Series 90-70 Genius Bus Controller User`s Manual, GFK

Series 90-70 Genius Bus Controller User`s Manual, GFK
GE
Intelligent Platforms
Î
Programmable Control Products
Series 90*- 70
Genius* Bus Controller
User’s Manual
GFK–0398C
March 2010
GFL-002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages,
currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this
equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or damage to equipment,
a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
Note:
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts
have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not purport to cover all
details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for every possible contingency in
connection with installation, operation, or maintenance. Features may be described herein
which are not present in all hardware and software systems. GE Intelligent Platforms assumes
no obligation of notice to holders of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Intelligent Platforms makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory
with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, sufficiency, or
usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of merchantability or fitness for
purpose shall apply.
* indicates a trademark of GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc. and/or its affiliates. All other
trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
©Copyright 2010 GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
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Preface
t
This manual describes the features and operation of the Series 90 –70 Bus Controller. It
also provides the configuration and programming information needed to complete the
interface between a Series 90–70 PLC and a Genius I/O bus.
t
If you need information about types of systems, system planning, installation, and system components, refer to the Genius I/O System User’s Manual (GEK–90486). It is the primary source of information about Genius I/O products.
v
Preface
Content of this Manual
Chapter 1. Introduction: Chapter 1 describes the Series 90–70 Bus Controller and explains how it operates.
Chapter 2. Installation: Chapter 2 explains how to install or remove a Bus Controller,
and how to connect it to a Genius serial bus.
Chapter 3. Bus Controller Configuration: Chapter 3 explains how to complete the Logicmaster configuration steps for a Bus Controller and its bus.
Chapter 4. Diagnostics: Chapter 4 describes diagnostics capabilities of interest in Series
90–70 PLC systems that use Genius I/O and communications.
Chapter 5. Communication Request: Chapter 5 describes the use of the COMREQ program instruction with a Bus Controller.
Chapter 6. Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy: Chapter 6 describes some advanced systems supported by the Series 90–70 Bus Controller.
Appendix A. ASCII Code List: Lists ASCII characters and their decimal and hexadecimal
equivalents.
Changes for this Revision of the Manual
This manual describes the new features available with release 4.0 of the Bus Controller,
including greater support for redundancy and reference address checking. New and
revised information in this manual includes:
vi
H
Revised information on page 13 about completing Shield In and Shield Out connections to a Bus Controller.
H
Instructions for configuring reference address checking, bus redundancy and Bus
Controller redundancy, in chapter 3.
H
H
H
H
Some new and revised diagnostics messages in chapter 4.
Information about using passwords with COMREQs in chapter 5.
An expanded description of redundancy features in chapter 6.
Instructions for determining how many Bus Controllers can be used in a system that
includes the use of dual (redundant) busses.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
Preface
Related Publications
For more information, refer to these publications:
Genius I/O System User’s Manual (GEK–90486–1). Reference manual for system designers, programmers, and others involved in integrating Genius I/O products in a PLC or
host computer environment. This book provides a system overview, and describes the
types of systems that can be created using Genius products. Datagrams, Global Data,
and data formats are defined.
Genius Discrete and Analog Blocks User’s Manual (GEK–90486–2). Reference manual
for system designers, operators, maintenance personnel, and others using Genius discrete and analog I/O blocks. This book contains a detailed description, specifications,
installation instructions, and configuration instructions for all currently–available discrete and analog blocks.
Series 90–70 PLC Installation and Operation Manual (GFK–0262). This book describes
the modules of a Series 90–70 PLC system, and explains system setup and operation.
Logicmaster 90–70 User’s Manual (GFK–0263). Reference manual for system operators
and others using the Logicmaster 90–70 software to program, configure, monitor, or
control a Series 90–70 PLC and/or a remote drop.
Logicmaster 90 Software Reference Manual (GFK–0265). Reference manual which describes program structure and defines program instructions for the Series 90–70 PLC.
Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual (GFK–0579). Reference manual for the
Remote I/O Scanner, which interfaces a drop containing Series 90–70 modules to a Genius bus. Any CPU capable of controlling the bus can be used as the host. This book describes the Remote I/O Scanner features, configuration, and operation.
t
Series Six
Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK–0171). Reference manual for the Bus
Controller, which interfaces a Genius bus to a Series Six PLC. This book describes the
installation and operation of the Bus Controller. It also contains the programming information needed to interface Genius I/O devices to a Series Six PLC.
Series Five
Bus ControllerUser’s Manual (GFK–0248). Reference manual for the Bus
Controller, which interfaces a Genius bus to a Series Five PLC. This book describes the
installation and operation of the Bus Controller. It also contains the programming information needed to interface Genius I/O devices to a Series Five PLC.
Genius I/O PCIM User’s Manual (GFK–0074). Reference manual for the PCIM, which
interfaces a Genius bus to a suitable host computer. This book describes the installation
and operation of the PCIM. It also contains the programming information needed to interface Genius I/O devices to a host computer.
Chapter Title Here
vii
Preface
We Welcome Your Comments and Suggestions
At GE Intelligent Platforms automation, we strive to produce quality technical documentation.
After you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Jeanne L. Grimsby
Senior Technical Writer
viii
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
System Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
I/O Devices on the Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
Bus Controller Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
The Genius Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
Bus Controller Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Installing the Bus Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Removing the Bus Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
Connecting the Serial Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
Bus ControllerConfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Configuration Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Configuring a Bus Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
Configuring Devices on the Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Bus Controller Configuration Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
System Status References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
Fault and No Fault Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
High Alarm and Low Alarm Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
Fault Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
Fault Table Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
GFK–0398C
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
ix
Contents
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Appendix A
Communication Requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
COMREQs and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
63
Programming for a Communication Request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
COMREQ Command Block Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
The COMREQ Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68
COMREQs and Datagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74
COMREQ #1: Pulse Test Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75
COMREQ #2: Read Configuration Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
76
COMREQ #3: Write Configuration Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77
COMREQ #4: Read Diagnostics Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
78
COMREQ #5: Clear Circuit Faults Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
COMREQ #6: Clear All Circuit Faults Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
COMREQ #7: Assign Monitor Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
COMREQ #8: Enable/Disable Outputs Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
COMREQ #9: Enable/Disable Global Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83
COMREQ #10: Switch BSM Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
COMREQ #11: Read Device Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
COMREQ #12: Write Device Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
COMREQ #13: Dequeue Datagram Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
COMREQ #14: Send Datagram Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
94
COMREQ #15: Request Datagram Reply Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97
COMREQ #16: Enable/Disable I/O Fault Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98
Data Monitoring, Distributed Control,
and Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
99
Data Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100
Distributed Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
102
ASCII Code List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
117
GFK–0398C
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
x
Restarts for autonumbers that do not restart in each chapter. figure bi level 1, reset table_big level 1, reset chap_big level 1, reset1 app_big
level 1, resetA figure_ap level 1, reset table_ap level 1, reset figure level 1, reset Figure 1. table level 1, reset Table 1. these restarts must be
in the header frame of chapter 1. a:ebx, l 1 resetA a:obx:l 1, resetA a:bigbx level 1 resetA a:ftr level 1 resetA c:ebx, l 1 reset1 c:obx:l 1, reset1
c:bigbx level 1 reset1 c:ftr level 1 reset1 Reminders for autonumbers that need to be restarted manually (first instance will always be 4)
let_in level 1: letter level 1:A.B.C. num level 1: 1. 2. 3. num_in level 1: 1. 2. 3. rom_in level 1: I. II. III. roman level 1: I. II. III. steps level 1:
1. 2. 3.
Chapter
1 Introduction
1
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the Series 90–70 PLC Bus Controller and its operation.
System Overview
The Series 90t–70 PLC Bus Controller (catalog number IC697BEM731) is used to interface a Geniust I/O serial bus to a Series 90–70 PLC.
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CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
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HAND–HELD
MONITOR
COMMUNICATIONS
BUS
REMOTE DROP
P
S
S
C
A
N
N
E
R
I/O BLOCKS
A Genius bus may serve:
H Genius blocks, which provide interface to a broad range of discrete, analog, and
special–purpose field devices. Genius blocks are self–contained modules with advanced diagnostics capabilities and many software–configurable features.
H Remote Drops, Series 90–70 I/O racks that are interfaced to the bus via Remote I/O
Scanner Modules. Each remote drop can include any mix of discrete and analog I/O
modules, providing up to 128 bytes of input data and 128 bytes of output data.
H The Hand–held Monitor, which can be used as a portable device or permanently–
mounted. An HHM provides a convenient operator interface for block setup, data
monitoring, and diagnostics.
H Multiple hosts, for communications using datagrams and Global Data.
A bus may feature I/O control enhanced by communications commands in the program.
Or a bus may be used entirely for I/O control, with many I/O devices and no additional
communications. Or a bus may be dedicated to CPU communications, with multiple
CPUs and no I/O devices. More complex systems can also be developed, with dual CPUs
and one or more additional CPUs for data monitoring.
Number of Bus Controllers
Up to 31 Bus Controllers can be included in a Series 90–70 PLC system with a release 3.0
or later CPU. For earlier CPU versions, the maximum number of Bus Controllers that
can be accommodated is 16. In some redundant system configurations, fewer Bus Controllers can be used. See chapter 6 for details.
1
1
I/O Devices on the Bus
The I/O devices on a bus may be Genius I/O blocks, or standard Series 90–70 I/O modules in one or more remote drops. The total number of I/O circuits that can be served by
one Genius bus depends on the types of I/O devices that are used and the memory
available in the CPU.
Memor y Required for Genius Blocks
Memory requirements for Genius I/O blocks are shown below. For %I and %Q memory,
the sizes shown are in bits. For %AI and %AQ memory, the sizes shown are in words.
Maximum Memory Requirements
Block Type
115 VAC Grouped I/O blocks
115 VAC Isolated I/O blocks
16 Ckt AC Input Block
16 Ckt DC Sink/source blocks
32 Ckt DC Sink/source blocks
Relay Output blocks
4 Input/2 Output Analog Blocks
Current–source Analog I/O Blocks
Current–source Analog Output Blocks
RTD Input blocks
Thermocoupleblocks
High–speed Counter
PowerTRAC Module
%I(bits)
%Q(bits)
8
8
16
16
32
8
8
%AI(words)
%AQ (words)
4
4
2
2
6
16
32
16
16
16
16
16
6
6
15
18
Many Genius I/O blocks have both inputs and outputs on the same block. Blocks configured in the Logicmaster 90 software as having both inputs and outputs will occupy identical references in both %I and %Q memory, regardless of the block’s software configuration. Unused references cannot be assigned to other inputs or outputs, and should not
be used in the application program.
Memor y Required for a Remote Drop
Together, one 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733) and the modules it serves
make up a remote drop on the Genius bus.
REMOTE DROP
RACK 0
Î
P
S
RACK 1
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S B
C T
A M
N
N
E
R
P
S
RACK 6
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B
R
M
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P
S
B
R
M
RACK 7
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P
S
B
R
M
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UP TO 50 FEET
GENIUS BUS
NOTE:
ALL RACKS MUST BE AT THE SAME GROUND POTENTIAL
The remote drop can include any mix of Series 90–70 discrete and analog input and output modules, up to a total of 128 bytes of inputs and 128 bytes of outputs (8 discrete
points represent one byte and 1 analog channel uses 2 bytes).
2
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
1
Bus Controller Description
The Bus Controller is a standard, rack–mounted Series 90–70 PLC module.
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LEDs
HHM
CONNECTOR
REMOVABLE
BUS WIRING
TERMINAL
ASSEMBLY
Status LEDs
The LEDs on the front of the Bus Controller indicate its operating status. The top two
LEDs should be on during normal operation. The bottom LED is not used.
Module OK
Shows the status of the Bus Controller. This LED blinks during powerup diagnostics.
Channel OK
Shows the status of the bus. This LED is on steadily when the bus is
operating properly. It blinks for intermittent bus errors and is off for a
failed bus. It is also off when no configuration has been received from
the PLC CPU.
Hand–held Monitor Connector
The Hand–held Monitor connector on the Bus Controller faceplate provides attachment
for a Hand–held Monitor. For Bus Controller IC697BEM931, the lower HHM connector,
if present, is not used. All Hand–held Monitor functions except I/O block Device Number assignment can be performed with the HHM connected to the Bus Controller. Bus
and block operation can be monitored, circuits forced or unforced, outputs Pulse Tested,
diagnostic messages displayed, and faults cleared, from this convenient central location.
Hand–held Monitor version IC660HHM501C (or later), permitting selection of a “host
CPU” is recommended for proper operation with the Series 90–70 PLC.
Terminal Assembly
Serial bus and shield wiring connections are made to the removable terminal strip on the
front of the Bus Controller. For Bus Controller IC697BEM931, only the upper three terminals are used. To remove the Terminal Assembly without disturbing the continuity of
the bus, jumpers are used. See chapter 2.
Chapter 1 Introduction
3
1
The Genius Bus
The Genius bus is a shielded twisted–pair wire, daisy–chained between devices, and
terminated at both ends. Proper cable selection is critical to successful operation of the
system. Suitable cable types are listed in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Conservative wiring practices, as well as national and local codes, require physical separation between control circuits and power distribution or motor power. Refer to sections
430 and 725 of the National Electric Code.
Bus Type
Daisy–chained bus cable; single twisted pair plus shield or Twinax.
Fiber optics cable and modems can also be used.
Bus Termination
75, 100, 120, or 150 ohm resistor at both ends of electrical bus cable.
Baud Rate
Configurable. 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8
Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud.
Maximum Bus Length
7500 feet at 38.4 Kbaud, 4500 feet at 76.8 Kbaud, 3500 feet at 153.6
Kbaud extended, 2000 feet at 153.6 Kbaud, standard. Maximum
length at each baud rate also depends on cable type. Chapter 2 provides a complete list of cable types, showing corresponding bus
lengths and baud rates.
Greater bus lengths are possible using sections of fiber optics cable
with modems.
4
Maximum Number of
Devices
32 devices at 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, or 76.8
Kbaud. 16 devices at 38.4 Kbaud. Includes bus controller and typically a Hand–held Monitor.
DataEncoding
Each bit is encoded into three dipulses, majority voted at the receiver
to correct any single dipulse errors. A dipulse is an AC code consisting of a positive then negative excursion of voltage. Dipulses are
individually sampled to reject low and high frequency interference.
ModulationTechnique
Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) 0 to 460.8 KHz max. (153.6 Kilobaud)
Isolation
2000 volts Hi–Pot, 1500 volts transient common mode rejection.
Signal/noiseRatio
60 db
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
1
Bus Controller Operation
The Bus Controller handles all data transfer between the PLC and the devices on its bus.
In order to do this, the Bus Controller must interface two completely separate and
asynchronous activities:
A. The Genius bus scan, a cycle of communications between the devices on a bus (including the Bus Controller itself). The cycle follows the order of Bus Addresses
(0–31).
B. The CPU sweep, the cycle of actions that includes communications between the
CPU and the Bus Controller.
The Bus Controller manages data transfer between the bus and the CPU by maintaining
two separate on–board RAM memories. One interfaces with the bus and the other interfaces with the CPU. The Bus Controller automatically transfers data between these
two memories, making data available to the bus or to the CPU when it is needed.
The Genius Bus Scan
A bus scan consists of one complete rotation of a “token” among the devices on the bus.
a43528
BUS
CONTROLLER
TOKEN PATH
(DEVICE 31)
1
2
3
ÎÎ
30
As mentioned earlier, these devices may include other Bus Controllers, or Remote I/O
Scanners, in addition to (or instead of) the Genius blocks illustrated above.
During a bus scan, the Bus Controller automatically:
H
H
H
Receives all input data that has been sent by devices on the bus.
H
Receives any fault messages issued by devices on the bus and sets diagnostic status
references for use by the CPU.
H
Sends a single command received from the CPU (for example, Clear Circuit Faults)
to the appropriate devices.
Broadcasts Global Data.
Updates outputs, as permitted, to the devices on the bus. Transmission of outputs
from the Bus Controller can be disabled for one or more devices on the bus.
The amount of time it takes for the communications token to pass to all devices depends
on the baud rate, the number and types of devices on the bus, and the use of Global
Data and datagram communications.
Chapter 1 Introduction
5
1
Input Data from Devices on the Bus
The Bus Controller receives input data from each input block, I/O block, and remote
drop each time the block or Remote I/O Scanner has the communications token. (Because this data is broadcast, it may be received by any other bus interface module operating on the bus).
INPUTS
FROM BLOCK 4
BUS
CONTROLLER
1
a43559
2
4
3
= TOKEN
The Bus Controller stores all the input data it receives. Once per CPU sweep, the CPU
reads all discrete and analog inputs from the Bus Controller. (Analog data is not multiplexed).
Output Data from the CPU
As the application program executes, the CPU sends outputs and any commands to the
Bus Controller. The Bus Controller stores this data, transmitting it on the bus each time
it has the communications token. Unlike inputs, which are broadcast, outputs are directed to the specific device that should receive them.
PLC CPU
a43557
BUS
CONTROLLER
READS STORED INPUTS
OUTPUTS
STORES NEW OUTPUTS
BUS
CONTROLLER
HAS
TOKEN
1
2
3
4
TOKEN
Outputs for 4 Input/2 Output Analog Blocks
Four words of %AQ memory are assigned to a 4 Input/2 Output block by the configuration software. The CPU stores the output data as shown below. Locations “n+2” and
“n+3” are not used by the block.
6
n+3
n+2
n+1
n
not used
not used
channel 2
channel 1
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
%AQ
1
Diagnostics
Genius blocks and other devices on the bus will automatically report faults, alarms and
certain other predefined conditions to the PLC.
BUS
CONTROLLER
INPUTS AND FAULT MESSAGE
FROM BLOCK 3
1
TOKEN
F
FAULT
2
a43556
3
4
F
F
Only one diagnostic message can be sent during any bus scan. If a fault message has
already been sent (by another device) during that scan, a device saves its own diagnostic
message until the next available bus scan. For example, if the communications token is
currently at device 2, and faults occur at devices 3 and 4 at the same time, device 3 can
send its diagnostic message if another message has not already been sent. Device 4 must
wait at least one more bus scan to send its diagnostic message.
The Bus Controller stores any diagnostic messages it receives. They are read automatically by the Series 90–70 CPU. Faults may then be displayed in the fault table using the
Logicmaster 90–70 software and cleared from the programmer. Details are in chapter 4.
A Genius Hand–held Monitor can also be used for diagnostics and fault clearing.
In addition the built–in diagnostics capabilities of Genius devices, the Logicmaster
90–70 application program can make use of additional diagnostics mechanisms provided by the Series 90–70 PLC:
H
H
System Status References that have been defined for Genius use.
H
Alarm contacts that can be used to indicate when an analog value has reached an
assigned alarm limit.
Fault and No Fault contacts that can be used to detect fault and lack of fault conditions.
Chapter 1 Introduction
7
1
Datagrams
The Series 90–70 Bus Controller supports all Genius datagrams:
Datagram Type Type
Description
Read ID
Requests identifying information from a device on the bus.
Read ID Reply
The automatic response to a Read ID datagram.
ReadConfiguration
Requests configuration data from a device on the bus.
Read Configuration Reply
The automatic response to a Read Configuration datagram.
WriteConfiguration
Sends configuration data to a device on the bus.
AssignMonitor
Commands a device on the bus to direct an extra copy of each Fault
Report to another device on the bus.
ReadDiagnostics
Requests diagnostics data from a device on the bus.
Read Diagnostics Reply
The automatic response to a Read Diagnostics datagram.
Write Point
Sends up to 1 word of bit data to a Series Six or Series Five PLC, or
to a host computer.
ReadBlockI/O
Requests I/O data from some types of Genius blocks.
Read Block I/O Reply
The automatic response to a Read Block I/O datagram.
Report Fault
An automatic diagnostic message received from a device on the bus.
Pulse Test
Commands a discrete block to pulse its outputs.
Pulse Test Complete
Automatic indication that outputs have been pulsed.
Clear Circuit Fault
Clears one specific circuit fault.
Clear All Circuit Faults
Clears all circuit faults on bus devices.
Switch BSM
Causes a Bus Switching Module to switch to alternate bus, if operational.
Read Device
Reads up to 128 bytes of CPU data via another Bus Controller.
Read Device Reply
The response to a Read Device datagram.
Write Device
Sends up to 128 bytes of data to a CPU, via its Bus Controller.
Read Data
Requeststemporary data from a High–speed Counter block.
Read Data Reply
The automatic reply to a Read Data datagram.
Write Data
Sends temporary data to a High–speed Counter block.
Read Map
Requests the I/O map configuration of a Remote I/O Scanner.
Read Map Reply
Automatic response to a Read Map datagram.
Write Map
Sends I/O map configuration to a Remote I/O Scanner.
Additional datagrams, not listed above, are sent as system messages; they do not involve
any application programming. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual explains datagrams
in detail. It also shows the formats of the data that is transferred by datagrams.
In the application program, COMREQ instructions are used to send datagrams and to
read any unsolicited datagrams that have been received. See chapter 5 for instructions.
8
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
1
Global Data
Global Data is data which is automatically and repeatedly broadcast by a Bus Controller.
The Series 90–70 Bus Controller can send up to 128 bytes of Global Data each bus scan.
It can receive up to 128 bytes of Global Data each bus scan from each Bus Controller on
its bus.
Sending Global Data
Once set up by configuration (see chapter 3), Global Data is broadcast automatically.
Other Bus Controllers receiving the Global Data sent by a Series 90–70 PLC will place it
in these memory locations:
Series 90–70 Sends
Global Data To:
Other CPU Places Global Data in this Memory Location:
Series 90–70 PLC
%I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, %AQ memory if manually–configured, or %G
memory if automatically–configured. Memory type and beginning address are chosen during configuration of the receivingbus controller.
Series 90–30 PLC
%G memory location corresponding to Device Number (16–23) of the
Series 90–70 Bus Controller that sent the data.
Series Six PLC
Registermemory. Beginning address selected during configuration of
the Series 90–70 Bus Controller that sent the data.
