type Parameter Query
INTYPE? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies input to query: A - D.
<sensor type>,<autorange>,<range>,<compensation>,<units> [term]
n,n,n,n,n (refer to command for description)
If autorange is on, the returned range parameter is the currently auto-selected range.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
KRDG?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
LEDS
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
LEDS?
Input
Returned
Format
125
Kelvin Reading Query
KRDG? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A - D.
<kelvin value>[term]
±nnnnnn
Also see the RDGST? command.
Front Panel LEDS Command
LEDS <off/on>[term]
n
<off/on>
0 = LEDs Off, 1 = LEDs On
If set to 0, front panel LEDs will not be functional. Function can be used when display
brightness is a problem.
LED 0[term]—turns all front panel LED functionality off.
Front Panel LEDS Query
LEDS?[term]
<off/on> [term]
n (refer to command for description)
LOCK
Front Panel Keyboard Lock Command
Input
Format
LOCK <state>,<code>[term]
n,nnn
<state>
0 = Unlocked, 1 = Locked
<code>
Specifies lock-out code. Valid entries are 000 –999.
Locks out all front panel entries except pressing the All Off key to immediately turn
off all heater outputs. Refer to section 4.7.
LOCK 1,123[term]—enables keypad lock and sets the code to 123.
Remarks
Example
LOCK?
Front Panel Keyboard Lock Query
Input
Returned
Format
LOCK?[term]
<state>,<code>[term]
n,nnn (refer to command for description)
MDAT?
Minimum/Maximum Data Query
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
MNMXRST
Input
Remarks
MDAT? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A–D.
<min value>,<max value>[term]
±nnnnnn,±nnnnnn
Returns the minimum and maximum input data. Also see the RDGST? command.
Minimum and Maximum Function Reset Command
MNMXRST[term]
Resets the minimum and maximum data for all inputs.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
MODE
Remote Interface Mode Command
Input
Format
Example
MODE <mode>[term]
n
<mode>
0 = local, 1 = remote, 2 = remote with local lockout.
MODE 2[term]—places the Model 336 into remote mode with local lockout.
MODE?
Remote Interface Mode Query
Input
Returned
Format
MODE?[term]
<mode>[term]
n (refer to command for description)
MOUT
Manual Output Command
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
MOUT <output>,<value>[term]
n, +nnnnn[term]
<output>
Specifies output to configure: 1–4.
<value>
Specifies value for manual output.
MOUT 1,22.45[term]—Output 1 manual output is 22.45%.
Manual output only applies to outputs in Closed Loop PID, Zone, or Open Loop modes.
MOUT?
Manual Output Query
Input
Format
Returned
Format
MOUT? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output to query: 1 - 4.
<value>
+ nnnnn[term] (refer to command for description)
NET
Network Settings Command
Input
NET <DHCP>,<AUTO IP>,<IP>,<Sub Mask>,<Gateway>,
<Pri DNS>,<Sec DNS>,<Pref Host>,<Pref Domain>,
<Description>[term]
n,n,dd,dd,dd,dd,dd,s[15],s[64],s[32],
<DHCP>
0 = DHCP off, 1=DHCP on.
<AUTO IP>
0 = Dynamically configured link-local addressing (Auto IP)
off, 1 = On
<IP>
IP address for static configuration.
<Sub Mask>
Subnet mask for static configuration.
<Gateway>
Gateway address for static configuration.
<Pri DNS>
Primary DNS address for static configuration.
<Sec DNS>
Secondary DNS address for static configuration.
<Pref Host>
Preferred Hostname (15 character maximum)
<Pref Domain>
Preferred Domain name (64 character maximum)
<Description>
Instrument description (32 character maximum)
Format
NET?
Input
Returned
Format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Network Settings Query
NET?[term]
<DHCP>,<AUTO IP>,<IP>,<Sub Mask>,<Gateway>,<Pri DNS>,<Sec DNS>,<Pref Host>,<Pref
Domain>,<Description>[term]
n,n,dd,dd,dd,dd,dd,s[15],s[64],s[32] (refer to command for description)
6.6.1 Interface Commands
127
NETID?
Network Configuration Query
Input
Returned
NETID?[term]
<lan status>,<IP>,<sub mask>,<gateway>,<pri DNS>,<sec DNS>,<mac addr>,<actual hostname>,<actual domain>[term]
n,dd,dd,dd,dd,dd,hh:hh:hh:hh:hh:hh,s[15],s[32]
<lan status>
Current status of Ethernet connection: 0 = Connected Using
Static IP, 1 = Connected Using DHCP, 2 = Connected Using
Auto IP, 3 = Address Not Acquired Error, 4 = Duplicate Initial
IP Address Error, 5 = Duplicate Ongoing IP Address Error,
6 = Cable Unplugged, 7 = Module Error, 8 = Acquiring
Address, 9 = Ethernet Disabled. Refer to section 6.4.2.1 for
details on lan status.
<IP>
Configured IP address
<sub mask>
Configured subnet mask
<gateway>
Configured gateway address
<pri DNS>
Configured primary DNS address
<sec DNS>
Configured secondary DNS address
<actual hostname>
Assigned hostname
<actual domain>
Assigned domain
<mac addr>
Module MAC address.
This query returns the configured Ethernet parameters. If the Ethernet interface is
not configured then IP, subnet mask, gateway, primary DNS and secondary DNS
parameters will be 0.0.0.0.
Format
Remarks
OPST?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
OPSTE
Operational Status Query
OPST? [term]
<bit weighting> [term]
nnn
The integer returned represents the sum of the bit weighting of the operational status bits. Refer to section 6.2.5.2 for a list of operational status bits.
Operational Status Enable Command
Input
Format
Remarks
OPSTE <bit weighting> [term]
nnn
Each bit has a bit weighting and represents the enable/disable mask of the corresponding operational status bit in the Operational Status Register. This determines
which status bits can set the corresponding summary bit in the Status Byte Register.
To enable a status bit, send the command OPSTE with the sum of the bit weighting for
each desired bit. Refer to section 6.2.5.2 for a list of operational status bits.
OPSTE?
Operational Status Enable Query
Input
Returned
Format
OPSTE?[term]
<bit weighting> [term]
nnn (Refer to section 6.2.5.2 for a list of operational status bits)
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
OPSTR?
Operational Status Register Query
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
OPSTR? [term]
<bit weighting> [term]
nnn
The integers returned represent the sum of the bit weighting of the operational status bits. These status bits are latched when the condition is detected. This register is
cleared when it is read. Refer to section 6.2.5.2 for a list of operational status bits.
OUTMODE
Output Mode Command
Input
Format
OUTMODE <output>,<mode>,<input>,<powerup enable>[term]
n,n,n,n
<output>
Specifies which output to configure: 1–4.
<mode>
Specifies the control mode. Valid entries: 0 = Off, 1 = Closed
Loop PID, 2 = Zone, 3 = Open Loop, 4 = Monitor out,
5 = Warmup Supply
<input>
Specifies which input to use for control: 0 = None, 1 = A,
2 = B, 3 = C, 4 = D
<powerup enable>
Specifies whether the output remains on or shuts off after
power cycle. Valid entries: 0 = powerup enable off,
1 = powerup enable on.
Example
OUTMODE 1,2,1,0[term]—Output 1 configured for Zone control mode, using Input A
for the control input sensor, and will turn the output off when power is cycled.
Modes 1 and 2 are only valid for heater outputs (1 and 2), and modes 4 and 5 are only
valid for Monitor Out (3 and 4).
Remarks
OUTMODE?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
PID
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Output Mode Query
OUTMODE? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output to query: 1–4.
<mode>,<input>,<powerup enable>[term]
n,n,n (refer to command for description)
Control Loop PID Values Command
PID <output>,<P value>,<I value>,<D value>[term]
n,+nnnnn,+nnnnn,+nnnn
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to configure: 1 or 2.
<P value>
The value for output Proportional (gain): 0.1 to 1000.
<I value>
The value for output Integral (reset): 0.1 to 1000.
<D value>
The value for output Derivative (rate): 0 to 200.
Control settings, (P, I, D, and Setpoint) are assigned to outputs, which results in the
settings being applied to any loop formed by the output and its control input.
PID 1,10,50,0[term]—Output 1 P is 10, I is 50, and D is 0%.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
PID?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
129
Control Loop PID Values Query
PID? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to query: 1 or 2.
<P value>,<I value>,<D value>[term]
+nnnnn,+nnnnn,+nnnn (refer to command for description)
RAMP
Control Setpoint Ramp Parameter Command
Input
Format
RAMP <output>,<off/on>,<rate value>[term]
n,n,nnnn
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to configure: 1 or 2.
<off/on>
Specifies whether ramping is 0 = Off or 1 = On.
<rate value>
Specifies setpoint ramp rate in kelvin per minute from
0.1 to 100. The rate is always positive, but will respond to
ramps up or down. A rate of 0 is interpreted as infinite, and
will therefore respond as if setpoint ramping were off.
RAMP 1,1,10.5[term]—when Output 1 setpoint is changed, ramp the current setpoint to the target setpoint at 10.5 K/minute.
Control loop settings are assigned to outputs, which results in the settings being
applied to the control loop formed by the output and its control input.
Example
Remarks
RAMP?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
RAMPST?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
RANGE
Input
Format
Remarks
RANGE?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Control Setpoint Ramp Parameter Query
RAMP? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to query: 1 or 2.
<off/on>,<rate value>[term]
n,nnnn (refer to command for description)
Control Setpoint Ramp Status Query
RAMPST? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to query: 1 or 2.
<ramp status>[term]
n
<ramp status>
0 = Not ramping, 1 = Setpoint is ramping.
Heater Range Command
RANGE <output>,<range>[term]
n,n
<output>
Specifies which output to configure: 1–4.
<range>
For outputs 1 and 2: 0 = Off, 1 = Low, 2 = Medium, 3 = High
For outputs 3 and 4: 0 = Off, 1 = On
The range setting has no effect if an output is in the Off mode, and does not apply to
an output in Monitor Out mode. An output in Monitor Out mode is always on.
Heater Range Query
RANGE? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output to query: 1–4.
<range>[term]
n (refer to command for description)
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
RDGST?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Remarks
Input Reading Status Query
RDGST? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A–D.
<status bit weighting>[term]
nnn
The integer returned represents the sum of the bit weighting of the input status flag
bits. A “000” response indicates a valid reading is present..
Bit
Bit Weighting
Status Indicator
0
4
5
6
7
1
16
32
64
128
invalid reading
temp underrange
temp overrange
sensor units zero
sensor units overrange
RELAY
Relay Control Parameter Command
Input
Format
Example
RELAY <relay number>,<mode>,<input alarm>,<alarm type>[term]
n,n,a,n
<relay number>
Specifies which relay to configure: 1 or 2.
<mode>
Specifies relay mode. 0 = Off, 1 = On, 2 = Alarms.
<input alarm>
Specifies which input alarm activates the relay when the
relay is in alarm mode: A - D.
<alarm type>
Specifies the input alarm type that activates the relay when
the relay is in alarm mode. 0 = Low alarm, 1 = High Alarm,
2 = Both Alarms.
RELAY 1,2,B,0[term]–relay 1 activates when Input B low alarm activates.
RELAY?
Relay Control Parameter Query
Input
Format
Returned
Format
RELAYST?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
RELAY? <relay number>[term]
n
<relay number>
Specifies which relay to query: 1 or 2.
<mode>,<input alarm>,<alarm type>[term]
n,a,n (refer to command for description)
Relay Status Query
RELAYST? <relay number>[term]
n
<relay number>
Specifies which relay to query: 1 or 2.
<status>[term]
n
0 = Off, 1 = On.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
131
SCAL
Generate SoftCal Curve Command
Input
SCAL <std>,<dest>,<SN>,<T1 value>,<U1 value>,<T2 value>,<U2
value>,<T3 value>,<U3 value>[term]
n,nn,S[10],+nnnnnn,±nnnnnn,+nnnnnn,±nnnnnn,+nnnnnn,±nnnnnn
<std>
Specifies the standard curve from which to generate
a SoftCal™ curve.
Valid entries: 1, 6, 7.
<dest>
Specifies the user curve to store the SoftCal™ curve.
Valid entries: 21–59.
<SN>
Specifies the curve serial number. Limited to 10 characters.
