Electronic interfacing with a head

Electronic interfacing with a head
US008031878B2
(12) Ulllted States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
Gauger, Jr. et al.
(45) Date of Patent:
(54) ELECTRONIC INTERFACING WITHA
2
_
,
HEAD MOUNTED DEVICE
,
6,108,415 A
_
(75)
_
243$, 11 etlal
ea et a .
8/2000 Andrea
6,415,034 B1*
7/2002
6,445,799 B1
9/2002 Taenzer et al‘
(US); Roman Sapiejewski, Boston, MA
6,507,650 B1
1/2003 Moquin
(Us)
6,735,316 B1*
5/2004 WuItZ ........................... .. 381/74
6,873,862 B2
.
6,975,984 B2
(73) Ass1gnee: Bose Corporation
_
_
Not1ce:
_
7,058,182 B2
_
_
7,110,800 B2
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
7,155,214 B2
7,181,233 B2
DE
Prior Publication Data
Us 2007/0025561 A1
A
l
t l.
9/2006
Nagayasu et a1.
12/2006 Struthers et a1,
2/2007 Fry
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
Jul. 28, 2005
(65)
M
600% K3068 usane a
(Continued)
(21) Appl. No.: 11/191,873
(22) Filed:
Hietanen .................... .. 381/71.6
3/2005 Reshefsky
12/2005
U.S.C. 154(b) by 1423 days.
(51)
Oct. 4, 2011
Inventors: Daniel M. Gauger, Jr., Cambridge, MA
-
(*)
US 8,031,878 B2
Feb’ 1’ 2007
20 2006 oo46zs(cominjéigo6
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
http://WWW.u?ymike.c0m/indeX.html, pp. 1-2, Downloaded Apr. 18,
2005.
Int. Cl.
H04R 1/10
(2006.01)
H04R 25/00
(2006.01)
H04R 5/02
(200601)
A61F 11/06
(2006.01)
H04M1/00
(2006.01)
(Continued)
Primary Examiner * Devona Faulk
(57)
ABSTRACT
(52)
US. Cl. ......... .. 381/74; 381/72; 381/71.6; 381/370;
Power is delivered from a power Source in a head_moumed
(58)
_
_
_
381L311’ 455/5691
Field of Classi?cation Search .................. .. 381/74,
device to a separate accessory that is coupled to the head
mounted device_ pOWer and Signals are delivered on a Com_
981/72’ 716’ 370> 311; 455/3453 297> 569-1
mon conductor that couples the head-mounted device to an
See aPPhCaUOn ?le for Complete Search hlstory_
(56)
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US 8,031,878 B2
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8i
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* cited by examiner
US. Patent
0a. 4, 2011
Sheet 1 of6
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US. Patent
0a. 4, 2011
Sheet 2 0f 6
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US. Patent
0a. 4, 2011
Sheet 5 of6
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US. Patent
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Sheet 6 of6
600\
US 8,031,878 B2
608\
Accessory
Head-Mounted
Device
604\
Power
605
606\
/
Electronic
Source
Circuit
FIG. 6
US 8,031,878 B2
1
2
ELECTRONIC INTERFACING WITH A
HEAD-MOUNTED DEVICE
tor carries poWer from the audio device to an accessory and
BACKGROUND
mounted on a head includes a transducer to deliver sound to
an ear, a signaling device to communicate With an accessory
This description relates to electronic interfacing With a
head-mounted device.
Audio signals, for example, are typically carried to a head
that is connected to the audio device, and a Wired channel to
signals betWeen the audio device and the accessory.
In general, in another aspect, an audio device to be
carry con?guration signals back and forth betWeen the head
mounted audio device and the accessory.
In general, in another aspect, an audio device to be
phone through a multiple-conductor cable ending in a plug
mounted on a head includes a transducer to deliver sound to
an ear, a poWer source, and a dedicated poWer conductor to
that ?ts into a jack of a player or radio. When a microphone is
added to the headphone to form a headset, the microphone
signal also may be carried through the same cable to a device
deliver poWer from the poWer source to an accessory coupled
to the audio device, and a Wired channel carries con?guration
signals back and forth betWeen the head-mounted audio
that uses the microphone signal, such as a telephone set or a
recorder. In aviation headsets, the cable may be detachable at
a jack on the headset to permit changes in the use of the
headset.
device and an accessory that is connected to the audio device.
