Dear Energy User, Why should we care about renewable energy

Dear Energy User, Why should we care about renewable energy
Unit A, West Cork Business & Technology Park
Clonakilty, Co Cork
t +353 23 42193
f +353 23 63398
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie
Dear Energy User,
Why should we care about renewable energy?
Renewable energy is the most environmentally friendly, reliable and cost effective source of heating for your
home.
Climate change is arguably one of the greatest environmental threats the world is facing. At the heart of this major
environmental issue is our current energy system, which is based around fossil fuels (such as coal, peat, oil and
gas) and the resulting pollution is mainly responsible for global warming and climate change. The impacts of
disruptive change leading to catastrophic events such as storms, droughts, sea level rise and floods are already
being felt across the world.
In addition to the climate change problem, Ireland also has the most energy import dependent economy in the
industrialized world, importing almost 90% of all our fuels. Taking advantage of Ireland's abundant renewable
energy sources frees our energy options and reduces our over dependence on increasingly expensive imported
energy. The ‘old’ ways can no longer secure our heating, electricity and fuel supply.
With the help of renewable energy sources like the sun, wood and wind we can continue to affordably produce the
large amounts of electricity, heat and fuel needed by our modern society AND avoid the carbon dioxide emissions
that cause global warming.
What are the benefits of renewable energy?

Clean – Pollution free
 Reliable - Predictable heating costs
Renewable energy offers safe and reliable energy for all your needs - predominantly for heating, as over 80% of
the energy used by you at home is for central heating and hot water. Renewables will also continue to provide heat
even when conventional energy supplies are disrupted.
 Cost Effective - Substantial savings on conventional heating bills
Whether you are building a new house, replacing an existing heating system or renovating, renewable energy can
save you a significant amount of money. For example a heat pump can save 70% of your home heating bill, a
wood stove over 20% and a solar thermal panel will give you 6 months free hot water!
Many experienced renewable energy suppliers now operate in your area, offering competitive, high quality
products including heat pumps, solar panels and wood pellet stoves. Your investment will not only help safeguard
your wallet and the environment, it will also create new jobs and opportunities for local businesses. For further
information and to download lists of registered installers and suppliers go to www.sei.ie/greenerhomes.
RENEWABLES – Harness the energy around you!
Sustainable Energy Ireland’s Renewable Energy Information Office (REIO) is a national service established to
independently promote the use of renewable energy resources.
A Buyers’ Guide to Wood
Pellet & Chip Boilers
Choosing and installing a wood boiler is not such a difficult process. However, there are
important decisions to make and a few rules to apply to ensure that your boiler will be to
your satisfaction and meet your requirements.
It is vital to look for high quality when choosing your boiler. All products registered by SEI
under the Greener Homes Scheme have met minimum quality requirements in terms of
efficiency, safety (CE marking) and eco-friendliness (low emissions).
We advise that you ask your supplier to recommend an installer as reputable suppliers will
generally only deal with experienced and qualified installers.
Please visit www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for lists of suppliers and installers. We highly
recommend that you shop around and view a fully operating system before you make your
final decision in order to get the best product and the best value for your money.
Questions to ask your supplier and installer
SEI REIO has compiled a list of questions you should ask suppliers and installers before making your purchase. It is in
your best interest to make sure you are satisfied that all the questions are answered.
Wood Boiler
•
Is the boiler on SEI’s list of registered products? (Remember, if it is not listed you will not be eligible for a grant under the
Greener Homes Scheme?
•
Is the boiler certified by a quality label?
•
Can the boiler modulate (vary) its heat output according to the heat demand without a large loss in efficiency?
•
What is the efficiency rating of the boiler at maximum and minimum heat output respectively?
•
What type of burn back protection is in place, i.e. protection against fire spreading back to the pellet hopper?
•
Has the boiler been sized accurately (over sizing the boiler can lead to a loss in efficiency)?
•
Is it recommended to connect the boiler to a buffer tank (large heat store)?
•
Does the boiler include automatic heat exchanger cleaning and allow for easy ash removal?
•
Does the boiler design allow for easy cleaning of the internal passages if manual cleaning is required?
•
What is the noise level from the boiler during operation?
•
How do the controls work and are they suitable for my requirements?
•
How will the installation of a wood fired boiler affect the Building Energy Rating (BER) of the dwelling (where required)?
See http://www.epbd.ie for more information.
Location
•
Is the boiler located to allow sufficient clearance from combustible surfaces and materials?
•
Is there a properly wired outlet for electricity near the boiler location?
•
Is there enough fresh air supply to the boiler for safe and efficient combustion? If not, how can outside air be drawn from an
appropriate location?
•
Is there provision for appropriate access for maintaining and cleaning the boiler?
Chimney or flue pipe
•
Will there be provision for appropriate access to maintain and clean the flue / chimney?
•
Will minimum clearance between the flue and combustible materials be respected?
•
Does the existing or proposed flue or chimney comply with boiler manufacturer’s instructions and building regulations?
•
Does the flue or chimney recommended take into consideration local factors like windy conditions?
•
Will the joints and seams of the flue pipes be properly sealed to avoid exhaust gas leakage in the boiler room?
Wood fuel and fuel storage
•
Where can good quality fuel (chips or pellets) be sourced reliably and at a reasonable cost in my area?
•
What is the fuel quality recommended by the boiler manufacturer?
•
What type of fuel storage system is compatible with the boiler?
•
What is the optimal fuel storage size for the convenient and cost-effective delivery of fuel? (For wood pellet systems a
minimum size of 3 tonnes is recommended).
•
Does the fuel store specified ensure that the fuel is kept dry?
•
Will the boiler room and fuel store be of robust construction and give a long life in service?
•
Is the access to the fuel store appropriate for the delivery vehicle?
•
Does the fuel delivery system (screw / conveyor / suction) between the store and boiler comply with the manufacturer
recommendations?
Installation and commissioning
•
Does the supplier offer delivery, installation, commissioning and after sales service?
•
What training and experience do the installers have?
•
How long will the installation take?
•
What is the commissioning procedure?
•
Who is responsible for making good disruption to walls / ceilings etc. necessary during the installation of the system?
•
Will the floor supporting the boiler be protected and structurally adequate?
•
Will all the pipe work including fittings be insulated to a good standard?
•
Is the outlet of the pressure relief valve piped for the safe disposal of expelled water?
•
Does the electrical installation of the boiler room meet safety standards?
Operation and maintenance
•
Is full documentation, including the operation manual, provided with the boiler (in English)?
•
Is boiler ignition manual or automatic?
•
How often does the boiler need to be cleaned and what is the cleaning procedure?
•
What maintenance tasks have to be performed by a professional and how regularly?
•
How often will I have to refill the fuel store under normal operating conditions?
•
What is the range of annual costs (fuel and maintenance) under average operating conditions?
•
How often do I have to empty the ash pan? What do I do with the ash?
•
Does the supplier / installer have spare parts available?
Costs and payment
•
Does the quotation cover all the costs associated with the installation of the system (boiler, fuel storage, fuel feed, flue,
installations/delivery, floor protection)?
•
What are the financing options and payment terms?
After-sales services
•
What is the guarantee on parts (for each component of the system) and labour?
•
Is an annual service contract available from the supplier?
•
How does the dealer provide emergency service work if required?
•
If there are any issues with the electrical system or heating circuit (radiators/underfloor) will the installer troubleshoot or
work with the other contractors to solve the issues?
For further information on renewable energy and energy efficiency, please visit www.sei.ie. Call 023 42193 or email
[email protected] for a free information pack on how renewable energy can be applied to your house or business.
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
West Cork Business and Technology Park
Clonakilty, Co. Cork
t: 023 42193
f: 023 63398
e: [email protected]
w: www.sei.ie/reio.htm
A Buyers’ Guide to
Wood Pellet Stoves
Choosing and installing a wood pellet stove is not such a difficult process. However,
there are important decisions to make and a few rules to apply to ensure that your
stove will be to your satisfaction and meet your requirements.
It is vital to look for high quality when choosing your wood pellet stove. All products
registered by SEI under the Greener Homes Scheme have met minimum quality
requirements in terms of performance (efficiency) and eco-friendliness (low
emissions).
We advise that you ask your supplier to recommend an installer as reputable
suppliers will generally only deal with experienced and qualified installers.
Please visit www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for lists of pellet stoves suppliers and
installers. We highly recommend that you shop around in order to get the best
product and the best value for your money.
Questions to ask your supplier and installer
SEI REIO has compiled a list of questions you should ask suppliers and installers
before making a purchase. It is in your best interest to make sure you are satisfied that all your questions are answered.
Equipment
•
Is the stove on SEI’s list of registered products? (Remember, if it is not listed you will not be eligible for a grant under the
Greener Homes Scheme).
•
Does the stove carry any additional quality labels?
•
Is the stove CE marked?
•
What is the efficiency of the stove at maximum and minimum heating output?
•
What is the noise level from the stove during operation?
•
Can the stove modulate (vary) output according to the heat demand?
•
What kind of room temperature regulation (thermostat) does the stove have?
•
Does the stove have an integral programmer / timer?
•
How will the stove interact with other heating systems?
•
What kind of safety features does the stove have?
•
Does the stove design allow for easy cleaning of the burner area and flue?
•
Is the pellet stove going to feed into the central heating system? If yes, how many radiators can it heat? Can it also heat hot
water?
•
What kind of flame pattern and view does the stove give?
•
How will the stove installation affect the Building Energy Rating (BER) of the dwelling (where required)? See
http://www.epbd.ie for more information.
•
Is the stove correctly sized for the space it is intended to heat?
•
Will the installation be in compliance with all Building Regulation requirements, e.g. Parts F, J and L.
Location
•
Are there any fans present which will interfere with the operation of the stove?
•
Can the stove be located to allow sufficient clearance with combustible surfaces and materials?
•
Is there a properly wired outlet for electricity near the stove location?
•
Is their enough fresh air supply to the stove for safe and efficient combustion? If not, how can outside air be drawn from an
appropriate location?
•
Is there provision for appropriate access for maintaining and cleaning the stove?
Chimney or flue
•
Is there provision for appropriate access to maintain and clean the chimney system?
•
Is the minimum clearance between the flue and combustible materials respected?
•
Does the existing or proposed flue comply with the stove manufacturer’s instructions and with the Irish building regulations?
•
Does the flue system recommended take into consideration local factors like altitude, windy conditions, or possible negative
pressure within the house itself (e.g. in very airtight houses or due to extract fans)?
•
Are the joints and seams of the flue pipes properly sealed to avoid exhaust gas leakage into the room?
Installation and commissioning
•
Does the supplier offer delivery, installation, commissioning and after sales service?
•
Is the floor protected according to the pellet stove manufacturer’s instructions?
•
What training and experience do the professionals involved with the installation possess?
•
How long will the installation take?
•
Who is responsible for making good disruption to walls / ceilings etc. necessary during the installation of the system?
•
What are the procedures and tests carried out when commissioning the system?
Operation and maintenance
•
Is full documentation, including the operation manual, provided with the stove (in English)?
•
Does the stove have automatic ignition fitted as standard?
•
What is the pellet storage capacity of the stove and how long can it operate with one refill under normal conditions?
•
What kind of wood pellets (quality and size) have to be used with the stove?
•
What is the availability and cost of wood pellets in my area?
•
What maintenance tasks have to be performed by a professional and how regularly?
•
What is the range of annual costs (fuel and maintenance) under average conditions?
•
How often do I have to empty the ash pan?
•
Does the dealer have spare parts available?
Costs and payment
•
Does the quotation cover all the costs associated with the installation of the stove (stove, flue, installation, delivery, floor
protection)?
•
What are the financing options and payment terms?
After-sales services
•
What does the manufacturers’ or suppliers’ guarantee cover?
•
Is an annual service contract available from the supplier?
•
How does the dealer provide emergency service work if required?
For further information on renewable energy and energy efficiency, please visit www.sei.ie.
Call 023 42193 or email [email protected] for a free information pack on how renewable energy can be applied to your house
or business.
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
West Cork Business and Technology Park
Clonakilty, Co. Cork
t: 023 42193
f: 023 63398
e: [email protected]
w: www.sei.ie/reio.htm
A Buyers’ Guide to
Solar Heating Systems
Installing a solar thermal hot water system is not such a difficult process.
However, it is not a do-it-yourself job for most people.There are important
decisions to make and a few rules to apply to ensure that your solar
heating system, including system size and design, are to your satisfaction
and meet your requirements.
It is vital to look for a high quality product when choosing your solar
collector. All products registered by SEI under the Greener Homes Scheme
have met minimum quality requirements in terms of efficiency and safety.
In addition, we suggest that you select a collector that has a quality mark,
e.g. the European Solar Keymark label, which shows a further
commitment to quality from the manufacturer.
We advise that you ask your supplier to recommend an installer as
reputable suppliers will generally only deal with experienced qualified
installers.
Please visit www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for lists of solar heating system
suppliers and installers.We highly recommend that you shop around and
view a fully operating system before you make your final decision in order
to get the best product and the best value for your money.
Questions to ask your supplier and installer
SEI REIO has compiled a list of questions you should ask suppliers and installers before making a purchase. It is in your best
interest to make sure you are satisfied that all your questions are answered.
Equipment
·
Is the product on SEI’s list of registered products? (Remember, if it is not listed you will not receive a grant under the Greener
Homes Scheme).
·
·
·
·
Is the solar collector certified by the European Solar Keymark or similar quality mark?
·
·
·
·
·
·
Is the solar storage tank specifically designed to operate correctly with your solar system?