<T1 value>
Specifies first temperature point in kelvin.
<U1 value>
Specifies first sensor units point.
<T2 value>
Specifies second temperature point in kelvin.
<U2 value>
Specifies second sensor units point.
<T3 value>
Specifies third temperature point in kelvin.
<U3 value>
Specifies third sensor units point.
Generates a SoftCal™ curve. Refer to Paragraph 5.3.
SCAL 1,21,1234567890,4.2,1.6260,77.32,1.0205,300.0,0.5189[term]–generates a
three-point SoftCal™ curve from standard curve 1 and saves it in user curve 21.
Format
Remarks
Example
SETP
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
Control Setpoint Command
SETP <output>,<value>[term]
n,±nnnnnn
<output>
Specifies which output’s control loop to configure: 1–4.
<value>
The value for the setpoint (in the preferred units of the
control loop sensor).
SETP 1,122.5[term]—Output 1 setpoint is now 122.5 (based on its units).
For outputs 3 and 4, setpoint is only valid in Warmup mode. Control settings, that is,
P, I, D, and Setpoint, are assigned to outputs, which results in the settings being
applied to the control loop formed by the output and its control input.
SETP?
Control Setpoint Query
Input
Format
SETP? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which output to query: 1–4.
<value>[term]
±nnnnnn (refer to command for description)
Returned
Format
SRDG?
Sensor Units Input Reading Query
Input
Format
SRDG? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A–D.
<sensor units value>[term]
±nnnnnn
Also see the RDGST? command.
Returned
Format
Remarks
TEMP?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
Thermocouple Junction Temperature Query
TEMP?[term]
<junction temperature>[term]
+nnnnn
Temperature is in kelvin. This query returns the temperature of the ceramic thermocouple block used in the room temperature compensation calculation
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
TLIMIT
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
TLIMIT?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
TUNEST?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
WARMUP
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Temperature Limit Command
TLIMIT <input>,<limit>[term]
a,+nnnn
<input>
Specifies which input to configure: A–D.
<limit>
The temperature limit in kelvin for which to shut down all
control outputs when exceeded. A temperature limit of zero
turns the temperature limit feature off for the given
sensor input.
TLIMIT B,450[term]—if the temperature of the sensor on Input B exceeds 450 K, all
control outputs will be turned off.
A temperature limit setting of 0 K turns the temperature limit feature off.
Temperature Limit Query
TLIMIT? <input>[term]
a
<input>
Specifies which input to query: A–D.
< limit>[term]
+nnnn (refer to command for description)
Control Tuning Status Query
TUNEST?[term]
<tuning status>,<output>,<error status>,<stage status>[term]
n,n,n,nn
<tuning status>
0 = no active tuning, 1 = active tuning.
<output>
Heater output of the control loop being tuned (if tuning):
1 = output 1, 2 = output 2
<error status>
0 = no tuning error, 1 = tuning error
<stage status>
Specifies the current stage in the Autotune process.
If tuning error occurred, stage status represents stage
that failed.
If initial conditions are not met when starting the autotune procedure, causing the
autotuning process to never actually begin, then the error status will be set to 1 and
the stage status will be stage 00.
Warmup Supply Parameter Command
WARMUP <output>,<control>,<percentage>[term]
n,n,+nnn
<output>
Specifies which unpowered analog output to configure: 3 or
4
<control>
Specifies the type of control used: 0 = Auto Off,
1 = Continuous
<percentage>
Specifies the percentage of full scale (10 V) Monitor Out
voltage to apply to turn on the external power supply.
WARMUP 3,1,50[term]—Output 3 will use the Continuous control mode, with a 5 V
(50%) output voltage for activating the external power supply.
The Output Mode parameter and the Control Input parameter must be configured
using the OUTMODE command.
6.6.1 Interface Commands
WARMUP?
Input
Format
Returned
Format
WEBLOG
Input
Format
Example
Remarks
WEBLOG?
Input
Returned
Format
Remarks
ZONE
Input
Format
Remarks
Example
133
Warmup Supply Parameter Query
WARMUP? <output>[term]
n
<output>
Specifies which unpowered analog output to query: 3 or 4.
<control>,<percentage>[term]
n,+nnn (refer to command for description)
Website Login Parameters
WEBLOG <username>,<password>[term]
s[15],s[15]
<username>
15 character string representing the website username.
<password>
15 character string representing the website password.
WEBLOG “user”, “pass” —sets the username to user and the password to pass.
Strings can be sent with or without quotation marks, but to send a string that contains spaces, commas, or semi-colons quotation marks must be used to differentiate
the actual parameter separator.
Website Login Parameter Query
WEBLOG?[term]
<username>,<password>[term]
s[15],s[15] (refer to command for description)
Note that all strings returned by the Model 336 will be padded with spaces to maintain a constant number of characters.
Control Loop Zone Table Parameter Command
ZONE <output>,<zone>,<upper bound>,<P value>,<I value>,
<D value>,<mout value>,<range>,<input>,<rate>[term]
n,nn,+nnnnn, +nnnnn,+nnnnn,+nnnn,+nnnnn, n,n, +nnnn [term]
<output>
Specifies which heater output to configure: 1 or 2.
<zone>
Specifies which zone in the table to configure.
Valid entries are: 1–10.
<upper bound>
Specifies the upper Setpoint boundary of this zone in kelvin.
<P value>
Specifies the P for this zone: 0.1 to 1000.
<I value>
Specifies the I for this zone: 0.1 to 1000.
<D value>
Specifies the D for this zone: 0 to 200%.
<mout value>
Specifies the manual output for this zone: 0 to 100%.
<range>
Specifies the heater range for this zone. Valid entries:
0 = Off, 1 = Low, 2 = Med, 3 = High.
<input>
Specifies the sensor input to use for this zone. 0 = Default
(Use previously assigned sensor), 1 = Input A, 2 = Input B,
3 = Input C, 4 = Input D
<rate>
Specifies the ramp rate for this zone: 0.1 –100 K/min.
Configures the output zone parameters. Refer to Paragraph 2.9.
ZONE 1,1,25.0,10,20,0,0,2,2,10[term]—Output 1 zone 1 is valid to 25.0 K with
P = 10, I = 20, D = 0, a heater range of medium, sensor input B, and a
ramp rate of 10 K/min.
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cHAPTER 6: Computer Interface Operation
ZONE?
Output Zone Table Parameter Query
Input
Format
ZONE? <output>,<zone>[term]
n,nn
<output>
Specifies which heater output to query: 1 or 2.
<zone>
Specifies which zone in the table to query.
Valid entries: 1–10.
< upper boundary>,<P value>,<I value>,<D value>,<mout
value>,<range>,<input>,<rate>[term]
+nnnnn,+nnnnn,+nnnnn,+nnnn, +nnnnn,n,n, +nnnn
(refer to command for description)
Returned
Format
Model 336 Temperature Controller
7.1 General
135
Chapter 7: Options and
Accessories
7.1 General
This chapter provides information on the models, options, and accessories available
for the Model 336 temperature controller.
7.2 Models
The list of Model 336 model numbers is provided as follows:
Model
336
Description of Models
Standard temperature controller. 4 diode/RTD inputs and 4 control outputs
TABLE 7-1 Model description
Power configurations—the instrument is configured at the factory for customerselected power as follows:
VAC-100
Instrument configured for 100 VAC with U.S. power cord
VAC-120
Instrument configured for 120 VAC with U.S. power cord
VAC-220
Instrument configured for 220 VAC with European power cord
VAC-240
VAC-120-ALL
Instrument configured for 240 VAC with European power cord
Instrument configured for 120 VAC with U.S. power cord and European power cord
TABLE 7-2 Power configurations
7.3 Options
The list of Model 336 options is provided as follows:
Model
3060-F
Description of Options
Dual Thermocouple Input Option Card. Adds 2 thermocouple inputs to the Model 336.
TABLE 7-3 Model description
7.4 Accessories
Accessories are devices that perform a secondary duty as an aid or refinement to the
primary unit. Refer to the Lake Shore Temperature Measurement and Control Catalog
for details. A list of accessories available for the Model 336 is as follows:
Model
106-009*†
Description of Accessories
Heater Output Connector. Dual banana jack for heater output.
G-106-233*†
Sensor Input Mating Connector. 6-pin DIN plug for diode/resistor input; 4 included
G-106-735*†
Terminal Block Mating Connector. 10-pin terminal block for relays and Outputs 3 and 4.
115-006*†
Detachable 120 VAC Line Cord.
MAN-336*†
Model 336 Temperature Controller User's Manual.
G-112-325
Sensor/Heater Cable Assembly—10 Feet. Cable assembly for 2 diode/resistor sensors and
1 heater output. Approximately 3 m (10 ft) long. Requires 2 to use 4 sensors and 2 heaters.
Refer to FIGURE 7-1.
G-112-326
Sensor/Heater Cable Assembly —20 Feet. Cable assembly for 2 diode/resistor sensors and 1
heater output. Approximately 6 m (20 ft) long. Requires 2 to use 4 sensors and 2 heaters.
Refer to FIGURE 7-1.
3003
Heater Output Conditioner. The heater output conditioner is a passive filter that further
reduces the already low heater output noise of the Model 336. Refer to section 7.7 and
see FIGURE 7-6.
6201†
IEEE-488 Cable. 1 m (3 ft) long IEEE-488 computer interface cable.
CAL-336-CERT†
Instrument recalibration with certificate.
CAL-336-DATA†
Instrument recalibration with certificate and data.
TABLE 7-4 Accessories
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cHAPTER 7: Options and Accessories
Model
Description of Accessories
ES-2-20
Stycast® Epoxy 2850-FT, Catalyst 9 (20 packets, 2 g each). Stycast® is a common, highly versatile, nonconductive epoxy resin system for cryogenic use. The primary use for Stycast® is for
vacuum feedthroughs or permanent thermal anchors. Stycast® is an alternative to
Apiezon® N Grease when permanent sensor mountings are desired.
ID-10-XX
Indium Solder Disks (Quantity 10). Indium is a semi-precious non-ferrous metal, softer than
lead, and extremely malleable and ductile. It stays soft and workable down to cryogenic temperatures. Indium can be used to create solder "bumps" for microelectronic chip attachments
and also as gaskets for pressure and vacuum sealing purposes.
ID-10-31 Indium Disks are 7.92 mm diameter × 0.13 mm (0.312 in diameter × 0.005 in)
ID-10-56 Indium Disks are 14.27 mm diameter × 0.127 mm (0.562 diameter × 0.005 in)
IF-5
Indium Foil Sheets (Quantity 5). When used as a washer between DT-470-CU silicon diode or
other temperature sensors and refrigerator cold stages, indium foil increases the thermal contact area and prevents the sensor from detaching due to vibration. It also may be used as a
sealing gasket for covers, flanges, and windows in cryogenic applications. Each sheet is
0.13 mm × 50.8 mm × 50.8 mm (0.005 in × 2 in × 2 in).
GAH-25
Apiezon® H Grease, 25 g Tube. It is designed for general purposes where operating temperatures necessitate the use of a relatively high melting point grease. Melting point is 523 K
(250 °C). Can be removed using Xylene with an isopropyl alcohol rinse.
GAN-25
Apiezon® N Grease, 25 g Tube. General purpose grease well-suited for cryogenic use because of
its low viscosity. It is often used as a means of thermally anchoring cryogenic sensors as well as
lubricating joints and o-rings. Contains high molecular weight polymeric hydrocarbon additive
that gives it a tenacious, rubbery consistency allowing the grease to form a cushion between
mating surfaces. Melting point is 316 K (43 °C). Can be removed using Xylene with an isopropyl
alcohol rinse.
HTR-25
25 ) Cartridge Heater. The heater features precision-wound nickel-chromium resistance wire,
magnesium oxide insulation, 2 solid pins, non-magnetic package, and has UL and CSA component recognition. The heater is 25 ), 6.35 mm (0.25 in) diameter by 25.4 mm (1 in) long. The 25
) rating is in dead air. With proper heat sinking, the cartridge heater can handle many times
this dead air power rating.
HTR-50
50 ) Cartridge Heater. The heater features precision-wound nickel-chromium resistance wire,
magnesium oxide insulation, 2 solid pins, non-magnetic package, and has UL and CSA component recognition. The heater is 50 ), 6.35 mm (0.25 in) diameter by 25.4 mm (1 in) long. The 50
) rating is in dead air. With proper heat sinking, the cartridge heater can handle many times
this dead air power rating.