In general, in another aspect, an accessory to be coupled to
a head-mounted device has a conductor to connect to a dedi
The connecting cable may also be disconnected from typi
cal noise reduction headphones When the user is using only
the noise reduction feature and is not using audio from a
player or radio. The circuits that are part of noise reduction
cated poWer conductor of the device to receive poWer for the
accessory.
20
headphones may be poWered by batteries mounted in the
signals With a head-mounted device.
In general, in another aspect, an accessory having a com
mon conductor carries poWer and signals betWeen the acces
headphones.
In some military communication headsets, a detachable
microphone plug may both carry the microphone signal to an
intercom circuit and microphone poWer.
Headsets that can be plugged into cell phones for hands
free use commonly use electret microphones that receive bias
voltage from the cell phone’s poWer source.
Portable music players may provide poWer to run electron
In general, in another aspect, an accessory having a signal
ing device conducts Wired communication of con?guration
25
sory and a head-mounted device.
In general, in another aspect, an accessory has a device that
uses poWer and a conductor receives poWer for the device
from a head-mounted device.
In general, in another aspect, poWer is delivered from a
30
poWer source in a portable accessory to a head-mounted
ics in peripheral devices such as transmitters to an FM radio
device that is coupled to the portable accessory and uses
in, for example, an automobile.
In the Universal Serial Port (U SB) standard, poWer may be
poWer for circuitry in the head-mounted device that delivers
provided by a USB host or hub to a USB peripheral through
a USB connector. The host and peripheral may exchange
audio to a user.
35
messages (using the USB standard’s handshaking and poWer
management features) regarding one another’s identity and
operational parameters. The messages may include hoW
a headphone and a headset. The head-mounted device com
prises an audio device. The head-mounted device includes at
least one of active noise reduction circuitry, ampli?cation
circuitry, or audio processing circuitry. The accessory com
much poWer the peripheral Will use in different operational
states or the amount of memory available in the peripheral.
Implementations may include one or more of the folloWing
features. The head-mounted device comprises at least one of
40
USB headsets may be con?gured as peripherals in interaction
With other devices.
prises at least one of a music player, a Wireless receiver, a
Wireless transceiver, or a radio. The device and the accessory
are coupled using a detachable cable that includes the con
SUMMARY
ductor. The signals comprise at least one of command, con
trol, or management signals. The poWer is delivered from a
45
source of poWer in the head-mounted device. The source of
In general, in one aspect, poWer is delivered from a poWer
poWer comprises a battery. The accessory is peripheral to the
source in a head-mounted device to a separate accessory that
head-mounted device. The poWer conductor is dedicated to
is coupled to the head-mounted device.
In general, in another aspect, poWer and signals are deliv
delivering poWer.
ered on a common conductor that couples a head-mounted 50
device to an accessory.
Other advantages and features Will become apparent from
the folloWing description and the claims.
In general, in another aspect, signals are passed back and
DESCRIPTION
forth betWeen a head-mounted device and an accessory that is
coupled by conductors to the head-mounted device, and one
or both of the head-mounted device and the accessory are
55
headphone.
con?gured based on the signals.
In general, in another aspect, poWer is received at an acces
sory from a head-mounted device through a poWer conductor,
for example, a dedicated poWer conductor.
In general, in another aspect, an audio device to be
FIGS. 3 and 4 are schematic diagrams.
FIG. 5 is a side vieW of a headphone jack.
FIG. 6 is a block diagram.
60
As shoWn in the speci?c example of FIG. 1, an audio
headphone 100 is served by a detachable accessory cable 400
that provides an interface betWeen the headphone and an
accessory (not shoWn), for example, a stereo or MP3 player,
a microphone for voice sensing, an aviation or helicopter
65
interface cable, a cable connection to a USB host, or a module
mounted on a head comprises a transducer to deliver sound to
an ear and a poWer source, and a conductor delivers poWer
from the poWer source to an accessory coupled to the audio
device.
In general, in another aspect, an audio device mounted on
FIG. 1 is a front vieW of a headphone partially cutaWay.