Series Five PLC
Registermemory. Beginning address selected during configuration of
the Series 90–70 Bus Controller that sent the data.
Computer
PCIM or QBIM Input Table Segment corresponding to Device Number
of the Series 90–70 bus controller that sent the data.
Receiving Global Data
The Bus Controller can be configured to receive or ignore Global Data from any other
Bus Controller. The memory type and length for incoming Global Data are also selected
during configuration, as described in chapter 3.
The Series 90–70 CPU can place incoming Global Data in %I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, or
%AQ memory.
Example
In the following example, a Series 90–70 PLC (PLC 1) sends 64 bits of Global Data beginning at %I0101 to another Series 90–70 PLC (PLC 2). PLC 2 places this data into its own
memory beginning at %I0017. PLC 2 sends 8 words of %AQ data beginning at
%AQ0001 to PLC 1. PLC 1 places this data into its own memory beginning at %AI0032.
Series 90–70
PLC 1
%I0101 – %I0164
%AI0032 – %AI0039
Chapter 1 Introduction
Series 90–70
PLC 2
a
'
%I0017 – %I0081
%AQ00001
– %AQ00008
9
Chapter
2 Installation
2
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains:
H
H
H
How to install and remove a Bus Controller.
How to connect a Genius serial bus.
How to terminate a bus if a Bus Controller is physically at either end.
For Additional Information, Also See:
Chapter 1 for a description and illustration of the Bus Controller, explanation of its LEDs,
and specifications for the Genius bus.
Chapter 3 for configuration instructions.
Chapter 6 for information about dual bus and dual controller systems.
11
2
Installing the Bus Controller
1.
Be sure the rack is powered down.
2.
Position the Bus Controller at its intended location.
3.
Push the Bus Controller into the card guide until it is aligned with the connector
on the rack backplane.
4.
Pressing the upper and lower flanges on the left of the module, push it into the
connector until it clicks onto the rack rails.
Look to see that the board has seated properly in the connector.
5.
Complete the bus connections to the front of the board as described on the next
page.
Removing the Bus Controller
1.
Power down the rack in which the Bus Controller is located. Before removing
power, it is important to consider the impact on the controlled process.
2.
If the PLC is not part of a redundant system, the bus wiring can be removed from
the Bus Controller.
If the PLC is part of a redundant system and another CPU on the bus is now functioning as the controller, the Bus Controller can be removed without powering down
the bus, provided the Bus Controller’s Serial 1 terminals and Serial 2 terminals have
been jumpered as described in this chapter. If this has been done, do not disconnect
the bus cable or any terminating resistor. Remove the terminal assembly from the
Bus Controller carefully. Avoid contact with exposed cable wiring. Place the terminal assembly with the bus wiring still attached, in a protected location.
Caution
If exposed wiring comes in contact with conductive material, data on the
bus may be corrupted, possibly causing the system to shut down.
12
3.
Squeeze the retaining clips at the top and bottom of the cover to disengage them
from the rack rails.
4.
Pull the board firmly to remove it from the backplane connector.
5.
Slide the board out of the card guide to remove it from the rack.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
2
Connecting the Serial Bus
For information about bus selection and installation, you should refer to the Genius
I/O System User’s Manual.
Connect the bus cable to the terminal assembly on the front of the Bus Controller. The
tie-down screws can be removed to accommodate ring-type connectors. Terminal designations, illustrated below, are also shown on the module faceplate.
The maximum exposed length of bare wires should be two inches. For added protection,
each shield drain wire should be insulated with spaghetti tubing to prevent the Shield In
and Shield Out wires from touching each other or the signal wires.
a43524
IN
OUT
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SERIAL 2
SHIELD
OUT
SHIELD
IN
NOT
USED
Replacing an Older Bus Controller
If this hardware (GIOC1) is being used to replace older hardware (GIOA1 or GIOB1: see
markscreen on the edge of the board), the GENIUS bus connections to the Bus Controller must be rewired. Refer to the wiring label inside the module cover for detals concerning the proper wiring of the connector. Note that GIOC1 hardware was also used
with Genius Bus Controller versions IC697BEM731B and C.
Shield In and Shield Out Connections in an Existing Installation
The actual positions of the Bus Controller’s Shield In and Shield Out terminals are correctly shown above. On the faceplates of older Bus Controllers and in earlier revisions of
the documentation, these terminals are shown reversed. Regardless of the markings on the
faceplate, all Series 90–70 Bus Controllers have their Shield In and Shield Out terminals in the
positions shown above.
Because of this inconsistency, Bus Controllers in an existing installation may have their
Shield In and Shield Out terminals incorrectly connected (that is, not as illustrated
above). For most applications, this should not be a problem, and rewiring is not necessary. If noise immunity is a particular concern, however, rewiring of the Shield In and
Shield Out terminals on these older Bus Controllers is recommended.
Chapter 2 Installation
13
2
Terminating the Bus
Each Genius communications bus must be terminated at both ends by its characteristic
impedance, as explained in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
If the Bus Controller is located at the end of a bus, install the appropriate resistor across
its Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals.
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î ÎÎ
ÎÎ
a43525
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SERIAL 2
Wiring for Bus Continuity
For a redundancy system, where another CPU on the bus will be capable of acting as a
controller, jumpers should be installed on the Bus Controller’s terminal assembly as
shown at right. This will allow possible removal of the terminal assembly in the future
without breaking the continuity of the bus.
For bus continuity, jumper the Serial 1 terminals together and jumper the Serial 2 terminals together (even if the Bus Controller is at the end of the bus). Alternatively, use only
one terminal of each pair, and wire both cable ends to the selected terminals.
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SHIELD
OUT
14
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
a43526
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SHIELD
IN
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
Chapter
3 Bus Controller Configuration
3
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains the Logicmaster 90–70 configuration steps for a Bus Controller
and its bus devices. If the configuration software being used is earlier than release 4.01,
some of the features described here will not be available.
Configuration Overview
A Bus Controller and the devices on its bus must be configured in two basic, different
procedures.
1.
The Bus Controller and the devices on its bus must be configured as part of the Series 90–70 PLC system using the Logicmaster 90–70 software.
2.
The devices on the bus must also be configured separately. This includes:
A. Configuring I/O blocks with a Hand–held Monitor and/or Write Configuration
COMREQs.
B. Configuring Remote Drops using Logicmaster 90–70.
C. Configuring redundant Bus Controllers using Logicmaster 90–70.
This book only covers Logicmaster configuration of Bus Controllers.
For Additional Information, Also See:
Chapter 5, which describes Read Configuration and Write Configuration COMREQs.
Chapter 6, which describes data monitoring, distributed control, and redundant control
systems.
The Genius Analog and Discrete Blocks Manual, which includes instructions for configuring
most I/O blocks.
The Genius I/O System and Communications Manual, which details the data that can be
transferred using Read Configuration and Write Configuration COMREQs.
The Logicmaster 90–70 Software User’s Manual, which covers configuration of the entire
PLC.
The Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual, which covers configuration of Remote Drops.
15
3
Configuring a Bus Controller
A Bus Controller is configured in the same manner as other rack–mounted Series 90–70
PLC modules.
Place the cursor at the slot representation corresponding to the Bus Controller’s installed
location in the PLC rack.
Select F2 (Genius), then F1 (gbc). Press the Enter key to select the Bus Controller.
16
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
After selecting the Bus Controller, complete its configuration entries:
The default entries can be used as is, or changed. Until a valid configuration is stored to the
PLC CPU, the Bus Controller will not operate on the Bus, and its Channel OK LED will not light.
Bus Addr.
Ordinarily, the Device Number (Bus Address) assigned to a Bus Controller is 31. Any number from 0 to 31 can be used; each must be unique on
that Genius bus. For redundancy applications, only 30 and 31 should be
used.
Baud Rate
All devices on a bus must use the same baud rate: 153.6 Kbaud standard,
153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8 Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud. Selection of a baud
rate depends on the application, as explained in the Genius I/O System
User’s Manual. Usually, the bus length determines the baud rate. The
entry made here establishes the baud rate for the Bus Controller only. If
the default baud rate (153.6 Kbaud standard) will not be used, the baud
rate of other devices on the bus must also be changed. Typically, this is
done using a Hand–held Monitor.
Error Rate
This entry determines how the Bus Controller will respond to errors on
the bus. If the Bus Controller should drop off the bus when a specified
number of errors occur within a 10–second period, enter that number
of errors here. If the Bus Controller should remain on the bus when
errors occur and try to maintain communications, enter 0 here.
Caution
If the bus includes a Bus Switching Module or another device that controls bus switching, the Error Rate MUST be set
to 0. Otherwise, the Bus Controller may drop off the bus
when the BSM is switching a block to the bus.
Ref Adr Chk
This entry can be used to verify that references already configured for
devices on the Genius bus match the status references assigned to the
same devices in Logicmaster 90. If ENABLED, references are checked for
all configured devices except PowerTRAC blocks or “GENA”–based bus
devices. This feature will not detect or configure an unconfigured device,
or correct references that do not match.
Chapter 3 Configuration
17
3
Configuring Global Data
Config
Mode:
This entry determines how Global Data will be set up for the Bus Controller. If the Bus Controller will not send or receive Global Data, select
NONE.
If the Bus Controller will transmit Global Data, select MANUAL if you
want to specify a reference address and data length. Or select AUTO to
let the Logicmaster 90 software automatically configure the data length
and Global Data address. See “Automatic Global Data Setup” on page
19.
If you select MANUAL, the following entries appear:
From Addr:
Specify the beginning PLC address from which data will be transmitted
on the bus. It can be from %I, %Q, %G, %R, %AI, or %AQ memory.
Data Length:
Also for MANUAL configuration mode, this entry specifies the amount
of Global Data to be sent each bus scan.
If bit–oriented memory (%I, %Q, or %G) is selected above, this may be
0 to 1024 bits. It must be a multiple of 8. If you enter a number that is
not a multiple of 8, the software will automatically adjust it upward.
If word–oriented memory (%AI, %AQ, or %R) is selected above, this
may be 0 to 64 words. If more than 64 words are selected, the Logicmaster 90 software automatically adjusts the length to 64 words.
The total amount of memory specified must not exceed the configured
memory size for that memory type. For example, for the 731 CPU, the
maximum value for %I memory that can be configured is 512.
To (Opt):
This information is not used by another Series 90–70 Bus Controller. If the
Global Data sent by this Bus Controller will be received by a Series Six
PLC or a Series Five PLC, use this entry to configure the destination
register address in the other PLC. Only one such destination address
can be specified for Global Data sent by each Bus Controller; if there is
more than one Series Six and/or Series Five PLC on the bus, they must
all use the same register address for Global Data received from this Bus
Controller. For information about selecting and entering a register address for one of these PLCs, refer to the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
t
t
Note
The Bus Controller’s Global Data address will not be displayed
on the Hand–held Monitor’s Block/Bus Status screen unless
you enter a register address here that corresponds to the actual
Global Data address.
If the Global Data destination is another Series 90–70 PLC, the destination memory address is specified as part of that PLC’s configuration.
18
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Automatic Global Data Setup
Selecting AUTO configuration mode automatically assigns a Global Data address and
length to the Bus Controller. As many as 6 Bus Controllers in the same rack can easily be
configured for Global Data in this way (additional Bus Controllers can be configured by
selecting MANUAL, as described previously). If you select AUTO configuration mode,
these entries appear for Global Data:
Length for Automatic Global Data
When AUTO is selected, the Logicmaster 90 software assigns a Global Data length based
upon the Bus Controller’s Device Number. The length may be either 4 bytes or 16 bytes.
Bytes of Global Data
Device Numbers
4
16
16 through 23
24 through 31
A Bus Controller’s Device Number is its bus address. The bus address chosen for a Bus
Controller may not conflict with that of any other device on its bus. Two or more Bus
Controllers in a PLC system may use the same Device Number, providing they are on
different busses.
Address for Automatic Global Data
When AUTO is selected, the Logicmaster 90 software assigns %G references to Global
Data. Like the length, the starting address is based on the Bus Controller’s Device Number. For the first Bus Controller configured in AUTO config. mode, the software selects
one of these %G references:
Bytes of
Global Data
Device
Number
Starting
Address
Ending
Address
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
%G0001
%G0033
%G0065
%G0097
%G0129
%G0161
%G0193
%G0225
%G0032
%G0064
%G0096
%G0128
%G0160
%G0192
%G0224
%G0256
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
%G0257
%G0385
%G0513
%G0641
%G0769
%G0897
%G1025
%G1153
%G0384
%G0512
%G0640
%G0768
%G0896
%G1024
%G1152
%G1280
For example, if the Device Number of the first Bus Controller configured in AUTO mode
is 21, the Logicmaster 90 software automatically assigns references %G0161 through
%G0192, and the Global Data length is 4 bytes.
Chapter 3 Configuration
19
3
Configuring Additional Bus Controllers in AUTO Mode
To accommodate additional Bus Controllers in the same rack, %G memory has five more
areas, identified as %GA, %GB, %GC, %GD, and %GE. The second Bus Controller configured in AUTO mode is automatically assigned to %GA, the third to %GB, and so on.
Within those memory areas, reference assignments and Global Data lengths are the
same for %G.
1st Bus
Controller
2nd Bus
Controller
3rd Bus
Controller
4th Bus
Controller
5th Bus
Controller
6th Bus
Controller
Device
Number
%G
Addresses
%G
Addresses
%GB
Addresses
%GC
Addresses
%GD
Addresses
%GE
Addresses
16
1–32
1–32
1–32
1–32
1–32
1–32
17
33–64
33–64
33–64
33–64
33–64
33–64
18
65–96
65–96
65–96
65–96
65–96
65–96
19
97–128
97–128
97–128
97–128
97–128
97–128
20
129–160
129–160
129–160
129–160
129–160
129–160
21
161–192
161–192
161–192
161–192
161–192
161–192
22
193–224
193–224
193–224
193–224
193–224
193–224
23
225–256
225–256
225–256
225–256
225–256
225–256
24
257–385
257–385
257–385
257–385
257–385
257–385
25
386–512
386–512
386–512
386–512
386–512
386–512
26
513–640
513–640
513–640
513–640
513–640
513–640
27
641–768
641–768
641–768
641–768
641–768
641–768
28
769–896
769–896
769–896
769–896
769–896
769–896
29
897–1024
897–1024
897–1024
897–1024
897–1024
897–1024
30
1025–1152
1025–1152
1025–1152
1025–1152
1025–1152
1025–1152
31
1153–1280
1153–1280
1153–1280
1153–1280
1153–1280
1153–1280
Assigning a Bus Controller to a %G channel in AUTO mode reserves that channel; no
part of it can be assigned to another Bus Controller in the rack. If an ”external” device
on the bus sends Global Data to the Bus Controller, that data will be placed in the same
channel, at the starting address that corresponds to the other controller’s Device Number. The starting location cannot be changed but the length can, if necessary, by switching to MANUAL mode. If the length is changed, it is important to be sure that the new length
does not overlap a memory area being used for another device’s Global Data.
20
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Configuring Redundancy
The rest of the entries on the Bus Controller configuration screen are for redundancy.
Use of these features requires the following hardware and software:
H
H
H
Series 90–70 PLC CPU, version 4.0 or later.
Series 90–70 PLC Bus Controller, version 4.0 or later.
Logicmaster 90 Software, release 4.01 or later.
To get back the redundant configuration, zoom into the Bus Controller
configuration screen, and re–select the Redundancy Mode.
Redund
Mode:
The type of redundancy, if any. See chapter 6 for more detailed descriptions of redundancy modes. Configuration examples for redundancy
are also shown on the following pages.
Note: if you set up a Bus Controller for redundancy, then either COPY or UNDELETE the Bus Controller’s configuration, the Redundancy Mode of the
copy or restored version will be reset to NONE and the Redundancy of blocks
on the bus will be reset to NO.
None: This is the default. None means the Bus Controller communicates with a single bus, it is the only controller on the bus sending outputs, and no I/O devices on the bus are set up for any type of redundancy.
If, during subsequent configuration of devices on the bus. any is set up for redundancy, this item will automatically be changed to Dual Bus.
Similarly, if Redund Mode is set to anything except NONE, any devices on the
bus that have already been configured will automatically have their Redundancy parameter set to YES.
Chapter 3 Configuration
21
3
Dual Bus: In a dual bus configuration, there are two busses, each of
which has its own Bus Controller. The Bus Controllers can be either in
the same PLC or separate PLCs. Switching devices, usually Genius Bus
Switching Modules (BSMs), each link up to seven additional devices to
the dual busses.
BUS
CONTROLLER
a42360
BUS
CONTROLLER
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
BUS A
BUS B
BSM
BSM
CONTROLLER
BLOCK
UP TO 7
MORE BLOCKS
Red Ctrl: Select this for redundant Bus Controllers, either in the same
PLC or separate PLCs:
Ï ÏÏ
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 31)
(DEVICE 30)
1
2
a43558
4
3
5
DB/RC: Select this for a system that combines redundant Bus Controllers with a dual bus. It requires two PLCs and four Bus Controllers:
a42472
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
A
(DEVICE 31)
B
(DEVICE 31)
A
(DEVICE 30)
B
(DEVICE 30)
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
BUS A
BUS B
1
BSM
22
2
3
4A
BSM
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
4B
3
Paired GBC:
Both dual bus and dual controller redundancy use pairs of Bus Controllers. This selection specifies the location of the other Bus Controller of
the pair. The three choices are:
Internal:
If the Redundancy Mode is either dual bus or redundant control and both Bus Controllers are located in the same PLC (not necessarily in the same
rack), select Internal. You must also enter a Dual
GBC Addr (see below).
External:
If the Redundancy Mode is either dual bus or redundant control and the other Bus Controller is in
another PLC, select External.
Int/Ext:
Select this if Redund Mode is set to DB/RC. You
must also enter a Dual GBC Addr (see below).
If, during subsequent configuration of devices on the bus, any is set up for redundancy, this item will automatically be changed to External.
Switch Time: This is the amount of time that will be allowed for switching on a dual
bus. The choices are 2.5 seconds and 10 seconds. If the Redundancy
Mode is either Dual Bus or DB/RC and the total bus scan time on either
bus is expected to exceed 100mS, change the Switch Time selection to 10
seconds. If the Bus Controller stops receiving input data from a device
or devices on the bus, it will wait this specified time period before defaulting inputs or generating fault reports.
Be sure to select the same time period when configuring the devices on
the bus with a Hand–held Monitor or Write Configuration COMREQs.
This determines the length of time I/O devices on the bus allow for bus
switching, before defaulting their outputs.
Dual GBC
Addr
If you selected Internal for Paired GBC, enter the location of the other
Bus Controller:
For rack # and slot #, enter the rack and slot number where the other
Bus Controller is located in the Series 90–70 PLC. The bus # entry
should be left as 1.
Note
When configuring a redundant system, remember to change the Loss of
IOC fault from fatal to diagnostic. Otherwise, loss of a Bus Controller will
cause the PLC to shut down. (This change can be made on the Fault Categories screen, during CPU configuration.)
Chapter 3 Configuration
23
3
Configuring Devices on the Bus
After configuring the Bus Controller, configure the devices on its bus by pressing F10
(Zoom) with the cursor at the Bus Controller slot. The bus configuration screen (see below) appears.
Selecting a Device
Each location on the bus is represented by a Device Number from 0 to 31. To select a
Device Number. position the cursor at its numbered box on the bus display. For example, positioning the cursor as shown below would assign Device Number 28.
With the cursor positioned at the correct Device Number, configure the device type:
24
d in (F1)
Select F1 for a discrete input block or combination block with inputs
only.
d out (F2)
Select F2 for a discrete output block, or a combination block with outputs only.
d mix (F3)
Select F3 for a discrete I/O block with both inputs and outputs. This includes blocks configured for “outputs with feedback”.
a in (F4)
Select F4 for an analog block that has inputs only.
a out (F5)
Select F5 for an analog block that has outputs only.
a mix (F6)
Select F6 for an analog block with both inputs and outputs.
other (F7)
Select F7 to configure another Bus Controller, a High–speed Counter, a
PowerTRAC Block, a PCIM, GENI, GENA, or “generic” I/O device.
remote (F8)
Select F8 to add a remote drop the bus.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Configuring I/O Blocks
Genius I/O blocks with selectable I/O configuration appear in more than one list. If a
discrete combination block will have inputs only, select it from the “D IN” (F1) list. If it
will have outputs only, select it from the “D OUT” (F2) list. If it will have both inputs
and outputs, select it from the “D MIX” (F3) list. If a block is selected from the wrong list,
or if its I/O type configuration is changed at a later time, a “Genius I/O Type Mismatch” error
will be placed in the PLC Fault Table.
When a block type has been selected from the correct list, press the Enter key. A configuration screen for that block will appear. For example, this is a configuration screen for a
115 VAC 8 Circuit Grouped I/O block.
You must enter a configuration screen for each device on the bus, although you may
wish to use the default references and configuration selections.
This does NOT configure the characteristics of the Genius I/O blocks themselves. That
separate configuration is normally done using a Hand–held Monitor, but may also be
done using Communication Request instructions in the application program. For information about Communication Request instructions, see chapter 5.
Chapter 3 Configuration
25
3
Block Reference Address
A block’s Reference Address is the beginning reference for its inputs and outputs. As
each block is configured, the software selects the correct memory types for that block.
For example, for a discrete block with both inputs and outputs, this address is shown in
the configuration screen as:
Ref Addr :
%QInnnnn
For an analog block with both inputs and outputs, this address is shown in the configuration screen as:
Ref Addr :
%AQInnnnn
Memor y Type
The memory type shown on the configuration screen cannot be changed. If a discrete
combination block will NOT use the reference types shown (for example, if %QI is
shown, but the block will be configured with a Hand–held Monitor for inputs–only
operation), the block has been selected from the wrong list. The memory type displayed
on this screen must match the memory type selected with the Hand–held Monitor. If it
doesn’t, delete the current entry then re–select the block from the correct list.