RM-1
VGE-7031
Wire
Rack Mounting Kit. Mounting brackets, ears, and handles to attach 1 Model 336 to a
482.6 mm (19 in) rack mount cabinet. See FIGURE 7-2.
IMI-7031 Varnish (formerly GE 7031 Varnish) (1 pint can). IMI-7031 Insulating Varnish and
Adhesive possesses electrical and bonding properties which, when combined with its chemical
resistance and good saturating properties, make it an excellent material for cryogenic temperatures. As an adhesive, IMI-7031 bonds a variety of materials, has fast tack time, and may be
air dried or baked. It is also an electrically insulating adhesive at cryogenic temperatures and is
often used as a calorimeter cement. When soaked into cigarette paper, it makes a good, high
thermal conductivity, low electrical conductivity heat sinking layer. Maximum operating temperature: 423 K (150 °C).
Lake Shore Cryogenic Wire. Lake Shore sells the following types of cryogenic wire:
DT = Duo-Twist, MN = Single Strand, MW = Manganin, NC = Nichrome Heater,
ND = Heavy Duty, QL = Quad-Lead, and QT = Quad-Twist.
Lake Shore Coaxial Cable. Lake Shore sells the following types of coaxial cable:
CC = Ultra Miniature Coaxial Cable, SR = Semi-Rigid Coaxial Cable, CRYC = CryoCable.
*Accessories included with a new Model 336
†RoHS compliant
TABLE 7-4 Accessories
Model 336 Temperature Controller
7.5 Rack Mounting
137
FIGURE 7-1 Model 336 sensor and heater cable assembly 10 ft: P/N G-112-325, 20 ft: P/N G-112-326
7.5 Rack Mounting
The Model 336 can be installed into a 482.6 mm (19 in) rack mount cabinet using the
optional Lake Shore Model RM-1 Rack Mount Kit. The kit contains mounting ears,
handles and screws that adapt the front of the instrument to fit into a 88.9 mm
(3.5 in) tall, full rack space. Additional support may be required in the rear of the
instrument and to relieve strain on heavy cables. The mounting ears are painted and
do not guarantee good electrical contact between the instrument and cabinet. They
should not be used for ground strapping unless paint is removed from under all
screws.
Ensure that there is a 25 mm (1 in) clearance on both sides of the instrument after
rack mounting.
Item
Description

*


Rack mount ear
Screw, 6-32×3/8, PH, FLHD, MS, SS
Rack mount handles, 3 in, black
Screw, 8-32×3/8, PH, FLHD, MS, SS
PN
107-440
0-033
107-433
0-081
Qty
2
4
2
4
*Remove and discard 4 screws from case; replace with 4 screws from kit
FIGURE 7-2 Model RM-1 rack mount kit
7.6 Model 3060-F
Thermocouple
Input Option
The field installable Model 3060 thermocouple input option adds thermocouple
functionality to inputs C and D. While the option can be easily removed, this is not
necessary as the standard inputs remain fully functional when they are not being
used to measure thermocouple temperature sensors. Calibration for the option is
stored on the card so you can be install it in the field and use it with multiple
Model 336 temperature controllers without recalibration.
7.6.1 Model 3060-F
Installation
The Model 3060-F is field-installable. You will need a small Phillips-head screwdriver
and the 5/64-in hex driver. Follow this procedure to install the 3060-F option.
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cHAPTER 7: Options and Accessories
To avoid potentially lethal shocks, turn off controller and disconnect it from AC power
before performing these procedures.
The components on this board are electrostatic discharge sensitive (ESDS) devices.
Follow ESD procedures in section 8.11 to avoid inducing an electrostatic discharge (ESD)
into the device.
1. Turn Model 336 power switch Off. Unplug power cord from wall outlet, then
instrument.
2. Stand the unit on its face. Use the hex driver to remove the 4 screws on both sides
of the top cover. Loosen the 2 rear bottom screws (FIGURE 7-3).
Remove
rear
bottom
cover
screw
(unshown)
Remove
rear
plastic
bezel
Loosen
bottom
rear
side cover
screws
(both sides)
Remove top
cover screws
Remove top
side cover
screws
(both sides)
To remove
top cover,
slide it to
the rear
on the
tracks
Rear panel option plate screws
FIGURE 7-3 Cover and option plate screws
3. Use a small Phillips screwdriver to remove the 2 top cover screws and 1 rear
bottom screw (FIGURE 7-3).
4. Remove the rear plastic bezel. The cover is tracked. Slide the top cover to the rear
on the track to remove it.
5. Remove the rear panel option plate screws and set aside. Remove the rear panel
option plate.
6. With the instrument still standing on its face, turn it to view the inside circuit
board.
7. Place the Model 3060-F card into its position in the rear panel from inside the
instrument. Orient the card so that the thermocouple option input C and D are
aligned with the Model 336 standard sensor input C and D DIN plugs,
respectively (FIGURE 7-4).
Model 336 Temperature Controller
7.7 Model 3003 Heater and Output Conditioner
139
FIGURE 7-4 Align the 3060 card with input C and D
8. Attach the card by starting both screws in a few threads before tightening either.
9. Fully tighten both screws.
10. Insert the 14-pin ribbon cable connector plug into the socket on the option
board. Orient the ribbon cable connector plug so that the arrow nub slides into
the plug slot, and the ribbon cable exits downward (FIGURE 7-5).
FIGURE 7-5 Proper orientation of the ribbon cable connector plug
11. Plug the other end of the cable into the main board, option connector J12
(FIGURE 8-11).
12. Slide the top panel forward in the track provided on each side of the unit.
13. Replace the rear plastic bezel by sliding it straight into the unit.
14. Use a small Phillips screwdriver to replace the two top cover screws and the
one bottom cover screw.
15. Use the hex driver to replace the 4 screws on the sides of the top covers. Tighten
the two rear bottom screws.
16. Replace the power cord in the rear of the unit and set the power switch to On.
17. To verify option card installation, check the instrument information by pressing
and holding the Escape key. Refer to section 8.7 for more information on instrument information.
7.7 Model 3003
Heater and Output
Conditioner
The Lake Shore Model 3003 heater output conditioner is a passive filter that reduces
the already low noise present in the heater output of the Model 336. The Model 3003
connects between the heater output terminals on the rear panel of a controller and a
resistive heater. See FIGURE 7-6.
Specifications are as follows:
D
D
D
D
D
D
Max Current:2 A
Max Voltage:60 V
Attenuation:50 or 60 Hz (line frequency): 20 dB
100 Hz and above (line frequency harmonics): 40 dB
Enclosure Size: 144 mm wide × 72 mm long × 165 mm deep (5.7 × 2.8 × 6.5 in)
Weight:1.6 kg (3.5 lb)
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cHAPTER 7: Options and Accessories
The Model 3003 is a passive filter and requires no external power supply. The High
and Low terminals on the controller must be connected to the High and Low terminals marked From Controller on the Model 3003. The binding posts or a dual banana
plug can be used to connect to the Model 3003. Precautions must be taken to ensure
the High and Low terminals are not reversed. A diode in the Model 3003 shorts the
heater output if the polarity of the terminals is reversed.
The High and Low terminals marked To Heater on the Model 3003 should be attached
to a resistive heater used for temperature control. The binding posts or a dual banana
plug can be used to connect to the Model 3003. The ground terminals on the
Model 3003 continue the shield if the heater cable is shielded.
FIGURE 7-6 Model 3003 heater output conditioner
Model 336 Temperature Controller
8.1 General
141
Chapter 8: Service
8.1 General
This chapter provides basic service information for the Model 336 temperature controller. Customer service of the product is limited to the information presented in this
chapter. Factory trained service personnel should be consulted if the instrument
requires repair.
8.2 USB
Troubleshooting
This section provides USB interface troubleshooting for issues that arise with new
installations, existing installations, and intermittent lockups.
8.2.1 New Installation
1. Check that the instruments interface is set to USB.
2. Check that the USB driver is installed properly and that the device is functioning.
In Microsoft Windows®, the device status can be checked using Device Manager
by right-clicking Lake Shore Model 336 Temperature Controller under Ports
(COM & LPT) or Other Devices and then clicking Properties. Refer to
section 6.3.3 for details on installing the USB driver.
3. Check that the correct com port is being used. In Microsoft Windows®, the com
port number can be checked using Device Manager under Ports (COM & LPT).
4. Check that the correct settings are being used for communication. Refer to
section 6.3.3 for details on installing the USB driver.
5. Check cable connections and length.
6. Send the message terminator.
7. Send the entire message string at one time including the terminator. (Many terminal emulation programs do not.)
8. Send only one simple command at a time until communication is established.
9. Be sure to spell commands correctly and use proper syntax.
8.2.2 Existing
Installation No Longer
Working
1.
2.
3.
4.
Power the instrument off, then on again to see if it is a soft failure.
Power the computer off, then on again to see if communication port is locked up.
Check all cable connections.
Check that the com port assignment has not been changed. In
Microsoft Windows®, the com port number can be checked using Device Manager
under Ports (COM & LPT).
5. Check that the USB driver is installed properly and that the device is functioning.
In Microsoft Windows®, the device status can be checked using Device Manager
by right-clicking Lake Shore Model 336 Temperature Controller under Ports
(COM & LPT) or Other Devices and then clicking Properties.
8.2.3 Intermittent
Lockups
1. Check cable connections and length.
2. Increase the delay between all commands to 100 ms to make sure the instrument is not being overloaded.
3. Ensure that the USB cable is not unplugged and that the Model 336 is not powered down while the com port is open. The USB driver creates a com port when
the USB connection is detected, and removes the com port when the USB connection is no longer detected. Removing the com port while in use by software can
cause the software to lock up or crash.
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cHAPTER 8: Service
8.3 IEEE Interface
Troubleshooting
This section provides IEEE interface troubleshooting for issues that arise with new
installations, old installations, and intermittent lockups.
8.3.1 New Installation
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
8.3.2 Existing
Installation No Longer
Working
1. Power the instrument off, then on again to see if it is a soft failure.
2. Power the computer off then on again to see if the IEEE card is locked up.
3. Verify that the address has not been changed on the instrument during a memory
reset.
4. Check all cable connections.
8.3.3 Intermittent
Lockups
1. Check cable connections and length.
2. Increase the delay between all commands to 50 ms to make sure the instrument
is not being overloaded.
8.4 Fuse Drawer
The fuse drawer supplied with the Model 336 holds the instrument line fuses and line
voltage selection module. The drawer holds two 5 mm × 20 mm (0.2 in × .79 in) time
delay fuses. It requires two good fuses of the same rating to operate safely.
Refer to Section 8.5 for details.
Check the instrument address.
Always send a message terminator.
Send the entire message string at one time including the terminator.
Send only one simple command at a time until communication is established.
Be sure to spell commands correctly and use proper syntax.
Attempt both Talk and Listen functions. If one works but not the other, the hardware connection is working, so look at syntax, terminator, and command format.
Fuse
120
Front view
Fuse
Side view
Rear view
FIGURE 8-1 Fuse drawer
8.5 Line Voltage
Selection
Use the following procedure to change the instrument line voltage selector.
To avoid potentially lethal shocks, turn off the controller and disconnect it from AC power
before performing these procedures.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Identify the line input assembly on the instrument rear panel. See FIGURE 8-2.
Turn the line power switch OFF (O).
Remove the instrument power cord.
With a small screwdriver, release the drawer holding the line voltage selector
and fuse.
5. Slide out the removable plastic fuse holder from the drawer.
6. Rotate the fuse holder until the proper voltage indicator shows through
the window.
7. Re-assemble the line input assembly in the reverse order.
8. Verify the voltage indicator in the window of the line input assembly.
9. Connect the instrument power cord.
10. Turn the line power switch On (l) Refer to FIGURE 8-2.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
8.6 Fuse Replacement
143
FIGURE 8-2 Power fuse access
8.6 Fuse
Replacement
Use this procedure to remove and replace a line fuse.
To avoid potentially lethal shocks, turn off controller and disconnect it from AC power
before performing these procedures.
For continued protection against fire hazard, replace only with the same fuse type and
rating specified for the line voltage selected.