FIG. 2 is a perspective vieW ofan accessory module and a
a head includes a transducer to deliver sound to an ear, a
162 (describedbeloW) that connects directly to the headphone
poWer source, and a signaling device, and a common conduc
100. The headphone 100 is an example of a head-mounted
US 8,031,878 B2
4
3
Similarly, the right earcup 104 is rotatably connected to the
device. A headset (Which includes a microphone) is another
example. The phrase head-mounted device is meant to
include every possible sort of electronic device that is
mounted on the head or any part of the head (for example an
right adjustment sleeve110 by the earcup adjustment mount
The detachable accessory cable 400 may alloW for a func
128. The earcup adjustment mount 128 may comprise one or
more rotational connectors 144 and 148. The earcup adjust
ment mount 128, as shoWn in this example, may comprise a
rotational pin 148 and a rotational connector 144. The rota
tional recon?guration of the headphone 100 for various plat
tional pin 148 enables the right earcup 104 to be rotatably
ear or a nose or the hair) for use by a Wearer.
adjusted about an axis 152. The rotational connector 144
forms. For example, an internal battery 160 that is used to
poWer electronics 134 and 136 (e. g., Active Noise Reduction,
ANR) in the headphone 100 may also be used to poWer
enables the right earpiece 104 to be rotatably adjusted about
a longitudinal axis 140.
In FIG. 1, the audio headphone 100 is shoWn in a stoWage
electronics in the accessory cable 400 or in the accessory to
position. The left earcup 102 and the right earcup 104 have
been rotated about longitudinal axes 138 and 140, respec
tively. In the stoWage position, the earcup cover 118 of the left
earcup 102 and the earcup cover 120 of the right earcup 104
Which the cable is connected.
The connection betWeen the detachable accessory cable
400 and the headphone 100 may be through a 3.5 mm, 0.25 in,
or other diameter j ack plug or telephone plug 41 0. Other types
of connectors may be used, for example connectors similar to
lie in a common plane.
The cutaWay of the earcup cover 118 reveals an opening to
the parallel-contact ones commonly found on some cell
phones. PoWer may be supplied from the headphone 100 to
the accessory cable 400 by one of the four metal contacts of
20
the plug 410. The poWer provided by the headphone 100 to
the electronics in the accessory cable 400 may be voltage
regulated poWer, current regulated poWer, raW battery poWer,
DC, AC, fuel cell, or solar cell, or any other poWer source.
In addition to providing poWer, the detachable accessory
25
cable 400 may serve as a Wired channel to carry control or
management signals betWeen the headphone 100 and the
accessory, for example, for use in handshaking and con?gu
electronic interfacing With the accessory poWer management
circuit, left earcup speaker, and the left earcup ANR electron
ics. Similarly, the cutaWay of the earcup cover 120 reveals the
electronics 136 Which may be contained Within the right
earcup chamber 132. The electronics 136 includes an ANR
enable sWitch 158, the battery 160 for the headphone poWer
supply, the headphone poWer supply circuit, the right earcup
ration (described beloW).
The headphone 100 includes a left earcup 102 and a right
an accessory insertion channel 153 for the accessory plug
410. The cutaWay of the earcup cover 118 also reveals the
electronics 134 that may be contained Within the left earcup
chamber 130. The electronics 134 may include a jack 154 that
mates With the plug 410 of the accessory cable 400 to permit
30
speaker, and the right earcup ANR electronics.
earcup 104 connected to a headband 106 that includes a left
Referring to FIG. 2, an example accessory module 162
adjustment sleeve 108 ?xed to a center span 112 by a connec
tor 109 and a right adjustment sleeve 110 connected to the
center span 112 by a connector 111. In some examples, the
headband 106 may be comprised of other numbers and con
connects directly through the accessory insertion channel 153
35
?gurations of elements. The left adjustment sleeve 108 and
the right adjustment sleeve alloW the Wearer to adjust the
position of the left earcup 102 and the right earcup 104 rela
tive to the center span 112 to accommodate siZe requirements
and comfort preferences of different Wearers.
ShoWn as a partial cutaWay in FIG. 1, the left earcup 102
include the accessory poWer management electronics 164,
left earcup speaker 166, and the left earcup ANR electronics
40
168.
The example accessory module 162 includes electronics
170 that provide the Wearer With a hands-free Wireless (e. g.,
includes an earcup housing 114, an earcup cover 118, an
earcup audio seal (not shoWn in FIG. 1), and an earcup angu
lar adjustment mount 126.
