Deck - Columbia Access Television
www.aja.com
Ki PRO
Published: 11/1/10
Installation and Operation
Guide
B e c a u s e
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m a t t e r s .
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Trademarks
AJA®, KONA®, and XENA® are registered trademarks of AJA Video, Inc. Ki Pro™, Io Express™,
Io HD™ and Io™ are trademarks of AJA Video, Inc. Apple, the Apple logo, AppleShare,
AppleTalk, FireWire, iPod, iPod Touch, Mac, and Macintosh are registered trademarks of
Apple Computer, Inc. Final Cut Pro, QuickTime and the QuickTime Logo are trademarks of
Apple Computer, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Notice
Copyright © 2010 AJA Video, Inc. All rights reserved. All information in this manual is subject
to change without notice. No part of the document may be reproduced or transmitted in
any form, or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording,
without the express written permission of AJA Inc.
Contacting Support
To contact AJA Video for sales or support, use any of the following methods:
Telephone: 800.251.4224 or 530.274.2048
Fax: 530.274.9442
Web: http://www.aja.com
Support Email: [email protected]
Sales Email: [email protected]
Limited Warranty
AJA Video warrants that the product, not including hard-disk based Storage Modules
(HDD), will be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period of three years
from the date of purchase. AJA Video warrants that the hard-disk based Storage Modules
(HDD), will be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period of one year from
the date of purchase. If a product proves to be defective during this warranty period, AJA
Video, at its option, will either repair the defective product without charge for parts and
labor, or will provide a replacement in exchange for the defective product..
To obtain service under this warranty, the Customer must notify AJA Video of the defect
before expiration of the warranty period and make suitable arrangements for the
performance of service by contacting AJA Video support through the channels set forth on
the support contacts web page at http://www.aja.com/support/index.php. Except as stated,
the Customer shall bear all shipping, packing, insurance and other costs, excluding parts
and labor, to effectuate repair. Customer shall pack and ship the defective product to a
service center designated by AJA Video, with shipping charges prepaid. AJA Video shall pay
to return the product to Customer but only if to a location within the country in which the
AJA Video service center is located.
This warranty shall not apply to any defect, failure or damage caused by negligent,
inadequate or improper use, handling or maintenance. Without limiting the foregoing, AJA
Video shall not be obligated to furnish service under this warranty or repair any damage or
malfunction a) resulting from attempts by personnel other than AJA Video representatives
to install, repair or service the product, b) resulting from improper use or connection to
incompatible equipment, c) caused by the use of non-AJA Video parts or supplies, d) if the
product has been modified or integrated with other products when the effect of such a
modification or integration increases the time or difficulty of servicing the product, or (e)
resulting from being dropped or otherwise subjected to undue force, exposure to moisture
or other corrosive or conductive substances, exposure to strong magnetic fields, use with
improperly regulated power supplies, exposure to electric shock, use in temperatures
outside the specified operating range, or otherwise failing to treat the product in
accordance with the standard of care appropriate to sensitive and delicate electronic
equipment.
EXCEPT AS STATED ABOVE, AJA VIDEO AND ITS VENDORS DISCLAIM IN THEIR ENTIRETY ALL
OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ALL
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. AJA VIDEO'S
RESPONSIBILITY TO REPAIR OR REPLACE TIMELY REPORTED DEFECTIVE PRODUCTS IS THE
WHOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY CUSTOMER IS PROVIDED.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Limited Warranty
THE PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED, STATED, OR WARRANTED TO OPERATE UNINTERRUPTED OR
ERROR-FREE. YOU UNDERSTAND AND ACKNOWLEDGE THAT THE PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED
TO BE USED AS THE SOLE OR PRIMARY DATA SOURCE OR TARGET FOR CRITICAL DATA, AND THAT
IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO IMPLEMENT REDUNDANT CAPTURE AND BACKUP SYSTEMS AS
APPROPRIATE.
Limitation of
Liability
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHALL AJA VIDEO BE LIABLE IN ANY WAY FOR ANY LOST,
CORRUPTED OR DESTROYED DATA, FOOTAGE OR WORK, OR FOR ANY OTHER INDIRECT, SPECIAL,
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, OR FOR ANY THIRD PARTY CLAIM, IN CONNECTION
WITH THE PRODUCT, WHETHER RESULTING FROM DEFECTS IN THE PRODUCT, SOFTWARE OR
HARDWARE FAILURE, OR ANY OTHER CAUSE WHATSOEVER, EVEN IF AJA VIDEO HAS BEEN
ADVISED OF THE POSSIBLITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. AJA VIDEO's LIABILITY IN CONNECTION WITH
THIS PRODUCT SHALL UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE PAID FOR THE
PRODUCT.
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Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
Contacting Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
Limited Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii
Limitation of Liability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iii
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter 1: Introduction
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . . 2
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
What’s In The Box? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Apple ProRes 422 Advantages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
In This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Chapter 2: Getting Started and Installation
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Operator Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Controls and Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Displays and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Other Front Panel Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Connector Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
LTC Timecode Input And Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
SDI Input and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Component YPbPr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
CVBS Composite NTSC/PAL Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
HDMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Analog 2 Channel Balanced Audio Input and Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Analog 2 Channel Unbalanced Audio Input and Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
9-pin Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Host (FireWire 800) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
CTRL/TC (FireWire 400) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
LANC Loop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Lens Tap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
LED Indicator for IEEE 802.11 Radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Power Connector (back of unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
ExpressCard/34 Memory Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Removable Storage Modules (HDD or SSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Formatting Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Using Ki Pro Media in Final Cut Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Stand-alone Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Camera Mounting with Exo-skeleton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Exo-skeleton Setup and Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Applying Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Using AC Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Using DC Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Remote Network Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
TCP/IP Information You’ll Need . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Networking via DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
1
2
Networking Ki Pro using a Static IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Networking Ki Pro using the Factory Default IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Test Ki Pro’s Network Connection with “Ping” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Mac Ping Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Controlling Ki Pro from a web-browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Controlling Ki Pro via 802.11b/g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 3: Front Panel Operation
TRANSPORT Mode (default) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Recording a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Recording Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Playing Back a Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Deleting Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
STATUS menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Record Mode (TRANSPORT ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Alarm Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
MEDIA menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Media Menu Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
14.1 ENCODE TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
15.1 PLAY MEDIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
15.2 LOOP PLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
16.1 FORMAT MEDIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
16.2 DELETE CLIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
17.0 REEL NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
17.2 CLIP NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Clip Naming—Two Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
17.3 CLIP NUMBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
17.4 CLIP APPEND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
17.5 ALPHA APPEND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
17.8 TAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Custom Clip Naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
19.1 USE CUSTOM CLIP NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
19.2 CUSTOM CLIP NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
19.3 USE CUSTOM CLIP TAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
19.4 CUSTOM TAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
22.1 GANG CLIP NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
CONFIG menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
CONFIG Menu Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
1.1 RECORD TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
1.3 1080p PLAYBACK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
1.4 IN CONVERT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
1.5 OUT CONVERT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
1.6 SDI OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
1.7 COMPONENT OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
1.8 HDMI OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
2.1 VIDEO INPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
2.2 AUDIO INPUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
2.3 AUDIO CHANNELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3.1 COMPONENT IN LVL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
3.2 COMPONENT OUT LVL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
3.4 NTSC CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.1 ANALOG AUDIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
5.1 UPCONVERSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
5.2 DOWNCONVERSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
6.1 GENLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
8.0 TC IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
8.1 TC VALUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
8.2 TC TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Table of Contents
8.3 ARM RECORDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
35.2 9-PIN REMOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
41.1 VIDEO SG FRMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
41.2 VIDEO SG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
41.3 AUDIO SG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
50.1 IP CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
50.2 IP ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
50.3 SUBNET MASK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
50.4 STATIC GATEWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
50.5 SYSTEM NAME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
50.6 MAC ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
50.7 802.11 MAC ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
53.0 802.11 AVAILABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
53.1 802.11 CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
53.2 802.11 NETWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. . . . 54
53.3 802.11 SECURITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
53.4 802.11 PASSWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
53.5 HIDE 802.11 PASSWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
54.1 802.11 IP CONFIG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
54.2 802.11 IP ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
54.3 802.11 SUBNET MASK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
55.4 DATE SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
55.6 TIME SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
70.1 SCREEN SAVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
70.2 DISPLAY INTENSITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
70.3 FAN SPEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
80.1SERIAL NUMBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
80.2 SW VERSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
99.0 FACTORY RESET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Chapter 4: Browser Remote Control
Remote Control Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Web Browser via Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
General Screen Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Controlling Multiple Ki Pros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Gang Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Resetting Values To Factory Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Config Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Media Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Transport Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Network Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Wireless Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Clips Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Update Firmware Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Preparing to Update Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Upload and Install the Software on your Ki Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Web Browser via Wireless Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Using Wireless Devices to Control Ki Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
iPhone Ki Pro Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
When Using an iPhone to Control Ki Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Appendix A: Specifications
3
4
Chapter 1: Introduction
Edge Shot Photo Here
Overview
Ki Pro is an all new way of connecting production and post. With it, you can now
acquire with the same codec you edit with—Apple ProRes 422—in all 4 types
(including HQ, LT and Proxy). Ki Pro simplifies the link between production and post
by acquiring on the best codec for use with Apple Final Cut Studio, from virtually any
camera, regardless of format. With its extensive analog and digital connectivity,
virtually any video and audio source can be fed into Ki Pro. Also included is AJA's
powerful 10-bit realtime up/down/cross conversion, allowing you to record in the
format you want to edit and deliver.
Small and portable, AJA’s Ki Pro was designed as a field recorder for creating “readyto-edit” professional digital video. Ki Pro supports an Apple “file-based” workflow by
recording standard Apple ProRes 422 QuickTime files on industry standard media. Ki
Pro supports analog and digital audio/video I/O and records on either removable
34mm ExpressCards (up to two can be mounted) or a removable storage module.
Two types of storage modules are also available for Ki Pro: a 2.5” SATA hard drive
(supplied with the base system), or a Solid-State-Drive (SSD) module you can
optionally purchase. When removed, storage modules function as a standard
FireWire 800 drive when connected to a Mac.
Note: ExpressCard storage is not currently supported with versions 1.0, 1.0.1, 1.1, or 2.0 of
firmware.
Ki Pro's multi-purpose mechanical design and small form factor allow both “standalone” and camera configurations. In standalone mode, it can connect to a camera
while sitting on a desk or flat surface. In a camera configuration it mounts between
the camera and a tripod using an optional “Exo-skeleton” frame. The frame option
allows for flexible positioning of the camera and accessories and serves as an
attachment to a professional tripod.
1
1
1
2
Internally, Ki Pro natively supports the Apple ProRes 422 codecs in hardware,
allowing realtime capture directly to Apple ProRes 422 QuickTime files. In fact,
while the camera is recording to its own tape or file-based memory, Ki Pro can
simultaneously capture the media as ProRes so it’s instantly ready to edit when the
removable storage module is connected to a Mac. With this kind of flexibility, you
can save time, steps, and get your project done quicker and with the highest
quality.
Like AJA’s famous KONA and Io HD desktop products, Ki Pro offers unparalleled
connectivity. Within its portable and rugged form factor, Ki Pro offers SD/HD analog
I/O, SD/HD digital I/O including SDI, HD-SDI and HDMI, two channels of balanced
and unbalanced analog audio with switch selectable line/mic levels, and LTC
timecode in/out.
Control options are also varied and flexible. Ethernet 10/100/1000 connection is
possible via an RJ45 connector, allowing remote control and configuration from a
Mac or PC web browser.
Note: Though not supported in Versions 1.0, 1.0.1, 1.1 or 2.0, a future release will
support a FireWire 400 (1394a) connector that allows passing control and
timecode from the camera, while a special “AJA Lens Tap” connector provides
the unique ability to intercept lens control data for use in start/stop and
automated recording control. Plus, a FireWire 800 connector will allow a Mac
to mount Ki Pro’s storage devices (SSD, HD, and ExpressCards).
For wireless control, Ki Pro features an internal 802.11b/g antenna and radio for
connection to wireless devices such as iPhone, iPod Touch, or 802.11 equipped
computers. (For detailed illustrations and discussions of Ki Pro connectors and
control features, see Chapter 2.)
This manual covers the installation and operation of Ki Pro and its optional
accessories.
Features
Ki Pro offers a large number of unique features for optimum quality, ease of use,
and support for a wide variety of workflows and environments. Ki Pro provides
flexible standard and high definition recording, with hardware up/down/crossconversion for versatile operation in a mixed SD/HD environment, plus a wide
variety of control methods and storage options.
Hardware
• Apple ProRes 422, Apple ProRes 422 (HQ), Apple ProRes 422 (LT), and Apple
ProRes 422 (Proxy)—SD, HD 720/1080, full-raster 10 bit 4:2:2, realtime,
implemented in hardware
• Up/down/cross-conversion, 10-bit, realtime, implemented in hardware
• Component HD/SD analog video I/O (6 BNC)
• Composite video output (1 BNC)
• HD/SD SDI I/O (2 BNC)
• HDMI I/O (2 HDMI)
• 2 channel balanced and unbalanced analog audio I/O (4 XLR, 4 RCA)
• LTC I/O (2 BNC)
• IEEE 802.11 wireless
• 10/100/1000 Ethernet LAN
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Features
• Panel user interface features a VFD display (2 line character display), with 14
control buttons, 3 control knobs, and a power button
• Storage Module (HDD) with FireWire 800 port for use with Apple Mac®
computers (HFS+ file system)
• 12 Vdc AC adapter with industry standard 4-pin XLR connector
• 3-year warranty
Software
• Remote Browser control software. When a Mac®, PC, or 802.11b/g enabled
device such as an iPhone are connected via the Ki Pro Ethernet port or its
802.11b/g connection, the device can control the Ki Pro via a web browser
• Embedded internal web server for remote control via 802.11b/g
1 or LAN
• Gang recording via multiple Ki Pro units controlled by a master Ki Pro unit
(see CONFIG parameter 35.4 explained in Chapter 3)
• RS422 control of Ki Pro for VTR-style from an editing application (see CONFIG
parameter 35.2 explained in Chapter 3)
Options
AJA’s Ki Pro can be enhanced by purchasing several options:
• Ki Box Exo-skeleton—provides a surrounding chassis for the Ki Pro that can
both mount to a tripod and provide a mount for camera on top; this
combination allows convenient access to controls.
Base Ki Pro Exo-skeleton
chassis with camera mount
Knurled thumbscrews
secure Ki Pro chassis
to Exo-skeleton
Ki Box Exo-skeleton Option
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Storage Module Options: SSD or Hard Drive
• Ki Pro SSD Storage Module—although the Ki Pro comes standard with a
removable HDD Storage Module, an optional SSD Storage Module is also
available. The Ki Pro Solid State Storage Module (SSD) is recommended for
mobile environments where shock-proof sturdiness may be needed. The Ki
Pro SSD Storage Module offers the ultimate in media reliability.
• Ki Pro Hard Drive Storage Module—although Ki Pro comes with one
removable HDD Storage Module standard, you can buy extras and simply
swap them as needed.
• Ki Pro Rod Accessory Kit—this kit adds endplates to the Exo-skeleton so you
can attach two user-supplied 15mm camera accessory rods. The endplates
have knobs for adjusting the height of the rod brackets relative to the camera,
as well as a set of knobs for securing the rods in the brackets.
Optional Rod Accessory Kit Assembly
Kit components:
2 endplates
4 screws (5/32 allen)
4 knobs with plastic washers
Rod Accessory Kit Option
• AJA Lens Tap Cable Accessory—this AJA proprietary cable allows Ki Pro to
connect between the lens tap control connector on a lens and camera body,
thereby intercepting the lens control signals for use in simple start/stop Ki Pro
recording operations. This option is not yet available.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — What’s In The Box?
What’s In The Box?
When you unpack your Ki Pro, you’ll find the following components:
• Ki Pro CD-ROM—this CD contains documentation—including this manual you’re
reading (PDF format).
• Ki Pro Recorder
• Ki Pro 250GB Hard Drive Storage Module and AC Adaptor
• AC Adapter 110/220 with industry standard 4-pin XLR connector for supplying
power to the Ki Pro.
• Read Me First Notice—Contains late-breaking news and/or errata related to
Ki Pro.
1
• Registration Sheet—allows you to register by mail or online (details provided).
Please save all packaging for shipping the Ki Pro should you wish to do so when
moving or sending it in for service.
Ki Pro
Installation and Operation
Manual
in PDF format on CD
Ki Pro Documentation CD
Read Me First Notice
and Registration Sheets
AC Adaptor and Line Cord
Ki Pro Recorder
HDD Storage Module
Storage Module AC Adaptor
Ki Pro Shipping Box Contents
Warning!
Only use attachments and accessories specified and/or sold by the manufacturer,
such as the Exo-skeleton.
Warning!
Read and follow all warning notices and instructions marked on the product or
included in the documentation.
Warning!
Do not use this device near water and clean only with a dry cloth.
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System Requirements
AJA Video recommends that the Mac Pro or MacBook Pro used with the Ki Pro offer a
FireWire 800 port and support Apple ProRes 422 with a satisfactory level of
performance. Consult Final Cut Pro documentation when setting up and configuring
your system for editing; ensure you have an adequate storage system (RAID array)
and any needed video/audio interfaces.
Apple ProRes 422 Advantages
Data rates: 220 Mb/second Apple ProRes 422 (HQ), 145 Mb/second Apple ProRes 422,
100 Mb/second Apple ProRes 422 (LT), and 36 Mb/second Apple ProRes 422
(Proxy)—all supported by internal system drive or attached storage.
Note: Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy) is for high-quality offline editing at the original frame
size, frame rate, and aspect ratio.
Quality: Excellent, broadcast quality
Captured media is virtually indistinguishable from pristine uncompressed sources.
Better yet, ProRes maintains the quality during editing, surviving multiple encoding/
decoding generations without degradation. It was designed by Apple for editing,
rather than as a transmission/distribution codec as are most popular codecs. Some of
the advantages include:
• Full-size 1920-by-1080 and 1280-by-720 HD resolutions.
• Full-size 720-by-486 and 720-by-576 SD resolutions.
• 4:2:2 chroma sampling. Provides precise compositing and blending at sharp
saturated-color boundaries.
• 10-bit sample depth. Preserves subtle gradients of 10-bit sources (perfect for
green-screen compositing, graphics or color correction) with no visible banding
artifacts.
• I frame-only encoding. Ensures consistent quality in every frame and no artifacts
from complex motion.
• Variable bit-rate (VBR) encoding. “Smart” encoding analyzes the image and
allocates more bits to complex frames.
• Low data rate requirements make for more storage options and require less
drive space to store high quality video.
• Optimized for efficient Real-Time effects
In This Manual
Chapter 1 is the introduction you’re reading, listing features, box contents, and
system requirements.
Chapter 2 gets you started with Ki Pro, introducing the front and rear panel features,
connections and indicators, and all the options available.
Chapter 3 provides complete instructions for operating the Ki Pro from the front
panel.
Chapter 4 discusses remote web browser control of Ki Pro via Ethernet or 802.11b/g.
Chapter 2: Getting Started
Overview
When using Ki Pro, you’ll make media cable connections to a variety of equipment
based on how it’s being used. Chapters 2 and 3 discuss how to operate and use the Ki
Pro in its many configurations—this chapter introduces the operating configurations,
power supply options, plus all indicators, controls, and connections so you’ll have a
working knowledge of how it can be used to tie together the worlds of acquiring
media (production) and post-production. For ease of explanation, we’ll talk about
these two ways of using the Ki Pro:
• Stand-alone—in standalone use for acquiring media, the Ki Pro unit is placed on
a desktop or surface and connected by cable to video/audio sources, usually a
camera or camcorder. After acquiring media, you can use the media on a Mac,
by removing the Ki Pro storage module and directly connecting it to the Mac via
FireWire 800. Alternatively, the whole Ki Pro unit can be connected to a Mac via a
FireWire 800 cable (this feature is not yet enabled).