Test fuse with an ohmmeter. Do not rely on visual inspection of fuse.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Locate the line input assembly on the instrument rear panel. See Figure 8-2.
Turn the power switch Off (O).
Remove the instrument power cord.
With a small screwdriver, release the drawer holding the line voltage selector
and fuse.
5. Remove existing fuse(s). Replace with proper Slow-Blow (time-delay) fuse ratings
as follows:
6.
7.
8.
9.
8.7 Factory Reset
Menu
100/120 V
4 A T 250 V
5 × 20 mm
220/240 V
4 A T 250 V
5 × 20 mm
Re-assemble the line input assembly in reverse order.
Verify voltage indicator in the line input assembly window.
Connect the instrument power cord.
Turn the power switch On (l).
It is sometimes necessary to reset instrument parameter values or clear the contents
of curve memory. Both are stored in nonvolatile memory called NOVRAM, but they
can be cleared individually. Instrument calibration is not affected except for Room
Temperature Calibration, which should be recalibrated after parameters are set to
default values or any time the thermocouple curve is changed.
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cHAPTER 8: Service
8.7.1 Default Values
Input Setup – General
Sensor type
The factory defaults can be reset, and the user curves cleared, using the Factory Reset
menu. To access the Factory Reset menu, press and hold the Escape key for 5 s. Once
the menu appears, set either Reset to Defaults or Clear Curves, or both, to Yes, then
highlight Execute and press Enter.
Default
Interface Setup – General
Default
Diode
Enabled
USB
Interface Setup – IEEE
Default
Filter
Off
Input name
Input A (B, C, D)
Temperature limit
0 K (Off)
Input units
Kelvin
DHCP
On
Curve
DT-670
Auto-IP
Off
Input Setup – Diode
IEEE Address
Interface Setup – Ethernet
12
Default
Default
Static-IP
192.168.0.12
Range
2.5 V (Silicon)
Static Subnet Mask
255.255.255.0
Diode current
10 µA
Static Gateway
192.168.0.1
Default
Static Primary DNS
0.0.0.0
Autorange
On
Static Secondary DNS
0.0.0.0
Current reversal
On
Preferred hostname
LSCI-336
Default
Web username
user
Input Setup –
Platinum/NTC RTD
Input Setup – Thermocouple
Room comp
On
Room cal
Cleared
Output Setup
Web password
Alarm
Default
Default
Alarm
Relay
Off
Default
Output mode
Closed loop PID (off for Output 3 and 4)
Control input
Input A for Output 1; Input B for Output 2
none for output 3 and 4
Heater resistance
25 )
Power up enable
Off
Mode
Unlocked
Heater out display
Current
Lock code
123
Setpoint ramping
Off
Display Setup
Relay
Keypad Locking
PID/Manual Heater Power
(MHP) Output
Default
Off
Default
Default
Proportional (P)
50.0
20.0
Display mode
Custom
Integral (I)
Number of locations
2 (large)
Derivative (D)
0.0
Location 1 source
Input A
Manual Output
0.000%
Location 1 units
Kelvin
Location 2 source
Input B
Location 2 units
Kelvin
Location 3 source
Input C
Location 3 units
Kelvin
Location 4 source
Input D
Location 4 units
Kelvin
Location 5 source
Input A
Upper boundary
0.000 K
Location 5 units
Sensor
Proportional (P)
50.0
Location 6 source
Input B
Integral (I)
20.0
Location 6 units
Sensor
Derivative (D)
0.00
Location 7 source
Input C
Manual output
0.000%
Location 7 units
Sensor
Range
Off
Location 8 source
Input D
Ramp rate
0.100 K/min
Location 8 units
Sensor
Control input
Default
Contrast
28
Heater
Heater range
Setpoint
Off
Default
Setpoint value
Remote/Local
Remote/Local
Zone Settings – All Zones
TABLE 8-1 Default values
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Default
0.000 K
Default
Local
Default
8.7.2 Product Information
8.7.2 Product
Information
Product information for your instrument is also found in the Factory Reset menu.The
following information is provided:
D
D
D
D
D
D
8.8 Error
Messages
145
Firmware version
Firmware date
Serial number
Option card type
Option card serial number
Ethernet version
The following are error messages that may be displayed by the Model 336 during
operation.
Message
Description
DISABL
Input is disabled. Refer to section 4.4.
NOCURV
Input has no curve.Refer to section 4.4.7.
S.OVER
Input is at or over full-scale sensor units.
S.UNDER
Input is at or under negative full-scale sensor units.
T.OVER
Input at or over the high end of the curve.
T.UNDER
Input at or under the low end of the curve.
Cannot Communicate with The main microprocessor has lost communication with the sensor
Input uP
input microprocessor.
NOVRAM Corrupt
Invalid data or contents in NOVRAM–when this message appears, options are provided
for resetting the instrument to default values, and for clearing all user curve locations
(21– 59). To perform the reset, set the desired parameters to “Yes”, then choose the
“Execute” option.
A temperature limit has
been exceeded
The temperature reading on a sensor input has exceeded the Temperature Limit setting. A detailed message will follow, which includes a reference to which sensor input's
temperature limit has been exceeded.
*** Keypad Locked ***
An attempt has been made to change a parameter while the keypad is locked.
Refer to section 4.7.
*** Heater Short Circuit
Detected ***
A short circuit condition has been observed on 1 of the heater outputs. A detailed message will follow, which includes a reference to which output caused the condition. The
output will be turned off when this occurs.
*** Heater Open Circuit
Detected ***
An open circuit condition has been observed on 1 of the heater outputs. A detailed message will follow, which includes a reference to which output caused the condition. The
output will be turned off when this occurs.
*** Invalid Calibration ***
The calibration memory is either corrupt, or is at the default, uncalibrated state. This
message appears when the Model 336 is first powered on. To clear the message, and
continue with instrument start-up, press the Escape and Enter keys simultaneously.
*** Invalid Option Card
Calibration ***
The installed option card calibration memory is either corrupt, or is at the default,
uncalibrated state. This message appears when the Model 336 is first powered on. To
clear the message, and continue with instrument start-up, press the Escape and Enter
keys simultaneously.
*** Firmware Update in
Progress ***
This indicates that the Model 336 is in firmware update mode.
TABLE 8-2 Error messages
8.9 Calibration
Procedure
Instrument calibration can be obtained through Lake Shore Service. Refer to
section 8.13 for technical inquiries and contact information.
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cHAPTER 8: Service
8.10 Rear Panel
Connector
Definition
The sensor input, heater output, terminal block, USB, Ethernet, and IEEE-488 connectors are defined in FIGURE 8-3 through FIGURE 8-8. For thermocouple connector
details refer to FIGURE 3-7.
FIGURE 8-3 Sensor input A through D
Pin
Symbol
Description
1
I–
–Current
2
V–
–Voltage
3
None
Shield
4
V+
+Voltage
5
I+
+Current
6
None
Shield
TABLE 8-3 Sensor input A through D
connector details
FIGURE 8-4 Heater output connectors
Model 336 Temperature Controller
8.10 Rear Panel Connector Definition
147
FIGURE 8-5 Terminal block for relays and Output 3 and 4
Pin
Description
1
Output 3+
2
Output 3–
3
Output 4+
4
Output 4–
5
Relay 1 normally closed
6
Relay 1 common
7
Relay 1 normally open
8
Relay 2 normally closed
9
Relay 2 common
10
Relay 2 normally open
TABLE 8-4 Terminal block pin and
connector details
2 1
3 4
FIGURE 8-6 USB pin and connector details
Pin
Name
Description
1
VCC
+5 VDC
2
D-
Data –
3
D+
Data +
4
GND
Ground
TABLE 8-5 USB pin and connector
details
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cHAPTER 8: Service
EPWREPWRRXDEPWR+
EPWR+
RXD+
TXDTXD+
148
FIGURE 8-7 Ethernet pin and connector details
Pin
Symbol
Description
TXD+
Transmit data+
2
TXD-
Transmit data-
3
RXD+
Receive data+
4
EPWR+
Power from switch+ (not used)
5
EPWR+
Power from switch+ (not used)
6
RXD-
Receive data-
7
EPWR-
Power from switch- (not used)
8
EPWR-
Power from switch- (not used)
1
TABLE 8-6 Ethernet pin and connector details
8.10.1 IEEE-488
Interface Connector
Connect to the IEEE-488 Interface connector on the Model 336 rear with cables specified in the IEEE-488 standard. The cable has 24 conductors with an outer shield. The
connectors are 24-way Amphenol 57 Series (or equivalent) with piggyback receptacles to allow daisy chaining in multiple device systems. The connectors are secured in
the receptacles by 2 captive locking screws with metric threads.
The total length of cable allowed in a system is 2 m for each device on the bus, or 20 m
maximum. The Model 336 can drive a bus of up to 10 devices. A connector extender is
required to use the IEEE-488 interface and relay terminal block at the same time.
FIGURE 8-8 shows the IEEE-488 interface connector pin location and signal names as
viewed from the Model 336 rear panel.
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
FIGURE 8-8 IEEE-488 interface
Model 336 Temperature Controller
8.11 Electrostatic Discharge
Pin
Symbol
Description
1
DIO 1
Data input/output line 1
2
DIO 2
Data input/output line 2
3
DIO 3
Data input/output line 3
4
DIO 4
Data input/output line 4
5
EOI
End or identify
6
DAV
Data valid
7
NRFD
Not ready for data
8
NDAC
No data accepted
9
IFC
Interface clear
10
SRQ
Service request
11
ATN
Attention
12
SHIELD
Cable shield
13
DIO 5
Data input/output line 5
14
DIO 6
Data input/output line 6
15
DIO 7
Data input/output line 7
16
DIO 8
Data input/output line 8
17
REN
Remote enable
18
GND 6
Ground wire—twisted pair with DAV
19
GND 7
Ground wire—twisted pair with NRFD
20
GND 8
Ground wire—twisted pair with NDAC
21
GND 9
Ground wire—twisted pair with IFC
22
GND 10
Ground wire—twisted pair with SRQ
23
GND 11
Ground wire—twisted pair with ATN
24
GND
Logic ground
149
TABLE 8-7 IEEE-488 rear panel connector details
8.11 Electrostatic
Discharge
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) may damage electronic parts, assemblies, and equipment. ESD is a transfer of electrostatic charge between bodies at different electrostatic potentials caused by direct contact or induced by an electrostatic field. The
low-energy source that most commonly destroys Electrostatic Discharge sensitive
devices is the human body, which generates and retains static electricity. Simply
walking across a carpet in low humidity may generate up to 35,000 V of
static electricity.
Current technology trends toward greater complexity, increased packaging density,
and thinner dielectrics between active elements, which results in electronic devices
with even more ESD sensitivity. Some electronic parts are more ESD sensitve than
others. ESD levels of only a few hundred volts may damage electronic components
such as semiconductors, thick and thin film resistors, and piezoelectric crystals during testing, handling, repair, or assembly. Discharge voltages below 4000 V cannot be
seen, felt, or heard.
8.11.1 Identification of
Electrostatic Discharge
Sensitive Components
The following are various industry symbols used to label components as
ESD sensitive.
FIGURE 8-9 Symbols indicating ESD sensitivity
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cHAPTER 8: Service
8.11.2 Handling
Electrostatic Discharge
Sensitive Components
Observe all precautions necessary to prevent damage to ESDS components before
attempting installation. Bring the device and everything that contacts it to ground
potential by providing a conductive surface and discharge paths. As a minimum,
observe these precautions:
D
D
D
D
D
D
8.12 Enclosure Top
Remove and
Replace Procedure
De-energize or disconnect all power and signal sources and loads used with unit.
Place the unit on a grounded conductive work surface.
The technician should be grounded through a conductive wrist strap (or other
device) using 1 M series resistor to protect operator.
Ground any tools, such as soldering equipment, that will contact the unit. Contact with the operator’s hands provides a sufficient ground for tools that are otherwise electrically isolated.
Place ESD sensitive devices and assemblies removed from a unit on a conductive
work surface or in a conductive container. An operator inserting or removing a
device or assembly from a container must maintain contact with a conductive
portion of the container. Use only plastic bags approved for storage of
ESD material.
Do not handle ESD sensitive devices unnecessarily or remove them from the
packages until they are actually used or tested.