Similarly, the right earcup 104 (also shoWn as a partial
cutaWay in FIG. 1) includes an earcup housing 116, an earcup
cover 120, an earcup audio seal 124, and an earcup angular
adjustment mount 128.
The earcup cover 118 is connected to the earcup housing
using an accessory plug 410 mounted on the accessory mod
ule 162, rather than using a cable. The earcup cover 118 of the
left earcup 102 has been removed to reveal the electronics 134
mounted Within the left earcup chamber 130. The electronics
134 revealed by the removal of the earcup cover 118 may
Bluetooth) connection to a cell phone (not shoWn). The acces
45
sory module 162 also may include a microphone 172 that may
pick up the sound of a Wearer’s voice. The accessory module
162 and the microphone 172 receive poWer from the head
phone battery 160. In some implementations, the accessory
module may include electronics 170 that, for example, pro
vide the Wearer With a Wireless connection to a stereo or MP3
114 to de?ne a left earcup chamber 130. The earcup cover 120 50 player audio source, an aviation or helicopter interface, a
is connected to the earcup housing 116 to form a right earcup
chamber 132. The left and right earcup chambers 130 and 132
contain left and right electronics 134 and 136, respectively. In
the example of FIG. 1, the left and right electronics 134 and
136 provide and control headphone 100 functions that may
include ANR, headphone poWer supply, and accessory poWer
USB host, or the like.
The detachable module 162 may alloW for a functional
recon?guration of the headphone 100 for use on a variety of
55
platforms. For example, the headphone 100 may contain an
internal battery (not shoWn) to poWer the ANR electronics
1 68 in the headphone 1 00. The internal battery may be used to
management (described beloW).
poWer electronics in the accessory module 162 that may
The left earcup 102 is rotatably connected to the left adjust
ment sleeve 108 by the earcup adjustment mount 126. The
interface With the headphone 100. The poWer may be supplied
from the headphone 100 to the accessory module 162 by one
of the contacts on the plug 410. The poWer provided by the
headphone battery 160 to the electronics 170 in the accessory
module 162 may be raW battery poWer, poWer that is voltage
or current regulated by the accessory poWer management
electronics 164 (discussed in FIGS. 3 and 4), or any other
earcup adjustment mount 126 may comprise one or more
rotational connectors 142 and 146. The earcup adjustment
mount 126, as shoWn in this example, may comprise a rota
tional pin 146 and a rotational connector 142. The rotational
pin 146 enables the left earcup 102 to be rotatably adjusted
about an axis 150. The rotational connector 142 enables the
left earcup 102 to be rotatably adjusted about a longitudinal
axis 138.
60
65 poWer source.
Some implementations may include signaling capabilities
betWeen the headphone 100 and the accessory module 162.
US 8,031,878 B2
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6
The signaling capabilities may be used for a Wide variety of
exemplary handshaking and con?guration protocol betWeen
purposes and functions, including handshaking, power sup
ply con?guration, or signal con?guration betWeen the head
the headphone 100 and accessory 302 While also managing
poWer How. The protocol may alloW the accessory 302 to pass
a binary or integer value N to the headphone 100 upon poWer
up. This value N may be used to identify Whether the acces
sory 302 is compatible for use With that headphone 100 or to
con?gure the headphone 100 in some fashion.
phone 100 and the accessory module 162.
As shoWn in FIG. 3, an example circuit 200 that may be
mounted in the headphone includes a boost converter 202 to
poWer the ANR headphone electronics 204 and an accessory
poWer management circuit 206. Circuit 200 is a portion of
Examples of headphone 100 con?gurations may include
headphone right earcup electronics 136 or alternatively a part
presenting a 32 ohm load through a cable connection acces
sory cable 400 to a typical audio source (e. g., home stereo) to
of left earcup electronics 134 or in some other location in the
emulate traditional passive consumer headphones. Another
headphone. The accessory poWer management circuit 206
may turn off the poWer supply to the accessory (e.g., 400 and
162) if the current draWn by the accessory (e.g., 400 and 162)
exceeds a maximum predetermined supply threshold.
