87256 Event Counter Display User`s Manual

87256 Event Counter Display User`s Manual
Vorne Industries
87/256
Event Counter Display
User's Manual
1445 Industrial Drive
• Itasca, IL 60143-1849
• (630) 875-3600
• Telefax (630) 875-3609
. 1
Chapter 1 Setting Up Your Display For Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.1 Accessing Wiring Connections And Selection Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3 Setting The DIP Switches For Your Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Run and Program Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
DIP Switch or VDP4 Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Unit Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Input 2 Input Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Input 1 Input Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Active Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Counter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.4 Connecting Power To The Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.5 Wiring and Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Input 1 and Input 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Output Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.6 Basic Information About Serial Communication Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.7 RS-232 Communication To A Single Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Selecting RS-232 Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
RS-232 Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Wiring Diagram For An RS-232 Host Device To One Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Guidelines For Wiring RS-232 Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.8 RS-422 Or RS-485 Communication To One Or More Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 2 Using The Simple Packet Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
2.1 Simple Packet Communication Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.2 Simple Packet Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Simulate An Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Display Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Flash Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Change Color (For Tri-color Display's) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Activate Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.3 Addressing Multiple Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Unit Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
87/256 Users Manual
1
2.4 Using Checksums And Command Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Chapter 3
Advanced Features Of the 87 Series Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
3.1 VDP4 Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Display Justification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Leading Zeroes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Fixed Decimal Point After Digit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Number of Display Digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Counter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Input Active Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Debounce Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Counter Reload Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Scale Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Save on Power Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Count Below Zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Trigger Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Relay Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Data Bits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Terminator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Unit Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Member of Group(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Checksum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Command Acknowledgment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Output Transmission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Appendix A Operating Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix B Character Set Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix C Display Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
22
23
Notice Of Disclaimer
While the information in this manual has been carefully reviewed for accuracy, Vorne
Industries, Inc. assumes no liability for any errors, or omissions in the information. Vorne
Industries also reserves the right to make changes without further notice to any products
described in this manual.
2
87/256 Users Manual
Chapter 1 Setting Up Your Display For Operation
This chapter describes how to set up the display hardware for operation, including setting the dip
switches, connecting power, wiring the counter inputs, and wiring to the serial communication
port. There are many references in this chapter to the term input device. The input device is
whatever device will be providing a input signal to the 87/256 display. Some typical input devices
are foot switches, relay contacts, 3 wire proximity sensors, PLC outputs and photoelectric eyes.
1.1
Accessing Wiring Connections And Selection Switches
All external power and signal connections to the display are made to printed circuit board mounted
terminal strips. These terminal strips, as well as a 10 position DIP switch can be accessed by
removing the back panel user access plate.
WARNING - SHOCK HAZARD
Always completely disconnect power from the display before
opening the user access plate. Do not reapply power to the
display until the access plate has been reinstalled and
securely closed.
There are two 7/8" conduit openings on the back panel of the display, provided for bringing
external wiring into the display enclosure. If these conduit openings will not be used for wiring,
these openings can be filled with plastic plugs (Caplugs Part Number BP-7/8) which are provided
with the display.
The left most conduit opening is provided for power wiring, the right most for signal wiring. It is
not recommended to run power wiring and signal wiring in the same conduit!
1.2
Operation
The 87/256 event counter displays the number of inputs received on a 2 to 8 digit display field. The
count value is stored in a EEPROM which makes it possible for the unit to retain the last count in
the event of power loss, without battery back-up. The scale factor for each input is set to 1 at the
factory. The scale factor can be modified in the field by using 87 Express, a Windows based Setup
Utility, or via Mini-T a handheld terminal available from Vorne. The display value is the product of
the scale factor and the actual counts received since the last reset.
An RS232 serial port is provided standard with each counter. The serial port can be used for
customizing the operation of the unit. See chapter 3 for additional information on customization.
The serial port also allows remote user access to the following features:
Inputs can be simulated & an optional relay output can be controlled with serial commands.
Data such as time can be sent to the display as a temporary message.
An optional RS-485 converter increases the communications distance up to 4000 feet.
87/256 Users Manual
3
1.3 Setting The DIP Switches For Your Application
DIP switch changes are only acknowledged at power up. Factory defaults are shown in gray.
Run and Program Modes
1
Mode
ON
Program
OFF
Run
For normal operation the Run/Program switch should be set to Run (off). Setting the unit to
Program mode allows the unit to be customized using VDP4 and to run one of two diagnostic
routines. If DIP switch 2 is off, the display cycles thru the following display diagnostic.
a. Error status
Should show E0. E1 or E2 indicates a memory error.
b. Unit Address
Default value is 00.
c. Red segment test The unit will turn on 1 segment at a time A thru F and DP.
d. Green segment test. For a single color display a blank screen will be displayed.
e. All segments ON.
f. Unit type.
0 = 87/256
g. --.
This is a separator between the Unit type and the Software version.
h. Software version. This number is displayed on two consecutive screens (Ex: 1.1.3).
