Dyno-Scan for Palm OS User Guide
User Guide
Warnings
The exclamation point within the triangle is a warning sign alerting you of important
instructions accompanying the product. Please observe all warnings.
Do not operate DashDyno while the vehicle is in motion. DashDyno can be
mounted inside the vehicle but it should not be used in such a manner as to distract
the operator from the operation of the vehicle. Driving requires the full attention of
the driver. Operating or observing the DashDyno will cause driver distraction and
could cause a fatal accident.
Do not mount DashDyno so it interferes with a vehicle airbag. When mounting
DashDyno inside a vehicle, take care not to locate the device over an airbag or
within the deployment path of an airbag. An airbag is also known as a
Supplementary Restraint System (SRS), Air Cushion Restraint System (ACRS), or
Supplemental Inflatable Restraint (SIR).
Do not operate the vehicle indoors. A running engine produces lethal carbon
monoxide exhaust fumes that can seriously harm or kill you if inhaled. Only run the
vehicle motor outdoors with proper ventilation. Many scan tool operations do not
require a running motor.
Ensure the DashDyno and cables do not interfere with the vehicle controls. A
cable dangling in front of the foot pedals, gear shifter, or steering wheel can
interfere with vehicle operation and cause a fatal accident. Always ensure the
DashDyno and cables are securely fastened out of the way. If the DashDyno cannot
be safely attached as to not interfere with the vehicle controls, then do not drive the
vehicle with the DashDyno connected to the vehicle.
Never race or exceed the posted speed limit while on public highways. The
dynamometer operations require accelerating to high speeds. Always uses a closed
course raceway when performing dynamometer and acceleration tests.
Terms of Use
The Software contains proprietary and confidential information that is protected by applicable
intellectual property and other laws. You may not modify or sell works based on the Software.
The Software is for your personal use. We grant you a personal and non-exclusive license to
use the object code version of the Software on a single Windows-based personal computer;
provided that you do not (and do not allow any third party to) copy, modify, reverse engineer,
create derivative works from, assign or otherwise transfer any right in the Software; and you
will not modify the Software by any means.
Disclaimer
The “Product” is the complete DashDyno SPD device and the Dyno-Scan for Windows software
including hardware, software, user manual, and packaging.
Auterra, LLC assumes no responsibility for any loss or claim by third parties, which arise
through the use of this Product. Auterra, LLC assumes no responsibility for any damage or loss
caused by deletion of data as a result of a Product malfunction. Be sure to backup copies of all
important data on other media to protect against data loss.
The Software, and all accompanying files, data and materials, are provided "as is" without
warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including, but not limited to, the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. The entire risk as to the
quality and performance of the Software is with you. Should the Software prove defective, you
assume the cost of all necessary servicing, repair or correction.
AUTERRA, OR ITS PRINCIPALS, SHAREHOLDERS, OFFICERS, EMPLOYEES, AFFILIATES,
CONTRACTORS, SUBSIDIARIES, OR PARENT ORGANIZATIONS, SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY
INCIDENTAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR OTHER DAMAGES INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS OF PROFITS, LOSS OF REVENUE, LOSS OF DATA, LOSS OF USE OF THE
PRODUCT OR ANY ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT, DOWNTIME AND CONSUMER’S TIME OR FOR
BREACH OF ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OR CONDITION, DAMAGE TO THE VEHICLE,
BREACH OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE, STRICT LIABILITY OR ANY OTHER LEGAL THEORY
RELATED TO THIS PRODUCT.
Copyright
2007 Auterra, LLC. All rights reserved.
Trademarks
DashDyno™, DashDyno SPD™ and Dyno-Scan™ are trademarks of Auterra, LLC. Windows® is a
registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Google and Google Earth are trademarks of
Google Inc.
ii Preface
Contents
Preface
1
Key Features
1
Minimum Platform and Software Requirements
3
DashDyno SPD™
3
Specifications
3
Supported Vehicles
5
OBD II
5
OBD II Connector
5
Abbreviations
5
Abbreviations and Definitions
6
DashDyno Basics
8
DashDyno at a Glance
8
Setting Up Your DashDyno
8
Vehicle Mounting
10
Using DashDyno Menus
12
Using DashDyno Wizards
12
Turning On DashDyno
13
Sleep Mode
13
Power Loss Resume
14
Keys
14
Caring for DashDyno
15
Software Updates
15
Scan Tool Features
16
Trouble Codes
16
Freeze Frame
17
Clear Check Engine Light
17
Data Logger Features
18
Theory of Operation
18
Sample Speed
19
Parameters
19
Enhanced OBD II Parameters
Parameter Select Wizard
27
Screen Configuration
28
Alarms
29
Meter 2 Screen
29
Meter 4 Screen
30
Line Graph Screen
30
Bar Graph Screen
31
Gauge Screen
32
List Screen
32
Oscilloscope Screen
32
Live Data and Playback Modes
33
Switching Modes
33
Pause/Play
34
Record
34
Playback
34
Analog Inputs
35
Digital Input
35
Connect Simulation
36
Dynamometer Features
Theory of Operation
ii
27
37
37
DashDyno SPD™ Dynamometer
37
Automatic Transmissions
38
Dyno Files
38
Dyno Setup File
39
Drag Coefficient and Frontal Area
39
Tire Diameter
40
Dyno Setup File Usage
41
Gear Ratio Screen
Measuring Overall Gear Ratio
41
Calculating Overall Gear Ratio
42
Confirming Gear Ratio Result
42
Automatic Transmissions
42
Dynamometer Getting Started
43
Power Torque Screen
43
Power Torque Statistics
44
Power Torque Run Do’s and Don’ts
44
Acceleration Screen
45
Acceleration Run Statistics
47
Acceleration Run Do’s and Don’ts
47
Performance Screen
48
Trip Computer
48
Preferences
50
Vehicle Speed Correction
51
Distance Correction
52
MPG Correction
53
Boost Calibration
53
Engine Size
54
Fuel Type
54
Fuel Cost
55
Case Temperature
55
Files
Create Files
iii
41
56
56
Create Alarm File
57
Create Screen Setup File
57
Create Dyno Setup File
57
Create Formula File
57
Delete Files
57
View Files
57
New Memory Card
57
Backup
58
Corrupted Memory Card
58
Alarms
61
Alarm Processing Rules
62
Shift Light Example
63
Inside Range Alarm
64
Outside Range Alarm
65
Hysteresis Alarm
65
Complex Shift Light Alarm
66
Auxiliary Ports
68
Auxiliary Port Pinouts
68
Analog In
68
Digital In
69
Digital Out
69
5V Output
69
Serial Transmit/Receive
70
GPS
71
GPS Record and Playback
73
GPS Update Rate
73
HDOP
73
Formulas
75
Formula File
75
Wide Band Air/Fuel Controller Example
77
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Example
77
Software Upgrades
80
DashDyno Upgrade
80
Dyno-Scan for Windows Upgrade
81
Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
82
iv
Google Earth
82
Compatible File Types
84
PC Pass-Through Mode
86
Virtual COM Port
87
TrackVision
88
Troubleshooting
DashDyno Does Not Turn On
92
DashDyno Turns Off Or Resets While Driving
92
Scan Tool Connects but No Live Sensor Data
92
No Communication (Scan Tool)
92
No Communication (Vehicle)
92
Lost Communication
93
Freeze Frame Screen is Blank
93
Clearing Codes Did Not Work or MIL Didn’t Turn Off
93
Some Parameters Are Not Accurate
93
Addendum
94
California Drivers
94
Minnesota Drivers
94
Diagnostic Trouble Codes
v
92
95
Diagnostic Trouble Code Format Structure
95
P00XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
95
P01XX Fuel and Air Metering
96
P02XX Fuel and Air Metering
98
P03XX Ignition System or Misfire
99
P04XX Auxiliary Emission Controls
101
P05XX Vehicle Speed, Idle Control, and Auxiliary Inputs
102
P06XX Computer and Auxiliary Inputs
103
P07XX Transmission
104
P08XX Transmission
106
Additional Diagnostic Trouble Code Ranges
107
P09XX Transmission
107
P1XXX Manufacturer Controlled
107
P2XXX SAE Controlled DTCs
107
P3XX Manufacturer Controlled and SAE Reserved
108
Support
109
Warranty Information
110
Index
111
vi
CHAPTER 1
Preface
Congratulations on your purchase of a DashDyno SPD™. Please take time to read through
these operating instructions and become familiar with the operating procedure.
Auterra DashDyno SPD™ is unique product that combines a scan tool, performance meter, a
data logger and more into one, easy to use portable instrument for the automotive enthusiast.
The scan tool functions can read and clear trouble codes, turn off the “Check Engine” light, and
display a vehicle freeze frame. The performance meter includes features such as a
dynamometer, acceleration tests, and fuel economy measurements. And the data logger
records all live sensor data to the expansion SD card.
Key Features
DashDyno SPD ™ offers a multitude of diagnostic and performance-measuring features:
1
•
All 1996 and later vehicles supported, including American, Asian, and European
•
Easy installation – no hard wiring required
•
Compatible with Dyno-Scan for Windows PC software for PC-based diagnostics
•
Can be dash mounted or handheld
•
Quick release windshield mount option
•
Powerful 32-bit microprocessor
•
Backlit high-contrast LCD display with temperature contrast compensation
•
280 selectable parameters and simultaneously record up to 16
•
Records GPS data using an external GPS receiver
•
View GPS data within Google Earth1
•
Powered from an OBD II cable or an A/C wall adapter
•
Measures Horsepower and Torque
•
0-60mph, 1/8 and 1/4 mile, and top speed
•
Two trip computers with instant and average fuel economy
Dyno-Scan for Windows software required
1 Preface
•
SD / MMC card slot for recording data
•
Auto power-on when vehicle is started
•
Playback recorded data and use fast forward/reverse for quick navigation
•
Three user programmable alarm lights
•
Record / play and keyboard shift key indicator lights
•
8 button backlit keypad with secondary functions
•
USB port for connection to a PC
•
Two expansion ports for optional accessories and sensor logging
•
Four external analog inputs, a digital input, a digital output, and a serial port
•
Analog input range select (0-6V, 0-12V and 0-24V)
•
2-channel digital oscilloscope mode
•
Customizable sensor conversion formulas
•
Software wizards offer step by step guidance
•
Read and clear diagnostic trouble codes
•
Enhanced and generic code definitions displayed on screen
•
Turn off Check Engine or Service Engine Soon light
•
Line graphs, bar graphs, meters and gauges
•
All graph screens zoom in/out and scroll right/left
•
Axis labels auto-hide after 3 seconds providing unobstructed graph views
•
Min/max axis labels update with zoom and scroll
•
256-point per channel buffer on graph screens
•
Corrects measurements for inaccurate speedometer due to non-stock tire size
•
J1850 (VPW, PWM), ISO 9141, ISO 14320 (KWP), and ISO 15765 (CAN bus) protocols
•
CAN bus 6x mode reads six sensors at once from the vehicle
•
Easy installation – plugs into the vehicle OBD II diagnostic port
•
Low-profile OBD II cable connector
•
Compatible with the Dyno-Scan for Windows PC software
•
Free software upgrades installed through the mini USB port
•
1-year warranty
2 Preface
Minimum Platform and Software Requirements
DashDyno does not require a PC. However, you must have one of the following operating
systems with Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.01 or later installed on your computer to run the
Dyno-Scan™ for Windows PC software:
•
Microsoft® Windows® 98
•
Microsoft® Windows® 98 Second Edition
•
Microsoft® Windows® Millennium Edition (Windows Me)
•
Microsoft® Windows NT® 4 (Workstation or Server) with Service Pack 6a
•
Microsoft® Windows® 2000 (Professional, Server, or Advanced Server)
•
Microsoft® Windows® XP (Home or Professional)
•
Microsoft® Windows® XP Media Center Edition
•
Microsoft® Windows® XP Tablet PC Edition
•
Microsoft® Windows® Server 2003 family
•
Microsoft® Windows® Vista
Minimum hardware requirements:
•
Pentium 166MHz or faster
•
64MB of RAM or higher
DashDyno SPD™
The DashDyno SPD™ includes many different components. Some items are optional and not
included with all versions of the product.
•
DashDyno SPD™
•
Quick Start Guide
•
Electronic User’s Manual
•
OBD II Cable
•
Quick Release Suction Cup Windshield Mount
•
AC adapter
•
USB Cable
•
Dyno-Scan™ for Windows software
Specifications
DashDyno SPD™ product specifications:
Size
3 Preface
5.2” W x 2.4” H x 1.4” D
Processor
32-bit, software upgradeable
Screen
High contrast monochrome, white LED backlit
Keys
Backlit silicon rubber
Expansion Slot
Support for MultiMediaCard, SD and SDIO cards
File Formats
FAT12, FAT16, FAT32
Card Size
1GB max
Power
OBD II cable or AC adapter
Sleep Mode
Auto power-off
Keypad
Backlit, secondary function keys
Aux Port 1
Mini-DIN, four analog inputs, 5V output
Aux Port 2
Mini-DIN, one digital input, one digital output, serial port, 5V
output
Aux 5V Output
Current limited 25mA max (combined both ports)
Analog Inputs
Selectable ranges of 0-6V, 0-12V or 0-24V, 10-bit ADC
Analog Input
Impedance
95k ohm 6V range, 62k ohm 12V range, 54k ohm 24V range
Oscilloscope Mode
200Hz bandwidth, 1mS sample rate
Digital Input
24V max, 4V high min, 1.6V low min
Digital Output
Open Collector, 15V max, 75ma sink max
External GPS Baud
4800, 9600, 19200, 38400
External GPS Protocol
NMEA 0183
USB Port
Mini USB type B
OBD II Port
Modular
OBD II Cable
6ft, low-profile OBD II connector
Alarm Lights
Three high intensity LEDs
Mounting
Two brass 8-32 rear mounting screw holes
Windshield Mount
Suction cup with quick release
OBD II Protocols
J1850 (VPW, PWM), ISO 9141, ISO 14320 (KWP), and ISO 15765 (CAN
bus) protocols
4 Preface
Ambient Temperature
Operation
14ºF to 131ºF (-10ºC to 55ºC)
Ambient Temperature
Storage - Short Term
-4ºF to 140ºF (-20ºC to 60ºC)
Ambient Temperature
Storage – Long Term
32ºF to 86ºF (0ºC to 30ºC)
Supported Vehicles
DashDyno supports all 1996 and newer vehicles, including American, European, and Asian
models. Some 1994 and 1995 vehicles are also supported with a sticker under the hood
indicating OBD II compliance. All vehicles sold in the US model year 1996 and newer are OBD II
compliant and do not require the under hood sticker.
OBD II
OBD II stands for On-Board Diagnostics second generation. OBD II was incorporated on some
1994 and 1995 model-year vehicles and was required for all 1996-and-later vehicles.
OBD II is a series of government regulations intended to reduce in-use vehicle emissions by
continually monitoring for failure and/or deterioration of the powertrain and its emissioncontrol systems. A Malfunction Indicator Light (i.e. Check Engine light or Service Engine Soon
light) visible to the vehicle operator will be illuminated and a Diagnostic Trouble Code set
when either there is a failure of a monitored component/system or any of the sensed
parameters deteriorates such that the vehicle's emissions would exceed the relevant standard
by approximately 50 percent.
The OBD II standard makes the Auterra DashDyno SPD™ universal to all automobiles, since all
newer vehicles sold must conform to these government regulations.
OBD II Connector
OBD II compliant vehicles must have a 16-pin connector located in plain sight underneath the
dash near the driver’s seat. Alternatively, it may be behind ashtrays or concealed by an easily
removed plastic cover, sometimes with the letters “OBD” stamped on the outside. Some 1994
and 1995 vehicles have this connector and are only OBD I compliant. These OBD I vehicles are
not supported by the scan tool.
Abbreviations
Some item descriptions are abbreviated within the software.
BX – designates a bank number (e.g. B1 means bank 1)
5 Preface
SX – designates a sensor number (e.g. S1 means sensor 1)
BX-SX – designates a bank-sensor combination (e.g. B1-S2 means bank 1 – sensor 2)
Abbreviations and Definitions
A/F – Air Fuel
AFR – Air Fuel Ratio
A/T – Automatic Transmission
Check Engine Light – also known as a MIL (Malfunction Indicator) light.
CHT – Cylinder Head Temperature
Closed Loop – In closed loop operation the oxygen sensors are used to adjust the fuel
mixture. See open loop.
DTC – Diagnostic Trouble Code
Dyno - Dynamometer
EBCM – Electronic Brake Control Module
EBTCM – Electronic Brake Traction Control Module
ECU – Emission Control Unit (i.e. the vehicle’s on-board computer)
EGR – Exhaust Gas Recirculation
EFI – Electronic Fuel Injection
EMR – Electronic Module Retard
ESC – Electronic Spark Control
EST – Electronic Spark Timing
EVAP – Evaporative Emission
Fuel Trim – engine computer function that keeps the air/fuel mixture close to ideal.
GPS – Global Positioning System
HC – Hydrocarbons
HEI – High Energy Ignition
HO2S – Heated Oxygen Sensor
Horsepower – a unit of measure to express the rate at which mechanical energy is expended.
HP – Horsepower
M/T – Manual Transmission
MAF – Mass Air Flow
6 Preface
MIL – Malfunction Indicator Light (i.e. “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon” light on the
vehicle’s instrument panel).
NOx – Oxides of Nitrogen
O2 – Oxygen
Open Loop – used to describe the fuel mixture when the oxygen sensors are not being used,
usually when the engine is cold or if a malfunction preventing closed loop operation is
detected. See closed loop.
PCM – Power Control Module
PID – Parameter ID is a number used to designate a particular vehicle sensor.
PTO – Power Take-Off
RPM – Revolutions per Minute
SAE – Society of Automotive Engineers
Scan Tool – a computer that reads out OBD II values from the vehicle.
Service Engine Soon – also known as a MIL light.
SFI – Sequential Fuel Injection
TBI – Throttle Body Injection
TCM – Transmission Control Module
TCS – Traction Control Switch
TFT – Transmission Fluid Temperature
Torque - Torque is a measure of the force acting on an object causing that object to rotate.
TP – Throttle Position
TPS – Throttle Position Sensor
VAC – Vacuum
VIN – Vehicle Identification Number
VSS – Vehicle Speed Sensor
7 Preface
CHAPTER 2
DashDyno Basics
Getting started with your DashDyno is easy, and this section shows you how.
To use your DashDyno it must be plugged into your vehicle’s diagnostic port. Power is
obtained from the diagnostic port. The two auxiliary ports may optionally be used to control
or collect data from optional DashDyno accessories or sensors of your choosing.
All data and configuration files are recorded onto the external SD memory card. The recorded
files can be viewed on the DashDyno or within the Dyno-Scan for Windows PC software. The
files are transferred back and forth from the DashDyno and PC using a memory card reader
(not included).
DashDyno at a Glance
The DashDyno is a sophisticated and powerful automotive tool.
Setting Up Your DashDyno
Unpack your DashDyno and find that you have the following components. The two
configurations of the product are DashDyno SPD and DashDyno SPD ProPack.
8 DashDyno Basics
•
DashDyno SPD™
•
Quick Start Guide
•
Electronic User Manual
•
Dyno-Scan™ for Windows software
•
OBD II Cable
•
Quick Release Suction Cup Windshield Mount (ProPack)
•
Female Quick Release Mounting Screws (ProPack)
•
Cable Tie (ProPack)
•
AC Adapter (ProPack)
•
USB Cable (ProPack)
Insert an SD card into the DashDyno external memory slot. Ensure the SD card gold contacts
are facing as shown below. Most 1GB or smaller standard-size SD or MMC cards will work.
Optionally, copy the DTC database files from the Auterra CD ROM onto your SD card as
explained in the section New Memory Card on page 57. The DTC database files allow
DashDyno to lookup trouble code definitions read from the vehicle.
DashDyno will run without an SD card but preferences, trip computer, live data and dyno
recordings will not be saved. Also trouble code definition lookup will not function as the
database files are stored on the SD card.
Plug the OBD II cable into the DashDyno OBD II port. Plug the OBD II connector into the
vehicle’s OBD II data port. The DashDyno will immediately power on when plugged into the
vehicle.
9 DashDyno Basics
Turn the vehicle ignition to the ON position. The vehicle does not need to be running.
Select the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option. After a few seconds, the DashDyno will
be connected to the vehicle. Upon connection, a ‘i’ symbol will be located in the upper left
corner of the screen indicating live information is coming from the vehicle.
To remove the DashDyno from the vehicle, just unplug the OBD II cable. The cable can be
unplugged from either the vehicle or the DashDyno. Before unplugging, ensure you are not
recording or reading from the external memory card (Play/Rec LED is not illuminated).
Vehicle Mounting
DashDyno may be mounted inside the vehicle using the suction cup windshield mount. This
mount offers a quick release feature for easily removal of the device from the vehicle.