Follow this procedure to remove the top enclosure:
To avoid potentially lethal shocks, turn off the controller and disconnect it from AC power
before performing these procedures.
The components on this board are electrostatic discharge sensitive (ESDS) devices.
Follow ESD procedures in section 8.11 to avoid inducing an electrostatic discharge (ESD)
into the device.
1. Turn the Model 336 power switch Off. Unplug the power cord from the wall outlet, then from the instrument.
2. Stand the unit on its face. Use a 5/64 in hex driver to remove the four screws on
both sides of the top cover. Loosen the two rear bottom screws (FIGURE 8-10).
Remove
rear
bottom
cover
screw
(unshown)
Remove
rear
plastic
bezel
Loosen
bottom
rear
side cover
screws
(both sides)
Remove top
cover screws
To remove
top cover,
slide it to
the rear
on the
tracks
Remove top
side cover
screws
(both sides)
FIGURE 8-10 Cover removal
3. Use a small Phillips screwdriver to remove the two top cover screws and one rear
bottom screw (FIGURE 8-10).
4. Remove the rear plastic bezel. The cover is tracked. Slide the top cover to the rear
on the track to remove it.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
8.12 Enclosure Top Remove and Replace Procedure
151
Follow this procedure to install the top enclosure:
5. Slide the top panel forward in the track provided on each side of the unit.
6. Use a small Phillips screwdriver to replace the two top cover screws and 1 rear
bottom screw.
7. Use the hex driver to replace the two screws on the side of the top covers.
8. Replace the rear plastic bezel by sliding it straight into the unit.
9. Tighten the two rear bottom screws.
10. Replace the power cord in the rear of the unit and set the power switch to On.
J12 (option
connector)
JMP1
JMP2
FIGURE 8-11 Location of internal components
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cHAPTER 8: Service
8.13 Technical
Inquiries
Refer to the following sections when contacting Lake Shore for application assistance
or product service. Questions regarding product applications, price, availability and
shipments should be directed to sales. Questions regarding instrument calibration or
repair should be directed to instrument service. Do not return a product to Lake Shore
without a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number (section 8.13.2).
8.13.1 Contacting
Lake Shore
The Lake Shore Service Department is staffed Monday through Friday between the
hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM EST, excluding holidays and company shut down days.
Contact Lake Shore Service through any of the means listed below. However, the
most direct and efficient means of contacting is to complete the online service
request form at http://www.lakeshore.com/sup/serf.html. Provide a detailed
description of the problem and the required contact information. You will receive a
response within 24 hours or the next business day in the event of weekends or
holidays.
If you wish to contact Service or Sales by mail or telephone, use the following:
Mailing address
Lake Shore Cryotronics
Instrument Service Department
575 McCorkle Blvd.
Westerville, Ohio USA 43082-8888
E-mail address
[email protected]
[email protected]
Sales
Instrument Service
Telephone
614-891-2244
614-891-2243 option 6
Sales
Instrument Service
Fax
614-818-1600
614-818-1609
Sales
Instrument Service
Web service request
http://www.lakeshore.com/sup/serf.html
Instrument Service
TABLE 8-8 Contact information
8.13.2 Return of
Equipment
The temperature controller is packaged to protect it during shipment.
The user should retain any shipping carton(s) in which equipment is originally received, in
the event that any equipment needs to be returned.
If the original packaging is not available, a minimum of 76.2 mm (3 in) of shock
adsorbent packing material should be placed snugly on all sides of the instrument in a
sturdy corrugated cardboard box. Please use reasonable care when removing the
temperature controller from its protective packaging and inspect it carefully for
damage. If it shows any sign of damage, please file a claim with the carrier
immediately. Do not destroy the shipping container; it will be required by the carrier
as evidence to support claims. Call Lake Shore for return and repair instructions.
All equipment returns must be approved by a member of the Lake Shore Service
Department. The service engineer will use the information provided in the service
request form and will issue an RMA. This number is necessary for all returned
equipment. It must be clearly indicated on both the shipping carton(s) and any
correspondence relating to the shipment. Once the RMA has been approved, you will
receive appropriate documents and instructions for shipping the equipment to
Lake Shore.
8.13.3 RMA Valid Period
Model 336 Temperature Controller
RMAs are valid for 60 days from issuance; however, we suggest that equipment
needing repair be shipped to Lake Shore within 30 days after the RMA has been
issued. You will be contacted if we do not receive the equipment within 30 days after
the RMA is issued. The RMA will be cancelled if we do not receive the equipment after
60 days.
8.13.4 Shipping Charges
153
8.13.4 Shipping
Charges
All shipments to Lake Shore are to be made prepaid by the customer. Equipment
serviced under warranty will be returned prepaid by Lake Shore. Equipment serviced
out-of-warranty will be returned FOB Lake Shore.
8.13.5 Restocking Fee
Lake Shore reserves the right to charge a restocking fee for items returned for
exchange or reimbursement.
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cHAPTER 8: Service
Model 336 Temperature Controller
155
Appendix A: Temperature Scales
A.1 Definition
Temperature is a fundamental unit of measurement that describes the kinetic and
potential energies of the atoms and molecules of bodies. When the energies and
velocities of the molecules in a body are increased, the temperature is increased
whether the body is a solid, liquid, or gas. Thermometers are used to measure temperature. The temperature scale is based on the temperature at which ice, liquid water,
and water vapor are all in equilibrium. This temperature is called the triple point of
water and is assigned the value 0 °C, 32 °F, and 273.15 K. These 3 temperature scales
are defined as follows:
D
D
D
D
A.2 Comparison
Celsius—abbreviation: °C. A temperature scale that registers the freezing point
of water as 0 °C and the boiling point as 100 °C under normal atmospheric pressure. Formerly known as Centigrade. Originally devised by Anders Celsius (1701 1744), a Swedish astronomer.
Fahrenheit—abbreviation: °F. A temperature scale that registers the freezing
point of water as 32 °F and the boiling point as 212 °F under normal atmospheric
pressure. Originally devised by Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686 - 1736), a German physicist residing in Holland; developed use of mercury in thermometry.
Kelvin—abbreviation: K. An absolute scale of temperature, the zero point of
which is approximately
-273.15°C—scale units are equal in magnitude to Celsius degrees. Originally
devised by Lord Kelvin, William Thompson, (1824 - 1907), a British physicist,
mathematician, and inventor.
The 3 temperature scales are graphically compared in Figure A-1.
Boiling point of water
373.15 K
100 °C
212 °F
Freezing point of water
273.15 K
0 °C
32 °F
Absolute zero
0K
kelvin
-273.15 °C
-459.67 °F
Celsius
Fahrenheit
FIGURE A-1
A.3 Conversions
To convert Fahrenheit to Celsius: subtract 32 from °F then divide by 1.8, or:
°C = (°F - 32) ÷ 1.8
To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit: multiply °C by 1.8 then add 32, or:
°F = (1.8 × °C) + 32
To convert Fahrenheit to kelvin, first convert °F to °C, then add 273.15.
To convert Celsius to kelvin, add 273.15.
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Appendices
°F
°C
K
°F
°C
K
°F
K
-459.67
-273.15
0
-292
-180
93.15
-129.67
-89.82
183.33
-454
-270
3.15
-290
-178.89
94.26
-120
-84.44
188.71
188.89
-450
-267.78
5.37
-289.67
-178.71
94.44
-119.67
-84.44
-449.67
-267.59
5.56
-280
-173.33
99.82
-117.67
-83.15
190
-441.67
-263.15
10
-279.67
-173.15
100
-112
-80
193.15
-440
-262.22
10.93
-274
-170
103.15
-110
-78.89
194.26
-439.67
-262.04
11.11
-270
-167.78
105.57
-109.67
-78.71
194.44
-436
-260
13.15
-269.67
-167.59
105.56
-100
-73.33
199.82
-430
-256.67
16.48
-261.67
-163.15
110
-99.67
-73.15
200
-429.67
-256.48
16.67
-260
-162.22
110.93
-94
-70
203.15
-423.67
-253.15
20
-259.67
-162.04
111.11
-90
-67.78
205.37
-420
-251.11
22.04
-256
-160
113.15
-89.67
-67.59
205.56
-419.67
-250.93
22.22
-250
-156.67
116.48
-81.67
-63.15
210
-418.00
-250
23.15
-249.67
-156.48
116.67
-80
-62.22
210.93
-410
-245.56
27.59
-243.67
-153.15
120
-79.67
-62.04
211.11
-409.67
-245.37
27.78
-240
-151.11
122.04
-76
-60
213.15
-405.67
-243.15
30
-239.67
-150.93
122.22
-70
-56.67
216.48
216.67
-400
-240
33.15
-238
-150
123.15
-69.67
-56.48
-399.67
-239.82
33.33
-230
-145.56
127.59
-63.67
-53.15
220
-390
-234.44
38.71
-229.67
-145.37
127.78
-60
-51.11
222.04
-225.67
-143.15
130
-59.67
-50.93
222.22
-220
-140
133.15
-58
-50
223.15
-389.67
-234.26
38.89
-387.67
-233.15
40
-382
-230
43.15
-219.67
-139.82
133.33
-50
-45.56
227.59
-380
-228.89
44.26
-210
-134.44
138.71
-49.67
-45.37
227.78
-379.67
-228.71
44.44
-209.67
-134.26
138.89
-45.67
-43.15
230
-370
-223.33
49.82
-207.67
-133.15
140
-40
-40
233.15
369.67
-223.15
50
-202
-130
143.15
-39.67
-39.82
233.33
-364
-220
53.15
-200
-128.89
144.26
-30
-34.44
238.71
-360
-217.78
55.37
-199.67
-128.71
144.44
-29.67
-34.26
238.89
-359.67
-217.59
55.56
-190
-123.33
149.82
-27.67
-33.15
240
-351.67
-213.15
60
-189.67
-123.15
150
-22
-30
243.15
-350
-212.22
60.93
-184
-120
153.15
-20
-28.89
244.26
-349.67
-212.04
61.11
-180
-117.78
155.37
-19.67
-28.71
244.44
-346
-210
63.15
-179.67
-117.59
155.56
-10
-23.33
249.82
-340
-206.67
66.48
-171.67
-113.15
160
-9.67
-23.15
250
-339.67
-206.48
66.67
-170
-112.22
-160.93
-4
-20
253.15
-333.67
-203.15
70
-169.67
-112.04
161.11
0
-17.78
255.37
-330
-201.11
72.04
-166
-110
163.15
+0.33
-17.59
255.56
-329.67
-200.93
72.22
-160
-106.67
166.48
8.33
-13.15
260
-328
-200
73.15
-159.67
-106.48
166.67
10
-12.22
260.93
-320
-195.56
77.59
-153.67
-103.15
170
10.33
-12.04
261.11
-319.67
-195.37
77.78
-150
-101.11
172.04
14
-10
263.15
-315.67
-193.15
80
-149.67
-100.93
172.22
20
-6.67
266.48
266.67
-310
-190
83.15
-148
-100
173.15
20.33
-6.48
-309.67
-189.82
83.33
-140
-95.96
177.59
26.33
-3.15
270
-300
-184.44
88.71
-139.67
-95.37
177.78
30
-1.11
272.04
-135.67
-93.15
180
30.33
-0.93
272.22
-130
-90
183.15
32
0
273.15
-299.67
-184.26
88.89
-297.67
-183.15
90
TABLE A-1 Temperature conversions
Model 336 Temperature Controller
°C
157
Appendix B: Handling Liquid
Helium and Nitrogen
B.1 General
Use of liquid helium (LHe) and liquid nitrogen (LN2) is often associated with the Model
336 temperature controller. Although not explosive, there are a number of safety
considerations to keep in mind in the handling of LHe and LN2.
B.2 Properties
LHe and LN2 are colorless, odorless, and tasteless gases. Gaseous nitrogen makes up
about 78 percent of the Earth's atmosphere, while helium comprises only about
5 ppm. Most helium is recovered from natural gas deposits. Once collected and isolated, the gases will liquefy when properly cooled. A quick comparison between LHe
and LN2 is provided in Table C-1.