Are all the flashing and fixing components for the panels provided?
Do all the materials used conform to the solar system manufacturer’s specifications?
Is the cylinder sufficiently insulated (minimum 50mm factory fitted insulation recommended), and how many oC of
temperature will typically be lost from the cylinder over a 24 hour period if hot water is not used?
Is the system protected against overheating, freezing and excessive pressure?
Will the pipe work be insulated to a good standard?
How do the controls work and are they suitable for my requirements?
Will the control system keep a record of the energy supplied to the hot water system (useful to check performance)?
Is water circulation in the solar system provided by a mains electricity powered pump, a small photovoltaic panel, or is it a
natural circulation (thermosiphon) system?
Sizing and design
·
·
·
Will the system be designed to be exempt from planning permission requirements?
·
What is the performance rating of the solar collectors under expected operating conditions (e.g. in kWh per metre square of
collector area per year?)
·
What percentage of your hot water requirement will be typically provided by the solar system?
How are your hot water requirements calculated and how is the solar system sized?
Is the solar hot water cylinder appropriately sized (Minimum cylinder size of 180 litres, and 50 litres per m2 of collector
aperture area)?
·
·
·
·
·
Will the location of the solar panels (orientation, tilt, visual aspect, avoidance of shading) be appropriate?
·
·
·
Will a thermal mixing valve be fitted to reduce the risk of scalding?
Will the solar system be installed according to the manufacturer’s installation instructions?
Will there be any disruption of the building structure or fabric required to install the system?
How is back-up heating going to be provided?
Will the storage temperature be regulated to avoid health risks such as legionella (recommended storage temperature is
usually 60oC)?
What type of solar thermal system would the supplier recommend for the dwelling in question. Flat plate or evacuated tube?
How will the solar system affect the Building Energy Rating (BER) of the dwelling (where required)? See http://www.epbd.ie
for more information.
Installation and commissioning
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Does the supplier offer delivery, installation, commissioning and after sales service?
What is the training or accreditation of the installers involved in the installation?
Which trade associations’ do the installers belong to?
How many systems has the installer installed; are local references available?
How much of the installation will be sub-contracted?
Who is ultimately responsible for what segments of work?
How long will the installation take?
Who is responsible for commissioning the system?
What are the procedures and tests carried out when commissioning the system?
Who is responsible for making good disruption to walls / ceilings etc. necessary during the installation of the system?
Operation and maintenance
·
·
·
Is full documentation, including an operation manual, provided with the system (in English)?
What maintenance tasks have to be performed by a professional and how regularly?
Does the supplier have spare parts available?
Costs and payment
·
Does the quotation cover all the costs associated with the installation of the solar heating system (collectors, storage tank,
pipes and fittings, controller, delivery, installation, commissioning)?
·
·
·
·
What is the range of annual cost and energy savings under average conditions?
Is electricity for operation of the water circulation pump included in the savings calculation?
What are the financing options or payment terms?
Are there any additional costs?
After-sales services
·
·
·
·
What is the guarantee on labour and parts for each component of the system?
Is an annual service contract available from the supplier?
Is full documentation, including the user’s manual, provided?
How does the dealer provide emergency service work if required?
For further information on renewable energy and energy efficiency, please visit www.sei.ie.
Call 023 42193 or email [email protected] for a free information pack on how renewable energy can be applied to your house
or business.
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
West Cork Business and Technology Park
Clonakilty, Co. Cork
t: 023 42193
f: 023 63398
e: [email protected]
w: www.sei.ie/reio.htm
A Buyers’ Guide to
Renewable Heat Pumps
Installing a renewable heat pump is not such a difficult process. However, there are
important decisions to make and a few rules to apply to ensure that your heat
pump system will be to your satisfaction and meet your requirements.
It is vital to look for high quality when choosing your heat pump. All
products registered by SEI under the Greener Homes Scheme have met
strict quality requirements in terms of efficiency (Coefficient of
Performance) and safety (CE marking).
We advise that you ask your supplier to recommend an installer as
reputable suppliers will generally only deal with experienced and
qualified installers.
Please visit www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for lists of heat pump suppliers and
installers. We highly recommend that you shop around and view a fully
operating system before you make your final decision in order to get the best
product and the best value for your money.
Before installing a heat pump it is recommended that your home should be
adequately insulated to ensure cost effective and efficient operation of
the heat pump system.
Questions to ask your supplier and installer
SEI REIO has compiled a list of questions you should ask suppliers and installers
before making your purchase. It is in your best interest to make sure you are satisfied
that all your questions are answered.
Equipment
·
Is the heat pump on SEI’s list of registered products? (Remember, if it is not listed you will not be eligible for a grant under the
Greener Homes Scheme).
·
·
·
Is the heat pump certified by a non compulsory quality label, e.g. DACH Label?
·
·
·
·
·
What is the noise level of the system during operation?
What basic options exist, e.g. air source vs. ground source, in conjunction with under floor heating Vs. radiators.
What is the efficiency (coefficient of performance) under normal operating conditions (usually 3 to 5 depending on heat
pump type : Air to water, brine to water, water to water)?
Does the refrigerant used conform to EU and national legislation (R22 is banned from 01/01/04)?
What kind of controls does the system have, e.g. time and temperature regulation, weather compensation?
How will the heat pump interact with other heating systems (if applicable)?
Do all the system components and materials used conform to the heat pump manufacturer’s specifications?
Sizing and design
·
·
How are your space heating and hot water requirements calculated and how is the heat pump system sized?
·
Is the heat pump system’s capacity sufficient to meet the maximum heat loss of the house? Is an additional heating system
required?
·
·
·
·
Is the ground loop (or other heat source) sized and designed to ensure best performance by the heat pump system?
Is the current heat distribution system suitable for a heat pump system (Note : Not all radiator systems are suited to heat
pumps?
Is the heat pump system configured according to the manufacturer’s specifications?
Will the heat pump system take care of your domestic hot water needs?
Are there any special requirements regarding electrical connection, e.g. 3 Phase connection?
·
·
·
How much space is required for the heat pump system?
·
What is the estimate of annual electricity consumption?
Are there any restrictions on landscaping in the case of a ground source heat pump?
How will the heat pump system affect the Building Energy Rating (BER) of the dwelling (where required)? See
http://www.epbd.ie for more information.
Installation and commissioning
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Does the dealer offer delivery, installation, commissioning and after sales service?
What is the training or accreditation of the contractors involved in the installation?
To which trade associations do the contractors belong?
How many years has the contractor been in business?
How many systems has the dealer installed? Are local references available?
How much of the installation will be sub-contracted?
Who is ultimately responsible for what segments of work?
How long will the installation take?
Is there provision for appropriate access to the heat pump, manifolds, etc. for maintenance purposes?
What is the commissioning procedure and who signs off on the heat pump installation?
Who is responsible for making good disruption to walls / ceilings etc. necessary during the installation of the system?
Is there a contract detailing the above information? (If not, see www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for a model contract)
Operation and maintenance
·
·
·
Is full documentation, including an operation manual, provided with the system (in English)?
·
·
·
Does the dealer have spare parts available?
What maintenance tasks have to be performed by a professional and how regularly?
How does the control system work and who is going to train the user to operate it in order to achieve optimum operational
efficiency of the system?
What is the range of annual operating costs (electricity and maintenance) under typical conditions?
Is there a site plan, piping and wiring diagram?
Costs and payment
·
Does the quotation cover all the costs associated with the installation of the heat pump system (heat pump, heat collector,
heat distribution, controls)?
·
·
Is there any additional cost above those quoted to complete the installation?
What are the financing options or payment terms?
After-sales services
·
·
·
What is the guarantee on parts (for each major component in the system) and labour?
Is an annual service contract available from the supplier?
How does the dealer provide emergency service work if required?
For further information on renewable energy and energy efficiency, please visit www.sei.ie.
Call 023 42193 or email [email protected] for a free information pack on how renewable energy can be applied to your house
or business.
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
West Cork Business and Technology Park
Clonakilty, Co. Cork
t: 023 42193
f: 023 63398
e: [email protected]
w: www.sei.ie/reio.htm
A Buyer’s Guide to Low-Energy
and Passive Houses
Buying or building a house is one of the most important decisions in your life. It will have huge
implications on your finances and your well-being. By ensuring that your future house
achieves the highest energy, health and comfort standards, you are taking a big step in the
right direction.This buyer’s guide will help answer most of your questions and give you some
suggestions which should help you to make the right choices.
What is a low-energy house?
A low-energy house is one that has been designed and built to the highest level of comfort
while having the minimum energy requirement for heating, lighting, etc. This can be
achieved with a high level of thermal insulation, an air-tight shell, a controlled fresh air
ventilation system and responsive heating controls. A low energy house also maximises the
use of free solar gains through good design and uses renewable energy for heating through
solar panels, wood heating or a heat pump.
What is a passive house?
A passive house is a super low-energy house. The same principles are applied, only pushed to
a degree where there is no need for a conventional central heating system. A passive house requires about 4 times less energy for
heating than a house built to Irish building regulations. For more information on passive houses, please visit our website
(www.sei.ie/reio.htm).
What are the benefits of living in a low-energy house?
•
Excellent insulation and air-tightness. This means better comfort (no cold walls or windows, no drafts);
•
Controlled ventilation. This results in outstanding fresh air quality, protection against respiratory problems and avoidance of
damp and mouldy conditions;
•
Being able to ventilate without opening the windows. This also eliminates unwanted noise and reduces the risk of intrusion;
•
Protect your house against rising energy prices;
•
High energy performance generally goes hand in hand with good quality construction;
•
Reducing your energy consumption helps the environment.
As an investor, what will I gain from it?
•
Low-energy houses are easier to sell or rent;
•
Gain a competitive edge by pitching your product as high-quality and eco-friendly;
•
Better acoustic protection allows you to enhance the potential of noise sensitive areas for development;
•
High comfort and low-energy bills mean tenants stay longer;
•
Higher levels of client satisfaction mean more referrals and more business.
Do I need professional assistance to achieve a low-energy building?
We strongly recommend that you find a design team, i.e. an architect or an engineer to assist you with your project. Their role
will be to:
• Work on your brief and propose one or several design concepts;
•
Develop the chosen concept into a detailed design including the specifications for the building and its services;
•
Carry out the tendering process and manage the construction process;
•
Manage the commissioning and hand-over process.
When choosing your design team, ensure that the professionals involved have the appropriate qualifications, a proven trackrecord in the area of sustainable energy design (ask for customer references) and that they subscribe to the codes of practice of
the relevant trade associations.
What brief should I give to my design team for a low-energy house or a passive house?
The Heat Energy Rating of your house is a key indicator of its overall energy performance. It is a measure of how much heat is
required from the heating appliances to maintain comfortable conditions and produce hot water, expressed kWh/m2/year of living
area. By January 2009, all houses sold or rented will be rated for their energy performance according to this type of indicator.
We recommend you adopt one of the following European Standards as a target Heat Energy Rating and include it in the brief for
your design team:
Heat Energy Rating
Annual energy bill (euro/year) (*)
Low-Energy House
42 kWh/m2/year
Oil: 640 euro/year
Pellets: 280 euro/year
Passive House
30 kWh/m2/year
Oil: 430 euro
Pellets: 200 euro
(*) Heating bill at a cost of 0.5 euro/litre of oil and 180 euro/tonne for wood pellets for a 150 m2 house.
See our heating cost comparison tool in the reference section of our website.
What kind of site should I be looking for?
Try and find a site which meets as many of the following conditions as possible:
• It is south facing;
•
It is not overshadowed by neighbouring buildings or plantations;
•
It is sheltered from prevailing and northern winds by terrain, walls or vegetation;
•
The location minimises dependence on car transport;
•
It has the potential to accommodate the use of renewable energy materials sourced locally.
How can design and specification options be checked to see if our target will be met?
We recommend that your design team carries out a computerised analysis to measure the effect of the various design and
specification options on the Heat Energy Rating of the building. This analysis should be based on the methodology of the
European Standard EN 832.
SEI-REIO is happy to recommend suitable tools to carry out this analysis. If you are buying an existing house, you should either
require strong evidence of its Heat Energy Rating from the seller or require an energy audit from your own engineer.
Is air tightness compatible with good indoor air quality?
Different strategies can be applied to maintain a good level of fresh air renewal without excessive heat losses. In a low-energy or
a passive house, a controlled ventilation system with heat recovery is recommended. Such systems can also be fitted with a heat
pump system to produce hot water from the heat recovered.
Does my house have to look like a bunker to be energy efficient?
No, a low-energy house doesn’t need to look any different from any other house; neither does it preclude architectural creativity.
However, a compact building with a simple shell form is less conducive to heat losses through its external walls.
What about the sustainabilty of the building components themselves?
The negative environmental impact of energy use in Irish buildings causes up to 10 times more pollution than the materials used
to construct them. However, the sustainability of the building components is an aspect that should not be neglected. Important
considerations include:
• the energy required during their production cycle (from mining to delivering them to your site);
•
the associated greenhouse gas emissions;
•
the use of natural resources to manufacture them;
•
the air pollutants generated during their manufacture as well as during the life of the building;
•
the wastes generated during their manufacture and after their life-time.
For further information on renewable energy and energy efficiency, please visit www.sei.ie.
Call 023/42193 for a free information pack on how renewable energy can be applied to your house or business.
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Renewable Energy Information Office
Shinagh House
Bandon
Co. Cork
t +353 23-42193
f +353 23-29154
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/reio.htm
PASSIVE Solar Design
Solar Homes
Catch the Sun
Are you planning a new house?