• Camera Mount with Exo-skeleton—for the optimum in onset flexibility, an
optional Ki Pro Exo-skeleton camera mount can be attached to a tripod, the Ki
Pro mounted within it, and the camera mounted on top of the Exo-skeleton. This
creates a complete self contained acquisition system for acquiring Apple ProRes
422 media in realtime as the camera is shooting. As in the standalone mode, the
storage media can be easily inserted or removed for shooting and shuttling to
your editing system—without having to remove Ki Pro from the tripod. The Exoskeleton offers many adjustments and an optional rod accessory kit is available
for vertical/horizontal camera adjustment with respect to the rod and
accessories.
Learning about the front panel indicators will be useful in selecting operational
modes and monitoring what is happening on Ki Pro as well as troubleshooting
problems that can occur. Becoming familiar with the Ki Pro operator-side and
connectors will simplify installation, setup, and operation of the system.
On the following pages are front and rear panel illustrations with notations that
summarize all of the connectors and indicators. Detailed descriptions of each of the
connectors and indicators follow afterward.
Caution!
This device is a Class A product. Operation of this equipment in a residential area
is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to take
whatever measures may be necessary to correct the interference at their own
expense.
Caution!
The AJA Ki Pro contains a lithium battery soldered in place
permanently (it is not user replaceable). If you ever dispose of
the Ki Pro, ensure you follow local regulations for safe disposal.
The lithium battery shall not be exposed to excessive heat, such
as sunshine or fire.
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8
Operator Side
Slot LED Status Indicators show:
Media Selected—Green
Not-Selected—not illuminated
Recording—flashes Green, On and Off
Storage Module
Release
Button
(press and hold button down
while removing Disk Storage
Cartridge)
Expresscard Memory Slots (2) — 34mm 1-lane PCIe
(press card in to mount; press again to eject)
Storage Module (slides into slot)
1
2
VU
Meters
(2 Channel)
STATUS
01 1 4% S
SELECT
CONFIG
Audio
Input
Level
Adjust
(Press in and
knob will pop out
for easy adjustment)
CLIP xxxxxxxx
Cover Plate
over 802.11 b/g
Antenna
L
REEL xxx
ADJUST
4-pin XLR
Battery Power
Connector
(on side)
00:01:21:13
R
DELETE
CLIP
MEDIA
SLOT
Phones
Mic/Line
140 x 16 pixel
Alphanumeric
and Graphics Display
(typically 2 x 20 characters)
Transport Control Buttons
(Reverse/Stop/Play/Record/Fast Forward)
Head
Phone
Volume
(Press in and
volume adjust
knob will pop out
for easy adjustment)
Head
Phone
Jack
Power
ON/OFF
(Press to power up,
press and hold for 2 seconds to
power-down; abort power-down
by removing finger before 2 seconds)
Ki Pro Operator Side (front panel)
Controls and
Displays
The Operator Side of Ki Pro features a variety of buttons, knobs, jacks, and
indicators for operating Ki Pro directly. Each of the items found on the “Operator
Side” are described here and on the following pages. This side is referred to as the
“Operator Side” because when mounted in the Exo-skeleton, it matches the
operator side of the camera. When controlling camera features, you’ll also be
looking at all the Ki Pro control features for ease of use.
The front panel of Ki Pro operates in two modes: the “TRANSPORT” mode (default),
and the “MENU” mode. Some controls have different functions in these two modes.
The TRANSPORT mode (shown above) controls basic play, record, clip select, etc.
functions. The MENU mode is for set-up and configuration of Ki Pro. There are three
menu groups: STATUS, CONFIG, and MEDIA - these menus are accessed by
depressing the corresponding Menu buttons on the left of the panel.
Buttons
Power ON/OFF Button—Controls system power on/off and shows whether power
is ON (when illuminated) or OFF. To turn power on, press the button once.It
isn’t necessary to press hard or depress the button—it’s a “soft” button sensed
by the processor inside. When OFF, and the button is touched, it will begin
powering up and display start-up progress on the alphanumeric display.
To power down, you must press and hold the power button down for 2
seconds. This action prevents accidental power-off during normal operation.
When the unit is powering down you can abort the power-down process by
simply removing your finger from the power button before 2 seconds have
elapsed.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Operator Side
STATUS Button—Pressing the STATUS button, when not lit, enters the I/O Status
menu. Pressing STATUS when it is lit turns off the Status menu and returns
you to Transport mode. STATUS menus can be accessed at any time—
including when the machine is in an active transport mode (PLAY, RECORD,
FF, REV). The ALARM state displayed on the display shares functionality with
STATUS. The Select buttons can be used to cycle through alarms and I/O
status. All menus and front panel operations are described in Chapter 3.
CONFIG Button—Pressing CONFIG when not lit, enters the CONFIG menu.
Pressing CONFIG when it is lit turns Off the CONFIG menu (returning you to
the default TRANSPORT menu). The CONFIG menu can only be entered from
the STOP mode. The CONFIG menu remembers which parameter it is set to
when exited, and will return to that same parameter when the menu is re1
entered.
MEDIA Button—Pressing MEDIA when not lit, enters the MEDIA menu. Pressing
MEDIA when it is lit will turn Off the MEDIA menu (returning to the default
TRANSPORT menu). The MEDIA menu can only be entered from the STOP
mode. The MEDIA menu remembers which parameter it is set to when
exited, and will return to that same parameter when the menu is re-entered.
Transport Control Buttons—The transport buttons are always active.
SELECT
ADJUST
STOP : The STOP button has a dual function. When playing back a clip
(PLAY, FF, or REV) the first push of STOP acts as a “pause” mode: the
playback is paused, the current point of the clip is displayed, and the STOP
button flashes. A second push of STOP completely stops the playback and
directs Ki Pro's outputs into an “E to E” mode (the currently selected inputs
bypass to the outputs). To determine at a glance if the STOP button is in a
“pause” mode, note that the stop button will flash if media playback is
paused. The STOP button is fully illuminated in “stop” mode.
PLAY : Press PLAY to begin forward playback of the current clip at
normal speed.
RECORD : Press the red button to begin recording. Once in RECORD
mode, all other transport buttons are locked-out except the STOP button.
FFWD : Press button to begin fast playback of the current clip at 2x
speed. Successive pushes increase the speed to 4x, 8x, and 16x. (Pushing
the button after 16x speed is reached has no further effect.) When fastforwarding, audio is muted.
REV : Pressing REV when not lit, begins playback of the current clip in
reverse at 1x speed. Successive pushes increase the speed to 2x, 4x, 8x, and
16x. (Pushing the button after 16x speed is reached has no further effect.)
When playing in reverse, audio is muted for all speeds.
SELECT (up/down): The SELECT up/down buttons operate differently
depending on whether Ki Pro is in the TRANSPORT mode or the MENU
mode. In the TRANSPORT mode, the SELECT buttons select clips and
operate like “previous” and “next” keys. When a clip is selected, Ki Pro
“cues” it to the beginning. Note that ordering and playback of clips is
based on timestamp order (creation date), not clip name. In the MENU
mode, the SELECT buttons select parameters for adjustment. Holding
down either of the SELECT buttons causes them to repeat.
ADJUST (up/down): ): The ADJUST up/down buttons operate differently
depending on whether Ki Pro is in TRANSPORT mode or MENU mode. In
TRANSPORT mode, and in the “Pause” mode (single push of STOP from
PLAY mode), the ADJUST buttons “single step” the current clip at a rate of
one frame per button push (up=forward, down=reverse). In the MENU
mode, the ADJUST buttons adjust the selected parameter. Holding down
either of the ADJUST buttons causes them to repeat
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DELETE CLIP Button—Dedicated button that when pressed, deletes the currently
selected clip. When pressed, the system displays a precautionary “ARE YOU
SURE?” prompt. Press the up-arrow ADJUST button to say “Yes” and delete the
clip, or the down-arrow ADJUST button to abort the deletion. When a clip is
deleted, the next clip is then cued for deletion. Pressing DELETE CLIP, STOP or
any other button—while the “ARE YOU SURE” prompt is displayed—cancels
the delete operation. Pressing any button other than up-arrow ADJUST always
aborts deletion.
DELETE CLIP can be used in either the TRANSPORT menu or the MEDIA menu.
When pressed in the TRANSPORT menu with a current clip active (PLAY, REV,
FF, RECORD), the active mode will continue until the DELETE CLIP is confirmed.
SLOT Button—The SLOT button serves two purposes. First, it selects which storage
is accessed by the system—either the storage module slot or one of the
ExpressCard slots. Second, the SLOT button is used to unmount a currently
selected piece of media.
Caution!
Not using the SLOT button to unmount the media can lead to issues with the
media if the media is removed prior to this action.
Pushing the slot button cycles between unmounting media and selecting
media. This function is only active when in the “STOP” mode and requires a
“PRESS STOP TO CONFIRM” if not stopped. After you select a slot, the system
returns to the last selected clip and timecode for that slot. If the media has
been changed since the slot was last selected (physically removed/media
replaced), then the “first” clip on the media will be “cued” to its start point. If
inserted media has any issues, additional prompts may be displayed as
appropriate such as: “WARNING Backup and Reformat” or “WARNING Media
Unrecognized.”
Note: On power up, the storage module is the initial storage system selected and accessed
by Ki Pro.
Disk Storage Module Release Button—Press and hold to physically release a
storage module from the unit; you must pull out the storage module while
pressing the button. This action prevents a storage module from accidental
removal while recording/playing. For safe removal of any media, either storage
module or Expresscards, the corresponding slot LED must be unlit. Note: the
ExpressCard/34 media is push-to-eject media and does not require this release
button to be pressed for removal.
Caution!
Removing any media with the slot LED lit, or while flashing, can result in
corrupted media or potential damage to the SSD, hard drive or ExpressCard/34
media.
Analog Audio Input Level Adjust Knobs—Knobs underneath the VU meters
allow you to adjust the analog input levels for each of the two audio channels.
Note: Digital audio via embedded SDI and HDMI is not affected by the adjustment knobs.
To adjust an analog audio level, press the knob inward and the knob will
then pop out for easy adjustment. This feature allows the knobs to be
recessed, preventing accidental changes in a production environment.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Operator Side
Head Phone Volume Knob—To adjust headphone listening level, press the knob
inward and the knob will then pop out for easy adjustment—just like the audio
input level knobs.
Displays and Indicators
Alphanumeric and Graphics Display—Display details: The display is a 140x16 Graphics
display. Normally, it will be configured in a 2x20 character format. All menus are
designed to fit into this format, so some words may be truncated to fit the display
limits.
Operational note: The display power consumption is directly related to the number
of pixels that are turned on and the intensity. Therefore, the default brightness is
an intensity value of 6 (on a scale of 1-8) and users will be able to1diminish this
value as they see fit in order to conserve as much as 22% power consumption for
the VFD. The intensity setting of the VFD also correlates to the backlit buttons on
the unit (play, select up, select down, etc.)
During a period of 3 minutes of inactivity, the VFD will go to a screensaver mode—
if the Screen Saver parameter has been set in the CONFIG menu.
VU Meters—7-segment LEDs show audio input levels for the 2 analog audio channels
(respectively). Knobs underneath the VU meters allow you to adjust the input
levels independently to prevent clipping and ensure proper signal amplitude.
Green—audio source signal level is in the “safe” area (no clipping). Vertically, the
green LEDs also show the signal strength, so you can see if the signal level is low.
Generally, it’s preferred to have the signal near the top of the green or even
occasionally peaking into the yellow LEDs.
Yellow—audio source signal levels are at the peak edge of the safe area before
clipping will occur.
Red—audio source amplitude is too hot and the signal is clipping at its signal
peaks. You should reduce the input gain at its source (camera, mixer or source
equipment supplying the signal).
ExpressCard Slot LED Status Indicators—Each of the 3 media slots (S1, S2, D1) have an
associated LED status indicator. The following states for the LED indicator denote
the status of the media:
LED lit/on: selected media
LED unlit/off: inactive media, okay to eject or no media inserted
LED flashing: recording in progress
Disk Storage Module LED Status Indicator—The following states for the LED indicator
denote the status of the media:
LED lit/on: selected media
LED unlit/off: inactive media, okay to eject or no media inserted
LED flashing: recording in progress
Other Front Panel Features
ExpressCard Memory Slots (2)—Both of these slots support ExpressCard/34 (34 mm
wide) memory cards (not ExpressCard/54). Cards must be very fast to be used with
Ki Pro.
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Note: ExpressCard Memory is not supported in Ki Pro versions 1.0 through 2.0.
Visit the Ki Pro support page on our website for a list of AJA-qualified cards:
http://www.aja.com/support/ki-pro/ki-pro.php
Head Phone Jack—1/8” (3.5mm) miniature stereo TRS connection for standard
stereo headphones.
Connector Side
Connect any camcorder, camera, or audio source—digital or analog—regardless of
brand or format, to Ki Pro’s many connectors. The connector side of Ki Pro contains
almost all of the available connections, protected by handles that extend out for easy
grip while protecting the connectors when out of the Exo-skeleton. On the back side
of the unit is a single power connector for supplying the 12-Volt DC operating
voltage (see installation later in this chapter).
The function of Ki Pro’s inputs and outputs depend on the operational mode. Ki Pro’s
active input (the one to be recorded) is selected by front panel, web browser, or
wireless device browser. Ki Pro’s outputs are active all the time. In other words, the
same output video appears simultaneously on the HDMI, SDI, component, and
composite outputs. (Note: composite is an SD only format, so it will not output HD
material.) This method of operation allows simultaneous connection to source
devices, onset monitoring displays, and audio equipment.
Ki Pro Connector Side and Back Side
Connections
• HDMI—video with embedded audio, 2 channel input and recording support as
of v2.0 firmware. 1x connector for input and 1x connector for output.
• HD/SD-SDI Input and Output, with 2 or 8 channel embedded audio as of v2.0
firmware (2x BNC)
• HD/SD Component YPbPr/RGB Video, 3x BNCs for input, and 3x BNCs for output.
• Composite video output (CVBS, 1x BNC)
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Connector Side
• 2 channel balanced analog audio Input and Output (4x XLR)
• 2 channel unbalanced analog audio Input and Output (4x RCA)
• Line/Mic Level Switch (analog XLR audio input level)
• LTC Input and Output (2x BNC)
• Lens Tap*
• LANC*
• 1394a FireWire port (connection to camera for timecode and control)*
• 1394b FireWire port (connection to host computer)*
• LED Indicator for IEEE 802.11 Radio ON/OFF
• 10/100/1000 Ethernet LAN
1
• 9 pin serial port for RS422 control of Ki Pro via external editing systems
Note: above items marked with an asterisk (*)are not supported in Ki Pro versions 1.0 through
2.0 software.
LTC Timecode Input And Output
Two BNCs provide connections to the house LTC timecode generator or
source. Connections are high impedance. One BNC is for input and the
other for output.
SDI Input and Outputs
Two BNC connectors are provided for SDI input and output. SDI input and
output supports SD-SDI and HD-SDI video and embedded 24-bit digital
audio. If your camera has multiple outputs, look to see if it has SDI, and use it
where possible for the highest quality.
Component YPbPr
Connect component YPbPr video cables from a VTR, Camera, or other
source to the three YPbPr input BNCs: Y/G, Pb/B and Pr/R. Then
connect the YPbPr Out BNCs to a monitor, or other component
device. Component input video signals are A/D (input) converted (10bit). Similarly, component output video signals are D/A converted (10-bit). Component
video signals are higher quality than composite.
A Note About RGB—Although RGB is used less in today’s video systems, Ki Pro
supports it at output. Because Ki Pro’s (and SMPTE SDI) native format is YPbPr, AJA
recommends the use of YPbPr whenever possible. Although component video
monitors often have RGB inputs, it’s better to use YPbPr when the monitor
supports it. The YPbPr format provides “headroom” for “superwhite” and
“superblack”—and these video levels will be clipped when transcoding to RGB.
Also, the RGB/YPbPr transcoding involves a level translation that results in
mathematical round-off error.
A Note About YPbPr—Component Video, or YPbPr, has been given several names
over time. YUV, Y/R-Y/B-Y, and YCbCr, are just some examples. Although these
various formats have some differences in levels, they are all basically the same. Ki
Pro supports three different types of YPbPr: SMPTE/EBU N10, Betacam (NTSC), and
Betacam (NTSC Japan). These three formats differ in level only.
Note About BETA Setting—Setting the Ki Pro component input and/or output to
"Beta" for HD material will result in an "Invalid Selection" alarm that will need
correction before recordings or other operations may take place.
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CVBS Composite NTSC/PAL Output
One BNC connector supplies composite NTSC or PAL output. Connect the
CVBS Out BNC to a monitor, or other Composite video device. Composite
video signals are D/A (output) converted (10-bit).
Note: Composite video output follows the settings made for the component video output;
because of this, if a composite output is desired when working with HD, the component
video output must be set to SD.
HDMI
Two HDMI connectors provide for input and output of HDMI compatible
video (version 2.0) and multi-channel embedded audio. HDCP is not
supported on either input or output. The HDMI input is designed to support
long cable runs: up to 100 feet (30.48m) when using 22 or 24AWG HDMI cable, or up
to 50 feet (15.24m) using 28 or 30AWG HDMI cable. The HDMI output supports
standard HDMI cables only.
HDMI Formats supported in Version 2.0:
525i 29.97
625i 25
720p 50, 720p 59.94
1080i 25, 1080i 29.97,
1080p 23.98, 1080p 24, 1080p 25, 1080p 29.97
Note: When using Ki Pro HDMI connections and attaching it to any HDMI audio or video
accessory, you must use one each of the ferrite beaded HDMI cables, HH-28F-06, between
the input and output ports of the Ki Pro and the HDMI accessory to maintain regulatory
compliance.
Analog 2 Channel Balanced Audio Input and Output
Four XLRs, 2 female for input and 2 male for output, provide 2
channels of balanced audio. Audio is high-quality 24-bit A/D
input and D/A output at 48kHz. Level adjustments are made via
software and a switch for line-level inputs. Software level
adjustments for analog audio (parameter 4.1) apply to balanced
audio (XLR) using the “Line” setting on the switch. The Mic and
Mic +48 settings offer a lower input level suitable for
microphones and their associated input impedance. Use
Mic +48 for microphones with phantom power (condenser mic.), or Mic for
microphones without phantom power (dynamic micrphones).
Analog 2 Channel Unbalanced Audio Input and Output
Two RCA connectors provide an unbalanced stereo audio input pair for use with
consumer camcorders, VTR/VCRs and other A/V devices. For output, two RCA
connectors provide an unbalanced stereo audio output pair for driving inexpensive
audio monitoring systems.
9-pin Connector
Ki Pro features a 9-pin serial port that may be used with some RS-422
devices beginning with the 2.0 version of firmware. IMPORTANT: Not all
RS-422 devices have been tested with Ki Pro, so AJA cannot definitively say which
devices may or may not communicate as expected with Ki Pro when operated under
RS-422 remote control. Refer to the latest Release Notes document for which devices
or non-linear editors have been tested with Ki Pro operating under RS-422 control.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Power Connector (back of unit)
Host (FireWire 800)
IEEE 1394b FireWire™ connector for connecting to the 800 Mb/s FireWire
connector on an Apple Mac Pro or MacBook Pro for passing data. This connector does
not support connection to any other FireWire devices such as cameras or hard drives.
Feature not supported in versions 1.0 through 2.0.
CTRL/TC (FireWire 400)
IEEE 1394a FireWire™ connector for connecting Ki Pro to a camera for
timecode control. This connector does not support data transfer of
compressed audio/video signals nor does it support connection to hard drives.