Property
Liquid Helium
Liquid Nitrogen
Boiling Point at 1 atm
4.2 K
77 K
Thermal Conductivity (Gas), w/cm-K
0.083
0.013
Latent Heat of Vaporization, Btu/L
2.4
152
Liquid Density, lb/L
0.275
0.78
TABLE B-1 Comparison of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen
B.3 Handling
Cryogenic Storage
Dewars
Cryogenic containers (Dewars) must be operated in accordance with the manufacturer instructions. Safety instructions will also be posted on the side of each Dewar.
Cryogenic Dewars must be kept in a well-ventilated place where they are protected
from the weather and away from any sources of heat. A typical cryogenic Dewar is
shown in FIGURE B-1.
FIGURE B-1 Typical cryogenic storage
Dewar
B.4 Liquid Helium
and Nitrogen
Safety Precautions
Transferring LHe and LN2 and operation of the storage Dewar controls should be in
accordance with the manufacturer/supplier's instructions. During this transfer, it is
important that all safety precautions written on the storage Dewar and recommended by the manufacturer be followed.
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158
Appendices
Liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are potential asphyxiants and can cause rapid suffocation without warning. Store and use in area with adequate ventilation. DO NOT vent container in confined spaces. DO NOT enter confined spaces where gas may be present unless
area has been well ventilated. If inhaled, remove to fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. Get medical help.
Liquid helium and liquid nitrogen can cause severe frostbite to the eyes or skin. DO NOT
touch frosted pipes or valves. In case of frostbite, consult a physician at once. If a physician is not readily available, warm the affected areas with water that is near body temperature.
The two most important safety aspects to consider when handling LHe and LN2 are
adequate ventilation and eye and skin protection. Although helium and nitrogen
gases are non-toxic, they are dangerous in that they replace the air in a normal
breathing atmosphere. Liquid products are of an even greater threat since a small
amount of liquid evaporates to create a large amount of gas. Therefore, it is imperative that cryogenic Dewars be stored and the MTD system be operated in open and
well ventilated areas.
Persons transferring LHe and LN2 should make every effort to protect eyes and skin
from accidental contact with liquid or the cold gas issuing from it. Protect your eyes
with full-face shield or chemical splash goggles. Safety glasses (even with side
shields) are not adequate. Always wear special cryogenic gloves (Tempshield CryoGloves® or equivalent) when handling anything that is, or may have been, in contact
with the liquid or cold gas, or with cold pipes or equipment. Long sleeve shirts and
cuffless trousers that are of sufficient length to prevent liquid from entering the shoes
are recommended.
B.5 Recommended
First Aid
Every site that stores and uses LHe and LN2 should have an appropriate Material
Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) present. The MSDS may be obtained from the manufacturer/distributor. The MSDS will specify the symptoms of overexposure and the first
aid to be used. A typical summary of these instructions is provided as follows.
If symptoms of asphyxia such as headache, drowsiness, dizziness, excitation, excess
salivation, vomiting, or unconsciousness are observed, remove the victim to fresh air.
If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. If breathing has stopped, give artificial respiration. Call a physician immediately.
If exposure to cryogenic liquids or cold gases occurs, restore tissue to normal body
temperature (98.6 °F) as rapidly as possible, then protect the injured tissue from further damage and infection. Call a physician immediately. Rapid warming of the
affected parts is best achieved by bathing it in warm water. The water temperature
should not exceed 105 °F (40 °C), and under no circumstances should the frozen part
be rubbed, either before or after rewarming. If the eyes are involved, flush them thoroughly with warm water for at least 15 minutes. In case of massive exposure, remove
clothing while showering with warm water. The patient should not drink alcohol or
smoke. Keep warm and rest. Call a physician immediately.
Model 336 Temperature Controller
159
Appendix C: Curve Tables
C.1 General
Standard curve tables included in the Model 336 temperature controller are as follows:
Curve Location
Model
Table
Curve 01
DT-470 Silicon Diode
Table D-1
Curve 02
DT-670 Silicon Diode
Table D-2
Curve 03 & 04
DT-500-D/-E1 Silicon Diode
Table D-3
Curve 06 & 07
PT-100/-1000 Platinum RTD
Table D-4
Curve 08
RX-102A Rox™
Table D-5
Curve 09
RX-202A Rox™
Table D-6
Curve 12
Type K Thermocouple
Table D-7
Curve 13
Type E Thermocouple
Table D-8
Curve 14
Type T Thermocouple
Table D-9
Curve 15
Chromel-AuFe 0.03% Thermocouple
Table D-10
Curve 16
Chromel-AuFe 0.07% Thermocouple
Table D-11
TABLE C-1
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Volts
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Volts
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Volts
1
475.0
0.09062
30
170.0
0.82405
59
031.0
1.10476
2
470.0
0.1.191
31
160.0
0.84651
60
030.0
1.10702
3
465.0
0.11356
32
150.0
0.86874
61
029.0
1.10945
4
460.0
0.12547
33
145.0
0.87976
62
028.0
1.11212
5
455.0
0.13759
34
140.0
0.89072
63
027.0
1.11517
6
450.0
0.14985
35
135.0
0.90161
64
026.0
1.11896
7
445.0
0.16221
36
130.0
0.91243
65
025.0
1.12463
8
440.0
0.17464
37
125.0
0.92317
66
024.0
1.13598
9
435.0
0.18710
38
120.0
0.93383
67
023.0
1.15558
10
430.0
0.19961
39
115.0
0.94440
68
022.0
1.17705
11
420.0
0.22463
40
110.0
0.95487
69
021.0
1.19645
12
410.0
0.24964
41
105.0
0.96524
70
019.5
1.22321
13
400.0
0.27456
42
100.0
0.97550
71
017.0
1.26685
14
395.0
0.28701
43
095.0
0.98564
72
015.0
1.30404
15
380.0
0.32417
44
090.0
0.99565
73
013.5
1.33438
16
365.0
0.36111
45
085.0
1.00552
74
012.5
1.35642
17
345.0
0.41005
46
080.0
1.01525
75
011.5
1.38012
18
330.0
0.44647
47
075.0
1.02482
76
010.5
1.40605
19
325.0
0.45860
48
070.0
1.03425
77
009.5
1.43474
20
305.0
0.50691
49
065.0
1.04353
78
008.5
1.46684
21
300.0
0.51892
50
058.0
1.05630
79
007.5
1.50258
22
285.0
0.55494
51
052.0
1.06702
80
005.2
1.59075
23
265.0
0.60275
52
046.0
1.07750
81
004.2
1.62622
24
250.0
0.63842
53
040.0
1.08781
82
003.4
1.65156
25
235.0
0.67389
54
039.0
1.08953
83
002.6
1.67398
26
220.0
0.70909
55
036.0
1.09489
84
002.1
1.68585
27
205.0
0.74400
56
034.0
1.09864
85
001.7
1.69367
28
190.0
0.77857
57
033.0
1.10060
86
001.4
1.69818
29
180.0
0.80139
58
032.0
1.10263
TABLE C-2 Lake Shore DT-470 Silicon Diode (Curve 01)
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160
Appendices
Breakpoint
Volts
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
Volts
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
Volts
1
0.090570
500.00
26
1.01064
87.0
51
1.19475
Temp (K)
20.2
2
0.110239
491.0
27
1.02125
81.0
52
1.24208
17.10
3
0.136555
479.5
28
1.03167
75.0
53
1.26122
15.90
4
0.179181
461.5
29
1.04189
69.0
54
1.27811
14.90
5
0.265393
425.5
30
1.05192
63.0
55
1.29430
14.00
6
0.349522
390.0
31
1.06277
56.4
56
1.31070
13.15
7
0.452797
346.0
32
1.07472
49.0
57
1.32727
12.35
8
0.513393
320.0
33
1.09110
38.7
58
1.34506
11.55
9
0.563128
298.5
34
1.09602
35.7
59
1.36423
10.75
10
0.607845
279.0
35
1.10014
33.3
60
1.38361
10.0
11
0.648723
261.0
36
1.10393
31.2
61
1.40454
9.25
12
0.686936
244.0
37
1.10702
29.6
62
1.42732
8.50
13
0.722511
228.0
38
1.10974
28.3
63
1.45206
7.75
14
0.755487
213.0
39
1.11204
27.3
64
1.48578
6.80
15
0.786992
198.5
40
1.11414
26.5
65
1.53523
5.46
16
0.817025
184.5
41
1.11628
25.8
66
1.56684
4.56
17
0.844538
171.5
42
1.11853
25.2
67
1.58358
4.04
18
0.869583
159.5
43
1.12090
24.7
68
1.59690
3.58
19
0.893230
148.0
44
1.12340
24.3
69
1.60756
3.18
20
0.914469
137.5
45
1.12589
24.0
70
1.62125
2.62
21
0.934356
127.5
46
1.12913
23.7
71
1.62945
2.26
22
0.952903
118.0
47
1.13494
23.3
72
1.63516
1.98
23
0.970134
109.0
48
1.14495
22.8
73
1.63943
1.74
24
0.986073
100.5
49
1.16297
22.0
74
1.64261
1.53
25
0.998925
93.5
50
1.17651
21.3
75
1.64430
1.40
TABLE C-3 Standard DT-670 diode curve
DT-500-D Curve
DT-500-E1 Curve
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Volts
Temp (K)
Volts
1
365.0
0.19083
330.0
0.28930
2
345.0
0.24739
305.0
0.36220
3
305.0
0.36397
285.0
0.41860
4
285.0
0.42019
265.0
0.47220
5
265.0
0.47403
240.0
0.53770
6
240.0
0.53960
220.0
0.59260
7
220.0
0.59455
170.0
0.73440
8
170.0
0.73582
130.0
0.84490
9
130.0
0.84606
100.0
0.92570
10
090.0
0.95327
075.0
0.99110
11
070.0
1.00460
060.0
1.02840
12
055.0
1.04070
040.0
1.07460
13
040.0
1.07460
036.0
1.08480
14
034.0
1.09020
034.0
1.09090
15
032.0
1.09700
032.0
1.09810
16
030.0
1.10580
030.0
1.10800
17
029.0
1.11160
029.0
1.11500
18
028.0
1.11900
028.0
1.12390
19
027.0
1.13080
027.0
1.13650
20
026.0
1.14860
026.0
1.15590
21
025.0
1.17200
025.0
1.18770
22
023.0
1.25070
024.0
1.23570