The operation of the accessory poWer management circuit
example may include sWitching the left and right inputs 306
and 308 of the headphone 100 to a high impedance state When
connected to a Wireless accessory module 162 to minimize
poWer consumption and draW on the battery 310.
In such examples, the circuit includes tWo microcontrollers
312 and 314. The microcontroller Uh 312 is part ofthe head
phone electronics 134. The microcontroller Ua 314 is part of
206 is as folloWs. When the headphone 100 is ?rst turned on
using sWitch 230, Vcc 208 increases to a nominal value of 2.8
Vdc because of the action of boost circuit 202. The +input pin
210 of comparator Uc 212 is heldto a loW voltage as capacitor
Cto 214 charges. The —input pin 216 of comparator Uc 212 is
held to a higher voltage through Rb 218 so the comparator Uc
the accessory 302 electronics. The tWo microcontrollers 312
20
212 Will initially pull its output loW, turning on MOSFET Qa
220. MOSFET Qa 220 provides poWer Va 222 to the acces
sory (e.g., 400 and 162). The time constant Which is approxi
mately R11*Cto (items 224 and 214), since R12 is normally
25
and 314 may be Microchip Technology Inc. PIC-10F inte
grated circuits. Some implementations may use more sophis
ticated controllers that may already be present in the electron
ics of either the headphone 100 or the accessory 302 to
accomplish similar or additional functions. The microcon
trollers 312 and 314 may have code that may be ?ashed into
much greater than R11 may be chosen so that Qa 220 may be
memory to alloW the implementation of the folloWing hand
held on by +input pin 210 of comparator Uc 212 being held to
a loW enough voltage for the duration of any initially high
turn-on current spikes draWn by the accessory (e.g., 400 and
poWer sWitch 352 is turned to the on position, the microcon
162).
shaking and con?guration protocol: While the headphone 100
trollerUh 312 checks input I 316 periodically (typically every
30
Subsequently, if the current draWn from Va 222 by the
accessory (e.g., 400 and 162) exceeds a predetermined value
such that the voltage drop across the sense resistor Rs 228
exceeds the drop across R11 224 in the R11/R12 224/226
divider, then comparator Uc 212 output Will go to logic high
level, Qa 220 Will turn off, and Va 222 Will fall to essentially
Zero, latching the accessory (e.g., 400 and 162) poWer off.
35
40
example is just one possible implementation.
Some implementations of the accessory poWer manage
ment circuit 206 may include replacing the accessory poWer
management circuit 206, as shoWn in FIG. 3, With no poWer
management. In such examples, Va 222 may be directly con
nected to Vcc 208 and current limiting in the poWer supply
202 may be desirable. Possible current limiting implementa
tions may include a resistor, a circuit, or a device that clamps
the current to a maximum value (e.g., a Junction Field Effect
Transistor (JFET) connected to limit current to its saturation
45
sory 302 from operating. After having held output S 330 to a
50
55
60
sory device 302 on a conductor shared With voltage Va 318
provided to the accessory 302. For example, the circuit 300
device 302. The electronics 304 could replace the poWer
management circuitry 206 With circuitry to implement an
ler Ua 314 then releases S 330 to alloW Cdd 320 to recharge
to ensure su?icient voltage to keep poWering microcontroller
Ua 314 (typically 40 milliseconds). When microcontrollerUh
312 detects that input I 316 (voltage Va 318) has returned to a
logic high state it begins checking pin I 316 much more often
(i.e., every 100 microseconds). This begins the accessory
handshake sequence. After Cdd 320 recharges, the microcon
troller Ua 314 pulls S 330 to a logic loW level for 150 micro
seconds (typically), ensuring that the microcontroller Uh 312
detects that the input I 316 (voltage Va 318) is at a logic loW
Referring to FIG. 4, in some examples of the circuit 300
may enable electrical handshaking and con?guration signal
ing betWeen the headphone 100 and the poWered accessory
seconds) for the microcontroller Uh 312 to detect the pres
ence ofaccessory 302. Rhs 332 is ofa small enough value to
ensure that Va 318 is pulled beloW a predetermined threshold
of microcontroller Uh 312 input I 316. At Wake-up, and
logic loW level for 15 milliseconds (typically), microcontrol
requires.
