Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Challenger10
Administrators Manual
P/N MAADMN-TS1016 • REV 01 • ISS 18FEB13
Copyright
Trademarks and
patents
Manufacturer
Agency compliance
Contact information
© 2013 UTC Fire & Security. All rights reserved.
The Challenger10 name and logo are trademarks of
UTC Fire & Security.
Other trade names used in this document may be trademarks or
registered trademarks of the manufacturers or vendors of the
respective products.
Interlogix (a division of UTC Fire & Security Australia Pty Ltd)
Level 1, 271–273 Wellington Road, Mulgrave, VIC, 3170, Australia
N4131
For contact information, see www.interlogix.com.au.
Content
Important information iii
Preface v
Chapter 1
Introduction 1
Welcome to the Challenger system 2
Testing your system 3
Challenger user interfaces 3
Using the keypad 7
What is a user? 10
Chapter 2
Administrator tasks 13
Testing input devices 14
Chapter 3
Menu reference 17
Option 1 Panel Status 18
Option 2 Input Unsealed 18
Option 3 Input In Alarm 19
Option 4 Input Isolated 19
Option 5 History 20
Option 6 Test Report 21
Option 7 Service Menu 23
Option 8 Film Counters 25
Option 9 Input Text 25
Option 10 Isolate 25
Option 11 Deisolate 26
Option 12 Test Input 26
Option 13 Start Auto Access Test 27
Option 14 Program Users 30
Option 15 Time & Date 37
Option 16 Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP 40
Option 17 Enable/Disable Service Tech 40
Option 18 Reset Cameras 41
Option 19 Install Menu 41
Option 20 Door and Floor Groups 42
Option 21 Holidays 44
Option 22 Open Door 46
Option 23 Unlock, Lock, Disable and Enable 46
Appendix A
Programming worksheets 49
Users worksheet 50
Door groups worksheet 51
Floor groups worksheet 52
Holidays worksheet 53
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
i
Glossary 55
Index 63
ii
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Important information
Agency compliance
This product conforms to the standards set by Standards Australia on behalf of
the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). UTC Fire &
Security recommend enclosure covers remain fitted to maintain C-Tick
compliance.
Limitation of liability
To the maximum extent permitted by applicable law, in no event will Interlogix (a
division of UTC Fire & Security Australia Pty Ltd) be liable for any lost profits or
business opportunities, loss of use, business interruption, loss of data, or any
other indirect, special, incidental, or consequential damages under any theory of
liability, whether based in contract, tort, negligence, product liability, or otherwise.
Because some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion or limitation of liability for
consequential or incidental damages the preceding limitation may not apply to
you. In any event the total liability of Interlogix shall not exceed the purchase
price of the product. The foregoing limitation will apply to the maximum extent
permitted by applicable law, regardless of whether Interlogix has been advised of
the possibility of such damages and regardless of whether any remedy fails of its
essential purpose.
Installation in accordance with this manual, applicable codes, and the instructions
of the authority having jurisdiction is mandatory.
While every precaution has been taken during the preparation of this manual to
ensure the accuracy of its contents, Interlogix assumes no responsibility for
errors or omissions.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
iii
Regulatory requirements for New Zealand
Some parameters required for compliance with Telecom’s Telepermit
requirements are dependent on the equipment (PC) associated with this device.
In order to operate within the limits for compliance with Telecom’s Specifications,
the associated equipment shall be set to ensure that:
•
There shall be no more than 10 call attempts to the same number within any
30 minute period for any single manual call initiation.
•
The equipment shall go on-hook for a period of not less than 30 seconds
between the end of one attempt and the beginning of the next attempt.
•
Automatic calls to different numbers are spaced such that there is no less
than 5 seconds between the end of one call attempt and the beginning of
another.
•
This equipment shall not be set up to make automatic calls to the Telecom
‘111’ Emergency Service.
•
The associated equipment shall be set to ensure that calls are answered
between 3 and 30 seconds of receipt of ringing.
Refer to the Challenger10 Programming Manual for details about programming
these parameters.
iv
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Preface
This is the Challenger10 Administrators Manual. It is part of the following suite of
manuals for the Challenger10 intrusion detection and access control panel.
•
The Challenger10 Installation and Quick Programming Manual is for
installation technicians to install and commission a Challenger panel.
•
The Challenger10 Users Manual is suitable for most users of the
Challenger10 system to perform everyday tasks.
•
The Challenger10 Administrators Manual is for users and system
administrators who need to manage the Challenger10 system via its
text-based user interface.
•
The Challenger10 Programming Manual is for system administrators and
installers who need to manage the Challenger10 system via its
text-based user interface (in particular the “Install” menu).
Notes
•
The permissions assigned to you may not allow you to do everything
described in this manual. You may not be able to see all menu items
described in this manual.
•
A qualified service person, complying with all applicable codes, should
perform all required hardware installation.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1
Introduction
Summary
This chapter provides an introduction to the Challenger system.
Content
Welcome to the Challenger system 2
Testing your system 3
Challenger user interfaces 3
The LCD screen 4
Area LEDs 5
CA111x status LEDs 5
TS0804 system fault LEDs 6
TS0804 system alarm LEDs 6
Internal beeper 6
Using the keypad 7
Displaying input names 8
Selecting areas by searching 8
Entering text via RAS 9
Using the menu 10
What is a user? 10
Codes 11
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 1: Introduction > Welcome to the Challenger system
Welcome to the Challenger system
The Challenger integrated intrusion detection and access control panel is widely
accepted as a versatile, high-quality, Australian-designed product. Challenger’s
customisable design makes it the benchmark for intrusion detection (alarm) and
access control systems.
The Challenger panel is the heart and soul of the Challenger intrusion detection
and access control system. The Challenger system is essentially a collection of
databases that are stored in the panel’s onboard memory and can be
programmed by the installer (or administrator, as applicable) using the following
tools:
•
LCD RAS: Initially the Challenger system must be programmed using a
remote arming station (RAS) fitted with a liquid crystal display (LCD) screen
and keypad. The RAS’s text-based user interface provides a menu that is
numbered for rapid access. This manual describes how to program and
operate a Challenger system by means of a RAS.
•
Management software: A Challenger system that is configured and
programmed to be accessed via management software (such as Security
Commander) may be programmed and operated via the management
software on a graphical interface. Any changes to the Challenger system
made via management software must be downloaded to the Challenger panel
before they take effect.
This manual is a reference for the Challenger operations and programming that
can be done via RAS. Use management software for advanced operations and
programming, and refer to the documentation provided with the management
software for assistance.
Note: If management software is used to program a Challenger panel, to change
user data or access control data, or used to upload a panel’s programming, the
management software becomes the primary location for the panel’s data, and the
panel becomes the secondary location. In other words, keep track of where the
‘correct’ version of Challenger data is stored. As administrator you are
responsible to avoid loss of data, errors in data, or uncertainty about the validity
of data.
A Challenger system might be managed locally from an LCD RAS or via a
locally-connected management software computer (Windows computer).
Alternatively, the system might be managed remotely via management software
computers.
In an Enterprise-wide intrusion detection and access control system, thousands
of Challenger systems can be programmed, controlled, and monitored by
hundreds of operators working on management software computers in remote
locations. Refer to the documentation provided with the management software
for details.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1: Introduction > Testing your system
Your Challenger system has been programmed to meet your specific
requirements. Therefore, not all of the features described in this manual may
apply to your system. Also, some of the features described in this manual will not
be visible to all users (see “What is a user?” on page 10). Your system may have
extra features or equipment installed. The programming instructions for extra
equipment are supplied separately.
Testing your system
It is important that you regularly test your Challenger system to ensure that all
installed equipment is operating properly.
You may have a technician operate your Challenger system locally or remotely to
test and service your intrusion detection system. There are various tests that can
be used to ensure your system is working correctly. We recommend that you
discuss with the technician the testing processes you can perform to check your
system, and its ability to report to your remote monitoring company (if
applicable).
Routine maintenance on intruder alarm systems installed in a client’s premises
should be performed in accordance with AS2201.1-1998 SECTION 5.
MAINTENANCE, RECORDS AND REPORTS. Note that this standard requires
that routine maintenance be performed at least once per year. Refer to the
Challenger10 Programming Manual for maintenance recommendations.
Challenger user interfaces
A Challenger system typically has at least one LCD RAS connected to one of two
LANs (RS-485 data buses). The LCD screen plus keypad provides a text-based
user interface for programming and operating the Challenger system. Up to 32
RASs may be connected to the Challenger LANs.
A RAS with a keypad and liquid crystal display (LCD) screen (or a touch screen)
enables authorised users to enter a series of numbers called a “code”, in order to
perform functions such as accessing the Challenger’s menus, or to open doors.
The CA111x models of the LCD RAS are used in this manual for illustrations and
keypad depictions. The CA1116 model shown here (with cover removed)
includes a four-line LCD screen and an integral card reader. Figure 1 on page 4
indicates the locations of various controls on the CA1116 RAS.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 1: Introduction > Challenger user interfaces
Figure 1: Details of CA1116 RAS
(1)
(1)
(9)
(2)
(3)
(10)
(4)
(5)
(11)
(6)
(12)
(7)
(8)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
8
9
Status LEDs
LCD screen
Area search mode key.
Press the On key after entering your PIN
to tell the Challenger system that you
want to arm your areas. (Some arming
stations have a # instead of the ON key).
(5) Press the Off key after entering your PIN
to tell the Challenger system that you
want to disarm your areas. (Some arming
stations have a * instead of the OFF key).
(6) Press a numeric key to enter numbers,
and for entering text when programming
user names.
(7) Press the Menu* key to display the menu
login prompt; backspace to correct an
error; or to scroll backwards in the menu.
(Some arming stations have only a *
without the word “menu”).
(8) Area LEDs
(9) Card reader icon (applies to CA1115 and
CA1116 models).
(10)Press the up arrow and down arrow
keys to scroll through menu options.
(Some arming stations have a NEXT key
to display additional text).
(11)Press the Clear key to exit the current
function or operation and return to alarm
control prompt. (Available on some
arming stations only).
(12)Press the ENTER key when information is
to be processed (similar to the Enter key
on a computer); or to scroll forwards in
the menu. (Some arming stations have a
# instead of the ENTER key).
The LCD screen
Messages are displayed on the liquid crystal display (LCD) screen on the keypad
or on a touch screen. These messages guide you through the functions of the
Challenger system, such as identifying problems, the procedures necessary to
rectify problems, programming functions, and other menu options. The display
might also show information you have entered on the keypad. The second line of
the display shows instructions and the characters you enter on the keypad.