Address
The Logicmaster programmer automatically assigns the next available reference address
within a memory type. If the address displayed is not appropriate, a different address
can be entered from the keyboard. Discrete references must begin on a byte boundary
(a byte boundary is a number which is one greater than a multiple of 8, for example: 9,
17, or 25). If you assign a reference address out of sequence, the software will then continue to increment that number for additional modules. For example, if you assigned the
reference %I0401 to the first input module and it had 16 circuits, the software would
next assign %I0417 or %QI0417 to an input or combination block. You could change this
to a different address. A message appears when the highest available address has been
assigned, although you may have skipped lower addresses.
References for Blocks having both Discrete and Word Inputs: For certain types of Genius I/O blocks (an example is the High–speed Counter block), the input data that is
routinely broadcast by the block consists of BOTH discrete and word–type data.
For such a block, the configured Reference Address represents three memory locations
(in %I, %Q, and %AI memories) instead of the two (%I and %Q) assigned to other types
of blocks.
For example, a High–speed Counter block has 16 bits of input data, 16 bits of output
data, and 15 words of calculated data. If a High–speed Counter block were configured
to use Reference Address 0049, the following memory locations would be used by the
block:
%I0049 to %I0064
%Q0049 to %Q0064
%AI0049 to %AI0063
26
for the block’s inputs
for the block’s outputs
for the block’s calculated data
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
References for Inputs–only or Outputs–only Blocks: An Inputs–only block uses one
reference in %I or %AI memory for each circuit on the block. Similarly, a block with outputs only requires one reference in %Q or %AQ memory only.
References for Blocks with both Inputs and Outputs: A block which has both inputs
and outputs uses the same number of input and output references, regardless of the
block’s actual I/O mix.
An analog block with 4 inputs and 2 outputs requires four words of analog input
memory and four words of analog output memory. The block only uses the first two
output words; however, the second two output words cannot be used for outputs because they cannot be assigned by the configuration software. However, they can be
used for internal registers in the application program.
References for Redundancy: The Series 90–70 PLC handles I/O data the same way for
redundant and non–redundant systems. For any redundant Bus Controller pair in the
PLC, each CPU sweep the CPU receives a one set of bus inputs and sends one set of bus
outputs. The Series 90–70 PLC does not maintain two sets of references for devices that
are set up for redundancy.
Reference Address Configuration Example
As the following examples show, it is not necessary to configure blocks in Device Number sequence. Device Numbers are unrelated to the assignment of Reference Addresses.
SERIES 90–70
a43459
1
BLOCK REFERENCE TYPE
QI
INPUT REFERENCES
17–24
OUTPUT REFERENCES
17–24
31
1
2
3
4
2
3
4
5
AQI
1–4
1–4
Q
AI
5–10
I
1–16
1–16
5
The bus has five blocks:
Device Number 1:
Device Number 2:
Device Number 3:
Device Number 4:
Device Number 5:
8–circuit Isolated I/O block
4 Input/2 Output analog block
16–circuit discrete Relay Output block
RTD analog block (6 inputs, no outputs)
16–circuit discrete Inputs–only block
The order in which the blocks are configured determines their reference assignments.
Chapter 3 Configuration
27
3
Reference Address Example Configuration 1:
Here, the first block to be configured is Device Number 5, the 16–circuit Inputs–only
block. The configuration software assigns to it %I0001. The second block configured is
Device Number 3, the Relay Output block. The software assigns to it %Q0001. If Device
Number 1, the 8–circuit Isolated I/O block, were configured next, the software would
automatically assign it %QI0017.
SERIES 90–70
a44897
BLOCK REFERENCE TYPE
INPUT REFERENCES
OUTPUT REFERENCES
31
1
THIRD
%QI0017–%QI0024
2
3
SECOND
%Q001–%QI0016
4
1
2
3
4
5
QI
17–24
17–24
AQI
1–4
1–4
Q
AI
5–10
I
1–16
1–16
5
FIRST
%I0001–%I0016
The assignment of %I and %Q memory would then be:
%I
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
1
%Q
32
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
1
28
16
16
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
32
3
Reference Address Example Configuration 2:
If the 16–circuit Input block were configured first, the 8–circuit Isolated block second,
and the 16–circuit Relay block third, the software would not go back and assign reference address %Q0001 to the Relay block.
SERIES 90–70
a44898
BLOCK REFERENCE TYPE
INPUT REFERENCES
OUTPUT REFERENCES
31
1
SECOND
%QI0017–%QI0024
2
3
4
THIRD
%Q0025–%QI0040
1
2
3
4
5
QI
17–24
17–24
AQI
1–4
1–4
Q
AI
5–10
I
1–16
25–40
5
FIRST
%I0001–%I0016
The automatic memory assignments in %I and %Q would be like this instead:
%I
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
1
16
%Q
32
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
1
16
32
x x x x x x x x
33
40
In this case, the Reference Address %Q0001 could be typed in from the keyboard, resulting in the memory usage shown first.
It is not necessary to configure the analog blocks as a separate group. The software assigns their Reference Addresses independently of the discrete Reference Addresses.
Chapter 3 Configuration
29
3
Disabling Outputs
If outputs are disabled, the Bus Controller will not send output data from the CPU to the
designated device(s). Output Disable is not selectable for inputs–only devices. Inputs–only
blocks are ALWAYS sent a dummy message to turn on their I/O Enabled LEDs.
It is possible for outputs to be disabled or re–enabled using Communication Request
instructions in the application program. If this capability will be needed, then outputs
should be enabled during I/O configuration.
Ordinarily, the configuration software would be used to disable outputs that were to
remain disabled. To re–enable such inputs, it would be necessary to change the configuration and re–store the new configuration to the PLC.
Outputs might be disabled in a system where multiple CPUs are used for distributed
control, or a system using the Series 90 PLC as an assigned monitoring device. Examples
are shown below.
Example
Selectively Disabling Outputs for Distributed Control of I/O Blocks: Some systems use
two or more CPUs on the same bus for distributed control of I/O blocks. In a distributed control system, each CPU sends outputs to (and receives fault reports from)
certain blocks on the bus and not others. This is accomplished by selectively enabling or disabling outputs to the blocks.
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
CPU
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
a42485
CPU
CPU
BUS
INTERFACE
MODULE
BUS
INTERFACE
MODULE
(DEVICE 31)
(DEVICE 30)
BUS
INTERFACE
MODULE
(DEVICE 7)
OUTPUTS
1
30
2
3
4
5
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
3
Example
Disabling Outputs for an Assigned Monitor: If the Series 90 PLC will be used to monitor
inputs from certain blocks on the bus, outputs to those blocks should be disabled.
When being used as a monitor, the PLC will also receive fault reports and configuration change messages if the blocks have been sent Assign Monitor datagrams.
CONTROLLER
PLC
ÏÏ
MONITOR
a42566
PLC
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
OUTPUTS
DISABLED
OUTPUTS
1
2
3
4
PHASE B I / O BLOCKS
Output data for these blocks will be supplied by one or more other CPUs on the same
bus.
CONTROLLER
PLC
BUS
CONTROLLER
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
a42565
MONITOR
PLC
BUS
CONTROLLER
INPUTS
1
2
3
4
PHASE B I / O BLOCKS
If a CPU is used as a monitor, it may NOT have two of its Bus Controllers located on the same
bus. Otherwise, the CPU would receive input data from both Bus Controllers for the same
references, and internal system errors will result.
Chapter 3 Configuration
31
3
Block Redundancy Configuration
If a block will be used in dual bus or dual controller mode, or both, set the entry for Redundancy to YES.
If Redundancy is set ot YES for any block on a bus, the Bus Controller must also be configured for a form of redundancy: dual bus, redundant control, or dual bus/redundant
control.
The configuration software will automatically attempt to supply a correct configuration
when you set device Redundancy to YES:
H
If the Bus Controller is configured for a Redundancy Mode of NONE, and you set
the Redundancy of any device on the bus to YES, the Bus Controller’s configuration
is automatically changed to Redundancy: DUAL BUS and Paired GBC: EXTERNAL.
H
If the Bus Controller is configured for a Redundancy Mode of either DUAL BUS or
Redundant Control (Red Ctrl), and Paired GBC is INTERNAL, each device on the
bus is automatically configured at the same bus address (Device Number) on the
redundant bus, and given the same reference addresses.
If Paired GBC is set to EXTERNAL, the block is not automatically configured on the
other bus of the pair.
H
If the Bus Controller is configured for a Redundancy Mode of DB/RC (dual bus/redundant control) each device on the bus is automatically configured at the same bus
address (Device Number) on the redundant bus, and given the same reference address.
Redundancy
The redundancy mode of I/O blocks is automatically matched to the Redundancy Mode
configuration of the Bus Controller;
32
Bus Controller
I/O Block
none
redundant control
dual bus
DB/RC
none
Hot Standby
BSM Present = YES
BSM Present = YES
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Configuring a Remote Drop
To add a remote drop to the bus, select a Device Number for the Remote I/O Scanner by
moving the cursor to the desired number and pressing F8 (Remote).
Note
If a Remote I/O Scanner has a Device Number conflict on an operating bus,
it will not scan the modules in the remote drop until the fault is cleared.
In the example below, a Remote I/O Scanner has been selected at Device Number 29.
Press the Enter key to accept the Remote I/O Scanner (IC697BEM733) at the desired Device Number. A configuration screen next appears for the Remote I/O Scanner.
Please refer to the Series 90–70 Remote I/O Scanner User’s Manual for additional configuration instructions.
Redundancy
The redundancy mode of the Remote I/O Scanner is automatically matched to the Redundancy Mode configuration of the Bus Controller;
Bus Controller
Remote I/O Scanner
none
redundant control
dual bus
DB/RC
none
Hot Standby
BSM Present = YES
BSM Present = YES
Chapter 3 Configuration
33
3
Configuring Other Devices on the Bus
Select F7 (other) from the bus configuration screen to configure:
H
H
H
H
H
Another Bus Controller on the same bus.
A PCIM or QBIM interface module.
A High–speed Counter Block.
A PowerTRAC Block.
A GENI, GENA, or generic I/O device.
After you select “other ”, a screen like this appears:
To display the names of additional devices, use PGUP or PGDN. Configuration for the
devices listed on this menu is summarized on the following pages.
34
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Configuring an Attached Bus Controller, Genius Communications Module, PCIM,
QBIM, or GENI–based Device
Select the module from the menu of “other ” modules. Press the Enter key. The configuration screen that appears will look like this example:
Receiving Global Data
If the Bus Controller you are now configuring (at the rack level) will not accept Global
Data from this Bus Controller, the entry for Config Mode should be NONE. If it will accept the Global Data, select the CPU reference address for the data to be placed after it is
received.
A. For automatic configuration of a %G reference based on the module’s Device Number, select AUTO. See page 19 for more information.
B. To choose a specific reference in %I, %Q, %G, %AI, %AQ, or %R memory for the
data, select MANUAL. You can then enter the beginning reference, and the length
of memory to be reserved.
To:
The beginning address in %I, %Q, %G, %AI, %AQ, or %R memory.
Input
Length:
The amount of Global Data expected to be received. For bit–oriented
data, this is the number of bits. For word–oriented data, it is the number of words. If the expected data length (defined by configuration) and
the actual data length (defined by the content of the Read ID Reply
message from the module) don’t agree, a System Configuration Mismatch fault is placed in the PLC Fault Table.
If Redundancy is set ot YES, the Bus Controller must also be configured for a form of
redundancy. The configuration software will automatically attempt to supply a correct
configuration when you set device Redundancy to YES, as explained on page 32.
Chapter 3 Configuration
35
3
Configuring a High–speed Counter Block
Select the High–speed Counter from the menu of “other ” modules. Press the Enter key.
A configuration screen like this will appear:
The High–speed Counter Block has both bit–type data and word–type data. On this
screen, select the beginning references for both. When you make a %QI entry for “Ctrl/
Status”, it automatically assigns the corresponding starting reference in %AI memory for
the block’s word data (“HSC Data”).
Ctrl/Status
The %QI reference location for the block’s discrete I/O data. The length
is fixed at 16 bits.
HSC Data
The %AI reference for the block’s word data. The length is fixed at 15
words.
If you would like more information about the content and format of this data, please see
the High–speed Counter User’s Manual.
If Redundancy is set ot YES, the Bus Controller must also be configured for a form of
redundancy. The configuration software will automatically attempt to supply a correct
configuration when you set device Redundancy to YES, as explained on page 32.
36
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Configuring a PowerTRAC Block
Select the PowerTRAC Block from the menu of “other ” modules. Press the Enter key. A
configuration screen like the one shown below will appear.
The PowerTRAC Block has both bit–type data and word–type data. On this screen,
select the beginning references for both. The required lengths are shown. You can also
select the default state for the block’s input data, and enable or disable CPU outputs to
the block.
If Redundancy is set ot YES, the Bus Controller must also be configured for a form of
redundancy. The configuration software will automatically attempt to supply a correct
configuration when you set device Redundancy to YES, as explained on page 32.
If you would like more information about the content and format of PowerTRAC block
data, please see the PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual.
Chapter 3 Configuration
37
3
Configuring a Generic I/O Device
A device on the bus can be configured as a “generic” I/O device. This might be done to
provide selections for “input defaults” and “outputs enabled” that are not otherwise
available for a given Genius product, or to configure a device that is not included in the
other menus.
To configure a generic device, select GENERIC I/O from the menu of “other ” modules.
Press the Enter key. A configuration screen like this will appear:
Select the beginning references and lengths for the module’s bit and word data. The
combined lengths of bit and word inputs (%I and %AI) must exactly match the amount
of data that will be sent by the device. The combined lengths of bit and word outputs
(%Q and %AQ) must exactly match the amount of data that will be sent by the Bus Controller to the device. If the device being configured is a Bus Controller, assign it INPUTS
ONLY.
You can also select the default state for the device’s input data, and enable or disable
CPU outputs to the device.
If Redundancy is set ot YES, the Bus Controller must also be configured for a form of
redundancy. The configuration software will automatically attempt to supply a correct
configuration when you set device Redundancy to YES, as explained on page 32.
38
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
Bus Controller Configuration Steps
The examples on the following pages show Logicmaster configuration steps for non–redundant and redundant Bus Controllers:
H
H
Example 1: A non–redundant Bus Controller.
H
Example 3: A Bus Controller that will use bus redundancy (dual bus), with the other
Bus Controller in the same PLC (not necessarily in the same rack, however).
H
Example 4: A Bus Controller that will use controller redundancy, with the other Bus
Controller in another PLC (typical application).
H
Example 5: A Bus Controller that will use controller redundancy, with the other Bus
Controller in the same PLC (not necessarily in the same rack).
H
Example 6: A Bus Controller that will use both dual bus and controller redundancy
(typical application).
Example 2: A Bus Controller that will use bus redundancy (dual bus), with the other
Bus Controller in another PLC (typical application).
Chapter 3 Configuration
39
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 1: No Redundancy
40
1.
Select the rack and slot location for
the Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press
Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side
of the screen.
6.
On the right side of the screen, leave
Redund mode set to NONE. The
entries below it cannot then be
edited.
7.
Press the ESC key to return to the
rack configuration screen.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
8.
The rack configuration screen now
includes the Bus Controller.
9.
Press F10 (zoom) to go to the bus
configuration screen.
10. On the bus configuration screen, the
Bus Controller appears at its configured Bus Address, 31 in this example.
11. From here, you can configure the devices on the bus.
end of Example 1
Chapter 3 Configuration
41
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 2:
Bus Redundancy Only,
Bus Controllers in Separate PLCs
42
1.
Select the rack and slot location for the
Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side
of the screen.
6.
On the right side of the screen,
change Redund Mode set to DUAL
BUS.
7.
Set Paired GBC to EXTERNAL.
8.
If the bus scan time will exceed
100mS, set Switch Time to 10S.
9.
When you are finished with the entries on this screen, press the ESC key
to return to the rack configuration
screen
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
10. The Bus Controller appears on the
rack configuration screen.
11. From this screen, you can zoom into
the bus configuration screen.
12. The Bus Controller appears at its configured Bus Address, 31 in this example.
13. To configure the bus, include all devices that are connected to the dual
bus (via bus switching devices), as well
as any devices that are connected only
to the portion of the bus controlled by
this Bus Controller.
Repeat these steps for the other Bus Controller when configuring its PLC.
end of Example 2
Chapter 3 Configuration
43
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 3:
Bus Redundancy Only,
Bus Controllers in the Same PLC
1.
Select the rack and slot location for the
Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side of
the screen.
6.
On the right side of the screen, change
Redund Mode set to DUAL BUS.
7.
Change the entry for Paired GBC to
INTERNAL. Press the Enter key.
8.
If the bus scan time will exceed 100mS,
set Switch Time to 10S.
9.
For Dual GBC Addr, enter the rack
and slot number of the other Bus Controller of the pair.
10. When you are finished with the entries
on this screen, press the ESC key to return to the rack configuration screen.
11. The rack configuration screen now
includes both of the Bus Controllers,
as illustrated at right (in this example, the other bus controller is in the
same rack, but that is not necessary).
12. Zoom into the bus configuration
screen for the first Bus Controller.
44
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
13. The Bus Controller appears at its configured Bus Address, 31 in this example.
14. Complete the Logicmaster configuration for the other Bus Addresses. Include all devices that are connected to
both busses of the pair via bus switching devices. Set their Redundancy to
YES. Also include any devices that are
directly connected just to the portion
of the bus that is controlled by this
Bus Controller. Set their Redundancy
to NO. In this example, there are two
discrete I/O blocks. The one at Bus
Address 30 is set for NO redundancy,
while the one at Bus Address 31 is set
for YES.
15. Press the ESC key to return to the rack
display.
16. Zoom into the bus configuration
screen for the second Bus Controller.
17. Notice that, by default, the second
Bus Controller has the same Bus Address as the first. This could be
changed on the second Bus Controller’s configuration screen. However,
it is usually preferable for the pair of
Bus Controllers to have the same Bus
Address.
18. Notice also that the block configured
for redundancy YES has automatically been added to the dual bus. The
block configured for redundancy NO
has not. Configure any non–redundant devices on this portion of the
bus.
19. Press the ESC key to return to the
rack display.
end of Example 3
Chapter 3 Configuration
45
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 4:
Controller Redundancy Only,
Bus Controllers in Two PLCs
1.
Select the rack and slot location for
the Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press
Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side
of the screen. The Bus Address (Bus
#1 Addr) of the Bus Controller must
be either 31 (as shown here) or 30.
6.
On the right side of the screen,
change Redund Mode set to RED
CTRL (redundant controllers).
7.
Set Paired GBC to EXTERNAL.
8.
When you are finished with the entries on this screen, press the ESC key
to return to the rack configuration
screen.
9.
The Bus Controller appears on the
rack configuration screen.
10. From this screen, you can zoom into
the bus configuration screen.
46
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
11. The Bus Controller appears at its configured Bus Address, 31 in this example. The other Bus Controller automatically appears next to it.
12. If the two Bus Controllers will exchange Global Data, select the other
Bus Controller and press F10 (zoom)
A configuration screen appears.
13. Enter the Global Data parameters.
14. Press ESC to return to the bus configuration screen.
Repeat these steps for the other Bus Controller, when configuring its PLC.
end of Example 4
Chapter 3 Configuration
47
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 5:
Controller Redundancy Only,
Bus Controllers in the Same PLC
1.
Select the rack and slot location for the
Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side
of the screen. The Bus Address of the
Bus Controller must be either 31 (as
shown here) or 30.
6.
On the right side of the screen,
change Redund mode set to RED
CTRL (redundant controllers).
7.
Set Paired GBC to INTERNAL.
8.
For Dual GBC Addr, enter the rack
and slot number of the other Bus Controller of the pair.
9.
When you are finished with the entries on this screen, press the ESC key
to return to the rack configuration
screen.
10. Both of the Bus Controllers now appear
on the rack configuration screen. In
this example, they are in the same
rack, as shown as right, but that is not
necessary. Each now appears as a configured device on the bus of the other
(BUS1 : 1).
11. Zoom into the bus configuration
screen for the first Bus Controller.
48
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
12. The bus configuration screen also includes both of the Bus Controllers, as
shown as right. From this screen, you
can configure the devices on the bus
for the Bus Controller located in rack
0, slot 2, which is at Bus Address 31.
13. If the two Bus Controllers will exchange Global Data, select the other
Bus Controller and press F10 (zoom)
A configuration screen appears. Enter the Global Data parameters on
the configuration screen. Press ESC
to return to this bus configuration
screen.
14. Configure the rest of the bus. In this
example, discrete blocks are placed
at Bus Addresses 29 and 28. They are
configured for redundancy YES.
15. Press ESC to return to the rack display. Notice that each device configured for the first Bus Controller was
copied to the bus of the second
(BUS1: 3).
end of Example 5
Chapter 3 Configuration
49
3
Bus Controller Configuration Example 6:
Bus AND Controller Redundancy,
Bus Controllers in Two PLCs
1.
Select the rack and slot location for the
Bus Controller.
2.
Press F2 (genius).
3.
From the Catalog # screen, press F1
(gbc).
4.
From the Description screen, press Enter.
5.
Complete the entries on the left side of
the screen. The Device Number (Bus
#1 Addr) of the Bus Controller must
be either 31 (as shown here) or 30.
6.
On the right side of the screen, change
Redund Mode to DB/RC (dual bus, redundant controllers).
7.
Set Paired GBC to INT/EXT (internal/
external).
8.
If the bus scan time will exceed 100mS,
set Switch Time to 10S.
9.
For Dual GBC Addr, enter the rack
and slot number of the other Bus Controller of the internal pair.
10. When you are finished with the entries
on the Bus Controller configuration
screen, press the ESC key to return to
the rack configuration screen, which
now includes both internal Bus Controllers. The two external Bus Controllers
are part of the second PLC’s configuration.
11. Zoom into the bus configuration
screen for the first Bus Controller.
50
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
3
12. The bus configuration screen, as shown as
right, includes two Bus Controllers. One, in
this example the one at Bus Address 31, is
the internal Bus Controller that was just
configured. The second, here the one at
Bus Address 30, is the Bus Controller in the
other PLC.