Feature not supported in versions 1.0 through 2.0.
1
Ethernet
An RJ45 connector provides a 10/100/1000 Ethernet port for connecting Ki
Pro directly to a computer or Ethernet hub or switch for connecting to a LAN.
Ki Pro is compatible with CAT-5 straight-through or cross-over Ethernet cables,
automatically detecting which is used. Once connected and properly configured, Ki Pro
can then be controlled by a web browser on the LAN.
LANC Loop
This connector accepts a LANC plug (2.5mm 3-conductor TRS jack) and then
loops it through to a second connector (loop). LANC or Local Application
Control Bus System (sometimes called Control-L) is a Sony protocol for synchronizing
cameras. Available on many brands of cameras, LANC enables accessories to control
camera and Ki Pro record/stop functions.
Feature not supported in versions 1.0 through 2.0.
Lens Tap
This connector supports an optional “Lens Tap” kit AJA offers for controlling Ki Pro. A
proprietary AJA cable connects between the camera body and the lens, intercepting
the camera’s own interconnecting cable. This allows the Ki Pro transport control
(record/stop) to happen by simply operating the shutter/record button on the camera.
Feature not supported in versions 1.0 through 2.0.
LED Indicator for IEEE 802.11 Radio
This LED shows the status of the internal 802.11 radio used to transmit and receive
data. When illuminated, the LED shows the radio is ON.
Power Connector (back of unit)
On the back of Ki Pro is a standard 4-pin male XLR connector for
supplying 12-Volt DC power to the unit. You can use either the supplied
AC Adapter or furnish your own battery source. Since the connector is
an industry standard pinout, choices are varied and flexible. Many 3rd
party vendors offer products using this standardized power connector.
Pin 1: Pin 4: +
Pins 2 and 3: not used
15
16
Warning!
Ki Pro has no user-serviceable parts. To remove power from the unit, remove the
4-pin XLR power connector to ensure disconnection. Refer all servicing to
qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the device has been
damaged in any way, such as power-supply cord or plug is damaged, liquid has
been spilled or objects have fallen into the device, the device has been exposed
to rain or moisture, does not operate normally, or has been dropped.
Warning!
Do not defeat the safety purpose of the polarized or grounding-type plug. A
polarized plug has two blades with one wider than the other. A grounding type
plug has two blades and a third grounding prong. The wide blade or the third
prong are provided for your safety. If the provided plug does not fit into your
outlet, consult an electrician for replacement of the obsolete outlet.
Warning!
Since the Mains plug is used as the disconnection for the device, it must remain
readily accessible and operable.
Warning!
Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at plugs,
convenience receptacles, and the point where they exit from the device.
Storage
Record hours of media to a portable removable hard-drive storage module with
built-in FireWire 800, or to flash-based ExpressCard/34 cards (feature not available in
version 2.0), that both instantly mount on your OSX desktop for immediate editing
and file access. Ki Pro ships with a 250GB hard disk that can store up to 2 hours of
1080i Apple Pro Res 422 HQ media or 4 hours of standard 1080i Apple Pro Res 422 (or
even more for standard definition). For additional storage you can buy a variety of
storage types.
Caution!
Failure to properly mount or dismount media, or an unexpected loss of power
while recording, can result in an unrecoverable data loss.
ExpressCard/34
Memory Cards
Although AJA doesn’t make or sell ExpressCard/34 memory cards, Ki Pro provides
two slots where they can be used (ExpressCards Media not supported yet in version
Version 2.0). With the rapid industry development of these cards and many
manufacturers providing them, brands and models will change often. AJA will post
on the Ki Pro support web page which brands AJA has tested and found to work
acceptably. Since cards have to be fast enough to sustain throughput without
dropping frames, not all ExpressCard/34 cards will qualify for Ki Pro usage.
Search here to find list of qualified cards:
http://www.aja.com/support/ki-pro/ki-pro.php
ExpressCard/34 Memory Card
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Storage
Removable Storage
Modules (HDD or
SSD)
Although the Ki Pro comes standard with a removable 250GB HDD Storage Module, an
optional SSD Storage Module is also available. The Ki Pro Solid State Storage Module
(SSD) is recommended for mobile environments where shock-proof sturdiness may be
needed. The Ki Pro SSD Storage Module offers the ultimate in media reliability.
You may also choose to purchase extra HDD or SSD Storage Modules so you can
quickly load and unload media from the Ki Pro unit while onset.
Storage Modules can be powered via the FireWire 800 cable, or via an AC adapter
(supplied).
Check with your AJA dealer or the AJA website for Storage Module offerings as
capacities and models may change.
1
Firewire 800
Connector
Power connector
(AC Adapter)
Storage Module (HDD and SSD look identical—see label underneath for type)
Formatting Media
To reformat storage media, it must first be selected using the SLOT button (see
previous topic). Once selected, follow these steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Using Ki Pro Media
in Final Cut Pro
Press the STOP button
Press the MEDIA button
Press SELECT (up or down) repeatedly until you see the menu 16.1 Format Media.
Press ADJUST up arrow. Ki Pro will display “FORMAT”. Press the ADJUST up arrow
button. Ki Pro will display “CONFIRM ERASE”—press and hold the ADJUST up
arrow button for 2 seconds or longer and then formatting will begin. Ki Pro will
display progress and when done, you’ll see the 16.1 Format Media menu once
again.
When a Ki Pro storage module (HDD or SSD) is removed and connected to a Mac via a
FireWire 800 cable, the module will mount as a normal Apple HFS+ filesystem. The REEL
NAME parameter is the name of the media that will appear mounted on the OSX
desktop.
Once a Ki Pro storage device (storage module or ExpressCard/34) is mounted, each clip
recorded by Ki Pro will be a file on its filesystem, which can be opened in Final Cut Pro.
Because the clips were recorded as Apple ProRes 422, Apple ProRes 422 (HQ), Apple
ProRes 422 (LT), or Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy) with proper Final Cut Pro metadata, they’re
instantly ready to edit.
In Final Cut Pro's browser window you will see some of the information Ki Pro saved as
data to describe the media. Ki Pro saves the “Name”,“Media Start”,“Media End” and
“Reel” for Final Cut Pro.
Note: From the Storage Module, Ki Pro supports the playback of Apple ProRes 422, Apple
ProRes 422 (HQ), Apple ProRes (LT) and Apple ProRes (Proxy) QuickTime files with
appropriate 24-bit 48kHz audio in formats and frame rates noted as supported by the latest
firmware release. Files created in other codecs or at other frame rates or frame sizes will not
result in playback if placed in the "AJA" folder on the Ki Pro Storage Module. Placing nonApple ProRes QuickTime files in the "AJA" folder can lead to problematic issues when
attempting "Play All" operation of clips; if media other than Apple ProRes QuickTime files
must be kept on the Ki Pro Storage Module, they should be placed outside of the "AJA"
folder on the drive.
17
18
Installation
The following topic details set up and installation of Ki Pro. There are two different
ways to set up and use the Ki Pro portable recorder:
• Stand-alone use
• Camera and mounting with optional Exo-skeleton (with or without a tripod)
Software setup is the same for both uses. Choices you will make include how Ki Pro
will be controlled (front panel, 802.11 wireless, or Ethernet & web-browser) and the
physical system requirements for your application (camera mount or not, video and
audio monitoring choices, and media workflows). First we’ll discuss mounting
methods and then follow up with software configuration and setup.
Warning!
Do not install near any heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, stoves, or
other apparatus (including amplifiers) that produce heat.
Warning!
Do not block any ventilation openings. Install in accordance with the
manufacturer's instructions.
Warning!
Unplug this device during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of
time.
Warning!
Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel. Servicing is required when the
device has been damaged in any way, such as power-supply cord or plug is
damaged, liquid has been spilled or objects have fallen into the device, the device
has been exposed to rain or moisture, does not operate normally, or has been
dropped.
Stand-alone Usage
In stand-alone use, Ki Pro is simply a
box that connects to the video and
audio output connector(s) from a
camera, camcorder, or other
professional source, recording media
that is output. Here are some typical
workflows and applications:
• Recording a live video feed from
a camera; Ki Pro is rackmounted,
receiving component video
input.
• Recording a corporate video live
from a camera; Ki Pro sits on a
computer work desk receiving HDMI audio and video input.
• Recording on location, Ki Pro is truck-mounted, receiving an HD-SDI feed.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Installation
• Desk mounted in an AV media library, recording legacy material from a variety of
decks, formats and sources, converting dissimilar media to standardized Apple Pro
Res for archival.
• Recording live house-of-worship services, Ki Pro sits on a shelf receiving a feed
from a wall mounted remote camera and audio feed from the house mixer.
• Recording live music at a remote location, Ki Pro receives video feed from event
producer’s switcher and picks up audio from a stereo pair of phantom-powered
condenser microphones.
Camera Mounting
with Exo-skeleton
Ki Pro’s applications become even wider,
when you add in the optional Exo-skeleton
that provides for mounting of both a
camera and/or a tripod. Here are some
typical workflows and applications:
1
• Handheld camcorder with Ki Pro
mounted underneath and a battery
pack used for live sports—recorded
media is ready to edit immediately.
• Broadcast usage with Ki Pro’s
hardware-based conversion capability
to take camera’s (1080 or 720) input
and realtime convert to another
format.
Ki Pro with Exo-skeleton and
camera on mount
• On-set application: camera operator controls
shooting via optional AJA lens tap—
whenever trigger is pressed, recording/stop
occurs. An assistant remotely names clips
and content using an iPhone communicating
with Ki Pro wirelessly. (Note: Lens tap feature
not available in version 1.0.)
Ki Pro with Exo-skeleton and
optional endplates with
user-supplied accessory rods
• Multi-camera shoot, with different brands of
cameras, different internal camera codecs, all
mounted with Ki Pros and delivering the
same format of media: Apple Pro Res 422,
ready to edit immediately after filming. No
log and capture necessary.
When mounting a camera inside the Exo-skeleton
frame, all Ki Pro controls will face the same
direction as the camera controls, so the camera
operator can easily make adjustments. Power to
Ki Pro exits on the same side as the camera power supply so cables don’t clutter the
lens side of the setup.
19
20
Exo-skeleton Setup and Adjustment
The Exo-skeleton
option has two
configurations. As it
comes out of the box,
it contains an
adjustable camera
mount on top, a plate
on the bottom for
tripod mounting, and
two thumbscrews for
securing the Ki Pro
unit to the Exoskeleton.
Base Ki Pro Exo-skeleton
chassis with camera mount
An option that can be
added is an accessory
Knurled thumbscrews
rod kit that adds
secure Ki Pro chassis
to Exo-skeleton
plates to each side of
the Exo-skeleton
frame so that 15mm
user-supplied rods can be used with the camera.
Rods are handy for mounting battery packs, matte boxes, and a wide variety of other
accessories.
Optional Rod Accessory Kit Assembly
Kit components:
2 endplates
4 screws (5/32 allen)
4 knobs with plastic washers
For most uses with an Exo-skeleton, you’ll want to first mount the camera or
camcorder to the adjustable mount on top, before sliding in the Ki Pro unit and
locking it. To mount a camera, follow these steps:
1. Locate the camera mount locking knob on the Exo-skeleton and loosen it.
2. Slide the camera mount off of the mounting rail.
3. Place the camera on the mount, orienting the mount’s alignment pin to
camera’s corresponding pin socket. Once aligned, tighten the mounting screw
to secure the camera.
4. Slide the camera and mount back on the rail and tighten the locking knob.
21
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Installation
Alignment
Pin
Mounting
Screw
2
Slide Mount
off of Exo-skelton
3
1
Locate the Camera
Mounting screw underneath
(2 sizes provided),
align pin to Camera base
and tighten the Mounting screw
to fasten securely.
Replace Mount on
Exo-skeleton when done,
and tighten Locking Knob
to lock camera in place.
Loosen
Camera
Mount
Locking
Knob
1
Base Ki Pro Exo-skeleton
chassis with camera mount
Knurled thumbscrews
secure Ki Pro chassis
to Exo-skeleton
Exo-skeleton Camera Mounting
Attaching the optional Ki Pro Exo-skeleton rod accessory kit is simple:
1. Open the kit box; you’ll find preassembled endplates—these must be
disassembled before you can attached the plates to the Exo-skeleton. Place an
endplate from the kit on the outside of the Exo-skeleton frame, aligning it’s two
screw slots with the two screw holes in the frame.
2. Insert one of the supplied screws from the inside of the frame through the frame
hole and slot. While holding the screw from the inside, place a supplied washer
over the threaded end of the screw and screw one of the supplied knobs over
the end of the screw.
3. Repeat step 2 for each of the 4 knobs, washers and screws.
Once the kit is installed, you can then loosen the rod lock knobs, insert user-supplied
15mm accessory rods, and then mount any desired accessories.
To raise or lower the rods, simply loosen the rod height adjustment knobs (the ones
you installed in step 2), lift the rods to the desired height, and then tighten the knobs
once complete.
22
Exo-skeleton Endplates and Rod Height Adjustment
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Installation
Applying Power
The installation and set up of a Ki Pro is straight-forward. If you’ll be controlling the unit
from the front panel buttons and display, it’s ready right out of the box. Just cable the
system’s audio and video sources, VTR(s), monitors, and audio equipment, mount the Ki
Pro unit as desired, and begin recording. However, if you wish to control Ki Pro from a
web browser or 802.11 device (iPhone etc.), then there are additional configuration
steps necessary.
Warning!
Since the Mains plug is used as the disconnection for the device, it must remain
readily accessible and operable.
Warning!
1
Protect the power cord from being walked on or pinched particularly at plugs,
convenience receptacles, and the point where they exit from the device.
Warning!
Unplug this device during lightning storms or when unused for long periods of
time.
Warning!
Do not open the chassis. There are no user-serviceable parts inside. Opening the
chassis will void the warranty unless performed by an AJA service center or licensed
facility. Remove the supplied AC line cord from mains power when moving the unit.
Do not defeat the safety purpose of the grounding-type plug.
Using AC Power
To begin using Ki Pro, plug the 4-pin XLR on the supplied AC adapter into the XLR
power socket on the back of Ki Pro. Then plug the AC adapters line cord into 110 VAC or
230 VAC (the supply is autosensing).
1. Locate Line Cord
2. Insert into DC supply
3. Insert 4-pin XLR into
12Vdc Ki Pro power socket
Using DC Power
To run Ki Pro on DC power, simply plug a 3rd-party industry standard 12 volt battery
pack with a 4-pin female XLR connector into the side power connector on Ki Pro. The
battery should be capable of supplying a sustained 3.3 A (just like the supplied AC
Adapter provides). Such battery packs are available from a variety of sources.
Notes: To operate Ki Pro properly, batteries should not have voltage lower than 12 volts and
should not have voltage that exceeds 18 volts.
Ki Pro consumes approximately 30 watts of power so many batteries can power Ki Pro for
several hours at a time.
23
24
In the event of sudden power loss, recordings that are in progress will not be written
properly to the media. Note that there is a "Low Battery" warning prompt that users
should take note of and stop recordings in progress if at all possible before battery failure.
Ki Pro can sometimes manage to close the file before the battery stops providing
sufficient power, but this is not always possible due to the nature of some batteries and
the duration of some recordings. It is best to be mindful of remaining battery life. The
use of batteries with metering or remaining power indications is highly recommended.
For very long recordings, it is advisable to use the supplied AC power supply instead of
battery power.
Remote Network Control
.
Laptop
w/Web Browser
for Remote
Control
Ki Pro Wireless Connection
STATUS
CONFIG
CLIP xxxxxxxx
REEL xxx
MEDIA
Ki Pro Wired Connectionion
ion
1 4% S
STATUS
SELECT
ADJUST
DELETE
CLIP
SLOT
00:01:21:13
CONFIG
MEDIA
CLIP xxxxxxxx
REEL xxx
1 4% S
SELECT
ADJUST
DELETE
CLIP
SLOT
00:01:21:13
10/100/1000 Base-T
802.11b/g
wireless
Hub
Airport
Wireless
Router
iPhone
10/100/1000 Base-T
LAN
WAN/ISP
Firewall
& Router
Ki Pro Networking Example
Network
Connections
Ki Pro can be networked directly to a MacBook Pro or Mac using a single Ethernet
cable (straight or cross-over)—or it can be connected to a local area network (LAN). If
wireless networking is desired, Ki Pro can also be controlled via an iPhone or laptop
browser using 802.11b/g and communicating through a wireless access point
(Airport).
In hard-wired configurations, Ki Pro connects via its 10/100/1000 Base-TX Ethernet
connector. In a direct connection, you simply connect the Ki Pro to an Ethernetequipped computer having a browser using a Cat-5 cable. If connecting via a LAN,
you then connect the Ki Pro’s Ethernet connector to a hub or switch on the LAN. A
LAN is a shared network that includes other Ethernet devices all attached via a hub or
digital switch. LANs may be divided into zones separated by software or hardware
routers.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Remote Network Control
Devices on a LAN have IP addresses which may be fixed and permanent, or dynamically
assigned by the network (DHCP). When attaching Ki Pro to a LAN, you should first talk
to your network administrator and find out how they want it connected (static IP or
DHCP). Your IT department will be able to supply the information you need to install Ki
Pro on a LAN.
Caution!
This device is a Class A product. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is
likely to cause harmful interference, in which case users will be required to take
whatever measures may be necessary to correct the interference at their own
expense.
Caution!
The 802.11b/g radio is disabled by default and can be enabled only in the presence
1
of an authorized access point.
Warning!
Intentional radiators, such as the AJA Ki Pro client adapter, are not intended to be
operated with any antenna(s) other than those furnished by AJA. An intentional
radiator may only be operated with the antenna(s) with which it is authorized.
Warning!
Do not touch the Ki Pro radio or antenna cover when the antenna is transmitting or
receiving.
Warning!
Install this device in such a manner as to maintain a minimum of 5 cm (2 inches)
separation distance between the radiating element(s) and all persons. This safety
warning conforms with FCC radio frequency exposure limits.
TCP/IP Information
You’ll Need
If your LAN has a DHCP server that assigns IP addresses dynamically, then you don’t
have to configure anything (Ki Pro defaults to DHCP). If for some reason your IT
administrator prefers an assigned IP address that is fixed (called a “static IP), then get
the IP address—you’ll be entering it in the “IP CONFIG parameter.” If your LAN requires
static IP addresses, then also ask your IT administrator for the Subnet Mask and default
gateway IP address (your LAN’s internet router). The following two topics discuss two
different ways to set up Ki Pro: via DHCP or via a static IP address.
Networking via
DHCP
The default configuration (from the factory) automatically looks for a DHCP server to
issue an IP address. So, as long as your network has a DHCP server (usually part of your
router—e.g. an Airport base station wireless router), then you need to do nothing other
than plugging the Ki Pro into the net. To manually select DHCP: use the Select buttons
to navigate to the parameter “50.1 IP CONFIG”, and then use the Adjust buttons to select
“DHCP”. That’s it!
25
26
Here are the steps to communicate with Ki Pro after choosing the DHCP selection:
1. Use the Select buttons to navigate to parameter 50.2. Note on a piece of paper
the DHCP supplied IP address shown.
2. With your laptop or desktop computer connected to the same LAN and DHCP
enabled, type the IP address you noted in step 1 into the browser address bar.
You should now see Ki Pro’s browser status screen.
If Ki Pro cannot get an address from the DHCP server on the LAN while Ki Pro is set to
DHCP via parameter 50.1, it will then automatically drop back to a preset factory IP
address of 192.168.0.2. In this instance you can follow these alternate steps to
communicate with Ki Pro:
1. Set the computer’s Ethernet IP address to 192.168.0.n (where n is not 2).
2. Set the computer’s Subnet mask to 255.255.255.0 (most computers default to
the proper netmask when the address is set).