poWer management and signaling electronics 304 enable sig
naling betWeen the headphone 100 and the poWered acces
alloWing Ua’ s 314 supply input feed by the voltage of Cdd to
approachVcc 326 less the drop across the Schottky diode Ddd
328, before pulling the output S 330 to a logic loW level. S 330
is held at a logic loW level long enough (typically 15 milli
during all handshaking, microcontroller Ua 314 pin 0 350 is
held high to keep MOSFET Qa 336 off, preventing the acces
value Idss). Another example may include a voltage regulator
(either sWitching or linear) to regulate Vcc 208 to the Va 222
required by the cable or module accessories 400 and 162. In
some implementations for poWer management, the head
phone poWer supply 202 may also be a raW voltage or a higher
voltage (e.g., lithium polymer) from a battery 232 and a buck
converter to create the Vcc 208 that the headphone 100
(typically 10 uF) charges through the resistor Rb 322 (typi
cally 2 Kohm) until the voltage is high enough for the micro
controller Ua 314 to be enabled. The microcontroller Ua 314
then Waits several time constants Rb*Cdd 322 and 320,
The Wearer Would need to turn the headphone 100 poWer off
and back on using the sWitch 230 in order to once again
provide poWer to the accessory (e.g., 400 and 162). This
10 milliseconds) to see ifthe voltage Va 318 is loW. This is to
detect the mating (or presence upon poWer up) of an acces
sory 302.
When an accessory 302 is mated, the capacitor Cdd 320
level. When the microcontroller Uh 312 detects Va 318 is at a
logic loW level it Zeros a handshake register. The microcon
troller Uh 312 continues checking the state of input I 316
every 100 microseconds. Every fourth check (i.e., every 400
microseconds) the value in the handshake register is incre
65
mented by one.
After the ?rst 150 microsecond (typically) strobe of pin S
330, the microcontroller Ua 314 Waits some multiple N of 400
US 8,031,878 B2
7
8
microseconds to strobe output S 330 loW for another 150
microsecond (typically) interval. The value of N is the infor
mation the accessory 302 Wishes to pass to the headphone 100
control, management, or command signals, or one or more
contacts and cable conductors may carry any combination of
poWer, audio signals, and control/command/management
signals by appropriate multiplexing techniques. In some
during the handshaking process. When the microcontroller
Uh 312 detects that the microcontroller Ua 314 has pulled Va
loW a second time, the 100-microsecond checking cycle and
the handshaking process is complete With the handshake reg
ister noW containing the value N passed from the accessory
302. In the circuit 300, as shoWn, N is compared against a
stored list in the headphone 100 to determine if the accessory
is compatible. If the accessory is compatible, the microcon
troller Uh 312 pulls output 0 334 loW turning on the MOS
FET Qh 338 to provide poWer to the accessory 302. The gate
of Qh 338 has been held to a logic high level by a pull-up
resistor Rgh 340. The output 0 334 could also be passed to the
ANR electronics 336 to accomplish some other con?gura
tion, such as the impedance matching mentioned earlier.
implementations, connectors other than a coaxial multi-con
tact phone plug may be used to connect the headphone to the
accessory. In some implementations, the cable is permanently
attached to the head-mounted device, and accessories are
connected to the free end of the cable.
In some implementations, for example, as shoWn in FIG. 6,
an accessory 600 such as a portable music player, radio, cell
phone, or other audio communication device may have its
oWn internal poWer source 604, and the poWer from that
source may be carried by a conductor 605 to poWer electronic
circuits 606 involved in providing audio to a user Within a
head-mounted device 608, for example, an ANR circuitry,
ampli?cation circuitry or other audio processing circuitry in a
headphone.
Meanwhile, after the second handshake-completing strobe
of pin S 330, the microcontroller Ua 314 Waits for the micro
controller Uh 312 to complete the handshake process and
Other embodiments are also Within the scope of the fol
20
con?gure the headphone 100. It then pulls the output 0 350
loW, turning on the MOSFET Qa 336, providing poWer to the
What is claimed is:
1. A method comprising
accessory 302 electronics. After the microcontroller Uh 314
turns on Qh 338, the microcontroller Uh 312 then begins
monitoring comparator inputs C+ 342 and C- 324. If C- 324
25
current exceeding the designed limit and transistor Qh 338 is
turned off by microcontroller Uh 312 output 0 334. The
current limit is determined by current sense resistor Rcl 344
the separate accessory that passes at least one of a binary
30
348.