Welcome screen
A RAS’s LCD screen displays messages about the state of the Challenger
system and to help navigate the menu options (subject to permissions). The
display might also show information you have entered on the keypad.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1: Introduction > Challenger user interfaces
Figure 2: Default LCD welcome screen
There Are No Alarms In This Area
Code:
The welcome screen indicates that the Challenger system is ready to receive
commands. The top line is a configurable custom message, such as the default
time and date, or other text, such as the company name.
Note: Images of LCD screens used in this manual are for illustration only and
may not match actual RAS LCD screens.
In some instances there is insufficient space to display all the text being
presented (for example, a list of areas in your building). LCD RASs that have
small displays (16-characters LCD screens) scroll longer strings of text in order
to display entire messages. This scrolling is referred to as ‘rotation’. When a long
message displays, the text rotation begins after a configurable delay, and scrolls
at a configurable speed (this functionality is not applicable to TS0004 or TS0210
LCD RASs).
The bottom line displays “Code” to indicate that the Challenger system is ready
to accept a user’s personal identification number (PIN), also called a code. The
bottom line may also display instructions and the characters you enter on the
keypad (except for PINs, which are shown as ‘*’ characters).
Area LEDs
RASs have up to 16 area LEDs that can be used to indicate the state of the
system’s 99 areas. Areas 1 to 16 are mapped to the RAS’s area LEDs by default,
but can be reassigned by the installer as needed.
When the CA111x RAS cover is open or removed, 16 LEDs are visible at the
bottom of the RAS. Each LED represents an area, and the indications are as
follows:
•
The LED illuminates when its corresponding area is armed (secure).
•
The LED flashes slowly when a fault is detected, or when an alarm occurs, in
disarm (access).
•
The LED flashes quickly when a fault is detected, or when an alarm occurs, in
arm (secure).
CA111x status LEDs
CA111x RASs have four status LEDs above the LCD screen. The indications are
as follows:
•
Power—illuminates when the RAS is powered.
•
Fault—flashes when there is a system fault (i.e. comms fault, RAS fault, DGP
fault, battery test fail, or hardware tamper).
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 1: Introduction > Challenger user interfaces
•
Access—flashes once when a card is badged at CA1115 or CA1116 RASs
(subject to Valid Card Flash programming).
•
Alarm—flashes when there is an access alarm, a 24-hour alarm, or a secure
alarm.
TS0804 system fault LEDs
TS0804 RASs have system fault LEDs that indicate as follows:
•
Comms—illuminates if there is a failure in the communications between the
Challenger panel and a remote monitoring station.
•
RAS—illuminates if a remote arming station is offline.
•
DGP—illuminates if an access controller or data gathering panel is offline.
•
Battery—illuminates if the auxiliary battery power is found to be low after
mains power is lost.
TS0804 system alarm LEDs
TS0804 RASs have system alarm LEDs that indicate as follows:
•
Access—illuminates if an alarm has occurred in an area that is occupied and
the intrusion detection system has been set to allow normal access.
•
24 Hr—illuminates if an alarm has occurred in an area where an input device
has been programmed for 24 hour monitoring.
•
Secure—illuminates if an alarm has occurred in an area that is secure
(armed).
•
Tamper—illuminates if an alarm has occurred due to tamper.
Internal beeper
The RAS’s beeper provides a number of indications:
•
A short beep indicates that a valid card is presented at a reader or a key is
pressed on a keypad. The beep may be followed by two beeps to indicate
that access has been granted (for example, to open a door).
•
Seven short beeps indicates that a PIN or card is not valid at the particular
RAS or at the particular time, or that the area you are attempting to arm has
an input that is unsealed or in alarm.
•
A continuous tone indicates that an input test is being performed.
•
Continuous beeping indicates that one or more inputs are in local alarm.
•
Your Challenger system may be programmed so that the RAS beeps whilst
an entry timer, exit timer, or warning timer is running.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1: Introduction > Using the keypad
Using the keypad
Use the following steps to access the menu when the “Code” prompt is displayed
on the bottom line of the LCD screen.
In the following example, the system is configured to display the time and date
instead of the default message “There Are No Alarms In This Area”.
14:01 30/08/2012
Code:
1. Press [MENU*].
To Access Menu Enter Code
Code:
2. Press nnnn (where nnnn is your code), and then press [ENTER] to display the
user menu prompt.
“0”-Exit “ENTER”-Down “*”-Up
0-Exit, Menu:
3. From the user menu prompt, you can now select the menu option you need
(see Figure 1 on page 4), or press [0] [ENTER] to exit. Alternatively, press
[ENTER] (or the RAS’s down button, if applicable) to view the available user
menu options in sequence.
4. When finished, press [0] [ENTER] or [CLEAR] to exit the menu.
Note: After a few minutes of inaction, the Challenger system automatically exits
the menu and returns to the “Code” prompt. However, we recommend that you
press [0] [ENTER] or [CLEAR] to exit the menu when you are finished, in order to
prevent unauthorised use (that would otherwise be logged against your code).
The following keys are used to move between menu options:
•
Press [ENTER] to scroll forward one menu option.
•
Press [MENU*] to scroll backward one menu option.
•
Press the menu number and press [ENTER] to jump directly to a menu.
•
Press [0] [ENTER] or press [CLEAR] to exit the menu.
To program a value, such as a number or amount, enter the value and press
[ENTER]. The information will be saved. Press [ENTER] to display the next
option.
To program a YES/NO option, press [ENTER] to accept the display or press
[MENU*] to toggle between YES and NO. Press [0] [ENTER] to skip options.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 1: Introduction > Using the keypad
Displaying input names
Input devices are identified by a number from 1 to 1008 and (optionally) a name
programmed by the installer. The name is useful to determine the location of an
input device that is unsealed or in alarm.
Your Challenger system may be programmed to display inputs by their number,
along with their name (Figure 3 below).
Figure 3: Input name displayed
Unsealed On 6, Front Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Alternatively, your system might be programmed to display a list of input
numbers (Figure 4 below).
Figure 4: Input numbers displayed
Unsealed On 6, 7, 9
NEXT or ENTER
In this case, enter an input number, and then press [ENTER] to display the
input’s name.
Selecting areas by searching
Areas are identified by a number from 1 to 99 and (optionally) a name
programmed by the installer.
When arming or disarming the system, you may want to select a specific area
instead of selecting all areas. Some RAS models (such as the CA111x series)
support area search mode to help you quickly find areas by name.
For example to use a CA1116 RAS (see Figure 1 on page 4) to arm an area
named “East wing foyer”:
1. Press nnnn (where nnnn is your code), and then press [ENTER] or [ON]. Any
disarmed areas that are assigned to your alarm group are listed.
2. Press the area search mode key (Figure 1, item 3) to begin area search.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1: Introduction > Using the keypad
Figure 5: Area search prompt
Area Search is ,(*)-End
3. Use the RAS keypad to enter a search character or string, as described in
“Entering text via RAS” below. When each character is displayed, press
[ENTER] to move to the next position. When finished, press [*] [*] to list all
areas that contain the string.
For example, search for “EAST ” to find all with area names beginning with
that text (including “East wing foyer”). Search is not case-sensitive.
4. When the list of areas displays, you can press the area number, and then
press [ENTER] to arm only that area. Alternatively, press [0] [ENTER] to arm
all of the found areas.
5. When finished arming areas, press [ENTER] to exit the display.
Entering text via RAS
A RAS keypad can be used to create or edit text, such as user names. When
required, the keypad automatically changes to text edit mode, where numbered
keys can produce both text and numerals, as listed in Table 1 on page 10. For
example, press [2] for “D”, press [2] [2] for “E”, and so on.
Press [ENTER] to save the first value, and move to the second value.
Alternatively, if the RAS has up and down arrow keys, you can press an up or
down key to save and move between the first and second values.
When each required character is displayed, press [ENTER] to move to the next
position. When finished, press [MENU*] to save the name, and press [MENU*] a
second time to exit. In this option, [ENTER] has no other function than to move
the cursor.
Note: If you make a change, then only the letters to the left-hand side of the
cursor will be saved (the cursor must be to the right-hand side of the name when
you press [MENU*] to save).
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
9
Chapter 1: Introduction > What is a user?
Table 1: Key presses to produce characters
Key
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
6th
7th
1
A
B
C
1
a
b
c
2
D
E
F
2
d
e
f
3
G
H
I
3
g
h
i
4
J
K
L
4
j
k
l
5
M
N
O
5
m
n
o
6
P
Q
R
6
p
q
r
7
S
T
U
7
s
t
u
8
V
W
X
8
v
w
x
9
Y
Z
sp
9
y
z
sp
0
.
—
&
0
.
—
&
Using the menu
The Challenger system’s user menu has 23 options for use by authorised users,
administrators, or installers. The user menu is described in detail in Chapter 3
“Menu reference” on page 17.
Note: A menu option will be visible to you only if allowed by the alarm group
assigned to you and to the alarm group assigned to the particular RAS that you
are using.
What is a user?
A user is someone with a PIN and/or a card who can operate the Challenger
system. It helps to think of users as three main types:
•
Users: Users can typically arm or disarm the intrusion detection system
(called alarm control), handle alarms, or open doors (called access control).
User tasks are described in the Challenger User Manual.
•
Administrators: In addition to a user’s role, administrators can add users and
perform other administrative tasks, as described in this manual.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 1: Introduction > What is a user?
•
Installers: Installers (or alarm technicians) typically install, program, and
maintain the Challenger system. Installer tasks are described in the
Challenger10 Programming Manual. Some tasks (such as testing inputs) may
be performed by installers instead of administrators. These tasks are
described in this manual.
The differences between types of users is determined by what they can do
(arming and disarming the system, and by accessing the Challenger menu) and
where they can go (by opening doors or accessing floors via a lift).
•
A user’s ability to arm and disarm the system and to access the Challenger
menu is determined by assigning an alarm group to the user. Refer to the
Challenger10 Programming Manual for details about alarm groups.
•
A user’s ability to open doors is determined by assigning a door group to the
user.
•
A user’s ability to access a floor via a lift is determined by assigning a floor
group to the user.
Codes
A PIN (or user code) is a series of 4 to 10 digits that uniquely identifies you to the
Challenger system. Your Challenger system may be programmed so that you
can use your PIN to arm and disarm the system and to open doors.
Alternatively, your system may allow the use of a door code to open doors, and a
duress code to send a message to the alarm monitoring company. These terms
are explained in the Challenger10 Users Manual.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 1: Introduction > What is a user?