3. Run a browser on the computer and type “192.168.0.2” (the factory fallback IP
address). You should now see Ki Pro’s browser status screen.
Note: If Ki Pro fails to find a DHCP server via it’s network connection, it will fall back to using
the factory default static IP of 192.168.0.2—or whatever IP address you’ve previously
defined. AJA recommends you define a Static IP address with parameter 50.2 so you’ll be
prepared in the event your DHCP server fails.
Networking Ki Pro
using a Static IP
Address
To set a static IP address for Ki Pro, you’ll have to make some simple Parameter menu
selections. The illustration below shows the four menu selections you need to make,
while entering the information provided to you by your IT administrator (as discussed
earlier).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Remote Network Control
1
Note: for parameters 50.2,
50.3, and 50.4, you will be
setting IP addresses that
consist of “octets” separated
by a period (i.e., 90.0.180.0).
For these parameters, the
Select button selects the
octet and then the Adjust
buttons select the desired
number. Pressing Select
again advances to the next
octet. At the final octet, the
address will flash—pressing
Select at that point confirms
the setting.
Configuring Ki Pro with a Static IP Address
27
28
Networking Ki Pro
using the Factory
Default IP
If you don’t want to use DHCP to network Ki Pro and also don’t want to set your own
static IP address, you can simply use a Default setting to use a factory setting of
10.65.74.65. This might be useful for an application where you directly connect a
laptop or computer to Ki Pro and want to get networking quickly. Here are the steps
to set up this method of communication:
1. Use the Select buttons to navigate to parameter “50.1 IP CONFIG”, and then use
the Adjust buttons to select “Default”.
2. Set your laptop or desktop computer Ethernet IP address to 10.m.n.m (where
m is not 65 and n is not 74).
3. Also on the computer, set the Subnet mask to 255.0.0.0 (most PCs default to
the proper netmask when the address is set—so you may not have to do
anything here).
4. Run a browser on the computer and type “10.65.74.65” (the Default factory IP
address). You should now see Ki Pro’s browser status screen.
Test Ki Pro’s
Network
Connection with
“Ping”
After setting the IP address and other TCP/IP settings and connecting Ki Pro’s
Ethernet connection to a LAN or directly to a computer, ensure that you have a valid
connection by “Pinging” the Ki Pro. Pinging ensures that other devices on the
network, or a computer directly attached to it, can see it. Simply run the Ping utility
from a computer on the same LAN as Ki Pro, or one attached directly to Ki Pro. Here’s
how to Ping a Ki Pro from a Mac OSX computer:
Mac Ping Procedure
1. Find the Applications Folder, and then find the Utilities Folder inside of the
Applications Folder.
2. Locate the “Terminal” utility application and double-click it.
3. On the Ki Pro, go to parameter menu 50.2 and read the IP address.
4. At the Terminal prompt, enter the IP address noted in step 3. For example: ping
192.168.0.2
5. If successful, the ping utility will respond that packets were sent, received and
how long it took. For example:
64 bytes from 192.168.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.590 ms
6. If unsuccessful, check Ki Pro’s network settings and resolve the problem with
your IT administrator.
Controlling Ki Pro
from a web-browser
To control Ki Pro from a web-browser on a network attached computer, you must
enter Ki Pro’s IP address as a URL in the browser. For example, if Ki Pro’s IP address
were “90.0.6.31”, you would then type into the web browser: http://90.0.6.31
This topic is explained in greater detail in Chapter 4: Browser Remote Control.
Controlling Ki Pro
via 802.11b/g
Another option for remote control is Ki Pro’s built-in 802.11 wireless transceiver
which can communicate with properly configured 802.11 wireless access points such
as an Airport Basestation or 802.11 wireless router.
You can enable or disable wireless control of Ki Pro for security. Further, you can
select a type of wireless security to match other devices; popular methods such as
WEP, WPA and WPA2 are supported. To use wireless control you’ll follow this basic
process:
• Enable wireless control of Ki Pro
• Select a wireless network to connect to (as set on the access point you’ll
communicate with).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Remote Network Control
• Select the type of security, if any, to be used. If there is security, you’ll also enter its
password.
• Once configured, you can control Ki Pro from an iPhone or other 802.11 wireless
device that supports browser control (iPod Touch et al).
Wireless control of Ki Pro is managed using menus 53.1 through 53.5 as listed in
Chapter 3, under Config Menu Parameters. The steps of setting up and using Wireless
control are then discussed later in Chapter 4 under Browser Remote Control.
Warning!
Install this device in such a manner as to maintain a minimum of 5 cm (2 inches)
separation distance between the radiating element(s) and all persons. This safety
warning conforms with FCC radio frequency exposure limits.
Caution!
1
The 802.11b/g radio is disabled by default and can be enabled only in the presence
of an authorized access point.
Warning!
Intentional radiators, such as the AJA Ki Pro client adapter, are not intended to be
operated with any antenna(s) other than those furnished by AJA. An intentional
radiator may only be operated with the antenna(s) with which it is authorized.
29
30
Chapter 3: Front Panel Operation
There are three ways to control Ki Pro: the front panel, remotely from a web browser
connected via ethernet, or a wireless browser (iPhone etc.) via 802.11. This chapter
discusses controlling and using Ki Pro from its front panel. (Remote control via
browser is discussed later in Chapter 4.)
In Chapter two we discussed the panel controls overall, so ensure you've read and
understand that material first. Here in this Chapter we introduce each of the front
panel's modes and menus—plus talk about Clips and Reels, with procedures for basic
use.
First we introduce the two basic front panel modes, TRANSPORT and MENU, followed
by how the SELECT and ADJUST buttons operate in each of these two panel modes.
Select Adjust
The TRANSPORT mode is the default mode—it controls basic PLAY, STOP, FF, REV, etc.
functions. In the TRANSPORT mode, the Select buttons (up or down) cycle through
the clips in the currently selected storage slot (like previous/next), and the Adjust
buttons allow single-stepping, frame forward or backward. The display for the
TRANSPORT mode is shown below:
Clip SC12BTK1
Reel 212
D1
47%
01:02:22:14
TRANSPORT Mode
For the MENU mode, depressing one of the 3 MENU buttons (STATUS, CONFIG, or
MEDIA) will enter the corresponding menu.
In the STATUS menu, the Select buttons will cycle through the various STATUS
screens. The Adjust buttons have no effect on the STATUS menu. The display for the
STATUS menu is shown below:
3
1
1
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Input Format
Input selected
Recording Format
Audio input selected
STATUS Menu (Record Mode)
Current Clip
Storage Slot
Reel Number
Remaining Capacity
Timecode
STATUS Menu (Play Mode)
In the CONFIG or MEDIA menus, the Select buttons select various adjustable
parameters, and the Adjust buttons adjust the selected parameter. When entering
a menu, the system remembers and returns to the last selected parameter. The
display for the CONFIG and MEDIA menus is sh
own below:
Parameter number
Parameter Name
Parameter setting
(chosen by Adjust buttons)
CONFIG Menu
Parameter number
Parameter Name
Parameter setting
(chosen by Adjust buttons)
MEDIA Menu (like CONFIG)
TRANSPORT Mode (default)
TRANSPORT mode is the default mode for Ki Pro operation. When you power up Ki
Pro, the first display you’ll see is TRANSPORT mode menu. Any clip that previously
was recorded is referenced in the display and can be played.
Pushing one of the transport buttons in the middle of the front panel (PLAY, STOP,
FF, REV, REC) immediately takes action and causes the display to change to the
TRANSPORT mode if it is not already displayed. Settings you’ve made in the MEDIA
menus are observed (more on that later). You’ll always know you are in TRANSPORT
mode as long as one of the MENU buttons aren’t lit (STATUS, MENU, or MEDIA)—if
one is lit, then you are in a “menu”.
When in the “STOP” mode, the CONFIG and MEDIA set-up menus can be accessed
to adjust various parameters that control Ki Pro's operation. Note that you must be
in STOP, not PAUSE to access these menus—if you try to access these menus
without first having stopped playback, a “PRESS STOP” prompt will appear on the
VFD display. You can tell if the STOP button is in “pause” if the button is flashing.
There are certain times when transport controls are locked out. For example, when
ejecting media, or entering an IP address, the transport controls are locked out
until the operation is completed. Most other menu functions do not lock out the
transport controls.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — TRANSPORT Mode (default)
At any time you only need to hit any transport button to exit (or “exit” a STATUS,
CONFIG, or MEDIA menu by pushing its button). Pressing a transport button sends the
display into the TRANSPORT default menu.
Several operations may result in an “ARE YOU SURE” interaction; for example, FORMAT
MEDIA. This protects you from inadvertent actions and ensures that accidental button
presses don’t have negative repercussions. When you answer yes to an ARE YOU SURE
prompt, the display then changes to an “in progress display”, and automatically returns
to the menu when the operation is complete.
When recording, Ki Pro is in an E-to-E state. However, any conversions selected (on
input or output) will be applied. This means you can specify the type of recording via
the In Convert as “None”, leaving the incoming signal as is, or convert the signal to
another format for your recording.
1
Certain parameters are stored in non-volatile memory so that the parameter is
remembered between power cycles, for example: system name and date/time.
Recording a Clip
There is more than one way to record a clip since you can control Ki Pro in numerous
ways. The MEDIA and CONFIG menus presented later in this chapter detail the
parameters you have to control recording. Before we get into that level of detail, here’s
an example of just how simple recording can be:
1. Press the STATUS button. You’ll see the currently selected input and input format
(line 1) and the chosen recording format and audio input (line 2). If these settings
are acceptable, then push the red RECORD button below the display.
2. The green LED next to the storage module release button will begin blinking,
showing that a recording is in process, and you’ll see the timecode changing on
the display. The RECORD button is also backlit while recording.
3. When you’ve finished recording, press the STOP button (left of RECORD).
You can, of course, customize your configuration via the CONFIG and MEDIA menu
parameters.
Note: To change Apple ProRes 422 settings prior to recording: press MEDIA, then repeatedly
press SELECT until you see 14.1 Encode Type—then press ADJUST up or down to select
“ProRes 422LT”, “ProRes 422PX”, “ProRes 422HQ” or “ProRes 422”. Press MEDIA or STOP to exit
the menu.
To select a different video input, press CONFIG, then repeatedly press SELECT until you
see 2.1 Video In—then press ADJUST up or down to choose a desired video input
connector. To select a different audio input, use the SELECT up arrow button and you
will see 2.2 Audio In. Press ADJUST up or down to chose a desired audio input
connector.
Note: You cannot select HDMI audio unless you have an HDMI video source, nor can you select
a SDI audio source if you have not selected an SDI video source.
These are just a few menu parameters that you might wish to change before you make
your recordings. To learn all the ways to convert formats on input or output read the
CONFIG menu and MEDIA menu parameter topics later in this chapter.
Recording Notes
• Ki Pro may take a few seconds to close longer files (files over 20 minutes). For
these longer recordings, you may see a "Closing File" prompt on the display.
• Ki Pro alerts you when the media is nearly full with a "Media Low" prompt at 15%
of the remaining capacity. At 10% of the total capacity of the media, the "Media
Full" prompt will appear. Any recordings that have been started will stop once
10% is reached and no further recordings can be performed using this media until it is
formatted again or a MEDIA>Delete Clips>DELETE ALL has been performed.
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Playing Back a Clip
To playback recorded media, you simply select the clip desired and press PLAY. If the
clip you wish to playback is not currently selected, use the SELECT up/down buttons
until the clip name appears on the display. Like recording, there is more than one way
to initiate playback (front panel, web browser, and wireless). From the front panel
these are the basic steps:
1. Press the STOP button to get to the TRANSPORT mode (if not already there).
Find the clip name in the display (it shows the current clip/reel).
2. Press the SELECT up or down arrow button repeatedly until you find the clip
you are looking for.
3. Press the PLAY button ().
4. When playing back a clip (PLAY, FF, or REV) the first push of STOP acts as a
“Pause” mode: the playback is paused, the current point of the clip is displayed,
and the STOP button will flash. A second push of STOP will completely stop the
playback and Ki Pro's outputs will go into an “E to E” mode (the currently
selected inputs will be bypassed to the outputs). When a playback reaches the
end of a clip, it will automatically pause on the last frame of the clip.
During playback you can use the FFWD, REV, SELECT, or ADJUST buttons as follows:
FFWD : Press button to begin fast playback of the current clip at 2x speed.
Successive pushes increase the speed to 4x, 8x, and 16x. (Pushing the button
after 16x speed is reached has no further effect.) When fast-forwarding, audio
is muted.
REV : Pressing REV when not lit, begins playback of the current clip in
reverse at 1x speed. Successive pushes increase the speed to 2x, 4x, 8x, and
16x. (Pushing the button after 16x speed is reached has no further effect.)
When playing in reverse, audio is muted for all speeds.
SELECT (up/down): while in TRANSPORT mode, the SELECT buttons select clips
and operate like “previous” and “next” keys. When a clip is selected it is “cued”
to the beginning of the clip. Note that ordering and playback of clips is based
on timestamp order, not clip name. If you have paused playback (the STOP
button is flashing), you can use the SELECT down button to jump back to the
beginning of the clip. If the STOP button is not flashing, depressing the SELECT
down button will select the previous clip.
ADJUST (up/down): while in TRANSPORT mode, and in either a “STOP” or
“pause” state, the ADJUST buttons will “single step” the current clip at a rate of
one frame per button push (up=forward, down=reverse).
Deleting Clips
To delete a previously recorded clip:
1. In TRANSPORT mode, use the SELECT up and down arrow buttons to browse
through the clips on the current storage device. (In version 1.0 only the Storage
Module is supported; in a future release Ki Pro will support ExpressCard/34
cards—when a clip is on another storage device, you will press SLOT
repeatedly until it’s selected.)
2. When you find a clip you want to delete, press the DELETE CLIP button.
3. Ki Pro will ask “Are you sure”—press the ADJUST up arrow button to confirm
deletion. Pressing the down arrow, or any other button, will abort the deletion.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — STATUS menus
STATUS menus
The STATUS menus display I/O status and Alarm information. The STATUS menu can be
accessed almost anytime and will not change any active transport modes. Like the
CONFIG and MEDIA menus, STATUS display screens can be viewed by pushing the
SELECT up or down buttons. Pressing STATUS will exit the screens and return to
TRANSPORT mode, where an action could still be occurring (like playback or even
recording).
Record Mode (TRANSPORT )
Line 1: displays the input format, the 4 characters on the right display the selected
input video format. The 4 character video symbols are: SDI, CMP, 1HDMI
Line 2: displays the record format—the 4 characters on the right display the selected
audio input. The 4 character audio symbols are: SDI, XLR, RCA, HDMI
Here are some STATUS display examples of record mode:
Clip SC12BTK1
S1
Reel 001
47%
IN 720p 59.94
SDI
01:02:22:14
REC 1080i 29.97
XLR
Transport (also Status Play Mode)
Record Mode
Alarm Status
The Alarm menu displays warnings and alarms. Some alarms will automatically be
shown on the display. Others will only be seen by checking the STATUS displays (press
Select up/down to cycle through them). If everything is OK, then a “SYSTEM NORMAL”
message will be seen when you cycle through the STATUS displays.
SYSTEM NORMAL
You will be alerted to an alarm condition by having all backlit keys and the display flash
to full intensity for 2 seconds. If more than one alarm state is active, then the display
will hold each alarm notification for 3 seconds before cycling to the next alarm. These
alarm notifications override whatever the display is currently showing for the
TRANSPORT or STATUS menus. Once there is a Ki Pro alarm active (e.g. Invalid Selection)
the STATUS button light will blink for as long as the alarm is present. This alerts you so
you’ll know the reasons for the alarm condition are still active—you can then press the
STATUS button to determine what the alarm condition is.
CONFIG and MEDIA menus, once entered after an alarm notification, will cause the
alarm display to go away. Pushing any button always returns Ki Pro to its pre-alarm
state—however, if the alarm condition still exists after this initial button push (i.e., the
reason for the alarm), the alarm notification will reappear on the display. Note: the
STATUS button will blink if there is an active alarm condition.
Examples of ALARM displays are shown following this page. WARNING appears on the
first line and the prompted action item on the second line.
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WARNINIG
INVALID SELECTION
WARNING
UNRECOGNIZED MEDIA
WARNING
MEDIA IN USE
Ki Pro features a variety of alarms to help you diagnose the condition of the unit,
possible configuration issues, or possible signal issues. Here is a list of warning
messages and their meaning:
"WARNING Input Format Changed" prompt appears if a recording is started
and the signal is lost or is changed. If this occurs, Ki Pro stops the recording
that is in progress.
"WARNING Record Format" may appear if there is no video input to Ki Pro. No
recording will be performed in this state.
"WARNING A/V Mismatch" may appear if SDI video is selected and HDMI audio
is selected or vice versa. Embedded audio, via SDI or HDMI, must be matched
to the video source. Analog audio can be used with any video input.
"WARNING Dropped Frames" may appear if media is underperforming and
cannot keep up with the data rate required to make a recording or perform a
playback. If you see this prompt during recording, you might consider backing
up your current recordings and formatting the media. For playback, you might
simply re-attempt playback.
"WARNING SDI VFR Mismatch" will appear if you have set the video input to
something other than SDI when parameter 1.1 is set to “VFR”—as only the SDI
input provides the appropriate data for VFR support.
"WARNING Media Low" will appear when the media only has 15% of capacity
remaining. Media must be switched out when it reaches 10% of capacity.
With 10% of media remaining, the "WARNING Media Full" prompt will appear.
"WARNING Media in Use" may appear if you try to remove the media by
pushing the SLOT button while an operation is still taking place. Wait for the
operation to finish and then try again.
"WARNING Media Not Present" may appear if media has been physically
removed and the user hits the slot button.
"WARNING Media Unrecognized" may appear if there is a problem with the
media. To resolve this issue, mount the drive on an Apple computer under
Mac OSX, copy the clips from the media, then re-insert the media into Ki Pro. If
it does not read properly, you will need to format the media.
"WARNING Storage Removed" will appear if the media is removed without first
hitting the SLOT button to properly unmount media. In the event this
happens, media immediately re-inserted into the Ki Pro may show clips as "N/
A" and subsequent recordings may not be possible. To resolve this issue,
mount the drive on an Apple computer under Mac OSX, then re-insert the
media. If it does not read properly, you will need to format the media.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — MEDIA menus
"WARNING Backup and Reformat" may appear if media has issues being
mounted by the Ki Pro. As the prompt indicates, it is best to back up the media
by copying it to another drive or disk array and then reformat the media. Some
signs that the media is in a read-only state: even though clips have been
recorded to the media, "N/A" appears in the clip area of the UI, "Loading"
appears in the clip area of the UI but does not eventually load a clip, or hitting
the record button with all settings correctly configured for the Ki Pro does not
result in a recording.
MEDIA menus
As the name implies, these menus display choices are all related to media storage, the
type of encoding, and how Ki Pro behaves when recording and playing back. There are
1
also menus for naming reels, clips and takes.
Media Menu
Parameters
14.1 ENCODE TYPE
14.1 ENCODE TYPE
This parameter defines the Apple ProRes encoding method.
ProRes 422 (default)
ProRes 422HQ
ProRes 422LT
ProRes 422PX
Record media as Apple ProRes 422 files.
Record media as Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) files.
Record media as Apple ProRes 422 (LT) files.
Record media as Apple ProRes 422 (Proxy) files.
15.1 PLAY MEDIA
This parameter determines behavior during playback.
15.1 PLAY MEDIA
One (default)
All
Plays one clip and then stops playback
Plays the current clip and then continues playing the next
clip on the Ki Pro media. Note that with this setting, Ki
Pro will play all clips back regardless of format or
framerate—but you may notice the video monitor reset for
format/framerate changes. If all clips are the same
format and framerate or conversion is applied to the
output for clips with the same Hz, then clips play out
smoothly one after another.