13. If the two Bus Controllers will exchange
Global Data, select the other Bus Controller
and press F10 (zoom) A configuration
screen appears. Enter the Global Data parameters on the configuration screen.
Press ESC to return to this bus configuration screen.
14. Configure the other Bus Addresses. Here,
discrete blocks have been located at Bus
Addresses 28 and 29.
15. Press ESC again to return to the rack display.
16. From the rack configuration screen, select
the other Bus Controller. Press F10 (zoom)
to display its bus configuration screen.
17. Notice that this Bus Controller has the
same Bus Address (31 in this example) as
the other internal Bus Controller. The second Bus Controller shown here is the external Bus Controller.
18. Notice also that the redundant devices
have been copied to this bus. If the Bus
Controllers will exchange Global Data,
zoom into the Bus Address of the external
Bus Controller and enter its parameters.
end of Example 6
Chapter 3 Configuration
51
Chapter
4 Diagnostics
4
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the following diagnostics capabilities of interest in Series 90–70
PLC systems that use Genius I/O and communications:
H
H
Relevant system status references.
H
High Alarm and Low Alarm Contacts, which will indicate when an analog reference
has reached one of its alarm limits.
H
Display and clearing of Genius faults from the programmer I/O Fault Table. I/O Table
faults related to the Bus Controller and Genius devices are listed at the end of the
chapter.
Fault and No Fault Contacts, which can be used with program references or with the
built–in fault–locating references.
For Additional Information, Also See:
Chapter 1 for an overview of Genius fault reporting.
Chapter 5, which describes the use of Read Diagnostics, Clear Circuit Faults, and Clear
All Circuit Faults COMREQs (Communication Requests).
Chapter 6 to learn how the Bus Controller’s redundancy capabilities can optionally be
utilized to check its I/O and diagnostics data memory when it is not used with a dual bus
or as a dual controller.
53
4
System Status References
System status references are pre–defined locations and nicknames. They can be included in an application program to check for fault–related conditions. The following
system status references are of special interest for a system with a Bus Controller:
Reference
%SA0009
%SA0012
%SA0013
%SA0014
%SA0017
%SA0018
%SA0019
%SA0022
%SA0023
%SA0029
%SB0016
%SC0011
%SC0013
%S00010
Nickname
CFG_MM
LOS_RCK
LOS_IOC
LOS_IOM
ADD_RCK
ADD_IOC
ADD_IOM
IOC_FLT
IOM_FLT
SFT_IOC
MAX_IOC
IO_FLT
IO_PRES
IO_FULL
Conditions Indicated When Set
SystemConfiguration Mismatch
Loss of Rack
Loss of Bus Controller
Loss of I/O module
Addition of Rack
Addition of Bus Controller
Addition of I/O module
Bus fault or Bus Controller fault
I/Omodulefault
Bus Controller software failure
Too many Bus Controllers (maximum is 31)
I/Ofaultoccurred
Fault logged into I/O Fault Table
I/OFault Table is full
These references and their Nicknames can be used like any other type of reference. For
more information, see the Logicmaster 90 Software Reference Manual.
Example:
A PLC system includes one Bus Controller. During CPU configuration, the system status
fault LOS_IOC has been designated a diagnostic (rather than fatal) fault. LOS_IOC represents loss of the Bus Controller; if this occurs, the Loss of IOC fault will be placed in the
I/OFault Table. In this example, the application program also monitors the LOS_IOC
reference. If this reference is set, the contact passes power flow to an output coil, which
energizes a warning light on an operator panel.
|
LOS_IOC
%Q00023
|–––––||––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––()–
|
54
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
4
Fault and No Fault Contacts
Fault and No Fault contacts can be used to detect fault or lack of fault conditions on a
discrete (%I or %Q) or analog (%AI or %AQ) reference, or they can be programmed with
the Series 90-70’s built-in fault-locating references (see below). Unless they are used
ONLY with fault-locating references, fault memory for their use must be set up using
the CPU Configuration functions of the Logicmaster 90-70 software.
A Fault contact will detect a fault in a discrete or analog input or output, or a hardware
component of the system. The contact passes power flow if the reference has a fault.
Example:
|
%AI0034
%M00053
|–––[FAULT]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––( )–
|
When used with a %I, %Q, %AI, or %AQ reference, a fault associated with the
–[F AULT]– contact must be cleared to remove it from the fault table and stop the contact passing power flow. Clearing such a fault with a Hand–held Monitor does not remove it
from the fault table or stop the contact passing power flow.
No Fault Contacts will also detect faults in discrete or analog inputs and outputs. A No
Fault Contact passes power flow if its associated reference does not have a circuit fault.
Example:
|
%I00167
%Q00168
|–––[NOFLT]––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––()–
|
Fault Locating References
Both Fault and No Fault contacts can be programmed with fault–locating references to
identify faults associated with system hardware. These fault references are for informational purposes only. The PLC does not halt execution if one of these reference faults
occurs. For a Genius device, the format of the fault–locating reference is M_rsbmm,
where r is the rack number 0 to 7, and s is the slot number of the Bus Controller; b is the
bus number, and mm is the Device Number (serial bus address) of the affected Genius
device (00 to 31). For example, M_46128 represents rack 4, slot 6, bus 1, module 28. For
more information about fault–locating references, please refer to the Logicmaster 90–70
Software User’s Manual.
Chapter 4 Diagnostics
55
4
High Alarm and Low Alarm Contacts
High Alarm and Low Alarm Contacts will indicate that an analog reference has reached
one of its alarm limits. These alarm limits are established when a device is configured. If
an alarm limit is reached, a block or Remote I/O Scanner sends the high alarm or low
alarm message to the Bus Controller. Analog alarms are not considered fault conditions.
This information is ignored by the Fault and No Fault contacts, as explained on the previous page.
Example
The analog input assigned to reference %AI00015 has been configured to have the following Alarm Limits:
150ft/sec
25 ft/sec
High Alarm
Low Alarm
If the input exceeds a rate of 150 feet per second, a High Alarm contact energizes internal coil %M00002.
|
%AI0015
%M00002
|–––[HIALR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––()–
|
Example
If the same analog input slows to a rate of 22 feet per second, its Low Alarm contact energizes internal coil %M00003.
|
%AI0015
%M00003
|–––[LOALR]–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––()–
|
56
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
4
Fault Table
Faults and alarms from I/O devices, Bus Controller faults, and bus faults are automatically logged into the Series 90–70 PLC’s I/O Fault Table. Faults can be displayed with the
programmer in either On–Line or Monitor mode. The programmer must be in On–
Line mode to clear faults (this feature may be password protected).
|PROGRM |TABLES |STATUS |
|
|LIB
|SETUP |FOLDER |UTILTY |PRINT
1plcrun 2passwd 3plcflt 4io flt 5plcmem 6blkmem 7refsiz 8sweep 9clear 10zoom
>
I / O
F A U L T
TOP FAULT DISPLAYED: 0001
TOTAL FAULTS: 0007
FAULT DESCRIPTION: OPEN WIRE
Remote Drop Fault
Drop ID#, rack, slot
T A B L E
TABLE LAST CLEARED: 09–21 08:00:00
ENTRIES OVERFLOWED: 0000
PLC DATE/TIME: 10–14 10:05:13
FAULT
CIRC REFERENCE
FAULT
FAULT
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
NO.
ADDR.
CATEGORY
TYPE
M–D H: M: S
___________ _____ _________ ___________________ ________________ _____ ________
33#0.4
6
%AI010124 CIRCUIT FAULT
ANALOG FAULT
10–12 08:12:20
0.3.1.5
%Q01009
ADD’N OF DEVICE
10–12 08:12:22
Genius Bus Fault
rack, slot, bus,
bus address
MAINPLC
RUN/ENABLE
PLC C: LESSON
REPLACE
7MS SCAN ONLINE
PRG: LESSON
L4 ACC: WRITE CONFIG CONFIG EQUAL
For a Genius bus fault, the display shows the date and time the fault occurred, and the
following information:
Fault
Location:
For a Genius bus fault, the formatis:rack/slot/bus/busaddress.
For a Remote Drop fault, the format is: Drop ID#/rack/slot. See above.
Circ No:
The relative position of a point within its module.
Reference
Addr:
The I/O reference address where the fault was detected. It consists of
the memory type (%I, %Q, %IQ, %AI, %AQ) and a five–digit offset.
Fault
Category:
The general type of fault that has occurred. For diagnostic faults, the
CPU sets fault references. For fatal faults, the CPU sets fault references
and places itself in STOP mode.
Fault Type:
Further explains fault categories: Circuit Fault, Module Fault, I/O Bus
Fault, Loss of Block, and GBC Software Exception. See the table on
pages 58–61.
Fault
Description:
Provides additional information if the highlighted fault is one of the
Circuit Faults or a Module Fault. See the table on pages 58–61.
Chapter 4 Diagnostics
57
4
Number of Faults in the I/O Fault Table
The I/O Fault Table can contain up to 32 faults. Additional faults cause the table to overflow, and faults are lost. The system reference IO_FULL (%S00010) is set to indicate that
the fault table is full.
As faults occur, the first 16 are logged into the table and remain there until the table is
cleared again; none of these 16 faults will be dropped if the table overflows. For faults 17
through 32, the Fault Table operates as a First–In–F irst–Out stack. When fault 33 occurs, fault 17 is dropped from the table. Clearing the Fault Table removes all the fault
listings.
Fault 1
.
.
Fault 16
Fault 17
'
Faults overflow here
Fault 33
a
New faults are added here
y
y
Clearing Faults
You must clear the I/O Fault Table from Logicmaster 90 for the fault to be cleared in the
PLC CPU and for the associated fault contact to be cleared. Clearing faults with a Hand–
held Monitor alone does not remove them from the Fault Table, or cause any associated
–[F AULT]– contacts to stop passing power flow.
Clearing the Fault Table causes the Bus Controller to send a Clear All Circuit Faults background message to all blocks on the bus. Faults can be cleared from the Fault Table either from the programmer screen or by the application program.
Clearing the fault table removes the faults it contains; it does not clear fault conditions in
the system. If the condition that caused a fault still exists and is detected, the fault will
be reported again.
Removing I/O Force Messages from the I/O Fault Table
When a point is forced on a Genius block with a Hand–held Monitor, a fault is registered in the Series 90 I/O Fault Table. Subsequent forces on the same block do not generate additional messages. Only when all forces are removed from the block does the
Bus Controller log an Unforce message in the I/O Fault Table.
Loss of Device Faults Caused by High Bus Error Rate
If the bus is experiencing a high error rate (possibly due to electrical interference or
damaged cable), Loss of Device faults may be logged into the Fault Table. Loss of Device
faults that are logged in conjunction with I/O Bus Faults can be usually be attributed to
the poor quality of the bus installation. The condition causing the bus errors should be
corrected as soon as possible.
58
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
4
Fault Table Definitions
Fault
Category
CIRCUIT
FAULT
Diag.
or
Fatal
D
Indicates
Fault
Type
Indicates
Short circuit, open
wire, etc.
DISCRETE
Circuit fault
on discrete
I/Opoint
FAULT
ANALOG
FAULT
Fault on analog I/O channel
Fault
Description
LOSS POWER
Indicates
Loss of user side power
SHORT CIRCUIT
Short in user wiring
OVERLOAD
Sustainedovercurrent
NO LOAD
Very low or no current flow
OVER TEMP
Switch temperature too high
SWITCH FAIL
Genius “smart switch” failure
POINT FAULT
Integral individual point fault
FUSE BLOWN
Integral output fuse blown.
AI LOW ALARM
Input channel low alarm
AI HI ALARM
Input channel high alarm
AI UNDER RANGE
Input channel under range
AI OVERRANGE
Input channel over range
OPEN WIRE
Open wire detected on input
channel
AQ UNDER
RANGE
Output channel under range
AQ OVERRANGE
Output channel over range
CS FEEDBACK ERR
Feedback error from Current–
source Analog block
GENA
FAULT
Fault on a
GENA
GENA CKT FLT
Fault on a GENA analog or
discrete point
LL
ANALOG
FAULT
Fault on a
low–level
analog channel
AI LOW ALARM
Input channel low alarm
AI HI ALARM
Input channel high alarm
AI UNDER RANGE
Input channel under range
AI OVERRANGE
Input channel over range
OPEN WIRE
Open wire detected on input
channel
WIRING ERROR
improper RTD connection or
thermocouple reverse junction
fault
INTERNALFAULT
Cold junction sensor fault on
thermocouple block, or internal error in RTD block.
INPUT SHORT
Input channel shorted
REMOTE
FAULT
Chapter 4 Diagnostics
Fault on a
Remote I/O
Scanner
n/a
Any fault detected by a Remote
I/O Scanner and sent to the
PLC.
59
4
Fault Table Definitions (continued)
Fault
Category
LOSS OF
DEVICE
D
Indicates
Fault
Type
Block no longer
responding.
See page 58.
NOT SPEC
FAULT
No reason specified
AD
COMM
FAULT
LossofA/Dcommunications.
BUS
FAULT
Genius bus fault
ADDITION
OF DEVICE
D
New block appeared
GENIUS
BUS
SWITCH
D
Redundant
bus switched
I/OBUS
FAULT
D
Genius bus
fault
I/O
MODULE
FAULT
60
Diag
or
Fatal
D
EEPROM fault,
watch
dog timeout
Indicates
BUS OUT
DISABLE
Bus Controller disabled
all outputs on the bus
becausecommunications
timed out between the
PLC CPU and the Bus
Controller.
SBA CONFLICT
Bus Controller ’s Device
Number duplicated elsewhere on bus.
HEADEND
FAULT
Block Fault (EEPROM,
Watchdog, etc..)
A TO D
COMM
FAULT
Analog to digital communications fault or calibration error
USER
SCALING
ERROR
Scaling error cause out
of range values
Fault
Description
Indicates
CONFIG MEM
FAIL
Genius EEPROM or
NVRAMfailure
CAL MEM
FAIL
Geniuscalibration
memory failure
SHARERAM
FAIL
Genius Shared RAM
fault
INTRNAL
CKT FLT
Genius internal circuit
fault
WD TIMEOUT
Watchdog Timeout (discrete I/O modules only)
POINT FAULT
Point fault (also indicated for CIRCUIT
FAULT category)
FUSE BLOWN
Integral output fuse
blown (also indicated for
CIRCUIT FAULT category)
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
4
Fault Table Definitions (continued)
Diag.
or
Fatal
Indicates
ADDITION
OF IOC
D
Addition of Bus Controller
LOSS OF IOC
F*
Loss of or missing Bus
Controller
BUS CONTROLLER SOFTWARE
FAULT
F*
Bus Controller software
fault
FORCED
CIRCUIT
D
Genius I/O point forced
(eg: from Hand–held
Monitor)
UNFORCED
CIRCUIT
D
Last forced circuit released
(eg: from Hand–held
Monitor)
EXTRA DEVICE
D
Found extra device on
Genius bus
EXCESSIVE
FAULTS
D
Bus Controller has
stopped reporting faults
because too many have occurred
GBC
SOFTWARE
EXCEPTION
D
Bus Controller software
exception
Fault
Category
*
Fault
Type
Indicates
HIGH ERROR
RATE
Bus Controller has
dropped off the bus for at
least 1.5 seconds.
DG QUEUE
FULL
Incoming datagram queue
is full
RW QUEUE
FULL
The queue for Read/Write
requests in the Bus Controller is full. The requests
may be from the Genius
bus or from COMREQs.
LP MAIL
REJECTED
The low–priority mail
queue from the Bus Controller to the PLC is full.
The response to the PLC
was lost.
Fault
Description
May be configured as (D)iagnostic, particularly in a redundantsystem.
Additional Fault Information
If you need more information about a listing in the Fault Table, move the cursor to that
fault and press the CTRL and F keys. A number string will appear above the command
line. The Series 90–70 PLC Installation and Operation Manual (GFK–0262, version C or
later) explains how to interpret this additional fault information.
Chapter 4 Diagnostics
61
Chapter
5 Communication Requests
5
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how to use Communication Requests to:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
Pulse Test outputs on Genius blocks
Read the configuration of a device on the bus, or the Bus Controller
Write configuration data to a device on the bus or a Bus Controller
Assign a device on the bus to monitor fault reports from Genius blocks
Clear a circuit fault on the bus
Clear all faults on the bus
Switch a Bus Switching Module
Read diagnostics (faults) from a device on the bus or the Bus Controller
Read up to 64 words of data from a device on the bus
Write up to 64 words of data from the CPU to a device on the bus
Enable/disable all outputs from the Bus Controller to devices on the bus
Enable/disable the Bus Controller’s ability to receive or transmit Global Data
Enable/disableI/Ofaultcategories
Send a datagram to a device on the bus.
Send a datagram to a device which then sends a reply datagram.
Transfer an unsolicited incoming datagram from the Bus Controller to the CPU.
For Additional Information, Also See:
The Genius I/O System and Communications Manual (GEK–90486–1), which describes Genius Datagrams in detail.
COMREQs and Passwords
Level 1 and 2 Logicmaster passwords, which prevent write access, cannot be used in applications that include COMREQs. COMREQs require write access to return their
completion status.
63
5
Programming for a Communication Request
In order to communicate with an intelligent module (such as a Bus Controller), the application program should perform the following three actions.
First, the program must supply the content of the communication. Block Moves or similar program instructions can be used to place the information into CPU memory. This
content is called the Command Block.
Application
Program
CPU Memory
Command Block
a
Edit content of
communication
Second, the program must use a COMREQ instruction to perform the intended function.
Application
Program
Sends COMREQ
to Device
'
Bus Controller
Third, the program should check the status of the requested task by looking at an area
of CPU memory that is referred to as the Status Block.
Application
Program
CPU Memory
Status Block
a'
Check completion
of communication
COMREQs should be executed sequentially. The application program should check the
status of the previous COMREQ to a Bus Controller before sending it another one. Failure to do this may result in improper operation of the Bus Controller.
64
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ Command Block Format
The first step in programming communications requests is to set up the contents of the
communication. This can be done using Block Moves or similar program instructions, as
shown later in this chapter.
CPU Memory
Command Block
Application
Program
a
Edit content of
communication
Data is placed together in adjacent locations in CPU memory to form a Command Block.
Data
Location
address
“Data Block” Length
address + 1
Wait/NoWait Flag
address + 2
Status Pointer Memory Type
address + 3
Status Pointer Offset
address + 4
Idle Timeout Value
address + 5
Max. Communication Time
address + 6 to
address + 70
Data Block
The length of the Command Block depends on the type of COMREQ being sent. 70
words is the maximum, for a COMREQ that transfers a 128–byte datagram; most Command Blocks are much shorter. A table on page 67 gives an overview of the contents of
each type of COMREQ that may be sent to a Series 90–70 Bus Controller.
Command Block Contents
Command Block contents are described below:
Length:
The first word of the Command Block indicates the “data block” length.
This is the amount of data from [address + 6] to the end of the Command Block Each type of COMREQ command has a unique Data Block,
as shown in this chapter.
Wait/No Wait
Flag:
This must be set to 0 for No Wait.
Status Pointer Memory
Type:
The Status Pointer Memory Type and Offset (see below) identify the
location of the function’s associated Status Block. The Status Block is
where the COMREQ will return its status. If one of the bit–oriented
memories (%I or %Q) is used as the status location, its bits can be monitored (see page 71).
Location
Data
address + 1
Status Pointer Memory
address + 2
Status Pointer offset
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
65
5
The high byte of address + 2 of the pointer is not used; it must be
zero.The low byte of address + 2 specifies the type of memory where
the Status Pointer will be located.
For This Memory Type:
Enter This Number:
%I
discrete input table
70
%Q
discrete output table
72
%R
register memory
8
%AI
analog input table
10
%AQ
analog output table
12
Status Pointer Offset:
Address + 3 of the Command Block contains the address within the
memory type selected. The offset of the status location is 0–based. For
example, if the Status Block were located at %R099, memory type would
be specified as 08 (for %R memory) and the offset would be 98.
Idle Timeout
Value:
This field is not used for the No Wait mode of communication.
Maximum
Communication Time:
This field is not used for the No Wait mode of communication.
Data Block:
The Data Block contains the parameters of the command. Complete
descriptions of all commands appear later in this chapter. The Data
Block begins with a Command Number in Address +6. The Command
Number identifies the type of communications function to be performed. The following Command Numbers are used for the Genius Bus
Controller:
Command
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Function
Pulse Test Outputs
Read Configuration
Write Configuration
Read Diagnostics
Clear Circuit Fault
Clear All Circuit Faults
Assign Monitor
Outputsenable/disable
Global Data enable/disable
Switch BSM
Read Device
Write Device
Dequeue Datagram
Send Datagram
Request Datagram Reply
I/OFault Categoryenable/disable
Commands 14 and 15 are used to send Datagrams. Most of the other
commands listed above can also be sent as datagrams. For more information, see page 74.
66
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Command Block Quick Reference
This table summarizes the content of the COMREQ commands for a Bus Controller.
Command Block Content
Add.
Add.
+1
Add.+
2
Add.+
4
Add.+
5
Length
Wait/
No Wait
Status
Pointer
Memory
Type
Status
Pointer
Offset
Idle
Timeout
Value
Max.
Comms.