10 DashDyno Basics
Base Mount
Male Quick Release
Female Quick Release
Connect the male quick release to the base mount with the two screws and two lock nuts
provided.
Connect the female quick release to the rear of the DashDyno with the two screws provided.
Ensure the female quick release tab is pointed upwards. Be careful not to over tighten.
The DashDyno with the female quick release is inserted over the male quick release. Pull the
female quick release tab back slightly when inserting and removing the device.
The suction cup on the base windshield mount should be placed flat against the inside of the
vehicle windshield. The two tabs on the base are rotated clockwise to lock the mount in
position. To remove, rotate the tabs counter clockwise.
When selecting a mounting location, ensure it does not interfere with the visibly or controls of
the vehicle. The OBD II cable will need to be routed to the vehicle OBD II connector such that it
does not dangle in front of the vehicle foot pedals, steering wheel, air bags, or other controls.
Use the supplied cable tie to securely the cable out of the way. If you need more cable ties, any
home improvement or computer store will carry them.
11 DashDyno Basics
Ensure the DashDyno and cables do not interfere with the vehicle controls. A
cable dangling in front of the foot pedals, gear shifter, or steering wheel can
interfere with vehicle operation and cause a fatal accident. Always ensure the
DashDyno and cables are securely fastened out of the way. If the DashDyno cannot
be safely attached as to not interfere with the vehicle controls, then do not drive the
vehicle with the DashDyno connected to the vehicle.
Do not mount DashDyno so it interferes with a vehicle airbag. When mounting
DashDyno inside a vehicle, take care not to locate the device over an airbag or
within the deployment path of an airbag. An airbag is also known as a
Supplementary Restraint System (SRS), Air Cushion Restraint System (ACRS), or
Supplemental Inflatable Restraint (SIR).
Do not attempt to operate the DashDyno while driving a vehicle. Driving
requires the full attention of the driver. Operating or observing the DashDyno will
cause driver distraction and could cause a fatal accident.
Using DashDyno Menus
After the splash screen, the main menu screen is displayed. Up and down arrows will scroll
through the list of menu options. Press OK to select an option. Press MENU to return to a
previous screen.
Using DashDyno Wizards
Wizards are used to quickly step you through complex operations. The upper right corner of
the display shows the wizard position when active. The two numbers represent the current
and total steps within the wizard.
12 DashDyno Basics
Pressing the OK or Right button answers questions and moves the wizard forward. If you make
a mistake, use the Left key to go back within the wizard. Not every operation will require
executing all steps. Depending on your answers, some wizard steps may be skipped.
Pressing the MENU key terminates the wizard partway through. If partially completed, the
software will take the answers provided up to that point and, if possible, act upon those
answers. After becoming familiar with the software, this can speed some operations by
bypassing unneeded steps.
Turning On DashDyno
DashDyno is powered from either the OBD II cable connected to your vehicle, or an optional
AC adapter connected to the power jack. The DashDyno will automatically power on when
plugged into either source. Do not connect both power sources simultaneously.
If DashDyno enters sleep mode, it may be turned on by either pressing the Power On button
or starting the vehicle engine.
Sleep Mode
The DashDyno will self-power down if:
1
No key is pressed for 60 seconds if the user interface displays a non-data collection screen
(e.g. a menu).
2
The vehicle ECU fails to respond for 60 seconds if the user interface displays a data
collection screen (e.g. Meter 2).
When you remove your key from the vehicle, the vehicle ECU will stop responding. Therefore,
if you exit your vehicle while on a live data screen, the DashDyno will automatically self-power
down.
Starting the engine will automatically wake DashDyno from sleep mode if, before entering
sleep mode, the vehicle was detected using the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option.
Alternative, DashDyno can be powered on again by pressing the Power On button. The
DashDyno will resume exactly where it left off.
13 DashDyno Basics
The default 60 seconds can be changed using the Preferences menu Power Down Timeout.
The self-power down can be prevented by selecting Never from the Preferences > Power
Down Mode menu option, useful for hybrid vehicles.
Power Loss Resume
When DashDyno is plugged in it will automatically auto-detect the vehicle and resume
operation on the last used Live Data or Trip Computer screen. The last used parameters and
alarms are automatically restored.
The Power Loss Resume feature will activate only if DashDyno is powered on by plugged in to
the vehicle (or AC adapter).
The Preferences > Power Loss Resume menu option turns this feature on and off.
Keys
DashDyno has primary and secondary function keys. The Key Lock button toggles between
the primary and secondary keys. When locked into the secondary mode, the shift key / lock
light will illuminate.
Holding a key down will cause the key to repeat, useful for scrolling.
Key
Name
Function
OK
Selects a menu option.
Menu
Returns to the previous menu.
Key Lock
Selects the primary or secondary function keys. When the
secondary keys are active, the shift key light is illuminated.
Record
Starts recording.
Up
Moves the selected item up.
Down
Moves the selected item down.
Left
Moves the selected item left.
Right
Moves the selected item right.
Play/Pause
In live data mode, starts or pauses live data. In playback mode,
plays or pauses the recorded file.
Fast Reverse
Moves the playback position backwards.
Fast Forward
Moves the playback position forwards.
Line Select
Each press cycles through showing both lines, line 1, and line 2 on
graph screens.
14 DashDyno Basics
Zoom Y
Zooms the y-axis (vertical) on graph screens.
Zoom X
Zoom the x-axis (horizontal) on graph screens.
Power On
Powers the device on when in sleep mode.
Caring for DashDyno
Observe these precautions when taking care of your DashDyno.
•
Use a soft, dry cloth to clean your DashDyno; do not use any liquid cleaners.
•
Do not open the casing of the DashDyno. There are no user serviceable parts inside
and opening will invalidate the product warranty.
•
Do not expose your DashDyno to high or low temperatures, which might cause
permanent damage. For example, don’t leave it in the car on a hot summer day or
during a cold winter night.
Software Updates
Check the Auterra website periodically to download software updates at
www.auterraweb.com.
15 DashDyno Basics
CHAPTER 3
Scan Tool Features
With a DashDyno, you can diagnose problems with your vehicle. This section shows you how.
To get started with the scan tool features:
1
Connect the DashDyno to your vehicle.
2
Turn the vehicle ignition ON.
3
Select the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option.
4
Go back to the main menu by pressing the MENU button.
Trouble Codes
When the vehicle Check Engine light illuminates, it means the on-board vehicle computer has
detected a problem with your vehicle. The codes detected will be displayed on the Stored
Trouble Codes screen.
Two categories of trouble codes exist: generic and enhanced. Generic codes are standardized
and common to all vehicle manufacturers. Enhanced codes are not uniquely defined and may
overlap with another manufacture, or even the same manufacturer. For instance, multiple
definitions may exist for code P1234. Ford may define it as “Engine Oil Pressure Too Low”, but
Toyota’s definition could mean something different like “System Voltage Unstable”.
There are four types of trouble codes: P (Powertrain), B (Body), C (Chassis), and U (Network
Communication). The scan tool reads and clears all P-codes and, depending on the vehicle, B,
C, and U-codes as well2.
To read stored trouble codes:
1
Select the Scan Tool > Stored Trouble Codes menu option.
2
If codes are stored, they will appear on screen within 30 seconds.
3
Use the Up/Down key to highlight a diagnostic trouble code. Press the OK button.
4
The code definition will display within a few seconds.
2
Not all vehicles support retrieving and clearing B, C, and U-codes.
16 Scan Tool Features
All diagnostic trouble code definitions are stored on the external memory card. The definitions
must be located within the card directory \DTC for the software to locate the definitions.
Pending trouble codes are potential problems detected by the vehicle, but are not serious
enough yet to illuminate the Check Engine light.
To read pending trouble codes:
1
Select the Scan Tool > Pending Trouble Codes menu option.
2
If codes are stored, they will appear on screen within 30 seconds.
3
Use the Up/Down keys to highlight a diagnostic trouble code. Press the OK button.
4
The code definition will display within a few seconds.
Freeze Frame
A freeze frame is a snapshot of the current sensor values at the time the Check Engine light is
illuminated.
To read the vehicle freeze frame:
1
Select the Scan Tool > Freeze Frame menu option.
2
If a freeze frame is stored, it will display on screen within 30 seconds.
3
Use the Up/Down keys to scroll through the freeze frame.
Clear Check Engine Light
The Check Engine light can be turned off and all of the diagnostic trouble codes on your
vehicle can be erased.
To turn off the Check Engine light:
1
Select the Scan Tool > Clear Check Engine Light menu option.
2
Select Yes to the prompt to turn off the light and clear all trouble codes.
Clearing codes not only extinguishes the Check Engine light, it also erases the vehicle’s freeze
frame log. Sometimes the vehicle’s ignition must be turned off and on again before the Check
Engine light turns off.
17 Scan Tool Features
CHAPTER 4
Data Logger Features
DashDyno contains powerful data logging features. The data logger reads data from different
sources such as the vehicle ECU and analog inputs and records them to the external memory
card. Alarms can be set to trigger when any parameter value is exceeded. Alarm actions
consist of illuminating/flashing one or more alarm lights or activating a digital output switch.
Up to 16 parameters can be recorded simultaneously. Recorded data files can be played back
on any of the data logger screens. The maximum recording length is only limited by the size of
the external memory card. All data is individually time stamped.
Live data can be viewed in many different formats including meters, gauges, line graphs, bar
graphs, and lists.
Screen setup is easy with wizards stepping you though the process. Once a screen is setup, the
configuration may be saved to the external memory card for easy recall.
DashDyno and Dyno-Scan for Windows use the same file format so data can be easily
exchanged between the two systems.
To get started with the data logger features:
1
Connect the DashDyno to your vehicle.
2
Turn the vehicle ignition ON.
3
Select the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option.
4
Go back to the main menu by pressing the MENU button.
Theory of Operation
A data logger is a device that records data over time. Each data sample is time stamped and
saved for later analysis and graphing. Whether on the racetrack or driving around town, data
logging provides a detailed view of how your vehicle is operating in real world situations.
Types of data vary widely, from engine RPM, air/fuel ratio and ignition timing advance to
custom analog inputs from sensors of your choosing or even GPS data. Data collected from
the vehicle OBD II diagnostic port and aux ports are stored to the external SD card.
Data obtained from the OBD II diagnostic port use well-established units of measure. For
example, engine coolant temperature uses either °F or °C.
Data can be obtained from the aux port analog inputs, which can be connected to almost any
sensor. The analog inputs measure voltage. However, sometimes it’s desirable to convert the
18 Data Logger Features
measured raw sensor voltage into another more convenient units of measure. For instance, if
measuring the voltage from a pressure sensor its nice to have it converted to psi. The formula
feature provides this functionality. See Formulas on page 75 for more information.
Recorded data can be played back directly on DashDyno. Optionally, it may be opened by a
Windows PC and analyzed within the Dyno-Scan for Windows software package.
Sample Speed
The data logger captures data from the vehicle’s diagnostic port and on-board hardware
peripherals simultaneously. The speed at which data is collected depends on the input source.
The vehicle diagnostic port sample rate may be set to high (fast as possible), medium (every 3
seconds) or low (every 10 seconds).
On non-CAN bus equipped vehicles, one sensor at a time is polled from the vehicle. On a CAN
bus equipped vehicle with the CAN 6x option set to On, up to 6 parameters can be read at one
time speeding data throughput considerably.
When the sample speed is set to high; the data is polled as fast as possible from the vehicle.
The more vehicle parameters monitored, the slower the data rate for any one sensor. For
instance, if parameter ‘A’ by itself can be polled every 50mS, then monitoring three
parameters means parameter ‘A’ will be updated every 150mS.
With CAN 6x mode, up to 6 sensors can be monitored at one time without appreciably
degrading the timing responsiveness.
On-board analog and digital inputs are all sampled at 100mS intervals (10 times per second).
The number of vehicle parameters does not degrade the 100mS-sampling interval.
Each data value captured is time stamped and stored to the external memory card.
Parameters
DashDyno supports 280 selectable parameters. Parameters marked with an asterisk (*) are
obtained from on-board auxiliary ports. The remaining parameters are obtained from the
vehicle diagnostic port.
Each parameter name ending with a number (e.g. “Average Economy 2”) provides the same
data value as the non-numeric ending parameter. The distinction is the same parameter is
obtained from the vehicle in different ways.
User defined formula parameters can also be added to the parameter list. See Formulas on
page 75 for more information.
Not every vehicle supports all parameters. A custom list of parameters is created unique to the
vehicle connected.
Parameter
Parameter
Parameter
*GPS HDOP
*GPS Satellites
*GPS Speed
Commanded Wastegate A
Commanded Wastegate B
Control Module Voltage
Long Term Sec Fuel TrimB3
Long Term Sec Fuel TrimB4
Manifold Surface Temp
19 Data Logger Features
Air Flow Rate From MAP
Air Fuel Ratio
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S1
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S1 2
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S2
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S2 2
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S3
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S3 2
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S4
Air Fuel Ratio B1-S4 2
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S1
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S1 2
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S2
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S2 2
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S3
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S3 2
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S4
Air Fuel Ratio B2-S4 2
*Analog In 1 - 12V
*Analog In 1 - 24V
*Analog In 1 - 6V
*Analog In 2 - 12V
*Analog In 2 - 24V
*Analog In 2 - 6V
*Analog In 3 - 12V
*Analog In 3 - 24V
*Analog In 3 - 6V
*Analog In 4 - 12V
*Analog In 4 - 24V
*Analog In 4 - 6V
Average Economy
Average Speed
Battery Voltage
Boost Pressure
Digital In 1
Distance Traveled
Drive Time
Fuel Cost
Fuel Rate
Fuel Used
Idle Percent
Idle Time
Instant Economy
Absolute Evap Vapor Pres
Absolute Load Value
Absolute Throttle Pos B
20 Data Logger Features
Distance Since DTCs Clrd
Distance Traveled MIL On
DPF Delta Pressure B1
DPF Delta Pressure B2
DPF Inlet Pressure B1
DPF Inlet Pressure B2
DPF Inlet Temp B1
DPF Inlet Temp B2
DPF Outlet Pressure B1
DPF Outlet Pressure B2
DPF Outlet Temp B1
DPF Outlet Temp B2
Driver Demand Torque
EGR A Error
EGR B Error
EGR Error
EGR Temperature B1-S1
EGR Temperature B1-S2
EGR Temperature B2-S1
EGR Temperature B2-S2
Engine Coolant Temp
Engine Coolant Temp 1
Engine Coolant Temp 2
Engine Fuel Rate
Engine Oil Temp
Engine Reference Torque
Engine RPM
Engine Torque Idle Point 1
Engine Torque Point 2
Engine Torque Point 3
Engine Torque Point 4
Engine Torque Point 5
Equivalence Ratio B1-S1
Equivalence Ratio B1-S1 2
Equivalence Ratio B1-S2
Equivalence Ratio B1-S2 2
Equivalence Ratio B1-S3
Equivalence Ratio B1-S3 2
Equivalence Ratio B1-S4
Equivalence Ratio B1-S4 2
Equivalence Ratio B2-S1
Equivalence Ratio B2-S1 2
Equivalence Ratio B2-S2
Equivalence Ratio B2-S2 2
Equivalence Ratio B2-S3
Equivalence Ratio B2-S3 2
Mass Air Flow A
Mass Air Flow B
Minutes Run with MIL On
NOx Concentration B1-S1
NOx Concentration B2-S1
O2 B1-S1 Wide Range mA
O2 B1-S1 Wide Range V
O2 B1-S2 Wide Range mA
O2 B1-S2 Wide Range V
O2 B1-S3 Wide Range mA
O2 B1-S3 Wide Range V
O2 B1-S4 Wide Range mA
O2 B1-S4 Wide Range V
O2 B2-S1 Wide Range mA
O2 B2-S1 Wide Range V
O2 B2-S2 Wide Range mA
O2 B2-S2 Wide Range V
O2 B2-S3 Wide Range mA
O2 B2-S3 Wide Range V
O2 B2-S4 Wide Range mA
O2 B2-S4 Wide Range V
O2 Sensor B1-S1
O2 Sensor B1-S2
O2 Sensor B1-S3
O2 Sensor B1-S4
O2 Sensor B2-S1
O2 Sensor B2-S2
O2 Sensor B2-S3
O2 Sensor B2-S4
PM Mass Concentrate B1-S1
PM Mass Concentrate B2-S1
Reagent Tank Level
Rel Throttle A Position
Rel Throttle B Position
Relative Accel Pedal Pos
Relative Intake Air A
Relative Intake Air B
Relative Throttle Position
Run Time NOx Warn
Short Fuel Trim B1-S1
Short Fuel Trim B1-S2
Short Fuel Trim B1-S3
Short Fuel Trim B1-S4
Short Fuel Trim B2-S1
Short Fuel Trim B2-S2
Short Fuel Trim B2-S3
Absolute Throttle Pos C
Absolute Throttle Position
Accelerator Pedal Pos D
Accelerator Pedal Pos E
Accelerator Pedal Pos F
Actual EGR A Duty
Actual EGR B Duty
Actual Engine Torque
Air Flow Rate From MAF
Alcohol Fuel Percentage
Ambient Air Temperature
Avg Demanded
Consumption
Avg Reagent Consumption
Barometric Pressure
Boost Pressure A
Boost Pressure B
Calculated Load
Catalyst Temp B1-S1
Catalyst Temp B1-S2
Catalyst Temp B2-S1
Catalyst Temp B2-S2
Chrg Air Cooler Temp B1S1
Chrg Air Cooler Temp B1S2
Chrg Air Cooler Temp B1S2
Chrg Air Cooler Temp B2S1
Cmd Boost Pressure A
Cmd Boost Pressure B
Cmd Fuel Rail Pressure A
Cmd Fuel Rail Pressure B
Cmd Injection Pressure A
Cmd Injection Pressure B
Cmd Throttle Actuator A
Cmd Throttle Actuator B
Cmd Variable Turbo A
Cmd Variable Turbo B
Command Throttle Actuator
Commanded EGR
Commanded EGR A Duty
Commanded EGR B Duty
Commanded Equival Ratio
Commanded Evap Purge
Commanded Intake Air A
Commanded Intake Air B
21 Data Logger Features
Equivalence Ratio B2-S4
Equivalence Ratio B2-S4 2
Evap System Vapor Pres
Evap System Vapor Press
Exhaust Gas Temp B1-S1
Exhaust Gas Temp B1-S2
Exhaust Gas Temp B1-S3
Exhaust Gas Temp B1-S4
Exhaust Gas Temp B2-S1
Exhaust Gas Temp B2-S2
Exhaust Gas Temp B2-S3
Exhaust Gas Temp B2-S4
Exhaust Pressure B1
Exhaust Pressure B2
Fuel Injection Timing
Fuel Level Input
Fuel Rail Press Rel Manifold
Fuel Rail Pressure
Fuel Rail Pressure (abs)
Fuel Rail Pressure (gauge)
Fuel Rail Pressure A
Fuel Rail Pressure B
Fuel Rail Temp A
Fuel Rail Temp B
Hybrid Battery Pack Life
Ignition Timing Advance
Injection Pressure A
Injection Pressure B
Intake Air Temp B1-S1
Intake Air Temp B1-S2
Intake Air Temp B1-S3
Intake Air Temp B2-S1
Intake Air Temp B2-S2
Intake Air Temp B2-S3
Intake Air Temperature
Intake Manifold Abs PresA
Intake Manifold Abs PresB
Intake Manifold Pressure
Long Term Fuel Trim B1
Long Term Fuel Trim B2
Long Term Fuel Trim B3
Long Term Fuel Trim B4
Long Term Sec Fuel Trim B1
Long Term Sec Fuel TrimB2
Short Fuel Trim B2-S4
Short Term Fuel Trim B1
Short Term Fuel Trim B2
Short Term Fuel Trim B3
Short Term Fuel Trim B4
Shrt Term Sec Fuel Trim B1
Shrt Term Sec Fuel TrimB2
Shrt Term Sec Fuel TrimB3
Shrt Term Sec Fuel TrimB4
Time Since DTCs Cleared
Time Since Engine Start
Total Engine Idle Time
Total Engine Run Time
Total Engine Run w/PTO
Total Run w/IE-ACED 1
Total Run w/IE-ACED 10
Total Run w/IE-ACED 2
Total Run w/IE-ACED 3
Total Run w/IE-ACED 4
Total Run w/IE-ACED 5
Total Run w/IE-ACED 6
Total Run w/IE-ACED 7
Total Run w/IE-ACED 8
Total Run w/IE-ACED 9
Turbo A In Compressor
Turbo A In Turbine Temp
Turbo A Inlet Pressure
Turbo A Out Compressor
Turbo A Out Turbine Temp
Turbo A RPM
Turbo B In Compressor
Turbo B In Turbine Temp
Turbo B Inlet Pressure
Turbo B Out Compressor
Turbo B Out Turbine Temp
Turbo B RPM
Variable Turbo A
Variable Turbo B
Vehicle Speed
Warm-ups Since DTCs Clrd
Wastegate A
Wastegate B
Air Fuel Ratio – overall air to fuel ratio of the vehicle being commanded.