15.2 LOOP PLAY
This parameter turns looped playback on and off.
15.2 LOOP PLAY
OFF (default)
ON
Play clip(s) and then stop playback when complete
Play clip(s) and then loop back and repeat playback
16.1 FORMAT MEDIA
This parameter is used to format the currently selected storage device.
16.1 FORMAT MEDIA
KEEP MEDIA (default)
FORMAT MEDIA
No action (do not format the media device selected)
Format the selected media device
(you will be prompted Y/N?)
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16.2 DELETE CLIPS
This parameter can be used to delete all of the clips on the media.
16.2 DELETE CLIPS
DELETE ALL (default)
KEEP CLIPS
Delete all clips on the storage device when
DELETE CLIPS is pressed or Adjust up arrow is
pressed and held for 2 seconds
No action (do not delete clips)
The Ki Pro Storage Module can be used to hold data other than Apple ProRes 422
QuickTime recordings. If other files are saved to the Ki Pro Storage Module, they
should be placed outside of the "AJA" folder. Any material inside of the "AJA" folder
will be erased if a MEDIA>Delete Clips>DELETE ALL is performed.
17.0 REEL NAME
This parameter determines the reel name associated with all clips generated while
using this setting. The reel name is a number between 001 and 999. It is historically
linked to the naming conventions used for film and tape-based media. The REEL
NAME is an incrementing three digit value that works with EDLs. For this reason, the
parameter does not have a “NONE” selection—all clips will be associated with a REEL
NAME. The REEL NAME parameter is also the name of the media as it will appear
when the storage device (storage module or ExpressCard/34) is mounted on a Mac
OSX desktop (and media was formatted by the user).
17.0 REEL NAME
001 to 999
(default = 001)
Press ADJUST button up or down to change the
REEL NAME value from 001 to 999.
17.2 CLIP NAME
This parameter determines the clip name associated with all clips generated while
using this setting. The clip name is either “Clip” or “SC”.
17.2 CLIP NAME
SC (default)
Clip
Clips generated will have filenames beginning with “SC”
Clips generated will have filenames beginning with “Clip”
Clip Naming—Two Examples
Two examples are presented below showing how resulting clip names are generated.
Each example is based on the collective settings for these parameters:
• REEL NAME
• CLIP NAME
• CLIP NUMBER
• CLIP NUMBER APPEND
• ALPHA APPEND VALUE
In both examples that follow, “TK” is a default append to the naming convention just
prior to the auto-incrementing TK value (which can be manually overridden via
parameter 17.8 Take).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — MEDIA menus
Ki Pro offers these parameter choices for easy identification of the QuickTime files, so
that the names can logically match the shooting script, and are acceptable when
imported into the Final Cut Pro Browser window. Final Cut Pro's Browser window
provides columns of data used to describe the media. In the most minimal form,
“Name”,“Media Start”,“Media End” and “Reel” are required pieces of information for a
Final Cut Pro clip to be properly perceived as “valid” media. Additional information or
“QuickTime metadata” is useful and can be mapped into the myriad choices provided
in the Final Cut Pro Browser column headings.
Example 1: using the factory default AJA parameter settings:
REEL NAME
1
001
CLIP NAME
CLIP
CLIP NUMBER
1
CLIP APPEND
NONE
ALPHA APPEND
A
TAKE
1
The resulting clip would be named and displayed as: “CLIP1TK1”. The media
would be named “001” if mounted on the OS X desktop as a volume.
Example 2: using customized settings:
REEL NAME
002
CLIP NAME
SC
CLIP NUMBER
12
CLIP APPEND
ALPHA
ALPHA APPEND
B
TAKE
1
The resulting clip would have the following naming convention:
“SC12BTK1”. The media would be named “002” if mounted on a desktop as a
volume.
17.3 CLIP NUMBER
This parameter determines the clip number, from 1 to 999, that follows the CLIP NAME,
and is associated with all clips generated while using this setting.
17.3 CLIP NUMBER
1 to 999
(default = 1)
Press ADJUST button up or down to change the
CLIP NUMBER value from 1 to 999.
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17.4 CLIP APPEND
This parameter is used with parameter 17.5 ALPHA APPEND to append a text value
after the CLIP NUMBER or have no text appended.
17.4 CLIP APPEND
NONE (default)
ALPHA
No text is appended to the CLIP NAME and
CLIP NUMBER
The text value entered in ALPHA APPEND is appended
to the CLIP NAME and CLIP NUMBER
17.5 ALPHA APPEND
This parameter is used with parameter 17.4 CLIP APPEND to append a text value after
the CLIP NUMBER.
17.5 ALPHA APPEND
A to Z
(default = A)
Press ADJUST button up or down to change the
ALPHA APPEND value from A to Z. Alphabetic
values increment with A and Z wrapping around.
17.8 TAKE
This parameter determines the TAKE number, from 1 to 999, that follows the CLIP
NAME and CLIP NUMBER, followed by any ALPHA APPEND (if selected), generated for
all clips while using this setting.
17.8 TAKE
1 to 999
(default = 1)
Ki Pro automatically generates a TAKE number.
Press ADJUST button up or down to change the
TAKE value from 1 to 999, if a value other than the
automatically generated value is desired.
There are rules that Ki Pro observes in relation to Clips and Takes:
1. Ki Pro will not overwrite an existing clip when using standard clip naming.
2. The Take number will auto-increment past existing numbers for the “prefix” as
defined by the Reel Name, Clip Name, Clip Number, Clip Append, Alpha
Append, and Take settings.
3. If the number is at “999” , Ki Pro will not auto-increment; instead it will register
a “Name In Use” alarm. This prompts you to select a new Clip Name, Clip
Number, Clip Append, Alpha Append, and/or Take settings so that a new
unique “prefix” is created. This action ensures files are unique and
understandable, and that clips are never overwritten.
Custom Clip
Naming
Beginning with Ki Pro 2.0 firmware, users can elect to give their clips names other
than the standard criteria provided by AJA. IMPORTANT: Certain characters may not
be allowed or supported if entered for a clip name. Examples include: punctuation
marks (other than internal spaces or periods), special characters (like @), and nonASCII UTF-8 characters are rejected outright. Note: non-UTF-8 characters appear in
some languages, like Chinese and Japanese, and are not supported.
Custom clip names can be created via the front panel UI menu parameters (19.1, 19.2,
19.3, and 19.4) through the use of the select and adjust up/down arrows. Users may
find that the more efficient method to perform custom clip naming is via the web UI
entry fields.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — MEDIA menus
19.1 USE CUSTOM CLIP NAME
This parameter enables or disables whether a custom clip name can be used via menu
parameters 19.1, 19.2, 19.3, and 19.4, or via the web UI.
19.1 USE CUSTOM CLIP NAME
OFF (default)
ON
Enable defining of custom clip name
Disable defining of custom clip name
19.2 CUSTOM CLIP NAME
This parameter defines a custom clip name. The custom clip name is defined via the
front panel select and adjust up/down arrows.
1
variable
19.2 CUSTOM CLIP NAMEE
Using the adjust buttons, enter a custom clip name. Using
the adjust buttons and the top Select button, select the
characters for the name. The adjust buttons scroll through
the choices and the top Select button advances to the
next character. While selecting characters, the character
being changed will flash to show its position. Certain
characters may not be allowed or supported if entered for
a clip name. Examples include: punctuation marks (other
than internal spaces or periods), special characters (like
@), and non-ASCII UTF-8 characters are rejected
outright. Note: non-UTF-8 characters appear in some
languages, like Chinese and Japanese, and are not
supported.
Default: CUSTOM
19.3 USE CUSTOM CLIP TAKE
This parameter enables or disables whether a custom clip take name will be used. If
enabled, takes increment sequentially from the first value selected.
19.3 USE CUSTOM CLIP TAKE
ON (default)
OFF
Enable defining of custom clip take
Disable defining of custom clip take
Caution!
If a custom clip name is not changed and the "Use Custom Clip Take" parameter is
not enabled, an existing clip can be overwritten on the disk. Example: the first
recording made is called "Flying" and the "Use Custom Clip Take" parameter is not
enabled and the user does not enter a new value for the custom clip name and
leaves "Flying" entered, the first recording will be overwritten by the second
recording. AJA does not typically recommend disabling the use of the custom clip
take, but in some situations, overwriting an existing file may be desirable.
19.4 CUSTOM TAKE
This parameter defines a custom take. The custom take number is defined via the front
panel select and adjust up/down arrows.
19.4 CUSTOM TAKEE
1 to 999
(default = 1)
Press ADJUST button up or down to change the
TAKE value from 1 to 999, if a value other than the
automatically generated value is desired.
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22.1 GANG CLIP NAME
This parameter is used when performing gang recording via multiple Ki Pros (refer to
Controlling Multiple Ki Pros later in this manual). If the desire is to have clips named
the same across all Ki Pro ganged units' recordings, then use the "Master Name"
selection in this parameter. If the desire is to have clips named independently on Ki
Pro units, then "Slave Name" should be selected. Selecting "Slave Name" means that
the recording will take it's name from the individual Ki Pro's parameters and not
accept the value pushed to the Slave by the Master Ki Pro.
22.1 GANG CLIP NAME
Master Name (default)
Slave Name
Enable have clips named the same across all Ki Pro
ganged units
Name clips independently on Ki Pro units
CONFIG menus
When we talk about menus, we discuss the Parameter Number and Name on the top
line of the display and the Parameter Setting(s) possible as shown on the bottom line
of the display; remember, the current setting is what is shown.
As in the MEDIA menus already presented, pressing one of the parameter Adjust
buttons changes the current CONFIG parameter’s value to a new one from the Ki Pro’s
list of choices—repeating the list if you continue to press Adjust—or adjusting a
numerical value up or down.
The exact choices displayed will vary depending on the parameter. Most adjustment
choices made with the Adjust buttons take effect immediately and will be
subsequently stored into the Ki Pro’s non-volatile memory if they remain unchanged
for 3 seconds.
If a Select or Adjust button is held down continuously, the changes will begin to
happen automatically - with acceleration if applicable.
Holding down both the Adjust (up) and Adjust (down) buttons—at the same time —
will set that parameter back to its factory default value.
The CONFIG menu is for system set-up and configuration. Each parameter is
numbered, just like the MEDIA menus.
Note: The composite output on the unit follows the component output; this means that the
composite output only works if either the source format or the convert format is SD.
CONFIG Menu
Parameters
Many of the CONFIG menu parameters are used together to configure the type of Ki
Pro recording and associated conversion formats used on the input or output for a
particular workflow.
Before we begin listing all of the individual CONFIG menu parameters, it’s useful to
see how they can be used for an example application. Here are two examples of
making CONFIG menu selections for specific real world workflows.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
Example 1: In this example the incoming video is 1080i29.97. However, we
want our Ki Pro recording to match the rest of the footage we have
acquired at 720p59.94. Therefore, we select IN CONVERT>HD 720 to get the
desired result. Here are the parameter settings:
1. Set 1.1 RECORD TYPE>NORMAL
2. Set 1.4 IN CONVERT>HD 720
3. Set 1.5 OUT CONVERT>NONE
1 so we
Example 2: In this example the incoming video is 1080PsF 29.97,
need to configure Ki Pro for PsF recordings (which would otherwise be
understood as interlace). To do this, we’ll set the RECORD TYPE to PsF. Here
are the parameter settings:
1. Set 1.1 RECORD TYPE>PsF
2. Set 1.4 IN CONVERT>NONE
3. Set 1.5 OUT CONVERT>NONE
1.1 RECORD TYPE
This parameter defines the frame recording method of media stored. RECORD TYPE can
be configured to record the incoming video signal in a “NORMAL” manner, “PsF” signal
if the incoming source is 1080psf 29.97 (for example), or variable frame rate (VFR).
1.1 RECORD TYPE
NORMAL (default)
PsF
VFR
Record standard format as input
Record progressive segmented frame
Record variable frame rate
Note: A 23.98Hz source is automatically treated as PsF, regardless of this setting. For 29.97 Hz or
25 Hz, “NORMAL” means encode as interlaced and “PSF” means encode as progressive. This
only applies to 1080 formats.
VFR (Variable Frame Rate) recording makes use of meta data embedded in the RP188
data stream on the SD-SDI/HD-SDI input, allowing for the frame rate to change actively.
Examples of cameras offering variable frame rate include Panasonic AJ-HDC27 and
several cameras from the Panasonic HPX line.
Note: with version 1.1 firmware, Ki Pro supports 720p VFR rates of 23.98, 25 and 29.97fps.
Other 720p rates and 1080p VFR support will be added with a future firmware update.
1.3 1080p PLAYBACK
This parameter defines the format applied when 1080p media is played bac k off from
storage.
1.3 1080p Playback
Progressive (default)
PsF
Playback as standard 1080p progressive frame
Playback as 1080 progessive segmented frame
(regardless of what was recorded when input)
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1.4 IN CONVERT
This parameter defines the type of up, down, cross, or aspect-ratio conversion, if any,
applied to the selected input and stored when recording.
1.4 IN CONVERT
NONE (default)
SD
HD 720
HD 1080
No conversion of selected input.
Convert selected input to SD
Convert selected input to HD 720
Convert selected input to HD 1080
Note: There is one converter available for input—if selected, it will be applied to the
currently selected input. Also, input conversion of 1080psf23.98 sources is not supported.
1.5 OUT CONVERT
This parameter defines the type of up, down, cross, or aspect-ratio conversion, if any,
applied to the output when playing media from storage or while recording.
1.5 OUT CONVERT
NONE (default)
SD
HD 720
HD 1080
No conversion on output.
Convert on output to SD
Convert on output to HD 720
Convert on output to HD 1080.
Note: There is one converter available for output—if selected, it will be applied as
appropriate, based on other settings (1.6, 1.7 and 1.8) possibly affecting multiple outputs.
Output conversion of 1080psf23.98 is only supported for SD (not 720p).
1.6 SDI OUT
This parameter defines whether the SDI output matches the file format or has the 1.5
OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
1.6 SDI OUT
FILE FRMT (default)
OUT CONVERT
Output with the same format as the file
Output using the selection in 1.5 OUT CONVERT
Note: The “FILE FRMT” (file format) is from the file on playback and is the result of any input
conversion (or none) applied during capture.
1.7 COMPONENT OUT
This parameter defines whether the component video output matches the file format
or has the 1.5 OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
1.7 COMPONENT OUT
FILE FRMT (default)
OUT CONVERT
Output with the same format as the file
Output using the selection in 1.5 OUT CONVERT
Note: Setting the Ki Pro component input and/or output to "Beta" for HD material will result
in an "Invalid Selection" alarm that will need correction before recordings or other
operations may take place.
1.8 HDMI OUT
This parameter defines whether the HDMI output matches the file format or has the
1.5 OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
1.8 HDMI OUT
FILE FRMT (default)
OUT CONVERT FRMT
Output with the same format as the file
Output using the selection in 1.5 OUT CONVERT
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
2.1 VIDEO INPUT
This parameter selects a video input source from the video input connections available.
This is the video that will be recorded and/or passed through.
2.1 VIDEO INPUT
SDI (default)
HDMI
COMPONENT
Selects SDI input connector
Selects the HDMI input connector
Selects the Component input connectors
2.2 AUDIO INPUT
This parameter selects an audio input source from the audio input connections
available, including embedded SDI audio which requires an SDI video source and HDMI
1
audio, which requires and HDMI video source.
2.2 AUDIO INPUT
SDI (default)
RCA
XLR
HDMI
Selects SDI embedded audio from the SDI input
connector (if SDI video input is selected)
Selects the two RCA jacks (stereo pair) for audio input
Selects the XLR input for audio input
Selects HDMI embedded audio (if HDMI video input is
selected)
Note: XLR input could be microphone level or line level, depending on the connector panel
switch setting.
2.3 AUDIO CHANNELS
This parameter selects the use of either two or eight audio channels via SDI embedded
audio. Generally, when working with camera sources, there are only one or two audio
tracks being produced, and therefore 2 channel would be the appropriate selection. In
post production use, there are often more channels of audio required, so 8 channel
audio may be the appropriate choice in such situations. Ki Pro only allows for the
selection of either 2 channels or 8 channels of audio to be written to the QuickTime file
that is recorded. Therefore, if the source has more than 2 channels of audio, but less
than 8 channels of audio that need to be preserved, the CONFIG Menu parameter 2.3
Audio Channels would need to be set to "8 Channels."
Note: Not all devices support 8 channel audio. Ki Pro does not provide a "mixdown" option for
8 channel recordings on output, so be sure to use devices that support 8 channel audio via
SDI if the 8 channels recorded are desired.
2.3 AUDIO CHANNELS
2 Channels (default)
8 Channels
Selects recording of 2 SDI embedded audio channels
Selects recording of 8 SDI embedded audio channels
3.1 COMPONENT IN LVL
This parameter selects the input level for signals applied at the component video input
connectors.
3.1 COMPONENT IN LVL
SMPTE/N10 (default)
BETACAM
Selects SMPTE/N10 input signal levels
Selects BETACAM input signal levels
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3.2 COMPONENT OUT LVL
This parameter selects the output level for signals applied at the component video
output connectors.
3.2 COMPONENT OUT LVL
SMPTE/N10 (default)
BETACAM
RGB
Selects SMPTE/N10 output signal levels
Selects BETACAM output signal levels
Selects RGB output signal levels
Note: Setting the Ki Pro component input and/or output to "Beta" for HD material will result
in an "Invalid Selection" alarm that will need correction before recordings or other
operations may take place.
3.4 NTSC CONFIG
This parameter selects the output level for the composite video output connector.
3.4 NTSC CONFIG
NTSC (default)
NTSC JAPAN
Selects standard NTSC output signal levels
Selects NTSC Japan output signal levels
4.1 ANALOG AUDIO
This parameter configures the analog audio signal levels for input and output.
Professional audio equipment has much higher levels than consumer equipment: a 0
VU reading corresponds to +4 dBu. Connecting a professional +4 dBu device to a
consumer audio input -10dBV (-7.8 dBu) may cause overloading, whereas the output
of a consumer device probably does not have sufficient power to drive a professional
audio input. With consumer and semi-professional audio equipment, a VU reading of
0 dB is typically referenced to -10 dBV. 0 dBu = 0.775 VRMS. These settings are valid
with the panel Mic/Line switch set to “Line.” (The Mic settings are lower input level
settings for use with condenser and dynamic microphones—use Mic +48 for
powered condenser mics and Mic for dynamic microphones.)
4.1 ANALOG AUDIO
+24dBu (default)
+18dBu
+15dBu
+12dBu
Selects pro-level USA signal levels of +24dBu
Selects pro-level Europe signal levels of +18dBu
Selects pro-level German signal levels of +15dBu
Selects consumer signal levels of +12dBu
Note: Maximum amplitude (0 dBFS)
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
5.1 UPCONVERSION
This parameter selects the type of upconversion from SD performed, if set up to do so
with parameters 1.6 through 1.8.
5.1 UPCONVERSION
ZOOM WIDE (default)
ANAMORPHIC
ZOOM 14X9
ZOOM LTTRBOX
PILLARBOX
Using a combination of zoom and stretch, the image is
sized to fit a 16x9 screen
Anamorphic full screen display
Image is zoomed slightly to fill a 14x9 image with black
sidebars
Image is zoomed to fit the full screen (this can introduce
a small aspect ratio change)
Image is not changed; black sidebars surround image
1
Upconvert Illustrations—Ki Pro
4:3 Upconverts To
These displays on 16:9
4
16
Anamorphic
3
9
Zoom 14x9
Zoom Letterbox
Pillarbox
Zoom Wide
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5.2 DOWNCONVERSION
This parameter selects the type of downconversion from HD performed, if set up to
do so with parameters 1.6 through 1.8.