Discover how you can apply
solar architecture principles to:
• keep your heating bills
to a minimum
• enjoy the comfort of a
warm and cosy house
• create a healthy and
ecological living
environment for you
and your family
2
Revolutionary Standards in Comfort and Energy Efficiency
Solar architecture relies on simple and sensible principles to:
• minimise heat losses from your house
• maximise free solar energy input during the winter
• provide adequate ventilation and daylighting
• use renewable energy to heat your house cost-effectively
These principles, which will be detailed in the following sections, can be applied to
various degrees of effectiveness to reduce the heating demand of your house.
GOOD
Insulate your house
according to current BUILDING
REGULATIONS and use solar energy
gains to cover at least 20% of your
heating requirement.
With the oil consumed to heat one conventional house, you can...
... heat 3 low-energy houses
VERY GOOD Adopt a LOW-ENERGY
HOUSE strategy and reduce your
heating requirement by 60%
compared to a conventional new
house.
... or 7 passive houses
EXCELLENT Go a step further with
the PASSIVE-HOUSE standards and
reduce your heating requirement to
the point where no central heating is
required.
The benefits of living in a “low-energy” house or a “passive” house in terms of energy
efficiency and heating bills are obvious. But it goes a lot further:
THERMAL COMFORT
Highly insulated external envelope means no more cold
surface walls, windows and ceilings
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
Controlled ventilation means good air quality and no
condensation and dampness problems
HIGHER PROPERTY VALUE High quality construction and the promise of low running
costs mean better sale or renting value
3
Step One: Keep the Heat In
The first objective of an energy efficient home is to reduce heat losses. Like a polar
bear, protect your house with a thick layer of insulation in the roof, walls and floor, as
well as highly insulating windows. This is your best guarantee against expensive
heating bills and a cold house.
These graphics compare the insulation
thickness required for a wall to achieve:
CURRENT
BUILDING
REGULATIONS
LOW-ENERGY
STANDARD
PASSIVE-HOUSE
STANDARD
10 cm
15-20 cm
25-30 cm
U value = 0.27
U value = 0.20-0.15
U value = 0.10-0.13
The U value of a fabric is a measure of its
insulating property and is expressed in W/m2,K.
It is also important to seal your house in order to avoid nasty draughts and unwanted air
leaks. Windows and doors should close tightly, there should be no cracks in the walls and
ceilings, tubing for electrical wires and water pipes should be sealed, etc.
Avoid heat loss
through the
masonry by
applying a
continuous
insulation layer
around the building
Other ways of reducing heat losses include:
Masonry
Insulation
Keep Northern
Windows smaller
NORTH
SOUTH
Locate non or less heated
rooms on the north side of
the house as buffer zones
Conservatories or sunspaces provide
shelter for the house and its
inhabitants while allowing sunlight in
Hedges and trees provide
shelter from cold winds
4
Step 2: Let the Sun Shine In
The second objective of solar architecture is to let the sun shine into your house to
bring in natural light and free heat. This is best achieved by giving your house a
southerly orientation and locating larger windows on the south façade.
Daylighting is another important
principle of solar architecture.
Windows open your house to natural
light, brightening your interior and
+15%
West Orientation
providing good visual comfort. They
also bring a connection with your
environment and let you enjoy the
view when inside.
+11%
+6%
Good windows have a high
insulating value to minimise heat
losses (U value <2.0 W/m2K) and a
high degree of transparency (≥65%)
Due South
Orientation
Percentage
+3%
increase in space
0%
heating demand with deviations from a
mainly due south window orientation.
to maximise solar gains.
During the summer, two simple rules can be
applied to avoid overheating:
•
generally, opening windows should be
sufficient to dissipate excess heat in
the house. Ventilation at night will be
particularly effective at cooling down
the house’s masonry
•
avoid excess heat gains from the sun by
shading windows with blinds (external
preferably), eves, roof projection or overhangs,
and deciduous trees
South façade of a house in Doolin,
Co. Clare
5
These two graphs illustrate how sunshine brings useful winter heating in a solar house:
Daytime
Large windows maximise
solar gains in winter.
Low winter sun
Small northern
windows or
rooflights bring
in daylight
Warm air
circulates freely
to distribute heat
within the
building
Tall windows allow
sunshine further into
the room
Deciduous trees let solar radiation through
their bare crown during the winter and
provide shading during the summer
Heavy construction
elements absorb excess
gains during the day
Masonry
Insulation
Nighttime
Heavy construction
elements release
heat stored at night
Insulated glass +
heavy curtains
reduce heat losses
Hedges and trees provide
shelter from cold winds
6
Step 3: Give Yourself a Breath of Fresh Air
Adequate ventilation is important to
ensure a constant supply of clean and
fresh air in your house, as well as
removing moist air to prevent condensation and the proliferation of mould
and dust mites. In a highly sealed and
insulated house, it is particularly
important to ensure that the indoor air is
replaced regularly without leading to
excessive heat losses (i.e. without
opening windows).
In a low-energy or a passive house, a
controlled ventilation system with heat
recovery is recommended. In such a
system, fresh outside air is supplied
through ducts to living rooms while
exhaust air is extracted from wet rooms
and ducted outside. The heat content of
the exhaust air (warmer) is recovered to
pre-heat the incoming fresh air.
The advantages of a heat recovery ventilation system are:
•
•
automatically controlled supply of
•
can be fitted with filters to remove
fresh air
dusts and pollen inducing allergies
80% of the heat content of the
and asthma
exhaust air is recovered and supplied
with the fresh air
•
windows can be kept safely closed to
avoid noise disturbance and risks of
intrusion
A heat pump system can also be fitted on the heat recovery system to extract heat
from the exhaust air, which can then be used to produce hot water and/or pre-heat
the fresh air supplied.
Cool
Stale Air
Extraction of
Warm Stale Air
Supply of
Warm
Fresh Air
Controlled ventilation with
heat recovery in a lowenergy or a passive house
Cool
Fresh Air
7
Step 4: The 100% Solar House
In a solar house, the heating
requirement is reduced so much that it
is very easy to provide the remaining
heat demand from a renewable energy
source. A heat pump or wood heating
system would provide your space
heating without any difficulty, and a
solar water heater your hot water. As
heating equipment can be downsized
considerably (by at least twice compared
pollution free (and carbon tax free!).
to a conventional house), the initial
For further information on renewable
investment will be much lower as well. All
heating systems, please read our
in all, you will have the benefit of a very
additional leaflets on heat pumps, solar
economical heating system totally
heating and wood heating.
A Profitable and Sustainable Investment
Market research in Europe has demonstrated that, on average, low-energy and
passive houses cost only 6 to 8% more to build than conventional houses. But that is
not the whole picture! What future house owners should be looking at is the actual
yearly running costs of their house (mortgage and heating). In low-energy and
passive houses, the much lower heating bill more than compensates for the slight
increase in mortgage repayment. Plus houses of such a high specification have a
much better resale value than standard houses.
From the building developer’s point of view, adopting a low energy strategy will pay
for itself. House buyers or tenants are more and more aware of the importance of
energy efficiency and are willing to pay extra for a guarantee of comfort and low
running cost. In a rented low-energy or passive house, the high comfort and low
heating bill mean that tenants will want to stay longer. This reduces maintenance
costs of the house, administrative hassle and expenses for the owner.
Sustainable Energy Ireland's Renewable Energy
Information Office, one of Europe's leading renewable
energy agencies, provides expert, independent
information and advice on the development of all
renewable energy technologies, including solar energy.
For further information on passive solar design and
other solar technologies:
- download REIO’s factsheets on www.sei.ie/reio.htm
- order REIO’s Solar CD-ROM by email, fax or phone
Contact:
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
Shinagh House,
Bandon,
Co.Cork.
t +353 23 42193
f +353 23 29154
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/reio.htm
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by
the Irish Government under the
National Development Plan 2000-2006
with programmes part financed by the
European Union
Pellets are a clean, dry fuel made from a mixture of
sawdust and wood shavings. Pellets are a high
energy, smoke free fuel. Unlike other solid fuels, they
are easy to handle and create almost no ash. Pellets
are available in bags of 10 to 15 kilograms, at a cost
of 2 to 4 euro per bag.
Quality pellets are essential to ensure trouble-free
operation of your stove and clean combustion. Only
buy pellets with a quality mark and a complete fuel
analysis printed on the bags.
Environmentally friendly
Wood pellets are a renewable source of energy and
do not contribute to climate change. The carbon
dioxide that is released when pellets are burned is
equal to the amount the tree consumed when it was
Sustainable Energy Ireland's
Renewable Energy Information
Office, one of Europe's leading
renewable energy agencies,
provides expert, independent
information and advice on the
development of all renewable
energy technologies, including
wood pellet heating.
Contact:
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information
Office,
Shinagh House,
Bandon,
Co.Cork.
t +353 23 42193
f +353 23 29154
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/reio.htm
growing.
Wood pellets are manufactured with wood from
sustainable forests.
Printed on
recycled paper
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by
the Irish Government under the
National Development Plan 2000-2006
with programmes part financed by the
European Union
WOOD Pellet Stoves
What are wood pellets?
Pellets, the natural choice
Everyone loves a wood fire, it really
Safety
Buying and installing a pellet stove
turns a house into a home. But open fires
Pellet stoves are far safer than traditional stoves.While
the traditional stove’s body radiates the heat to the
room, the pellet stove ventilates only the warm air into
the room and does not heat up itself. Good stoves are
equipped with a number of safety features against
power failure and overheating problems.
Quality is of paramount importance when choosing
a pellet stove and sourcing pellets.
and old-fashioned stoves can be
polluting, inefficient and inconvenient.
Modern wood pellet stoves offer the
warmth and comfort of wood heating
but are highly efficient, clean burning
and totally automatic, saving you time
and money.
Easy and clean to use
To light the pellet stove, all you need to do is fill the
integrated pellet container and the stove does the
rest for up to 30 hours continuously.
Automatic fuel supply and a thermostat means you
can relax and enjoy the comfort of pellet heating at
the switch of a button.
Automatic ignition
means that lighting the
fire is hassle free.
Modern pellet stoves are
self cleaning so you can
forget the daily cleaning
chore of traditional solid
fuel stoves.The ash pan
needs to be emptied no
more than once a month.
Wide range of designs
Wood pellet stoves combine
great functionality with the
latest designs.They fit in easily
with modern and traditional
interiors in your home,
apartment or office.
Pellet stoves can either be free
standing or fireplace inserts.
Wood pellet stoves are also available with a back boiler
to feed into your central heating
Phone home for remote control heating
A simple control panel on the appliance or on an
adjacent wall allows you to set the temperature
required in the room.The latest innovation allows
remote control by mobile phone. By simply making a
short call on
your way home,
you can return
to a warm living
room.
The Renewable Energy Information Office maintains
a list of suppliers using pellets and stoves of
certified quality.This list is available from our
website: www.sei.ie/reio.htm or can be ordered with
a sample of pellets from our call centre: 023 42193.
When installing your pellet stove, make sure to
follow the manufacturer’s instructions with regard
to connecting it to an adequate chimney and
making provision for fresh air supply to the stove.
Bring the benefits of solar energy to
your house and family.
SAVINGS
Replace increasingly
expensive fossil fuels
with free energy from the
sun.
QUALITY
VALUES
Invest now in an
altogether more efficient
water heating system that
will last you over 20
years!
A solar water heater will
increase the value of your
house.
ENVIRONMENT
COMFORT
Show that you care
for the environment by
contributing directly to
the fight against climate
change.
Enjoy the comfort of
plenty of hot water at a
very low cost.
Invest now for a
brighter future!
Sustainable Energy Ireland's
Renewable Energy Information
Office, one of Europe's leading
renewable energy agencies,
provides expert, independent
information and advice on the
development of all renewable
energy technologies, including
solar energy.
Contact:
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
Shinagh House,
Bandon,
Co.Cork.
t +353 23 42193
f +353 23 29154
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/reio.htm
Printed on
recycled paper
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by
the Irish Government under the
National Development Plan 2000-2006
with programmes part financed by the
European Union
SOLAR Water Heaters
Solar Water Heating
Hot water from the sun, in Ireland?
Is my house suitable?
Believe it or not, one square metre on your roof receives
the equivalent of more than 100 litres of oil in free solar
energy per year. As a matter of fact, this is more than in
Paris.
A solar water heater can suit most situations. All you
need is:
A solar water heater produces hot water by transforming
sunlight into heat through its solar panels. That heat is
then stored in a large hot water cylinder so that it is
available when you need it. A control system ensures
the regulation and safety of the whole equipment.
Simple, efficient and reliable!
➤ space to put the solar panels (generally on the roof)
and room for the storage cylinder in your utility
room or hot press.
➤ access to the sun for the panels (orientated between
south-east and south-west) and no over-shadowing
by trees or other buildings.
NUMBER OF
PEOPLE IN THE
HOUSEHOLD
AREA OF
SOLAR
PANELS
VOLUME OF
THE SOLAR
STORAGE CYLINDER
INDICATIVE
COST OF
EQUIPMENT
2-3
3 - 4 m2
150 - 200 litres
€ 2,500 - 3,000
4-5
4-6m
2
200 - 300 litres
€ 3,000 - 4,000
6-7
6 - 8 m2
300 - 400 litres
€ 4,000 - 5,000
Installation may take one to three days for a skilled installer.
What to do next?
Ok. But what if the sun is not shining?
Quality is of paramount importance when choosing a solar
water heater and an installer.