Referring to FIG. 5, the body 470 of the accessory plug 410
may contain embedded or in-line electronics to perform vari
ous functions, such as audio and voice level control or passive
con?guration to an accessory. The body 470, as shoWn, may
35
on/off poWer sWitch, an audio attenuation sWitch, a mute
sWitch, or the like. Alternatively, body 470 may be enlarged as
shoWn in FIG. 2 to house all accessory electronics.
40
face With, for example, an audio output from a stereo or MP3
player, a hands-free connection to a cell phone (Wired or
Wireless), a microphone for voice sensing, an aviation or
helicopter, a connection to a USB host, or the like. For this
purpose the other end of the cable may be ?tted With a plug,
a socket, or another kind of connector or be Wired directly to
the accessory. Or as previously described, the accessory can
be attached directly to the plug Without the use of any cable.
45
con?guring one or both of the head-mounted device and
the accessory based on the signals.
2. The method of claim 1 in Which the head-mounted
device comprises at least one of a headphone and a headset.
3. The method of claim 1 in Which the head-mounted
device comprises an audio device.
at least one of a music player, a Wireless receiver, a Wireless
transceiver or a radio.
5. The method of claim 1 in Which the device and the
accessory are coupled using a detachable cable.
6. The method of claim 1 also comprising delivering poWer
50
and signals on a common conductor that couples the head
mounted device to the accessory.
7. An apparatus comprising
an audio device to be mounted on a head of a user and
comprising a transducer to deliver sound to an ear and a
The plug 410 of the accessory cable 400 comprises four
separate contacts that alloW the headphone to connect to the
mounted device to the separate accessory that is coupled
to the head-mounted device,
passing signals back and forth betWeen the head-mounted
device and the accessory, and
4. The method of claim 1 in Which the accessory comprises
connection to an accessory. The cable 420 and plug 410 may
provide the headphone 100 With the physical ability to inter
or integer preset value from the separate accessory to the
head-mounted device, and if the separate accessory is
determined to be compatible based upon the preset
value, delivering poWer from a poWer source in the head
also contain a sWitch 480 that may be con?gured for use as an
The plug 410 may mate With the jack 154 through the
accessory insertion channel 153 in the headphone 100. The
accessory plug 410 may contain a strain relief 490 and be
coupled to a single, dual, or multiple conductor cable 420
detecting a coupling of a head-mounted device to a sepa
rate accessory,
determining if the separate accessory is compatible With
the head-mounted device by communicating a con?gu
ration protocol betWeen the head-mounted device and
falls beloW the value at C+ 342, the accessory 302 has draWn
(typically 1 ohm) and limit setting resistors R11 346 and R12
loWing claims.
55
accessories. The contacts may, in this example be con?gured
poWer source,
a circuit to determine if a separate accessory adapted to
to serve a poWer circuit 430, a left audio channel 440, a right
audio channel 450, and a common or ground circuit 460. In
device by communicating a con?guration protocol
some implementations, the poWer circuit 430 may be con?g
ured as a handshaking, con?guration control, or communica
couple to the audio device is compatible With the audio
betWeen the audio device and the separate accessory that
60
tion interface line (e.g., Va 318, as described above) betWeen
the headphone 100 and the accessory. Conductors in the cable
from the separate accessory to the audio device,
a conductor to deliver poWer from the poWer source to a
are connected respectively to each of the contacts.
In some implementations, one or more of the contacts and
cable conductors can be dedicated to and carry only poWer,
one or more others may be dedicated to and carry only audio
signals, one or more others may be dedicated to carry only
passes at least one of a binary or integer preset value
65
separate accessory coupled to the audio device if the
circuit determines that the separate accessory is compat
ible With the audio device based upon the preset value,
a signaling device to communicate With an accessory that is
connected to the audio device, and
US 8,031,878 B2
9
10
27. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which
a Wired channel to carry con?guration signals back and
forth between the audio device and the separate acces
sory.
8. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the head-mounted
the accessory comprises a device that uses poWer and a
conductor to receive poWer for the device from a head
mounted device.
device comprises at least one of a headphone and a headset.
28. A method comprising
9. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the head-mounted
device comprises an audio device.
10. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the poWer is deliv
detecting a coupling of a head-mounted device to a por
table accessory,
ered from a source of poWer in the head-mounted device.
11. The apparatus of claim 10 in Which the source of poWer
10
comprises a battery.
the separate accessory that passes at least one of a binary
12. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the accessory com
prises at least one of a music player, a Wireless receiver, a
or integer preset value from the separate accessory to the
head-mounted device, and if the separate accessory is
determined to be compatible based upon the preset
Wireless transceiver, or a radio.
13. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the device and the
accessory are coupled using a detachable cable that includes
the conductor.
14. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the conductor is
dedicated to delivering poWer.
15. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the accessory is
peripheral to the head-mounted device.
determining if the separate accessory is compatible With
the head-mounted device by communicating a con?gu
ration protocol betWeen the head-mounted device and
value, delivering poWer from a poWer source in the por
table accessory to the head-mounted device that is
coupled to the portable accessory and uses the poWer for
circuitry in the head-mounted device that delivers audio
to a user,
20
passing signals back and forth betWeen the accessory and
the head-mounted device, and
16. The apparatus of claim 7 also including
con?guring one or both of the accessory and the head
mounted device based on the signal.
a signaling device to communicate With an accessory that is
connected to the audio device, and
a common conductor to carry poWer from the audio device 25
29. A method comprising
detecting a coupling of a head-mounted device to a sepa
rate accessory,
to the separate accessory to carry signals betWeen the
audio device and the accessory.
determining if the separate accessory is compatible With
17. The apparatus of claim 7 in Which the signals comprise
the head-mounted device When the accessory is coupled
at least one of command, control, or management signals.
18. An apparatus comprising
an accessory to be coupled to a head-mounted device, the
accessory having a conductor to connect to a poWer
conductor of the device to receive poWer for the acces
sory,
a circuit to determine if the accessory is compatible With
?guration protocol betWeen the head-mounted device
and the separate accessory that passes at least one of a
35
the audio device by communicating a con?guration pro
tocol betWeen the head-mounted device and the acces
sory that passes at least one of a binary or integer preset
value from the accessory to the head-mounted device,
and if the accessory is compatible With the audio device
based upon the preset value, to provide poWer to the
accessory on the conductor, and
the accessory comprises a signaling device to conduct
reduction circuitry.
battery of the head-mounted device.
45
50
from a source of poWer in the head-mounted device to the
accessory.
22. The apparatus of claim 21 in Which the source of poWer
55
37. The method of claim 1 in Which the accessory com
prises a signaling device to set the head-mounted device input
impedance.
38. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the signals com
prise an input impedance setting for the head-mounted
a Wireless transceiver, or a radio.
25. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the device and the
accessory are coupled using a detachable cable that includes
the conductor.
26. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which
the accessory comprises a common conductor that carries
poWer and signals betWeen the accessory and the head
mounted device.
33. The method of claim 32 in Which the identi?er is used
to determine accessory compatibility.
34. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the signals com
prise an identi?er for the accessory.
35. The apparatus of claim 34 in Which the identi?er is used
to determine accessory compatibility.
36. The method of claim 1 in Which the signals comprise an
input impedance setting for the head-mounted device.
comprises a battery.
23. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the accessory is
peripheral to the head-mounted device.
24. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the accessory
comprises at least one of a music player, a Wireless receiver,
31. The apparatus of claim 29 in Which the accessory is one
of Wireless transceiver, cell phone or communication device.
32. The method of claim 28 in Which the signals comprise
an identi?er for that accessory.
device comprises at least one of a headphone and a headset.
20. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the head-mounted
device comprises an audio device.
21. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which poWer is delivered
binary or integer preset value from the separate acces
sory to the head-mounted device, and if the separate
accessory is determined to be compatible based upon the
preset value, delivering poWer from a poWer source in
the head-mounted device to the separate accessory that
is coupled to the head-mounted device,
Wherein the head-mounted device includes active noise
30. The apparatus of claim 29 in Which the poWer is from a
Wired communication of con?guration signals With the
head-mounted device.
19. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the head-mounted
to the head mounted device by communicating a con
30
60
device.
39. The apparatus of claim 18 in Which the signaling device
is con?gured to set the head-mounted device input imped
ance.
65
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