5.2 DOWNCONVERSION
LETTERBOX (default)
CROP
ANAMORPHIC
Image is reduced with black top and bottom added to
image area, with the aspect ratio preserved
Image is cropped to fit new screen size
HD image is converted to full-screen SD with a 16x9
aspect ratio (anamorphic)
Downconvert Illustrations—Ki Pro
16:9 Downconverts To
These displays on 4:3
16
4
Letterbox
9
3
Crop
Anamorphic
6.1 GENLOCK
This parameter selects source of reference video used to genlock to during playback.
Ki Pro always genlocks to the selected input during capture.
6.1 GENLOCK
INPUT
CMP Y
FREERUN (default)
Use the currently selected input as the Genlock source
Use component Y as the Genlock source
Free run mode: Ki Pro syncs to its own timebase and
is not locked to an external source
8.0 TC IN
This parameter selects the source of timecode from those available.
8.0 TC IN
TC VALUE (default)
SDI RP188
LTC
TIME OF DAY
RS422
Use the value specified in parameter 8.1 TC VALUE
Use the timecode read from the embedded RP188
metadata in the SDI input
Use timecode from the LTC input connector
Set to “Time of Day” clock (CONFIG parameter 55.6)
Allows Ki Pro to accept in-point timecode values for an
edit as the beginning timecode value for a recording.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
8.1 TC VALUE
This parameter selects an hour for timecode to start.
8.1 TC VALUE
1 to 23
Use the ADJUST buttons to select a timecode hour.
For example: 01:00:00:00,
“02:00:00:00, etc.
8.2 TC TYPE
This parameter selects drop frame or non-drop frame timecode.
8.2 TC TYPE
NDF (default)
DF
Selects Non-drop Frame timecode
Selects Drop Frame timecode
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8.3 ARM RECORDING
This parameter selects how recording will begin: either by pressing record button (or
web “Record” button) or via timecode. If starting on timecode, parameters 8.0, 8.1. and
8.2 must be set to qualify the source and type of timecode.
8.3 ARM RECORDING
REC KEY
TC/REC KEY (default)
Start Record button is pressed
Start on Time Code or Record button
35.2 9-PIN REMOTE
Ki Pro RS-422 control is enabled or disabled in the CONFIG menu parameter 35.2 9 Pin
Remote via Local Only or Remote Only parameter settings.
35.2 9 PIN REMOTE
Local Only (default)
Remote Only
Selects Ki Pro control under front panel or web UI
Selects RS422 control of Ki Pro
Once "Remote Only" has been selected, the CONFIG menu parameter 8.0 TC In will
default to "RS422". This change allows Ki Pro to accept in-point timecode values for an
edit as the beginning timecode value for a recording. Example: the value 01:00:00:00 is
entered, this becomes the first frame of the Ki Pro recording.
Note: Not all RS-422 controllers send timecode values to devices over 9-pin. If the controlling
device does not send a timecode value by RS-422, another timecode source may be
selected in the CONFIG menu parameter 8.0 TC In.
IMPORTANT: Ki Pro can be used as a player or a recorder under RS-422 operation, but
when used as a recorder, Ki Pro can only perform assemble edits, not insert edits. This
means that Ki Pro creates a new file for each assemble edit performed; Ki Pro cannot
insert into an existing file.
Ki Pro can operate on a solitary clip under RS-422 control or all of the clips on the
Storage Module. Whether one clip or all clips are active under RS-422 is determined by
the MEDIA menu parameter 15.1 Play Media. IMPORTANT: Ki Pro may react erratically if
invalid clips or media are present and 15.1 Play Media "All" is selected.
Note: Ki Pro RS-422 device control under a single clip is designed so that the clip may be
obtained in it's entirety via non-linear capture. This is made possible because Ki Pro
produces video black/silence prior to the first frame of video for the single clip and after the
last frame of video for the single clip. This means that unlike video tape where you might
not have sufficient pre-roll to ingest a take into a non-linear editor, Ki Pro allows you to
obtain the whole clip by marking the in-point for ingest as the very first frame of video
recorded.
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If MEDIA parameter 15.1 is set to "All", Ki Pro allows the playback of all clips on the
Storage Module in the order they were created, but does not allow for video black/
silence prior to the first clip or after the last clip recorded. In this way, Ki Pro is more
like a tape recording and the traditional VTR behavior. Like a tape recording, Ki Pro
will display continuous timecode for clips that were recorded one after another, but
Ki Pro will also display timecode for clips that might have been recorded with
differing or non-continuous timecode values. In such cases, the user must be aware
of the timecode changes and log and capture material accordingly, just as would be
the case if using a videotape with discontinuous timecode.
There are other important considerations when working with Ki Pro under RS-422
control. When media is mounted in Ki Pro, the most recently recorded clip is
displayed. If using the MEDIA parameter 15.1 Play Media in the "All" selection, this is
akin to having a videotape inserted into a VTR "tail out" and not rewound. Also note
that if using the 15.1 Play Media parameter set to "One", the clips would need to be
stepped through manually via the Ki Pro front panel Select up/down arrows or via
the web UI via the Transport page with the same Select up/down arrows to move
between clips that are to be controlled.
Since Ki Pro has a default state of E-to-E when stopped, if both the input and output
of a non-linear editor are simultaneously connected to Ki Pro, you may then need to
begin playback on Ki Pro to produce a clean picture. After this initial playback
happens under remote control, subsequent playback and stop/pause will appear as
expected as Ki Pro will not re-enter the E-to-E state.
Due to the fact that Ki Pro is file based, when shuttling across clips at high speed, a
"hop" may be visually perceptible as files close and open; this does not compromise
the operation of Ki Pro under RS-422, but may seem different from how a tape-based
VTR would respond under similar conditions.
41.1 VIDEO SG FRMT
This parameter determines the video format output from Ki Pro’s internal test signal
generator. This parameter is used with parameter 41.2 to determine the type of
video test signal output by Ki Pro.
41.1 VIDEO SG FRMT
525i 29.97
625i 25
720p 50
720p 59.94
1080PsF 23.98
1080i 25
1080i 29.97
Select the video format desired for test signal output.
41.2 VIDEO SG
This parameter determines the video signal output from Ki Pro’s internal test signal
generator. This parameter is used with parameter 41.1 to determine the type of
video test signal output by Ki Pro.
41.2 VIDEO SG
OFF (default)
Black
75% Bars
100% Bars
Turn test signal output OFF.
Video test signal output is color black.
Video test signal output is 75% color bars. This 75%
amplitude,100% saturation test signal is useful to check
low frequency response and video tilt as well as the
performance of video clamping.
Video test signal output is 100% color bars. This 100%
white full field bars test signal is helpful to check chroma
amplitude versus overall video level.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
41.3 AUDIO SG
This parameter determines the audio signal output from Ki Pro’s internal test signal
generator.
41.3 AUDIO SG
OFF (default)
Silence
1 kHz
Turn audio test signal output OFF.
Output an audio test signal containing silence only.
Output a standard 1 kHz test signal tone.
50.1 IP CONFIG
This parameter determines the type of TCP/IP network configuration used by Ki Pro.
Note: With parameters 50.1, 50.2 and 50.3, there is no timeout when editing—changes
made
1
while in these menus will be saved and activated when the menu is exited.
50.1 IP CONFIG
STATIC ADDR
DEFAULT ADDR
DHCP (default)
Assign a static IP address manually (parameters 50.2,
50.3, and 50.4 will have to be entered to accomplish
this).
Use the factory default static IP address: 10.65.74.65
Select automatic IP address assignment from DHCP
server on LAN.
Note: if Ki Pro cannot find a DHCP server to
communicate with, it will select the default factory IP
address of 192.168.0.2.
50.2 IP ADDRESS
This parameter determines the static IP address used by Ki Pro for TCP/IP networking.
50.2 IP ADDRESS
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter an IP address compatible
with your LAN (if you have one). If direct connecting to a
computer, enter a legal IP address that you’ll also enter in
the computer’s web browser. This is only needed for
Static IP configurations.
If 50.1 is set to DHCP and there is a DHCP failure, then
the default IP address is: 192.168.0.2
If 50.1 is set to Default Addr, the default static IP address
is: 10.65.74.65
Note: For parameters 50.2, 50.3, and 50.4, you will be setting IP addresses that consist of
“octets” separated by a period (i.e., 90.0.181.0). When editing these, the Select button selects
the octet and then the Adjust buttons select the desired number. Pressing Select Up again
advances to the next octet. At the final octet, the address will flash—pressing Select Up at
that point confirms the setting.
When these parameters are edited, you can abort the editing process by backing out (press
the Select down arrow button repeatedly until the edit passes the first octet). You’ll notice
that after completing the edit on the last octet, the display will blink—this is an indication
that the edited IP address is about to be saved. You can save the edited IP address (press the
Select arrow up to save) or choose not to save by pressing the Select arrow down button.
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50.3 SUBNET MASK
This parameter determines the subnet mask used by Ki Pro for TCP/IP networking.
50.3 SUBNET MASK
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a subnet mask compatible
with your LAN (if you have one). This is only needed for
Static IP configurations.
If 50.1 is set to DHCP, the default Subnet Mask will be
assigned by the DHCP server
If 50.1 is set to Default Addr, the default Subnet Mask is:
255.0.0.0
Please read the “Note” about editing IP addresses in parameter 50.2 as it also applies
to parameters 50.3 and 50.4.
50.4 STATIC GATEWAY
This parameter determines the gateway or router used by Ki Pro on your LAN for TCP/
IP networking.
50.4 STATIC GATEWAY
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a gateway compatible with
your LAN (if you have one). This is only needed for Static
IP configurations.
If 50.1 is set to DHCP, the default gateway will be
assigned by the DHCP server
If 50.1 is set to Default Addr, the default gateway is:
10.0.0.1
Note: Without a properly configured default gateway (whether you have a router/gateway
or not), Ki Pro will be unable to see other Ki Pros on the network, although you may still
be able to control the Ki Pro via a web browser. Also, without a proper gateway defined,
the discovery feature “Available Ki Pros—Click to Refresh” on the Network web page will
not work correctly and list other Ki Pros on the network.
50.5 SYSTEM NAME
This parameter defines a name for Ki Pro and gives it a unique identifier. This same
name is used both when displaying systems via the web interface/802.11b/g and for
display on Ki Pro’s screen saver (if System name is chosen in Parameter 70.1 Screen
Saver).
50.5 SYSTEM NAMEE
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a name for Ki Pro. Using
the adjust buttons and the top Select button, select the
characters for each of the up to 20-character name. The
adjust buttons scroll through the choices and the top
Select button advances to the next character. While
selecting characters, the character being changed will
flash to show its position. The character set allowed is: 0
through 9, '-','.', A through Z (uppercase) and a through z
(lowercase).
Default: aja-kipro
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
50.6 MAC ADDRESS
This parameter is an information only field showing the MAC address of the Ki Pro’s
ethernet adapter.
50.6 MAC ADDRESS
information only display
Selecting this parameter allows you to view Ki Pro’s
ethernet MAC address. The MAC address is a unique
value associated with the internal ethernet network
adapter. MAC addresses are also known as hardware
addresses or physical addresses. MAC addresses
uniquely identify an ethernet adapter on a LAN.
MAC address format: MM:MM:MM:SS:SS:SS
The value is 12-digit hexadecimal, where the first half
identifies the manufacturer and the second half identifies
the unique serial number. Ki Pro has1two MAC
addresses: one for the 802.11 radio and one for the
ethernet adapter—parameter 25.0 shows the radio’s
MAC address.
50.7 802.11 MAC ADDRESS
This parameter is an information only field showing the MAC address of the wireless
adapter.
50.7 802.11 MAC ADDRESS
information only display
Selecting this parameter allows you to view the Ki Pro’s
802.11b/g MAC address. The MAC address is a unique
value associated with the wireless radio’s internal
network adapter. MAC addresses are also known as
hardware addresses or physical addresses. MAC
addresses uniquely identify an ethernet adapter on a
LAN.
MAC address format: MM:MM:MM:SS:SS:SS
The value is 12-digit hexadecimal, where the first half
identifies the manufacturer and the second half identifies
the unique serial number. Ki Pro has two MAC
addresses: one for the radio and one for the ethernet
adapter—parameter 50.6 shows the ethernet MAC
address.
53.0 802.11 AVAILABLE
This parameter shows all available 802.11 wireless networks detected by Ki Pro.
Choosing a network selects it for parameter 53.2. Note: security details for any selected
wireless network must be defined by the related parameters 53.3 through 53.5.
53.0 802.11 AVAILABLE
information display
Choosing this parameter allows you to view 802.11
wireless networks within signal range of Ki Pro. The
Adjust buttons allow you to scroll up or down to view
those available. If you find one that you want to connect
Ki Pro to, then select it via the Adjust buttons and it will
then transfer to parameter 53.2 (802.11 NETWORK) as
the selected wireless network.
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53.1 802.11 CONTROL
This parameter determines whether Ki Pro can be controlled remotely from a wireless
browser. Enabling 802.11b/g control turns on the internal 802.11 radio. Parameters
53.2 through 53.5 must be set correctly to configure Ki Pro so it can be controlled. Ki
Pro wireless control also requires the presence of wireless access point on the local
LAN that it can communicate with.
Note: Although Ki Pro has an internal 802.11 transceiver, it is not a wireless access point.
Wireless browser clients talk to Ki Pro via an external wireless access point (such an
Airport Extreme base station). Also, turning on the 802.11 radio consumes additional
power; it should be disabled unless needed in order to save battery life.
53.1 802.11 CONTROL
DISABLED (default)
ENABLED
Disable wireless control of Ki Pro
Enable wireless 802.11 control of Ki Pro
Caution!
The 802.11b/g radio is disabled by default and can be enabled only in the
presence of an authorized access point.
Controlling Ki Pro from a browser (wired or wireless) is described in
Chapter 4, Remote Web Control. As an overview, to wirelessly connect Ki Pro, you
must:
• Enable the radio (53.1)
• Define the security between Ki Pro and wireless browser clients via parameter 53.3
• Setup the correct password required for wireless browser clients via parameter 53.4
• Choose the wireless access point that will connect Ki Pro to the LAN and to wireless
browser clients (54.1 through 54.3). The access point will have a 802.11b/g network
name defined.
53.2 802.11 NETWORK
This parameter defines the wireless network or “SSID” that Ki Pro will connect to via
the access point.
53.2 802.11 NETWORK
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a legal wireless network
name (SSID) for Ki Pro to connect with. Using the adjust
buttons and the top Select button, select the characters
for the password. The adjust buttons scroll through the
choices and the top Select button advances to the next
character. While selecting characters, the character being
changed will flash to show its position. The character set
allowed is:'-','.', A through Z (uppercase) and a through z
(lowercase).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
53.3 802.11 SECURITY
This parameter defines the type of security (encryption/format) used between Ki Pro,
the access point and wireless browser clients—if any.
53.3 802.11 SECURITY
WPA2 (default)
DISABLED
WEP
WPA
Use WPA2 packet and stream encryption
No security employed. No password needed
Use WEP packet and stream encryption
Use WPA packet and stream encryption
Note: WEP is an entry level encryption, with WPA being
better and WPA2 the best of the three.
53.4 802.11 PASSWORD
1
This parameter defines the password used between Ki Pro, the access point and
wireless browser clients—if any.
53.4 802.11 PASSWORD
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a password for Ki Pro.
Using the adjust buttons and the top Select button, select
the characters for the password. The adjust buttons scroll
through the choices and the top Select button advances
to the next character. While selecting characters, the
character being changed will flash to show its position.
The character set allowed is: 0 through 9, '-','.', A through
Z (uppercase) and a through z (lowercase).
Maximum password length is 20 characters.
53.5 HIDE 802.11 PASSWORD
This parameter determines whether the password set in 53.4 is visible from the front
panel or Web browser user interfaces.
54.1 HIDE 802.11 PASSWORD
ON
OFF (default)
Hide password (show characters as asterisks)
Display password.
Note: if you choose to hide the password (ON setting) and then switch the parameter back to
OFF, then the password will not be displayed. In order to see it again, you would need to reenter it.
54.1 802.11 IP CONFIG
This parameter determines the type of TCP/IP network configuration used by Ki Pro’s
wireless 802.11 transceiver.
Note: There is no timeout when editing—changes made will be saved and activated when the
menu is exited.
54.1 802.11 IP CONFIG
DHCP
STATIC ADDR (default)
Select automatic IP address assignment from DHCP
server in access point.
Assign a static IP address manually (parameters 54.2
and 54.3 will have to be entered to accomplish this).
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54.2 802.11 IP ADDRESS
This parameter determines the static IP address used by Ki Pro’s 802.11 transceiver.
54.2 802.11 IP ADDRESS
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter an IP address compatible
with your access point (if you have one).This is only
needed for Static IP configurations.
Note: For parameters 54.2 and 54.3, you will be setting IP addresses that consist of “octets”
separated by a period (i.e., 90.0.181.0). When editing these, the Select button selects the
octet and then the Adjust buttons select the desired number. Pressing Select Up again
advances to the next octet. At the final octet, the address will flash—pressing Select Up at
that point confirms the setting. When these parameters are edited, you can abort the
editing process by backing out (press the Select down arrow button repeatedly until the
edit passes the first octet). You’ll notice that after completing the edit on the last octet,
the display will blink—this is an indication that the edited IP address is about to be saved.
You can save the edited IP address (press the Select arrow up to save) or choose not to
save by pressing the Select arrow down button.
54.3 802.11 SUBNET MASK
This parameter determines the subnet mask used by Ki Pro’s wireless 802.11
transceiver.
54.3 802.11 SUBNET MASK
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a subnet mask compatible
with your access oint (if you have one). This is only
needed for Static IP configurations.
If 54.1 is set to DHCP, the default Subnet Mask is:
255.255.255.0
55.4 DATE SET
This parameter manually sets the calendar date of the internal Ki Pro clock. The value
is defined as YYYY/MM/DD (year/month/day).
55.4DATE SET
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a calendar date for Ki Pro.
Using the adjust buttons and the top SELECT button,
select the characters for each category ( YYYY/MM/DD).
The adjust buttons scroll through the choices and the top
SELECT button advances to the next character. While
selecting characters, the character being changed will
flash to show its position. When finished, the final press
of the SELECT up button will flash the whole value, hit
SELECT once more to confirm and the next menu
parameter will appear.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — CONFIG menus
55.6 TIME SET
This parameter manually sets the calendar date of the internal Ki Pro clock, when
setting manually (NTP not used).
55.6 TIME SET
variable
Using the adjust buttons, enter a time for Ki Pro’s clock.
Using the adjust buttons and the top Select button, select
the characters for each digit (hours/minutes). The adjust
buttons scroll through the choices and the top Select
button advances to the next character. While selecting
characters, the character being changed will flash to
show its position. When finished, the final press of the
SELECT up button will flash the whole value, hit SELECT
once more to confirm and the next menu parameter will
appear. Time is set using a 24 hour 1
format (military) and
must be set to GMT time.
Note: there are many websites that will assist you in
converting your local regional time to GMT (UTC). AJA
does not endorse any particular one, but here are two
examples:
http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/zones.html
http://hurricanes.noaa.gov/zulu-utc.html
70.1 SCREEN SAVER
When set to “AJA Logo”, a rolling AJA logo screen saver will appear on the alphanumeric
display after 3 minutes of inactivity—defined as no button presses on the front panel.
When the Screen saver is on, the STATUS button or STOP button will exit the screen
saver.
70.1 SCREEN SAVER
ON (AJA LOGO —
default)
Display horizontally rolling AJA logo after 3 minutes of
button inactivity
SYSTEM NAME
Display the Ki Pro system name (defined in parameter
50.5).
Screen saver is disabled.