No problem. A solar water heater not only converts
direct sunlight but also indirect sunlight into heat, so it
works even when the sky is overcast. True, there will be
less solar heat available during the winter, but a back-up
heater will boost the water temperature. The result is
100% comfort at all times, with plenty of hot water for a
fraction of the cost.
REIO’s recommendations:
• Only opt for a solar heating system with a recognised
certificate of quality and performance.
• Your system should be designed by a professional to meet
your specific requirements and fit in with your central
heating system.
What kind of system do I need?
There is a good selection of solar water heaters available
on the Irish market. They are all built on the same
principle, with varying degrees of sophistication and
price.
SO
LA
RP
AN
EL
The table below gives a few pointers in terms of size and cost
of the equipment:
If you are building a new house or replacing your hot
water system,the extra cost of a solar water heater can be
as low as 1000 Euro compared to a conventional system.
• Your supplier should recommend an installer with the
proper training and experience in this field.
• Make sure your system has been thoroughly checked and
commissioned before signing off the installation.
For further information, download the following documents
from REIO’s website:
• our full brochure and our buyers’ guide on solar water
heating;
• a list of suppliers of certified solar water heaters in Ireland.
STORAGE
CYLINDER
BACK UP
SYSTEM
Bring the benefits of a heat pump to
your house and family.
On top of 70% lower heating bills, heat pumps have the
following advantages:
•
high reliability and longevity (on average lasting
over 20 years)
•
little or no on-going maintenance (no boiler
cleaning, no chimney sweeping, etc.)
•
the healthiness and comfort of low temperature
heating systems
•
a real contribution to a better environment
What to do next?
Quality is of paramount importance when choosing a
heat pump system and an installer.
REIO’s recommendations:
• Only opt for a heat pump with a recognised certificate
of quality and performance.
• Your heat pump and its heat source (ground or water
collector) should be designed by a professional to meet
the heating requirement of your house.
Sustainable Energy Ireland's
Renewable Energy Information
Office, one of Europe's leading
renewable energy agencies,
provides expert, independent
information and advice on the
development of all renewable
energy technologies, including
heat pumps.
Contact:
Sustainable Energy Ireland,
Renewable Energy Information Office,
Shinagh House,
Bandon,
Co.Cork.
t +353 23 42193
f +353 23 29154
e [email protected]
w www.sei.ie/reio.htm
• Your supplier should recommend an installer with the
proper training and experience in this field.
• Make sure your system has been thoroughly checked
and commissioned before signing off the installation.
For further information, download the following
documents from REIO’s website:
-
our full brochures and buyers’ guide on renewable
heat pumps;
a list of suppliers of certified heat pumps in Ireland.
Printed on
recycled paper
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by
the Irish Government under the
National Development Plan 2000-2006
with programmes part financed by the
European Union
Renewable HEAT PUMPS
Renewable Heat Pumps
Free heat from the garden?
And good for the environment...
Heat is widely available in the ground, air and water
around your house. These natural sources of heat are
constantly replenished by the sun, wind and rain. A heat
pump system will harness these free and renewable
energy sources for heating your house and supplying
hot water at a very low cost.The role of the heat pump is
to ‘pump up’ heat from a low temperature source, for
example the ground under your lawn and release it at a
higher temperature into your central heating system.
When driven with conventional electricity, a heat pump
system emits 40% less CO2 emissions than a boiler.That’s
a great contribution to the fight against climate change.
But if you can operate your heat pump with green
electricity (e.g. from wind farms) then your central
heating system becomes 100% renewable and totally
free of greenhouse gases emissions.
30%
ELECTRICITY
Ok. But why is it so economical?
Because at least 70% of your heat will come from a free
source. For every unit of electricity used to drive the heat
pump, 3 to 5 units of useful heat will be generated.
Manufacturers generally refer to the ratio between the
useful heat produced and the electricity used as the
coefficient of performance. With an overall energy
efficiency in excess of 400%, compared to 70%-85%
efficiency for a good oil or gas boiler, no wonder a heat
pump is so economical.
100% HEATING
70%
FREE HEAT
Fine.Will it fit my house?
If you are building a new house, you are in the best
position to do it. You can cover the extra cost with your
mortgage and finance the installation at a low cost.Make
sure your house is well insulated and opt for a heat
distribution system operating at a low temperature (e.g.
underfloor heating or fan coils). This ensures optimal
performance of your heat pump. The heat pump itself
requires little room and will fit neatly into your utility
room or hot press.
A heat pump system can also be fitted into an
existing central heating system. It can provide
all the heat required on its own if the
characteristics of the existing heat distribution
system allow it. If not, it can be operated in
conjunction with the existing boiler, which will
act as a back-up system when the heating
demand is high.
So, is it really worth it?
Absolutely. While they are more expensive
initially to install compared to a conventional
oil system, their frugality in electricity will save
you €20,000 over its lifetime.
The graph below shows the annual heating cost of a 180m2 house with
different types of heating systems, including a ground source heat pump.
70% SAVING
Ground source heat pump
Natural gas boiler
Oil boiler
L.P.G. boiler
Storage electric heaters
Direct electric heaters
0
500
1000
1500
EURO
2000
2500
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
Greener Homes Scheme
Phase III
(Existing Dwellings)
Application Guide
Version 3.0
IMPORTANT NOTICE
It is the responsibility of each applicant to the Greener Homes Scheme to ensure that they
have read, and fully understand, this Application Guide and the Home Owner Application
Form before submitting a signed application form. Failure to fully adhere to the provisions
of this Application Guide and the Application Form will result in application refusal, grant
revocation or payment request refusal, depending on the particular status and stage of the
grant. SEI accepts no liability or responsibility, whether for breach of contract, negligence
or otherwise, in respect of any claim or cause of action arising out of, or in relation to, any
equipment, product, work, system or installation in respect of which grant approval was
given by SEI.
This Application Guide will be revised periodically. Call the Helpline 1850 734 734 or check
the SEI website (www.sei.ie/greenerhomes) to ensure that you have the latest version.
Application Guide Version 3.0
Page 1 of 20
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
Table of Contents
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
2
3
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Description of Scheme ................................................................................................................................... 3
Using Renewable Energy for Heating.............................................................................................. 3
Will a renewable energy heating system save me money? .................................................... 3
Why offer a grant? ................................................................................................................................... 3
Scheme Objectives .......................................................................................................................................... 4
Who Can Avail of the Scheme? ................................................................................................................... 4
What Products are Eligible?.......................................................................................................................... 4
Biomass System Requirements .......................................................................................................... 4
Solar Thermal System Requirements............................................................................................... 5
Heat Pump System Requirements .................................................................................................... 5
What Level of Funding is Available? ......................................................................................................... 5
Installers ............................................................................................................................................................... 6
Approval Criteria............................................................................................................................................... 7
Application and Approval Procedure....................................................................................................... 7
Payment Procedure ......................................................................................................................................... 7
Installation Inspections .................................................................................................................................. 8
Terms and Conditions of the Scheme ...................................................................................................... 9
Useful Contacts ...............................................................................................................................................10
Appendix A – Practical Guidelines for Buyers .....................................................................................11
Appendix B – Technology Descriptions.................................................................................................13
Appendix C – Useful Publications ............................................................................................................18
Appendix D – Registered Installer Terms & Conditions...................................................................19
Application Guide Version 3.0
Page 2 of 20
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
1
Description of Scheme
The Greener Homes Scheme Phase III (the “Scheme”) provides assistance to homeowners who
intend to purchase a new renewable energy heating system for existing homes. The scheme is
administered by Sustainable Energy Ireland (“SEI”) and aims to increase the use of renewable
energy and sustainable energy technologies in Irish homes.
1.1
Using Renewable Energy for Heating
We, in Ireland are heavily reliant on fossil fuels which are a limited resource, cause emissions that are
harmful to the environment and can be subject to volatility of price and availability. The Irish
Government wishes to reduce this reliance and move towards making greater use of our renewable
energy resources. This diversification can be good for the economy because of the longer term
availability and constancy of supply and good for the environment through the reduced emissions
of Carbon Dioxide (CO2).
The main sources of renewable energy in Ireland are the sun (solar energy), the wind, moving water
(hydropower, wave and tidal energy), geothermal (heat below the earths surface) and biomass
(wood, certain wastes and energy crops). One of the main benefits of using renewable energy is
that it reduces emissions of carbon dioxide. Ireland has an abundance of several of these resources
and their effective development and use will reduce emissions of harmful greenhouse gases and
our reliance on imported fossil fuels.
Homeowners can play their part by choosing a renewable heating system (solar, biomass or heat
pump based) that meets their particular needs in terms of heat demand, budget and environmental
considerations. Doing so will help Ireland move down a path towards more sustainable energy use,
ultimately benefiting the environment.
1.2
Will a renewable energy heating system save me money?
Where a renewable energy technology uses a “free” energy source like sun shine, you no longer
have to worry about fuel prices increasing. On the other hand heat pumps require electricity to
operate and biomass equipment requires a wood based fuel – so both of these remain vulnerable
to fuel / energy price fluctuations.
The guaranteed way to reduce your energy bills is to only generate as much heat as you require, at
the time you want it, and to maximise the value of that heat by preserving it within your home. We
strongly advise anyone planning to invest in a renewable heat system to investigate all methods of
increasing the overall energy efficiency of their homes. Effective wall and attic insulation, good time
and temperature controls of your heating and high performance windows will all reduce the heat
required to have a warm and comfortable home. Purchasing household electrical equipment with
an 'A' energy rating e.g. fridges, freezers, washing machines and light bulbs* reduces electricity
consumption. This approach will have a significant impact on your energy bills and will also protect
you from any price variation in your primary fuel source.
1.3
Why offer a grant?
Renewable energy heating systems are new technologies which, while proven and highly popular
overseas, have yet to become widespread in Ireland. The Irish Government, through SEI, wishes to
encourage people to “green” their homes by contributing to the initial investment cost of installing
a renewable energy heating system. The government believes that this will help ensure a faster
uptake of renewable heating systems which will underpin the development of a long term market,
while enabling homeowners to play their part in reducing carbon dioxide emissions.
[*More details of these options are available in a range of SEI Home Energy Guides listed in Appendix C of this
Guide].
Application Guide Version 3.0
Page 3 of 20
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
2 Scheme Objectives
The objectives of the Scheme are:
• To increase the number of households in Ireland that use renewable energy;
• To guide consumers towards discerning choices of Renewable Energy Heating;
• To ensure that the market for the products, services and fuels continues to develop in a
robust manner;
• To decrease our reliance on imports of fossil fuels;
• To benefit the environment by reducing the emissions of harmful carbon dioxide
3 Who Can Avail of the Scheme?
The Scheme is open to the following applicants:
• Individuals who are homeowners
• Installing eligible products (see Section 4 below and Registered Product List) either a new
o wood chip/pellet boiler or stove w/back-boiler or standalone stove
o wood gasification boiler
o solar thermal
o heat pump based heating system
• Using installers who are registered with SEI (the “Registered Installer List” available on
request or on line at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes).
• Individuals intending to retrofit or install a new renewable energy heating system in their
existing home.
4 What Products are Eligible?
The grants will be provided to homeowners who invest in new renewable energy based heating
systems in the following categories:
Solar Heating
- Solar hot water system and / or
- Solar space heating system
Heat Pumps
- Horizontal ground collector
- Vertical ground collector
- Water (well) to water
- Air source
Wood Chip or Pellet Stoves – with or without integral boiler
Wood Chip or Pellet Boilers – with bulk fuel storage installed
Wood Gasification Boiler
An application MUST INCLUDE the SEI Product ID found on the Registered Product List.
Applications made without the SEI Product ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. The SEI
Registered Product List is available on request or online at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes .
Further details on each of the technologies above are contained in Appendix B to this guide. More
detailed technical descriptions and Buyers Guides for the specific products are available on request
or online at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
4.1
Biomass System Requirements
Bulk Fuel Storage: All biomass boiler installations shall require the provision of bulk fuel storage. It
shall be required to meet local building and fire regulations. The ONORM M7137 Standard
http://on-norm.at/ecom/ shall be used as a guideline for DIY bulk storage units. Bulk storage
capacity shall be able to store a minimum of 3 tonnes of wood pellets (80% of a typical houses’
requirement for one year).
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Buffer Heat Store: It is a recommendation that a buffer or accumulator tank be incorporated as
part of domestic wood pellet / chip boiler system installations where appropriate. A buffer or
accumulator cylinder in a domestic biomass heating installation is a primary heat
storage/distribution cylinder, which is heated by the boiler to a set temperature and can store the
resulting high temperature water for long system standstill periods, until heating or hot water is
required. A buffer / accumulator reduces the on/off cycling of wood boilers by “smoothing” the heat
output to the dwelling. The buffer or accumulator capacity should be calculated in accordance with
your manufacturer’s recommendations. A rough guideline for establishing the volume of the buffer
is available from EN303-5 and from the REIA training manual and is in the region of 55 to 65 L/kW of
the rated boiler size.
The use of a buffer / accumulator is noteworthy in the following situations:
− Where the boiler does not have full modulation capabilities: the use of a buffer will smooth
the heat output to the dwelling.
− In situations where the boiler is not capable of supplying the full heat demand of the
house, a buffer tank will allow the boiler to run for longer at optimum efficiency extracting
maximum potential from the boiler and fuel.