TABLE C-4 Lake Shore DT-500 series silicon diode curves (no longer in production
Model 336 Temperature Controller
161
DT-500-D Curve
DT-500-E1 Curve
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Volts
Temp (K)
Volts
23
021.0
1.35050
022.0
1.32570
24
017.0
1.63590
018.0
1.65270
25
015.0
1.76100
013.0
1.96320
26
013.0
1.90660
009.0
2.17840
27
009.0
2.11720
004.0
2.53640
28
003.0
2.53660
003.0
2.59940
29
001.4
2.59840
001.4
2.65910
TABLE C-4 Lake Shore DT-500 series silicon diode curves (no longer in production
PT-100
PT-1000
Breakpoint
Temp (K)
Ohms ())
Temp (K)
Ohms ())
1
030.0
3.820
030.0
38.20
2
032.0
4.235
032.0
42.35
3
036.0
5.146
036.0
51.46
4
038.0
5.650
038.0
56.50
5
040.0
6.170
040.0
61.70
6
042.0
6.726
042.0
67.26
7
046.0
7.909
046.0
79.09
8
052.0
9.924
052.0
99.24
9
058.0
12.180
058.0
121.80
10
065.0
15.015
065.0
150.15
11
075.0
19.223
075.0
192.23
12
085.0
23.525
085.0
235.25
13
105.0
32.081
105.0
320.81
14
140.0
46.648
140.0
466.48
15
180.0
62.980
180.0
629.80
16
210.0
75.044
210.0
750.44
17
270.0
98.784
270.0
987.84
18
315.0
116.270
315.0
1162.70
19
355.0
131.616
355.0
1316.16
20
400.0
148.652
400.0
1486.52
21
445.0
165.466
445.0
1654.66
22
490.0
182.035
490.0
1820.35
23
535.0
198.386
535.0
1983.86
24
585.0
216.256
585.0
2162.56
25
630.0
232.106
630.0
2321.06
26
675.0
247.712
675.0
2477.12
27
715.0
261.391
715.0
2613.91
28
760.0
276.566
760.0
2765.66
29
800.0
289.830
800.0
2898.30
TABLE C-5 Lake Shore PT-100/-1000 platinum RTD curves
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162
Appendices
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
1
3.02081
40.0
36
3.05186
13.50
71
3.17838
2.96
2
3.02133
38.8
37
3.05322
13.10
72
3.18540
2.81
3
3.02184
37.7
38
3.05466
12.70
73
3.19253
2.67
4
3.02237
36.6
39
3.05618
12.30
74
3.20027
2.53
5
3.02294
35.5
40
3.05780
11.90
75
3.20875
2.39
6
3.02353
34.4
41
3.05952
11.50
76
3.21736
2.26
7
3.02411
33.4
42
3.06135
11.10
77
3.22675
2.13
8
3.02472
32.4
43
3.06330
10.70
78
3.23707
2.00
9
3.02537
31.4
44
3.06537
10.30
79
3.24842
1.87
10
3.02605
30.4
45
3.06760
9.90
80
3.26000
1.75
11
3.02679
29.4
46
3.06968
9.55
81
3.27169
1.64
12
3.02749
28.5
47
3.07190
9.20
82
3.28462
1.53
13
3.02823
27.6
48
3.07428
8.85
83
3.29779
1.43
14
3.02903
26.7
49
3.07685
8.50
84
3.31256
1.33
15
3.02988
25.8
50
3.07922
8.20
85
3.32938
1.23
16
3.03078
24.9
51
3.08175
7.90
86
3.34846
1.130
17
3.03176
24.0
52
3.08447
7.60
87
3.37196
1.020
18
3.03280
23.1
53
3.08786
7.25
88
3.39220
0.935
19
3.03393
22.2
54
3.09150
6.90
89
3.41621
0.850
20
3.03500
21.4
55
3.09485
6.60
90
3.44351
0.765
21
3.03615
20.6
56
3.09791
6.35
91
3.47148
0.690
22
3.03716
19.95
57
3.10191
6.05
92
3.50420
0.615
23
3.03797
19.45
58
3.10638
5.74
93
3.54057
0.545
24
3.03882
18.95
59
3.11078
5.46
94
3.58493
0.474
25
3.03971
18.45
60
3.11558
5.18
95
3.63222
0.412
26
3.04065
17.95
61
3.12085
4.90
96
3.68615
0.354
27
3.04164
17.45
62
3.12622
4.64
97
3.75456
0.295
28
3.04258
17.00
63
3.13211
4.38
98
3.82865
0.245
29
3.04357
16.55
64
3.13861
4.12
99
3.91348
0.201
30
3.04460
16.10
65
3.14411
3.92
100
4.01514
0.162
31
3.04569
15.65
66
3.14913
3.75
101
4.14432
0.127
32
3.04685
15.20
67
3.15454
3.58
102
4.34126
0.091
33
3.04807
14.75
68
3.16002
3.42
103
4.54568
0.066
34
3.04936
14.30
69
3.16593
3.26
104
4.79803
0.050
35
3.05058
13.90
70
3.17191
3.11
TABLE C-6 Lake Shore RX-102A Rox™ curve
Model 336 Temperature Controller
163
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
log )
Temp (K)
1
3.35085
40.0
34
3.40482
11.45
67
3.52772
2.17
2
3.35222
38.5
35
3.40688
11.00
68
3.53459
2.04
3
3.35346
37.2
36
3.40905
10.55
69
3.54157
1.92
4
3.35476
35.9
37
3.41134
10.10
70
3.54923
1.80
5
3.35612
34.6
38
3.41377
9.65
71
3.55775
1.68
6
3.35755
33.3
39
3.41606
9.25
72
3.56646
1.57
7
3.35894
32.1
40
3.41848
8.85
73
3.57616
1.46
8
3.36039
30.9
41
3.42105
8.45
74
3.58708
1.35
9
3.36192
29.7
42
3.42380
8.05
75
3.59830
1.25
10
3.36340
28.6
43
3.42637
7.70
76
3.61092
1.150
11
3.36495
27.5
44
3.42910
7.35
77
3.62451
1.055
12
3.36659
26.4
45
3.43202
7.00
78
3.63912
0.965
13
3.36831
25.3
46
3.43515
6.65
79
3.65489
0.880
14
3.37014
24.2
47
3.43853
6.30
80
3.67206
0.800
15
3.37191
23.2
48
3.44230
5.94
81
3.69095
0.725
16
3.37377
22.2
49
3.44593
5.62
82
3.71460
0.645
17
3.37575
21.2
50
3.44984
5.30
83
3.73889
0.575
18
3.37785
20.2
51
3.45355
5.02
84
3.76599
0.510
19
3.37942
19.50
52
3.45734
4.76
85
3.79703
0.448
20
3.38081
18.90
53
3.46180
4.48
86
3.83269
0.390
21
3.38226
18.30
54
3.46632
4.22
87
3.87369
0.336
22
3.38377
17.70
55
3.47012
4.02
88
3.92642
0.281
23
3.38522
17.15
56
3.47357
3.85
89
3.98609
0.233
24
3.38672
16.60
57
3.47726
3.68
90
4.05672
0.190
25
3.38829
16.05
58
3.48122
3.51
91
4.14042
0.153
26
3.38993
15.50
59
3.48524
3.35
92
4.24807
0.120
27
3.39165
14.95
60
3.48955
3.19
93
4.40832
0.088
28
3.39345
14.40
61
3.49421
3.03
94
4.57858
0.067
29
3.39516
13.90
62
3.49894
2.88
95
4.76196
0.055
30
3.39695
13.40
63
3.50406
2.73
96
4.79575
0.051
31
3.39882
12.90
64
3.50962
2.58
97
4.81870
0.050
32
3.40079
12.40
65
3.51528
2.44
33
3.40286
11.90
66
3.52145
2.30
TABLE C-7 Lake Shore RX-202A Rox™ curve
|
www.lakeshore.com
164
Breakpoint
Appendices
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
1
-6.45774
3.15
48
-6.10828
57.4
95
-2.95792
192
142
18.1482
714.5
2
-6.45733
3.68
49
-6.08343
59.4
96
-2.82629
196
143
19.2959
741.5
3
-6.45688
4.2
50
-6.05645
61.5
97
-2.6762
200.5
144
20.8082
777
4
-6.45632
4.78
51
-6.02997
63.5
98
-2.52392
205
145
23.1752
832.5
5
-6.45565
5.4
52
-6.00271
65.5
99
-2.36961
209.5
146
24.5166
864
6
-6.45494
6
53
-5.97469
67.5
100
-2.21329
214
147
25.6001
889.5
7
-6.4541
6.65
54
-5.94591
69.5
101
-2.05503
218.5
148
26.5536
912
8
-6.4531
7.35
55
-5.91637
71.5
102
-1.87703
223.5
149
27.4199
932.5
9
-6.45201
8.05
56
-5.8861
73.5
103
-1.69672
228.5
150
28.2413
952
10
-6.45073
8.8
57
-5.85508
75.5
104
-1.51427
233.5
151
29.0181
970.5
11
-6.44934
9.55
58
-5.82334
77.5
105
-1.32972
238.5
152
29.7714
988.5
12
-6.44774
10.35
59
-5.78268
80
106
-1.12444
244
153
30.5011
1006
13
-6.44601
11.15
60
-5.74084
82.5
107
-0.91675
249.5
154
31.2074
1023
14
-6.44403
12
61
-5.69792
85
108
-0.70686
255
155
31.8905
1039.5
15
-6.44189
12.85
62
-5.6539
87.5
109
-0.47553
261
156
32.571
1056
16
-6.43947
13.75
63
-5.60879
90
110
-0.22228
267.5
157
33.2489
1072.5
17
-6.43672
14.7
64
-5.5626
92.5
111
0.053112
274.5
158
33.9038
1088.5
18
-6.43378
15.65
65
-5.51535
95
112
0.350783
282
159
34.5561
1104.5
19
-6.43065
16.6
66
-5.46705
97.5
113
0.651006
289.5
160
35.2059
1120.5
20
-6.42714
17.6
67
-5.4177
100
114
0.973714
297.5
161
35.8532
1136.5
21
-6.42321
18.65
68
-5.36731
102.5
115
1.31919
306
162
36.4979
1152.5
22
-6.41905
19.7
69
-5.3159
105
116
1.70801
315.5
163
37.14
1168.5
23
-6.41442
20.8
70
-5.26348
107.5
117
2.14052
326
164
37.7596
1184
24
-6.40952
21.9
71
-5.19928
110.5
118
2.69954
339.5
165
38.3767
1199.5
25
-6.40435
23
72
-5.13359
113.5
119
3.75883
365
166
38.9915
1215
26
-6.39841
24.2
73
-5.06651
116.5
120
4.29687
378
167
39.6038
1230.5
27
-6.39214
25.4
74
-4.99801
119.5
121
4.74986
389
168
40.2136
1246
28
-6.38554
26.6
75
-4.92813
122.5
122
5.17977
399.5
169
40.821
1261.5
29
-6.37863
27.8
76
-4.85687
125.5
123
5.60705
410
170
41.4063
1276.5
30
-6.37077
29.1
77
-4.78426
128.5
124
6.03172
420.5
171
41.9893
1291.5
31
-6.36253
30.4
78
-4.71031
131.5
125
6.49428
432
172
42.5699
1306.5
32
-6.35391
31.7
79
-4.63503
134.5
126
7.09465
447
173
43.1288
1321
33
-6.34422
33.1
80
-4.55845
137.5
127
8.15226
473.5
174
43.6853
1335.5
34
-6.33408
34.5
81
-4.48056
140.5
128
8.75291
488.5
175
44.2394
1350
35
-6.3235
35.9
82
-4.38814
144
129
9.25576
501
176
44.7721
1364
36
-6.3117
37.4
83
-4.29393
147.5
130
9.74087
513
177
45.3024
1378
37
-6.29939
38.9
84
-4.19806
151
131
10.2285
525
178
45.8114
1391.5
38
-6.2866
40.4
85
-4.10051
154.5
132
10.7186
537
179
46.3182
1405
39
-6.27241
42
86
-4.00133
158
133
11.2317
549.5
180
46.8038
1418
40
-6.25768
43.6
87
-3.90053
161.5
134
11.7883
563
181
47.2873
1431
41
-6.24239
45.2
88
-3.79815
165
135
12.3888
577.5
182
47.7684
1444
42
-6.22656
46.8
89
-3.6942
168.5
136
13.054
593.5
183
48.2287
1456.5
43
-6.21019
48.4
90
-3.58873
172
137
13.7844
611
184
48.6868
1469
44
-6.19115
50.2
91
-3.46638
176
138
14.5592
629.5
185
49.1426
1481.5
45
-6.17142
52
92
-3.34204
180
139
15.3786
649
186
49.5779
1493.5
46
-6.15103
53.8
93
-3.21584
184
140
16.2428
669.5
187
50.0111
1505.5
47
-6.12998
55.6
94
-3.08778
188
141
17.1518
691
TABLE C-8 Type K (Nickel-Chromium vs. Nickel-Aluminum) thermocouple curve
Model 336 Temperature Controller
165
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
1
-9.834960
3.15
55
-8.713010
77.50
109
0.701295
285.0
2
-9.834220
3.59
56
-8.646710
80.00
110
1.061410
291.00
3
-9.833370
4.04
57
-8.578890
82.50
111
1.424820
297.00
4
-9.832260
4.56
58
-8.509590
85.00
112
1.791560
303.00
5
-9.830920
5.12
59
-8.438800
87.50
113
2.161610
309.00
6
-9.829330
5.72
60
-8.366570
90.00
114
2.534960
315.00
7
-9.827470
6.35
61
-8.292900
92.50
115
2.943070
321.50
8
-9.825370
7.00
62
-8.217810
95.00
116
3.355100
328.00