OFF
Note: The screensaver will not appear if an active transport function is underway (e.g., Play,
Record, etc.).
70.2 DISPLAY INTENSITY
This parameter determines the brightness of the alphanumeric VFD display and front
panel backlit buttons.
70.2 DISPLAY INTENSITY
variable
Using the adjust buttons, you can dim or brighten the
alphanumeric display and activity indicator LEDs in steps
from 1 (dim) to 8 (brightest)
Default: 6
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70.3 FAN SPEED
This parameter determines the speed of Ki Pro’s internal cooling fan. In some
environments where audio recording is occurring close to the Ki Pro unit, it may be
desirable to set the fan speed to “QUIET RECORD” for optimum quiet operation.
70.3 FAN SPEED
NORMAL (DEFAULT)
NORMAL AUTO
QUIET RECORD
QUIET AUTO
Fan runs at normal fixed speed for optimum cooling.
Fan runs at variable speeds for optimal cooling.
Fan runs at a fixed slower speed for optimum quiet.
Fan runs at normal speed until recording begins, then the
fan ramps down to a slower speed for optimum quiet.
80.1SERIAL NUMBER
This parameter displays this Ki Pro’s unique serial number.
80.2 SW VERSION
This parameter displays Ki Pro’s software version level.
99.0 FACTORY RESET
Selecting this parameter and then pressing the ADJUST (up) button for 2 seconds
recalls
Ki Pro’s factory default settings.
Caution!
Selecting this parameter and recalling factory defaults will overwrite the current
settings (with the exception of network settings, which are retained).
Recalling factory defaults does not affect these network settings: IP
Config, IP Address, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway, System Name, 802.11 settings, or
Date and Time. To clear network settings and recall factory defaults, hold down both
the Adjust (up) and Adjust (down) buttons at the same time.
Note: To set a single parameter to its factory default value, go to that parameter and hold
down both the Adjust (up) and Adjust (down) buttons at the same time.
Chapter 4: Browser Remote Control
Remote Control Overview
An optimized web server inside Ki Pro allows you to remotely monitor and adjust parameter
settings via a a browser client, either running on a network wired computer or wireless device.
The network can be a closed local area network, a straight computer-to-Ki Pro cable, or even
exposed through a firewall to a broadband WAN (not generally recommended since anyone
on the internet can then access the Ki Pro). If wireless networking is desired, Ki Pro can
communicate with a LAN attached 802.11 access point for communication with wireless
browser clients like an Apple iPhone or Apple iPod Touch—or 802.11b/g enabled laptops.
The LAN connection on Ki Pro uses a standard RJ45 connector, but internally it’s intelligent
and communicates via standard “straight-through” CAT 5 ethernet cables or null-modem
(cross-over) cables without any configuration or strapping required.
Note: Safari is the supported web browser for Ki Pro control. Other browser software may
work, but AJA cannot guarantee operation.
Web Browser via Ethernet
To control Ki Pro via wired internet, connect a computer to the Ki Pro unit’s LAN connector, an
RJ45 socket, via a CAT5 ethernet cable.
To access the Ki Pro, simply enter its URL in the web browser. The URL will be the IP address
defined in Ki Pro’s Network parameter menus (50.2—please note also that 50.1 through 50.4
must all be configured correctly to access Ki Pro on your network). If Ki Pro is using DHCP (the
default), the IP address can be found by going to parameter 50.2 and reading it there. When
Ki Pro is shipped from the AJA factory, it defaults to DHCP operation.
If 50.1 is set to DHCP, and the DHCP server on the network fails to grant an IP address, then Ki
Pro will fall back to the static IP address.
If 50.1 is set to Default Addr, the factory default static IP address is: 10.65.74.65.
So, if 50.1 is set to Default Addr, you would type the following in the web browser:
http://10.65.74.65 to see Ki Pro’s web interface Main Status screen.
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General Screen
Information
All Ki Pro web screens have certain areas in common. On the left of each screen is an
information pane listing all the available Ki Pro screen choices. Click any of these items to
jump to that screen. At the top of each screen you’ll also find a heading showing the
connection status in addition to the Ki Pro’s serial number and software version. This latter
information is useful if you ever have to call AJA Technical Support to discuss a problem or
get help. In the middle of each screen are menu choices and information pertaining to the
subject matter of that screen (i.e., the “wireless” screen has choices about the wireless radio
and its TCP/IP network configuration).
Ki Pro web screens closely mirror the parameter menus displayed on its front panel. In each
of the screens presented on the following pages, we’ll list the parameter menu numbers
that are related so you can read the full definitions.
S/N, software version, and connection status
Status Information
List of Ki Pro Screens:
Click one to Display
that Screen
Ki Pro Web Interface, Main Status Screen
Controlling Multiple
Ki Pros
From the Network screen, you can at-a-glance see all of the Ki Pro devices present on the
same local LAN as the current Ki Pro you are controlling. At the bottom of the screen under
“Available Ki Pros: Click to Refresh”, the system names of all Ki Pros on the LAN are listed.
Clicking on any of these will bring up the Status screen of that particular Ki Pro.
Note: the Ki Pro you control may be running a different software version so screens may
look different. As a rule, it’s wise to have all your Ki Pro devices running the most current
software and the same version. Also, you must have a properly configured default gateway
to see the Ki Pros. In addition to Ki Pro on the LAN, the network screen will also display any
AJA FS1 frame syncs that are also attached to the LAN—these will be displayed under
“Others” at the bottom.
Also, if the Default Gateway (parameter 50.4) is not configured properly, other Ki Pros will
not be visible here. If it displays “No Ki Pros found” then check the gateway setting.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
Gang Recording
Multiple Ki Pro units can be used in unison to produce recordings via the Gang Control
feature, beginning with Ki Pro version 2.0 firmware. This feature is only available via the
web UI when Ki Pro units have IP addresses configured under a common network and
subnet mask and are connected via their LAN connections to an ethernet switch or hub
to a host computer.
Important Note: Gang control via the web UI is only supported under wired ethernet
connections, not under 802.11 wireless connections. AJA recommends disabling the
802.11 wireless connections when working with Ki Pro units under gang control.
Leaving 802.11 wireless connections enabled while operating Ki Pro units under
gang control can lead to sluggish or erratic web UI interactions.
Example:
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You have a Ki Pro "Master" and a Ki Pro "Slave" both attached on a network where their
static IP addresses are 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.3 respectively—each with a subnet
mask value of 255.255.255.0. They are connected to a host computer with IP address
192.168.0.1 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0. The host computer uses a web browser, like
Apple's Safari, to access the "Master" Ki Pro by entering 192.168.0.2 in the URL field of the
browser. The Ki Pro "Master" unit web UI should appear.
How to Use Gang Recording
Navigating to the Transport screen, a "Show Gang Controls" button appears on the left
hand side of the screen. If "Show Gang Controls" is clicked, a list of "Available Ki Pros" is
presented. If Ki Pro units that were expected to appear do not appear, click on "Hide
Gang View" then click on "Show Gang View" again to refresh. Ki Pro information can take
up to a few seconds to be displayed. Finally, if Ki Pros are not listed after refreshing,
confirm that the Ki Pros are on the appropriate network, have the appropriate IP address,
etc.
Parameters for each available Ki Pro will appear in the Gang
Controls area. These include: System, Input Format, Free Storage,
Gang, Master and Settings. Ki Pro units that may be added to a
gang will appear under the System column. The Input Format
column gives information on what type of video format/framerate each system is
receiving. Free Storage allows for an "at a glance" view of the capacity of the media in
each unit. Gang is where the units can be added or removed from the gang. Master
allows the promotion of a Ki Pro unit to the "controlling" role in the gang. Settings allows
for the configuration of clip names on the Master and Slave Ki Pro units.
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Ki Pro Web Interface, Transport Screen—Show Gang Contro
To add a Ki Pro to a gang, simply select the checkbox for the unit in the Gang column. As a
shortcut, if all available Ki Pro units are desired for a gang, select the "All" item below Gang.
Alternately, if you want to clear units from a gang, deselect them or use the "Clear" option.
IMPORTANT: There can be only one Master in a gang; typically, the IP address for the Ki Pro
unit you entered and are viewing the web UI on is the one which should be promoted to
the "controlling" role. If the unit with the IP address that is currently being viewed via the
web UI is selected, a red capitalized "MASTER" text will appear on the webpage above the
columns.
A Master Ki Pro unit can send three items to the slave Ki Pros units within a gang; a record
start command, a stop command and clip naming. The record start and stop commands are
controlled from the web UI Transport area above the gang information on the Master Ki Pro
unit or via physical front panel buttons (provided the unit is set to "Local Only" for the
CONFIG parameter 35.2).
The Settings area is where the Ki Pro clip name for each unit is decided.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
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By default, the Ki Pro is configured to use the standard clip naming conventions, not the custom
clip naming conventions. The first user selection is "Use Custom Clip Name"; if the user wants to
use the standard clip naming convention, leave this set to "OFF", but if the user wants to create a
custom clip name, mouse click on the "OFF" to reveal a pulldown for "OFF/ON" selection, then
click "OK".
If "OFF" was selected, the next parameter would be "Clip Name", again, clicking on the "SC" or
"Clip" presented brings up the pulldown and the "OK" box. "Clip Number" must be entered
manually with a valid value for Ki Pro of 1 through 999 and then the enter/return key must be
hit. NOTE: If the enter/return key is not entered after the selection, the value will revert to
whatever was previously shown. Clicking on the value next to "Clip Append" and "Alpha
Append" both bring up a pulldown and an "OK" button. "Take" operates like the "Clip Number",
where a valid value of 1 to 999 can be entered and then the enter/return key needs to be hit for
confirmation of the value. For custom clip naming considerations, review the section in this
manual on "Custom Clip Naming."
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Note that for Slave Ki Pro units, the Settings column provides a selection of either Use: "Master
Name" or "Slave Name." Clicking on the default value of "Master Name" pulls up a pulldown
selection of "Master Name" or "Slave Name" with an "OK" confirmation button. If the desire is to
have clips named the same across all Ki Pro units' recordings, then the Use: "Master Name"
selection should be made. If the desire is to have clips named independently on Ki Pro units,
then "Slave Name" should be selected. Selecting "Slave Name" means that the recording will
take it's name from the individual Ki Pro's parameters and not accept the value pushed to the
Slave by the Master Ki Pro.
It is important to note that as of firmware 2.0, Ki Pro can initiate recordings among units quickly,
but not all units will begin or end recordings precisely at the same time or the same frame. This
is not really an issue if matching timecode via SDI embedded RP-188 or LTC is sent to each unit
from a timecode generator via discrete outputs on the timecode generator or via a distribution
amplifier for the timecode. Note that many non-linear edit systems, like Final Cut Pro, can sync
clips based on timecode values for multi-clip editorial. Also note that Ki Pro does not, as of 2.0
firmware, provide simultaneous playback of media; only record start and stop functions are
available.
Note: Ki Pro Slave units in a gang do not respond if the Master Ki Pro is being operated under
RS-422 device control. This avoids the potential for a Ki Pro Master left in a gang to
accidentally arm other units outside of the defined parameters of control via the web UI or
front panel buttons.
Resetting Values To
Factory Settings
To perform a global reset of Ki Pro to factory settings, go to Ki Pro front panel CONFIG parameter
99.0 for a reset to factory values.
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Config Screen
The Config screen is a general purpose screen used to configure Ki Pro’s I/O choices,
conversion choices, and also set up Ki Pro’s environment (name, clock settings, display etc.)
Ki Pro Web Interface, Config Screen
Note: In the following web screen control definitions, the number in parentheses refers to
the Parameter descriptions in Chapter 2—you can read more information there about the
choices and their meanings.
In Convert (1.4): This parameter defines the type of up, down, cross, or aspect-ratio conversion,
if any, applied to the selected input when recording.
SDI Output (1.6): This parameter defines whether the SDI output matches the file format or has
the 1.5 OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
Component Output (1.7): This parameter defines whether the component video output
matches the file format or has the 1.5 OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
Out Convert (1.5): This parameter defines the type of up, down, cross, or aspect-ratio
conversion, if any, applied to the output.
Record Type (1.1): This parameter defines the frame recording method of media stored.
RECORD TYPE can be configured to record the incoming video signal in a “NORMAL”
manner, as a “PsF” signal if the incoming source is 1080psf 29.97 (for example), or VFR for
variable framerate recording of the SD-SDI/HD-SDI input (such as Varicam).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
Arm Recording (8.3): This parameter selects how recording will begin: either by pressing record
button (or web “Record” button) or via timecode. If starting on timecode, parameters 8.0,
8.1. and 8.2 must be set to qualify the source and type of timecode.
9 Pin Remote (35.2): Ki Pro RS-422 control is enabled or disabled in the CONFIG menu parameter
35.2 9 Pin Remote via Local Only or Remote Only settings made here via pulldown or viar
the front panel. This operation is described fully in Chapter 3 under Config Parameter 35.2,
9-Pin Remote.
HDMI Output (1.8): This parameter defines whether the HDMI output matches the file format or
has the 1.5 OUT CONVERT selection applied to it.
Video In (2.1): This parameter selects a video input source from the video input connections
available. This is the video that will be recorded and/or passed through.
Audio In (2.2): This parameter selects an audio input source from the audio input connections
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available. This is the audio that will be recorded and/or passed through.
Component In (3.1): This parameter selects the input level for signals applied at the component
video input connectors.
Component Level (3.2): This parameter selects the output level for signals applied at the
component video output connectors.
NTSC Config (3.4): This parameter selects the output level for the composite video output
connector.
Analog Audio Standard (4.1): This parameter configures the analog audio signal levels for input
and output. Professional audio equipment has much higher levels than consumer
equipment: a 0 VU reading corresponds to +4 dBu. Connecting a professional +4 dBu
device to a consumer audio input -10dBV (-7.8 dBu) may cause overloading, whereas the
output of a consumer device probably does not have sufficient power to drive a
professional audio input. With consumer and semi-professional audio equipment, a VU
reading of 0 dB is typically referenced to -10 dBV. 0 dBu = 0.775 VRMS.
Upconvert Mode (5.1): This parameter selects the type of upconversion from SD performed, if set
up to do so with parameters 1.4 through 1.8.
Downconvert Mode (5.2): This parameter selects the type of downconversion from HD
performed, if set up to do so with parameters 1.4 through 1.8.
Genlock Source (6.1): This parameter selects source of reference video used to genlock to during
playback.
TC In (8.0): This parameter selects the source of timecode from those available.
TC Value (8.1): This parameter selects an hour timecode start.
TC Type (8.2): This parameter selects drop frame or non-drop frame timecode.
System Name (50.5): This parameter defines a name for Ki Pro and gives it a unique identifier. This
same name is used both when displaying systems via the web interface/wireless and for
display on Ki Pro’s screen saver (if System name is chosen in Parameter 70.1 Screen Saver).
Date Set (55.4): This parameter manually sets the calendar date of the internal Ki Pro clock.
Time Set (55.6): This parameter manually sets the time of the internal Ki Pro clock.
Screen Saver (70.1): When set to “AJA Logo”, a rolling AJA logo screen saver will appear on the
alphanumeric display after 3 minutes of inactivity—defined as no button presses on the
front panel.
Display Intensity (70.2): This parameter determines the brightness of the alphanumeric display
and front backlit buttons.
Fan Speed (70.3): This parameter determines the speed of Ki Pro’s internal cooling fan. In some
environments where audio recording is occurring close to the Ki Pro unit, it may be
desirable to set the fan speed to “QUIET AUTO” or “QUIET RECORD”.
Video SG Format (41.1): This parameter determines the video format output from Ki Pro’s internal
test signal generator.
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Video SG (41.2): This parameter determines the video signal output from Ki Pro’s internal test
signal generator. This parameter is used with parameter above (41.1) to determine the
type of video test signal output by Ki Pro.
Audio SG (41.3): This parameter determines the audio signal output from Ki Pro’s internal test
signal generator (OFF, silence, or 1 kHz tone).
Gang and Master: These controls related to Gang recording using Multiple Ki Pro units are
described fully several pages earlier in this chaper under the topic “Gang Recording”.
1080p Playback: This parameter defines the format applied when 1080p media is played bac k
off from storage. You can choose Playback as standard 1080p progressive frame or 1080
progessive segmented frame (regardless of what was recorded when input).
Audio Channels (2.3): This parameter selects use of either two or eight audio channels via SDI
embedded audio.
Media Screen
This screen offers settings for a variety of media-related functions, including formatting
storage media, type of Apple ProRes 422 encoding, and reel and clip definitions.
Ki Pro Web Interface, Media Screen
Encode Type (14.1): This parameter defines the Apple ProRes encoding method.
Play Media (15.1): This parameter determines behaviour during playback: either one clip will
play when “Play” is selected, or all clips will be played when a play is selected. See
parameter 15.1, Play Media, in Chapter 3 for greater detail and caveates.
Loop Play (15.2): This parameter turns looped playback on and off.
Format Media (16.1): This parameter is used to format the currently selected storage device.
Reel Name (17.0): The reel name is a number between 1 and 999 that determines the name of
the media as it will appear when the storage device (storage module or ExpressCard/34)
is mounted on a Mac OSX desktop.
Clip Name (17.2): This parameter determines the clip name associated with all clips generated
while using this setting. The clip name is either “Clip” or “SC”.
Clip Number (17.3): This parameter determines the clip number, from 1 to 999, that follows the
CLIP NAME, and is associated with all clips generated while using this setting.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
Clip Append (17.4): This parameter is used with parameter 17.5 ALPHA APPEND to append a text
value after the CLIP NUMBER or have no text appended.
Take (17.8): This parameter determines the TAKE number, from 1 to 999, that follows the CLIP
NAME and CLIP NUMBER, followed by any ALPHA APPEND (if selected), generated for all
clips while using this setting.
Alpha Append (17.5): This parameter is used with parameter 17.4 CLIP APPEND to append a text
value after the CLIP NUMBER.
Use Custom Clip Name (19.1): This parameter enables or disables whether a custom clip name can
be used. Refer to “Custom Clip Naming” in Chapter 3 for greater detail.
Custom Clip Name (19.2): This parameter allows you to enter a custom clip name. Once entered,
you’ll have to click the Apply button for it to take effect and be used.
1 clip take name
Use Custom Clip Take (19.3): This parameter enables or disables whether a custom
can be used. Refer to “Custom Clip Naming” in Chapter 3 for greater detail.
Custom Take (19.4): This parameter allows you to define a custom take number. Once entered,
you’ll have to click the Apply button for it to take effect.
Use Gang Clip Name (22.1): This parameter is used when performing gang recording via
multiple Ki Pros (refer to Controlling Multiple Ki Pros earlier in this Chapter). If the desire is to
have clips named the same across all Ki Pro ganged units' recordings, then use the "Master
Name" pull down selection. If the desire is to have clips named independently on Ki Pro
units, then "Slave Name" should be selected from the pull down. Selecting "Slave Name"
means that the recording will take it's name from the individual Ki Pro's parameters and not
accept the value pushed to the Slave by the Master Ki Pro. Refer to “Custom Clip Naming” in
Chapter 3 for greater detail.
Transport Screen
This screen offers record, playback, fast forward, rewind and stop controls, similar to those
available on the operator-side of Ki Pro. The screen also duplicates what is displayed on the Ki
Pro front visual display, so you can see exactly what the Ki Pro operator/camera person is seeing.
Ki Pro Web Interface, Transport Screen
STOP : Press STOP to end playback or a media operation (PLAY, FF, REV, or RECORD). When
stopped, Ki Pro displays the current point in the stopped clip. STOP can also be considered
a “pause” button. A double-press of the STOP button will return Ki Pro to an
E-to-E state.
PLAY : press PLAY to begin forward playback of the current clip at normal speed.
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RECORD : press the red RECORD button to begin recording. Once in RECORD mode, all
other transport buttons are locked-out except the STOP button.