Time
COMREQ #
Pulse Test
2
0
”
”
0
0
1
Read Configuration
5
”
”
”
”
”
2
Add.+7 to Add.+10: see page 76
Write Configuration
data
length
+3
”
”
”
”
”
3
Add.+7 to Add.+n: see page 77
Read Diagnostics
5
”
”
”
”
”
4
Add.+7 to Add.+n: see page 78
Clear Circuit Fault
3
”
”
”
”
”
5
Device
SBA*
Clear All Circuit
Faults
2
”
”
”
”
”
6
”
Assign Monitor
3
”
”
”
”
”
7
”
Monitor
SBA*
(0–13)
Outputs Enable,
Disable
0
”
”
”
”
”
8
”
1 (enable) or
0 (disable)
Global Data Enable,
Disable
3
”
”
”
”
”
9
”
”
Switch BSM
3
”
”
”
”
”
10
”
0 (bus A)
or 1 (bus
B)
Read Device
16
”
”
”
”
”
11
Add.+7 to Add.+21: see page 85
Write Device
13 to 77
words
”
”
”
”
”
12
Add.+7 to Add.+n: see page 90
7
”
”
”
”
”
13
Add.+7 to Add.+12: see page 91
Send Datagram
6 to 70
words
”
”
”
”
”
14
Add.+7 to Add.+n: see page 94
Request Datagram
Reply
10 to 78
words
”
”
”
”
”
15
Add.+7 to Add.+n: see page 97
I/OFaults Enable,
Disable
3
”
”
”
”
”
16
Device
SBA*
COMREQ
Description
Dequeue Datagram
*
Add.+
3
Add.+
6
Add.+
7
Add.+
8
to
Add.+
n
Additional Content
Device
SBA*
circuit
number
Serial Bus Address (Device Number)
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
67
5
The COMREQ Instruction
After supplying the content of the communication in the Command Block, the application program uses a COMREQ instruction to request communications with the Bus Controller.
Application
Program
Sends COMREQ
to Device
'
Bus Controller
COMREQ Inputs and Outputs
The COMREQ instruction has four inputs and two outputs:
(enable) – COMM
REQ
– function OK (logic)
Pointer to the Command Block – IN FT – function faulted (logic)
Location of the Bus Controller – SYSID
Must be 1 for the Bus Controller – TASK
68
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ Inputs
(enable)
Permissive logic that controls power flow to the COMREQ function
block.
IN:
The memory location of the Command Block, which contains the specific command information. The Command Block may be located in any
word–oriented area of memory (%P, %L, %R, %AI, or %AQ).
SYSID:
A hex value that gives the rack and slot location of the Bus Controller.
Use this format:
R S
1 2
rack
slot
rack 1
slot 2
Examples
TASK:
Rack
Slot
Hex word value
0
7
4
2
0004h
0702h
For Bus Controller version IC697BEM731, the task is always “1”.
COMREQOutputs
The function’s OK and FT outputs can provide power flow to optional logic which can
verify successful completion of the COMREQ. The OK and FT outputs may have these
states:
ENable
Error?
OK output
FT output
active
active
not active
no
yes
no execution
true
false
false
false
true
false
The OK and FT outputs are never both true at the same time; OK indicates correct
execution while FT indicates a fault condition. The COMREQ passes power flow to OK
unless:
H
H
The specified Device Number (serial bus address) is not present.
H
The data length is zero.
The specified task is not valid for the device. This is not checked if the specified device is a Genius Bus Controller.
If any fault above occurs, the function passes power flow to FT instead.
If there are errors in the portion of the Command Block used specifically by the Bus Controller (for example, the Device Number entered is incorrect), these errors are reflected
in the value returned in the status location, not in the FT output.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
69
5
COMREQ Status Block
When the Bus Controller receives the communication from the CPU, it returns its current status to the CPU, at the memory location reserved for that purpose. This memory
location is referred to as the “Status Block”. Possible status values that may be returned
are listed on the next page.
When a command is complete, the Bus Controller writes any resulting data into the area
designated in the command, and sets the status to Complete (4).
Note
Because COMREQs require write access to return their status, level 1 and
2 Logicmaster software passwords, which prevent write access, cannot be
used with COMREQs.
If one of the bit–oriented memories (%I or %Q) is used as the status location, its bits can
be monitored. These bits correspond to the binary values listed below. For example, if
%I048 were selected as the beginning location, reference %I050 would be set to 1 each
time the COMREQ completed successfully.
Clearing the Status Block
COMREQs to the Bus Controller should be executed sequentially. Before sending a
COMREQ to the Bus Controller, the application program should check the status of any
previous COMREQ to that Bus Controller.
CPU Memory
Status Block
Application
Program
a'
Check completion
of communication
When the previous COMREQ has completed, the program should set the Status Block to
a value not in the list on the next page. Establishing this initial condition allows the program to differentiate between the result of an earlier command and the currently–
executing command.
70
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Contents of the Status Block
The Status Block is two words of memory to which the Bus Controller returns the status
of the COMREQ.
The lower word is used for general information about the execution of the COMREQ:
VALUE
decimal
(word)
0
1
4
8
16
32
64
128
256
512
1024
2048
binary (bit)
DESCRIPTION
MSB
000000000000 Bus Controller busy
000000000001 Command not accepted, Bus Controller busy with previous request
000000000010 Commandcompletedsuccessfully
000000001000 Command terminated due to syntax error
000000010000 Command terminated due to data error
000000100000 Command terminated due to suspended activity on bus
000001000000 No data to transfer
000010000000 Command not supported by target device
000100000000 Only No Wait commands may be sent to the target device
001000000000 Maximum Comms. Time must be greater than or equal to 5mS
010000000000 Text buffer invalid in wait mode
100000000000 Device did not accept the message, or timed out.
The upper word of the status location provides additional status information.
VALUE
decimal
(word)
11
21
51
71
101
102
121
141
142
143
144
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
DESCRIPTION
Non–discrete block specified for Pulse Test
Non–I/O device specified for Read Configuration
Invalid circuit number
Non–controller device specified for Assign Monitor
Switch BSM – device not BSM
Switch BSM – bus position greater than 1
P and L access not available
Function code greater than 111
Sub function code greater than 255
Priority greater than 1
Datagram length greater than 134
Invalid Device Number (greater than 31, but not 255)
Incorrect length for the command type
Device Number not configured or not active
Previous No Wait command in progress; current No Wait command not accepted
Invalid status pointer location specified
Command number is out of range
Subcommand code is out of range
Only partial data transferred
Device Number 255 not allowed for this command
Command specified is not valid for Genius Bus Controller
Command specified is only valid for controller devices
Command specified is not supported by the device to which it was sent
InvalidAlarmEnable/Disablemask
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
71
5
Programming Examples
The following example shows how a Communication Request can be used to clear a
circuit fault on point 4 of a Genius I/O block whose Device Number is 20.
|
_____
_____
_____
| FST_SCN
|
|
|
|
|
|
|–––| |–––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |
|
| UINT|
| UINT|
|UINT |
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00100
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00101
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00102
|
00003 |
|
00000 |
|
00008 |
|
|
| LEN |
| LEN |
| LEN |
|
| 001 |
| 001 |
| 001 |
|
|_____|
|_____|
|_____|
|
_____
_____
_____
| FST_SCN
|
|
|
|
|
|
|–––| |–––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |
|
| UINT|
| UINT|
| UINT|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00103
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00104
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00105
|
00098 |
|
00000 |
|
00000 |
|
|
| LEN |
| LEN |
| LEN |
|
| 001 |
| 001 |
| 001 |
|
|_____|
|_____|
|_____|
|
_____
_____
_____
| FST_SCN
|
|
|
|
|
|
|–––| |–––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |–––––––––––––––––|MOVE |
|
| UINT|
| UINT|
| UINT|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00106
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00107
CONST–|IN Q|–%R00108
|
00005 |
|
00020 |
|
00004 |
|
|
| LEN |
| LEN |
| LEN |
|
| 001 |
| 001 |
| 001 |
|
|_____|
|_____|
|_____|
|
|
_____
| %Q00128 |
|
%Q00129
|–––| |–––|COMM |–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(S)–
|
| REQ |
|
|
|
%Q00130
| %R00100–|IN FT|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(S)–
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST –|SYSID|
| 00002 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST |TASK |
| 00001 |
|
|
|_____|
This example logic uses a series of Move instructions to assemble the data that will be
used as inputs for the Communication Request instruction, and for its associated Command Block.
Address
%R100
%R101
%R102
%R103
%R104
%R105
%R106
%R107
%R108
72
Contents
Command length
Wait/NoWait Flag
Status Pointer Memory
Status Pointer Offset
Idle Timeout Value
Max.Communication Time
Command Number
Device Number
Point to be cleared
Value
3
0
08
98
0
0
5
20
4
Description
No wait
Selects %R memory type
Address in %R memory (%R099)
Unused (No Wait selected)
Unused (No Wait selected)
Clear Circuit Fault
Device Number of the block
Clear 4th point on block (For a COMREQ, points
are numbered starting at 1 (not 0). If this were a
datagram message instead of a COMREQ
command, points would begin at 0).
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
The Move instructions are executed during the first CPU sweep, when the special reference FST_SCN is true. This assures that the Communication Request will never be
executed with incomplete or incorrect parameters.
The example uses the reference %Q128 as a permissive to the Communication Request.
Output %Q129 is set if the Communication Request executes successfully. If it does not,
output %Q130 is set instead. For the Communication Request, failure might occur if the
Communication Request has been set up incorrectly, or for any of the other errors specified in the beginning of this chapter. A fault output is NOT caused by failure to receive a
reply. This must be detected from the contents of the status location.
|
_____
| %Q00128 |
|
%Q00129
|–––| |–––|COMM |–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(S)–
|
| REQ |
|
|
|
%Q00130
| %R00100–|IN FT|–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––(S)–
|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST –|SYSID|
| 00002 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST –|TASK |
| 00001 |
|
|
|_____|
|
Another way to assemble the data for the example Command Block would be to use a
Block Move instruction:
|
_____
_____
| FST_SCN |
|
|
|
|–––| |–––|BLKMV|––––––––––––––––|BLKMV|–
|
| INT|
| INT|
|
|
|
|
|
| CONST –|IN1 Q|–%R0100 CONST –|IN1 Q|–%R0107
| +00002 |
|
+0020 |
|
| CONST –|IN2 |
CONST –|IN2 |
| +00000 |
|
+0004 |
|
| CONST –|IN3 |
CONST –|IN3 |
| +00008 |
|
+0000 |
|
| CONST –|IN4 |
CONST –|IN4 |
| +00098 |
|
+0000 |
|
| CONST –|IN5 |
CONST –|IN5 |
| +00000 |
|
+0000 |
|
| CONST –|IN6 |
CONST –|IN6 |
| +00000 |
|
+0000 |
|
| CONST –|IN7 |
CONST –|IN7 |
| +00005 |
|
+0000 |
|
|
|_____|
|_____|
|
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
73
5
COMREQs and Datagrams
The table below lists datagrams with their Subfunction Codes, shows the best ways to
send datagrams, and explains what happens to datagrams received from other devices.
Datagram (hex code)
*
74
Ways to Send It
How Incoming Datagram is Handled
Read ID (00)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply) *
Bus Controller replies automatically to Read ID datagram
received from bus device.
Read ID Reply (01)
(Sent automatically)
Read Configuration (02)
COMREQ 2 (Read Configuration)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply) *
Bus Controller ignores it.
Read Configuration Reply
(03)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMREQ 2 or 15 was used to send
Read Configuration datagram. *
Write Configuration (04)
COMREQ 3 (Write Configuration)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Assign Monitor (05)
COMREQ 7 (Assign Monitor)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Begin Packet Sequence(06)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
End Packet Sequence (07)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Read Diagnostics (08)
COMREQ 4 (Read Diagnostics)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply) *
Bus Controller replies automatically.
Read Diagnostics Reply
(09)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMREQ 4 or 15 was used to send
Read Diagnostics datagram. *
Write Point (0B)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Read Block I/O (0C)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply) *
Bus Controller ignores it.
Read Block I/O Reply (0D)
(Sent automatically)
Report Fault (0F)
(Sent automatically)
Received from bus devices; Bus Controller automatically
places the fault in the Fault Table.
Pulse Test (10)
COMREQ 1 (Pulse Test) *
Bus Controller ignores it.
Pulse Test Complete (11)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMREQ 1 was used to send Pulse
Test datagram. *
Clear Circuit Faults (12)
COMREQ 5 (Clear Circuit Fault)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Clear All Circuit Faults
(13)
COMREQ 6 (Clear All Ckt Faults)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Switch BSM (1C)
COMREQ 10 (Switch BSM)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller ignores it.
Read Device (1E)
COMREQ 11 (Read Device)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
Bus Controller automatically sends reply.
Read Device Reply (1F)
(Sent automatically)
Handled automatically if COMREQ 11 or 15 was used to send
Read Device datagram. *
Write Device (20)
COMREQ 12 (Write Device)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Bus Controller processes automatically.
Read Data (27)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
Read Data Reply (28)
(Sent automatically)
Write Data (29)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Read Map (2A)
COMREQ 15 (Request Datagram Reply)
Read Map Reply (2B)
(Sent automatically)
Write Map (2C)
COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram)
Handled automatically if COMREQ 15 was used to send Read
ID datagram. *
Handled automatically if COMREQ 15 was used to send Read
Block I/O datagram. *
Bus Controller ignores it.
Handled automatically if COMREQ 15 was used to send Read
Data datagram. *
Bus Controller ignores it.
Bus Controller ignores it.
Handled automatically if COMREQ 15 was used to send Read
Map datagram.
Bus Controller ignores it.
All datagrams can be sent using COMREQ 14 (Send Datagram). If COMREQ 14 is used to send a datagram that has a reply, COMREQ
13 (Dequeue Datagram) must also be used, to obtain the reply from the Bus Controller’s queue of unsolicited incoming datagrams
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #1: Pulse Test Command
The Pulse Test command causes the Bus Controller to send a normal–priority Pulse Test
datagram.
Pulse testing is used to verify the operation of outputs on discrete Genius I/O blocks. It
checks whether the outputs will change state, and whether output circuits (wires, power
sources, loads) will start or stop current flow. Any circuit faults generated by pulse tests
are reported through the normal Report Fault message. Pulse testing is recommended
for blocks that seldom change state. It is typically done once per hour, or once per shift;
it should not be done more often than once per minute. Pulse testing provides assurance that when needed, an output will operate correctly. Blocks that control outputs
that change state frequently do not need to be pulse tested. Pulse testing does not provide enough energy to activate mechanical devices such as motor starters, relays, or solenoid valves, but may change the state of a very small load. If appropriate, blocks can be
configured (with the Hand–held Monitor or via a Write Configuration command) to
ignore a Pulse Test datagram. Pulse testing can also be done using a Hand–held Monitor.
Command Block Format for the Pulse Test Command
Address:
Command Length
2
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
1
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31. Or enter 255 to Pulse Test all discrete blocks.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
75
5
COMREQ #2: Read Configuration Command
The Read Configuration command is used to request configuration data from any block
on the bus. It causes the Bus Controller to send a normal–priority Read Configuration
datagram to the indicated block. After receiving the request, the block returns its configuration data to the Bus Controller in 16–byte increments. When the Bus Controller has
received all the configuration data, it transfers the data to the memory location specified
in the Command Block. Because configuration data consists of both bit–type and byte–
type portions, it is best to place it in word memory, then move the bit–oriented data to
bit memory (%M or %T is recommended). Contents of Read Configuration Reply messages for I/O blocks are shown in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Before a block can be sent this command, its Device Number (serial bus address) must be
set up using the Logicmaster 90 configuration software. In addition, the block must
have had its Device Number entered using a Hand–held Monitor.
Command Block for the Read Configuration Command
Address:
Command Length
5
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
2
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31.
Address +8:
Maximumdata
memory length.
May represent either
bits or words (depends on the
memory type selected below).
18 words (288 bits): any discrete block
13 words (208 bits): 16 Circuit AC Input block
42 words (672 bits): Analog blocks (4 inputs/2 outputs)
42 words (672 bits): RTD or Thermocoupleblocks
42 words (672 bits): 6–input Analog blocks
35 words (560 bits): High–speed Counter
13 words (208 bits): PowerTRAC Block
If the length of data returned by the device exceeds this
length, the Bus Controller writes as much data as possible to the PLC CPU and returns a data error to the
COMREQ status location.
If the same COMREQ will be used to read configuration
data from more than one type of block (for example, in a
subroutine), be sure to allow enough length to accommodate the largest amount of data that might be returned.
76
Address +9:
Memory type of the
location where the
Bus Controller will
place the data in the
CPU.
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ).
Address +10:
Memory offset
Starting address within this memory type.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #3: Write Configuration Command
The Write Configuration command is used to send configuration data from the CPU to a
block on the bus. (The Bus Controller cannot write configuration data to another bus
interface module or to a Hand–held Monitor). A Write Configuration command to the
Bus Controller itself would be rejected with status 128 (command not supported by target device).
Before a block can be sent this command, its Device Number (serial bus address) must be
set up using the Logicmaster 90 configuration software. In addition, the block must
have had its Device Number entered using a Hand–held Monitor.
The PLC sends the intended configuration data from CPU memory to the Bus Controller. The Bus Controller schedules background Write Configuration messages to the
block. Once message transmission begins, the Bus Controller sends the configuration
data to the block, up to 16 bytes per bus scan. The block does not use any of the new
configuration data until it all has been received. No new commands can be sent to the
block until the operation has been completed. When all the data has been sent, the Bus
Controller changes the status to 4 (Done).
The length of the data sent with this command must exactly match the length required
by the device. If the lengths are not equal the Bus Controller returns a Syntax Error to
the COMREQ status location.
Command Block for the Write Configuration Command
Address:
Command Length
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
3
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31. (SBA of the block to which configuration data
will be written).
Address +8:
Length of configuration
data in bytes.
Up to 248 bytes (128 words) of configuration data
may be written to a device. See “COMREQ #2: Read
Configuration” for data lengths.
Address +9 to
Address +n:
ConfigurationData
Configuration data formats are given in the Genius
I/O System User’s Manual.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
This number equals the amount of configuration data
to be sent, plus 3. For example, for an RTD block,
which has 42 words of configuration data, you would
enter 45 here. Configuration data formats for all Genius I/O blocks are shown in the Genius I/O System
User’s Manual.
77
5
COMREQ #4: Read Diagnostics Command
Use this command to request diagnostic information from a block or a bus interface
module. Diagnostics can be requested from any block, even those configured not to issue Report Fault messages. The diagnostic data returned by a block will indicate faults
that have occurred since powerup or since the last Clear Faults datagram. Current diagnostic state can be found by issuing a Clear Faults command to the circuit(s) or channel(s) to clear the fault history, then issuing a Read Diagnostics command.
This command causes the Bus Controller to send a Read Diagnostics datagram to the
specified device. When the device receives this datagram, it returns a Read Diagnostics
Reply datagram. I/O blocks return data in message segments of up to 16 bytes per bus
scan. The content of the Read Diagnostics Reply message depends on the device being
queried. The first word of the reply must contain the length of the data that follows.
Data is packed two bytes per word. Message formats are shown in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual. When all the data has been received, the Bus Controller transfers it to
the CPU and sets the COMREQ status to 4 (Done).
Command Block for the Read Diagnostics Command
Address:
Command Length
5
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
3
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31 (of the device whose diagnostics are to be read).
Address +8:
Maximumdata
memory length, in bits
or words (depends on
the memory type selected below).
This entry tells the CPU how much memory will be
needed to store the data returned by the block. The
number of bits or words needed depends on the number of circuits on the block, and the block type:
10 words (160 bits): Discrete I/O blocks, 8–ckt
18 words (288 bits): Discrete I/O blocks, 16–ckt
34 words (544 bits): Discrete I/O blocks, 32–ckt
8 words (128 bits): Analog, 4 input/2 output blocks
8 words (128 bits): RTD Input Blocks
8 words (128 bits): Thermocouple Input Blocks
6 words (96 bits): High–speed Counter
(For a PowerTRAC Block, status information is automatically provided as “input” data. See the PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual for more information.)
If the data returned by the designated device exceeds
this length, the Bus Controller will write as much as
possible to the PLC CPU and return a data error to the
COMREQ status location.
78
Address +9:
Memory type of the
location where the Bus
Controller will place
the data in the CPU.
Address +10:
Memory offset
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ). Since
diagnostic data is both bit–type and byte–type, use of
word memory is recommended. Bit–type data can
then be moved to a bit memory such as %T or %M.
Starting address within this memory type.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #5: Clear Circuit Faults Command
The Clear Circuit Faults command is used to clear any faults on a specified circuit of a
Genius I/O block. The Clear Circuit Fault command causes the Bus Controller to issue a
normal–priority Clear Circuit Fault datagram.
Command Block for Clear Circuit Faults
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
5
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31 (.of the Genius block on which the circuit to be
cleared is located).
Address +8:
CircuitNumber
This is the relative number of the circuit, not its reference number. The first circuit on the block is considered to be number 1. For example, to clear faults on
circuit 5, you would enter 5 here. For a 4 Input/2 Output analog block, circuit numbers 1 to 4 are for inputs,
5 and 6 are for outputs.
COMREQ #6: Clear All Circuit Faults Command
The Clear All Circuit Faults command is used to clear all faults on a Genius I/O block. It
causes the Bus Controller to issue a normal–priority Clear All Circuit Faults datagram.
Command Block for Clear All Circuit Faults
Address:
Command Length
2
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
6
Address +7:
Device Number
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
0 – 31 (of the Genius block on which the circuit to be
cleared is located). To send this datagram to all blocks
on the bus, enter the number 255.
79
5
COMREQ #7: Assign Monitor Command
An Assigned Monitor is an additional bus interface module (usually in another CPU) that
monitors Genius I/O devices on the bus. Remote I/O Scanners and I/O blocks broadcast
their inputs to all devices on the bus. Therefore, any interface module on the bus will
receive all inputs sent by the blocks. However, blocks direct fault reports and configuration change messages only to the bus interface module that sends them outputs. Blocks
configured for CPU Redundancy will automatically transmit two copies of any fault report or configuration change message, directing them to Device Numbers 30 and 31.
The Assign Monitor command can be used to have Genius I/O devices send extra fault
report and configuration change messages to a monitoring bus interface module. Blocks
would send two copies of each fault report or configuration message in a non–redundant system. Blocks in a redundant system would send three (two to the redundant bus
interface modules, and the third to the Assigned Monitor).
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
CONTROLLER
MONITOR
PLC
PLC
COMPUTER
BUS
CONTROLLER
PCIM
a42480
I/O BLOCKS
Multiple CPUs might be used to monitor different blocks on the same bus. However,
only one device can be assigned to monitor any given block.