4.2
Wood Gasification Boiler Requirements
A buffer store (accumulator) will be installed in conjunction with your wood gasification boiler to
ensure the efficient operation of your boiler. Buffer stores are important heat storage devices,
especially for wood gasification boilers. These boilers can only be operated efficiently when
combined with an accumulator since controlled operation at part load is more difficult. A buffer or
accumulator cylinder in a domestic biomass heating installation is a primary heat
storage/distribution device, which is heated by the boiler to a set temperature and can store the
resulting high temperature water for long system standstill periods, until heating or hot water is
required. The buffer or accumulator capacity should be calculated in accordance with your
manufacturer’s recommendations. A rough guideline for establishing the volume of the buffer is
available from EN303-5 and from the REIA training manual and is in the region of 55 to 65 L/kW of
the rated boiler size.
4.3
Solar Thermal System Requirements
The maximum aperture area supported is 6m2 for both flat plate and evacuated tube panels. The
following recommendations are made regarding the sizing of the hot water cylinder based on
maximum cylinder temperature;
•
At 60°C use a minimum of 70 litres per m2.
•
At 85°C use a minimum of 50 litres per m2.
4.4
Heat Pump System Requirements
When installing a heat pump into an existing dwelling it is critical to ensure that the building is
sufficiently insulated and the existing heating system is surveyed for compatibility. In many
cases the dwelling’s fabric will need to be upgraded to ensure efficient operation and thus optimal
electricity cost. It is recommended to try and achieve insulation levels as close to “new build”
requirements, where possible and practical. Recommended values for average elemental U-value
for insulation would be:
• Roofs
0.16 W/m2K
• Walls
0.27 W/m2K
• Ground Floors
0.25 W/m2K
• Exposed Floors
0.25 W/m2K
• External doors windows/roof-lights:
2.0 W/m2K
For more information in regard to achieving good insulation levels, please consult the relevant SEI
publications, in particular the following: What is a U-value, the Detailed Guide to Insulating Your
Home and Renovating and Older Home .
The existing heating system should be surveyed by your installer as not all radiators are suitable for
use with heat pumps. In new build it is common for heatpumps to be used in conjunction with
Underfloor Heating, however this may not be practical in existing buildings, due to the need for
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high levels of insulation (U-values = 0.15 W/m2/K) and the likely requirement to replace / renovate
the existing floor. An alternative to consider is low temperature radiators, which are particularly
suited to heatpumps.
ESB Networks are now requiring that a soft starter be incorporated in heat pump installations in
houses. Please contact ESB Networks before you apply to ensure that a sufficient electricity
connection can be provided.
5 What Level of Funding is Available?
The levels of grant support available for each technology are as follows:
Technology
Maximum Grant
Biomass - Boiler
€2,500
Biomass - Stove
€800
Biomass - Stove w/ Integral Back Boiler
€1,400
Heat Pump – Vertical Ground
€3,500
Heat Pump – Horizontal Ground
€2,500
Heat Pump - Water to water
€2,500
Heat Pump - Air Source
€2,000
2
Solar - Flat Plate
€250/ m (to max. of 6m2)
Solar - Evacuated Tube
€300/ m2 (to max. of 6m2)
Wood Gasification Boiler
€2,000
Please note only one grant will be provided per dwelling under Phase III and where a dwelling
had an installation funded under Phase I or Phase II, that dwelling will not be eligible for
further grant aid under the Scheme.
6 Installers
Applicants must use installers who have registered with SEI and that installer must be registered at
the time of application and at time of system commissioning. Applicants who wish to install a wood
gasification boiler must use an installer that is registered on the Wood Gasification Boiler
Registered Installer List. Installers wishing to register under Phase III of the Scheme are required to
achieve accredited qualifications in their relevant technology. Verification of an installer’s
qualifications is a matter for each applicant. Please see the Appendix D for the terms and conditions
for installers to register under the scheme.
NOTE: An application MUST INCLUDE Installer ID found on the Registered List of Installers.
Applications made without the SEI Installer ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. The
Registered Installer Lists are available on request or online at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes .
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7 Approval Criteria
The following conditions will apply in the approval of grant applications and all conditions must be
met in advance of any approval of a grant.
1. Applicant must be the homeowner and must have full possession of the property
where the system is to be installed
2. Applicant must fully complete the Greener Homes Application Form (the “Application
Form”) with information valid at time of application
3. Applicant must supply bank account and sort code details to facilitate electronic
payment of the grant. (Please note that currently we cannot process EBS and Credit
Union accounts)
4. Applicant must agree to be bound by the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme (see
Section 11 below)
5. Product must be listed, at the date of application, on the Registered Product List
(available on request or online at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes )
6. Installer must be listed, at the date of application and on the date of system
commissioning, on the Registered Installer List
7. SEI must still have adequate funding available to it pursuant to the relevant phase of
the Scheme in order to be able to approve the relevant application.
8 Application and Approval Procedure
Application should be made on the Scheme Application Form (available on request or online at
www.sei.ie/greenerhomes ) and sent to:
Greener Homes Scheme
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
Once a completed application form has been received it will be considered for approval by SEI
against the above Approval Criteria (see Section 7 above). Please allow a minimum of twenty one
days for processing of your application. If approved, a Letter of Offer will be issued to the applicant.
The offer will only be validated upon the applicant indicating the applicant’s acceptance of offer by
returning a signed copy of the Letter of Offer to SEI, which must be received within 30 days of date
of issue.
The grant offer remains valid for 12 months from the date of issue of the Letter of Offer. The
offer will automatically lapse after this date if a valid request for payment form (RFP) with all
appropriate supporting documentation has not been received by SEI.
9 Payment Procedure
Upon completion of the installation, and payment having been made in respect of the supply and
installation of the equipment, the applicant must make a formal request to SEI for payment
comprising the following:
1. Completed Request for Payment Form (which will be issued with the Letter of Offer at
time of grant approval)
2. Invoice and receipt of payment to installer separately detailing full cost of equipment
and installation* (in instances where the total amount paid is less than the grant
approved then the lesser amount will be paid)
3. Completed Standard Commissioning Report signed by the registered installer
*Note: If equipment was purchased separately, please provide separate invoices and receipts for
payment of full equipment cost and installation charges.
Once all documentation is in order and acceptable, and, if selected, a satisfactory inspection
completed (see Section 10), the grant will be paid electronically to the applicant’s bank account
and an accompanying letter notifying payment will be sent to the applicant. SEI will endeavour to
make payment within eight weeks of receipt of completed and acceptable payment
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documentation. However applicants should be aware that the timing of payments is subject to the
availability of funds to SEI in any calendar year.
10 Installation Inspections
All completed installations may be the subject of verification and/or technical inspections.
Properties may be the subject of a sampling process and homeowners will be notified by SEI prior
to the inspection.
In the case of Verification Inspections the inspection will precede payment of the grant. This
inspection will be scheduled at the earliest possible opportunity by SEI’s appointed inspector in
consultation with the homeowner. Grant payment will be made upon satisfactory receipt of the
verification inspection report from the inspector.
Technical Inspections on the other hand will take place once installation is completed, and will be
scheduled for an appropriate time thereafter, and will not delay payment. The report of the
inspector will be used by SEI in order to inform ongoing development of quality assurance within
the Scheme.
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11 Terms and Conditions of the Scheme
1.
The Application Guide, Application Form and Terms and Conditions are those
published on the SEI website on the date of submitting the application. However, SEI
may, if required by law and without incurring any liability, vary, revise or supplement
the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme after the applicant’s submission of an
application and these revised or supplemented Terms and Conditions may apply to
the application unless the applicant chooses to withdraw its application.
2. The applicant’s agreement with SEI in the event of a Letter of Offer being signed will
comprise the Terms and Conditions, the Application Guide (including its Appendices),
the Applicant Declaration in the Application Form and the rest of the Application
Form. The applicant shall comply with and agrees to be bound by the provisions of
these documents. In the event of any conflict arising between these documents the
order of precedence shall be:
(i)
the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme;
(ii)
the Applicant Declaration in the Application Form;
(iii)
the rest of the Application Guide less the Terms and Conditions of the
Scheme; and
(iv)
the rest of the Application Form less the Terms and Conditions of the
Scheme and less the Applicant Declaration.
3. The applicant must ensure that he/she completes and submits, to the extent
applicable, the latest version of the Application Form (see www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
for the latest version)
4. The applicant must be the owner of an existing home, located in the Republic of
Ireland, in respect of which the grant application is made (not applicable to mobile
homes, caravans, houseboats or other temporary dwellings). Only existing dwellings
are supported.
− An existing dwelling has been occupied for a minimum of one year
− An existing dwelling has an existing heating system
− SEI’s QA programme involves site visits at which time the stated
age of the house can be verified
− The installing engineer is required to vouch for the age of the
house at time of commissioning
5. The applicant must install a new product identified in the product types and listed on
the Registered Product List (see Section 4 of the Application Guide).
6. The applicant must engage an installer listed on the Registered Installer List (see
Section 6 of the Application Guide).
7. Approval of the grant only becomes valid upon receipt by SEI of the issued Letter of
Offer signed by the applicant indicating his/her acceptance.
8. The applicant must secure approval from SEI before assuming he/she will receive the
grant. SEI reserves the right to reject/approve applications for grants under the
Scheme
9. The applicant must ensure grant approval is received before proceeding with any
product purchase or installation work;
10. The grant, once approved, is only payable in respect of the type of product and
installer identified in the Application Form and referenced in the Letter of Offer.
11. The timing of payment to approved applicants is subject to the funding allocated to
the Scheme / programme in a particular calendar year, in accordance with public
financial procedures. Where all other conditions are met, payment will be made by SEI
on a “first come, first served” basis. Where funding is exhausted in a particular calendar
year, payment to remaining applicants will be deferred until such time as further funds
are available. Deferred payments will receive priority, if and when those funds become
available.
12. Should his/her property be selected as part of a sample inspection process, the
applicant must make his/her home available for verification and/or technical
inspection. The applicant consents to the results of such inspections being published
by SEI and made available to the public in whatever media SEI may, at its discretion,
choose. The applicant must also be prepared to participate in follow-up research
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13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
12
(telephone or postal questionnaire) as may be commissioned by SEI to establish the
Scheme’s impacts and achievements. The applicant acknowledges that SEI will have to
provide certain contact details to third party contractors in relation to these matters.
The applicant must obtain all necessary consents, permissions and statutory approvals
and have authority to install the technology in his/her home.
SEI accepts no liability or responsibility, whether for breach of contract, negligence or
otherwise, in respect of any dispute, claim or cause of action arising out of, or in
relation to, any product (or its suitability), equipment (or its suitability), work, system,
service, specification, standard, installation or the qualification or performance of the
installer in respect of which grant approval or payment was given by SEI. No
undertaking, guarantee, assurance or other warranty, express or implied, is given by
SEI, or any of its agents or servants, in respect of the cost, quality, efficiency and/or
benefit of any work, equipment, product, service or installation provided under the
Scheme. The fact of registration on the Registered Product List or the Registered
Installer List for the Scheme does not infer any warranty or endorsement of that
product or installer by SEI.
The information provided herein and on SEI’s website is provided solely for the
purpose of providing assistance to the public, and is not intended to warrant or
guarantee the quality of the product and/or the installation chosen by the grant
applicant.
In the event of any breach of these Terms and Conditions of the Scheme or the other
documents referred to in section 2 above by the applicant and where the applicant has
received payment pursuant to the Scheme, SEI shall, amongst its remedies against the
applicant, be entitled to demand the complete repayment of the grant payment and
the applicant agrees to comply with any such demand within one month of the date of
the letter from SEI containing such demand.
The applicant shall follow the SEI complaints procedure in relation to any disputes
between the applicant and SEI concerning any matter in connection with the Scheme.
Useful Contacts
Scheme Administrator
Adeline Carpenter
Greener Homes Scheme
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
Phone 1850 734 734
Fax
01 808 2013
Email [email protected]
This document together with the necessary forms may be downloaded from SEI’s website
www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
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13
Appendix A – Practical Guidelines for Buyers
A decision to install a renewable energy heating system involves a major investment. This is a new
technology area and you should ensure that you are fully informed and proceed carefully to ensure
that you get a system that truly meets your requirements and expectations.
Whether you have only just begun to consider a renewable energy heating system, or even if you
are nearly settled on your preferred system, these basic guidelines represent good practice in the
selection of the system. Ultimately the decision rests with you the customer and the basis for the
installation of the system should be recorded in some form of written contract between you and
your chosen installer.
The installation of certain products may constitute ‘works’ or ‘development’ within the meaning of
planning legislation and/or building regulations. You should ensure that you have relevant,
permissions, consents and approvals in place before works commence. Your installer is required to
comply with Irish building regulations and technical regulations some of which are available for
consideration on the Department of the Environment’s website (at www.environ.ie).
More detailed guidance on particular systems is available in the technology specific Buyers Guides
available on request (e-mail: [email protected] or Lo Call 1850 734 734) or on line at
www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
Choosing Your System
You need to be fully confident that the system you select will meet the heating needs of your home
in an efficient and effective manner and is within your budget. The design of that system is best
done by an appropriately skilled or experienced installer.
Getting the Best Option
Shop around. Before settling on any one product type, or installer, get at least two quotes for the
equipment and installation, more if desired, and compare the offerings. You might also ask for
quotes on likely running costs in terms of cost per unit of energy delivered. If you have decided on
a particular product/system, but remain uncertain about the installer, then contact the
manufacturer/supplier directly and ask them if they can recommend an installer to you.