9
-9.822890
7.70
63
-8.141330
97.50
117
3.770870
334.50
10
-9.820010
8.45
64
-8.047780
100.50
118
4.190420
341.00
11
-9.816880
9.20
65
-7.952190
103.50
119
4.613650
347.50
12
-9.813290
10.00
66
-7.854690
106.50
120
5.040520
354.00
13
-9.809180
10.85
67
-7.755260
109.50
121
5.470960
360.50
14
-9.804510
11.75
68
-7.653960
112.50
122
5.938380
367.50
15
-9.799510
12.65
69
-7.550790
115.50
123
6.409870
374.50
16
-9.793900
13.60
70
-7.445790
118.50
124
6.885210
381.50
17
-9.787610
14.60
71
-7.338970
121.50
125
7.364360
388.50
18
-9.780590
15.65
72
-7.230370
124.50
126
7.881760
396.00
19
-9.773150
16.70
73
-7.120010
127.50
127
8.403380
403.50
20
-9.764910
17.80
74
-6.989110
131.00
128
8.928940
411.00
21
-9.755820
18.95
75
-6.855790
134.50
129
9.493760
419.00
22
-9.746230
20.10
76
-6.720200
138.00
130
10.0629
427.00
23
-9.735700
21.30
77
-6.582330
141.50
131
10.6361
435.00
24
-9.724650
22.50
78
-6.442220
145.00
132
11.2494
443.50
25
-9.713080
23.70
79
-6.299900
148.50
133
11.867
452.00
26
-9.699960
25.00
80
-6.155400
152.00
134
12.5253
461.00
27
-9.686220
26.30
81
-6.008740
155.50
135
13.188
470.00
28
-9.671890
27.60
82
-5.859960
159.00
136
13.892
479.50
29
-9.655790
29.00
83
-5.687430
163.00
137
14.6005
489.00
30
-9.638980
30.40
84
-5.512090
167.00
138
15.3507
499.00
31
-9.621500
31.80
85
-5.334130
171.00
139
16.1432
509.50
32
-9.602020
33.30
86
-5.153520
175.00
140
16.9403
520.00
33
-9.581740
34.80
87
-4.970330
179.00
141
17.7798
531.00
34
-9.560710
36.30
88
-4.784590
183.00
142
18.6624
542.50
35
-9.537440
37.90
89
-4.596330
187.00
143
19.5881
554.50
36
-9.513290
39.50
90
-4.405600
191.00
144
20.5573
567.00
37
-9.486720
41.20
91
-4.212440
195.00
145
21.5702
580.00
38
-9.457560
43.00
92
-3.992330
199.50
146
22.627
593.50
39
-9.427340
44.80
93
-3.769140
204.00
147
23.7279
607.50
40
-9.396080
46.60
94
-3.543070
208.50
148
24.873
622.00
41
-9.363810
48.40
95
-3.314120
213.00
149
26.0623
637.00
42
-9.330540
50.20
96
-3.082340
217.50
150
27.3356
653.00
43
-9.296270
52.00
97
-2.847790
222.00
151
28.6935
670.00
44
-9.257090
54.00
98
-2.610520
226.50
152
30.1761
688.50
45
-9.216690
56.00
99
-2.343820
231.50
153
31.8242
709.00
46
-9.175140
58.00
100
-2.073770
236.50
154
33.7187
732.50
47
-9.132450
60.00
101
-1.800570
241.50
155
36.1028
762.00
48
-9.088620
62.00
102
-1.524210
246.50
156
41.8502
833.00
49
-9.043710
64.00
103
-1.244740
251.50
157
44.2747
863.00
50
-8.997710
66.00
104
-0.962207
256.50
158
46.2907
888.00
51
-8.950650
68.00
105
-0.676647
261.50
159
48.1007
910.50
52
-8.902530
70.00
106
-0.359204
267.00
160
49.8256
932.00
53
-8.840980
72.50
107
-0.009079
273.00
161
51.5056
953.00
54
-8.777760
75.00
108
0.344505
279.00
TABLE C-9 Type E (Nickel-Chromium vs. Copper-Nickel) Thermocouple Curve
|
www.lakeshore.com
166
Appendices
Breakpoint
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
-6.257510
-6.257060
-6.256520
-6.255810
-6.254950
-6.253920
-6.252780
-6.251380
-6.249730
-6.247810
-6.245590
-6.243040
-6.240300
-6.237210
-6.233710
-6.229800
-6.225630
-6.221000
-6.215860
-6.210430
-6.204430
-6.198680
-6.191780
-6.184530
-6.176930
-6.168310
-6.159280
-6.149830
-6.139220
-6.128130
-6.116580
-6.103700
-6.090300
-6.075460
-6.060040
-6.044070
-6.025470
-6.006200
-5.986280
-5.965730
-5.942210
-5.917930
-5.892970
-5.864730
-5.835680
-5.805860
-5.776670
-5.741100
-5.704560
-5.667130
-5.628800
-5.589590
-5.549510
-5.508560
-5.466760
3.15
3.56
4.00
4.50
5.04
5.62
6.20
6.85
7.55
8.30
9.10
9.95
10.80
11.70
12.65
13.65
14.65
15.70
16.80
17.90
19.05
20.10
21.30
22.50
23.70
25.00
26.30
27.60
29.00
30.40
31.80
33.30
34.80
36.40
38.00
39.60
41.40
43.20
45.00
46.80
48.80
50.80
52.80
55.00
57.20
59.40
61.50
64.00
66.50
69.00
71.50
74.00
76.50
79.00
81.50
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
-5.424100
-5.380600
-5.336260
-5.291080
-5.245070
-5.188800
-5.131290
-5.072630
-5.012780
-4.951770
-4.889610
-4.826300
-4.761840
-4.696250
-4.629530
-4.561670
-4.492700
-4.422610
-4.351390
-4.266950
-4.180930
-4.093440
-4.004430
-3.913940
-3.821970
-3.728520
-3.633620
-3.537260
-3.439460
-3.340240
-3.239610
-3.122930
-3.004370
-2.884040
-2.761910
-2.638010
-2.512340
-2.384920
-2.255770
-2.124900
-1.992320
-1.858060
-1.705090
-1.549970
-1.392820
-1.233640
-1.072450
-0.909257
-0.744065
-0.576893
-0.407776
-0.217705
-0.025325
0.188573
0.404639
84.00
86.50
89.00
91.50
94.00
97.00
100.00
103.00
106.00
109.00
112.00
115.00
118.00
121.00
124.00
127.00
130.00
133.00
136.00
139.50
143.00
146.50
150.00
153.50
157.00
160.50
164.00
167.50
171.00
174.50
178.00
182.00
186.00
190.00
194.00
198.00
202.00
206.00
210.00
214.00
218.00
222.00
226.50
231.00
235.50
240.00
244.50
249.00
253.50
258.00
262.50
267.50
272.50
278.00
283.50
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
0.623032
0.843856
1.067190
1.293090
1.521570
1.752660
1.986340
2.222600
2.461410
2.702740
2.946550
3.192800
3.441440
3.715300
3.991980
4.271300
4.553250
4.837770
5.148790
5.462770
5.779560
6.099160
6.421500
6.746540
7.099510
7.455590
7.814630
8.176630
8.541540
8.909320
9.306450
9.706830
10.1103
10.5169
10.9264
11.3664
11.8098
12.2564
12.7342
13.2155
13.7
14.1879
14.7079
15.2314
15.7583
16.2887
16.8224
17.3594
17.9297
18.5037
19.1116
19.7538
20.4611
20.8627
289.00
294.50
300.00
305.50
311.00
316.50
322.00
327.50
333.00
338.50
344.00
349.50
355.00
361.00
367.00
373.00
379.00
385.00
391.50
398.00
404.50
411.00
417.50
424.00
431.00
438.00
445.00
452.00
459.00
466.00
473.50
481.00
488.50
496.00
503.50
511.50
519.50
527.50
536.00
544.50
553.00
561.50
570.50
579.50
588.50
597.50
606.50
615.50
625.00
634.50
644.50
655.00
666.50
673.00
TABLE C-10 Type T (Copper vs. Copper-Nickel) thermocouple curve
Model 336 Temperature Controller
167
Breakpoint
mV
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
32
-2.24537
160
6.35
33
-2.06041
170
8.15
34
-1.86182
180.5
-4.58043
9.75
35
-1.66004
191
-4.53965
12.5
36
-1.47556
200.5
6
-4.47226
16.95
37
-1.0904
220
7
-4.43743
19.3
38
-0.73397
237.5
8
-4.39529
22.2
39
-0.68333
240
9
-4.34147
26
40
-0.3517
256
10
-4.29859
29.1
41
-0.2385
261.5
11
-4.26887
31.3
42
0.078749
277
12
-4.22608
34.5
43
0.139668
280
13
-4.2018
36.3
44
0.426646
294.5
14
-4.02151
49.8
45
0.546628
300.5
15
-3.94549
55.4
46
0.858608
316
16
-3.87498
60.5
47
0.938667
320
17
-3.80464
65.5
48
1.3456
340
18
-3.73301
70.5
49
1.7279
358.5
19
-3.65274
76
50
1.76905
360.5
20
-3.5937
80
51
2.20705
381.5
21
-3.51113
85.5
52
2.51124
396
22
-3.45023
89.5
53
2.69878
405
23
-3.43451
90.5
54
2.94808
417
24
-3.37842
94
55
3.13562
426
25
-3.35469
95.5
56
3.43707
440.5
26
-3.28237
100
57
3.85513
460.5
27
-3.11919
110
58
4.17136
475.5
28
-2.95269
120
59
4.28662
481
29
-2.78168
130
60
4.64037
498
30
-2.60639
140
61
4.68168
500
31
-2.42737
150
1
-4.6667
2
-4.62838
3
-4.60347
4
5
Temp (K)
TABLE C-11 Chromel-AuFe 0.03% thermocouple curve
|
www.lakeshore.com
168
Appendices
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
Temp (K)
Breakpoint
mV
1
-5.279520
3.15
35
-3.340820
115.00
69
1.313400
2
-5.272030
3.78
36
-3.253410
119.50
70
1.511140
341.50
3
-5.263500
4.46
37
-3.165360
124.00
71
1.709250
350.50
4
-5.253730
5.20
38
-3.076690
128.50
72
1.928940
360.50
5
-5.242690
6.00
39
-2.977480
133.50
73
2.127070
369.50
6
-5.229730
6.90
40
-2.877550
138.50
74
2.324710
378.50
7
-5.214770
7.90
41
-2.776950
143.50
75
2.523070
387.50
8
-5.196980
9.05
42
-2.675700
148.50
76
2.643480
393.00
9
-5.176250
10.35
43
-2.563610
154.00
77
2.708890
396.00
10
-5.150910
11.90
44
-2.450770
159.50
78
2.764030
398.50
11
-5.116700
13.95
45
-2.337230
165.00
79
2.797580
400.00
12
-5.049770
17.90
46
-2.223010
170.50
80
2.950200
406.50
13
-5.002120
20.70
47
-2.097700
176.50
81
3.008310
409.00
14
-4.938000
24.50
48
-1.971630
182.50
82
3.031200
410.00
15
-4.876180
28.20
49
-1.844890
188.50
83
3.218040
418.00
16
-4.801670
32.70
50
-1.706840
195.00
84
3.300110
421.50
17
-4.648620
42.00
51
-1.568040
201.50
85
4.000810
451.50
18
-4.569170
46.80
52
-1.428520
208.00
86
4.246390
462.00
19
-4.499080
51.00
53
-1.277520
215.00
87
4.701810
481.50
20
-4.435090
54.80
54
-1.114900
222.50
88
4.947390
492.00
21
-4.370520
58.60
55
-0.940599
230.50
89
5.636410
521.50
22
-4.303610
62.50
56
-0.754604
239.00
90
5.870300
531.50
23
-4.234290
66.50
57
-0.556906
248.00
91
6.547630
560.50
24
-4.164270
70.50
58
-0.358437
257.00
92
6.711600
567.50
25
-4.093560
74.50
59
-0.170179
265.50
93
6.781410
570.50
26
-4.022170
78.50
60
0.041150
275.00
94
6.931500
577.00
27
-3.950100
82.50
61
0.152699
280.00
95
7.001360
580.00
28
-3.877360
86.50
62
0.163149
280.50
96
7.166710
587.00
29
-3.803960
90.50
63
0.374937
290.00
97
7.260420
591.00
30
-3.729910
94.50
64
0.542973
297.50
98
7.412010
597.50
31
-3.655230
98.50
65
0.598604
300.00
99
7.529070
602.50
32
-3.579930
102.50
66
0.774384
308.00
100
7.657460
608.00
33
-3.504020
106.50
67
0.840638
311.00
101
7.704410
610.00
34
-3.427530
110.50
68
1.126350
324.00
TABLE C-12 Chromel-AuFe 0.07% thermocouple curve
Model 336 Temperature Controller
Temp (K)
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