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 2
Administrator tasks
Summary
This chapter describes the tasks that a user with administrator privileges would
typically perform via a Challenger RAS. These administrator tasks are in addition
to tasks such as arming, disarming, and so on, which are described in the
Challenger10 User Manual.
Content
Testing input devices 14
Overview 14
Conducting an access test 14
Cancelling an access test 15
Conducting a secure test 16
Cancelling a secure test 16
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
13
Chapter 2: Administrator tasks > Testing input devices
Testing input devices
Testing of Challenger devices may be performed by Challenger system
administrators and/or by installers, depending on the situation. In addition, your
system may be programmed to initiate tests automatically when arming or
disarming the system.
Note: “Automatic test” actually means to automatically start a test interval during
which you can test inputs by, for example, opening and closing a door to verify
that the Challenger system correctly identifies the input’s change of state from
sealed to unsealed and then back to sealed.
Overview
Input devices are the various items such as passive infrared (PIR) detectors,
switches, buttons, and so on, that can indicate a change of state in the
Challenger system. The system can recognize input states of sealed and
unsealed, and optionally open and shorted (when input tamper monitoring is
used).
Testing of inputs involves monitoring the state of the input whilst changing its
state from sealed to unsealed, and then back to sealed. This is typically done by,
for example, opening and closing a door and then checking the Challenger
system to verify that the change was correctly reported.
Being highly configurable, the Challenger system contains a number of testing
options to suit a variety of applications. For example:
•
You may need to test individual inputs on an ad hoc basis when a device
appears to be faulty. See “Option 12 Test Input” on page 26.
•
The system may need to be tested periodically in accordance with Australian
Standard AS2201.1.
•
High security applications like banks may require particular inputs (for
example, hold up and suspicion buttons) to be tested in access mode at the
start of every day.
Each input must be programmed for appropriate testing options and the system
must be programmed with an appropriate system test mode. In order to conduct
tests and interpret reports, you need to understand how certain terms are used.
Refer to the Glossary for details.
Conducting an access test
Access testing is typically used for alarm inputs and cameras that you need to
test as soon as the area is disarmed. For example, to enable you to test a holdup button immediately after disarming the area.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 2: Administrator tasks > Testing input devices
If your system contains areas configured as vaults, then the access test operates
as follows:
•
Disarming the vault area only, starts the access test on the vault area only.
•
Disarming all areas (including the vault area), starts the access test on all
areas.
•
Disarming the non-vault areas only, does not start the access test.
Your system may be programmed to automatically go into access test mode
when disarming areas that contain inputs configured for access testing. In such a
case, the RAS beeper sounds during the access test time, and the LCD screen
indicates that the access test is running (Figure 6 below).
Figure 6: Access test RAS display
Access test, NEXT For Untested
“0”- Cancel:
The access (disarmed) test is a defined interval during which specific inputs may
be tested to see if they are operating correctly when the area is occupied. The
input must be programmed to be included in access tests (determined by the
input’s test type). The input (for example, a hold-up button) is disabled during any
access test on areas assigned to it.
The area is disarmed after one of the following occurs:
•
The access test is cancelled by the user.
•
The required inputs are tested (toggled from sealed to unsealed and back to
sealed).
•
The access test time expires.
An input’s access test is recorded as completed if the input is toggled from
sealed to unsealed and back to sealed (typically by a technician activating a
sensor such as a door contact).
Note: If cameras are programmed to be tested during the access test, and the
system is programmed as a financial institution, then the film counters
automatically display after the cameras are tested.
Following an access test, you can view the access test report to see if any of the
required inputs are untested (see “Access test report” on page 21).
See also “Option 13 Start Auto Access Test” on page 27 for details of how to
manually initiate the access testing interval.
Cancelling an access test
From the access test RAS display (Figure 6 above), press [0] [ENTER] [ENTER].
The RAS beeper stops sounding and the selected areas are disarmed.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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Chapter 2: Administrator tasks > Testing input devices
Conducting a secure test
Secure testing is typically used for inputs that you need to test whilst the area is
being armed, for example, to enable you to test a door contact at the end of the
day when arming the area.
Your system may be programmed to automatically go into secure test mode
when arming areas that contain inputs configured for secure testing. In such a
case, the RAS beeper sounds during the test interval, and the LCD screen
indicates that the secure test is running (Figure 7 below).
Figure 7: Secure test RAS display
Secure test, NEXT For Untested
“0”- Cancel:
The secure (armed) test is a defined interval during which specific inputs may be
tested to see if they are operating correctly when the area is unoccupied. The
inputs must be programmed to be included in secure tests (determined by the
input’s test type).
The area is armed after one of the following occurs:
•
The secure test is cancelled by the user.
•
The required inputs are tested (toggled from sealed to unsealed and back to
sealed).
•
The secure test time expires.
An input’s secure test is recorded as completed if the input is toggled from sealed
to unsealed and back to sealed.
Following a secure test, you can view the secure test report to see if any of the
required inputs are untested (see “Secure test report” on page 22).
Cancelling a secure test
From the secure test RAS display (Figure 7 above), press [0] [ENTER] [ENTER].
The RAS beeper stops sounding (after the auto test interval expires) and the
selected areas are armed.
The secure test takes a little time to finish, in order to give the tested inputs time
to reseal.
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Chapter 3
Menu reference
Summary
This chapter provides details of the Challenger10 user menu options, with the
exception of option 19 Install Menu (which is described in the Challenger10
Programming Manual).
The ability to access a particular RAS menu option is subject to both the user’s
and the RAS’s alarm groups. For example, the RAS may have the permission to
display option 19 Install Menu, but if the user does not also have this permission
then the option cannot be accessed.
Content
Option 1 Panel Status 18
Option 2 Input Unsealed 18
Option 3 Input In Alarm 19
Option 4 Input Isolated 19
Option 5 History 20
Option 6 Test Report 21
Option 7 Service Menu 23
Option 8 Film Counters 25
Option 9 Input Text 25
Option 10 Isolate 25
Option 11 Deisolate 26
Option 12 Test Input 26
Option 13 Start Auto Access Test 27
Option 14 Program Users 30
Option 15 Time & Date 37
Option 16 Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP 40
Option 17 Enable/Disable Service Tech 40
Option 18 Reset Cameras 41
Option 19 Install Menu 41
Option 20 Door and Floor Groups 42
Option 21 Holidays 44
Option 22 Open Door 46
Option 23 Unlock, Lock, Disable and Enable 46
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 1 Panel Status
Option 1 Panel Status
Use Panel Status to list:
•
Inputs in alarm. The input number is preceded by “A”.
•
Inputs in tamper alarm. The input number is preceded by “T”.
•
Isolated inputs. The input number is preceded by “i”.
•
Unsealed inputs. The input number is preceded by “u”.
•
System alarms. For example, DGP tamper.
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [ENTER] to display a list of active alarms, tamper alarms, isolated inputs, or
unsealed inputs.
No Alarms, Tampers, Isolates, Unsealed.
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit this option, or press [NEXT] to update the display.
When one or more inputs are in alarm, tamper alarm, isolated, or unsealed, the
LCD screen displays the most recent alarm. If you see only numbers and no
names, refer to “Displaying input names” on page 8.
Summary On u2, Front Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Press [NEXT] or [MENU*] to display additional inputs, if any. Press [ENTER] to
exit the option.
Option 2 Input Unsealed
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[2] [ENTER] to display a list of unsealed inputs (for example, an open door
contact). The LCD screen displays the following information when no inputs are
unsealed.
All Inputs are Sealed.
Press ENTER
Note: If the system is configured for input tamper monitoring (four-state
monitoring), open circuit and short circuit conditions are also displayed.
Press [ENTER] to exit this option, or press [NEXT] to update the display.
When one or more inputs are unsealed, the LCD screen displays the inputs. If
you see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names”
on page 8. The input number is preceded by A if the unsealed input is in alarm,
or T if in tamper.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 3 Input In Alarm
Unsealed On A2, Front Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit the option. Alternatively, press [NEXT] to display additional
unsealed inputs.
Option 3 Input In Alarm
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[3] [ENTER] to list all inputs that are in an alarm state (but not in local alarm
state). You need to know what inputs are in alarm so that the cause of the alarm
can be investigated and the alarm reset.
The LCD screen displays the following information when no inputs are in alarm.
No Alarms.
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit the option. Alternatively, press [NEXT] to refresh the
display.
When one or more inputs are in alarm, the LCD screen displays the inputs. If you
see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names” on page 8.
The input number is preceded by T if in tamper.
Alarm On 2, Front Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit the option. Alternatively, press [NEXT] to display additional
inputs that are in alarm, if any.
Option 4 Input Isolated
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[4] [ENTER] to list all isolated inputs to determine which inputs are not
operational and need attention.
An isolated input is one which is excluded from functioning as part of the
intrusion detection system. It would typically be isolated because it is faulty, and
by isolating it you stop it from causing an alarm. See “Option 10 Isolate” on page
25 for details.
The LCD screen displays the following information when no inputs are isolated.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 5 History
No Isolated Inputs.
Press ENTER
When one or more inputs are isolated, the LCD screen displays the inputs. If you
see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names” on page 8.
Isolated On 2, Front Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit the option. Alternatively, press [NEXT] to display additional
isolated inputs, if any.
Option 5 History
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[5] [ENTER] to display past events of system history, including alarms and
access to the menu. It can help you determine events such as the time that an
alarm occurred, the time it was reset and who reset it, the time the system was
disarmed in the morning, and so on.
1-Alarm Events 2-Log Only Events
Option:
Press [1] [ENTER] to display alarm events currently held in the panel’s memory.
13:49 26/11 Menu Entered at Console 1 >
1-Scan, 0-Exit
The display indicates the most recent event. A > character at the end of the line
indicates that the text does not fit on the LCD screen. Press [1] to shift the text
sideways to see more, and repeat as needed. A * character at the start of the line
indicates that the event is an alarm activation.
Press [ENTER] to view earlier events, or press [NEXT] to view later events.
The above example shows:
•
The time of the event in hours and minutes (HH:MM).
•
The date of the event as day and month (DD/MM).
•
The type of event, for example, Menu Entered.
•
The location of the event, for example, Console (RAS) 1.
•
The user’s number and name (if applicable). In this case, press [1] to shift the
text sideways to see the additional text.
Enter [2] and press [ENTER] to display events currently held in the panel’s
memory that are not reported to the monitoring station but sent to local printer or
computer (for example, access granted at door).
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 6 Test Report
Option 6 Test Report
Inputs can be programmed to be included in either an access test or a secure
test. This means that a predefined timer starts running, and during this interval
the system looks for the input’s state to be toggled from sealed to unsealed and
back to sealed (typically by a technician activating a sensor such as a door
contact). See “Testing input devices” on page 14.