Air Fuel Ratio BX-SX (up to 8) – air to fuel ratio of the vehicle computed for one bank (i.e. one
oxygen sensor).
Analog In (4 inputs, 3 ranges each) – the analog input voltage measured on the DashDyno
auxiliary port.
Average Economy – the average fuel economy of the vehicle over time.
Battery Voltage – the vehicle battery voltage.
Boost Pressure – the pressure measured within the intake manifold.
Digital In 1 – the digital input state (high or low) measured on the DashDyno auxiliary port.
Distance Traveled – distance traveled by the vehicle. This is not the odometer.
Drive Time – the engine running time.
Fuel Cost – the cost per gallon or liter of fuel.
Fuel Used – amount of fuel used by the vehicle.
Idle Percent – the ratio of Drive Time vs. Idle Time.
Idle Time – the engine idling time defined as the motor running with the vehicle speed at 0.
Instant Economy – is defined as the instantaneous fuel economy of the vehicle (e.g. MPG).
GPS HDOP - horizontal dilution of precision. A measure of the GPS receiver’s position
horizontal accuracy. The lower the number the more accurate the reading.
GPS Satellites – the number of satellites currently being tracked by an external GPS receiver.
GPS Speed – the speed of the vehicle as reported by an external GPS receiver.
Absolute Evap Vapor Pres – the evaporative system vapor pressure normally obtained from a
sensor located in the fuel tank or a sensor in an evaporative system vapor line.
Absolute Load Value – indicates a percentage of peak available torque. The normalized value
of air mass per intake stroke displayed as a percent.
Absolute Throttle Position (up to 3) – the absolute throttle position (not the relative or
learned) throttle position. Usually above 0% at idle and less than 100% at full throttle.
Accelerator Pedal Pos (up to 4) – the absolute pedal position (not the relative or learned)
pedal position.
Actual EGR A Duty (up to 2) – actual EGR displayed as a percent.
Actual Engine Torque – the calculated output torque of the engine.
Air Flow Rate From MAF – indicates the airflow rate as measured by the mass airflow sensor.
Alcohol Fuel Percentage – percentage of alcohol fuel contained in ethanol or methanol fuels.
Ambient Air Temperature – displays the ambient air temperature.
22 Data Logger Features
Avg Demanded Consumption – average demanded reagent consumption by the engine
system either over the previous complete 48 hour period of engine operation or the period
needed for a demanded reagent consumption of at least 15 liters, whichever is longer.
Avg Reagent Consumption – average reagent consumption by the engine system either over
the previous complete 48 hour period of engine operation or the period needed for a
demanded reagent consumption of at least 15 liters, whichever is longer.
Barometric Pressure – barometric pressure normally obtained from a dedicated barometric
sensor. Note some weather services report barometric pressure adjusted to sea level. In these
cases, the reported value may not match the displayed value.
Boost Pressure A (up to 2) –the actual turbocharger/supercharger pressure.
Calculated Load Value – indicates a percentage of peak available torque. Reaches 100% at
wide open throttle at any altitude or RPM for both naturally aspirated and boosted engines.
Catalyst Temp Bank X – Sensor X (up to 4) –the catalyst substrate temperature.
Chrg Air Cooler Temp BXSX – (up to 4) – the charge air cooler temperature.
Cmd Boost Pressure A (up to 2) – the ECU commanded turbocharger/supercharger pressure.
Cmd Fuel Rail Pressure A (up to 2) – the commanded fuel rail pressure when the reading is
referenced to atmosphere (gauge pressure).
Cmd Injection Pressure A (up to 2) – the commanded injection control pressure.
Cmd Throttle Actuator A (up to 2) – the commanded throttle actuator. 0% fully closed and
100% fully open.
Cmd Variable Turbo A (up to 2) – the variable geometry turbocharger commanded vane
position as a percent.
Commanded Throttle Actuator – displays 0% when the throttle is commanded closed and
100% when the throttle commanded open.
Commanded EGR (up to 3) – display 0% when the EGR is commanded off, 100% when the
EGR system is commanded on, and if the EGR is duty cycled somewhere between 0% and
100%.
Commanded Equival Ratio – the commanded equivalence ratio (also known as lambda)
while the fuel system. Fuel systems that use conventional oxygen sensors display the
commanded open loop equivalence ratio while the system is in open loop. Should report
100% when in closed loop fuel. Fuel systems that utilize wide-range/linear oxygen sensors
shall display the commanded ratio in both open-loop and closed-loop operation.
Commanded Evap Purge – displays 0% when no evaporative purge is commanded and 100%
at the maximum commanded purge position/flow.
Commanded Intake Air A (up to 2) – the commanded air intake displayed as a percent. Also
known as EGR Throttle on compression ignition engineers.
Commanded Wastegate A (up to 2) – the commanded wastegate position as a percent. 0%
is fully closed (full boost) and 100% fully open (dump boost).
23 Data Logger Features
Control Module Voltage – power input to the control module. Normally the battery voltage,
less any voltage drop between the battery and the control module.
Distance Since DTCs Cleared – distance accumulated since DTCs where cleared with a scan
tool.
Distance Traveled MIL On – accumulates the vehicle distance traveled while the MIL light is
illuminated.
DPF Delta Pressure BX (up to 2) – diesel particulate filter delta pressure.
DPF Inlet Pressure BX (up to 2) – diesel particulate filter inlet pressure.
DPF Inlet Temp BX (up to 2) – diesel particulate filter inlet temperature.
DPF Outlet Pressure BX (up to 2) – diesel particulate filter outlet pressure.
DPF Outlet Temp BX (up to 2) – diesel particulate filter outlet temperature.
Driver Demand Torque – the requested torque output of the engine by the driver.
EGR Error (up to 3) – error as percent of actual commanded EGR. Negative percent is less than
commanded and positive is more than commanded.
EGR Temperature BX-SX (up to 4) – the EGR gas temperature.
Engine Coolant Temp (up to 3) – engine coolant temperature derived from an engine
coolant temperature sensor or a cylinder head temperature sensor.
Engine Fuel Rate – amount of fuel consumed by the engine per unit of time in liters per hour.
Engine Oil Temp – engine oil temperature.
Engine Reference Torque – display the engine reference torque value. This value does not
change.
Engine RPM – displays the current engine revolutions per minute value.
Engine Torque Idle Point – the torque limit that indicates the available engine torque that
can be provided by the engine at idle speed.
Engine Torque Point X (up to 4) – the torque limit that indicates the available engine torque
that can be provided by the engine point X of the engine map.
Equivalence Ratio BX-SX (up to 16) - is defined as the ratio of the fuel-to-oxidizer ratio to the
stoichiometric fuel-to-oxidizer ratio.
Evap System Vapor Press – evaporative system vapor pressure normally obtained from a
sensor located in the fuel tank.
Exhaust Gas Temp BX-SX – exhaust gas temperature.
Exhaust Gas Pressure BX – exhaust gas pressure.
Fuel Injection Timing – the start of the mail fuel injection relative to Top Dead Center (TDC).
Positive degrees indicate before TDC. Negative degrees indicate after TDC.
24 Data Logger Features
Fuel Level Input – indicates the nominal fuel tank liquid fill capacity as a percent of
maximum.
Fuel Rail Press Rel Manifold – displays the fuel rail pressure referenced to the manifold
vacuum (relative pressure).
Fuel Rail Pressure – indicates the fuel rail pressure at the engine referenced to atmosphere
(gauge pressure).
Fuel Rail Pressure (abs) – fuel rail pressure at the engine when the reading is absolute.
Fuel Rail Pressure (gauge) – displays the fuel injection rail pressure at the engine when the
reading is referenced to atmosphere (gauge pressure).
Fuel Rail Pressure A (up to 2) – fuel rail pressure when the reading is referenced to
atmosphere (gauge pressure).
Fuel Rate – the rate at which fuel is consumed by the engine in gallons/hour or liters/hour.
Fuel Rail Temp A (up to 2) – the fuel rail temperature.
Hybrid Battery Pack Life – the percent remaining life for the hybrid battery pack.
Ignition Timing Advance – ignition timing advance for #1 cylinder (not including any
mechanical advance).
Injection Pressure A (up to 2) - the injection control pressure.
Intake Air Temp BX-SX – displays the intake manifold air temperature.
Intake Air Temperature – displays the intake manifold air temperature.
Intake Manifold Abs PresA (up to 2) – intake manifold absolute pressure.
Intake Manifold Pressure – indicates the manifold pressure derived from a Manifold
Absolute Pressure sensor.
Long Term Fuel Trim-BX (up to 4) – indicates the correction being used by the fuel control
system in both open and closed loop modes of operation.
Long Term Fuel Trim BX-SX (up to 8) - indicates the correction being used by the fuel control
system in both open and closed loop modes of operation.
Manifold Surface Temp – intake manifold surface temperature.
Mass Air Flow A (up to 2) – airflow rate as measured by a vehicle MAF sensor or an equivalent
source.
Minutes Run with MIL On – accumulated minutes of engine run time while the MIL light is
on.
NOx Concentration BX-SX (up to 2) – NOx concentration.
O2 Sensor BX-SX Wide Range mA (up to 8) – shows milliamps for linear or wide-ratio oxygen
sensors.
25 Data Logger Features
O2 Sensor BX-SX Wide Range V (up to 8) – shows voltage for linear or wide-ratio oxygen
sensors.
O2 Sensor BX-SX (up to 8) – indicates the voltage for conventional 0 to 1V oxygen sensors.
O2 sensors with a different full-scale voltage shall be normalized to this range or, if a wide
range sensor, may use the wide range parameters instead.
PM Mass Concentration BX-SX (up to 2) – particulate matter mass concentration.
Reagent Tank Level – nominal reagent tank liquid fill capacity as a percent of maximum.
Rel Throttle A Position (up to 2) - relative or “learned” throttle position.
Relative Throttle Position – relative or “learned” throttle position.
Relative Accel Pedal Pos - relative or “learned” pedal position.
Relative Intake Air A (up to 2) – actual intake airflow position displayed as a percent. Also
knows as EGR Throttle Position on compression ignition engines.
Run Time NOx Warn – run time of the engine while NOx warning mode is activated.
Short Term Fuel Trim-BX (up to 4) – indicates the correction being used by the closed loop
fuel algorithm. If the fuel system is open loop, 0% correction should be reported.
Short Term Fuel Trim BX-SX (up to 8) - indicates the correction being used by the closed
loop fuel algorithm. If the fuel system is open loop, 0% correction should be reported.
Short Term Sec Fuel Trim BX (up to 4) – short term secondary O2 sensor fuel trim shall
indicate the correction being utilized by the closed-loop fuel algorithm. If the fuel system is
open loop, 0% correction should be reported.
Time Since DTCs Cleared – engine run time accumulated since DTCs were cleared.
Time Since Engine Start – indicates the elapsed time since the engine was started while the
engine is running.
Total Engine Idle Time – total engine idle time for the life of vehicle.
Total Engine Run Time – total engine run time for the life of vehicle.
Total Engine Run w/PTO – total engine run time with PTO (power take off) engaged for the
life of the vehicle.
Total Run w/IE-ACED X (up to 10) – total engine run time with Emission Increasing Auxiliary
Emission Control Device active for the life of the vehicle.
Turbo A In Compressor (up to 2) – turbocharger compressor inlet temperature.
Turbo A In Turbine Temp (up to 2) – turbocharger turbine inlet temperature.
Turbo A Inlet Pressure (up to 2) – turbocharger inlet pressure.
Turbo A Out Compressor (up to 2) – turbocharger compressor outlet temperature.
Turbo A Out Turbine Temp (up to 2) – turbocharger turbine outlet temperature.
Turbo A RPM (up to 2) – turbocharger revolutions per minute.
26 Data Logger Features
Variable Turbo A (up to 2) – variable geometry turbocharger actual vane position as a
percent. 0% when vanes are fully bypassed and 100% when the vanes are fully utilized.
Vehicle Speed – displays the vehicle road speed.
Warm-ups Since DTCs Cleared – number of warm-up cycles since all DTCs were cleared via a
scan tool. A warm-up is defined as the coolant temperature rising by at least 22°C (40°F) and
the engine temperature reaches at a minimum 70°C (160°F) (60°C (140°F) for diesels).
Wastegate A (up to 2) – actual wastegate position as a percent. 0% wastegate is off (allow full
boost) and 100% fully open (dump boost).
Enhanced OBD II Parameters
DashDyno can display and record enhanced OBD II parameters depending on the vehicle
make. Enhanced parameters are additional manufacturer-specific sensor options. Enhanced
parameters are marked with the § symbol (e.g. § Knock Feedback).
To enable enhanced parameters, go to the Preferences > Vehicle Make menu option and
select the make of your vehicle. After selecting the make, all Data Logger screens will show the
enhanced parameter options.
Select “All” for the make if your vehicle make is not listed. When “All” is selected, no enhanced
parameters are displayed.
When a Vehicle Make is selected, the enhanced parameters are always shown on the
Parameter Select Wizard list regardless whether your vehicle actually supports them. Not every
vehicle will support the enhanced parameters. If the enhanced parameter does not return live
data, then your vehicle does not support the parameter.
Some enhanced parameter categories supported are:
•
Knock Retard
•
Misfire Cylinder Counts
•
Transmission Temperature
•
And more. See the Auterra web site for the currently supported lists.
Parameter Select Wizard
All data logger screens use the same wizard to select parameters. Press the OK button to
access the parameter select wizard on a data logger screen, such as Datalogger > Meter 2.
27 Data Logger Features
To view live data by setting up the screen manually:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
4
Parameter 1 – select your first parameter to monitor and press OK.
5
Parameter N – continue to select parameters. You can select as many parameters as the
screen allows or select the <none> parameter when you are done. For instance, Meter 4
allows a maximum of four parameters.
6
Sample Speed – select High sampling speed.
7
Set Alarms? – select Don’t Set Alarms.
8
Save Config? – select Don’t Save Configuration.
9
The software will exit the wizard and live data for your parameters will show.
To change the live data parameters viewed:
1
From any data logger screen, press the OK button.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
4
Parameter 1 – select a new parameter for parameter 1 and press OK. Notice the software
automatically pre-selects the current parameter 1 setting.
5
Parameter N – select a new parameter for the additional parameters.
6
Sample Speed – as a shortcut, you can press the MENU button here to early terminate the
wizard and return to the datalogger screen. The software will use the parameters you
entered.
Screen Configuration
Screen configurations can be saved to the external memory card and recalled later.
To save a screen configuration:
1
From a data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
4
Parameter 1 – select a new parameter for parameter 1 and press OK.
5
Parameter N – select additional parameters as desired.
6
Sample Speed – select High sampling speed.
7
Set Alarms? – select Don’t Set Alarms.
8
Save Config? – select Save Configuration.
28 Data Logger Features
9
New Config File? – select Create New File.
10 New Screen File – enter a file name up to eight characters and press OK. Up/Down keys
select the letter, the Right key moves to the next character.
11 The screen configuration is now saved.
To open a screen configuration:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Open Screen Config File.
4
Screen File – select the file to open and press OK.
5
The software sets the datalogger screen to parameters within the file and starts showing
live data.
Alarms
Alarms can be set to trigger on one or more parameters. Complex alarm triggers can be
achieved by saving multiple rules into an alarm file. See Alarms on page 61 to create an alarm
file.
Once the alarm file is created, it can be used within the parameter select wizard.
To set alarms while data logging:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select the Setup Screen Manually.
4
Parameter 1 – select your first parameter to monitor and press OK.
5
Parameter N – continue to select parameters. You can select as many parameters as the
screen allows or select the <none> parameter when you are done. For instance, Meter 4
allows a maximum of four parameters.
6
Sample Speed – select High sampling speed.
7
Set Alarms? – select Set Alarms.
8
Alarm File – select the alarm file to use and press OK.
9
Press the MENU button to return to the data logger screen.
10 The software will now show live data and monitor for alarms as specified within the alarm
file.
Meter 2 Screen
Meter 2 allows viewing two parameters with a large font.
29 Data Logger Features
Meter 4 Screen
Meter 4 allows viewing up to four parameters with a medium font.
Line Graph Screen
Live Graph allows viewing up to two parameters graphed as lines. A movable marker allows
extracting values at any point along the graph. Range high/low values display anytime the
marker is moved or the graph is zoomed. After a few seconds, the range high/low values
disappear for an unobstructed view of the graph.
The graph has a 256-point deep buffer that extends beyond the viewable area. The live 1 and
2 marker values update showing the data values under the marker as is moves through the
buffer.
The Line Select button cycles between displaying both lines, line 1 and line 2. When a single
line is shown, the zoom and y-axis scroll only affects the active line.
Live data or playback data can be paused using the Play/Pause button to allow for analysis.
30 Data Logger Features
With the line graph, you can:
•
Zoom in and out
•
Scroll right and left within the graph buffer
•
Move the marker to obtain a value at any point
•
View the minimum and maximum values at each zoom level
•
Hide/show line 1, line 2 or both lines
•
Zoom and scroll each line independently
To zoom the graph:
1
Press the Key Lock key to select the secondary function keys.
2
Press the Zoom X button to zoom the x-axis. Pressing the button repeatedly will cycle
through each zoom level.
3
Press the Zoom Y button to zoom the y-axis. Pressing the button repeatedly will cycle
through each zoom level.
To scroll the x-axis:
1
Press the Right and Left buttons to move the marker.
To scroll the y-axis:
1
Press the Key Lock key to select the secondary function keys.
2
Press the Zoom Y button.
3
Press the Key Lock key to select the primary keys.
4
Press the Up/Down buttons to scroll the y-axis.
Bar Graph Screen
Bar Graph allows viewing up to two parameters in a medium font with bar graph a
background.
31 Data Logger Features
Gauge Screen
Gauge allows viewing one parameter in a round gauge format.
List Screen
List allows viewing up to 16 parameters in scrollable list format.
Oscilloscope Screen
Oscilloscope allows viewing two analog input parameters on a line graph. Each parameter
may select any input voltage range: 0-6V, 0-12V or 0-24V.
The Oscilloscope screen differs from the Line Graph screen in that it monitors only the
auxiliary port analog inputs and the sample rate is 1mS. This high sample rate allows viewing
and recording higher frequency analog signals not possible with the other data logger
screens.
32 Data Logger Features
The data is sampled in 256 bursts of 1mS per sample. Recorded data stored to the SD card and
opened using the Dyno-Scan for Windows software will show each 256-sample burst
separated by a few hundred milliseconds.
The 1mS sample rate (1000 samples a second) is good for a frequency bandwidth of 200Hz,
which is more than adequate for most automotive signals. For instance, an engine spinning at
7000RPM translates to frequency of only 117Hz.
Live Data and Playback Modes
The data logger has two modes of displaying data: live data and playback. While in live data
mode, all displayed data is live from the vehicle or aux port peripheral. On Playback mode, the
data is being read from the external memory card.
The Play/Rec light has three states: off, red and green. Off means live data. Red means
recording. Green means playback.
When data is being displayed, the Play/Rec light is the key to knowing what mode your in. Off
or red means live data is being displayed. Green means the data is played back from the
memory card.
Live data files can be large and playback can take a long time. However, the playback position
may be adjusted at any time using the Fast Forward and Fast Reverse keys. Hold the keys to
fast forward/reverse. During fast forward/reverse, a popup dialog shows the playback position
percentage. Release the key and playback will commence at the new position. Dynamic
playback positioning allows traversing to any point within a file within seconds.
Switching Modes
The first question (Live or Playback) in the parameter select wizard selects which mode the
device is in.
To quickly switch to live data mode:
1
From any datalogger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
33 Data Logger Features
3
Press the MENU button to return to the datalogger screen.
To quickly switch to playback mode:
1
From any datalogger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View/Create Playback File.
3
Press the MENU button to return to the datalogger screen.
Pause/Play
When in live data mode, pressing the Play/Pause key pauses live data. Pressing again resumes
live data.
When in playback mode, the Play/Pause key pauses playback. Pressing again resumes
playback.
Record
All data logger screens may record live data. A live data file must be created to store the data.
A dyno setup file must also be created at least once. See Create Files on page 56 for more
information.
To record live data:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View/Create Playback Files.
3
New Live Data File? – select Create New File.
4
New Live Data File – enter a file name up to eight characters and press OK. Up/Down keys
select the letter, the Right key moves to the next character.
5
Parameter 1 – select your first parameter to monitor and press OK.
6
Parameter N – continue to select parameters. You can select as many parameters as the
screen allows or select the <none> parameter when you are done.
7
Press the MENU key to return to the datalogger screen.
8
Press the Record key to start recording.