Check References
While comparing the quotes that you have received, and before you make any final decision,
request the prospective installers to provide reference homes where they have installed your
chosen system or similar systems. Contact the references supplied (again try for two or more):
- ask if the job came in on time and on price
- confirm that they are fully satisfied with the system
- check that it is operating correctly
- check that they are satisfied with the standard of workmanship of the installer
- see if there were any issues during or since installation and whether they were resolved to
the client’s satisfaction
- ask about the scope and quality of their after sales service.
It will always be worth visiting one of these homes to see the product in operation and to satisfy
you of the workmanship firsthand.
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Formalise the Relationship
As stated, the contract for the purchase and installation of the product will be between you the
customer and your chosen installer (and possibly the supplier). This is best done through the use of
a written contract that records the following aspects of the agreement:
- obligations of the installer / supplier in the installation of the product
- your duties in terms of facilitating the installation
- payment terms and milestones
- obligation of installer / supplier to effect and maintain appropriate levels of
professional liability insurance such as contractor’s all risk insurance or
professional indemnity insurance from the date of commencing installation works
until the end of a period of 6 years from the date of completion of the installation
- agreed terms for dispute resolution should problems arise before, during or after
the installation has been completed
In short, the decision is with you, the customer. The contract is between you and the installer. The
warranty and aftercare responsibility of the product and installation should rest with the installer
and /or the supplier/manufacturer as appropriate.
SEI Can Help
SEI has a range of support information to assist you in your decision, including the following:
Product Overviews
− Give you the buyer, details as to how the technology works and what it can be expected to
deliver
Product Buyers Guides
− These provide more detailed guidance on a range of questions you should ask your
installer to address satisfactorily before you come to any decision
Registered Product Lists
− Lists of products which have been identified to us for the Scheme (see Section 4 above)
Registered Installer Lists
− Lists of installers who are currently on the Registered Installer List (see Section 6 above)
A Model Contract
− A model written contract which may, depending on your circumstances, be suitable to use
as a basis for agreeing a contract with your chosen installer/supplier, or as a template for
you to assess your chosen installer’s/supplier’s own terms and conditions. However, should
you remain uncertain, you may wish to seek legal advice in the formalising of the contract.
The above information and resources are all available online at www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
The above Information is supplied as advice only in order to assist grant applicants in their decision
and in an effort to ensure that the grant applicant gets the most appropriate technology supplied
and fitted in a professional manner.
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14
14.1
Appendix B – Technology Descriptions
Solar
Solar Panels, also known as "collectors", can be fitted to a building’s roof. They use the sun’s heat to
warm water, or another fluid, which passes through the panel. The fluid is then fed to a heat store
(e.g. a hot water tank) and helps provide hot water or a source of hot water for central heating for
the building. Solar panels work throughout daylight hours, even if the sky is overcast and there is
no direct sunshine. Solar panels can also be used to contribute to space heating demand. The cost
of a professionally installed solar system for heating hot water can vary greatly. If you are
considering investing in this technology you should do sufficient research to ensure that you are
getting the best system for your needs and value for your money.
Location - The optimum location for solar panel collectors for all year round energy collection is
roughly south facing and at a tilt angle of 30°- 45° to the horizontal (however angles between 15o
and 60o are also acceptable). It is also important that the collectors are positioned so there are no
shadows on them during the middle of the day. Shading can be from the collectors themselves, or
from trees, chimneys, part of the building or adjacent buildings.
Cylinder – An appropriately sized cylinder should be chosen for the house. The volume of your
solar hot water cylinder is related to the maximum cylinder temperature. It is recommended that at
a maximum cylinder temperature of 60°C, 70 litres per square metre of aperture area is supplied and
at a maximum cylinder temperature of 80 – 90 °C, 50 litres per square metre of aperture area is
supplied. Smaller capacities will limit the benefit from the system and may lead to frequent
overheating of the solar circuit. Generally Dual Coil cylinders should be used, having the coils at the
top and bottom of the cylinder. The solar collector circuit should be connected to the bottom coil
and the auxiliary circuit to the top coil, which will enable the solar system to pre-heat in bad
weather. Your installer will be able to help you choose an appropriately sized cylinder.
Thermal Mixing Valve (Anti-Scald Valve) - Best practice calls for the fitting of a thermal mixing
(anti-scald) valve. This applies to all hot water systems and not just solar heated water systems. With
the current recommendation to store hot water at 60°C to prevent the growth of legionella bacteria
it is becoming more of a consideration to install thermal mixing valves. A thermal mixing valve
mixes cold and hot water together to ensure the water temperature is safe for people to use.
Controller – After commissioning, a permanent power supply should be provided for the solar
controller to ensure circulation in the solar loop.
A solar water heater is composed of:
− A solar collector (flat plate or evacuated tube) which absorbs solar radiation (sunlight) and
changes it into heat;
− A pump which transfers the heat from the collector to hot water in a storage tank;
− The storage tank accumulates the hot water produced by solar energy so that it can be stored
for use when needed;
− A number of accessories which ensure the regulation and the safety of the system;
− A back-up heater (gas, oil, or wood fuelled boiler, immersion heater or heat pump) which will
bring the hot water to the temperature required when there is not enough sunlight to do so
(mostly in winter).
− In Ireland, solar collectors alone cannot provide all the hot water for a household’s needs
throughout the year. Correctly sized they will supply 60% of heat / domestic hot water needs.
They are normally installed in conjunction with a conventional back-up heating system.
Planning Permission for Solar Panels
The installation of solar panels in your home is exempt from planning permission up to 12m2 or 50%
of the total roof area as per Statutory Instrument No. 83 of 2007 Planning and Development
Regulations
http://www.environ.ie/en/Publications/DevelopmentandHousing/Planning/FileDownLoad,1486,en.pdf
implemented on the 28th February 2007. Contact you local planning authority if you are unsure of
the local planning requirements.
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14.2
Heat Pumps
Heat is widely available in the ground, air and water around your house. These natural sources of
heat are constantly replenished by the sun, wind and rain. A heat pump system will harness these
free and renewable energy sources for heating your house and supplying hot water at a very low
cost. The role of the heat pump is to ‘pump up’ heat from a low temperature source, for example
the ground under your lawn and release it at a higher temperature into your central heating system.
There are three main types of heat pump available on the market, those that take heat from the
ground, from water (rivers or wells) or directly from the air. Ground source heat pumps come in two
varieties – vertical bore or horizontal loop.
Existing Dwellings Note
When installing a heat pump into an existing dwelling it is critical to ensure that the building is
sufficiently insulated and the existing heating system is surveyed for compatibility. Many times
the dwelling’s fabric will need to be upgraded to ensure efficient operation and thus optimal
electricity cost. Recommended values of average elemental U-value for insulation would be:
• Roofs:
0.3 W/m2K
• Walls:
0.6 W/m2K
• Ground Floors:
0.6 W/m2K
• Exposed Floors:
0.6 W/m2K
• External doors windows/roof-lights: 2.6 W/m2K
The existing heating system should be surveyed by your installer as not all radiators are suitable for
use with heat pumps; it is recommend that Underfloor Heating (with sufficient insulation) or low
temperature radiators are used.
Heat pumps are very economical, for every unit of electricity used to power the heat pump, 3 to 4
units of heat are generated. They work best in conjunction with low temperature heat distribution
systems e.g. underfloor heating. Because they require electricity to run, they are most cost effective
when they can use night rate electricity. This requires a night rate meter. A buffer store is required
to maximise efficiency as this allows the heat pump to store heat on a constant basis, releasing it as
and when required.
Ground Source Collector - This collector is used in closed loop systems to transfer the heat from
the ground to the house. The design and installation of this collector is important and your installer
will be able to explain all the relevant aspects of it. It is important not to landscape or plant any trees
or shrubs in the vicinity of the collector area as the roots can interfere with the operation of the heat
pump. It is important that you take care to note a number of things:
−
Your installer will provide a plan of the site showing the collector area and depth. This
could prevent damage to the collector if any future work or landscaping is carried out on
the grounds. In addition photographs of the collector before it is covered up would be
helpful with any future work or trouble-shooting of the heat pump system.
−
Collector calculations – Your supplier/installer will carry out tests on the soil to ensure
that the most suitable collector (vertical, horizontal) will be chosen. They will provide a
formal set of calculations for the collector design which will aid any future troubleshooting.
Air-Source Heat Pump - Air/Air heat pumps take the energy from the air and transfer it to a warm
air heating system and Air/Water heat pumps take the energy from the air and transfer it to the
water in a heating system.
Water –Source Heat Pump - Water source heat pumps work in a similar fashion to ground source
systems and transfer the heat from your water source to the house. Water source heat pumps use
an open loop collector. Underground water sources such as a well circulate the water through
pipework that in turn transfer heat to your house.
A Piping Schematic, Valve Chart and Wiring Diagram– Your installer will provide you with a
piping schematic, valve chart and wiring diagram. This will be very useful in helping with any future
work or trouble-shooting of the heat pump system.
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Under Floor Heating System Design – You should discuss the under floor heating system and any
plans for floor coverings with your installer as they affect the heat transfer from the floor and the
overall operation of the system. Again, photographs of the under floor piping system during the
installation would be helpful with any future trouble-shooting.
NB for the most efficient and economical operation of your system, it is important that your installer
is involved (or well informed) in the above 3 points.
14.3
Wood Chip or Pellet Stoves
Everyone loves a wood fire; it really turns a house into a home. But open fires and old-fashioned
stoves can be polluting, inefficient (typically only 20-30% efficient) and inconvenient. Modern wood
pellet stoves offer the warmth and comfort of wood heating while being highly efficient, clean
burning and totally automatic, saving you time and money.
Wood burning systems do emit carbon dioxide. However, as the wood fuel is cultivated, it absorbs
the exact same amount of carbon dioxide as is released when burnt. As such it does not add to the
carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. An eligible system can be used for heating a single room, hot
water or a whole house.
It is important that there is adequate ventilation and that a clean air source is supplied to the stove,
as the combustion process uses oxygen (in the same way as any fuel fired appliance). Given that
some stoves come equipped with an integral boiler for hot water and heat delivery, it is important
that these systems are correctly integrated with the existing hot water system (e.g. cylinder). (See
Part J of the Building Regulations for minimum ventilation requirements – go to www.environ.ie).
14.4
Wood Chip or Pellet Boilers
Modern wood chip or pellet boilers offer the warmth and comfort of wood heating while being
highly efficient, clean burning and totally automatic, saving you time and money.
Chip or Pellet boilers are lit automatically and continue to operate without manual intervention.
Automatic fuel supply and thermostat means you can relax and enjoy the comfort of chip/pellet
heating at the switch of a button. Automatic ignition means that lighting the boiler is convenient
and easy. Modern chip/pellet boilers are self cleaning so you can forget the daily cleaning chore of
traditional solid fuel heating systems. The ash pan needs to be emptied bi-weekly, or less
frequently, depending on service.
These systems must comprise the main heating system of the house and can be run on wood chips
and/or wood pellets.
Flues: The flue is used for the exhaust of the boiler or stove. It can be installed through a chimney
or outside the building. The flue must be installed to current Building Regulations. (Part J – go to
www.environ.ie ). Some things to look for would be:
− It is above the eaves line by about 1metre or 600mm if coming out near the roof apex.
− It is twin walled and insulated.
− It has a cowl or hood on top to help prevent down draught.
− It should be separated from any combustible material.
Constructional Hearth: A constructional hearth should be placed (see Part J of the current Building
Regulations – go to www.environ.ie) under a stove to separate the stove from combustible material
and to provide protection from the threat of fire. The constructional hearth could be a metal or a
non-combustible plate. The appliance should not be placed close to the edge of a hearth or any
combustible material.
Air Supply: A stove or boiler must have a secure air supply for safe operation (see Part J of the
current Building Regulations – go to www.environ.ie). This can be either in the form of a controlled
dedicated air supply directly to the appliance, or in the form of a permanent ventilation opening to
Application Guide Version 3.0
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
the room in which the appliance is located. Best practise is to rely upon dedicated ventilation and
not on air infiltration and/or leakage in the room. The size of the opening depends on the size of
the appliance. Your installer should be able to size this correctly. In addition, extractor fans may
interfere with the operation of the appliance causing smoke to spill out of the appliance into the
room so please consult with your installer.
Thermal Mixing Valve (Anti Scald Valve): See section 14.1
Bulk Fuel Storage: All biomass boiler installations shall require the provision of bulk fuel storage. It
shall be required to meet local building and fire regulations. The ONORM M7137 Standard
http://on-norm.at/ecom/ shall be used as a guideline for DIY bulk storage units. Bulk fuel storage
capacity shall be able to store a minimum of 3 tonnes of wood pellets (80% of a typical houses’
requirement for one year).
Buffer Heat Store: It is a recommendation that a buffer or accumulator tank be incorporated as
part of domestic wood pellet / chip boiler system installations where appropriate. A buffer or
accumulator cylinder in a domestic biomass heating installation is a primary heat
storage/distribution cylinder, which is heated by the boiler to a set temperature and can store the
resulting high temperature water for long system standstill periods, until heating or hot water is
required. A buffer / accumulator reduces the on/off cycling of wood boilers by “smoothing” the heat
output to the dwelling. The buffer or accumulator capacity should be calculated in accordance with
your manufacturer’s recommendations. A rough guideline for establishing the volume of the buffer
is available from EN303-5 and from the REIA training manual and is in the region of 55 to 65 L/kW of
the rated boiler size.
The use of a buffer / accumulator is noteworthy in the following situations:
− Where the boiler does not have full modulation capabilities: the use of a buffer will
smooth the heat output to the dwelling.