If an access test or a secure test (interval) has occurred and any inputs that are
programmed to be included in the test have not been toggled (i.e. tested), they
will be available for viewing via the Test Report option.
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[6] [ENTER] to display the current testing status of inputs configured for access
or secure testing.
Test Report 1-Access 2-Secure
Option:
Press [1] [ENTER] to display the results of inputs tested during access
(disarmed) tests. See “Access test report” below.
Enter [2] and press [ENTER] to display the results of inputs tested during secure
(armed) tests. See “Secure test report” on page 22.
Alternatively, press [ENTER] to exit this option.
Access test report
This function displays the results of the access (disarmed) test, which can be
performed on specific inputs and cameras to see if they are operating correctly.
The inputs must be programmed to be included in access tests (determined by
the input’s test type). The system must be programmed with an appropriate test
mode.
From the Test Report menu option, enter [1] and press [ENTER] to display the
results of inputs tested during access tests. If all inputs that are programmed to
be tested (including 0 inputs) during an access test have been tested, the LCD
screen displays the following.
No Untested Inputs.
Press ENTER
Alternatively, when one or more inputs are untested, the LCD screen displays the
inputs. If you see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names”
on page 8.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 6 Test Report
Untested Access On 25, Reception Hold Up
NEXT or ENTER
Press [NEXT] to update the list of untested inputs, and to display the remaining
inputs in the list (if any).
Press [ENTER] to display the results of camera testing (cameras in area 1 only).
If all the cameras that are programmed to be tested (including 0 cameras) have
been successfully tested the LCD screen displays the following.
All Cameras Have Tested Successfully
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit the option.
Use “Option 12 Test Input” on page 26 to manually test any untested inputs
reported.
Secure test report
This option is used to display the results of the secure (armed) test, which can be
performed on specific inputs to see if they are operating correctly. The inputs
must be programmed to be included in secure tests (determined by the input’s
test type). The system must be programmed with an appropriate test mode.
From the Test Report menu option, enter [2] and press [ENTER] to display the
results of inputs tested during secure tests. If all inputs that are programmed to
be tested (including 0 inputs) have been successfully tested the LCD screen
displays the following.
No Untested Inputs.
Press ENTER
Alternatively, when one or more inputs are untested, the LCD screen displays the
inputs. If you see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names”
on page 8.
Untested Secure On 17, Rear Door Contact
NEXT or ENTER
Press [NEXT] to update the list of untested inputs, and to display the remaining
inputs in the list (if any).
Press [ENTER] to exit the option.
Use “Option 12 Test Input” on page 26 to manually test any untested inputs
reported.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 7 Service Menu
Option 7 Service Menu
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[7] [ENTER] to request a service call or to manage telephone connections to a
remote service centres in order to program the Challenger system remotely.
The first option displayed is Request Service Technician.
1-Request Service Technician
0-Exit, Menu:
The Service menu contains the following options:
•
1—see “Request Service Technician” below.
•
2—see “Disconnect management software” below.
•
3—see “Dial management software” on page 24.
•
4—see “Dial temporary management software” on page 24.
•
5—see “Answer management software” on page 24.
•
Press [ENTER] to scroll through the options.
•
Press [0] [ENTER] to exit this option.
Request Service Technician
Your Challenger system may be configured so that you can send a message to
your alarm monitoring company requesting a service technician to contact you.
1 Request Service Technician
0-Exit, Menu:
From the Service menu, press [1] [ENTER] to select option 1.
1 Confirm Dial
0-Exit, Menu:
Press [1] [ENTER] to send a Service Request event to your alarm monitoring
company. Alternatively, press [0] [ENTER] to cancel.
Disconnect management software
Use this option to disconnect an active connection that has “Connect on Service”
option enabled. If there is more than one path with “Connect on Service” option
enabled, then the path with the highest priority is automatically selected.
From the Service menu, press [2] [ENTER] to disconnect from management
software. Challenger disconnects and exits the menu.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 7 Service Menu
Dial management software
Use this option to initiate a communication path’s connection to management
software (dial the path’s phone number 1 and attempt to connect to the remote
service modem). If there is more than one path with “Connect on Service” option
enabled, then the path with the highest priority is automatically selected.
From the Service menu, press [3] [ENTER] to dial management software.
1 Confirm Dial
0-Exit, Menu:
Press [1] [ENTER] to dial phone number 1. Alternatively, press [0] [ENTER] to
cancel.
Dial temporary management software
Use this option to enter a temporary service telephone number and initiate a
communication path’s connection to management software (dial the temporary
service telephone number that you enter, and attempt to connect to the remote
service modem). If there is more than one path with “Connect on Service” option
enabled, then the path with the highest priority is automatically selected.
From the Service menu, press [4] [ENTER] to select dial temporary management
software.
‘*’-Pause, Phone No:
Ser No:
Enter up to 10 digits to program a temporary service telephone number, and then
press [ENTER].
1 Confirm Dial
0-Exit, Menu:
Press [1] [ENTER] to dial the temporary service number. Alternatively, press [0]
[ENTER] to cancel.
Answer management software
Use this option to answer a current dial-in attempt. There can be one or more
communication paths with the “Connect on Service” option enabled. The path
with the highest priority is automatically selected.
Enter [5] and press [ENTER] to answer the call. Challenger connects and exits
the menu.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 8 Film Counters
Option 8 Film Counters
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[8] [ENTER] to display the current frame number position on each of the security
camera films.
If a camera is fitted with a film out detector and that camera does not have a film
in it, the frame count will be displayed as OUT (OUT is removed when film is
loaded).
Up to eight cameras can be displayed. A camera position that does not have a
camera fitted will display the frame count as ‘----’.
A frame count can be from 0 to 9999.
Film Counts 1: 0123 2:1077 3:0056 4:---Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to see the film counts for cameras 5 to 8. Press [ENTER] a
second time to exit this menu.
Option 9 Input Text
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[9] [ENTER] to display the names assigned to inputs 1 to 1008.
Input: 1, Rear Door Contact
Input No:
The LCD screen displays the first input number and its assigned name. If you
see only numbers and no names, refer to “Displaying input names” on page 8.
Press [NEXT] or [MENU*] to display subsequent input names. Alternatively, enter
the input number and press [ENTER] to display the input’s name.
Press [ENTER] to exit the display.
Option 10 Isolate
You may need to isolate an input to prevent false alarms (possibly due to a faulty
input device). A faulty input is typically unsealed, and cannot be sealed. Isolating
the input excludes it from functioning as part of the intrusion detection system.
If an input is in an alarm state, then isolating it resets the alarm. After the problem
is resolved the input must be de-isolated (see “Option 11 Deisolate” on page 26).
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [0] [ENTER]. The LCD screen displays the first unsealed input or the message
“All Inputs are Sealed”.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 11 Deisolate
Unsealed on 1, Front door contact
Input No:
Press [NEXT] or [MENU*] to display subsequent inputs.
Enter the input number and press [ENTER] to isolate that input. If an attempt is
made to isolate an input which is already isolated, the request appears as if it is
processed but it is not logged in the history and the input remains isolated.
When finished, press [ENTER] to exit this option.
Option 11 Deisolate
An input may have been isolated to prevent false alarms (possibly due to a faulty
input device). Isolating the input excludes it from functioning as part of the
intrusion detection system (see “Option 10 Isolate” on page 25). After the
problem is resolved the input must be de-isolated.
Note: Do not de-isolate the input before checking the circumstances, because
de-isolating an unsealed input may cause an alarm.
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [1] [ENTER]. The LCD screen displays a list of isolated inputs or the message
“All Inputs are De-Isolated”.
Isolated on u3, Rear door contact
Deisolate:
Press the displayed number of an isolated input and then press [ENTER] to
deisolate that input.
Press [NEXT] or [MENU*] to display additional isolated inputs (if any). Select the
required isolated input and then press [ENTER] to deisolate that input.
When finished, press [ENTER] to exit this option.
Option 12 Test Input
Use Test Input to start a defined interval (input test time) during which you can
test an individual input (even if the input is isolated). The input will not generate
alarms while in test.
When you select the Test Input option and enter the input’s number, you can
then test the input by manually altering its state (for example, by walking in front
of a PIR) and verifying that the system correctly identifies the state. During the
test, the keypad buzzer will sound when the input is unsealed.
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [2] [ENTER].
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 13 Start Auto Access Test
Test Individual Input
Input No:
Enter an input number and then press [ENTER] to display the state of the input
and begin the testing interval.
SEALED on 6, Loading dock
Press ENTER
Unseal the input device and then seal it. When the input is unsealed, open, short,
or sealed, the display should indicate the state.
UNSEALED on 6, Loading dock
Press ENTER
Depending on how your system is programmed for input tamper monitoring (fourstate or two-state), the results can indicate the conditions shown in Table 2
below.
Table 2: Input testing results
Input condition
4-state monitoring (default)
2-state monitoring
Sealed
Sealed
Sealed
Unsealed
Unsealed
Unsealed
Open circuit
Open
Unsealed
Short circuit
Short
Unsealed
If the input is not sealed, the RAS emits a continuous tone. When the input is
sealed, the display will be updated and the tone will stop. Alternatively, press
[ENTER] to stop the tone and return to the previous screen.
Press [ENTER] when finished to exit this option.
Note: If the test is not completed within the input test time (default is 5 minutes),
the option is exited.
Option 13 Start Auto Access Test
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [3] [ENTER] to initiate a defined interval during which specific untested inputs
and cameras (camera count input types) may be tested to see if they are
operating correctly when the area is in access (disarmed).
Note: This option may be used regardless of the programmed Challenger system
test mode. However, if an access test was automatically run and completed
before using this option, then the Test Completed message will display, and no
inputs will need to be tested.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 13 Start Auto Access Test
The following programming is required:
•
The inputs to be tested must be included in access tests (input test types 1, 2,
4, or 5). Camera count inputs must be assigned input test type 0 “No Testing”.
•
The access test time programmed by the installer must be sufficient for you to
test all the required inputs (default time is 15 minutes).
The RAS beeper sounds continuously during the testing time or until you exit this
option.
Access Test, NEXT For Untested
"0"-Cancel:
From the initial screen, press [NEXT] to display an untested input, test the input
by unsealing and then sealing it, and press [NEXT] to display the next untested
input. Repeat until all inputs have been tested.
If [NEXT] is selected to display any untested inputs, the LCD screen displays the
first input number and its assigned name. If you see only numbers and no
names, refer to “Displaying input names” on page 8.