9
When done recording, press the Record key again.
Playback
Live data recorded files can be played back on any data logger screen.
To playback a live data file:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View/Create Playback Files.
3
New Live Data File? – select View Existing File.
4
Live Data File – highlight the file to playback and press OK.
34 Data Logger Features
5
Parameter 1 – select your first parameter to monitor and press OK. Note the parameters list
only shows the parameters recorded within the file.
6
Parameter N – continue to select recorded parameters. Select the <none> parameter
when you are done.
7
Now you are on a data logger screen. To start the data playback, press the Play/Pause
button to start playback. The Play/Rec light will turn green.
8
During playback, you can press Pause to pause playback.
9
Pressing and holding the Fast Forward and Fast Reverse keys adjusts the playback
position.
Many times you want to record data using the screen configuration file to setup your screen.
To record live data using a screen configuration file:
1
From any datalogger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Open Screen Config File.
4
Screen File – highlight the file to open and press OK.
5
Press OK from the datalogger screen to start the wizard again.
6
Live or Playback – select View/Create Playback File.
7
New Live Data File? – select Create New File.
8
New Live Data File - enter a file name up to eight characters and press OK. Up/Down keys
select the letter, the Right key moves to the next character.
9
Parameter 1 – the parameter list is already populated with the first parameters from your
screen configuration file. Just press OK to confirm each parameter selecting <none> when
you are done.
10 Press MENU to return to the datalogger screen.
11 Press Record to start recording.
Analog Inputs
Four analog inputs are available on auxiliary port 1. Each analog input has three ranges: 0-6V,
0-12V, and 0-24V. The ranges are selectable within the software by selecting the appropriate
parameter. For instance, to measure 0-12V on analog input 1, select the parameter Analog In 1
– 12V. See Auxiliary Ports on page 68 for more information.
Digital Input
One digital input is available on auxiliary port 2. To measure the digital input, select the
parameter Digital In 1. See Auxiliary Ports on page 68 for more information.
35 Data Logger Features
Connect Simulation
The software has a built-in vehicle simulation that can be used to practice with the features
without being connected to vehicle. This mode is accessed from the Connect > Connection
Simulation menu option.
36 Data Logger Features
CHAPTER 5
Dynamometer Features
The dynamometer features are designed for easy operation and this section shows how.
Dyno operations require driving the vehicle while the software records performance data. For
increased safety, the software does not require user intervention during the test runs. All data
is recorded for later analysis and flashing lights are used to convey instructions to the user
while driving.
Theory of Operation
A dynamometer, or dyno for short, is used to measure the power produced by an engine.
Traditionally automotive dynos were either crankshaft dynamometers or chassis
dynamometers.
Crankshaft dynos require the motor to be removed from the vehicle. The power is measured
directly at the crankshaft, or flywheel, and is not affected by transmission and axle powertrain
losses. Vehicle manufacturers spec crankshaft power on new cars and trucks.
Chassis dynos test the entire vehicle. The vehicle is tied down to a large machine and the drive
wheels are placed over a rotating drum. The chassis dyno tests the entire powertrain system,
not just the crankshaft power. This is a more realistic test since it measures the power
delivered to the wheels, not just the crankshaft. As such, the power figures measured are
always less than with a crankshaft dyno since the powertrain causes some power loss.
DashDyno SPD™ Dynamometer
DashDyno uses the OBD II computer port located on all 1996 and newer automobiles to
compute engine power, acceleration times, fuel economy, and more.
DashDyno tests the vehicle in a completely real world situation that includes powertrain
losses, drag from disk brakes and wheel bearings, tire rolling resistance, etc. – everything a
vehicle sees on the street.
Aerodynamic drag is compensated for within the calculations. So, whether your vehicle has
the aerodynamics of a Chevy Suburban or a Porsche 911, the power calculations can correct
for losses due to wind drag.
Weather conditions affect the output of an internal combustion motor. A correction factor is
applied to compensate the measurements for weather conditions and elevation. The industry
standard document for horsepower and torque corrections is SAE J1349. DashDyno applies
this correction factor to all horsepower and torque measurements.
37 Dynamometer Features
By applying these correction factors to the dyno results, a vehicle dyno'd in Denver on a hot
day will give the same results as a chilly day in San Diego. Using the DashDyno, measurements
generated are comparable with one another the world over.
The dyno runs are performed in a single gear. Any gear will work, however increased accuracy
is obtained if the software has an increased measurement duration. For instance, the time to
accelerate from 1000 RPM to 5000 RPM in 1st gear is a shorter duration than it would be in 3rd
gear. Therefore, using 2nd or 3rd gear for dyno runs offers longer test durations for greater
accuracy.
Extensive comparison testing on a Dynojet chassis dynamometer has shown the DashDyno to
be extremely accurate.
Automatic Transmissions
All automatic transmissions are equipped with a torque converter. The torque converter is
designed to slip under certain conditions, such as at low RPM and under heavy load. When the
torque converter slips, the gear ratio is artificially lower and the RPM is higher than if the
torque converter is locked up in direct drive. At cruising speeds and under low load
requirements, the torque converter locks up for increased fuel economy.
Under heavy acceleration, the slippage is greatest below 3000 RPM. Above 3000 RPM the
slippage is still evident but to a lesser degree.
A slipping torque converter is perfectly normal. Automatic transmissions are designed to slip,
which gives them some advantages when towing a heavy load. However, this causes an
anomaly known to all chassis dynos and the DashDyno.
Since the RPM is higher than normal while the torque converter is slipping below 3000 RPM,
the power vs. torque graphs may display an unnaturally large swell below 3000 RPM. This
swell is the torque converter multiplying the engine’s available torque. The swell is normal and
all dynos exhibit this behavior. The power torque figures above 3000 RPM are the real
numbers generally used for evaluation.
Dyno Files
The Dynamometer feature use three storage file types:
Power Torque – stores Power and Torque run data.
Acceleration – stores Acceleration run data.
Dyno Setup – stores dyno setup variables such as vehicle weight, elevation, humidity,
etc.
The Power Torque files can be viewed and created on the Dynamometer > Power Torque
screen.
The Acceleration files can be viewed and created on the Dynamometer > Acceleration screen.
The Dyno Setup files can be viewed and created on the Files > View Files > View Dyno Setup or
Files > Create Files > Create Dyno Setup screen respectively.
38 Dynamometer Features
Dyno Setup File
The Dyno Setup files are created on the Files > Create Files > Create Dyno Setup menu option.
A wizard will walk you through setting each file attribute:
Weight – weight of the vehicle including passengers during the run.
Gear Ratio – the overall gear ratio of the vehicle, which includes transmission and
axle.
Tire Diameter – the vehicle tire diameter.
Temperature – current outside temperature.
Elevation – elevation at the test track.
Humidity – current outside humidity.
Pressure – current outside altimeter pressure available from www.nws.noaa.gov.
Altimeter pressure is different than barometric pressure.
Drag Coefficient – drag coefficient of vehicle.
Frontal Area – the frontal area of the vehicle.
Once Dyno Setup file is created, the parameters can be reviewed at Files > View Files > View
Dyno Setup.
The software measures the gear ratio for you. See Gear Ratio Screen on page 41 for more
information.
Drag Coefficient and Frontal Area
Common drag coefficients are usually in the range of 0.25 to 0.45 – the lower the number the
less wind drag on the vehicle.
Frontal areas are usually in the range of 17 to 28 sq. ft – the lower the number the less frontal
area. Smaller vehicles have lower frontal areas.
The table below lists drag coefficients to gain an understanding for these numbers.
Vehicle
Drag Coefficient
Frontal Area (sq/ft)
2005 BMW 325i
0.30
22.7
2005 Chevrolet Corvette Z06
0.31
22.4
2006 Porsche Cayman
0.29
21.3
1999 Chevy Cavalier
0.36
21.5
2000 Ford Taurus
0.32
23.7
2000 Chevy Silverado 1500 2WD
0.45
28.0
2000 Ford Explorer
0.45
25.8
2002 Honda Insight
0.25
20.5
39 Dynamometer Features
2002 Honda Civic Hatchback
0.36
20.5
2000 Acura Integra
0.32
20.1
2000 Volvo S40
0.32
20.9
2000 Mercedes E320
0.29
22.3
2000 Chrysler LHS
0.31
23.1
See the Auterra Vehicle Specifications document for more information on your specific vehicle
make and model.
An Internet search is another good source of drag coefficients, frontal areas and vehicle
weights. The web site www.carfolio.com has specifications for thousands of vehicles.
Many frontal areas on the Internet are listed in metric square meter (m2). To convert to square
feet (f2) multiply the metric frontal area by 10.76.
2.11 m2 x 10.76 = 22.71 f2
Calculation of Frontal Area
Frontal area can be calculated for any car. The frontal area represents the front projection area
of the vehicle. If one takes a straight-on picture of the front of a vehicle, it is the area included
in the outline. Use the following to calculate:
1. Calculate the area of a rectangle, which would encompass the front of the vehicle
(multiply width by the height).
2. Adjust the figure obtained above for areas not included, such as top rounded corners,
etc. Typical adjusting values are 85 percent for cars, and 100 percent for trucks.
Tire Diameter
Computing a tire diameter requires knowing the tire size. Most passenger car tire sizes are
listed as width, ratio, and rim diameter (e.g. 205/65 R15).
To compute a tire diameter in inches from a tire size:
tire diameter = rim + ((2.0 x width x (ratio / 100)) x 0.03937)
where:
width is the tire width in millimeters
ratio is the tire aspect ratio
rim is the rim diameter in inches
For instance, to compute a tire diameter for a 205/65 R15 size is:
25.49 inches = 15 + ((2.0 x 205 x (65 / 100)) x 0.03937
40 Dynamometer Features
Many large truck tire sizes are sized differently. These tires are listed as diameter, width, and
rim diameter (e.g. 31x10.5 R16). In this case, the first number is used as the tire diameter, in
inches (e.g. 31”).
Manufacturers are usually off very slightly from the indicated tire size. Many manufactures list
the exact tire diameter on their website. If available, use the tire diameter listed on the
manufacturer’s datasheet.
Dyno Setup File Usage
The Dyno Setup file stores vehicle setup variables. When a power torque run is performed, the
current Dyno Setup file set on the Preferences > Default Dyno Setup menu option is copied
into the Power Torque file. Similarly, the current Dyno Setup file is copied into the Acceleration
file for acceleration runs.
Once the settings are copied from the Dyno Setup file to the Power Torque or Acceleration file,
there is no tie to the original Dyno Setup file. Meaning if you change a Dyno Setup file, it does
not affect any stored Power Torque or Acceleration properties.
Gear Ratio Screen
DashDyno measures the overall gear ratio of the vehicle. The Gear Ratio screen is accessed
from the Dynamometer > Gear Ratio menu option.
Measuring Overall Gear Ratio
Measuring the vehicle gear ratio involves keeping the vehicle speed steady while the software
computes an overall gear ratio. The overall gear ratio changes with each transmission gear.
Therefore, the software computes one overall gear ratio per gear ratio run (e.g. overall gear
ratio for 2nd gear). The overall gear ratio is the combination of the transmission gear ratio and
the final drive gear ratio.
To measure gear ratio:
1
Select the Dynamometer > Gear Ratio screen.
2
Press OK to start the Gear Ratio wizard.
3
Enter Tire Diameter – enter Tire Diameter.
4
Ready to Start? – select Start Run.
5
The software will display a gauge and start to count down. During this time, get the
vehicle moving in the gear the run is going to be performed in (e.g. 2nd gear). The vehicle
RPM should be between 3000 and 4000 RPM for best results. Once the gear and RPM is
achieved, keep the throttle steady and clutch peddle out (if a manual transmission).
6
At the end of the countdown, the green alarm light will flash. This means data is being
collected.
7
After the data is collected, the four-grid screen will show and the Gear Ratio is displayed in
the lower right cell.
41 Dynamometer Features
Calculating Overall Gear Ratio
The overall gear ratio can also be computed if the tire diameter and RPM at a given speed is
known. The following formula computes the overall vehicle gear ratio used by the dyno
software:
overall gear ratio = RPM x tire diameter / MPH x 336
Example car:
3.57 = 3000 RPM x 26” / 65 MPH x 336
The preferred method is to use the DashDyno to compute the overall gear ratio.
Confirming Gear Ratio Result
The Gear Ratio screen in the lower left cell shows the value “Speed (Comp)”. This is the speed
computed from the gear ratio located in the Gear Ratio cell.
Speed (Comp) will only display if a value is entered into the Gear Ratio cell. This requires
running the Gear Ratio wizard.
If the Vehicle Speed cell and the Speed (Comp) cell values closely match throughout the RPM
range then the gear ratio and tire diameter values are correct for this vehicle. If they do not
match, adjust then re-run the Gear Ratio wizard.
Procedure to confirm a gear ratio is correct:
1
Keep a steady speed at 2000 RPM.
2
Confirm the Vehicle Speed and Speed (Comp) values match.
3
Increase speed to a steady 4000 RPM.
4
Confirm the Vehicle Speed and Speed (Comp) values match.
Always have a passenger confirm gear ratio is correct. Driving requires the full
attention of the driver. Operating or observing the DashDyno while driving will
cause driver distraction and could cause a fatal accident.
Computing a gear ratio requires an accurate speedometer. If the vehicle’s tire size is either
smaller or larger than stock and the speedometer has not been recalibrated to the new wheel
size, then the computed gear ratio will be incorrect. This will make the horsepower and torque
figures higher or lower than expected.
Automatic Transmissions
The software uses the gear ratio on the power torque run, which is performed under heavy
acceleration. The gear ratio run, however, is performed under essentially a no-load condition
where the torque converter slippage is negligible. Therefore, for automatic transmissions the
measured gear ratio may have to be lowered by 5 to 15% to account for the torque converter
slippage. Otherwise, the power and torque curves may show lower than expected results.
42 Dynamometer Features
Dynamometer Getting Started
Using the dynamometer features requires a few one-time configurations. This section
summarizes those steps.
To get started with the dynamometer features:
1
Obtain the drag coefficient, frontal area and vehicle weight as described in Drag
Coefficient and Frontal Area on page 39.
2
Measure gear ratio of your vehicle as described in Gear Ratio Screen on page 41.
3
Create a Dyno Setup file as described in Dyno Setup File on page 39.
4
Set the default Dyno Setup file at Preferences > Default Dyno Setup file.
5
Ensure the Preferences > Fast Sampling option is set to On.
6
Connect the DashDyno to your vehicle.
7
Turn the vehicle ignition ON.
8
Select the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option.
9
Go back to the main menu by pressing the MENU button.
10 To measure power and torque, proceed to the next section.
Power Torque Screen
The Power Torque screen analyzes power and torque data gathered from a vehicle run.
The power torque graph shows the relationship between horsepower/torque and engine
RPM. The vertical axis shows the power and torque. The horizontal axis shows the engine RPM.
The value at any point along the curve is obtained by moving the vertical marker right and left.
The RPM value displays anytime the marker is moved or the graph is zoomed. After a few
seconds, the RPM value disappears for an unobstructed view of the graph.
For a complete description of how to use features of a line graph, see Line Graph Screen on
page 30.
To measure power and torque:
1
Select the Dynamometer > Power Torque menu option.
2
Press the Record button to start the wizard.
43 Dynamometer Features
3
New Power File? – select Create New File.
4
New Power File – enter a file name up to eight characters and press OK. Up/Down keys
select the letter, the Right key moves to the next character.
5
Dyno Setup File – select a dyno setup file to use for the dyno run.
6
Set Alarms? – select Don’t set Alarms. Optionally an alarm file can be selected, but the
alarms may only be triggered in response to the Engine RPM parameter.
7
Ready to Start? – select Start Run to start the test.
8
A gauge screen will display and a countdown will start.
9
During the countdown, get the vehicle moving in the gear the run is going to be
performed in (e.g. 2nd gear). The vehicle RPM during the countdown should be relatively
low, under 2000 RPM, the throttle steady, and clutch out (if a manual transmission).
10 At the end of the countdown, the green alarm light will flash. Now floor the accelerator to
achieve maximum acceleration.
11 Once maximum RPM is reached, either shift to the next higher gear or decelerate the
vehicle by letting off the accelerator. The software will automatically show the power
torque graph.
To open a power torque file:
1
Press the OK key.
2
Stats or Open File? – select Open Dyno Run File.
3
Power Torque File – highlight the file to open and press OK.
Power Torque Statistics
The Power Run Stats screen calculates the peak horsepower and torque at RPM values for the
currently opened Power Torque file.
Power – peak horsepower at RPM during the run.
Torque – peak torque at RPM during the run.
To view power torque graph statistics:
1
On the Power Torque screen, press the OK key.
2
Stats or Open File? – select View Run Statistics.
Power Torque Run Do’s and Don’ts
For safety and the most accuracy from the software, please follow the guidelines below.
Keep your attention on driving – the software is designed to require no user intervention
when a run is performed. Start the power torque run while the vehicle is stopped. During the
countdown, accelerate to the correct gear and starting RPM. A green alarm light flash signals
when to accelerate the vehicle.
44 Dynamometer Features
Consistent vehicle setup – use the same tire pressure, same number of passengers, no A/C,
windows rolled up, low beams on, radio and other accessories off.
Automatic transmission – most automatic transmissions will want to downshift under hard
acceleration. Experiment with higher starting RPM or roll the throttle on slowly at first to
prevent a downshift.
Manual transmission – ensure the clutch is completely out when the data collection starts.
Steady throttle – do not “blip” the throttle during the countdown period. Keep the throttle
and RPM steady.
Maximum throttle – keep the throttle fully floored until maximum RPM is achieved. A dip in
the RPM will cause the power torque graphs to terminate early3.
Dyno setup – try to obtain current temperature, humidity, elevation, and altimeter pressure
before each day of runs.
Head/Tail Wind – a windy day will skew the power/torque results higher or lower depending
on the wind direction. A relatively calm day provides the best results.
Level Ground – an uphill climb will make the power/torque lower and conversely a downhill
run will have higher than expected values. Level ground provides the best results.
Heat soak – repeated runs will cause the intake manifold temperature to increase. Hot air is
less dense and causes a reduction in power/torque. Just note that the first run may have
slightly higher values than subsequent runs if performed back-to-back.
Acceleration Screen
The Acceleration screen analyzes acceleration data gathered from a vehicle run.
The acceleration graph shows the relationship between vehicle speed vs. time. The vertical
axis shows the vehicle speed in MPH. The horizontal axis shows the time in seconds.
The value at any point along the curve is obtained by moving the vertical marker right and left.
For a complete description of how to use features of a line graph, see Line Graph Screen on
page 30.
To measure acceleration:
3
Use common sense – let off the accelerator if something gets in the way of the vehicle.
45 Dynamometer Features
1
Select the Dynamometer > Acceleration menu option.
2
Press the Record button to start the wizard.
3
New Accel File? – select Create New File.
4
New Accel File – enter a file name up to eight characters and press OK. Up/Down keys
select the letter, the Right key moves to the next character.
5
Dyno Setup File – select a dyno setup file to use for the dyno run.
6
Set Alarms? – select Don’t set Alarms. Optionally an alarm file can be selected, but the
alarms may only be triggered in response to the Vehicle Speed parameter.
7
Ready to Start? – select Start Run to start the test.
8
The acceleration run is performed from a standing start. When status field says “Ready” in
the upper right corner means the software is waiting for the vehicle to start accelerating.
The acceleration run does not use RPM like a power torque run does. Therefore, while
waiting to accelerate you may rev the motor or do whatever else you think will achieve the
quickest acceleration time
9
The acceleration screen will record up thought the ¼ mile. It will terminate automatically if
the vehicle begins to slow down or the maximum test time has expired.
As you accelerate down the track, you may stop the acceleration run at different data points
depending on the data you’re trying to collect.
60 MPH – if acceleration stops after 60 MPH is reached, the 0-60 time will be
computed.
1/8 mile – if acceleration stops after 1/8 mile reached, the 1/8-mile time and speed is
computed.
1/4 mile – if acceleration stops after 1/4 mile reached, the 1/4-mile time and speed is
computed. In addition, a 1/4-mile horsepower value is computed.
Its best to accelerate slightly beyond a data point to ensure the software captures the vehicle
passing through the data point at maximum acceleration. For instance, don’t let off the
accelerator at exactly 60 MPH. Accelerate just beyond 60 for a second or two to achieve the
best results.
To open an acceleration file:
1
Press the OK key.
46 Dynamometer Features
2
Stats or Open File? – select Open Dyno Run File.
3
Acceleration File – highlight the file to open and press OK.
Acceleration Run Statistics
The Accel Run Stats screen computes times and horsepower values based upon how fast the
vehicle accelerates.
Top Speed – maximum speed achieved during the run.
Zero to 60 mph – how fast in seconds the vehicle traveled from 0 to 60 MPH.