When the Series 90–70 Bus Controller receives the Assign Monitor COMREQ command
from the CPU, it issues a normal–priority Assign Monitor Datagram to one block or to
all blocks on the bus. If sent to bus interface modules, it has no effect.
80
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Command Block for the Assign Monitor Command
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
7
Address +7:
Device Number of the
block(s) that should
send extra fault reports
0 – 31
Address +8:
Device Number of the
bus interface module
that will RECEIVE the
extra fault reports.
0 – 31 to send this command to one block. To send
this command to ALL blocks, enter the number 255. If
only some blocks should report to the faults to the
assigned monitor (for example, to minimize bus scan
time), program separate Assign Monitor commands to
each.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
81
5
COMREQ #8: Enable/Disable Outputs Command
The Enable/Disable Outputs command can be sent to the Bus Controller to disable sending outputs to any blocks whose outputs were enabled during I/O configuration with the Logicmaster 90 software. Outputs that were configured as disabled are NOT affected by this
COMREQ command. The effect of disabling outputs is the same as running the control
in Run/Disablemode.
Command Block for the Enable/Disable Outputs Command
82
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
8
Address +7:
Device Number
Enter 0–31 to enable or disable outputs to one block.
To enable or disable outputs to ALL devices on the
bus, enter the number 255.
Address +8:
Enable/Disablecommand
To disable outputs to the device(s) specified in address
+7, enter 0. To enable outputs, enter 1.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #9: Enable/Disable Global Data
If Global Data has been enabled using the Logicmaster 90 software, this COMREQ command can be used after powerup to disable or re–enable the sending of Global Data
from the Bus Controller, or receiving it from one or more devices on the bus.
If this COMREQ attempts to enable Global Data when it is already enabled, or to disable
Global Data when it is already disabled, the Bus Controller ignores the request and returns status 4 (successful completion) to the Status Block.
Command Block for the Enable/Disable Global Data Command
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
9
Address +7:
Device Number
Enter 0–31 to specify the bus interfacemoduleto/
from which Global Data is being enabled or disabled.
This may be the Device Number of the Bus Controller itself, or of any other bus interface module on the
bus.
To enable or disable the Bus Controller sendingGlobal
Data, enter the Bus Controller ’s Device Number.
To enable or disable the Bus Controller receivingGlobal Data from another bus interface module, enter the
Device Number of that bus interface module.
To enable or disable the Bus Controller sending or
receiving ANY Global Data, enter the number 255. If
255 is entered, the command will complete successfully if there are any controller devices on the bus.
Address +8:
Enable/disablecommand
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
To disable Global Data to or from the device specified
in address +7, enter 0. To enable Global Data, enter 1.
83
5
COMREQ #10: Switch BSM Command
In a dual bus system, the Switch BSM command can be used to cause a Bus Switching
Module to select a bus. This command causes the Bus Controller to issue a normal–
priority Switch BSM datagram.
The program must already know which bus is currently selected. The CPU may issue
the Switch BSM command at intervals to ensure continued proper bus switching capability. If the command is successful, the CPU will report a Loss of Block diagnostic for the
BSM Controller block and for any other block on the same bus stub. If the dual bus system includes a second Bus Controller controlling the other bus, that Bus Controller
should report an Addition of Block diagnostic for each of those blocks. If the BSM position is currently forced by the Hand–held Monitor, the command will have no effect. A
data error is returned to the status reference if the block does not control a BSM.
Command Block for the Switch BSM Command
84
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
10
Address +7:
Device Number of the
Genius block to which
the Bus Switching
Module is attached
0–31
Address +8:
Desired bus position
Bus A (0) or Bus B (1). If not 0 or 1, syntax error is returned.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #11: Read Device Command
To read up to 128 bytes of data from another CPU and place it in PLC CPU memory, use
the Read Device command. This causes the Bus Controller to issue a normal–priority
Read Device datagram. When the data is received, it will automatically be placed in the
CPU memory location specified in the Command Block.
Command Block for the Read Device Command
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
11
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31, for the device which is the source of the
data.
Address +8:
Address +9:
Memory address, bytes 1, 2.
”
Specify the location where data will be read
FROM. See the instructions on the following
pages. (It is not necessary to specify a memory
address when sending a Read Device COMREQ
to a computer).
Address
Address
Address
Address
+10:
+11:
+12:
+13:
Program name, characters 1, 2
”
characters 3, 4
”
characters 5, 6
”
characters 7, 8
Required to read %P or %L memory in another
Series 90–70 PLC. See the instructions on the
following pages. If the target of the command is
NOT another Series 90–70 PLC, Address +10
through Address +17 are ignored; they may
contain any value. Program names are limited
to 7 characters. Character 8 and all other trailing characters MUST be entered as nulls.
Address
Address
Address
Address
+14:
+15:
+16:
+17:
Block name, characters 1, 2
”
characters 3, 4
”
characters 5, 6
”
characters 7, 8
Required to read %L memory in another Series
90–70 PLC. For %P, Address +14 through Address +17 are ignored. Block names are limited
to 7 characters. Character 8 and all other trailing characters MUST be entered as nulls.
Address +18:
Data length, in words, bytes
or bits. This is the amount of
data to be read.
Reading a Series 90–70 PLC, data length is bits
or words, depending on the memory type being
read. For other types of devices, the length is
given as expected by the device. The maximum
length is equal to 128 bytes.
Address +19:
Maximummemory length
needed for the returned data
Value in bits or words (depends on memory
type selected below).
Address +20:
Memory type to receive the
returned data
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ).
Address +21:
Memory offset
Starting address within this memory type.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
85
5
Memor y Specification for Read Device and Write Device
The following pages explain how to specify the target memory type when sending a
Read Device or Write Device datagram to a Series 90–70 PLC, Series Six PLC, Series Five
PLC, or host computer.
Memor y Specification: Series 90–70 PLC
For a Series 90 PLC, in address + 8 enter the memory type, using one of the numbers
listed in the table below.
Target
Memory
Type
(decimal)
Value
%L
0
Local register memory (each subroutine)
16
%P
4
Program register memory
16
%R
8
Registermemory
16
%AI
10
Analog input memory
16
%AQ
12
Analog output memory
16
%I
16
70
Discrete input memory (byte mode)
Discrete input memory (bit mode)
8
1
%Q
18
72
Discrete output memory (byte mode)
Discrete output memory (bit mode)
8
1
%T
20
74
Discretetemporary memory (byte mode)
Discretetemporary memory (bit mode)
8
1
%M
22
76
Discrete momentary internal memory (byte mode)
Discrete momentary internal memory (bit mode)
8
1
%SA
24
78
Discrete system memory group A (byte mode)
Discrete system memory group A (bit mode)
8
1
%SB
26
80
Discrete system memory group B (byte mode)
Discrete system memory group B (bit mode)
8
1
%SC
28
82
Discrete system memory group C (byte mode)
Discrete system memory group C (bit mode)
8
1
%S
30
84
Discrete system memory (byte mode)
Discrete system memory (bit mode)
8
1
%G
56
86
Discrete Genius automatic global data table (byte mode)
Discrete Genius automatic global data table (bit mode)
8
1
Description
Bits per
Reference
Memor y Offset for Series 90–70 PLC
In address +9, enter a numerical offset within this memory type, for the beginning of
the data. Memory offsets start at 0; thus %R1 and %I1 are both accessed using a
Memory Offset of 0.
86
Example A:
For 3 bits starting at %I0014, you would enter the offset 13, and a data length of 3 bits.
Example B:
To write data to a Series 90–70 PLC beginning at %R100, you would enter the Memory
Type 8 (decimal) and the Memory Offset 99 (decimal).
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Bit Mode or Byte Mode for Series 90–70 PLC
Bit–oriented memories (%I and %Q) can be accessed either on byte boundaries (byte
mode) or as a string of bits (bit mode). Bit mode is used to access a single point within a
discrete memory, or a collection of points within a discrete memory which need not start
or end on a byte boundary. Byte mode is used to access one or more groups of 8 contiguous points within a discrete memory, and must start on a byte boundary.
In byte mode, the Message Offset reflects the byte being read or written. Offset 0 corresponds to bits 1–8, offset 1 to bits 9–16, and so on.
In bit mode, the Message Offset reflects the bit being read or written, offset 0 corresponds to bit 1, offset 1 to bit 2, and so on.
In bit mode, one or more bytes of data are read or written, even though some of the bits
within the bytes might be ignored. The bit or bits will be in the correct offset position
within the byte. For example, if three bits starting a %I0020 are requested, they will appear in the middle of the returned data byte. The “–” indicates unused bits. On READ,
they are guaranteed to be 0. On WRITE, they are ignored.
–
– I22 I21 I20 –
–
–
b7 b6 b5 b4 b3 b2 b1 b0
If four bits starting at %I00007 are requested, two bytes are transferred.
–
–
–
–
–
– I10 I9
b15 b14 b13 b12 b11 b10 b9 b8
byte
boundary
I8 I7 –
–
–
–
–
–
b7 b6 b5 b4 b3 b2 b1 b0
byte
boundary
Entering a Program or Block Name
If the target of the command is another Series 90–70 PLC, and the memory type to be
read is either %P or %L, a program name and, possibly a block name, must be entered.
Names are limited to 7 characters. Character 8 and any other trailing characters must be
nulls. Names are entered in ASCII hex format, as indicated by the following example:
(nul)(nul) (nul)
00
00
00
1
T
E
S
T
31
54
53
45
54
Sequence is reversed in
Logicmaster reference table.
Hex equivalents
Command Block.
entered
Address + 13 Address + 12 Address + 11 Address + 10
Hex ASCII equivalents are listed in appendix A. Lowercase letters are not valid in names.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
87
in
5
Memor y Specification: Series Six PLC
For a Series Six PLC, Read Device and Write Device include an absolute memory location
in either Register memory or I/O Status Table memory. Byte 4 of the address must be 80
hex.
Absolute Address
Series Six Memory Type
Decimal
Hexadecimal
I/OStatus Table
Outputs
Inputs
08192 – 08319
08320 – 08447
2000 – 207F
2080 – 20FF
Register Memory
R00001–R16384
16384 – 32767
4000 – 7FFF
Caution
When sending a Write Device COMREQ to a Series Six PLC, be sure the
CPU address specified is for the register table (first hex digit is 4–7) or
the I/O Status Table (first hex digit is 2). Writing CPU data to any other
absolute memory location may cause potentially hazardous control
conditions.
Memor y Specification: Series Five PLC
For a Series Five PLC, [Address+8] of the Read Device or Write Device COMREQ contain a memory offset, which is the beginning location for the data:
Series Five Memory Type
Register Memory
I/OMemory
Offset (hex)
R00001 to R16384
0000 – 7FFF
I1+0001 to I1+1024
I2+0001 to I2+1024
O1+0001 to O1+1024
O2+0001 to O2+1024
I0001 to I1024
O0001 to O1024
O1–0001 to O1–1024
O2–0001 to O2–1024
I1–0001 to I1–0512
8000 – 807F
8080 – 80FF
8100 – 817F
8180 – 81FF
8200 – 827F
8280 – 82FF
8300 – 837F
8380 – 83FF
8500 – 853F
To find the exact offset in the register table, follow these steps:
1.
Subtract 1 from the register number.
2.
Multiply the result by 2 to find the decimal byte offset.
3.
Continue as described below.
For a decimal offset in the register or I/O tables:
88
1.
Convert the decimal number to hex.
2.
Add the hex number to the beginning offset for that memory type.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Example of Read Device
In the following example, a Series 90–70 PLC reads ten words of %P memory starting at
location %P0050 from program “TEST1” in another Series 90–70 PLC.
Series 90–70 PLC
COMM
––| |–– REQ
%R0001– IN FT
CONST–
00002
CONST–
00001
%Q00001
––––––( )––
%Q00002
––––––( )––
GBC #31
SYSID
Series 90–70 PLC
a Genius
Bus '
GBC #29
TASK
Program Name
ABC
Initiating Device
X
TEST1
Target Device
Command Block Location
(COMREQ parameters)
Status Block Location
(COMREQ Status)
X
%R001–%R022
COMREQ Output References
%Q001, %Q002
%R023–%R024
Memory location to read data from
Memory location to place data
%P050–%P060
%AQ050–%AQ060
When the data is received from the target PLC, the requesting PLC will store it beginning at %AQ0050 in its own memory.
Example Command Block
Command Block
Register
Address +1
Address +2
Address +3
Address +4
Address +5
Address +6
Address +7
Address +8
Address +9
Address +10
Address +11
Address +12
Address +13
Address +14
Address +15
Address +16
Address +17
Address +18
Address +19
Address +20
Address +21
*
Description
Wait/NoWait
Memory type for Status Pointer
Starting address for Status Pointer
Timeout value
Max Communication Time
Command Code
Device Number
Memory Address bytes 1 & 2
Memory Address bytes 3 & 4
Program Name characters 1 & 2
Program Name characters 3 & 4
Program Name characters 5 & 6
Program Name character 7 & 8
Block Name characters 1 & 2
Block Name characters 3 & 4
Block Name characters 5 & 6
Block Name character 7 & 8
Data length (word) to read
Destination length (words)
Memory type for received data
Memory offset for data
Value
0
8
22
0
0
11
29
2
49
’ET’
’TS’
’1’
xx
10
10
12
49
Comment
No Wait
%R memory
%R023 (1 + 22 offset)
Not used for No Wait
Not used for No Wait
Read Device
Target Bus Controller
%P memory
%P0050 (1 + 49 offset)
TEST1
character 6 is null *
Ignored (don’t care)
Ignored
Ignored
Ignored
Ignored
10 words
10 words
%AQ memory
%AQ0050 (1+49 offset)
In hex, the two values in Address +12 are 31h (ASCII 1) and 00h (ASCII nul).
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
89
5
COMREQ #12: Write Device Command
To send up to 128 bytes of data to another CPU on the bus, use the Write Device command. Any type of data that can be addressed by its memory type and offset can be
sent. This command causes the Bus Controller to issue a normal–priority Write Device
datagram to the specified device. To send a Write Device datagram with high priority,
see COMREQ #14: Send Datagram.
Using Write Device Messages Instead of Global Data
Write Device datagrams can be used together with Global Data, or can replace Global
Data. Consider using Write Device datagrams instead of Global Data if Global Data
takes up too much bus scan time for the application, data does not need to be sent every
bus scan, or the CPU sweep time becomes too long for the application.
If this datagram will be broadcast, and there is another Series 90–70 Bus Controller on
the bus that should NOT receive it, send the datagram using COMREQ #14 instead.
See page 94.
Command Block for the Write Device Command
90
Address:
Command Length
13 – 77. Enter the number of words from Address +6 to the end of the data.
Address +1:
Address +2:
No Wait
Status Block memory type
Address +3:
Address +4:
Status Block offset
Idle timeout value
0
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12
(%AQ)
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
12
Address +7:
Device Number
0 – 31, for the device to be written to.
Address +8:
Address +9:
Memory address, bytes 1, 2.
”
Enter the location for data to be written to.
See the instructions for “Read Device”. (It is
not necessary to specify a memory address
when sending a Write Device COMREQ to a
computer).
Address
Address
Address
Address
+10:
+11:
+12:
+13:
Program name, characters 1, 2.
” characters 3, 4.
” characters 5, 6.
” characters 7, 8.
Required to write %P or %L memory in
another Series 90–70 PLC. See the instructions for “Read Device”. If the target of the
command is NOT another Series 90–70 PLC,
Address +10 through Address +17 are ignored; they may contain any value.
Address
Address
Address
Address
+14:
+15:
+16:
+17:
Block name, characters 1, 2.
” characters 3, 4.
” characters 5, 6.
” characters 7, 8.
Required to write %L memory in another Series 90–70 PLC. For %P, Address +14 through
Address +17 are ignored. Block names are
limited to 7 characters. Character 8 and all
other trailing characters MUST be entered as
nulls.
Address +18:
Data length, in words, bytes
or bits. This is the amount of
data to be read.
Writing a Series 90–70 PLC, data length is bits
or words, depending on the memory type being read. For other types of devices, the
length is given as expected by the device. The
maximum length is equal to 128 bytes.
Address +19 to
Address +n:
Data to be written to the other
device.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #13: Dequeue Datagram Command
The Bus Controller handles most incoming datagrams automatically, with no additional
programming required. Under certain circumstances, however, the Dequeue Datagram
command must be used to transfer incoming datagrams to the CPU. Program the Dequeue Datagram command for the following:
H
Replies that are received after sending Reply–type datagrams with the Send Datagram command. (If Send Datagram with Reply is used instead, it automatically handles replies).
H
Unsolicited datagrams that are not recognized by the Bus Controller (Function Code
not 20).
Command Block for the Dequeue Datagram Command
Address:
Command Length
7
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12
(%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
13
Address +7:
Maximum data memory
length
Enter bit or word value (depends on the
memory type selected below). This entry tells
the CPU how much memory will be needed
to store all the data.
If the length of data returned by the device
exceeds this length, the Bus Controller writes
as much data as possible to the PLC CPU and
returns a data error to the COMREQ status
location.
Address +8:
Memory type
Enter the number that represents the location
where the Bus Controller will place the data
in the CPU: 70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10
(%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +9
Startingaddress
Offset within this memory type.
Address +10
Function code of the datagram.
Enter a function code. or enter FF hex to
match any function code.
Address +11:
Subfunction code of the datagram.
Enter a subfunction code, or FF hex to match
any subfunction code.
Address +12:
Device Number (sender)
Enter 0 – 31, or FF hex to match any Device
Number.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
91
5
Number of Dequeue Datagram Commands Needed
One Dequeue Datagram command is needed for each incoming datagram. If multiple
incoming Datagrams are expected during one CPU sweep, it will be necessary to place
multiple Dequeue Datagram commands in the program to assure their efficient transfer
to the CPU.
The number of Dequeue Datagram commands needed depends on whether the Datagrams have been sent using Normal or High Priority, and the relative lengths of the CPU
sweep time and the scan time of the bus, as explained below.
If the Bus Scan Time is Greater than the CPU Sweep Time
If all Datagrams on the bus are sent with Normal Priority, there is a limit of one incoming
Datagram per CPU sweep. Therefore, only one Dequeue Datagram command per
sweep will be needed to handle incoming Datagrams.
If all Datagrams on the bus are sent with High Priority, the Bus Controller can potentially
receive one Datagram from each transmitting device during a scan. The program should
include the same number of Dequeue Datagram commands as incoming Datagrams.
If the Bus Scan Time is Less than the CPU Sweep Time
If the bus scan time is significantly shorter than the CPU sweep time, you can estimate
the number of Dequeue Datagram commands that must be sent to the Bus Controller to
accommodate incoming Datagrams on that bus.
First, determine how many scans can occur in one CPU sweep. For example, if the bus
scan were 20mS and the CPU sweep were 90mS, the ratio between them would be 4.5 to
1. This should be rounded upward to 5.
This is the maximum number of Normal Priority Datagrams that might be received in a
single CPU sweep. Plan to have the same number of Dequeue Datagram commands to
that Bus Controller in the program to handle the incoming Datagrams.
For High Priority Datagrams, multiply the number found above by the total number of
devices on the bus that might send a High Priority Datagram to the Bus Controller in
one bus scan. This is the total number of incoming Datagrams from that bus the program might have to handle in a single CPU sweep. Plan on this number of Dequeue Datagram commands to the Bus Controller.
Additional Logic for Incoming Datagrams
Up to 16 datagrams are enqueued by the Bus Controller in an internal queue. These include any unsolicited reply–type datagrams. This permits the program to, for example,
send a Read ID Send Datagram and dequeue the Read ID Reply with the Dequeue Datagram COMREQ.
If the 16–item queue fills, an informational fault GBC_SOFTWR_EXCPTN is logged
(Fault Type is DQ_QUEUE_FULL) in the I/O Fault Table. If the Dequeue Datagram is
issued and there are no datagrams in the queue, the Status Pointer is set to NO DATA
TO TRANSFER.
92
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Program logic should be used to assure that no datagrams are lost by being accidentally
written over. This might be done by copying each datagram to another memory location, or by changing the data memory location specified in the Command Block after
each incoming datagram is received.
Format of Returned Data
The Dequeue Datagram returns data in the following format.
Location
High Byte
Low Byte
Data Length
Status byte
Memory address +1
Subfunction code
Function code
Memory address +2
Data byte 2
Data byte 1
Memory address +69
Data byte 134
Data byte 133
Memory Address
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
Items are explained below.
Status Byte:
The status byte reports the Device Number of the device that sent the
datagram. It also indicates whether the message was broadcast or directed by the other device.
bit 7 6
5
4
3
2
1
0
B/D
x
n
n
n
n
n
x
DeviceNumber
(5bits:0–31decimal)
Unused
Broadcast
(1)
Directed
(0)
Data Length:
The number (0 to 134) of data bytes after the subfunction code.
Function
Code:
The function code of the received message: 0 to 111 decimal or 0 to 6F
hex.
Subfunction
Code:
The subfunction code of the received message: 0 to 255 decimal or 0 to
FF hex.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
93
5
COMREQ #14: Send Datagram Command
Most datagrams are normally programmed using their assigned COMREQ command
numbers. However, datagrams can also be sent using the Send Datagram command and
the Request Datagram Reply command. The Send Datagram command might be used
to send:
H
Datagrams for which no COMREQ command number is defined, such as Begin
Packet Sequence, End Packet Sequence, and Write Point.
H
Read Device and Write Device datagrams that are broadcast, but which should be
ignored by another Series 90–70 Bus Controller.
H
Datagrams that must be guaranteed transmission during the next bus scan. This
should be done with restraint, for the reasons explained on the following pages.
H
Datagrams which do not cause another device to send back a reply, such as Pulse
Test, or Write Configuration.
Datagrams which DO cause another device to send back a reply, such as Read Diagnostics or Read Configuration, are usually programmed using their assigned COMREQ numbers or the Request Datagram Reply command (COMREQ #15). However, if Send Datagram is used to send datagrams that cause replies, the Dequeue
Datagram command must be used to transfer the replies back to the CPU.