Untested Access On 4, Office PIR
NEXT or ENTER
Alternatively, press [ENTER] to proceed to the camera test or the Test
Completed/Not Completed display (as applicable).
Untested Access On 2, Camera 1
NEXT or ENTER
Inputs that are programmed as a camera input types (and assigned to area 1)
are also tested.
All Cameras Have Tested Successfully
Press ENTER
When all inputs that are programmed to be tested (including 0 inputs) during the
access test have been tested, or the time allowed for access test has expired,
the test will automatically cease and the display will indicate if the test is
completed or not completed.
Test Completed
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit this option.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 13 Start Auto Access Test
Note: If your Challenger system is programmed as a financial institution system,
and is programmed to automatically go into access test mode when disarming
area 1 (which contains camera film count inputs), then you will see the current
film counts for cameras 1 to 4. The LCD screen will resemble the example in
“Option 8 Film Counters” on page 25 until you press [ENTER] or the display
times out.
If there are any tests not completed, you can again select Start Auto Access Test
to finish the testing.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
Option 14 Program Users
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [4] [ENTER] to manage the user records that are stored in the Challenger
panel’s memory. For tasks involving large quantities of users it’s best to use
management software such as Security Commander.
Note: Your Challenger system may be configured for dual custody programming,
where any user (other than the master user) requires a second user to enter their
code before access is granted to this option.
1-Delete 2-Display 3-Create 4-Total 5-Card Learn
Option:
The Program Users menu contains the following options:
•
1—see “Delete user” below.
•
2—see “Display user” below.
•
3—see “Create (or modify) user” on page 32.
•
4—see “Total users” on page 36.
•
5—see “Card learn” on page 36.
•
Press [0] [ENTER] to exit this option.
See also “Programming non-Tecom magnetic card formats” on page 36.
We suggest that you record the details of users on the User worksheet (see
“Users worksheet” on page 50).
Delete user
From the Program Users menu, press [1] [ENTER] to delete a user.
Delete User
User No:
Enter the user number and then press [ENTER] to delete the user record. Repeat
if needed for another record.
Press [ENTER] again to exit this option.
Display user
From the Program Users menu, press [2] [ENTER] to display a user’s details
(assuming that you permissions to view the user).
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
Display User
User No:
Enter the user number and then press [ENTER] to display the user’s alarm
group.
Note: In the Display user option, you may see prompts to use the [MENU*] key
to change a setting. The [MENU*] key is not applicable to this option.
*-View, Alm Grp:12,Foreman
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to display the user’s door group.
Door Group: 2
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to display the user’s floor group.
Floor Group: 1
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to display the first of the user flags (if the system is programmed
to display user flags).
NO - Dual Custody
*-Change 0-Skip
Press [ENTER] to display subsequent user flags. Alternatively, press [0] to skip
the subsequent user flags.
The user flags displayed in sequence are:
•
dual custody
•
guard
•
visitor
•
trace user
•
card only
•
privileged
•
long access
Press [ENTER] to display the user’s name (if the system is programmed to allow
user name files), for user numbers in the range 1 to 2000.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
Your Name is Frank Smith
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to display the user’s PIN code (if the system is programmed to
allow users other than the master installer to see PIN codes).
Pin Code: 4346
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to display the user’s card data.
Card Bits: 27.0.0.0.25.0.6
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to exit this user record and return to the Display User screen.
Create (or modify) user
In any given Challenger panel, the process of using a RAS to create a new user,
or to modify an existing user is very similar. You need to:
•
Enter the user number that you want to add or modify (in addition to the
default master installer user 50).
•
Step though the LCD screens, adding or changing details as you go.
•
Press [ENTER] at the end to save the details.
A basic Challenger panel used only for intrusion detection (and not access
control) might require only the most basic information such as user number,
alarm group, and PIN code. Some Challenger systems allow you to program
many other user options, such as:
•
The user’s name.
•
A door group and a floor group defines where the user is allowed to go and at
what times of day.
•
User flags that further configure how the user’s access permissions are
handled by the Challenger system.
Some Challenger panels enable you to enter or update a user’s card data
electronically by presenting the card to the reader (called learning the card data),
or by manually entering card data.
From the Program Users menu, press [3] [ENTER] to create or modify a user.
Assuming that there is room in the user database, the following screen displays.
Create User
User No:
Enter the new or existing user number, and then press [ENTER] to select or
change the alarm group.
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
*-View, Alm Grp:1-No Access
Alarm Group:
Enter the number of the alarm group, and then press [ENTER] to assign the
alarm group to the user. Alternatively, press [NEXT] to display a list of alarm
groups that you can issue to a user.
Notes:
•
You cannot assign an alarm group to a user unless the alarm group has the
option “Can this Alarm Group be Assigned to Users” set to YES
•
Your alarm group must have all the areas and menu options of the alarm
group you wish to assign.
•
Your alarm group may contain Area Group 1, which, by default, does not
contain all 99 areas. Area Group 1 may need to be modified so that it
contains all the required areas for your users. Refer to “Working with multiarea systems” in the Challenger10 Installation and Quick Programming
Manual for details.
Press [ENTER] to display or change the user’s door group.
Door Group: 0
Door Group
Press [ENTER] to display or change the user’s floor group.
Floor Group: 0
Floor Group
Press [ENTER] to display or change the first of the user flags (if the system is
programmed to display user flags).
NO - Dual Custody
*-Change 0-Skip
If required, press [MENU*] to toggle the programmed value from NO to YES, and
then press [ENTER] to display subsequent user flags. Alternatively, press [0] to
skip the subsequent user flags.
The user flags displayed in sequence are:
•
dual custody
•
guard
•
visitor
•
trace user
•
card only
•
privileged
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Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
•
long access
Press [ENTER] to program or display the user’s name (if the system is
programmed to allow user name files), for user numbers in the range 1 to 2000.
Your Name is David Chisma
(1)-Edit
Enter up to 16 characters of text for the user’s name (see “Entering text via RAS”
on page 9).
When you’ve finished entering the name, press [MENU*] [MENU*] to save the
name, exit the option, and then to display the user’s PIN code (if the system is
programmed to allow users other than the master installer to see PIN codes).
Pin Code: 4346
Code:
The minimum PIN code length is 4 digits (5 for financial institutions), plus any
value programmed for the alarm code prefix. For example, if your system uses
an alarm code prefix value of 2 (digits) then you must program PIN codes of at
least 6 digits (4 + 2).
Press [ENTER] to save the PIN code, and then to learn the card data from a
reader.
Waiting For Card
*- Hist
Do one of the following:
•
Present a card at the designated card learn reader, and then press [ENTER]
to save the card bit data in the user record. See “Learning card data” below.
•
Press [MENU*] to use unknown card data from the Challenger panel’s history.
See “Using data from card history” on page 35.
•
Press [ENTER] to manually enter the card data bits. See “Manually entering
card data” on page 35.
Learning card data
At the Waiting For Card prompt, present a card at the designated card learn
reader. The LCD screen displays the card bit data.
Card Bits: 27.0.0.0.25.0.6
Bits:
Press [ENTER] to save the card bit data in the user record, and then return to the
Create User screen.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
Using data from card history
At the Waiting For Card prompt, press [MENU*] to display the start of the card
history list.
No 1 27.0.0.0.25.0.6
* Next, # Enrol
Press [ENTER] to save the card bit data in the user record, and then return to the
Create User screen.
Alternatively, press [MENU*] to display the next record in the card history list until
you find the one you want.
If there are no more records the card history list the following screen displays.
End Of History
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to return to the Create User screen.
Manually entering card data
At the Waiting For Card prompt, press [ENTER] to display the card bits.
Card Bits: 0.0.0.0.0.0.0
Bits:
Enter the card bits (raw card data) in format xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx, where
each field is a number from 0 to 255. Press [ENTER] after each number to save
the data and move to the next field.
When the last field is populated, press [ENTER] to exit this user record, and then
return to the Create User screen.
Modifying a user
The process of modifying a user is similar to the process of creating a user,
except that each screen will display the previously-programmed values. If the
user already has card data that you need to change, you have the option of
deleting the card data and learning or manually entering new card data, starting
at the Waiting For Card prompt.
Card Bits: 27.0.0.0.25.0.6
*-Del
Press [MENU*] to erase the user’s card data and return to the Waiting For Card
prompt.
Alternatively, press [ENTER] to return to the Create User screen.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
35
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 14 Program Users
Total users
You may need to know how many users are stored in the Challenger panel’s
memory (including the default user 50). For example, if the total number of users
is 21, then 20 users have been added, plus the master user 50.
From the Program Users menu, press [4] [ENTER].
Total Users 21
Press ENTER
Press [ENTER] to return to the User screen.
Card learn
A card reader RAS can be used to enter a user’s card data (card bits) into the
Challenger system by presenting (badging) the card at the reader during the user
creation process.
From the Program Users menu, press [5] [ENTER] to select a RAS to be the card
learn reader (RAS 1 is selected by default).
1
Card RAS:
Enter the card reader’s RAS address in the range 1 to 16 and 65 to 80, and then
press [ENTER].
16
Card RAS:
Press [ENTER] to return to the User screen.
Programming non-Tecom magnetic card formats
The following procedure must be used to allow non-Tecom format cards such as
credit cards, financial institution cards, and so on, to be programmed as users.
Your system must be equipped with the appropriate card reader in order to
perform this function.
Use the following steps to record the non-Tecom format card enrolment number
in the user record.
1. Swipe the card in the reader.
2. If the card is not recognized by the system, an event will be logged in
history as “Card/Pin” followed by an enrolment number of up to 10 digits
(for example, “Card/Pin 1234512345”). Note the enrolment number, which
will be recorded as the PIN code when programming the user.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 15 Time & Date
3. Follow the procedure described in “Create (or modify) user” on page 32,
and enter the enrolment number as the PIN code.
If you want the user to use the card but not the PIN code (enrolment number),
the following options must be programmed:
•
The system must be programmed to display user flags when programming
users.
•
Set the user flag “card only” to YES when programming the user.
Option 15 Time & Date
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [5] [ENTER] to manage the Challenger panel’s time and date settings (for
example, to program the daylight savings time start and end dates).
Time 1-Display, 2-Set, 3-DST, 4-Correct
0-Exit, Menu:
Display
From the Time & Date menu, press [1] [ENTER]. The LCD screen displays the
panel’s current time and date settings.
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
0-Exit
Press the [0] or [ENTER] to return to the Time & Date menu.
Set
From the Time & Date menu, press [2] [ENTER]. The LCD screen displays the
panel’s current time and date settings.