Zero to 100 mph - how fast in seconds the vehicle traveled from 0 to 100 MPH.
1/8 Mile – time and speed the vehicle was traveling at the 1/8-mile mark.
1/4 Mile – time and speed the vehicle was traveling at the 1/4-mile mark.
Quarter Mile HP – a rough calculation of horsepower based strictly on 1/4-mile time
and vehicle weight.
Zero (0) will be displayed if the vehicle didn’t travel far enough to compute that statistic.
To view acceleration graph statistics:
1
On the Acceleration screen, press the OK key.
2
Stats or Open File? – select View Run Statistics.
Acceleration Run Do’s and Don’ts
For safety and the most accuracy from the Dyno software, please follow the guidelines below.
Keep your attention on driving – the software is designed to require no user intervention
when a run is performed.
Consistent vehicle setup – use the same tire pressure, same number of passengers, no A/C,
windows rolled up, low beams on, radio and other accessories off.
Head/Tail Wind – a windy day will skew the acceleration results higher or lower depending
on the wind direction. A relatively calm day provides the best results.
Level Ground – an uphill climb will make the acceleration lower and conversely a downhill
run will have higher than expected values. Level ground provides the best results.
Heat soak – repeated runs will cause the intake manifold temperature to increase. Hot air is
less dense and causes a reduction in power/torque. Just note that the first run may have
slightly faster values than subsequent runs if performed back-to-back.
Accelerate Just Past Data Point - accelerate slightly beyond a data point (e.g. 60 MPH, 1/8
mile, or 1/4 mile) to ensure the software captures the vehicle passing through the data point
at maximum acceleration
47 Dynamometer Features
If the vehicle’s tire size is either smaller or larger than stock and the speedometer has not been
recalibrated to the new wheel size, then use the Vehicle Speed Correction on page 51 to
adjust the speedometer readings.
Performance Screen
The Performance screen offers an automatic method to measure performance while driving
around. The performance screen automatically resets when the vehicle stops. Upon
acceleration, the test auto-starts and the software measures acceleration. The test ends after
an elapsed time or if the vehicle speed drops. The results of the test are then displayed until
the vehicle stops again and accelerates starting a new test.
To measure vehicle performance:
1
Select the Dynamometer > Performance menu option.
2
Acceleration File – highlight the file to store the tests and press OK.
3
Set Alarms? – select Don’t Set Alarms. Optionally an alarm file can be selected, but the
alarms may only be triggered in response to the Vehicle Speed parameter.
4
The Performance screen is now ready to measure acceleration every time the vehicle
accelerates from a stop.
Trip Computer
The Trip Computer screen has two trip computers and measures multiple parameters while
you drive.
•
Instance Economy
•
Average Economy
•
Fuel Used
•
Fuel Cost
•
Fuel Rate
•
Average Speed
•
Distance Traveled
•
Drive Time (total time engine is running)
48 Dynamometer Features
•
Idle Time (total time engine is running with vehicle speed at 0 MPH)
•
Idle Time Percent (idle time vs. drive time percent)
•
Engine RPM
•
Intake Air Temp
•
Calculated Load
For an accurate Fuel Cost reading, set the cost per gallon/liter on the Preferences > Fuel Cost
menu option. If the Preferences > Units of Measure is set to Metric, the Fuel Cost is the cost per
liter.
Use the up/down arrows to display each page within the trip computer. Use the right/left keys
to switch between trip computer 1 and 2.
The trip statistics are stored to the external memory card, so when you return to the screen the
last values are remembered. Each trip computer may be independently reset at anytime.
To use the trip computer:
1
Select the Dynamometer > Trip Computer menu option.
To reset the trip computer:
1
Select the Dynamometer > Trip Computer menu option.
2
Press the OK key.
3
Select Yes to reset the trip computer statistics.
To switch between data parameters and trip computer 1 and 2:
1
Press the up/down arrow keys to view different data parameters.
2
Press the right/left arrow keys to switch trip computers.
49 Dynamometer Features
CHAPTER 6
Preferences
Preferences allow you to set the global system settings, which are saved to the external
memory card. Every time the DashDyno powers on or when a new card is inserted, the settings
saved on the external memory card are loaded and used.
When setting a preference, always press OK to save/change the setting. Pressing MENU on a
preference dialog will cancel a change and revert to the previous setting.
Preference
Function
Vehicle Make
Set the vehicle make to display enhanced OBD II
parameters (see Enhanced OBD II Parameters on
page 27). Select “All” if your vehicle make is not
listed.
Default Dyno Setup
Specifies the default dyno setup file to be used on
the dynamometer features.
Reset Logger Fuel Econ
Reset the fuel economy related parameters used
on the data logger screens.
Contrast
Sets the LCD display contrast.
Backlight
Sets the intensity of the LCD display backlight.
Units of Measure
English or Metric units of measure.
Fast Sampling
Allows faster data sampling on some vehicle
protocols.
CAN 6x
Allows querying 6 sensors at a time on CAN bus
equipped vehicles.
Power Down Mode
Timeout, RPM or Never. Timeout means if the
vehicle ECU stops communicating or no keys are
pressed, the device will self-power down. RPM
means if the vehicle RPM goes to 0 then selfpower down. Use the RPM option if DashDyno
does not self-power down using Timeout. Never
means the device will not self-power down.
Power Down Timeout
The timeout delay, in seconds, before self-power
down.
50 Preferences
MPG Correction
Percent correction factor of the computed MPG.
Distance Corr
Percent correction factor of the distance traveled.
Vehicle Speed Corr
Percent correction factor for the vehicle speed.
Used to correct for an inaccurate speedometer
due to non-stock tires sizes.
Boost Calibration
Boost pressure calibration.
Case Temperature
The current internal temperature inside the case.
GPS Baud Rate
Sets the GPS baud rate on auxiliary port 2.
Fuel Type
Gas or diesel.
Fuel Cost
Average cost per gallon or liter of the fuel
currently in the gas tank. Use to compute the Fuel
Cost live data parameter.
Engine Size
Engine size in liters.
Power Loss Resume
Auto-connect to the vehicle and switch to the last
Live Data or Trip Computer screen.
About
Shows the software versions within the product.
Vehicle Speed Correction
The vehicle speed correction preference adjusts the vehicle speed sensor readings to
accommodate a vehicle with an inaccurate speedometer. This is a global setting and adjusts
the vehicle speed measurements on all DashDyno screens (e.g. trip computer screen,
acceleration screen, data logger screens, etc…).
The vehicle speed correction preference does not adjust the vehicle dashboard speedometer
nor does it calibrate the vehicle speedometer.
If your vehicle is equipped with a stock tire size you leave this setting at 0.0%.
Always compute and adjust the vehicle speed correction first before measuring and adjusting
the distance correction or MPG correction.
To compute and adjust the vehicle speed correction factor using is GPS:
1
Select the Preferences > Vehicle Speed Corr menu option.
2
Enter Vehicle Speed Corr – enter 0.
3
Select the Data Logger > Meter 2 screen.
4
Press OK.
5
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
6
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
7
Parameter 1 – select Vehicle Speed and press OK.
51 Preferences
8
Press MENU.
9
Drive the vehicle and keep the vehicle speed stead (e.g. 30 MPH).
10 Have a passenger note the DashDyno Vehicle Speed and the GPS speed.
11 Compute an error percentage:
vehicle speed correction = ((GPS speed - DashDyno vehicle speed ) / GPS speed) x 100
Example:
7.3% = ((30.0 MPH – 27.8 MPH) / 30.0 MPH) x 100
12 Select the Preferences > Vehicle Speed Corr menu option.
13 Enter Vehicle Speed Corr – enter the computed correction factor.
Distance Correction
The distance correction preference fine-tunes the accuracy of the Distance Traveled
parameter, if necessary.
The distance correction preference does not adjust the vehicle odometer nor does it calibrate
the vehicle speedometer.
The Distance Traveled parameter is used within the Instant MPG and Average MPG parameter
computations. Therefore, an accurate Distance Traveled parameter ensures greatest accuracy
of these parameters.
To compute and adjust the distance correction preference using your vehicle odometer:
1
Select the Preferences > Distance Corr menu option.
2
Enter Distance Corr – enter 0.
3
Go to the Dynamometer > Trip Computer screen.
4
Press OK.
5
Reset Trip Computer? – select Yes.
6
Reset the vehicle’s trip computer odometer to 0.
7
Drive the vehicle for 25 to 50 miles. Always have the Trip Computer screen displayed when
driving the vehicle.
8
Compare the DashDyno trip computer Distance value and the vehicle’s odometer mileage.
Compute an error percentage:
distance correction = ((odometer distance - DashDyno distance ) / odometer distance) x 100
Example:
3.3% = ((27.5 miles – 26.6 miles) / 27.5 miles) x 100
9
Select the Preferences > Distance Corr menu option.
10 Enter Distance Corr – enter the computed correction factor.
52 Preferences
Alternatively a GPS may be used in place of the odometer in the above procedure if the
vehicle speedometer is not accurate.
MPG Correction
The MPG correction preference fine-tunes the accuracy of the Instant MPG, Average MPG and
Fuel Used parameters due to different fuels or minor vehicle sensor variances.
The MPG correction preference does not adjust the amount of fuel used by the vehicle.
Always compute and adjust the distance correction first before measuring and adjusting MPG
correction.
To compute and adjust the MPG correction preference:
1
Select the Preferences > MPG Correction menu option.
2
Enter MPG Correction – enter 0.
3
Fill up your vehicle gas tank.
4
Go to the Dynamometer > Trip Computer screen.
5
Press OK.
6
Reset Trip Computer? – select Yes.
7
Drive the vehicle normally until the tank is near empty. Always have the Trip Computer
screen displayed when driving the vehicle.
8
Fill up the vehicle and note the gallons used to fill up the vehicle.
9
Compute the error in the DashDyno Fuel Used parameter and the gallons used to fill up
the gas tank.
MPG correction = ((DashDyno fuel used - gas pump gallons) / gas pump gallons) x 100
Example:
-1.2% = ((25.3 gallons – 25.6 gallons) / 25.6 gallons) x 100
10 Select the Preferences > MPG Correction menu option.
11 Enter MPG Correction – enter the computed correction factor.
Boost Calibration
Two different methods are used for expressing pressure: gauge pressure and absolute
pressure. Gauge pressure is referenced to atmospheric pressure. The atmospheric pressure at
sea level is about 14.7psi and changes slightly with atmospheric conditions. Absolute pressure
is referenced to 0psi. The relationship between the pressures can be expressed as follows:
absolute pressure = gauge pressure + atmospheric pressure
The Boost Pressure parameter measures the absolute pressure within the vehicle’s intake
manifold. To measure gauge pressure, enter a Boost Cal offset. Gauge pressure can be
expressed as follows:
53 Preferences
gauge pressure = absolute pressure – atmospheric pressure
The Boost Cal allows entering the atmospheric pressure, in psi, such that a gauge pressure
reading may be obtained.
boost pressure = absolute pressure – Boost Cal
Two factors affect the Boost Cal accuracy: weather conditions and elevation changes, the later
being more significant. Enter a new Boost Cal for the most accurate gauge pressure
measurements.
See Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Example on page 77 for a discussion of gauge vs.
absolute pressure readings.
The boost calibration does not adjust the turbo boost pressure of the vehicle.
To compute a Boost Calibration correction factor:
1
Connect DashDyno to your vehicle.
2
Ensure your vehicle is not running.
3
Select the Preferences > Boost Calibration menu option.
4
Enter Boost Cal – enter 0.
5
Select the Data Logger > Meter 2 screen.
6
Press OK.
7
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
8
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
9
Parameter 1 – select Boost Pressure and press OK.
10 Press MENU.
11 The boost pressure parameter will display. This is your Boost Cal correction factor. With the
Boost Cal preference at 0 and the vehicle off, the Boost Pressure value shown is
atmospheric pressure.
12 Select the Preferences > Boost Calibration menu option.
13 Enter the boost calibration pressure value measured above.
Engine Size
The Engine Size preference is used in the following parameters: Instant Economy 2, Average
Economy 2, Fuel Used 2 and Air Flow Rate From MAP. Ensure you enter an accurate engine
size (in liters) if you use these parameters.
Fuel Type
The Fuel Type preference is used to adjust the fuel economy-related parameters. Ensure you
enter the correct fuel type: gas or diesel.
54 Preferences
Fuel Cost
The Fuel Cost preference is used to enter the cost per gallon of the fuel currently in the vehicle
gas tank. This value is used to correctly display the Fuel Cost live data parameter. If the
Preferences > Units of Measure is set to Metric, the Fuel Cost is the cost per liter.
Case Temperature
A temperature sensor inside the case monitors the internal device temperature. Case
temperature is used to:
•
Automatically adjust the LCD display contrast based on temperature
•
Reduce power consumption during high-heat conditions
•
Prevent operation if the device is too hot
LCD-type displays darken as the temperature increases. To compensate, the contrast is
automatically adjusting based on the internal case temperature for a clear display over a wide
range of operating temperatures.
Please see Caring for DashDyno on page 15 and Specifications on page 3 for information
about storage and ambient operational temperature ranges.
The temperature sensor is also utilized to protect against usage during abnormal temperature
extremes.
If the internal case temperature exceeds 140ºF (60ºC) power consumption is reduced by:
•
Turning off the keypad backlight
•
Reducing the LCD display backlight to 50% intensity
If the internal case temperature exceeds 158ºF (70ºC) an error message is displayed for 5
seconds and then powered down.
The temperature is displayed on the Preferences > Case Temperature menu. To refresh the
temperature value, press and hold the OK key while highlighting the Case Temperature menu
option.
55 Preferences
CHAPTER 7
Files
The DashDyno uses the external memory card to store all user data, including recorded data,
screen configuration, user preferences, and diagnostic trouble code definitions.
Upon inserting a new card, the DashDyno will create the necessary directory structures. Each
directory contains different file types.
Directory Name
File Type
File Extension
ACCEL
Acceleration files.
.ac
ALARM
Alarm files.
.al
DSETUP
Dyno setup files.
.ds
DTC
Diagnostic trouble code definition files.
.bin
FORMULA
Formula files.
.fo
LIVE
Live data files.
.ld
POWER
Power torque files.
.pt
SCREEN
Screen configuration files.
.sc
PREFS
User preferences files.
The memory card can be ejected or inserted while the DashDyno is powered. Ensure you are
not recording before ejecting the card.
The DashDyno can create any file type, except the diagnostic trouble code definition files
located in the DTC directory. These files are created by Auterra and included on your memory
card. If you need to reinstall these files onto a new card, your Auterra DashDyno CD ROM has
copies.
Creating, deleting and viewing files are all performed on DashDyno.
Create Files
Creating files on DashDyno is easy with wizards asking you simple questions. Alarm, Dyno
Setup, Formula and Screen files can be created on the Files main menu option. Other file types
are created with the Record button on the Dynamometer or Data Logger screens.
56 Files
Create Alarm File
See Alarms on page 61 for more information on how to create an Alarm file.
Create Screen Setup File
A screen setup file can be created in one of two ways. First, it can be created within the Files >
Create Files > Create Screen menu option. Or it can be created as part of setting up parameters
on a datalogger screen. See Parameter Select Wizard on page 27 for how to create a screen
setup file.
Create Dyno Setup File
See Dyno Setup File on page 39 for information on how to create a Dyno Setup file.
Create Formula File
See Formula File on page 75 for information on how to create a Formula file.
Delete Files
All file types can be deleted from accessing the Files > Delete Files menu option. All files are
deleted the same way.
To delete a acceleration file:
1
Select the Files > Delete Files > Delete Acceleration menu option.
2
Highlight the file to delete and press OK.
3
Select Yes to delete the file.
View Files
Configuration type files can be viewed from the Files > View Files menu option. Other file
types like recordings must be viewed with the Data Logger or Dynamometer screens. A
viewed file below cannot be edited.
•
Alarm File
•
Dyno Setup File
•
Formula File
•
View Screen File
To view an alarm file:
1
Select the Files > View Files > View Alarm menu option.
2
Highlight the file to view and press OK.
3
A scrollable screen lists parameters set for each alarm.
New Memory Card
To ready a new memory card for use:
57 Files
1
Unplug the DashDyno from the vehicle or AC adapter.
2
Insert the new memory card.
3
Power on the DashDyno. At power-up, the necessary subdirectories are created.
4
Eject the memory card from the DashDyno.
5
Insert the memory card into a PC memory card reader.
6
Copy all DTC files from the Auterra CD ROM to the \DTC directory on the memory card. The
files are named Acura.bin, Audi.bin, etc…
7
The new memory card is now ready for use.
Backup
To backup your data from the external memory card, you’ll need a Windows PC and a card
reader.
1
Eject the memory card from the DashDyno.
2
Insert the memory card into the PC card reader.
3
Copy the entire contents of the memory card to you PC for backup.
Corrupted Memory Card
If the DashDyno has trouble reading or writing files, it could mean the memory card has been
corrupted. If corrupted, it can be repaired. A corruption can occur if power is lost while writing
to the memory card. A Windows PC and a card reader are required for the fix.
To scan the disk for errors on a PC:
1
Insert the SD card into the card reader.
2
Select Properties by right clicking on the card reader drive letter.
3
Select the Tools tab.
4
Click the Check Now… button in the Error-checking section.
5
Select the options as shown in the dialog below and press Start.
58 Files
6
The disk should now be free of any errors and ready for use. You may now need to perform
the procedure described in section New Memory Card.
In some instances, it may be required to reformat the card.
All data will be lost on the external drive if formatted. Backup all data on the card
before formatting.
To reformat a SD card:
1
Select Format… by right clicking the card reader drive letter.
2
Select either FAT or FAT32 as the file system type.
3
Press Start.
59 Files
4
The card is now formatted. Now ready it for use as explained in section New Memory Card.
60 Files
CHAPTER 8
Alarms
An alarm file stores the alarm trigger rules that you define. Multiple alarm rules can be stored
within a single file making sophisticated triggering scenarios possible.
Five items are required to define each alarm. A wizard steps you through the process.
Alarm Parameter
Function
Parameter
The parameter to monitor for the alarm condition.
Alarm Threshold
Value of the parameter to trigger at.
Set Alarm When
The alarm can be triggered when the value is greater than the alarm
threshold or less than the alarm threshold.
Reset Alarm When
The alarm can be reset when the parameter value returns inside the
trigger range, or it may never be reset. If the ‘never’ option is used,
then another alarm should be used to control when the alarm action
is turned off.
Alarm Action
The action taken when the alarm is triggered, such as turning an
alarm light on or off, or setting the output switch state.
Any parameter can be used for an alarm, such as the Engine RPM parameter. Numerous alarm
actions are possible:
•
All Alarm Lights On
•
All Alarm Lights Off
•
All Alarm Lights Flash
•
Green Light On
•
Green Light Off
•
Green Light Flash
•
Yellow Light On
•
Yellow Light Off
•
Yellow Light Flash
•
Red Light On
61 Alarms
•
Red Light Off
•
Red Light Flash
•
Output Switch Close
•
Output Switch Open
To create alarms, you need to select parameters. Vehicle related parameters are only available
when you’re connected to a vehicle or if you use the Connect > Connect Simulation option.
The connect simulation provides access to all possible parameters. Your vehicle may not
support every parameter.
Alarm Processing Rules
The alarm feature allows one or more alarms to be stored into a single alarm file. The simplest
way to create an alarm is to use 1 alarm per alarm light. For instance, three alarms can be used
to illuminate the alarm lights when the RPM increases.
•
Alarm 1 turns the green light on when RPM is >3000
•
Alarm 2 turns the yellow light on when RPM >4000
•
Alarm 3 turns the red light on when RPM is >5000
More complex alarm triggers can be achieved by overlapping alarms, meaning using more
than one alarm to control the behavior of a single alarm light(s). Here are some reasons to use
overlapping alarms.
•
Inside Range - Triggering an alarm when the sensor value is inside a range (e.g. turn
on the green alarm light when the coolant temperature is between 200 and 240
degrees).
•
Outside Range - Triggering an alarm with the sensor value is outside a range (e.g. turn
on the red alarm light when the coolant temperature is less than 200 or greater than
240 degrees).
•
Hysteresis - Turn an alarm light on at one sensor threshold and off at another (e.g.
turn on the red light when the coolant temperature exceeds 240 degrees and turn if
back off only after it cools to below 200).
•
Complex Alarms - Create complex illumination scenarios by overlapping multiple
alarms on a single alarm light (e.g. turn the green light on >3000 RPM, yellow light on
>4000 RPM and flash all lights >5000 RPM).
Knowing how the alarm-processing algorithm prioritizes alarms allows you to create complex
alarm files. The alarm-processing algorithm follows these rules:
Alarm Processing Rule 1 – alarms triggered last takes precedence when multiple alarms
overlap on an alarm light(s).
Alarm Processing Rule 2 – alarms are evaluated in the order that they were created.