FFWD : press button to begin fast playback of the current clip at 2x speed. Successive
pushes increase the speed to 4x, 8x, and 16x. (Pushing the button after 16x speed is
reached has no further effect.) When fast-forwarding, audio is muted.
REV : pressing REV when not lit, begins playback of the current clip in reverse at 1x speed.
Successive pushes increase the speed to 2x, 4x, 8x, and 16x. (Pushing the button after 16x
speed is reached has no further effect.) When playing in reverse, audio is muted for all
speeds above 1x.
SELECT (up/down): while in the TRANSPORT menu, the SELECT buttons select clips and
operate like “previous” and “next” keys. When a clip is selected it is “cued” to the
beginning of the clip. Note that ordering and playback of clips is based on timestamp
order, not clip name.
ADJUST (up/down): while in the TRANSPORT menu, and in the “STOP” mode, the ADJUST
buttons will “single step” the current clip at a rate of one frame per button push
(up=forward, down=reverse).
DELETE CLIP: dedicated button that when pressed, deletes the currently selected clip.
When pressed, the system displays a precautionary “ARE YOU SURE?” prompt.
SLOT: this button serves two purposes. First, it selects which storage is accessed by
the system-either the storage module slot or one of the ExpressCard slots.
Second, the SLOT button is used to unmount a currently selected piece of media.
Caution!
Not using the SLOT button to unmount media before removal can cause
problems with the files stored on that media.
Pushing the SLOT button cycles between unmounting media and selecting media.
This function is only active when in the “STOP” mode and requires a “PRESS STOP TO
CONFIRM” if not stopped. After you select a slot, the system returns to the last selected
clip and timecode for that slot. If the media has been changed since the slot was last
selected (physically removed/media replaced), then the “first” clip on the media will be
“cued” to its start point. If inserted media has any issues, additional prompts may be
displayed as appropriate such as: “WARNING FRMT MEDIA” or “WARNING MEDIA LOW.”
Show Gang Controls: when clicked, the Transport screen will be expanded at the bottom to
show additional controls for controlling multiple Ki Pros. See “Gang Recording” discussed
earlier in this chapter.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
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Ki Pro Web Interface, Transport Screen—Show Gang Controls
Network Screen
This screen contains all of the information required to set up Ki Pro TCP/IP networking. The
screen also shows all Ki Pros that are on the same LAN as the Ki Pro the web browser is currently
communicating with.
Note: Ki Pro IP Address and netmask fields filter keystrokes and only allow legal characters. The
Ki Pro also checks the format of the entry to ensure it is valid; if found to be invalid, the
background of the IP Address or netmask will turn red. If you click the Update button while
an invalid entry exists in one of the these fields, Ki Pro will display an error dialog—you must
correct the error before updating.
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Ki Pro Web Interface, Network Screen
IP Address Type (50.1): use to change the IP address for Ki Pro. When an IP address is entered
and the Update button is clicked, the IP address will change and the browser will display
a “redirecting to...” page which should send the browser to the new IP address entered.
(You can also click on a link on the redirect page.
IP Address (50.2): enter an IP address compatible with your LAN (if you have one). When
networking Ki Pro to a computer, this is the IP address that you’ll enter in the computer’s
web browser to bring up the Ki Pro’s web interface from its embedded web server. You
must also click the “Update” button to update Ki Pro with the IP address entered here.
Netmask (50.3): enter a subnet mask compatible with your LAN (if you have one). You must
also click the “Update IP Address” button to update Ki Pro with the changed information
entered here.
Default Gateway (50.4): enter the IP address for your LAN’s gateway/router (if you have one).
You must also click the “Update IP Address” button to update Ki Pro with the changed
information entered here.
Update Network Settings: pressing this button requests Ki Pro to update its IP information with
that entered on this screen.
Available Ki Pros- Click to Refresh: all of the Ki Pro devices present on the same local LAN as the
current Ki Pro are listed below this heading (see note below). The serial numbers of all Ki
Pros on the LAN, or their defined “System Names” (see parameter 50.5) are listed—and
clicking on any of these will bring up the Status screen of that Ki Pro. Note: the Ki Pro you
control may be running a different software version so screens may look different. As a
rule, it’s wise to have all your Ki Pro devices running the most current software and the
same version. Also, without a properly configured default gateway (whether you have a
router/gateway or not), the discovery feature “Available Ki Pros—Click to Refresh” on the
Network page may not work.
Note: Ki Pro devices shown are cached and may not reflect the realtime state of all Ki Pros on
the LAN. As Ki Pros are added or removed from the network they may take awhile to
appear in the Available Ki Pros listing. If, at anytime you want a current view of the
network (clearing the cache and showing the realtime state), then press the Control key
on your keyboard while clicking the Available Ki Pros—Click to Refresh link.
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
Wireless Screen
This screen is used to enable or disable wireless access to/from Ki Pro and a LAN wireless access
point, as well as check settings and update them. You will see different controls depending on
whether wireless access has been enabled or disabled.
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Ki Pro Web Interface, Wireless Screen
KiPro 802.11 Control (53.1): this parameter determines whether Ki Pro can be controlled remotely
from a wireless browser. Enabling wireless control turns on the internal 802.11 radio.
Parameters 53.2 through 53.5 must be set correctly to configure Ki Pro so it can be
controlled. Ki Pro wireless control also requires the presence of wireless access point on the
local LAN that it can communicate with.
Note: Although Ki Pro has an internal 802.11 transceiver, it is not a wireless access point.
Wireless browser clients talk to Ki Pro via an external wireless access point (such an Airport
Extreme base station).
Warning!
Do not touch the Ki Pro radio or antenna cover when the antenna is transmitting or
receiving.
Warning!
Install this device in such a manner as to maintain a minimum of 5 cm (2 inches)
separation distance between the radiating element(s) and all persons. This safety
warning conforms with FCC radio frequency exposure limits.
802.11 Connection Status: shows the status of connection (connected or not connected)
802.11 IP Address Type (54.1): shows the type of IP address (DHCP, Static, or default)
802.11 Network (53.2, SSID): This parameter defines the wireless network or “SSID” that Ki Pro will
connect to via the access point.
802.11 IP Address (54.2): This parameter determines the static IP address used by Ki Pro for TCP/IP
networking.
802.11 Security (53.3): This parameter defines the type of security (encryption/format) used
between Ki Pro, the access point and wireless browser clients—if any.
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802.11 Netmask (54.3): This parameter determines the subnet mask used by Ki Pro for TCP/IP
networking.
802.11 Password (53.4): This parameter defines the password used between Ki Pro, the access
point and wireless browser clients—if any. Field is only displayed if Security is enabled.
802.11 MAC Address (50.7): This parameter is an information only field showing the MAC
address of the wireless adapter.
802.11 Connection Status: This parameter is an information only field that explains the status
of the wireless link, whether it is up or not, and whether any changes need to be made (if
the wireless access point is secured, it will tell you the type of security, i.e. WPA, WPA2
etc.).
Update and Apply 802.11 Settings: clicking this button updates the Ki Pro with any changes
you’ve made on the “Wireless” screen.
Clips Screen
The Clips screen allows you to see at a glance all of the clips on the currently selected media
storage device (storage module or Expresscard/34 memory card) as chosen by the SLOT
button (see Transport screen).
This screen also allows you delete clips listed, either all-clips or individually. A refresh button
ensures that the web pages cache is updated to show the latest state of what is on the Ki Pro.
Ki Pro Web Interface, Clips Screen
Important Note: If a Ki Pro Slave unit is set to accept a Ki Pro Master unit's clip name via the
"Use: Master Name" setting, the Slave unit will create a file with this name without regard
for what might already be recorded on the disk. This means that if a file was already
named "SC1ATK1" and it existed on the Slave unit prior to the Master unit pushing this
same file name to the Slave unit, the pre-existing file would be overwritten under the
"Use: Master Name" context. Therefore, it is typically best to use newly formatted or
empty Storage Modules for gang recordings to avoid any potential of overwriting
existing clips on a Storage Module in a Ki Pro that is added to a gang and is designated as
a Slave unit."
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Ethernet
Update Firmware
Screen
The Update Firmware screen allows you to update your Ki Pro to later versions of software as
they are issued by AJA and posted on the website. When software updates are released, they
often contain new features, improvements, and bulletins that may be very useful. We suggest
checking the website when you have time.
1
Ki Pro Web Interface, Update Firmware Screen
Preparing to Update Software
Although Ki Pro comes from the factory pre-installed with software, it may not be as up-to-date
as software posted on our AJA website. This topic describes the steps required to upgrade the
software in your Ki Pro.
1. Download the Latest Ki Pro Software
Current and past releases of Ki Pro software are available on the World Wide Web from
AJA's website. To get the software, point your browser to:
http://www.aja.com/support/ki-pro/ki-pro.php
This link is also available at the bottom of the “Update Firmware” screen (discussed later
on this page). Once you’re at the update page, Ki Pro software files can be selected to
download to your Mac or PC for upgrading your machine.
2. Unpack the Software
Ki Pro software update files are “ZIP” files, which you can open with a number of standard
and third party uncompressor applications. The software image that you’ll install on Ki
Pro is a file with a name like kipro_ver_2.0.0.99.bin or similar.
Note: Depending on your PC or Mac operating system settings, the “.bin” extension may not be
visible to you in a file directory.
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Upload and Install the Software on your Ki Pro
Uploading and installing the software update only requires a PC or Mac that can “see” the Ki
Pro via its ethernet connection. Follow this procedure to install the software:
1. Point your browser at Ki Pro's upgrade page by clicking on the “Update Firmware” link
at the bottom of the navigation box on the left-hand side of any Ki Pro web page.
2. Click the “Browse...” button to select the file you previously downloaded. For example:
kipro_ver_2.0.0.99.bin contained in the zipfile downloaded from AJA.
3. When you have selected a valid Ki Pro image file, click the “Upload” button in the web
browser. The file you select will upload to the Ki Pro and be tested for validity.
Incomplete, corrupted, or non-Ki Pro software files are rejected.
4. Wait for the procedure to complete—it will take only a few minutes. When done, Ki Pro
will prompt you to restart your machine. After restart, Ki Pro will be running the new
software. Progress is shown on the front panel.
5. Once these steps are complete, Ki Pro will be running the software you just uploaded
until the next time you upgrade it. The configuration of the Ki Pro prior to the upgrade
will be preserved.
Ensure the new software is running by bringing up the Ki Pro web page again; the
software version is displayed at the top of all web screens. If for some rare reason it
didn't update, you can then run through the update steps again.
Note:
On some browsers, the Retry page may appear even though the software upgrade was
successful. If this occurs, before clicking on retry, refresh the web page and check the
version number. If the new version number appears at the top of the page, the software
upgrade was successful. If the old version appears, click Retry.
If there is a power outage or glitch during the software download, Ki Pro will boot the
older software version and the upgrade process can then be re-started by the user. This
happens because Ki Pro has been designed with a safety feature where an internal “safe”
copy of the previous software is retained in the event the updating process fails.
Caution!
AJA recommends you only update the Ki Pro when on mains power, or with a
fully charged battery.
Web Browser via Wireless Device
Another option for remote control is Ki Pro’s built-in 802.11 wireless transceiver which can
communicate with properly configured 802.11 wireless access points such as an Airport
Basestation or 802.11 wireless router.
Note: Although Ki Pro has an internal 802.11 transceiver, it is not a wireless access point.
Wireless browser clients talk to Ki Pro via an external wireless access point (such an
Airport Extreme base station). Enabling wireless control turns on the internal 802.11
radio. Parameters 53.1 through 55.1 must be set correctly to configure Ki Pro so it can be
controlled via 802.11b/g.
You can enable or disable wireless control of Ki Pro for security. Further, you can select a type
of wireless security to match other devices; popular methods such as WEP, WPA and WPA2 are
supported. To use wireless control you’ll follow this basic process:
• Enable wireless control of Ki Pro: use parameter 53.1 to make this choice.
• Enter the name of a wireless network to connect to (as set on the access point you’ll
communicate with): use parameter 53.2 to enter the access point name (SSID).
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Wireless
• Select the type of security, if any, to be used. If there is security, you’ll also enter its
password: use parameter 53.3 to choose a method.
• Once configured, you can control Ki Pro from an iPhone or other 802.11 wireless device
that supports browser control (iPod Touch et al).
Using Wireless
Devices to Control
Ki Pro
Once an access point on the LAN is set up and Ki Pro is configured and enabled to communicate
with wireless devices, making the connection is easy. Like using a web browser on a Mac or PC,
wireless devices such as iPhones that have browsers can also be used to control Ki Pro. As in
using a computer’s browser, the same optimized web server inside Ki Pro allows you to use an
iPhones browser to load Ki Pro web pages for it. There are many wireless devices, some with
non-standard or incompatible browsers, so all examples shown in this chapter are based on
using an iPhone or iPod Touch wireless device. These are AJA supported configurations.
1 devices with
To access the Ki Pro, simply enter its URL in the iPhone’s web browser. For most
standard browser displays (such as a laptop), the URL will be the IP address defined in Ki Pro’s
Network parameter menus (50.2—please note also that 50.1 through 50.4 must all be
configured correctly to access Ki Pro on your network). If Ki Pro is using DHCP, the IP address can
be found by pressing the Status button on the Ki Pro front panel repeatedly until the Network
Status display is shown or by going to parameter 50.2 and reading it there.
If 50.1 is set to Default Addr, the factory default static IP address is: 10.65.74.65. So, if 50.1 is set to
Default Addr, you would type the following in the web browser: http://10.65.74.65 to see Ki Pro’s
web interface Main Status screen.
iPhone Ki Pro
Screens
When using a small handheld device like iPhone or iPod Touch browser, you will want to also use
the IP address as a URL, but also specifying a specially formatted webpage formatted for the
small display:
On an iPhone or iPod Touch, use this URL:
http://<IP address for your Ki Pro>/iphone.html
For example, if your Ki Pro is 90.0.7.110, then on an iPhone, you’d enter:
http://90.0.7.110/iphone.html
Once entered, the URL takes you to a navigation screen with these choices for controlling KiPro:
• Status
• Config
• Media
• Clips
The fields on these pages are a subset of the fields previously described in the Web Browser
page definitions.
When Using an iPhone to Control Ki Pro
• Be sure that your iPhone or iPod touch is updated to the latest version of software
(as of this writing, version 3.0.1 is the most recent for the iPhone). If you do not use
the most recent software for these devices, you may experience less than optimal
interaction with the Ki Pro wireless UI including, but not limited to inability to use
the transport buttons to operate the device.
• You can add the Ki Pro web control to your iPhone Home Screen by pushing the
"+" button, then "Add to Home Screen". Hint: Before adding the Ki Pro to the
Home Screen, open the Transport portion of the UI on the phone. The icon
created on the Home Screen will then look like the Ki Pro's front panel.
Hint: To see all of the buttons as they appear on the front of the Ki Pro in the
iPhone UI, turn the iPhone to landscape mode in the Transport menu and you will
then see the SELECT up/down. ADJUST up/down, DELETE CLIP and SLOT buttons.
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Access
Transport Controls such
as Record and Play
View
Ki Pro
Status
Configure
Input/Output
and Conversions
View
clips list
and select
or delete clips
Navigation Menu
Choose
Apple ProRes 422
Encoding Method
and Make
Media Choices
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — Web Browser via Wireless
Status
This iPhone screen displays the following controls and values:
• I/O status including input format, record format, video source and audio source
• Conversion status
• Alarm status (OK or specific alarm conditions)
Config
This iPhone screen displays the following controls and values:
• Out convert format
• SDI output
• Component output
• 802.11 enable/disable
• 802.11 security
• 802.11 Network (SSID)
• 802.11 password
1
Media
This iPhone screen displays the following controls and values:
• Encode type
• Loop play on/off
• Format media
• Delete mode
• Reel name
• Clip name
• Clip number
• Clip append
• Alpha append
Clips
This iPhone screen lists all the clips on the currently selected Ki Pro storage device with controls
for deleting all clips or specific clips. You can also select “Refresh” to update the browser with the
latest list of clips on the Ki Pro storage device.
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Appendix A: Specifications
Video Input
Digital:
SD and HD-SDI (1xBNC), SMPTE-259/292/296
HDMI
Analog:
SD/HD Component (3xBNCS):
SMPTE/EBU N10, Betacam 525 line,
Betacam 525J, YPbPr
12-bit A/D, 2x oversampling
Video Output (all simultaneously active)
Digital:
SD and HD-SDI, SMPTE-259/292/296 (1xBNC)
HDMI
Analog:
Composite (1xBNC):
NTSC, NTSCJ, PAL
12-bit D/A, 8x oversampling
SD/HD Component (3xBNCs):
SD: SMPTE/EBU N10, Betacam 525 line,
Betacam 525J, RGB
12-bit D/A, 8x oversampling
HD: YPbPr, RGB
12-bit D/A, 2x oversampling
Audio Input
Digital:
24-bit SDI embedded audio, 8 channel, 48kHz
HDMI embedded, 2 channel
Analog:
24-bit A/D, 2 channel balanced (2 XLR), 48kHz
Input level: Line, Mic, Mic + phantom 48Vdc
2 channel unbalanced (2 RCA)
A
1
1
A-2
Audio Output
Digital:
24-bit SDI embedded audio, 8 channel, 48kHz
HDMI embedded, 8 channel
Analog:
24-bit D/A, 2 channel balanced XLR, 48kHz
2 channel unbalanced (2 RCA)
Network
10/100/1000 Ethernet (RJ45)
802.11b/g wireless transceiver
Embedded webserver for remote control
Panel User Interface
2 x 20 character display, with dedicated buttons
Timecode
LTC timecode input and output via BNC
SDI embedded RP188 timecode
Control
LANC Loop (2 LANC connectors)—not supported in Version 2.0
Lens Tap: connects to optional AJA Lens Tap intercept cable placed between camera body
and lens for start/stop control—not supported in Version 2.0
IEEE-1394a/FireWire 400 for control and timecode data—not supported in Version 2.0
Serial Port
RS-422 (slave pinout), 9-pin (available beginning with version 2.0 firmware)—Connector
pinout is as follows:
1 GND
2 TX 3 RX +
4 GND
5 No Connection
6 GND
7 TX +
8 RX 9 GND
Shell GND
Ki Pro Installation and Operation Manual — FireWire
FireWire
IEEE-1394b, FireWire™ 800Mb/s connects to Mac Pro or MacBook Pro (mount as harddrive)—not
supported in Version 2.0
Hardware up-conversion - 10-bit
Anamorphic: full-screen
Pillar box 4:3: results in a 4:3 image in center of screen with black sidebars
Zoom 14:9: results in a 4:3 image zoomed slightly to fill a 14:9 image with black side bars
Zoom Letterbox: image zoomed to fill screen
1
Zoom Wide: combination of zoom and horizontal stretch to fill 16:9 screen; this setting can
introduce a small aspect ratio change
Hardware down-conversion - 10-bit
Anamorphic: full-screen
Letterbox: image is reduced with black top and bottom added to image area with the aspect
ratio preserved
Crop: image is cropped to fit new screen size
Hardware cross-conversion - 10-bit
1080i to 720P
720P to 1080i
Physical
Height: 3.25” (8.25 cm)
Width: 9.00” (22.86 cm)
Depth: 6.12” from front antenna cover to back of handles (15.56 cm)
Weight: 3.7 pounds (1.67 kg)
Temperature
Operating Temperature Range: 5C to 40C
Safe Storage Temperature Range (power OFF): -20C to 60C
Power
Voltage: 100-240 VAC (to supplied AC Adapter);
12Vdc to power connector input on side of chassis:
12 Vdc minimum
18 Vdc maximum
Current: 3.3A (maximum)
Typical operating power: 30W
A-3
A-4
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