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Hours:
Enter the hours in 24-hour format (or accept the current value), and then press
[ENTER].
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Minutes:
Enter the minutes (or accept the current value), and then press [ENTER].
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
37
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 15 Time & Date
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Seconds:
Enter the seconds (or accept the current value), and then press [ENTER].
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Day of Mth:
Enter the day of month (or accept the current value) and press [ENTER].
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Month:
Enter the month (or accept the current value) and press [ENTER].
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Year:
Enter the year (or accept the current value) and press [ENTER].
Time 14:33:59 05/09/2012 Wednesday
Year:
Review the displayed settings and press [ENTER] to save. Alternatively, press [0]
[ENTER] to abandon your changes and exit this option.
DST
From the Time & Date menu, press [3] [ENTER] to program the daylight savings
time start and end dates).
0-Disable, Month 00
Start Sunday:
Enter a value in the range 1 to 5 and press [ENTER] to indicate which Sunday in
the month daylight savings time begins. The following example shows the LCD
screen where a value of 1 is entered.
1-First Sunday, Month 00
Start Sunday:
If correct press [ENTER] to accept, and then to program the start month.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 15 Time & Date
1-First Sunday, Month 00
Start Month:
Enter a value in the range 1 to 12 and press [ENTER] to indicate which month
daylight savings time begins. The following example shows the LCD screen
where a value of 10 is entered.
1-First Sunday, Month 10
Start Month:
If correct press [ENTER] to accept, and then to program the end Sunday.
0-Disable, Month 00
End Sunday:
Enter a value in the range 1 to 5 and press [ENTER] to indicate which Sunday in
the month daylight savings time ends. The following example shows the LCD
screen where a value of 1 is entered.
1-First Sunday, Month 00
End Sunday:
If correct press [ENTER] to accept, and then to program the end month.
1-First Sunday, Month 00
End Month:
Enter a value in the range 1 to 12 and press [ENTER] to indicate which month
daylight savings time ends. The following example shows the LCD screen where
a value of 4 is entered.
1-First Sunday, Month 04
End Month:
If correct press [ENTER] to accept.
Correct
From the Time & Date menu, press [4] [ENTER] to program a time correction for
the Challenger panel’s internal clock (if needed).
Seconds Correction Per Day: +0
*-Chg, Sec:
Enter the value in seconds, press [MENU*] to toggle the + or – factor, for the
amount of seconds you need to add or subtract each day, and then press
[ENTER].
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
39
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 16 Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP
Option 16 Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [6] [ENTER] to temporarily exclude from the Challenger system fault or
tamper messages (system alarms) that are being generated by an arming station
(RAS) or data gathering panel (DGP). This would be used if a RAS or DGP has
generated a system alarm or is out of service, and needs to be isolated while
awaiting service.
Isolating a RAS or DGP will also reset any system alarm generated by the RAS
or DGP. Isolating a DGP will not isolate the alarm inputs on that DGP, but will
disable DGP’s offline and online reporting.
1-RAS, 2-DGP Isolate / Deisolate
0-Exit, Menu:
Isolate RAS
From the Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP menu, press [1] [ENTER].
No RASs Are Isolated
Isolate RAS:
Alternatively, if RAS 5 has previously been isolated the display would indicate the
following.
5,
Isolate RAS:
Enter a RAS number and then press [ENTER] to toggle its isolated/deisolated
state. For example, press [5] [ENTER] to deisolate RAS 5, or press [6] [ENTER]
to isolate RAS 6 and add it to the top line.
The procedures for isolating or deisolating a DGP are the same as for a RAS.
When finished deisolating RASs and DGPs, press the down arrow key or
[ENTER] to return to the Isolate/Deisolate RAS/DGP menu.
Option 17 Enable/Disable Service Tech
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [7] [ENTER] to enable the service technician’s PIN or card for the
programmed service time period, or to cancel the service technician’s PIN or
card prior to the expiration of the service time.
Note: This menu is disabled when any areas are armed, unless the system
option “Skip Access Check For Service Menu” is enabled.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 18 Reset Cameras
Enabling the service technician activates the special soft time zone 25, which is
used to enable the service technician’s PIN or card, and can also be used to
enable or disable other system functions, relays, etc., that are required while the
service technician is in attendance.
0-Cancel, 1-Service In
Option:
From the Enable/Disable Service Tech menu, press [1] [ENTER] to enable the
service technician for the programmed service time period and to exit to the
menu.
If not expired, the programmed service time period may be extended by
reactivating the option. Press [1] [ENTER] during the service time period or
Service Ending warning to reactivate.
If you need to cancel the service technician’s PIN or card before the service time
expires, press [0] [ENTER].
Option 18 Reset Cameras
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[1] [8] [ENTER] to reset the film frame count on all security cameras connected
directly to the Challenger panel to zero or to change the frame count number on
an individual camera. This would be necessary when you change the film in the
camera.
Reset Camera Counts “0#”-All
Camera No:
Press [0] [ENTER] to reset the film frame count on all security cameras to zero.
Press [n] [ENTER] to display the current film frame count on camera n. Press
[ENTER] a second time to return to the Reset Camera screen.
Alternatively, enter a new frame count in the range 0 to 1900 for the selected
camera, and then press [ENTER] to return to the Reset Camera screen.
Option 19 Install Menu
Access to the Install menu is typically limited to installers or administrators. Refer
to the Challenger10 Programming Manual if you are an installer or administrator
and you need to know details of Challenger system programming.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
41
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 20 Door and Floor Groups
Option 20 Door and Floor Groups
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[2] [0] [ENTER] to program door groups and floor groups.
A door group contains a list of doors and a time zone for each door. A floor group
contains a list of floors and a time zone for each floor. The time zone assigned to
the door group or floor group restricts user access to the times defined in the
time zone. Time zone 0 provides 24-hour access to authorized users.
Groups, 1-Doors 2-Floors
Option:
Press [1] [ENTER] to program a door group, or press [2] [ENTER] to program a
floor group. Alternatively, press [ENTER] to exit this option.
Programming or modifying a door group
We suggest that you record the details of Door Groups on the Door Groups
worksheet (see “Door groups worksheet” on page 51).
From the Door and Floor Groups menu, press [1] [ENTER] to program a door
group.
Door Groups
Group No:
Enter a door group number in the range 1 to 255 and press [ENTER].
The LCD screen displays the door group number, four of the possible 128 doors,
and each door’s assigned time zone (if ‘**’ displays instead of a time zone
number, then the door is disabled). Pressing * when Enter Door: is displayed
scrolls through all 128 doors.
Door Grp 1 D1-** D2-** D3-** D4-**
Enter Door:
For each door in the door group, enter a door number in the range 1 to 128, and
then press [ENTER] to allocate a time zone to the door.
Door Grp 1 D1-01 D2-** D3-** D4-**
*-Dis, Tz-D1:
Enter a time zone number in the range 1 to 63, and then press [ENTER] to return
to the Enter Door prompt.
Alternatively, if you need to disable a door, enter [MENU*] as the time zone and
then press [ENTER] to return to the Enter Door prompt.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 20 Door and Floor Groups
Door Grp 1 D1-01 D2-** D3-** D4-**
Enter Door:
We suggest that each time you program or change a door group, you record the
details on the Door groups worksheet.
Programming or modifying a floor group
We suggest that you record the details of floor groups on the Floor Groups
Worksheet (see “Floor groups worksheet” on page 52).
From the Door and Floor Groups menu, press [2] [ENTER] to program a floor
group.
Floor Groups
Group No:
Enter a floor group number in the range 1 to 128 and press [ENTER].
The LCD screen displays the floor group number, four of the possible 64 floors,
and each floor’s assigned time zone (if ‘**’ displays instead of a time zone
number, then the floor is disabled). Pressing * when Enter Floor: is displayed
scrolls through all 64 floors.
Floor Grp 1 F1-** F2-** F3-** F4-**
Enter Floor:
For each floor in the floor group, enter a floor number in the range 1 to 64, and
then press [ENTER] to allocate a time zone to the floor.
Floor Grp 1 F1-01 F2-** F3-** F4-**
*-Dis, Tz-F1:
Enter a time zone number in the range 1 to 63, and then press [ENTER] to return
to the Enter Floor prompt.
Alternatively, if you need to disable a floor, enter [MENU*] as the time zone and
then press [ENTER] to return to the Enter Floor prompt.
Floor Grp 1 F1-01 F2-** F3-** F4-**
Enter Floor:
We suggest that each time you program or change a floor group, you record the
details on the floor groups worksheet.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
43
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 21 Holidays
Option 21 Holidays
Overview
A holiday is a specified date (or range of dates) during which users are denied
access during times that they would normally be permitted access. For example,
a user may be able to disarm the system and unlock a door during working hours
except on defined holidays.
Challenger can have 24 holiday records. Each record can be designated as
recurring, so you don’t need to reprogram a holiday if it falls on the same date
each year.
Some users may require access during holidays. This functionality is provided via
the time zone in the user’s alarm group that allows access during holidays (via
the holiday type).
Holidays have one or more holiday types numbered 1 to 8. For example, there
might be four school holidays in a year, each of which has a Challenger holiday
record to record the dates. If each of these holidays is designated as holiday
type 1, then the holiday type provides access during school holidays, but not for
other types of holidays (such as public holidays).
We suggest that you record the details of holidays and holiday types on the
Holidays Worksheet (see “Holidays worksheet” on page 53).
Programming a holiday
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[2] [1] [ENTER] to program a holiday.
Holidays
Holiday No:
Defining the start
Enter a holiday number in the range 1 to 24 and then press [ENTER]. The
holiday programming screen displays.
Holiday 1:00/00/00–00/00/00
Start Day:
Enter a number in the range 1 to 31, and then press [ENTER] to program the day
that the holiday begins.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 21 Holidays
Holiday 1:31/00/00–00/00/00
Start Mth:
Enter a number in the range 1 to 12, and then press [ENTER] to program the
month in which the holiday begins.
Holiday 1:31/12/00–00/00/00
Start Yr:
Enter a number in the range 0 to 99, and then press [ENTER] to program the last
two digits of the year in which the holiday begins.
Defining the end
A holiday can span a range of dates: if so, you need to program the end date. If
the holiday is for only a single date, you can program only the start date, and
then enter zeros for the day, month, and year of the end date.
Holiday 1:31/12/12–00/00/00
End Day:
Enter a number in the range 1 to 31, and then press [ENTER] to program the day
that the holiday ends. Alternatively, enter 0 if this is a one-day holiday.