Rule 1 means that if you have two alarms governing a single alarm light, the last alarm to
trigger always takes effect. This is easier to explain given a simple example.
62 Alarms
Assume two alarms are created for the green alarm light: alarm 1 turns the green light on
steady and alarm 2 flashes the green light. If alarm 2 flashes the green light and while alarm 2
is active, alarm 1 triggers a steady green light. Alarm 1 occurred last and therefore it takes
precedence over the alarm 2 action.
Rule 2 means if a single sensor data value causes multiple overlapped alarms to trigger, the
alarm created last within the file has precedence. Again, a simple example helps to illustrate.
Assume you have two alarms: alarm 1 turns the green light on when the engine RPM <4000
RPM and alarm 2 turns the green light off when <3000 RPM. The green alarm light is on and
the engine RPM is 4500 RPM. The engine RPM then drops to 2000 RPM. Both alarms trigger,
however alarm 2 takes precedence and therefore the green light is turned off.
Shift Light Example
To understand how multiple alarms provide the utmost flexibility, let’s create a shift light
alarm file. Assume we want the green light to illuminate at 4500 RPM, yellow at 5000 RPM and
red at 5500 RPM.
1
Select the Files > Create Files > Create Alarm menu option.
2
Alarm Parameter 1 – highlight the Engine RPM and press OK.
3
Alarm Threshold – enter the first RPM threshold of 4500 RPM and press OK.
4
Set Alarm When – select Greater Than Threshold.
5
Reset Alarm When – select Below Trigger Threshold.
6
Alarm Action – select Green Light On.
7
Add Another Alarm? – select Add Another Alarm.
8
Alarm Parameter 2 – highlight the Engine RPM and press OK.
9
Alarm Threshold – enter the second RPM threshold of 5000 RPM and press OK.
10 Set Alarm When – select Greater Than Threshold.
11 Reset Alarm When – select Below Trigger Threshold.
12 Alarm Action – select Yellow Light On.
13 Add Another Alarm? – select Add Another Alarm.
14 Alarm Parameter 3 – highlight the Engine RPM and press OK.
15 Alarm Threshold – enter the first RPM threshold of 5500 RPM and press OK.
16 Set Alarm When – select Greater Than Threshold.
17 Reset Alarm When – select Below Trigger Threshold.
18 Alarm Action – select Red Light On.
19 Add Another Alarm? – select Don’t Add Another Alarm.
20 New Alarm File? – select Create New File.
63 Alarms
21 New Alarm File – enter the alarm file name and press OK.
22 Config File Saved – the file is now saved and ready for use. See Alarms on page 29 for how
to use your newly created alarm file.
Inside Range Alarm
Triggering an alarm when the sensor value is inside a particular range requires four alarms
created in the correct order.
The table below shows the settings required to create an inside range alarm. This example
illuminates the green light when the engine coolant temperature is between 150 and 220.
Alarm
Alarm 1
Alarm 2
Alarm 3
Alarm 4
64 Alarms
Alarm Parameter
Value
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
150
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light On
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
220
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light On
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
150
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light Off
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
220
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light Off
Outside Range Alarm
Triggering an alarm when the sensor value is outside a particular range requires four alarms
created in the correct order.
The table below shows the settings required to create an outside range alarm. This example
illuminates the red light when the engine coolant temperature is below 150 or above 220.
Alarm
Alarm 1
Alarm 2
Alarm 3
Alarm 4
Alarm Parameter
Value
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
150
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Red Light Off
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
220
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Red Light Off
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
150
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Red Light On
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
220
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Red Light On
Hysteresis Alarm
Triggering an alarm with a different ascending and descending limit requires two alarms
created in the correct order.
The table below shows the settings required to create a hysteresis alarm. Suppose you wanted
to illuminate the red light when the coolant temperature reaches 240 degrees, but don’t want
to turn off the light until the temperature cools to 200 or less.
65 Alarms
Alarm
Alarm 1
Alarm 2
Alarm Parameter
Value
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
240
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Red Light On
Parameter
Engine Coolant Temp
Alarm Threshold
200
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Below Trigger Threshold
Alarm Action
Red Light Off
Complex Shift Light Alarm
Alarms rules can be combined in even more complex ways to create very unique triggering
scenarios.
This example shows how to create a sequential shift light that illuminates the green light at
>3000 RPM, yellow light at >4000 RPM and then flashes all the lights >5000 RPM. To create
your own unique shift light alarm file, replace the 3000, 4000 and 5000 numbers below with
your own RPM values.
Alarm
Alarm 1
Alarm 2
Alarm 3
66 Alarms
Alarm Parameter
Value
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
5000
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Below Trigger Threshold
Alarm Action
All Lights Flash
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
3000
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light On
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
5000
Alarm 4
Alarm 5
Alarm 6
Alarm 7
67 Alarms
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light On
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
3000
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Green Light Off
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
4000
Set Alarm When
Greater Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Yellow Light On
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
5000
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Yellow Light On
Parameter
Engine RPM
Alarm Threshold
4000
Set Alarm When
Less Than Threshold
Reset Alarm When
Never, Another Alarm Used
Alarm Action
Yellow Light Off
CHAPTER 9
Auxiliary Ports
DashDyno has two female 8-pin mini DIN auxiliary input ports to connect optional Auterra
accessories or your own sensors.
Auxiliary Port Pinouts
Aux 1 and Aux 2 ports on the DashDyno each perform different functions.
Each female mini DIN has 8 pins numbered as follows:
Aux 1 Pin
Function
Aux 2 Pin
Function
1
+5V output, 25mA max*
1
+5V output, 25mA max*
2
Analog In 1
2
Digital Out 1
3
Spare
3
Serial Transmit
4
Spare
4
Serial Receive
5
Analog In 2
5
Spare
6
Analog In 3
6
Spare
7
Analog In 4
7
Digital In 1
8
Ground
8
Ground
* 25mA maximum from both pins combined.
Analog In
The analog inputs have selectable ranges of 0-6V, 0-12V or 0-24V. Actual voltage range for
each scale is 6.2V, 12.4V and 24.7V. Maximum input voltage is 24.7V on any range.
Most sensors on the vehicle are grounded already. Therefore, when connecting an aux port
analog input to a vehicle sensor it’s not necessary to run a ground wire from the sensor back
to the aux port ground pin 8.
68 Auxiliary Ports
If the sensor is not tied to vehicle ground, or if the signal levels are very low or if electrical
interference is being picked up, a ground wire can be run back to the aux port pin 8.
Digital In
The digital input maximum input voltage is 24V. A logic high is 4V or higher and a logic low is
1.6V or lower.
Digital Out
The digital output is an open drain FET. It can switch 15V maximum and sink a 75mA
maximum.
The picture below offers a simple representation of the digital output 1 electrical connection
supported. If your device has a digital in control signal, when the DashDyno digital out 1
switch is closed the aux 2 pin 2 will be grounded.
5V Output
A +5V output on the both aux connectors can be used for powering a low-power device. The
combined current draw from both connectors is limited to 25mA maximum.
69 Auxiliary Ports
Serial Transmit/Receive
The transmit/receive pins are used to communicate with an external peripheral device, such as
a GPS. Custom driver software is required to communicate with an external device. Auterra will
make software drivers and peripherals available.
70 Auxiliary Ports
CHAPTER 10
GPS
An external GPS receiver may be connected to DashDyno auxiliary port 2 using the DashDyno
serial cable. The GPS receiver must support serial communication and the NMEA 0183
protocol. Most handheld GPS receivers from makers such as Garmin, Magellan and Lowrance
will support these features.
A GPS receiver allows vehicle georeferenced positions to be recorded with your vehicle sensor
data. The recorded data is analyzed on a PC and provides you a means to correlate sensor
values with a vehicle position anywhere on Earth.
Five items are required to support GPS data logging:
4
•
DashDyno SPD
•
DashDyno Serial Cable (p/n C-160)
•
GPS Receiver
•
GPS Receiver Serial Cable (9-pin DSUB)
•
Dyno-Scan for Windows software4
Allows viewing recorded GPS positional data within Google Earth
71 GPS
Your GPS receiver must be configured to output serial data. A setup menu on your GPS
receiver will enable the NMEA output and a communication baud rate. Ensure the baud rate
selected on your GPS receiver matches the DashDyno baud rate set at the Preferences > GPS
Baud Rate menu.
There may be multiple NMEA settings on your GPS receiver. It may be necessary to experiment
with different settings until one is selected that outputs the necessary information required by
DashDyno.
To connect a GPS to DashDyno:
1
Select a GPS baud rate from the Preferences > GPS Baud Rate menu. 19200 is the most
common baud rate setting.
2
Connect the DashDyno serial cable to the DashDyno auxiliary port 2.
3
Connect the GPS receiver serial cable to your GPS receiver.
4
Connect the GPS receiver serial cable to the DashDyno serial cable.
5
Ensure you are outside with a clear view of the sky and wait for the GPS to acquire a
satellite lock.
6
Set the NMEA and baud rate settings on your GPS receiver. Ensure the baud rate on the
GPS receiver matches the baud rate on DashDyno.
7
Select the Data Logger > Meter 4 screen.
8
Press OK to start the Parameter Select Wizard.
9
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
10 Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
11 Parameter 1 – select GPS Satellites and press OK.
72 GPS
12 Press MENU to return to the Meter 4 screen.
13 If the GPS and DashDyno are communicating, the GPS Satellites parameter will display the
number of satellites being tracked (e.g. 5). If three dashes are displayed (- - -), the GPS and
DashDyno are not communicating. Adjust the baud rate and NMEA setting on the GPS
receiver until the GPS Satellites parameter shows the number of satellites.
14 Now that the GPS and DashDyno are communicating, try the GPS HDOP and GPS Speed
parameters. Both should show a number. If not, adjust only the NMEA setting on the GPS
receiver until all GPS parameters are able to show value.
GPS Record and Playback
You can record and playback GPS parameters (e.g. GPS Satellites) on the data logger screens.
In addition to the GPS parameter, GPS positional coordinates are also saved to the SD card.
GPS positional information is saved to the SD card as long as at least one GPS parameter is
being recorded. See Record on page 34 for more information about recording data.
While you can view GPS parameters such as GPS Speed on DashDyno, you cannot view GPS
positional information. DashDyno does not display a GPS map. GPS positional information is
recorded to the SD card for viewing within Dyno-Scan for Windows software package. See
Google Earth on page 82 for more information regarding viewing GPS data on a PC.
GPS Update Rate
The GPS positional data is extremely useful in correlating logged sensor data to a vehicle’s
georeferenced position when analyzed on the PC. Most handheld GPS receivers have a 1second update rate. This rate is enough to provide an excellent vehicle position-to-data
correlation.
HDOP
GPS HDOP (Horizontal Dilution Of Precision) parameter is a measure of the GPS receiver’s
horizontal positional accuracy. The lower the number the more accurate the positional data.
The table below summarizes different ranges of HDOP.
HDOP
Rating
Description
1
Ideal
This is the highest possible confidence level.
2-3
Excellent
Positional measurements are considered accurate enough
to meet all but the most sensitive applications.
4-6
Good
Positional measurements could be used to make reliable
vehicle location.
7-8
Moderate
The fix quality could be improved. A more open view of the
sky is recommended.
9-20
Fair
Represents a low confidence level. A very rough estimate of
the current location only.
73 GPS
21-50
74 GPS
Poor
At this level, measurements are inaccurate by as much as a
hundred yards.
CHAPTER 11
Formulas
Formulas allow applying a custom equation to any auxiliary port analog input voltage. A scale
factor, offset, parameter name, units of measure, minimum and maximum values are all
configurable.
Often an analog input is connected to a vehicle sensor. Typically a sensor outputs an analog
voltage signal (e.g. 0 to 5V). For conversion into the correct units of measure, a user defined
scale and offset is applied to the voltage measurement.
The formula applied to an analog input is:
value = (voltage x scale) + offset
where:
voltage is the voltage measured at the auxiliary port analog input
scale is the user defined scale factor
offset is the user defined offset
Formula File
A formula file saves the formula parameters to the external memory card. Seven items are
required to define each formula. A wizard steps you through the process.
Formula Parameter
Function
Formula Parameter
The analog input parameter to apply the formula.
Formula Name
The name of your formula.
Units Name
The units of measure for the formula.
Scale
The formula scale factor.
Offset
The formula offset.
Minimum Value
The minimum computed formula value when the sensor reads 0V.
Maximum Value
The maximum computed formula value when the sensor is at the
maximum voltage.
75 Formulas
Formula files are accessed under the Files menu option. One formula file stores one formula
parameter. Once a formula file is created, it is accessible from any Data Logger screen using
the Parameter Select Wizard. Formula parameters can be viewed and recorded just like any
other parameter by selecting the Formula Name. See Parameter Select Wizard on page 27.
A maximum of four formula parameters are used within the Parameter Select Wizard. If there
are more than four formula files stored, the extra files are ignored. The formula parameters
used by the Parameter Select Wizard are stored within the FORMULA directory on the external
memory card. Each Formula Name must be unique and only one formula is allowed per analog
input.
When a formula parameter is monitored, every voltage reading is converted using the user
defined formula units of measure. Formulas always use two digits of numeric precision after
the decimal point (e.g. 1.23).
Formula files may be viewed on the Files > View Files > View Formula screen. See View Files on
page 57 for more information.
To create a formula:
1
Select the Files > Create Files > Create Formula menu option.
2
Formula Parameter - select Analog In 1 – 6V.
3
Formula Name – enter a parameter name for your formula such as TEST FORMULA.
4
Units Name – enter a units of measure for your formula such as AFR.
5
Scale – enter a scale factor such as 2.
6
Offset – enter an offset such as 10.0.
7
Minimum Value – enter the minimum computed formula value when 0V is read at the
analog input port such as 0.
8
Maximum Value – enter the maximum computed formula value when the analog input
port is reading the maximum voltage such as 20.
9
New Formula File? – select Create New File.
10 New Formula File – enter a formula file name.
To view a formula parameter:
1
From any data logger screen, press OK.
2
Live or Playback – select View Live Data.
3
Setup Method – select Setup Screen Manually.
4
Parameter 1 – select your formula parameter name and press OK.
5
Parameter N – continue to select parameters. You can select as many parameters as the
screen allows or select the <none> parameter when you are done.
6
Sample Speed – select High sampling speed.
7
Set Alarms? – select Don’t Set Alarms.
76 Formulas
8
Save Config? – select Don’t Save Configuration.
9
The software will exit the wizard and formula parameter measurements will show.
Wide Band Air/Fuel Controller Example
An oxygen sensor measures the vehicle air/fuel ratio. Oxygen sensors come in two types:
narrow band and wide band. A narrow band oxygen sensor can measure lean/rich conditions
but obtaining an exact air/fuel ratio (e.g. 14.7 to 1) is not possible. A wide band sensor allows
precise air/flow ratio readings across a broad range.
Many newer vehicles come with a wide band sensor from the factory. If so, you can access the
air/fuel ratio from the vehicle’s OBD II diagnostic port (see Parameters on page 19). If your
vehicle has a narrow band sensor, then an air/fuel ratio controller is required.
There are many wide band oxygen sensor controllers on the market. A threaded female
“bung” is welded into your exhaust pipe to hold the wide band sensor within the exhaust gas.
A controller reads the air/fuel ratio (AFR) from the wide band oxygen sensor.
Most wide band controllers are able to output the air/fuel ratio as a linear analog voltage. For
instance, a 0 to 5V analog output signal may be configured for linear response between 7.35
AFR (0V) and 22.39 AFR (5V).
The analog output of the wide band controller is connected to an analog input on DashDyno
aux 1 port. If the controller has an analog ground, connect the controller analog ground to the
aux 1 port ground.
To convert AFR assuming a range of 0V = 7.35 AFR and 5V = 22.39 AFR, use these values:
Formula Parameter
Value
Scale
3.00
Offset
7.35
Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Example
The Motorola MPX4250 MAP series sensor measures absolute pressure, useful for measuring
turbo boost pressure, or vacuum, within the intake manifold. DashDyno can measure pressure
from an external pressure sensor using an analog input and a formula.
77 Formulas
Two different methods are used for expressing pressure: gauge pressure and absolute
pressure. Gauge pressure is referenced to atmospheric pressure. The atmospheric pressure at
sea level is about 14.7psi and changes slightly with atmospheric conditions. Absolute pressure
is referenced to 0psi. The relationship between the pressures can be expressed as follows:
absolute pressure = gauge pressure + atmospheric pressure
The MPX4250 sensor outputs a 0.2V to 4.9V signal for an absolute pressure range of 2.9 to
36.3psi. Since the sensor reads absolute pressure, it will measure about 14.7psi with nothing
connected to the pressure port fitting.
One can easily connect the MPX4250 pressure sensor to DashDyno for pressure
measurements. Since the maximum current draw is 10mA, the DashDyno may power this
device directly without an external power source.
DashDyno Aux 1 Port
Motorola MPX4250AP
Pin 1 (+5V)
Pin 3 (Vs)
Pin 2 (Analog In 1)
Pin 1 (Vout)
Pin 8 (Ground)
Pin 2 (GND)
A formula parameter will convert the pressure sensor voltage output into absolute pressure in
psi (pounds/square inch). Use these values to convert voltage to absolute pressure in psi:
Formula Parameter
Value
Scale
7.11
Offset
1.51
Conversion to gauge pressure requires knowing the atmospheric pressure. The atmospheric
pressure is obtained from www.nws.noaa.gov or other weather web sites. Atmospheric
pressure is usually given in inches of mercury (inHg). To convert from inHg to psi:
pressure = atmosphere x .491
where:
pressure is the pressure in psi
atmosphere is the atmospheric pressure in inHg
.491 is the inHg to psi conversion factor constant
With the atmospheric pressure in psi, a new formula offset is computed to convert the
absolute pressure into gauge pressure.
gauge offset = 1.51 – atmospheric pressure
where:
gauge offset is the new offset to use within the formula
78 Formulas
1.51 is the MPX4250 sensor offset constant in psi
atmospheric pressure is the pressure in psi
Assuming an atmospheric pressure of 14.7psi, use these values to covert voltage into gauge
pressure to in psi:
Formula Parameter
Value
Scale
7.11
Offset
13.19
A simple table expresses how atmospheric pressure changes with altitude.
Altitude
Pressure (inHg)
Pressure (psi)
0
29.92
14.70
1,000
28.86
14.17
2,000
27.82
13.66
3,000
26.82
13.17
4,000
25.84
12.69
5,000
24.89
12.22
10,000
20.58
10.12
79 Formulas
CHAPTER 12
Software Upgrades
DashDyno SPD and Dyno-Scan for Windows are both software upgradeable. Upgrades are
downloaded from Auterra’s Internet web site www.auterraweb.com.
DashDyno Upgrade
The software is uploaded to the DashDyno through the USB port using a Windows PC. Holding
the MENU key when the DashDyno powers on puts the DashDyno into flash upgrade mode.
The USB driver must be installed before the software upgrade is performed. See Virtual COM
Port on page 87 for more information.
Please observe these precautions when upgrading your software:
•
Shutdown unnecessary software application before upgrading your software.
•
Do not interrupt the software upload once the software upgrade process begins.
•
Do not unplug the DashDyno during the software upgrade.
•
Do not use your PC while the software is being upgraded.
Once the USB driver is properly installed on your Windows PC you can upgrade the software.
To upgrade the DashDyno software:
1
Go to www.auterraweb.com and download the latest DashDyno Flash Updater program.
2
Install the program onto your Windows PC.
3
Connect the DashDyno to your PC using a USB cable.
4
Hold the MENU key while you either (a) plug in the A/C adapter into the power jack or (b)
plug the OBD II cable into the vehicle. The screen will remain blank and some alarm lights
may illuminate indicating the device is in flash update mode.
5
Start the DashDyno Flash Updater software.
80 Software Upgrades
6
Select the virtual COM port used by DashDyno. See Virtual COM Port on page 87 for more
information.
7
Select Speed as High. If your computer is having trouble upgrading, then try Low speed.
8
Press the Update Software button. Do no disturb the software upgrade process.
Depending on the speed of your computer and the Speed selection, the software upgrade
will take from 2 to 10 minutes.
9
If the software upgrade fails, shutdown the Flash Updater program and repeat the process
starting from step 3.
10 After the upgrade is complete, the DashDyno will restart automatically. The Preferences >
About menu option will show the software version next to the “Ver A:” prompt.
Dyno-Scan for Windows Upgrade
See the Dyno-Scan for Windows user manual or Auterra web site for instructions on upgrading
the software.
81 Software Upgrades
CHAPTER 13
Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
The Dyno-Scan for Windows software is included with some configurations of the DashDyno
SPD product. To install the software, please refer to the Dyno-Scan for Windows user manual.
DashDyno can be used as the link between your PC and the vehicle. The Dyno-Scan for
Window software includes the USB driver necessary to connect the DashDyno to your
Windows PC.