Before using Send Datagram, refer to the table on page 74 for more information about
COMREQs and datagrams.
Command Block for the Send Datagram Command
Address:
Command Length
6 – 70. Enter the number of words from Address +6 to Address +n.
+1:
+2:
+3:
+4:
No Wait
Status Block memory type
Status Block offset
Idle timeout value
0
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
14
Address +7:
Device Number of the device to receive the message.
0 – 31, or 255 to broadcast the message.
Address +8:
Function code
For any datagram listed below, 32 decimal (20 hex).
Address +9
Subfunction code (hex)
See the list on page 74.
Address +10
Priority
Enter 0 for normalpriority, or 1 for high priority.
Address +11:
Datagram length (in bytes)
Enter the actual length of the Datagram, beginning
at [address +12].
Address +12:
to Address+n:
Datagram content
Enter the entire datagram as part of the Command
Block. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual shows
datagramstructures.
Address
Address
Address
Address
If the Send Datagram command is used to broadcast a
Write Device datagram, and that datagram should be
IGNORED by another Series 90–70 Bus Controller, set
the first byte of the datagram as shown in the System
User’s Manual (this byte is normally 0), to FE hex.
94
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
Datagram Priority
A Bus Controller can send one datagram per bus scan. That datagram may be assigned
either normal priority or high priority. Therefore, during one bus scan, there may be one
normal priority datagram followed by up to 31 high priority datagrams, or up to 32 high
priority datagrams sent by the devices on the bus.
In one bus scan (one complete rotation of the bus token among all devices on the bus),
there can be just one normal priority datagram sent by any device. If a normal priority
datagram or similar system message (such as a fault report) has already been sent by any
device (including itself), a device must wait until its next turn on the bus before it can
send a normal priority datagram.
Datagrams and I/O Blocks
If the bus will also be used for I/O block control, normal priority datagrams are recommended to allow other messages such as fault reports (which the system handles as normal priority datagrams) to get through. In addition, normal priority datagrams ensure
that bus scan time is only modestly delayed for communications. Bus scan time affects
the response time of any I/O data on the bus. If there are I/O blocks on the bus, use high
priority only if the datagram transmission cannot be delayed. Normal priority will work
satisfactorily except when there are many devices attempting to send datagrams simultaneously.
Number of Datagrams per CPU Sweep
The application program should include logic that verifies successful completion of earlier datagrams before requesting new ones. Because a Bus Controller can only send one
datagram per bus scan, the number of datagrams that can be executed during the same
CPU sweep of program logic depends on the relative lengths of the CPU sweep and the
bus scan.
If the Bus Scan Time is Greater than the CPU Sweep Time: If the bus scan time is
greater than the CPU sweep time, the Bus Controller will be able to send no more than
one datagram during one execution of the application program. Successful transmission
of a normal priority datagram will depend on the absence of datagram and system message traffic on the bus.
If the Bus Scan Time is Less than the CPU Sweep Time: If the bus scan time is significantly shorter than the CPU sweep time, the bus may be able to transmit multiple datagrams during one execution of the application program.
Effect of Datagrams on the Genius I/O Bus: Normal Priority Datagrams allow fault reports and Hand–held Monitor communications on a bus to continue undisturbed. Only
one Normal Priority Datagram is allowed each bus scan, so the scan time stays relatively
constant, and I/O update timing varies only by small increments.
If High Priority Datagrams are being transmitted constantly, the Hand–held Monitor
will not function properly; fault reports from blocks will be prevented from being transmitted on the bus, and regular Communication Request commands (such as Write Configuration commands) to that Bus Controller will fail with a transmission error. For these
reasons, use of High Priority Datagrams on a bus with I/O blocks should be avoided if
possible.
If High Priority Datagrams are transmitted infrequently, they will cause some delay in
the Hand–held Monitor communications and other normal system messages, but the
delay should not be noticeable.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
95
5
High Priority Datagrams will typically put more pressure on the Bus Controller to transfer multiple Datagrams per CPU sweep. However, this can also occur with Normal
Priority Datagrams if the bus scan time is much shorter than the CPU sweep time.
Maximum CPU Sweep Time Increase for Datagrams: To estimate the impact of Datagrams on CPU sweep time, add together the times required for all Datagrams that might
be sent between the Bus Controller and the CPU during one sweep if No Wait mode is
selected. Repeat this for each Bus Controller in the PLC that sends or receives Datagrams.
Total Datagram Bytes Sent
(may be none)
+
x
.031mS
=
LARGEST incoming Normal Priority
Datagram Received, bytes
x
.031mS
=
Total incoming High Priority
Datagrams Bytes Received
x
.031mS
=
1.200mS
=
OR
+
+
______mS
Additional Information about Timing
If you need more information about timing for datagrams, Global Data, I/O devices, and
remote drops, please refer to the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
96
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
5
COMREQ #15: Request Datagram Reply Command
The Request Datagram Reply command can be used to send any datagram that causes
the target device to return a reply, such as: Read Configuration or Read Diagnostics.
With this command, the Bus Controller automatically transfers replies to the CPU; no
separate Dequeue Datagram command is needed to handle them.
These datagrams are normally programmed using their assigned COMREQ command
numbers. The primary reason for sending any of these datagrams using COMREQ #15
would be to assign it high priority, guaranteeing that it would be sent on the next bus
scan. Before doing this, see COMREQ #14: Send Datagram for important information
about datagram priority.
Command Block for the Request Datagram Reply Command
Address:
Command Length
10 – 78. Enter the number of words from Address +6 to
Address +n.
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max. communications time
0
Address +6:
Command number
15
Address +7:
Device Number of the device to receive the message.
0 – 31
Address +8:
Function code
For any datagram listed below, 32 decimal (20 hex).
Address +9
Subfunction code (hex) of
the datagram to be sent.
00 Read ID
02 Read Configuration
08 Read Diagnostics
0C Read Block I/O
1E Read Device
27 Read Data
Address +10
Priority
Enter 0 for normal priority, or 1 for high priority.
Address +11:
Datagram length (in bytes)
Enter the actual length of the Datagram, beginning at [address +16].
Address +12:
Subfunction code (hex) of
the reply
01 Read ID Reply
03 Read Configuration Reply
09 Read Diagnostics Reply
0D Read Block I/O Reply
1F Read Device Reply
28 Read Data Reply
Address +13:
Memory type for the reply
Enter a number: 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +14:
Memory offset
Starting address within this memory type.
Address +15:
Maximum data memory
length needed
If the length of the memory
is smaller than the amount
of reply data received, the
extra portion of the data
will be lost, and a data error
(16) will be returned to the
status location.
Enter a value in bits or words, depending on the memory
type selected. This entry tells the CPU how much memory
will be needed to store all the reply data. The length depends on the message and device type.
– for Read Configuration Reply, see COMREQ #2.
– for Read Diagnostics Reply, see COMREQ #4.
– for Read Device Reply, message length depends on
device type. May be up to 64 words.
– for Read Data Reply, message length is 5 words.
– for Read ID Reply, message length depends on device
type. See the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Address +16 to
Address +n:
Datagram Content
Enter the entire datagram as shown in the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
Format of Returned Data
Returned data format is the same as for Dequeue Datagram. See page 93.
Chapter 5 Communication Requests
97
5
COMREQ #16: Enable/Disable I/O Fault Categories
The Enable/Disable I/O Fault Categories command can be sent to the Bus Controller to
disable or re–enable the reporting of all I/O faults, or Addition/Loss of Block faults.
If all I/O faults are disabled, the Bus Controller will not forward to the CPU any fault reports it receives from devices on its bus. This includes all I/O faults, as well as Loss of
Block and Addition of Block messages.
It is also possible to disable only reports of Addition or Loss of Block conditions, while
still forwarding other faults from the devices on the bus. This can be useful in a system
where blocks are intentionally switched on and off the bus, or in other applications
where these messages are not wanted.
If the passing of some or all fault reports is disable, the corresponding point–specific
fault contacts will operate. They are not affected by the use of this COMREQ. Some system–level and block–level fault contacts will be affected by the loss of the inhibited information.
Command Block for the Enable/Disable I/O Fault Categories Command
Address:
Command Length
3
Address +1:
No Wait
0
Address +2:
Status Block memory
type
70 (%I), 72 (%Q), 8 (%R), 10 (%AI), or 12 (%AQ)
Address +3:
Status Block offset
Beginning address for the COMREQ status.
Address +4:
Idle timeout value
0
Address +5:
Max.communications
time
0
Address +6:
Command number
16
Address +7:
I/OFault Category to
be enabled or disabled.
It may be:
0000
FFFF
0006
Address +8:
Must be:
0000
Must be:
FFFF
all I/O fault categories enabled.
all I/O fault categories disabled.
Addition/LossofBlockfault
categoriesdisabled.
if Address +7 is 0000 or 0006.
if Address +7 is FFFF.
The default is for all fault categories to be enabled.
98
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
Chapter
6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control,
andsection
Redundancy
level 1 1
6
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the following types of advanced I/O control systems:
H
Data Monitoring: Where an additional CPU (either a PLC or a computer) monitors
inputs and diagnostics from some or all of the blocks on a bus.
H
Distributed control: Where two or more CPUs control different I/O blocks on the
same bus.
H
Redundancy: The use of dual busses, dual controllers, or both.
These types of systems are possible because of the unique operation and communications capabilities of Genius I/O devices on a bus. Each Genius I/O block broadcasts its
input messages to all other devices on the bus. Therefore, more than one CPU can receive inputs from the same blocks.
The CPUs can communicate on the same bus, allowing formation of a common database. In addition, any CPU can send datagram messages to any other device on the bus.
For Additional Information, Also See:
Chapter 1, which describes non–redundant types of systems.
Chapter 4 for configuration details.
Chapter 5 for descriptions of COMREQs that might be used in a monitoring or redundancy system.
99
6
Data Monitoring
In addition to the PLC or computer running the application program, other CPUs on the
bus can monitor inputs, diagnostics, and Configuration Change messages sent by Genius
I/Odevices.
CONTROLLER
MONITOR
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
PHASE B
a43460
I/O BLOCKS
Monitoring Inputs
Genius I/O devices broadcast their inputs once per bus scan. These inputs may be accessed by any PLC or computer on the bus.
If the Series 90–70 PLC is to be used to monitor inputs from I/O devices not being controlled by its application program, the devices will be configured in the same manner as
other I/O devices on the bus. The PLC will use the Reference Number assigned to each
I/O device to store its inputs. Even though the monitoring PLC would not ordinarily be
expected to send outputs to devices being monitored, outputs to those devices should be
disabled when the PLC’s I/O configuration is done. This will prevent any unwanted
outputs being sent to the I/O devices from the monitoring PLC.
If a computer is used to monitor I/O data on the bus, it is important to consider data
type, message length, and message format when programming the computer. For example, a High–speed Counter block sends its word–type data first, followed by discrete
data. Other devices have different data formats.
Monitoring Diagnostics and Configuration Change Messages
In addition to receiving the broadcast input data, one PLC or computer on the bus may
also receive extra copies of any fault reports and configuration change messages that
may be sent by the bus devices. This PLC or computer, referred to as the Assigned Monitor, may not send control outputs to an I/O device. If the monitor is capable of sending
outputs to a I/O device it is monitoring, those outputs must be disabled.
The monitoring device can communicate with other devices on the bus through Global
Data or datagram messages. For example, it would be possible for a monitoring device
to send a Read Diagnostics datagram to an I/O device that was not configured to send it
fault reports automatically.
This feature is compatible with both redundant and non–redundant Genius configurations.
100
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Distributed Control
Distributed control means that two or more Bus Controllers are sending control outputs
to different I/O devices on the same bus. Ordinarily, these Bus Controllers would be in
different PLCs, but with the Series 90–70, they may also be in the same PLC.
Diagnostics are only automatically sent from the block to the Bus Controller that is controlling its outputs. The Assign Monitor datagram can be used to command blocks on
the bus to also direct fault reports to a second Bus Controller.
This is a form of split control, not a type of redundancy. Bus Controllers and devices on
the bus are set up for CPU Redundancy Mode = None, since each I/O device is receiving
outputs from only one Bus Controller. Remember that all I/O devices on the bus broadcast inputs to all bus interface modules automatically.
For example, a Bus Controller is configured at Bus Address 31, and the I/O devices it will
control are configured at Bus Addresses 1 and 2. A Bus Controller in another PLC is located at Bus Address 30. The I/O blocks it will control are located ate Bus Addresses 3
and 4. A third Bus Controller is at Bus Address 7. Two I/O blocks on its bus are located at
Bus Addresses 5 and 6. All devices are connected by the same bus.
a43458
CPU
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 31)
(DEVICE 30)
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 7)
OUTPUTS
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î Î
ÎÎ Î ÎÎ
Î ÎÎ
Î Î
1
2
3
4
5
6
When setting up a Series 90–70 PLC system for distributed control, there are two different ways to assign references to I/O devices:
A. Each Bus Controller can be assigned just those I/O devices whose outputs it controls.
If this is done, devices that are not configured for a Bus Controller (but which are
actually present on the bus) will generate Extra Device faults in that PLC at startup.
Once these faults are cleared, they will not reappear unless power is cycled to the
Bus Controller or I/O device.
B. Each Bus Controller can be assigned all of the I/O devices actually present on the
bus. Outputs are disabled to I/O devices controlled by another Bus Controller. This
means that each I/O device must be assigned a Reference Number in each CPU.
References assigned to devices controlled by another CPU are unavailable for further use.
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
101
6
Redundancy
Redundancy provides extra protection for critical processes through duplication of system components. For the Series 90–70 PLC (CPU rev. 4.0 and Bus Controller rev. 4.0),
the following can be configured using Logicmaster 90–70 rev. 4.0:
H
H
H
H
H
Dual bus, one PLC
Dual bus, two PLCs
Redundant controllers, one PLC
Redundant controllers, two PLCs
Dual bus and redundant controllers, two PLCs
Systems that are appropriate for a rev. 4 Series 90–70 PLC are described on the following pages. If the Series 90–70 PLC is rev. 3, see page 115.
Important Considerations
Suitability of Series 90–70 PLC redundancy depends on the requirements of the application. Some important factors to be considered are described below.
1.
102
CPU synchronization is not supported.
1.
Using a Genius LAN, transfer of data from the master CPU data to the backup CPU can take 10 to 20 CPU sweeps, depending on the quantity of data.
2.
The Series 90–70 PLC has transitional bits, but does not have a table that
can be transferred from one CPU to another for synchronization. One–
shots, counters, and transitional contacts cannot be guaranteed to be the
same in both PLCs.
3.
The timebase is not transferrable, so timers (real time and running time)
cannot be guaranteed to be the same. In addition, timers and counters used
in program blocks which are not called every sweep may produce different
results.
4.
For PID function blocks, elapsed time may be different in the two PLCs, because it represents the total time since PLC powerup.
2.
Hot Standby redundancy should only be used for systems that do not require
bumpless transfer of control from one CPU to the other.
3.
A higher level of support for both bus redundancy and CPU redundancy is provided by Release 4 products (Series 90–70 PLC rel. 4, Logicmaster 90–70 rel. 4,
and Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller, version 4.0). These versions should
therefore be used for redundant systems. The restrictions listed above still apply,
however.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Dual Bus Redundancy
Dual busses can be used to provide backup protection against cable break or loss or removal of a Bus Controller. Each bus of the dual bus pair has its own Bus Controller. The
two Bus Controllers can be located in the same PLC or in two PLCs.
If the Bus Controllers are in the same PLC, they can be placed in the same rack, or they
can be placed in different racks to protect against rack failure.
For applications that do not require bumpless transfer of control, the Bus Controllers can
be located in different PLCs.
Note
If bumpless transfer is a requirement, bus redundancy with two PLCs is
not recommended since the second PLC is essentially off–line before the
switch.
Dual Bus Operation
In dual bus redundancy, bus selection is controlled by a switching device (either a Bus
Switching Module, or a Remote I/O Scanner module with built–in bus switching capability).
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
a42360
BUS A
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
BUS B
BSM
BSM
CONTROLLER
BLOCK
UP TO 7
MORE BLOCKS
Clusters of up to eight devices each can be connected to a dual bus by a switching device. The maximum number of devices that can be located on both busses is 30, which
requires at least 4 bus switching devices.
If the bus switching device stops receiving outputs from the active bus, it automatically
switches to the other bus. If the bus it switches to is operational, the regular I/O updates
will resume with the Bus Controller on the new bus. An “Output Default Timeout” of
2.5 or 10 seconds must be selected for each bus device, so its outputs do not default during this switchover/login process. Bus switching and block login requires finite periods
of time. This varies from system to system, depending on the Genius bus scan time, the
CPU sweep time, and the number of devices switching. Generally, switchovers are completed before the 2.5 second timeout expires. The 10–second option is available for systems requiring a longer switchover period. During the timeout period, outputs hold
their last valid output state.
If, after switching due to loss of communications on the original bus, no outputs are received on the new bus, the bus switching device does not switch back. It waits until
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
103
6
communications are restored on the newly–connected bus, or until power is cycled.
This prevents unnecessary switching when no communications are available.
Data Transfer on a Dual Bus
In dual bus redundancy, both Bus Controllers are capable of sending outputs to the devices on the bus. However, the devices in a bus cluster will only receive outputs from
the bus that is currently selected by their switching device.
Similarly, although the devices in a cluster continually broadcast input data and diagnostic messages, they are only received by the Bus Controller on the bus that is currently
selected by their switching device. The Bus Controller on the inactive bus cannot receive
inputs, fault reports or Configuration Change messages.
Non–redundant Devices on a Dual Bus
Although most devices in a dual bus system will probably be connected to both bus
cables via a switching device, it is possible to have non–redundant devices connected
directly to one bus of the pair. The following illustration represents a dual bus with some
non–redundant I/O blocks.
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
A
(DEVICE 31)
B
(DEVICE 31)
a42475
BUS A
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
BUS B
1
2
3
4
A
4
B
BSM
Both of the Bus Controllers are configured at Bus Address 31 on their respective busses.
A Bus Switching Module interfaces three redundant I/O blocks to the dual bus. The redundant blocks are configured at Bus Addresses 1, 2, and 3 on both busses.
There are also two non–redundant I/O blocks. Each of them is configured at Bus Address 4 on its bus.
104
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
During normal operation, both bus A and bus B operate in the same way as a single bus:
H
H
H
Blocks 1, 2, and 3 interface to either bus A or bus B, as selected by the BSM.
Block 4A communicates with the Bus Controller on bus A only.
Block 4B communicates with the Bus Controller on bus B only.
ÎÎÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÌÌÌÌ Î
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÌÌÌÌ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌÌ
ÎÎÎ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÎÎ
ÌÌ
ÎÌÌÌ
Î
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌÌ
ÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌÌ
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
A
(DEVICE 31)
B
(DEVICE 31)
a42476
SELECTED BUS
BUS A
BUS B
1
2
4A
3
4B
BSM
If Bus Controller A stops communicating with the redundant blocks (due to program
action, a Bus Controller fault, a cable break, or loss of power), then:
H
H
The BSM will switch the cluster of blocks 1, 2, and 3 to bus B.
Block 4A, which is a non–redundant block, will no longer receive outputs from its
Bus Controller, and will no longer be able to send inputs or diagnostics to the PLC. If
there are outputs on block 4A, they will either hold their last state or default, depending on the block’s configuration. Although communications have been interrupted, the block is still receiving power, so any outputs that were ON or that default to ON will continue to operate.
ÎÎÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÌÌÌÌ
ÎÌÌÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÌÌ
ÎÎ
ÌÌ
Î
ÌÌ
Î
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÌÌÌÌÌÌ
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
A
(DEVICE 31)
B
(DEVICE 31)
a42477
SELECTED BUS
BUS A
BUS B
1
2
3
4A
BSM
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
ÎÎ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
ÎÎ
ÌÌ
ÌÌ
4B
105
6
Number of Bus Devices on a Dual Bus
Up to 30 bus devices can be connected, either directly or as part of a cluster, to a dual
bus. Redundant devices count toward both busses’ totals. Non–redundant devices only
count in the total of the bus to which they are directly connected. That means more devices can be used on a dual bus if some are not redundant.
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 30)
BUS A
a44720
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 31)
BUS B
BSM
BSM
NOTE
30 BLOCKS TOTAL
Number of Bus Controllers in a PLC with Dual Busses
Although using non–redundant devices on a dual bus increases the total number of bus
devices that can be used on a dual bus, it decreases the number of Bus Controllers that can be
used in the PLC. That is because any Bus Controller that has both redundant devices and
non–redundant devices on its bus counts as 2 Bus Controllers against the total of 31 permitted in a system.
Counts as two Bus Controllers, because its bus
includes both non–redundant and redundant blocks
1
2
In a large system, grouping non–redundant devices on the same bus or busses will permit the greatest number of Bus Controllers to be used in the PLC. For example, a PLC
could have 30 Bus Controllers with all redundant devices, and 1 Bus Controller with all
non–redundant devices.
106
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Dual Bus with the Bus Controllers in Two PLCs
In a dual bus system where the Bus Controllers are in the same PLC, the same application program automatically acts on inputs received from the devices and creates outputs
for them, regardless of which bus is active at any given time.
But if the Bus Controllers are NOT in he same PLC, the application program must monitor the busses dynamically to determine the correct reference to use at any given time.
Because the CPUs cannot communicate with each other on the dual bus, another Bus
Controller is needed in each CPU, on each bus, to transmit synchronization data between the two CPUs. Global Data or datagrams can be used.
a44893
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 29)
(DEVICE 31)
(DEVICE 30)
(DEVICE 28)
1
2
3
4
5
The illustration shows an optional Bus Controller in each CPU, connected via an additional Genius bus, for data sharing between the CPUs. In this example, the additional
Bus Controllers are for communications only; they do not control I/O. In that case, it is
not necessary to give them the same Bus Addresses.