− In situations where the boiler is not capable of supplying the full heat demand of the
house, a buffer tank will allow the boiler to run for longer at optimum efficiency
extracting maximum potential from the boiler and fuel.
Thermostats
Thermostats are used to control the temperature of an area or space. You should consider what the
optimum location of the thermostat is; usually it is the living space where you will spend most of
your time. It is very worthwhile to have all main rooms “zoned” and fitted with their own
thermostat.
Pellets
Quality pellets are essential to ensure clean combustion and trouble-free operation of your
appliance. When buying pellets, consumers should consider those that are supplied with a quality
mark and with a complete fuel analysis. Often this information will be printed on the packaging.
Pellets can be purchased in bagged or bulk form. For bulk purchases, a dry covered storage area is
required. Generally bulk prices are more competitive than those for bags. Wood chips are generally
sourced locally. It is important that the fuel used (quality, size, moisture content) is suitable for the
appliance; your supplier will provide you with these details.
Poor pellet quality can greatly interfere with the functioning of the heating system. There are
various European pellet quality standards currently in operation. Some of the more common
standards are:
Austria:
ÖNORM M1735
Sweden:
SS 187120 and SS 187121
Germany:
DIN 51731
Europe:
CEN TS 14961
In Canada and the US the equivalent standard is Premium grade.
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
14.5
Wood Gasification Boiler
A wood gasification boiler is a central heating boiler which produces its useful heat through
combustion of wood gas. This “generator” gas is produced by the thermal transformation of wood
fuel i.e. the wood fuel is first converted to gas then the resulting charcoal is then also converted to
gas.
A wood gasification boiler differs from a standard wood boiler by way of the combustion process. In
a standard wood boiler, direct combustion of the wood fuel takes place, whereas in a wood
gasification boiler, combustion of wood-gas takes place following thermal conversion of the wood
fuel to gas.
Buffer Heat Store
A buffer store (accumulator) will be installed in conjunction with your wood gasification boiler to
ensure the efficient operation of your boiler. Buffer stores are important heat storage devices,
especially for wood gasification boilers. These boilers can only be operated efficiently when
combined with an accumulator since controlled operation at part load is more difficult. This is due
to the nature of the fuel (generally wood logs). Once combustion take place, the fuel will continue
to burn irrespective of whether the dwellings heat load is met. Consequently the buffer or
accumulator cylinder in a domestic biomass heating installation is the primary heat
storage/distribution device, which is heated by the boiler to a set temperature and can store the
resulting high temperature water for long system standstill periods, until heating or hot water is
required. The buffer or accumulator capacity should be calculated in accordance with your
manufacturer’s recommendations. A rough guideline for establishing the volume of the buffer is
available from EN303-5 and from the REIA training manual and is in the region of 55 to 65 L/kW of
the rated boiler size.
Flues
The flue is used for the exhaust of the boiler or stove. It can be installed through a chimney or
outside the building. The flue must be installed to current Building Regulations. (Part J – go to
www.environ.ie ). Some things to look for would be:
ƒ It is above the eaves line by about 1metre or 600mm if coming out near the roof apex.
ƒ It is twin walled and insulated.
ƒ It has a cowl or hood on top to help prevent down draught.
ƒ It should be separated from any combustible material.
Constructional Hearth
A constructional hearth should be placed (see Part J of the current Building Regulations – go to
www.environ.ie) under a stove to separate the stove from combustible material and to provide
protection from the threat of fire. The constructional hearth could be a metal or a non-combustible
plate. The appliance should not be placed close to the edge of a hearth or any combustible
material.
Air Supply
A stove or boiler must have a secure air supply for safe operation (see Part J of the current Building
Regulations – go to www.environ.ie). This can be either in the form of a controlled dedicated air
supply directly to the appliance, or in the form of a permanent ventilation opening to the room in
which the appliance is located. Best practise is to rely upon dedicated ventilation and not on air
infiltration and/or leakage in the room. The size of the opening depends on the size of the
appliance. Your installer should be able to size this correctly. In addition, extractor fans may
interfere with the operation of the appliance causing smoke to spill out of the appliance into the
room so please consult with your installer.
Thermal Mixing Valve (Anti Scald Valve): See section 14.1
Thermostats
Thermostats are used to control the temperature of an area or space. You should consider what the
optimum location of the thermostat is; usually it is the living space where you will spend most of
your time. It is very worthwhile to have all main rooms “zoned” and fitted with their own
thermostat.
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
15
Appendix C – Useful Publications
The following publications from SEI will assist you in your learning and decision making:
Technology descriptions
Solar Water Heaters
Solar Space Heating
Renewable Heat Pumps
Wood Chip or Pellet Stoves
Biomass Boiler
Buyers Guides
Buyers Guides to Solar Water Heaters
Buyers Guides Solar Space Heating
Buyers Guides to Renewable Heat Pumps
Buyers Guides to Wood Chip or Pellet Stoves
Buyers Guides Wood Chip or Pellet Boilers
Consumer Guides on Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency
Consumer Guideline – Biomass Boilers and Stoves
Consumer Guideline – Solar Thermal Systems
Consumer Guideline – Heat Pump
Consumer Guide to Sustainable Energy
Consumer Guide to Renewable Energy
Passive Solar Design
How to make your Home Energy Efficient
Renovating an Older Home
Building an Energy Efficient Home
Detailed Guide to Home Heating
Detailed Guide to Home Insulation
Application Guide Version 3.0
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
16
Appendix D – Registered Installer Terms & Conditions
The following are the terms and conditions to register as an installer:
I confirm that I have reviewed and accept the following Terms and Conditions for registration on
the Registered Installer List and that I will comply with these Terms and Conditions:
1.
I undertake to furnish SEI with a valid tax clearance certificate (“TCC”) each year, and I
attach a valid TCC for the current year. I accept that failure to furnish SEI with a valid
TCC shall result in my removal from the Registered Installer List.
2.
I understand that in order to remain eligible under the Scheme I am required to be
registered on the Registered Installer List at all stages in the installation process
relating to installations where I am the nominated installer including grant application,
commissioning and sign off of the commissioning report.
3.
I declare that I am competent and have the necessary
□ Training
□ Experience
to enable me to satisfactorily and safely install / commission equipment in the
technology areas for which I apply for registration.
4.
I have achieved certification from an accredited training course in respect of each of
the technology areas for which I am registered (Copy certificate(s) to be supplied).
5.
I accept that installations grant aided under the Scheme and which I commission may,
for quality control purposes, be inspected by SEI or its authorised agents or contractors
and I will assist, by making myself available and/or disclosing any requested
information, and co-operate with any such inspector.
6.
I fully consent to the results of such inspections being published by SEI or its agents or
contractors and made available to the public in whatever media SEI may at its
discretion choose.
7.
I accept that failure to act on a direction from SEI or its authorised agent or contractor,
to remedy a deficit identified as a result of an inspection may result in my removal
from the Registered Installer List.
8.
I accept that my engaging in fraudulent or inappropriate behaviour in relation to the
Scheme will result in my removal from the Registered Installer List. I also accept that
any failure by me to comply with these Terms and Conditions may result in SEI
removing me from the Registered Installer List.
9.
I am aware that SEI may de-register installers where SEI has evidence of repeated
failures on the part of installers to deliver quality work or give customer satisfaction.
10.1
I agree that any dispute between me and SEI in relation to any matter in connection
with the Scheme shall in the first instance be discussed between us with a view to
finding a resolution. I agree that if the discussion between me and SEI fails, the dispute
may be referred by either of the parties to an independent mediator, accredited by the
Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution and appointed, in the absence of agreement
between the parties, by the Chairman (or his or her deputy) of the Irish Commercial
Mediation Association. Any mediation shall take place in Dublin, Ireland at a venue
chosen by the mediator. The appointed mediator will seek to mediate a resolution of
the dispute.
10.2
I agree that if the dispute between myself and SEI is not resolved in accordance with
clause 10.1, the dispute may then be referred by either party to arbitration under the
Arbitration Rules and Procedures of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators Irish Branch
and, in the absence of agreement, either party can apply to the Chartered Institute of
Arbitrators Irish Branch to have such an arbitrator appointed.
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Guide
11.
I accept that, in order to be reinstated to the list after deregistration in accordance with
these Terms and Conditions, I may be required by SEI to contribute to the costs of any
re-inspections arising out of any rework declarations previously issued by SEI or any of
its agents or contractors. Furthermore I accept that I may be required by SEI to
contribute to the cost of a number (at SEI’s discretion) of inspections carried out on my
installations after re-registration.
12.
I am aware that SEI intends to require Registered Installers to become members (at the
expense of Registered Installers) of a recognised trade association of installers carrying
out the type of work envisaged by these Terms and Conditions once such an
association is formed.
13.
I agree at my expense to attend targeted workshops when requested by SEI.
14.
I undertake that the services provided by me pursuant to the Scheme will be carried
out in accordance with recognised and accepted practices, acceptable industry
standards and any applicable equipment installation guidelines and any relevant
national and European laws and guidelines.
15.
I accept that the Terms and Conditions for registration on the Registered Installer List
may be updated from time to time on the SEI website and these updated Terms and
Conditions shall apply to me with immediate effect.
16.
I accept that in carrying out services pursuant to the Scheme that I shall not be acting
in my capacity as a consumer but that I shall be acting in the course of my business.
Wood Gasification Boiler Declaration
To be filled out by the authorised representative of company or distributor
I declare that ______________________________________ (installer) is competent to install and
commission wood log gasification boilers (name of boiler)
______________________________________________________
registered under the Greener Homes Scheme Product List.
I accept that installations grant aided under the Scheme and which the installer above commissions
may, for quality control purposes, be inspected by SEI or its authorised agents or contractors and I
will assist, by making myself available and/or disclosing any requested information, and co-operate
with any such inspector.
I accept that failure to act on a direction from SEI or its authorised agent or contractor, to remedy a
deficit identified as a result of an inspection may result in SEI removing the products and installers
from the Registered Lists.
Name (print):
__________________________________________________________
Company (print): __________________________________________________________
Address (print): __________________________________________________________
Contact telephone number (print): _______________________________________________
Email (print): _________________________________________________________________
Signature: ___________________________ Date: __________________________________
Application Guide Version 3.0
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
Greener Homes Scheme
Phase III
(Existing Dwellings)
Homeowner Application Form
Version 3.0
IMPORTANT NOTICE
It is the responsibility of each applicant to the Greener Homes Scheme to ensure that they have
read, and fully understand, this Application Form and the Home Owner Application Guide before
submitting a signed application form. Failure to fully adhere to the provisions of this Application
Form and the Application Guide will result in application refusal, grant revocation or payment
request refusal, depending on the particular status and stage of the grant. SEI accepts no liability or
responsibility, whether for breach of contract, negligence or otherwise, in respect of any claim or
cause of action arising out of, or in relation to, any equipment, product, work, system or installation
in respect of which grant approval was given by SEI.
This Application Form will be revised periodically. Call the Helpline 1850 734 734 or check the SEI
website (www.sei.ie/greenerhomes) to ensure that you have the latest version.
Application Form Version 3.0
Page 1 of 11
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY THE APPLICATION GUIDE BEFORE COMPLETING THIS FORM.
Instruction for Completing the Application Form
The assistance of an installer will be required in completing the Application Form.
Please complete the Application Form in BLOCK CAPITALS with blue or black pen.
Please complete:
• Sections A.1 – A.4 (The Applicant)
• Section B.1 or B.2 or B.3 or B.4 depending on product selected (Technical Details – Proposed
Installation)
• Section C (Application Declaration)
• Section D (Terms and Conditions)
Please ensure that you have fully read and accept the terms and conditions contained in section D. Please note
that an incomplete Application Form may result in a delay in the processing and/or rejection of your
application.
All the information requested in the application form is mandatory and failure to complete fully will result in
the application being returned.
The completed Application Form should be returned to:
Greener Homes Scheme
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
For further information regarding the Greener Homes Scheme (the “Scheme”):
Web
E-mail
Phone
www.sei.ie/greenerhomes
[email protected]
1850 734 734
NOTE: Please ensure compliance with the following eligibility criteria when filling out your
application form:
•
•
•
Grant eligibility commenced with the launch of Phase III of the Scheme on the 22nd July
2008. If any product procurement or work was initiated prior to this date then you are
not eligible to apply for a grant. (Product Procurement includes any form of ordering,
deposit and/or stage payment as well as product delivery. Work includes any
installation relating to the Renewable Heating System being applied for under the
Greener Homes Scheme).
No purchase or work should be initiated before receiving a formal Letter of Offer from
SEI.
Once approved and a request for payment is made, confirmation of the above,
including proof of purchase is a requirement for payment of the grant.
Application Form Version 3.0
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
Section A – The Applicant
Please complete shaded areas with BLOCK CAPITALS and tick boxes where appropriate
A.1
Application
For which technology are you applying: (tick one only):
Biomass
Gasification
Solar Thermal
Heat Pump
This is my first application for this installation address
I have applied before
Please enter Previous Ref. Number
Only one grant will be provided per dwelling under Phase III of the Greener Homes Scheme. Where a
dwelling had an installation funded under Phase I or Phase II, that dwelling will not be eligible for
further grant aid under the Scheme. If you have already received or are in the process of receiving a
grant under Phase I or Phase II please do not send in this application form as it will not be accepted.
A.2
Applicant Details
Name
Address
Phone
Mobile
E-mail
A.3
Bank details *
Bank Name
Bank Branch / Address
Bank Sort Code
-
-
Account Holders Name
Account Number
* We are unable to process EBS and Credit Union accounts at this time.