With the Dyno-Scan for Windows software, you can:
•
Connect to a vehicle and use all the features within the Dyno-Scan for Windows
software.
•
Access more diagnostic data than with DashDyno alone.
•
View Live Data, Acceleration, Power Torque and Dyno Setup files created on the
DashDyno.
•
Modify or create Live Data, Acceleration, Power Torque and Dyno Setup files and copy
them to DashDyno.
•
View recorded GPS data in Google Earth.
Viewing files created on the DashDyno requires ejecting the SD card and inserting the card
into a PC card reader. The PC card reader will allow reading the DashDyno files on your PC.
Connecting to a vehicle using the Dyno-Scan for Windows software requires using the
DashDyno’s PC Pass-Through Mode.
Google Earth
Google Earth is a geographic information system (GIS) and provides a 3D software
representation of Earth using satellite imagery. It provides you with the ability to move about
the Earth and view any location on the planet from any altitude or viewing angle. Google Earth
is a free application and may be downloaded from http://earth.google.com. Ensure you are
running version 4.1 or higher.
DashDyno and Dyno-Scan for Windows utilize Google Earth to correlate recorded vehicle
sensor data with the vehicle’s georeferenced position on Earth. This is an extremely powerful
tool in analyzing vehicle data whether on a racetrack, off road or around town.
DashDyno records OBD II vehicle sensors data, analog voltages and GPS data onto the SD card.
Dyno-Scan for Windows then opens the file and if it contains GPS data, Dyno-Scan for
Windows interactively sends coordinate information to Google Earth. You do not need to
82 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
interact with Google Earth –Dyno-Scan for Windows updates the camera position and viewing
angles automatically.
When a DashDyno live data file containing GPS data is opened, Google Earth draws a yellow
line showing the complete vehicle path and zooms to that location. Moving the data cursor on
the Analyze Live Data screen causes Google Earth to immediately fly to the new location on
the yellow line. The Google Earth yellow pushpin shows the current GPS location within the
data file.
Two Google Earth view modes are supported: Stationary and Follow Vehicle. In stationary
mode, the Google Earth view elevation and position does not move. This is useful if you want
to see the entire vehicle path. In Follow Vehicle mode, Google Earth zooms to the vehicle
georeferenced location.
If the Play button on the Playback Control toolbar is pressed, the line graph data within the
Analyze Live Data window starts to move and the Google Earth position continually updates
during playback. If the Follow Vehicle option is selected, you will fly behind the vehicle
position as it moves. Options are available to control the playback speed, attitude and camera
tilt angle.
83 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
See the Dyno-Scan for Windows software user manual for more information on using the
Google Earth features.
Compatible File Types
DashDyno and Dyno-Scan for Windows use the same file format. The files may be copied back
and forth between the two systems. The compatible file formats are:
•
Live Data
•
Acceleration
•
Power Torque
•
Dyno Setup
To open a live data file stored on DashDyno:
1
Eject the SD card from the DashDyno SD card slot.
2
Insert the SD card into an external memory card reader connected to your PC.
3
Start the Dyno-Scan for Windows software.
4
From the Navigation docking window, select the Analyze Live Data icon.
5
Select the File > Open > Live Data File… menu option.
6
Open a live data file from within the LIVE directory on the SD card. For instance, the live
data file could be stored at F:\LIVE\MYDATA.ld.
7
The Analyze Live Data screen now displays the recorded data.
84 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
To create a Dyno Setup file on a PC and copy to DashDyno:
1
Start the Dyno-Scan for Windows software.
2
Select the File > New > Dyno Setup File… menu option.
3
On the File Properties docking window, select the Dyno Setup Properties tab.
85 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
4
Enter your Dyno Setup parameters such as vehicle weight, elevation, etc.
5
Eject the DashDyno SD card from the SD card slot.
6
Insert the SD card into an external memory card reader connected to your PC.
7
Copy the Dyno Setup file from your PC to the DSETUP directory located on the SD card. For
instance, copy the file to F:\DSETUP\MYSETUP.ds.
8
Return the SD card to DashDyno.
9
The Dyno Setup file you created on the PC is now ready for use on DashDyno.
PC Pass-Through Mode
The DashDyno may be used as a pass-through device allowing you to use the Dyno-Scan for
Windows software with your vehicle.
After the USB driver is installed and the DashDyno is plugged into your PC, a virtual COM port
will be assigned on your PC. This virtual COM port (e.g. COM5) is set within the Dyno-Scan for
Windows software under the Tools > Options menu.
To use the DashDyno as a PC link to your vehicle:
1
Connect the DashDyno to your vehicle OBD II connector.
2
Connect the DashDyno to your PC using the USB cable.
3
Select the Vehicle Connect > PC Pass-Through Mode menu option on the DashDyno.
Leave DashDyno on the PC Pass-Through Mode screen the entire time.
4
Start the Dyno-Scan for Windows software.
86 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
5
Select the Tools > Options menu on the Windows software and select the correct virtual
COM port assigned to the DashDyno.
6
Turn the vehicle ignition to the ON position (vehicle does not have to be running).
7
Press the Connect button on the Dyno-Scan for Windows software to connect to the
vehicle.
8
The Dyno-Scan for Windows software is now connected to your vehicle and ready for use.
Virtual COM Port
When the DashDyno SPD is plugged into the PC, the driver will create a virtual COM port and
assign it a number. The Windows Device Manager shows all assigned port numbers.
To view the virtual COM port assigned within Device Manager:
1
Click on “Start” and then “Control Panel”.
2
Switch to Classic View (if in Category View).
3
Double click on “System”.
4
Select the Hardware tab.
5
Press the “Device Manager” button.
6
Click on the “+” next to Port.
7
The entry labeled “Auterra USB OBD II Adapter” shows the virtual COM port for the USB
OBD II adapter. Physical COM ports are also shown if you are using a serial OBD II adapter.
87 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
Refer to the Dyno-Scan for Windows software User Guide for more information on installing
the USB COM port driver.
TrackVision
TrackVision is a 3rd party software package that merges in-car video recorded with a camcorder
and vehicle data recorded with DashDyno. The TrackVision software synchronizes the video
and data and creates a virtual dashboard overlay within your video. Engine RPM, throttle
position, vehicle speed, GPS position and more can be displayed.
The resulting movie is exported to different video file formats or a DVD. TrackVision can be
purchased at www.trackvision.net.
88 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
DashDyno supports exporting these parameters to TrackVision:
•
GPS Position (Latitude and Longitude)
•
Engine RPM
•
Throttle Position
•
Vehicle Speed
•
Engine Coolant Temperature
•
Intake Manifold Pressure
•
Ambient Air Temperature
•
Air Flow Rate From MAF
•
O2 B1-S1 Wide Range V
•
O2 B1-S2 Wide Range V
•
O2 Sensor B1-S1
•
O2 Sensor B1-S2
To create videos with TrackVision, you’ll need these items:
1
DashDyno SPD
2
External GPS
3
TrackVision software
89 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
4
Camcorder
5
In-Vehicle Camcorder Mount
Mount the DashDyno, GPS and camcorder inside the vehicle. Connect the GPS to DashDyno.
See GPS on page 71 for information on connecting a GPS.
The DashDyno and camcorder are not connected together and record independent of each
other. The recorded vehicle data and video is later synchronized using the TrackVision
software.
Select the DashDyno parameters you want to record. Start recording on DashDyno then start
the camcorder recording. With DashDyno and the camcorder now recording, drive your
vehicle. When done, stop the DashDyno and camcorder recording.
Follow these basic steps to create your TrackVision movie.
1
Eject the SD card from DashDyno and insert it into your PC’s card reader.
2
Start the Dyno-Scan for Windows software.
3
Select the Export > TrackVision File… menu option. Select the Live Data file recorded on
the DashDyno SD card within the LIVE directory.
4
Select the destination CSV file (e.g. myfile.csv). The DashDyno data is now output into a
CSV format readable by TrackVision.
5
Transfer your camcorder video onto your PC into a TrackVision compatible file format (e.g.
.mpg, .wmv or .avi). See your camcorder documentation for specific instructions on how to
import video onto your Windows PC.
6
Start the TrackVision software.
7
Select the camcorder Video Input file (created by your camcorder) and Data Logger Input
file (created by DashDyno and exported as a CSV file).
8
Follow the TrackVision instructions on how to synchronize the Video Input and Data
Logger Input and create the final movie.
90 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
91 Dyno-Scan for Windows Software
CHAPTER 14
Troubleshooting
This section contains solutions for common problems encountered with the scan tool.
DashDyno Does Not Turn On
If DashDyno does not turn on when plugged into the vehicle, check the vehicle fuse box for a
blown fuse. A blown fuse can prevent power from reaching the OBD II connector and prevent
DashDyno from powering on.
DashDyno Turns Off Or Resets While Driving
Ensure the OBD II cable is securely plugged into the vehicle’s OBD II connector. A loose cable
can cause an intermittent connection. If necessary, you may want to zip tie the OBD II cable
connector to the vehicle.
Scan Tool Connects but No Live Sensor Data
If no live data is displayed within the Data Logger screens, try the following remedies:
1. Disable the Fast Sampling option in the Preferences > Fast Sampling menu option.
2. Disable the CAN 6x communication option in the Preferences > CAN 6x menu option.
No Communication (Scan Tool)
If the No Communication (Scan Tool) dialog appears, this means the software cannot
communicate with the vehicle. Try the following remedies:
1. Ensure the vehicle ignition is turned on. Vehicle does not have to be running; however, it
can be.
2. Try selecting the Connect > Connect to Vehicle menu option again.
3. Ensure the DashDyno OBD II cable is securely plugged into the vehicle’s OBD II connector.
4. Ensure the vehicle is OBD II compliant.
5. Ensure no vehicle fuses are blown. OBD II adapter power is derived from the vehicle and a
blown fuse could prevent power from reaching the scan tool.
No Communication (Vehicle)
If the No Communication (Vehicle) dialog appears, see No Communication (Scan Tool).
92 Troubleshooting
Lost Communication
If the Lost Communication dialog appears, this means the software initially established
communication but subsequently lost it. Try the following remedies:
1. Ensure the OBD II cable is securely plugged into the vehicle’s OBD II connector.
Freeze Frame Screen is Blank
If the vehicle has not detected a failure that caused the Check Engine to illuminate, the data
for the Freeze Frame screen will be blank.
Clearing Codes Did Not Work or MIL Didn’t Turn Off
There are a few possible causes for the check engine light not to extinguish or the DTCs to
reappear. First, if the problem is not fixed the DTC may return immediately for problems such
as misfires, open or shorted sensors, etc. Second, some vehicles can't be running when the
memory is cleared. In these cases, ensure the key is on but the engine is off before attempting
to clear the memory. Last, some vehicles require, after the codes are cleared, for the ignition
key to be turned off and then on again before the MIL light actually turns off.
Some Parameters Are Not Accurate
The Distance Traveled, Average MPG, Instant MPG, and Fuel Used accuracy can be adjusted by
the correction factors located on the Preferences menu. Ensure your connection factors are set
correctly. See Preferences on page 50for more information.
93 Troubleshooting
CHAPTER 15
Addendum
California Drivers
California Vehicle Code Section 26708 (a) (1) provides that "No persons shall drive any motor
vehicle with an object or material placed, displayed, installed, affixed, or applied upon the
windshield or side or rear windows." Drivers in California should not use a suction mount on
their windshield, side or rear windows.
Minnesota Drivers
Minnesota Statute 2005: 167.71 prohibits any objects suspended between the driver and the
windshield, other than sun visors and rearview mirrors and electronic toll collection devices;"
Auterra, LLC bears no responsibility for any fines, penalties or damage that may be incurred by
disregarding these notices. Auterra encourages you to obey all applicable laws Local, State
and Federal laws. Other Local, State or Federal agencies may, or in the future, have similar
laws. Check with your local Department of Motor Vehicles for current regulations regarding
suction cup windshield mounted devices. If you are driving through other states, it’s your
responsibility to conform to the laws within each state you travel.
Auterra, LLC may have other vehicle mounting options available. Contact Auterra or visit our
web site www.auterrweb.com.
94 Addendum
APPENDIX A
Diagnostic Trouble Codes
A Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) is a 5-digit value starting with a letter.
The DTC’s codes listed here are common to all manufacturers. These generic Diagnostic
Trouble Codes are those codes where industry uniformity has been achieved. However, each
vehicle manufacturer may optionally create new codes beyond the generic ones. The
DashDyno can read and display generic and enhanced manufacturer specific codes.
The DTC database files included with DashDyno incorporates thousands of more codes, both
generic and enhanced, than those listed here. The following listing simply provides an
overview of the types of codes available.
Diagnostic Trouble Code Format Structure
The Diagnostic Trouble Code numbering follows a standardized structure. All Diagnostic
Trouble Codes have a letter followed by a 4-digit number (e.g. P1234). The first letter indicates
the type of code:
P = Powertrain
C = Chassis
B = Body
U = Network Communication
The remaining 4-digit number specifies the problem within that system.
P00XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P0010
P0011
P0012
P0013
P0014
P0015
“A” Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit
“A” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance
“A” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded
“B” Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit
“B” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance
“B” Camshaft Position -Timing Over-Retarded
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
P0020
P0021
P0022
P0023
P0024
P0025
“A” Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit
“A” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance
“A” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded
“B” Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit
“B” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance
“B” Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0030
P0031
P0032
P0033
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
95 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0034
P0035
P0036
P0037
P0038
Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit Low
Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit High
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
P0042
P0043
P0044
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
P0050
P0051
P0052
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
P0056
P0057
P0058
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
P0062
P0063
P0064
P0065
P0066
P0067
HO2S Heater Control Circuit
HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low
HO2S Heater Control Circuit High
Air Assisted Injector Control Range/Performance
Air Assisted Injector Control Circuit or Circuit Low
Air Assisted Injector Control Circuit High
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
P0070
P0071
P0072
P0073
P0074
P0075
P0076
P0077
P0078
P0079
P0080
P0081
P0082
P0083
P0084
P0085
P0086
Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit
Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Range/Performance
Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Low Input
Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit High Input
Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit
Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low
Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High
Intake valve Control Solenoid Circuit
Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low
Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low
Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P01XX Fuel and Air Metering
P0100
P0101
P0102
P0103
P0104
P0105
P0106
P0107
P0108
P0109
P0110
P0111
P0112
P0113
P0114
P0115
P0116
P0117
Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit
Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit Low Input
Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit High Input
Mass or Volume Air Flow Circuit Intermittent
Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit
Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Low Input
Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit High Input
Manifold Absolute Pressure/Barometric Pressure Circuit Intermittent
Intake Air Temperature Circuit
Intake Air Temperature Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Intake Air Temperature Circuit Low Input
Intake Air Temperature Circuit High Input
Intake Air Temperature Circuit Intermittent
Engine Coolant Temperature Circuit
Engine Coolant Temperature Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Engine Coolant Temperature Circuit Low Input
96 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 2)
P0118
P0119
P0120
P0121
P0122
P0123
P0124
P0125
P0126
P0127
P0128
Engine Coolant Temperature Circuit High Input
Engine Coolant Temperature Circuit Intermittent
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit Low Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit High Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch A Circuit Intermittent
Insufficient Coolant Temperature for Closed Loop Fuel Control
Insufficient Coolant Temperature for Stable Operation
Intake Air Temperature Too High
Coolant Thermostat (Coolant Temperature Below Thermostat Regulating Temperature)
P0130
P0131
P0132
P0133
P0134
P0135
P0136
P0137
P0138
P0139
P0140
P0141
P0142
P0143
P0144
P0145
P0146
P0147
P0148
P0149
P0150
P0151
P0152
P0153
P0154
P0155
P0156
P0157
P0158
P0159
P0160
P0161
P0162
P0163
P0164
P0165
P0166
P0167
P0168
P0169
P0170
P0171
P0172
P0173
P0174
P0175
O2 Sensor Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
Fuel Delivery Error
Fuel Timing Error
O2 Sensor Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction
O2 Sensor Circuit Low Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit High Voltage
O2 Sensor Circuit Slow Response
O2 Sensor Circuit No Activity Detected
O2 Sensor Heater Circuit
Fuel Temperature Too High
Incorrect Fuel Composition
Fuel Trim
System too Lean
System too Rich
Fuel Trim Malfunction
System too Lean
System too Rich
P0176
P0177
P0178
P0179
Fuel Composition Sensor Circuit
Fuel Composition Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Fuel Composition Sensor Circuit Low Input
Fuel Composition Sensor Circuit High Input
97 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 1)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 2)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 1)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 2)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 2 Sensor 3)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0180
P0181
P0182
P0183
P0184
P0185
P0186
P0187
P0188
P0189
P0190
P0191
P0192
P0193
P0194
P0195
P0196
P0197
P0198
P0199
Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit
Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Range/Performance
Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Low Input
Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit High Input
Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Intermittent
Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit
Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Low Input
Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit High Input
Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Intermittent
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Low In put
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Range/Performance
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Low
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor High
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Intermittent
P02XX Fuel and Air Metering
P0200
P0201
P0202
P0203
P0204
P0205
P0206
P0207
P0208
P0209
P0210
P0211
P0212
P0213
P0214
P0215
P0216
P0217
P0218
P0219
P0220
P0221
P0222
P0223
P0224
P0225
P0226
P0227
P0228
P0229
P0230
P0231
P0232
P0233
P0234
P0235
P0236
P0237
P0238
P0239
Injector Circuit
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 1
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 2
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 3
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 4
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 5
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 6
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 7
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 8
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 9
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 10
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 11
Injector Circuit - Cylinder 12
Cold Start Injector 1
Cold Start Injector 2
Engine Shutoff Solenoid
Injector/Injection Timing Control Circuit
Engine Coolant Over Temperature Condition
Transmission Fluid Over Temperature Condition
Engine Over Speed Condition
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Low Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit High Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Intermittent
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “C” Circuit
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “C” Circuit Range/Performance Problem
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “C” Circuit Low Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “C” Circuit High Input
Throttle/Pedal Position Sensor/Switch “C” Circuit Intermittent
Fuel Pump Primary Circuit
Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Low
Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit High
Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Intermittent
Turbo/Super Charger Overboost Condition
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “A” Circuit
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “A” Circuit Range/Performance
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “A” Circuit Low
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “A” Circuit High
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “B” Circuit
98 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P0240
P0241
P0242
P0243
P0244
P0245
P0246
P0247
P0248
P0249
P0250
P0251
P0252
P0253
P0254
P0255
P0256
P0257
P0258
P0259
P0260
P0261
P0262
P0263
P0264
P0265
P0266
P0267
P0268
P0269
P0270
P0271
P0272
P0273
P0274
P0275
P0276
P0277
P0278
P0279
P0280
P0281
P0282
P0283
P0284
P0285
P0286
P0287
P0288
P0289
P0290
P0291
P0292
P0293
P0294
P0295
P0296
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “B” Circuit Range/Performance
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “B” Circuit Low
Turbo/Super Charger Boost Sensor “B” Circuit High
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “A”
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “A” Range/Performance
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “A” Low
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “A” High
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “B”
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “B” Range/Performance
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “B” Low
Turbo/Super Charger Wastegate Solenoid “B” High
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “A” (Cam/rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “A” Range/Performance (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “A” Low (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “A” High (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “A” Intermittent (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “B” (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “B” Range/Performance (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “B” Low (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “B” High (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control “B” Intermittent (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
Cylinder 1 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 1 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 1 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 2 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 2 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 2 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 3 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 3 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 4 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 4 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 4 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 4 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 5 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 5 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 5 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 6Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 6 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 6 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 7 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 7 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 7 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 8 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 8 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 8 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 9 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 9 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 9 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 10 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 10 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 10 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 11 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 11 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 11 Contribution/Balance