Holiday 1:31/12/12–02/00/00
End Mth:
Enter a number in the range 1 to 12, and then press [ENTER] to program the
month in which the holiday ends. Alternatively, enter 0 if this is a one-day holiday.
Holiday 1:31/12/12–02/01/00
End Yr:
Enter a number in the range 0 to 99, and then press [ENTER] to program the last
two digits of the year in which the holiday ends. Alternatively, enter 0 if this is a
one-day holiday.
Assigning holiday types
A holiday must be assigned at least one holiday type in order for it to be used.
The holiday type can be linked to a time zone. A holiday without a holiday type is
inactive.
Holiday 1: Hol Types:
Type (1) – (8):
To assign a holiday type to a holiday, enter the holiday type number and then
press [ENTER]. The holiday type number will display in the top line of the LCD
screen.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
45
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 22 Open Door
Alternatively, to remove a holiday type from a holiday (it’s already displayed in
the top line of the LCD screen), enter the number, and then press [ENTER].
Recurring holidays
NO - Recurring Holidays
*-Change 0-Skip
If required, press [MENU*] to toggle the programmed value from NO to YES, and
then press [ENTER]. Alternatively, press [0] to exit this holiday.
When a future holiday is defined as recurring, then the year portion of the start
and end dates is automatically incremented by 1 each time the holiday ends.
Option 22 Open Door
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[2] [2] [ENTER] to unlock a door that you (and the RAS) are authorized to unlock.
The Open Door command would typically be used at a RAS that’s at a different
location from the door (for example, from a security desk).
Open Door
Door No:
Enter the door number in the range 1 to 128 and then press [ENTER].
Alternatively, press [ENTER] to exit this option.
Option 23 Unlock, Lock, Disable and Enable
From the User menu prompt (see “Using the keypad” on page 7), press
[2] [3] [ENTER] to unlock, timed unlock, lock, disable, or enable an intelligent
door (doors numbered in the range 17 to 64 or 81 to 128 connected to an
Intelligent Access Controller).
The door will remain in the state selected until an opposite event occurs in the
system that will change the state of that door. For example, door 21 automatically
unlocks at 8 a.m. and relocks at 5 p.m. by using an override time zone. If the
user wishes to secure the premises and leave at 4 p.m., the door can be locked
using the lock option, but will still automatically unlock at 8 a.m. again the
following morning.
1-Unlock 2-Lock 3-Disable 4-Enable
Option:
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 23 Unlock, Lock, Disable and Enable
Select an option:
•
Press [1] [ENTER] to unlock a door.
•
Press [2] [ENTER] to lock a door.
•
Press [3] [ENTER] to disable a door.
•
Press [4] [ENTER] to enable a door.
•
Press [ENTER] to exit this option.
The following example uses option 1. The other options are similar.
Use 1-Unlock to unlock a door that you are authorized (via the door group
assigned to your PIN code) to unlock.
Unlock Door
Door No:
Enter the door number (17 to 64 or 81 to 128) and then press [ENTER].
Alternatively, press [ENTER] to return to the User menu.
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
47
Chapter 3: Menu reference > Option 23 Unlock, Lock, Disable and Enable
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Appendix A
Programming worksheets
Summary
Print or copy the following worksheets as needed.
•
“Users worksheet” on page 50
•
“Door groups worksheet” on page 51
•
“Floor groups worksheet” on page 52
•
“Holidays worksheet” on page 53
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
49
Appendix A: Programming worksheets
Users worksheet
User records are programmed in user menu option 14. Program Users.
Figure 8: Users worksheet
Challenger
Site
Mark check box to indicate YES
User number
PIN
Name
Dual custody
User number
Guard
Visitor
PIN
User number
User number
Guard
Visitor
PIN
Visitor
PIN
User number
User number
Visitor
PIN
Visitor
PIN
User number
50
Card only
Visitor
PIN
Long access
Floor group
Trace
Card only
Privileged
Long access
Floor group
Trace
Card only
Privileged
Long access
Floor group
Trace
Card only
Privileged
Long access
Name
Floor group
Door group
Guard
Privileged
Name
Alarm group
Dual custody
Trace
Door group
Guard
Long access
Floor group
Door group
Guard
Privileged
Name
Alarm group
Dual custody
Card only
Name
Alarm group
Dual custody
Trace
Door group
Guard
Long access
Floor group
Door group
Guard
Privileged
Name
Alarm group
Dual custody
Card only
Door group
Alarm group
Dual custody
Trace
Name
Alarm group
Dual custody
Floor group
Door group
Alarm group
Visitor
Trace
Card only
Privileged
Long access
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Appendix A: Programming worksheets
Door groups worksheet
Door groups are programmed in user menu option 20. Door and Floor Groups.
Figure 9: Door groups worksheet
Challenger
Site
Door group no.
Door
TZ
Description
Door
TZ
Door
TZ
Door
1
33
65
97
2
34
66
98
3
35
67
99
4
36
68
100
37
69
101
38
70
102
103
5
6
7
39
71
8
40
72
104
9
41
73
105
10
42
74
106
11
43
75
107
12
44
76
108
13
45
77
109
14
46
78
110
15
47
79
111
16
48
80
112
17
49
81
113
18
50
82
114
19
51
83
115
20
52
84
116
117
21
53
85
22
54
86
118
23
55
87
119
24
56
88
120
25
57
89
121
26
58
90
122
27
59
91
123
28
60
92
124
29
61
93
125
30
62
94
126
31
63
95
127
32
64
96
128
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
TZ
51
Appendix A: Programming worksheets
Floor groups worksheet
Floor groups are programmed in user menu option 20. Door and Floor Groups.
Figure 10: Floor groups worksheet
Challenger
Site
Floor group no.
Floor
52
TZ
Description
Floor
TZ
Floor
TZ
Floor
1
33
17
49
2
34
18
50
3
35
19
51
4
36
20
52
5
37
21
53
6
38
22
54
7
39
23
55
8
40
24
56
9
41
25
57
10
42
26
58
11
43
27
59
12
44
28
60
13
45
29
61
14
46
30
62
15
47
31
63
16
48
32
64
TZ
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Appendix A: Programming worksheets
Holidays worksheet
Holiday records are programmed in user menu option 21. Holidays.
Figure 11: Holidays worksheet
Challenger
Site
Mark check box to indicate YES
Holiday
Description
Start
End
Recur
Holiday types
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
53
Appendix A: Programming worksheets
Figure 12: Holiday types worksheet
Challenger
Site
Holiday type
Description
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Glossary
2-state monitoring
The system’s input circuits are monitored for sealed and
unsealed conditions.
4-state monitoring
The system’s input circuits are monitored for sealed, unsealed,
open, and short conditions. 4-state monitoring (also called input
tamper monitoring) is used in Challenger systems by default.
See “input tamper”.
24-hour alarm
Input types that will generate an alarm regardless of area status
(armed or disarmed).
4-Door/Lift DGP
See “Intelligent Access Controller“.
Access
The state of an area when it’s disarmed. The condition of an
area when it is occupied and when the intrusion detection
system has been set so that normal activity does not generate
an alarm. Opposite of “secure”.
Access control
Control of entry to, or exit from, a security area. The Challenger
system typically controls access by allowing only authorised
users to unlock a door or to enter a lift.
Access test
The access (disarmed) test is a defined interval during which
specific inputs may be tested to see if they are operating
correctly when the area is occupied. The input must be
programmed to be included in access tests (determined by the
input’s test type).
Access time
The time that a door will remain unlocked after a user has been
granted access.
Acknowledge
See “reset”.
Alarm
The state of a intrusion detection system when a input is
unsealed and the condition of the area is such that state should
be signalled, for example, a door is opened when its area is
armed.
Alarm code
The user’s full PIN (used for alarm control and optionally for
door control). See also “door code”.
Alarm code prefix digits
The alarm code prefix value in the range one to four enables
users to enter a door code (a shorter PIN) for access control.
For example, if a user’s full PIN is six digits long (for example,
123456), and the alarm code prefix value is two, then the first
two digits are removed for access control, and the user can
operate doors by entering only the last four digits of the PIN (for
example, 3456).
Alarm control
The control over alarm (arm and disarm) functions.
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55
Glossary
Alarm group
A panel programming concept that defines a group of areas,
functions and menu options. Alarm groups are assigned to
users, arming stations, or door readers, to define what areas
can be controlled and what functions can be performed by that
user, or from that device. An alarm group can also be assigned
to certain input types such as key switches.
Alarm reporting
A procedure to transmit alarm events or other events to a
remote monitoring company by means of a dialler and a set of
rules called a protocol.
Anti-passback
Anti-passback affects the ability of users to move from one
region to another. Entering a region twice in succession is either
not possible (hard anti-passback), or will only result in an event
being logged in the history log, reported to the printer and to
management software (soft anti-passback).
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Area
A logical grouping of input devices that are armed and disarmed
simultaneously.
Area group
A Challenger10 system can have 99 areas, so area groups are
used to help manage them. There can be 255 area groups.
Armed
See “secure”.
Arming station (RAS)
A device that provides a user interface for security functions for
areas or for access points (doors). The arming station may be
an LCD keypad, or any other device which can be used to
perform security functions such as arm or disarm, open doors,
and so on.
Card
A portable device (card or fob) that holds information to identify
a user to the Challenger system. The information to identify a
user can be stored in a chip (smart card), on a magnetic strip, a
bar-code, a Wiegand card, or in biometric data such as a
fingerprint.
Central station
See “remote monitoring company”.
CID
Ademco Contact ID alarm reporting format.
Console
See "arming station".
Console warning
Same as keypad buzzer.
DGP
Data Gathering Panel. A DGP expands the capacity of the
Challenger system.
Dialler
An electronic device that allows the intrusion detection system
to transmit alarms and other events to a remote monitoring
company via telephone lines. Can also be used to perform
upload and download of access control data with management
software.
Disarmed
See “access”.
Door code
An optional version of the user’s PIN shortened by the number
of digits specified in the alarm code prefix. The door code is
used for access control (for example, to open a door) without
revealing the entire PIN used for alarm control.
Door contact
A magnetic contact used to detect if a door or window is
opened.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Glossary
Door control
The control over door functions.
Door group
A panel programming concept that assigns a group of doors to
a user in order to allow access at those doors. Access to each
door in a group may be restricted via a time zone.
DOTL
Door open too long.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Download
The transfer of records from a management software computer
to a control panel.
Duress
A situation where a user is being forced to breach the system
security (for example, forced at gunpoint to open a door). The
duress facility allows a signal to be activated (for example,
notification to a remote monitoring company) by the user.
See also “keypad duress”.