Disabling Outputs from the Backup Bus Controller
When using bus redundancy with two PLCs, it may be necessary to disable the outputs
sent by the backup Bus Controller until the application program has logged in all the
devices, then enable outputs under program control. If this is done, the additional time
without outputs must not cause the total time without outputs to exceed the 2.5 or 10
second timeout selected for the block.
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
107
6
Redundant Controllers
Redundant controllers provide backup controller protection for devices on a bus. The
redundant controllers can be in the same PLC (in the same rack or in different racks), or
in two PLCs.
Bus Controller redundancy with one PLC provides protection against failure of the Bus
Controller.
Bus Controller redundancy with two PLCs, represented below, provides protection
against failure in the Bus Controller or elsewhere in the primary PLC.
Î Î
1
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
(DEVICE 31)
(DEVICE 30)
2
3
a43558
4
5
Synchronizing Dual CPUs
Since bus devices broadcast their inputs to all CPUs on a bus, redundant Bus Controllers
in separate PLCs need to maintain synchronization of their output data. Datagrams and
Global Data can be used to synchronize the PLCs.
Either PLC can monitor the outputs of the other using the Outputs with Feedback feature of discrete Genius I/O blocks. Since I/O blocks can monitor the actual state of the
load and feed this state back to the PLC as input data, both PLCs can monitor the actual
state of all outputs.
108
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Bus Device Configuration: Hot Standby or Duplex Mode
For a redundant controller system, devices on the bus can be individually configured
(using a Hand–held Monitor or Write Configuration datagrams) for Hot Standby or Duplex CPU Redundancy mode, or none.
Hot Standby Mode
If the system does NOT require bumpless transfer of control from one PLC to the other,
devices on the bus can be configured for Hot Standby CPU redundancy. Here, Hot
Standby mode is shown using two PLCs. However, it can also be done with one PLC;
with one rack or separate racks.
Bus Controller
31
outputs '''
Bus Controller
30
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
In Hot Standby mode, blocks receive outputs from both Bus Controllers, but they are
normally controlled directly by the Bus Controller at Bus Address (Device Number) 31.
If no output data is available from Bus Address 31 for a period of three bus scans, the
outputs are immediately controlled by the Bus Controller at Bus Address 30. If output
data is not available from either 30 or 31, outputs go to their configured default or hold
their last state. The Bus Controller at Bus Address 31 always has priority, so that when
31 is on–line, it always has control of the outputs.
Analog blocks, when configured for CPU redundancy, must be operated in Hot Standby
redundancy mode.
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
109
6
Duplex Redundancy Mode
If a bus device is configured for Duplex mode, it receives outputs from BOTH Bus Address 30 and 31 and compares them. Here, Duplex mode is shown using two PLCs. It
can also be done with one PLC, with one rack or separate racks.
31
30
outputs '''
outputs '''
If both outputs are the same, the device sets the output to that state. If both outputs are
not the same, the device sets the output to its preselected Duplex Default State. The following table shows how outputs operate in Duplex redundancy.
Commanded
State, from Bus
Address 31
Commanded
State, from Bus
Address 30
Configured
Duplex Default
State
On
Off
Off
On
On
On
Off
Off
Don‘t Care
Off
Don’t Care
On
Actual Output
State
On
Off *
Off
On *
* Decided by “Duplex Default State” selection.
If either 30 or 31 stops sending outputs to a device, the outputs are directly controlled by
the remaining device.
Only discrete blocks can be configured for Duplex redundancy mode. If there are analog blocks
on the same bus, they can be configured in Hot Standby mode or no CPU redundancy.
Note
In both Hot Standby and Duplex modes, both CPUs get the inputs from the
blocks automatically. In addition, the blocks automatically send fault reports to both Bus Controllers.
110
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Dual Bus and Redundant Controllers
The two methods just described can be combined for dual bus and controller redundancy. A dual bus/dual controller system provides protection against failure in the bus trunk
cable, the Bus Controller and the PLC. Through application programming, dual bus/
dual controller redundancy can be implemented in two different ways:
A. For operation with both Hot Standby and Duplex devices on the bus. This application does NOT provide bumpless transfer of control.
B. For bumpless transfer of control as long as both Bus Controllers in the primary PLC
are available (transfer is not bumpless between PLCs, however). This application is
not suitable for devices that must operate in Duplex CPU Redundancy mode.
Details of both types of application are given on the following pages.
Basic Operation of a Dual Bus/Dual Controller System
Both Bus Controllers in a given Series 90–70 PLC must use the same Bus Address (either
30 or 31).
a42472
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
A
(DEVICE 31)
B
(DEVICE 31)
A
(DEVICE 30)
B
(DEVICE 30)
BUS A
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
BUS B
1
BSM
2
3
4A
4B
BSM
In the example system represented above, both bus A and bus B operate in the same
way as a single bus, dual CPU system. Blocks 1, 2, and 3 interface to both PLCs via Bus
Controllers 31(A) and 30(A) whenever the active bus is bus A, or via Bus Controllers
31(B) and 30(B) whenever the active bus is bus B. Block 4(A) interfaces to both PLCs via
Bus Controllers 31(A) and 30(A). Block 4(B) interfaces to both PLCs via Bus Controllers
31(B) and 30(B).
Outputs
All four Bus Controllers are capable of sending outputs, although only outputs from the
Bus Controllers on the active bus are actually received. It may be necessary to disable the
outputs sent by the backup Bus Controller until the application program has logged in
all the devices, then enable outputs under program control. If this is done, the additional time without outputs must not cause the total time without outputs to exceed the 2.5
or 10 second timeout selected for the block.
Inputs and Diagnostics
Both Bus Controllers on the selected bus automatically receive all inputs and fault reports from any device on the bus that has been configured as being in “CPU Redundancy” mode.
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
111
6
Bus and Controller Redundancy for Hot Standby Devices
When both PLCs provide outputs, and devices are configured for Hot Standby CPU Redundancy, the sequence of control in case of bus controller, bus, or PLC failure is:
'
'
'
primar y PLC, bus A
backup PLC, bus A
primar y PLC, bus B
backup PLC, bus B
Because the PLCs are operating independently, each time the control switches from one
PLC to the other there may be a “bump” in the process. This may be of no consequence
in some applications, and of significant consequence in others.
31
Normal Operation
30
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
outputs '
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
ÇÇ
A
B
In the default setup shown at left, during normal operation Bus
Controller 31A in the primary PLC controls all devices set up for
Hot Standby CPU redundancy.
B
•
A
31
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇÇ
A
B
Control Passes to Backup PLC on Bus A
30
Ç
Ç
Ç
A
B
If the device fails to receive valid output data from Bus Controller 31 for three bus scans, it will permit Bus Controller 30A to
control its outputs.
B
outputs ' •
A
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
31
A
Control Passes to Bus B
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
ÇÇ
30
B
A
outputs '
B
If the device that controls bus switching stops receiving outputs
from bus A for a period of three bus scans, it switches to bus B.
Normal operation then resumes on bus B. Bus Controller 31B
controls (in the primary PLC) controls all devices set up for Hot
Standby CPU redundancy.
B
•
A
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
31
A
B
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
A
Control Passes to Backup PLC on Bus B
30
B
If the device fails to receive valid output data from Bus Controller 31 for three bus scans,it will permit Bus Controller 30B to
control its outputs.
outputs '
B
•
A
112
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Bus and Controller Redundancy for Duplex Devices
If the application requires that bus devices operate in Duplex CPU Redundancy mode,
outputs must be enabled to both the primary and the backup PLC. The sequence of control in case of Bus Controller, bus, or PLC failure is:
'
'
'
control shared by Bus Controllers 31 and 30 on bus A
Bus Controller 30, bus A
control shared by Bus Controllers 31 and 30 on bus B
Bus Controller 30, bus B
Because the PLCs are operating independently, each time the control switches from one
PLC to the other there may be a “bump” in the process. This may be of no consequence
in some applications, and of significant consequence in others.
31
Normal Operation
30
ÇÇ
Ç
A
B
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
In the default setup shown at left, during normal operation Bus
Controllers 31A and 30A jointly control any devices set up for
Duplex CPU redundancy.
B
outputs ' •
outputs '
A
31
Devices Controlled by Bus Controller 30 on Bus A
30
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
If a duplex device fails to receive output data from Bus Controller 31A for three bus scans, it will permit Bus Controller 30A to
control its outputs.
B
outputs ' •
A
31
ÇÇ
Ç
A
B
Ç
Ç
Ç
outputs '
Control Passes to Bus B
30
A
B
outputs '
B
•
If the device that controls bus switching stops receiving outputs
from bus A for a period of three bus scans, it switches to bus B.
Normal operation then resumes on bus B. Bus Controllers 31B
and 30B jointly control any devices set up for Duplex CPU redundancy.
A
31
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
Ç
Ç
Ç
A
Control Passes to Backup PLC on Bus B
30
B
If a duplex device fails to receive output data from Bus Controller 31B for three bus scans, it will permit Bus Controller 30B to
control its outputs.
outputs '
B
•
A
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
113
6
Operation Remains with Primary PLC, Dual Bus and Dual Controllers
The following application is for devices configured in Hot Standby CPU Redundancy
mode. It is not suitable for devices that operate in Duplex CPU redundancy mode. The
order of control is:
'
'
'
primary PLC, bus A
primar y PLC, bus B
backup PLC, bus B
backup PLC, bus A
This provides “bumpless” transfer of control within the primary PLC, and within the
backup PLC, although there will still be a bump in the process when control is transferred from PLC to PLC.
31
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇ
A
B
outputs
disabled ¿
Normal Operation
30
Ç
Ç
Ç
A
B
outputs '
B
•
During normal operation, Bus Controller 31A in the primary
PLC controls all devices. At powerup, the application program
in the backup PLC sends a Disable Outputs COMREQ to Bus
Controller 30A. That prevents the backup PLC from assuming
control following a bus switch from bus A to bus B (see below).
A
ÇÇ
Ç
outputs
reenabled ¿
31
A
B
outputs '
Control Passes to Bus B
30
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
ÇÇ
A
B
B
•
A
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
31
A
B
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
30
A
Because Bus Controller 30A in the backup PLC is not sending
outputs, if the bus switching device stops receiving outputs
from Bus Controller 31A for a period of three bus scans, it
switches to bus B. Normal operation then resumes on bus B. Bus
Controller 31B in the primary PLC controls all devices set up for
Hot Standby CPU redundancy. After the bus switch is completed, the application program in the backup PLC should re–
enable outputs from Bus Controller 30A, so it will be ready to
resume control if needed.
B
Control Passes to Backup PLC on Bus B
outputs '
•
B
If Bus Controller 31B stops sending outputs, or if the primary
PLC is not available when the bus switches, Bus Controller 30B
in the backup PLC controls all devices.
A
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
ÇÇÇÇ
ÇÇ
31
A
B
Ç
Ç
Ç
Ç
Control Passes to Backup PLC on Bus A
30
A
B
B
outputs ' •
A
114
If a device stops receiving outputs from Bus Controller 30B for
three bus scans, the bus switches to A again. If outputs from Bus
Controller 31A have not been restored, Bus Controller 30A in
the backup PLC assumes control. If outputs from Bus Controller
31A have been restored, normal operation resumes. The application program in the backup PLC should once again disable
outputs from Bus Controller 30A to bring the system back to its
original operating mode.
Series 90–70 Genius Bus Controller User’s Manual – June 1992
6
Genius Redundancy for Series 90–70 Rev. 3
Bus redundancy for a rev. 3 CPU and Bus Controller requires the written approval of GE
Intelligent Platforms application engineering. Operation of bus redundancy is as described
earlier in this chapter.
Dual Bus and Dual Controllers
To provide CPU redundancy, Bus Controller redundancy, and bus redundancy, a Series
90–70 PLC with version 3 CPU and Bus Controller must include two or four CPUs and
four Bus Controllers. Clusters of up to eight devices each can be connected to both
busses by bus switching devices.
a43457
CPU
CPU
CPU
CPU
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS
CONTROLLER
BUS A
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
BUS B
BSM
BSM
CONTROLLER
BLOCK
UP TO 7
MORE BLOCKS
A system like the one depicted above provides protection against single point failure in a
CPU or Bus Controller or on a bus trunk cable. It does not protect against failure of a bus
switching device, a BSM controller block, or a bus stub connecting blocks in a cluster.
The devices in each cluster communicate only with the bus that is currently selected. The
other CPU does not receive inputs, Report Fault datagrams, or Configuration Change
datagrams from the blocks. Therefore, if the switching device switches busses, the newly–selected CPUs will not have the most current inputs or diagnostics from the devices
in the cluster.
In a version 3 system, bus devices MUST be configured with one set of references for
operations on bus A, and a separate set of references for operations on bus B. The application program must decide which bus is operational, and use the appropriate set of
references for the devices’ I/O data.
Chapter 6 Data Monitoring, Distributed Control, and Redundancy
115
Appendix A ASCII Code List
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
A
In Read Device and Write Device datagrams, either uppercase or lowercase letters can be
used for program and task names if the Bus Controller is version 3.0 or later. For earlier versions of the Series 90–70 Bus Controller, program and task names must be all uppercase.
Char.
Dec.
Hex.
Char.
Dec.
Hex.
Char.
Dec.
Hex.
NUL
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
BEL
BS
HT
LF
VT
FF
CR
SO
SI
DLE
DC1
DC2
DC3
DC4
NAK
SYN
ETB
CAN
EM
SUB
ESC
FS
GS
RS
US
SP
!
’’
#
$
%
&
’
(
)
*
+
,
–
.
/
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
0A
0B
0C
0D
0E
0F
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
1F
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
2F
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
:
;
<
=
>
?
@
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
3F
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
4F
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
5A
[
\
]
^
_
’
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z
{
|
}
~
“
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
5B
5C
5D
5E
5F
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
6A
6B
6C
6D
6E
6F
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
7A
7B
7C
7D
7E
7F
117
Index
A
AD Comm fault, 60
Bus Fault status reference, 54
Bus Interface Modules, 34
Add. of Bus Controller fault, 60
Bus Out Disable fault, 60
Addition of Block fault, 60
Bus Scan, 5 , 92
Addition of Bus Controller status reference, 54
Bus Scan Time, 95
Addition of I/O Module status reference,
54
Addition of Rack status reference, 54
AIHi/LowAlarm fault, 59
AIUnder/Overrange fault, 59
Alarm Contacts, 56
Analog Data Format, 6 , 27
C
Cal Mem fault, 60
Catalog Number, 1
Circuit Faults, 59
Circuit Number, 57
Analog faults, 59
Clear All Circuit Faults COMREQ, 63 , 67 ,
79
AQ Under/Overrange fault, 59
Clear Circuit Fault COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 79
Assign Monitor COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 80
Command Block, 73 , 89
Assigned Monitor, 31
Communication Request Commands, 63
B
Baud Rate, 4 , 17
Bit or Byte mode for memory–access datagrams, 87
Bus
Configuration, 24
Connection to, 13
Continuity, 14
Length, 4
Terminating, 14
Type, 4
Bus Address, 17
Bus Controller
Configuration, 16 , 35
Description, 3
Installation, 12
Number in System, 1
Operation, 5
Removal, 12
Version required for redundancy, 21
Bus Controller configuration examples, 39
Bus Controller Fault status reference, 54
BUS CONTROLLER software fault, 61
Bus Error Rate, 58
118
Bus fault, 60
COMREQ, 63
Command Block, 65
Command Numbers, 66
Commands
Assign Monitor, 67 , 80
Clear All Circuit Faults, 67 , 79
Clear Circuit Fault, 67 , 79
Dequeue Datagram, 67 , 91
Global Data Enable, 67 , 83
I/OFault Categories Enable, 98
I/OFaults Enable, 67
Outputs Enabled, 67 , 82
Pulse Test, 67 , 75
Read Configuration, 67 , 76
Read Device, 67 , 85
Read Diagnostics, 67 , 78
Request Datagram Reply, 67 , 97
Send Datagram, 67 , 94
Switch BSM, 67 , 84
Write Configuration, 67 , 77
Write Device, 67 , 90
Examples, 72 , 73
Outputs, 69
Program Instruction, 68
Quick Reference, 67
Status, 71
Status Block, 70
Status Pointer, 65
COMREQs and Passwords, Allowable
password levels, 63
Index
Config Mem fault, 60
Configuration, 15
Bus Controller, 16 , 35
Devices on bus, 24
Generic I/O Device, 38
Global Data, 18 , 35
High–speed Counter, 36
I/O blocks, 25
Other devices, 34
PCIM, QBIM, 35
PowerTRAC Block, 37
Remote I/O Scanner, 33
E
Enable/Disable Global Data COMREQ, 63
, 83
Enable/Disable Outputs COMREQ, 63 , 82
Errors, number on bus, 17
Excessive faults, 61
External GBC, redundant, configuration,
23
Extra Block fault, 61
Configuration mismatch reference, 54
Connection to the Bus, 13
CPU Redundancy, 108
CPU Sweep, 92 , 95
CS Feedback Error fault, 59
D
F
Fault
Category, 57
Contacts, 55
Description, 57
Location, 57
Type, 57
Fault Clearing, 58
Fault Identification Reference, 59
Data Monitoring, 31 , 100
Fault Locating References, 55
Data quantities, 2
Fault Logged, status reference, 54
Datagram Priority, 95
Datagrams, 8 , 66
Incoming, 74 , 92
Number per CPU Sweep, 95
Priority, 94
Ways to Send, 74 , 94
Dequeue Datagram Command, 91
Dequeue Datagram COMREQ, 67
Device Number, 17 , 24
Device Number selection, 33
DG Queue fault, 61
Fault Reports, disable sending to CPU, 98
Fault Table, 57
Faults, number of, 58
Forced/Unforced Circuit fault, 61
Fuse Blown fault, 59 , 60
G
GBC Software Exception fault, 61
GENA faults, 59
Generic I/O Device, configuration, 38
Genius blocks, 1 , 2
Diagnostics, 7 , 15 , 53 , 100
Genius Bus Scan, 5
Disable Outputs, 30 , 31
Global Data, 90
%G memory for, 18 , 20
Automatic configuration, 18
Configuration, 18 , 35
Length, 18
Receiving, 35
Discrete faults, 59
Distributed Control, 30
Dual Bus, configuration, 22
119
Index
Reference for another host type, 18
Series 90–70 PLC, 9
Global Data Enable COMREQ, 67 , 83
H
Hand–held Monitor, 1
Compatibility, 3
Connector on Bus Controller, 3
Headend fault, 60
HIgh Error Rate fault, 61
High–speed Counter, 26
High–speed Counter, configuration, 36
L
LEDs
Channel OK, 3 , 17
I/O Enabled, blocks, 30
Module OK, 3
LL Analog Faults, 59
Logicmaster 90 software, version required
for redundancy, 21
Loss of Block fault, 58 , 60
Loss of BUS CONTROLLER fault, 61
Loss of Bus Controller status reference, 54
Loss of I/O Module status reference, 54
Loss of or Missing IOC fault, 23
Loss of Rack status reference, 54
Loss Power fault, 59
I
I/O block configuration, 25
LP Mail Rejected fault, 61
M
I/O Blocks, 1 , 2
Memory for Global Data, 18 , 20
I/O bus fault, 60
Memory for I/O Blocks, 2 , 26
I/O data, 2
Memory for Read/Write Device, 86
I/OFault Categories Enable COMREQ, 67
, 98
Modulation technique, 4
I/OFault Table capacity, 58
Monitoring, 100
Module Description, 3
I/O Module Fault status reference, 54
I/OTable Full, status reference, 54
N
Input Short fault, 59
No Fault contacts, 55
Inputs, Monitoring, 100
No Load fault, 59
Inputs and Outputs, 5 , 6 , 27
Not Spec fault, 60
Install the Bus Controller, 12
Internal fault, 59
O
Internal GBC, redundant, configuration,
23
Open Wire fault, 59
Intrnal Ckt fault, 60
Outputs Enable COMREQ, 67 , 82
Isolation, 4
Over Temp fault, 59
Outputs, Disable, 30 , 31 , 38
Overload fault, 59
J
Jumpers on Terminal Assembly, 14
120
P
Paired GBC, configuration, 23
Index
Passwords, Levels suitable for COMREQs,
63
PCIM
Configuration, 35
Receiving Global Data, 9
Point fault, 59 , 60
PowerTRAC Block, configuration, 37
Priority, 95
Programming for a COMREQ, 64
Pulse Test COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 75
RW Queue Full fault, 61
S
SBA conflict fault, 60
Send Datagram COMREQ, 67 , 94
Series 90–70 PLC, version required for redundancy, 21
Series 90–70 PLC Global Data Operation,
9
Share RAM fault, 60
Q
QBIM
Configuration, 35
Receiving Global Data, 9
Short Circuit fault, 59
Signal/noise ratio, 4
Software Failure status reference, 54
Status LEDs, 3
Status of COMREQ, 71
R
Read Configuration COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 76
Read Configuration Datagram, 97
Read Data Datagram, 97
Read Device COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 85
Read Device Datagram, 97
Read Diagnostics COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 78
Subfunction Code, 74 , 97
Switch BSM COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 84
Switch Fault fault, 59
Switching time, of redundant bus, configuration, 23
System Status references, 54
T
Read Diagnostics Datagram, 97
Terminating the Bus, 14
Redundancy, 32 , 102
configuration, 21
configuration examples, 40 , 42 , 44 , 46 ,
48 , 50
configuration instructions, 21
Timing, Bus scan and CPU sweep, 95
Token passing, 5
Too Many Bus Controllers, status reference, 54
Redundancy Mode, configuration, 21 , 22
Redundancy, references for, 27
Redundant control, configuration, 22
Reference Address, 26 , 57
U
User Scaling Error fault, 60
References, not used, 2
References, status, 54
W
Remote Drop, 1 , 33
Remote I/O Scanner, 33
Remove the Bus Controller, 12
Request Datagram Reply COMREQ, 67 ,
97
WD Timeout fault, 60
Wiring Error fault, 59
Write Configuration COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 77
Write Device COMREQ, 63 , 67 , 90
121
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