Cylinder 12 Injector Circuit Low
Cylinder 12 Injector Circuit High
Cylinder 12 Contribution/Balance
P0298
Engine Oil Over Temperature
P03XX Ignition System or Misfire
P0300
Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
99 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P0301
P0302
P0303
P0304
P0305
P0306
P0307
P0308
P0309
P0310
P0311
P0312
P0313
P0314
Cylinder 1 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 2 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 3 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 4 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 5 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 6 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 7 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 8 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 9 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 10 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 11 Misfire Detected
Cylinder 12 Misfire Detected
Misfire Detected with Low Fuel
Single Cylinder Misfire (Cylinder not Specified)
P0320
P0321
P0322
P0323
P0324
P0325
P0326
P0327
P0328
P0329
P0330
P0331
P0332
P0333
P0334
P0335
P0336
P0337
P0338
P0339
P0340
P0341
P0342
P0343
P0344
P0345
P0348
P0347
P0348
P0349
P0350
P0351
P0352
P0353
P0354
P0355
P0356
P0357
P0358
P0359
P0360
P0361
P0362
Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit
Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit Range/Performance
Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal
Ignition/Distributor Engine Speed Input Circuit Intermittent
Knock Control System Error
Knock Sensor 1 Circuit
Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Range/Performance
Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Low Input
Knock Sensor 1 Circuit High Input
Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Input Intermittent
Knock Sensor 2 Circuit
Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Range/Performance
Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Low Input
Knock Sensor 2 Circuit High Input
Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Input Intermittent
Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit
Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Range/Performance
Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Low Input
Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit High Input
Crankshaft Position Sensor A Circuit Intermittent
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Range/Performance
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Low Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit High Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Intermittent
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Range/Performance
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Low Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit High Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “A” Circuit Intermittent
Ignition Coil Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “A” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “B” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “C” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “D” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “F” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “F” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “G” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “H” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “I” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “J” Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “K Primary/Secondary Circuit
Ignition Coil “L’ Primary/Secondary Circuit
P0365
P0366
P0367
P0368
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Range/Performance
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Low Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit High Input
100 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 1 or Single Sensor)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
P0369
P0370
P0371
P0372
P0373
P0374
P0375
P0376
P0377
P0378
P0379
P0380
P0381
P0382
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Intermittent
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “A”
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “A” Too Many Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “A” Too Few Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “A” Intermittent/Erratic Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “A” No Pulse
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “B”
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “B” Too Many Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “B” Too Few Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “B” Intermittent/Erratic Pulses
Timing Reference High Resolution Signal “B” No Pulses
Glow Plug/Heater Circuit “A”
Glow Plug/Heater Indicator Circuit
Glow Plug/Heater Circuit “B”
P0385
P0386
P0387
P0388
P0389
P0390
P0391
P0392
P0393
P0394
Crankshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit
Crankshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Range/Performance
Crankshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Low Input
Crankshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit High Input
Crankshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Intermittent
camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” circuit Range/Performance
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Low Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit High Input
Camshaft Position Sensor “B” Circuit Intermittent
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P04XX Auxiliary Emission Controls
P0400
P0401
P0402
P0403
P0404
P0405
P0406
P0407
P0408
P0409
P0410
P0411
P0412
P0413
P0414
P0415
P0416
P0417
P0416
P0419
P0420
P0421
P0422
P0423
P0424
P0425
P0426
P0427
P0428
P0429
P0430
P0431
P0432
P0433
P0434
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Flow
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Flow Insufficient Detected
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Flow Excessive Detected
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control Circuit
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control Circuit Range/Performance
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “A” Circuit Low
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “A” Circuit High
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “B” Circuit Low
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “B” Circuit High
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “A” Circuit
Secondary Air Injection System
Secondary Air Injection System Incorrect Flow Detected
Secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “A” Circuit
Secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “A” Circuit Open
Secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “A” Circuit Shorted
Secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “B” Circuit
secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “B’ Circuit Open
secondary Air Injection System Switching Valve “B” Circuit Shorted
Secondary Air Injection System Relay “A” Circuit
Secondary Air injection System Relay “B” Circuit
Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
Warm Up Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Main Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Heated Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Heated Catalyst Temperature Below Threshold
Catalyst Temperature Sensor
Catalyst Temperature Sensor Range/Performance
Catalyst Temperature Sensor Low Input
Catalyst Temperature Sensor High Input
Catalyst Heater Control Circuit
Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold
Warm Up Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Main Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Heated Catalyst Efficiency Below Threshold
Heated Catalyst Temperature Below Threshold
101 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0435
P0436
P0437
P0438
P0439
P0440
P0441
P0442
P0443
P0444
P0445
P0446
P0447
P0448
P0449
P0450
P0451
P0452
P0453
P0454
P0455
P0456
P0457
P0460
P0461
P0462
P0463
P0464
P0465
P0466
P0467
P0468
P0469
P0470
P0471
P0472
P0473
P0474
P0475
P0476
P0477
P0478
P0479
P0480
P0481
P0482
P0483
P0484
P0485
P0486
P0487
P0488
Catalyst Temperature Sensor
Catalyst Temperature Sensor Range/Performance
Catalyst Temperature Sensor Low Input
Catalyst Temperature Sensor High Input
Catalyst Heater Control Circuit
Evaporative Emission Control System
Evaporative Emission Control System Incorrect Purge Flow
Evaporative Emission Control System Leak Detected (small leak)
Evaporative Emission Control System Purge Control Valve Circuit
Evaporative Emission Control System Purge Control Valve Circuit Open
Evaporative Emission Control System Purge Control Valve Circuit Shorted
Evaporative Emission Control System Vent Control Circuit
Evaporative Emission Control System Vent Control Circuit Open
Evaporative Emission Control System Vent Control Circuit Shorted
Evaporative Emission Control System Vent Valve/Solenoid Circuit
Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor
Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor Range/Performance
Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor Low Input
Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor High input
Evaporative Emission Control System Pressure Sensor Intermittent
Evaporative Emission Control System Leak Detected (gross leak)
Evaporative Emission Control System Leak Detected (very small leak)
Evaporative Emission Control System Leak Detected (fuel cap loose/off)
Fuel Level Sensor Circuit
Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Low Input
Fuel Level Sensor Circuit High Input
Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Intermittent
EVAP Purge Flow Sensor Circuit
EVAP Purge Flow Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
EVAP Purge Flow Sensor Circuit Low Input
EVAP Purge Flow Sensor Circuit High Input
EVAP Purge Flow Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Exhaust Pressure Sensor
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Range/Performance
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Low
Exhaust Pressure Sensor High
Exhaust Pressure Sensor Intermittent
Exhaust Pressure Control Valve
Exhaust Pressure Control Valve Range/Performance
Exhaust Pressure Control Valve Low
Exhaust Pressure Control Valve High
Exhaust Pressure Control Valve Intermittent
Cooling Fan 1 Control Circuit
Cooling Fan 2 Control Circuit
Cooling Fan 3 Control Circuit
Cooling Fan Rationality Check
Cooling Fan Circuit Over Current
Cooling Fan Power/Ground Circuit
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Sensor “B” Circuit
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Throttle Position Control Circuit
Exhaust Gas Recirculation Throttle Position Control Range/Performance
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0491
P0492
Secondary Air Injection System
Secondary Air Injection System
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
P05XX Vehicle Speed, Idle Control, and Auxiliary Inputs
P0500
P0501
P0502
P0503
P0505
Vehicle Speed Sensor
Vehicle Speed Sensor Range/Performance
Vehicle Speed Sensor Circuit Low Input
Vehicle Speed Sensor Intermittent/Erratic/High
Idle Control System
102 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P0506
P0507
P0508
P0509
P0510
P0512
P0513
Idle Control System RPM Lower Than Expected
Idle Control System RPM Higher Than Expected
Idle Control System Circuit Low
Idle Control System Circuit High
Closed Throttle Position Switch
Starter Request Circuit
Incorrect Irnmobilizer Key (“Immobilizer pending SAE J1930 approval)
P0515
P0516
P0517
Battery Temperature Sensor Circuit
Battery Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
Battery Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0520
P0521
P0522
P0523
P0524
Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit
Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Range/Performance
Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Low Voltage
Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch High Voltage
Engine Oil Pressure Too Low
P0530
P0531
P0532
P0533
P0534
A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit
A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input
A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
Air Conditioner Refrigerant Charge Loss
P0540
P0541
P0542
Intake Air Heater Circuit
Intake Air Heater Circuit Low
Intake Air Heater Circuit High
P0544
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit
P0545
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
P0546
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0547
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit
P0548
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit Low
P0549
Exhaust Gas Temperature Sensor Circuit High
P0550
Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit
P0551
Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
P0552
Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input
P0553
Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
P0554
Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Intermittent
P0560
System Voltage
P0561
System Voltage Unstable
P0562
System Voltage Low
P0563
System Voltage High
P0564
Cruise Control Multi-Function Input Signal
P0565
Cruise Control On Signal
P0566
Cruise Control Off Signal
P0567
Cruise Control Resume Signal
P0568
Cruise Control Set Signal
P0569
Cruise Control Coast Signal
P0570
Cruise Control Accel Signal
P0571
Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit
P0572
Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit Low
P0573
Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit High
P0574
Cruise Control System - Vehicle Speed Too High
P0575
Cruise Control Input Circuit
P0576
Cruise Control Input Circuit Low
P0577
Cruise Control input Circuit High
P0578 through P0580 Reserved for Cruise Control Codes
P06XX Computer and Auxiliary Inputs
P0600
P0601
Serial Communication Link
Internal Control Module Memory Check Sum Error
103 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0602
P0603
P0604
P0605
Control Module Programming Error
Internal Control Module Keep Alive Memory (KAM) Error
Internal Control Module Random Access Memory (RAM) Error
Internal Control Module Read Only Memory (ROM) Error (Module Identification Defined by SAE J1979)
P0606
P0607
P0608
P0609
P0610
ECM/PCM Processor
Control Module Performance
Control Module VSS Output “A”
Control Module VSS Output “B”
Control Module Vehicle Options Error
P0615
P0616
P0617
P0618
P0619
P0620
P0621
P0622
P0623
P0624
Starter Relay Circuit
Starter Relay Circuit Low
Starter Relay Circuit High
Alternative Fuel Control Module KAM Error
Alternative Fuel Control Module RAM/ROM Error
Generator Control Circuit
Generator Lamp “L” Terminal Control Circuit
Generator Field “F” Terminal Control Circuit
Generator Lamp Control Circuit
Fuel Cap Lamp Control Circuit
P0630
P0631
VIN Not Programmed or Mismatch - ECM/PCM
VIN Not Programmed or Mismatch - TCM
P0635
P0836
P0637
P0638
P0639
P0640
Power Steering Control Circuit
Power Steering Control Circuit Low
Power Steering Control Circuit High
Throttle Actuator Control Range/Performance
Throttle Actuator Control Range/Performance
Intake Air Heater Control Circuit
P0645
P0646
P0647
P0648
P0649
P0650
A/C Clutch Relay Control Circuit
A/C Clutch Relay Control Circuit Low
A/C Clutch Relay Control Circuit High
Immobilizer Lamp Control Circuit (“Immobilizer” pending SAE J1930 approval)
Speed Control Lamp Control Circuit
Malfunction Indicator Lamp (ML) Control Circuit
P0654
P0655
P0656
Engine RPM Output Circuit
Engine Hot Lamp Output Control Circuit
Fuel Level Output Circuit
P0660
P0661
P0662
P0663
P0664
P0665
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit Low
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit High
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit Low
Intake Manifold Tuning Valve Control Circuit High
P07XX Transmission
P0700
P0701
P0702
P0703
P0704
P0705
P0706
P0707
P0708
P0709
P0710
Transmission Control System (MIL Request)
Transmission Control System Range/Performance
Transmission Control System Electrical
Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit
Clutch Switch In put Circuit Malfunction
Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Malfunction (PRNDL Input)
Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Low Input
Transmission Range Sensor Circuit High Input
Transmission Range Sensor Circuit intermittent
Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit
104 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 1)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
(Bank 2)
P0711
P0712
P0713
P0714
P0715
P0716
P0717
P0718
P0719
P0720
P0721
P0722
P0723
P0724
P0725
P0726
P0727
P0728
P0730
P0731
P0732
P0733
P0734
P0735
P0736
P0737
P0739
P0739
P0740
P0741
P0742
P0743
P0744
P0745
P0746
P0747
P0748
P0749
P0750
P0751
P0752
P0753
P0754
P0765
P0756
P0757
P0758
P0759
P0760
P0761
P0762
P0763
P0764
P0765
P0766
P0767
P0768
P0769
P0770
P0771
P0772
P0773
P0774
Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Low Input
Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit High Input
Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit
input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit No Signal
Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit Low
Output Speed Sensor Circuit
Output Speed Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Output Speed Sensor Circuit No Signal
Output Speed Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit High
Engine Speed Input Circuit
Engine Speed Input Circuit Range/Performance
Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal
Engine Speed Input Circuit Intermittent
Incorrect Gear Ratio
Gear 1 Incorrect Ratio
Gear 2 Incorrect Ratio
Gear 3 Incorrect Ratio
Gear 4 Incorrect Ratio
Gear 5 Incorrect Ratio
Reverse Incorrect Ratio
TCM Engine Speed Output Circuit
TCM Engine Speed Output Circuit Low
TCM Engine Speed Output Circuit High
Torque Converter Clutch Circuit
Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Performance or Stuck Off
Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Stuck On
Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Electrical
Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Intermittent
Pressure Control Solenoid “A”
Pressure Control Solenoid “A” Performance or Stuck Off
Pressure Control Solenoid “A” Stuck On
Pressure Control Solenoid “A” Electrical
Pressure Control Solenoid “A” Intermittent
Shift Solenoid “A”
Shift Solenoid “A” Performance or Stuck Off
Shift Solenoid “A” Stuck On
Shift Solenoid “A” Electrical
Shift Solenoid “A” Intermittent
Shift Solenoid “B”
Shift Solenoid “B” Performance or Stuck Off
Shift Solenoid “B” Stuck On
Shift Solenoid “B” Electrical
Shift Solenoid “B” Intermittent
Shift Solenoid “C”
Shift Solenoid “C” Performance or Stuck Off
Shift Solenoid “C” Stuck On
Shift Solenoid “C” Electrical
Shift Solenoid “C” Intermittent
Shift Solenoid “C”
Shift Solenoid “D” Performance or Stuck Off
Shift Solenoid “D” Stuck On
Shift Solenoid “D” Electrical
Shift Solenoid “D” Intermittent
Shift Solenoid “E”
Shift Solenoid “E” Performance or Stuck Off
Shift Solenoid “E” Stuck On
Shift Solenoid “E” Electrical
Shift Solenoid “E” Intermittent
105 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P0775
P0776
P0777
P0778
P0779
P0780
P0781
P0782
P0783
P0784
P0785
P0786
P0787
P0788
P0789
P0790
P0791
P0792
P0793
P0794
P0795
P0796
P0797
P0798
P0799
Pressure Control Solenoid “B”
Pressure Control Solenoid “B” Performance or Stuck Off
Pressure Control Solenoid “B” Stuck On
Pressure Control Solenoid “B” Electrical
Pressure Control Solenoid “B” Intermittent
Shift
1-2 Shift
2-3 Shift
3-4 Shift
4-5 Shift
Shift/Timing Solenoid
Shift/Timing Solenoid Range/Performance
Shift/Timing Solenoid Low
Shift/Timing Solenoid High
Shift/Timing Solenoid Intermittent
Normal/Performance Switch Circuit
Intermediate Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit
Intermediate Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Intermediate Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit No Signal
Intermediate Shaft Speed Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Pressure Control Solenoid “C”
Pressure Control Solenoid “C” Performance or Stuck off
Pressure Control Solenoid “C” Stuck On
Pressure Control Solenoid “C” Electrical
Pressure Control Solenoid “C” Intermittent
P08XX Transmission
P0801
Reverse Inhibit Control Circuit
P0803
P0804
P0805
P0806
P0807
P0808
P0809
P0810
P0811
P0812
P0813
P0814
P0815
P0816
P0817
P0818
1-4 Upshift (Skip Shift) Solenoid Control Circuit
1-4 Upshift (Skip Shift) Lamp Control Circuit
Clutch Position Sensor Circuit
Clutch Position Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
Clutch Position Sensor Circuit Low
Clutch Position Sensor Circuit High
Clutch Position Sensor Circuit Intermittent
Clutch Position Control Error
Excessive Clutch Slippage
Reverse Input Circuit
Reverse Output Circuit
Transmission Range Display Circuit
Upshift Switch Circuit
Downshift Switch Circuit
Starter Disable Circuit
Driveline Disconnect Switch Input Circuit
P0820
P0821
P0822
P0823
P0824
P0825
Gear Lever X-Y Position Sensor Circuit
Gear Lever X Position Circuit
Gear Lever Y Position Circuit
Gear Lever X Position Circuit Intermittent
Gear Lever Y Position Circuit Intermittent
Gear Lever Push-Pull Switch (Shift Anticipate)
P0830
P0831
P0832
P0833
P0834
P0835
P0836
P0837
P0838
Clutch Pedal Switch “A” Circuit
Clutch Pedal Switch “A” Circuit Low
Clutch Pedal Switch “A” Circuit High
Clutch Pedal Switch “B” Circuit
Clutch Pedal Switch “B” Circuit Low
Clutch Pedal Switch “B” Circuit High
Four Wheel Drive (4WD) Switch Circuit
Four Wheel Drive (4WD) Switch Circuit Range/Performance
Four Wheel Drive (4WD) Switch Circuit Low
106 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P0839
P0840
P0841
P0842
P0843
P0844
P0845
P0846
P0847
P0848
P0849
Four Wheel Drive (4WD) Switch Circuit High
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “A” Circuit
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “A” Circuit Range/Performance
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “A” Circuit Low
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “A” Circuit High
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “A” Circuit Intermittent
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Range/Performance
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Low
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit High
Transmission Fluid Pressure Sensor/Switch “B” Circuit Intermittent
Additional Diagnostic Trouble Code Ranges
Other DTC ranges are defined for either manufacturer specific codes or under the control of
SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) and not yet defined. This section documents these
additional ranges. Refer to your vehicle’s repair manual for manufacturer specific Diagnostic
Trouble Codes.
P09XX Transmission
P1XXX Manufacturer Controlled
P10XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P11XX Fuel and Air Metering
P12XX Fuel and Air Metering
P13XX Ignition System or Misfire
P14XX Auxiliary Emission Controls
P15XX Vehicle Speed, Idle Control, and Auxiliary Inputs
P16XX Computer and Auxiliary Outputs
P17XX Transmission
P18XX Transmission
P19XX Transmission
P2XXX SAE Controlled DTCs
P20XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P21XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P22XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P23XX Ignition System or Misfire
P24XX SAE Reserved
P25XX SAE Reserved
P26XX SAE Reserved
P27XX SAE Reserved
107 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
P28XX SAE Reserved
P29XX SAE Reserved
P3XX Manufacturer Controlled and SAE Reserved
P30XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P31XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P32XX Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls
P33XX Ignition System Misfire
P34XX SAE Reserved
P35XX SAE Reserved
P36XX SAE Reserved
P37XX SAE Reserved
P38XX SAE Reserved
P39XX SAE Reserved
108 Diagnostic Trouble Codes
APPENDIX B
Support
Technical support is offered on our products via email. Please note technical support cannot
assist you in diagnosing and repairing your vehicle. Support is limited to operation of the scan
tool only.
Technical support is provided at: [email protected]
When contacting technical support please provide the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
Year of Vehicle (e.g. 1997)
Make (e.g. Chevrolet)
Model (e.g. K1500 Pickup Extended Cab)
Problem encountered, be specific as possible. List any error messages displayed by the
software.
Version of Auterra software. On DashDyno the version is located on the Preferences >
About menu. On Dyno-Scan for Windows the version is located on the Help > About
Auterra Dyno-Scan… menu.
109 Support
APPENDIX C
Warranty Information
Auterra warranties the DashDyno SPD hardware for 1 year. Damage caused by misuse or
modification is not covered.
Auterra is not responsible for damage to vehicle caused by misuse or otherwise. Auterra's sole
liability is limited to the repair or replacement of the scan tool while under warranty.
30-day money back guarantee. If for any reason you are not satisfied with the Auterra
DashDyno, you can return it to Auterra for a refund less shipping charges. The 30-day money
back guarantee only applies to purchases made from our website. Auterra resellers have their
own return policies.
The scan tool must be undamaged and contain all original packing, supplied materials, and
the original receipt or packing slip. No refunds if the scan tool arrives at Auterra after 30-days.
Email or write Auterra for a RMA before returning. Returns received without an RMA number
will be refused.
When contacting Auterra for an RMA please provide the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
Reason for returning the scan tool
Year of Vehicle (e.g. 1997)
Make (e.g. Chevrolet)
Model (e.g. K1500 Pickup Extended Cab)
Problem encountered, if any.
Email for an RMA at: [email protected]
110 Warranty Information
Index
16-pin, 5
gear ratio, 38, 39, 41, 42
a tire diameter, 40
Lost Communication, 93
accuracy, 38, 44, 47
MIL, 6, 7, 24, 25, 93, 104
Aerodynamic, 37
No Communication, 92
automatic transmissions, 38
OBD II, 5
Check Engine, 1, 5, 6, 7, 17, 93
OBD II adapter, 92
correction factor, 37
OBD II Cable, 3, 5, 9
Diagnostic Trouble Code, 5, 6, 95, 107
OBD II compliant, 5, 92
Diagnostic Trouble Codes, 95, 107
OBD II connector, 5, 92, 93
drag coefficients, 39, 40
Options, 104
DTC, 6, 93, 95, 107
RMA, 110
dynamometers, 37
Run Statistics, 47
Dynojet, 38
safety, 37, 44, 47
ECU, 6
Software Requirements, 3
enhanced, 95
support, 109
Fast Sampling, 92
Supported Vehicles, 5
Features, 1
tire diameter, 39, 41, 42
File Properties, 39
torque converter, 38, 42
Freeze Frame, 93
Updates, 15
Frontal areas, 39
VIN, 7, 104
111 Index
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