Egress
Exit, or request to exit (RTE).
Egress input
An input that is programmed to request that a door be briefly
unlocked. For example, an egress button is provided inside a
doorway to allow users to exit without using a door reader.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Egress time zone
When the egress time zone is valid, a user may press the
egress button and the door will unlock.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Extended access time
A longer than normal time for the door to unlock when a user
with "Extended Access" presents a valid card or PIN at a door
reader.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Floor group
A panel programming concept that assigns a group of floors to a
user in order to allow selection of those floors when accessing a
lift reader. Access to each floor in a group may be restricted via
a time zone.
Fob
A type of smart card. See “card”.
Forced arming
Allows areas to arm regardless of any unsealed inputs that may
subsequently cause an alarm.
Forced door debounce time
Forced door debounce time delays the generation of a forced
door alarm for the specified interval. It caters for certain locks
that may cause erroneous forced door reporting.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Guard
If the user is a “guard” type, then the system can generate a
“guard failed to check in” alarm if required.
History
A list of past intrusion detection and access control events
stored in memory which can be viewed on an LCD RAS, sent to
a printer, or uploaded to a management software computer.
Hold-up alarm
A (silent) alarm that is triggered by a hold-up button. Normally it
will not trigger any siren, only send a message to a remote
monitoring company.
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57
Glossary
Holiday
A specified date (or range of dates) during which typical users
are denied access during times that they would normally be
permitted access.
Holiday type
Functionality to enable access to be granted to certain users
during one holiday type, but not necessarily to another holiday
type. Each holiday must have at least one type assigned.
In reader
A reader (RAS) that provides entry to a region through a door.
The in reader is accompanied by an out reader that provides
exit from the region through the door.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
In reader region
When a valid card or PIN is entered at the door’s in reader, the
number of the region that the user is entering into is recorded
against the user code.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Input
Also called zone input. An electrical signal from a security
device (input device) to the intrusion detection system. Each
input device is identified by a system name (for example
“INPUT1”), and optionally by a custom name (for example
“Reception Holdup Button”).
Input tamper
The Challenger system is typically configured to monitor the
state of its zone input circuits (4-state monitoring). Input tamper
alarms are generated when the circuit indicates an open-circuit
or a short-circuit condition.
Input test
Input test is a defined interval during which a selected input can
be tested (toggled from sealed to unsealed and then back to
sealed) to verify that the panel correctly identifies the states.
Input type
The input type determines exactly how an input will function
when its area is armed or disarmed. Most input types require an
area, but some input types that affect the status of areas need
alarm groups.
Installer
A person who installs and services security equipment.
Intelligent Access Controller
Four-door or Four-lift DGPs.
Intrusion detection
Electrical detection devices (called inputs) are connected to the
Challenger panel or a DGP. Based on the type of device and
whether the device’s location (called area) is armed or
disarmed, the device triggers an alarm when something
activates it. For example, the device might be a reed switch that
detects a door being opened when the area is armed. An alarm
typically triggers a siren and flashing light to operate, and sends
a message to a remote monitoring company.
Isolate
The device is inhibited from reporting alarms. It is excluded from
functioning as part of the system.
Key switch
A device using a key-operated switch to arm or disarm areas.
Keypad
An arming station with buttons to input data.
Keypad duress
When enabled, a duress code (user’s alarm code + 1) can be
entered on a keypad to activate a duress alarm. Keypad duress
is enabled or disabled in Alarm Groups.
LAN
The system’s two RS-485 data busses (LAN1 and LAN2).
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Glossary
Local alarm
An alarm that is reported only within a building, and typically
occurs when an area is disarmed (occupied). The
circumstances that cause a local alarm can be checked and
rectified by personnel on site and it is therefore unnecessary for
the alarm to be relayed to a remote monitoring company.
Certain input types can generate a local alarm during access
(disarmed) times, and can report to remote monitoring company
during secure (armed) times.
Logic equation
A logic expression that combines macro inputs in a specific
manner. The result of a logic equation produces the macro
action.
Low security time zone
When a RAS’s low security time zone is valid, then either a card
or a PIN can be used to open a door. When the time zone is not
valid and “Card and Code” is set to YES, then both card and
PIN are required to open a door.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Macro input
An event flag or an output that is used in a logic equation. Each
macro input is an event flag or output.
Macro logic program
A set of rules that is created by macro inputs, logic equations,
and macro outputs.
Macro output
A macro output holds the result of a logic equation. The macro
output can have a timing element. Macro outputs trigger event
flags or inputs.
Management software
A Challenger system may be programmed and operated via
Security Commander management software on a graphical
interface.
Operator
Customer staff member or installer who has login rights to
system management software.
Out reader
A reader (RAS) that provides exit from a region through a door.
The out reader is accompanied by an in reader that provides
entry to the region through the door.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Out reader region
When a valid card or PIN is entered at the door out reader, the
number of the region that the user is exiting from into is
recorded against the user code.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Override time zone
A door can be programmed with an override time zone that,
when valid, automatically keeps the door unlocked.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
PIN
Personal Identification Number—A number given to, or selected
by, a user that identifies the user to the Challenger system.
PIR
Passive Infrared detector. A security device used to detect
intruders in a certain part of an area or premises.
Poll
An inquiry message continually sent by the control panel to
DGPs and arming stations. Polling allows the remote unit to
transfer data to the control panel.
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59
Glossary
RAS
Remote arming station. See “arming station”.
Reader
A device (arming station) used for access control that can read
magnetic stripe or proximity cards to authenticate the user.
Region
A defined access control area having intelligent doors acting as
boundaries. Regions are used by the anti-passback functions to
keep track of users. The system can deny access to a card or
PIN belonging to a user when the user is already assigned to
the region. A region can also keep a count of users in order to
activate a macro logic program when a certain value is reached.
Note: This functionality requires the use of an Intelligent Access
Controller.
Relay
Relay or output from the panel or a relay controller.
Relay controller
A PCB module that connects to the panel or a DGP to provide
additional relay or open collector outputs.
Remote monitoring company
A company that monitors whether an alarm has occurred in a
intrusion detection system. A remote monitoring company is
located away from the building or area it monitors. Also known
as “central station”.
Reporting
See “alarm reporting”.
Reset
An authorised user typically must enter a PIN at the keypad to
reset (acknowledge) an alarm.
RTE
Request to exit, egress.
Sealed
The input is not activated, for example when a door is closed.
Secure
The state of an area when it’s armed. The condition of an area
when it should be vacant and the intrusion detection system has
been set so that detected activity generates an alarm. Opposite
of “access”.
Secure test
The secure (armed) test is a defined interval during which
specific inputs may be tested to see if they are operating
correctly when the area is unoccupied. The inputs must be
programmed to be included in secure tests (determined by the
input’s test type).
Security Commander
Windows-based software that provides a large-scale, multioperator, user interface to control small and large Challenger
installations.
Shunt
A procedure that inhibits an input from generating an alarm
when unsealed. For example, shunts stops a door generating
an alarm when opened for a short time.
Smart card
See “card”.
STU
Subscriber Terminal Unit
STU port
The Challenger PCB’s serial (J15) port.
Tamper
Indication that a security device may have been interfered with.
Some devices such as panels and DGPs have tamper switches
to detect if they have been opened or removed from their
mounting.
See “input tamper”.
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Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Glossary
Time zone
A time zone (or timezone) is a means of making certain
Challenger functionality conditional. There are two types of time
zones. Hard time zones are valid between defined start and end
times on selected days. Soft time zones are valid when a relay
(output) is active.
Unsealed
The input is activated, for example, when a door is opened.
Upload
The transfer of records from a control panel to a management
software computer.
User
Someone with a PIN and/or a card who can operate the
Challenger system (for example, to unlock a door).
User category
User categories provide timed arming and disarming
functionality for specific areas.
User record
A record containing (at least) a user's PIN or card number to
identify the user to the Challenger system.
Vault area
Vault areas are areas that, when armed, will automatically arm
other areas after a specified time.
Visitor status
If the user flag “visitor status” is set to YES the user must be
accompanied by a non-visitor user.
Zone input
See “input”.
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Glossary
62
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
Index
A
access control, 2
access test, 14
automatic, 14
cancelling, 15
completing, 15
report, 21
starting automatically, 15
starting manually, 28
alarm code, 34, 55
alarm group, 10, 56
alarms, 8
answer management software, 24
area search, 8
B
open, 46
unlock, 46
door code, 55, 56
door groups, 42, 51, 57
duress code, 58
E
enable service tech, 40
entering text, 9
F
film counters, 25
financial institution option, 15
floor groups, 42, 52, 57
G
beeper, 6
glossary, 55
C
H
cameras, 14, 21, 25, 41
card learn RAS, 36
code
alarm, 11, 34
door, 11, 55
duress, 11, 58
PIN, 11, 34
user, 11
custom LCD message, 5
I
D
daylight savings time, 38
deisolate
DGP, 40
input, 26
RAS, 40
dial management software, 24
disable service tech, 40
disconnect management software, 23
door
disable, 46
enable, 46
lock, 46
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
history, 20
holiday types, 45
holidays, 44, 53
input in alarm, 19
input isolated, 19
input names, 8
input tamper monitoring, 27
input text, 25
inputs
alarm, 18, 19
deisolating, 26
isolated, 18, 19
isolating, 25
monitoring, 27
tamper, 18
testing, 14, 26
unsealed, 18
install menu, 41
intrusion detection, 2
isolate
DGP, 40
63
Index
input, 25
RAS, 40
K
keypad duress, 58
L
LCD
message, 5
screen, 4
LEDs
area, 5
status, 5
system alarm, 6
system fault, 6
local alarm, 7, 59
M
management software, 2
N
LEDs, 5
remote arming station (RAS), 2
request service technician, 23
reset cameras, 41
routine maintenance, 3
S
secure test
automatic, 16
cancelling, 16
completing, 16
report, 22
service menu, 23
service technician, 23, 40
shunt, 60
system alarm, 18
system alarm LEDs, 6
system fault LEDs, 6
system testing, 3
T
open door, 46
test report, 21
testing
cameras, 14, 22
inputs, 14, 16, 26, 28
time and date, 7, 37
time correction, 39
P
U
panel status, 18
PIN, 10
PIN code, 34
program users, 50
unlock, lock, disable and enable, 46
unsealed input, 6, 8, 14, 18
users, 10
create, 32
delete, 30
display, 30
learn card data, 34
programming, 30
total, 35
New Zealand requirements, iv
O
R
RAS
beeper, 6
keypad, 7
LCD screen, 4
64
Challenger10 Administrators Manual
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