Application Form Version 3.0
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
A.4
Installation Details
Installation Address, if different from above.
Address
Property Details: Only existing dwellings are supported.
•
•
•
•
An existing dwelling has been occupied for a minimum of one year
An existing dwelling has an existing heating system
SEI’s QA programme involves site visits at which time the stated age of the house can be verified
The installing engineer is required to vouch for the age of the house at time of commissioning
years
Building Age (estimated years)
(ESB Meter Point Reference Number – top right hand corner on ESB Bill)
Mid terrace
Detached
Apartment
End terrace
Semi-detached
m2
Floor Area
Property Size:
No. of bedrooms
Fuel Displacement
Primary heating fuel:
Oil
Solid Fuel (Coal / Peat )
Gas -LPG
Gas - Natural
Electricity
Total estimated system cost (incl. product
purchase and installation)
(including VAT)
*Anticipated date of Installation
Completion (dd/mm/yyyy)
Cannot be less than 21 days
from application submission
* Please allow a minimum of TWENTY ONE DAYS for processing of your application. Any purchase or
installation should not be initiated before receiving a formal Letter of Offer from SEI.
Note: All the information above is MANDATORY and failure to complete will result in the return of the
application.
Application Form Version 3.0
Page 4 of 11
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
Section B – Technical Details - Proposed Installation
Depending on the particular technology selected, ONE ONLY of sections B.1, B.2, B.3 or B.4 need be
completed.
B.1
Wood Chip or Pellet Stove or Boiler – Proposed Installation
The assistance of an installer will be required in completing Section B.
Installer Details: Applicants must use Installers who have registered with SEI and that Installer must be
registered at the time of application and at time of system commissioning.
Installer Name
Installer ID
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE Installer ID found on the Registered List of Installers. Applications made without the
SEI Installer ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Installer List.
Intended Purpose (tick one)
Space Heating Only
Space and Hot Water
Product Details:
Registered Product - SEI Product ID
Product Manufacturer
Product Make
Product Model
Product Model Number
Supplier
Rated Heat Output (kW)
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE the SEI Product ID found on the Registered Product List. Applications made without
the SEI Product ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Product List.
Product / System Details:
Please tick ONE of the grant options below
Wood Chip or Pellet Boiler
€2,500
Bulk Fuel Storage**
Yes
Wood Chip or Pellet Stove
€800
Wood Chip or Pellet Stove with Integral Boiler
€1,400
Buffer Heat Storage Cylinder** Existing
New
Intended Fuel Type (tick one)
Wood Chips
Wood Pellets
Both
**See Section 4.1 of the Application Guide
Application Form Version 3.0
Page 5 of 11
(mandatory) Capacity: _______
N/A
Size = _______ litres
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
B.2
Wood Gasification Boiler – Proposed Installation
The assistance of an installer will be required in completing Section B.
Installer Details: Applicants must use Installers who have registered with SEI and that Installer must be
registered at the time of application and at time of system commissioning.
Installer Name
Installer ID
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE Installer ID found on the Wood Gasification Boiler Registered List of Installers.
Applications made without the SEI Installer ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide
and Registered Installer List.
Intended Purpose (tick one)
Space Heating Only
Space and Hot Water
Product Details:
Registered Product - SEI Product ID
Product Manufacturer
Product Make
Product Model
Product Model Number
Supplier
Rated Heat Output (kW)
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE the SEI Product ID found on the Wood Gasification Boiler Registered Product List.
Applications made without the SEI Product ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide
and relevant Product List.
Product / System Details:
Wood Gasification Boiler
€2,000
Buffer Heat Storage Cylinder (mandatory) **
Existing
New
Fuel Supply (tick one)
Own Supply
Supplier
Purchase
** See Section 4.2 of the Application Guide
Application Form Version 3.0
Page 6 of 11
Size = _______ litres
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
B.3
Solar Thermal – Proposed Installation
The assistance of an installer will be required in completing Section B.
Installer Details: Applicants must use Installers who have registered with SEI and that Installer must be
registered at the time of application and at time of system commissioning.
Installer Name
Installer ID
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE Installer ID. Applications made without the SEI Installer ID will be returned to applicant
as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Installer List.
Intended Purpose (tick one)
Space Heating Only
Hot Water Only
Space and Hot Water
Product Details:
Registered Product - SEI Product ID
Product Manufacturer
Product Make
Product Model
Product Model Number
Supplier
Rated Heat Output (kW)
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE the SEI Product ID found on the Registered Product List. Applications made without
the SEI Product ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Product List.
Product / System Details:
Solar Collector Type
€250 / m2
Flat Plate
Evacuated Tube €300 / m2
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOLAR THERMAL (per m2; to maximum of 6 m2)
No. of Collectors/Panels
Aperture area per panel
m2
***Total Aperture area
m2
Grant Requested
Total Surface (Gross) area
m2
Estimated annual energy yield
€
*** The grant is based on the Aperture area of the collector – please consult your supplier if you are unsure.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hot Water Storage
Existing
New
Size = ______________ litres
Vented
Un-vented
Single coil
Triple coil
Dual coil
Thermal store
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Primary Circuit
Application Form Version 3.0
Indirect
Direct
Sealed system
Pumped drain-back
Feed & vent
Thermo-siphon
Page 7 of 11
kWh
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
B.4
Heat Pump – Proposed Installation
The assistance of an installer will be required in completing Section B.
Installer Details: Applicants must use Installers who have registered with SEI and that Installer must be
registered at the time of application and at time of system commissioning.
Installer Name
Installer ID
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE Installer ID found on the Registered List of Installers. Applications made without the
SEI Installer ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Installer List.
Intended Purpose (tick one)
Space Heating Only
Hot Water Only
Space and Hot Water
Product Details:
Registered Product - SEI Product ID
Product Manufacturer
Product Make
Product Model
Product Model Number
Supplier
Design Heat Output (kW)
Rated Heat Output
(kW)
Estimated Electricity Input
(kW)
Note: Application MUST INCLUDE the SEI Product ID found on the Registered Product List. Applications made without
the SEI Product ID will be returned to applicant as incomplete. See Scheme Application Guide and Registered Product List.
Product / System Details:
Please tick ONE of the grant options below
Heat Pump - Horizontal Ground Collector
€2,500
Heat Pump - Vertical Ground Collector
€3,500
Heat Pump - Water (well) to Water
€2,500
Heat Pump – Air Source
€2,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Space heating distribution (where applicable)
Under floor
Radiators
Air blowers
Convectors
Application Form Version 3.0
Page 8 of 11
Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
Section C – Terms and Conditions of the Scheme
1.
The Application Guide, Application Form and Terms and Conditions are those published on the
SEI website on the date of submitting the application. However, SEI may, if required by law and
without incurring any liability, vary, revise or supplement the Terms and Conditions of the
Scheme after the applicant’s submission of an application and these revised or supplemented
Terms and Conditions may apply to the application unless the applicant chooses to withdraw its
application.
2. The applicant’s agreement with SEI in the event of a Letter of Offer being signed will comprise
the Terms and Conditions, the Application Guide (including its Appendices), the Applicant
Declaration in the Application Form and the rest of the Application Form. The applicant shall
comply with and agrees to be bound by the provisions of these documents. In the event of any
conflict arising between these documents the order of precedence shall be:
a.
the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme;
b.
the Applicant Declaration in the Application Form;
c.
the rest of the Application Guide less the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme; and
d.
the rest of the Application Form less the Terms and Conditions of the Scheme and
less the Applicant Declaration.
3. The applicant must ensure that he/she completes and submits, to the extent applicable, the
latest version of the Application Form (see www.sei.ie/greenerhomes for the latest version)
4. The applicant must be the owner of an existing home, located in the Republic of Ireland, in
respect of which the grant application is made (not applicable to mobile homes, caravans,
houseboats or other temporary dwellings). Only existing dwellings are supported.
− An existing dwelling has been occupied for a minimum of one year
− An existing dwelling has an existing heating system
− SEI’s QA programme involves site visits at which time the stated age of the
house can be verified
− The installing engineer is required to vouch for the age of the house at time of
commissioning
5. The applicant must install a new product identified in the product types and listed on the
Registered Product List (see Section 4 of the Application Guide).
6. The applicant must engage an installer listed on the Registered Installer List (see Section 6 of the
Application Guide).
7. Approval of the grant only becomes valid upon receipt by SEI of the issued Letter of Offer signed
by the applicant indicating his/her acceptance.
8. The applicant must secure approval from SEI before assuming he/she will receive the grant. SEI
reserves the right to reject/approve applications for grants under the Scheme
9. The applicant must ensure grant approval is received before proceeding with any product
purchase or installation work;
10. The grant, once approved, is only payable in respect of the type of product and installer identified
in the Application Form and referenced in the Letter of Offer.
11. The timing of payment to approved applicants is subject to the funding allocated to the Scheme /
programme in a particular calendar year, in accordance with public financial procedures. Where
all other conditions are met, payment will be made by SEI on a “first come, first served” basis.
Where funding is exhausted in a particular calendar year, payment to remaining applicants will
be deferred until such time as further funds are available. Deferred payments will receive priority,
if and when those funds become available.
12. Should his/her property be selected as part of a sample inspection process, the applicant must
make his/her home available for verification and/or technical inspection. The applicant consents
to the results of such inspections being published by SEI and made available to the public in
whatever media SEI may, at its discretion, choose. The applicant must also be prepared to
participate in follow-up research (telephone or postal questionnaire) as may be commissioned by
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
SEI to establish the Scheme’s impacts and achievements. The applicant acknowledges that SEI
will have to provide certain contact details to third party contractors in relation to these matters.
The applicant must obtain all necessary consents, permissions and statutory approvals and have
authority to install the technology in his/her home.
SEI accepts no liability or responsibility, whether for breach of contract, negligence or otherwise,
in respect of any dispute, claim or cause of action arising out of, or in relation to, any product (or
its suitability), equipment (or its suitability), work, system, service, specification, standard,
installation or the qualification or performance of the installer in respect of which grant approval
or payment was given by SEI. No undertaking, guarantee, assurance or other warranty, express or
implied, is given by SEI, or any of its agents or servants, in respect of the cost, quality, efficiency
and/or benefit of any work, equipment, product, service or installation provided under the
Scheme. The fact of registration on the Registered Product List or the Registered Installer List for
the Scheme does not infer any warranty or endorsement of that product or installer by SEI.
The information provided herein and on SEI’s website is provided solely for the purpose of
providing assistance to the public, and is not intended to warrant or guarantee the quality of the
product and/or the installation chosen by the grant applicant.
In the event of any breach of these Terms and Conditions of the Scheme or the other documents
referred to in section 2 above by the applicant and where the applicant has received payment
pursuant to the Scheme, SEI shall, amongst its remedies against the applicant, be entitled to
demand the complete repayment of the grant payment and the applicant agrees to comply with
any such demand within one month of the date of the letter from SEI containing such demand.
The applicant shall follow the SEI complaints procedure in relation to any disputes between the
applicant and SEI concerning any matter in connection with the Scheme.
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Greener Homes Scheme Phase III
Homeowner Application Form
Section D - Applicant Declaration
•
•
•
Grant approval, indicated through a letter of offer, must be in place before any product is purchased
or installation work commenced. If any purchase has been made or works commenced prior to the
date of this application then I acknowledge and confirm that this application will be ineligible for
support. I confirm that no such purchases or works have occurred prior to the date set out below.
Verification checks form part of the Scheme’s inspection regime and these will be undertaken in a
number of homes. Installers are required to confirm details, including date of installations with a
penalty of removal from the List of Registered Installers for invalid declarations.
I agree and consent to SEI, as data controller, and its agents, storing the information which I provide
to SEI on its database. SEI agrees and hereby notifies you that SEI and its agents shall only process
personal data about you in accordance with the Data Protection Acts 1988 and 2003. I agree and
consent to personal data which I provide being used by SEI or its agents for grant approval and
payment purposes and to facilitate the administration of the grant process and the Scheme and for
the purposes of liaising with installers and where appropriate inspectors and researchers. This may
require my personal data being supplied to and discussed with any other persons or organisations
helping to assess and monitor this application including without limitation, SEI’s professional advisers
and any inspectors and researchers which SEI might engage. These persons will be required to
comply with the Data Protection Acts 1988 and 2003. I understand that I may request SEI to grant me
access to my personal data which SEI holds.
I also understand that all of the data collected in the administration of the Scheme will be aggregated
by SEI as a means of analysing the overall Scheme effectiveness e.g. in terms of cumulative
achievements, market trends, and/or environmental impacts. I understand that the disclosure of this
aggregated data will not involve the release of any personal data. My signature on this Application
Form is treated as confirmation that SEI and its agents may use the data which I have supplied for the
aforementioned purposes.
I have read in full and agree with the Application Form and the Scheme Application Guide including its
appendices.
I confirm that the dwelling for which I am applying is an existing dwelling as per the terms and
conditions of the Scheme (see point 4).
I have read and agree with the terms and conditions of the Scheme which are set out in section C of this
Application Form and also in section 11 of the Application Guide. I certify that the information entered on this
Application Form is true, accurate and complete in all respects.
Applicant’s Name:
(BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE)
Applicant’s Signature:
Date:
SEI may wish to use the information relating to your particular installation for the purposes of a case study,
publicity, promotional materials (print and / or web).
Please tick below if you are happy to allow your project details be utilised for these purposes.
The completed Application Form should be returned to:
Greener Homes Scheme
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Glasnevin
Dublin 9
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