If DIP switch 2 is on, the display runs a DIP switch diagnostic. This diagnostic displays the HEX
value of DIP switches 3 thru 10. (switches 3 to 6 = MSD, switches 7 to 10 = LSD)
DIP Switch or VDP4 Selection
For normal operation the Settings DIP switch should be set to DIP switch (on).
In program mode, Switch 2 selects between Display test (off) and DIP switch test (on). For VDP4
customized units DIP switch 2 will be set to VDP4 (off) and switches 3-10 will be ignored.
2
Settings
ON
DIP Switch
OFF
VDP4
Unit Type
The unit type of your 87 series display determines how the unit will operate. There are four unit
types available, Event Counter, Rate Monitor, Elapsed Timer and Production Monitor. The
functionality of DIP switches 5 to 10 is determined by this selection.
3
4
4
Unit Type
OFF OFF
87/256 Event Counter
OFF
ON
87/415 Rate Monitor
ON
OFF
87/705 Elapsed Timer
ON
ON
87/805 Production Monitor
87/256 Users Manual
Input 1 Input Rate
The input rate for Input 1 is field programmable to low or high speed by setting this DIP switch.
When using a input device such as a switch or a relay contact, set the input rate to low speed. This
will prevent false counts caused by contact bounce. For input devices such as proximity sensors
and photoelectric eyes, set the input rate to high speed. Shielded wire for the input is
recommended when the unit is set to high speed but not required for low speed.
5
Input 1 Rate
ON
High speed
OFF
Low speed
Input 2 Input Rate
The input rate for Input 2 is field programmable to low or high speed by setting this DIP switch.
When using a input device such as a switch or a relay contact, set the input rate to low speed. This
will prevent false counts caused by contact bounce. For input devices such as proximity sensors
and photoelectric eyes, set the input rate to high speed. Shielded wire for the input is
recommended when the unit is set to high speed but not required for low speed.
6
Input 2 Rate
ON
High speed
OFF
Low speed
Active Level
Active level of Input 1 and Input 2 can be configured as active high or active low. For sinking
inputs the typical selection is active low. This setting will allow the display value to be changed
when the input is connected to ground. For sourcing inputs the typical selection is active high. This
setting will allow the display value to be changed when the input is connected to +VDC.
7
Active Level
ON
High
OFF
Low
Counter Mode
The inputs of the counter can be configured to meet your application. Input 1 can be set to count
up, count down, or as a quadrature input. Input 2 can be set to select count / rate, count up, count
down, select count direction, or as a quadrature input.
The default scale factor setting for each input is 1.
Both inputs can occur simultaneously without loss of count.
In modes where count down inputs are available, if the count is decremented below zero, the
display will display a negative sign immediately to the left of the count value.
87/256 Users Manual
5
If the count value exceeds the display size, the least significant digits of the count will be
displayed (e.g. count =1059, unit is a 3 digit display, actual displayed value will be 059).
Mode 0 will set input 1 as a count up input and input 2 will be ignored.
Mode 1 sets both inputs as count up inputs.
Mode 2 sets both inputs as count down inputs.
Mode 3 sets input 1 as a up input and input 2 as a down input.
Mode 4 sets input 1 as the count input and input 2 will select whether the unit should count up
(input 2 open) or count down (input 2 active).
Mode 5 sets the inputs to quadrature X 1. The counter will count up on a negative going edge of
input 1 if input 2 is low. The counter will count down on a positive going edge on input 1
if input 2 is low.
Mode 6 sets the inputs to quadrature X 2. Mode 7 is similar in operation to Mode 6. However
both edges of input 1 are counted resulting in a doubling of the resolution of the encoder.
Mode 7 will set input 1 as a count up input where input 2 selects whether the count is displayed
(input 2 open) or the rate per minute is displayed (input 2 active). The rate per minute is
calculated and updated on a one second sample. The rate will drop to zero if no inputs are
received for six seconds.
8
6
9
10
Mode
Description
Input 1
Input 2
OFF
OFF
OFF
0
INPUT
N/A
OFF
OFF
ON
1
UP
UP
OFF
ON
OFF
2
DOWN
DOWN
OFF
ON
ON
3
UP
DOWN
ON
OFF
OFF
4
COUNT
UP / DOWN
ON
OFF
ON
5
QA
QB
X1
ON
ON
OFF
6
QA
QB
X2
ON
ON
ON
7
INPUT
COUNT / RATE
87/256 Users Manual
1.4 Connecting Power To The Display
Power connections are made to the three pin POWER terminal strip (marked P1). Connect power
to this terminal strip as shown below.
3 Pin POWER Terminal Strip (P1)
Pin
A
A
B
C
120 VAC Powered Units
120 VAC (Hot)
12 VDC Powered Units
+ 12 VDC
B
120 VAC (Neutral)
DC Ground
C
Earth Ground
Earth Ground
Proper grounding is an important aspect of power wiring, both as a safety measure and for
improved electrical noise immunity. Always connect Earth Ground to the 87/256 display.
WARNING
Terminal C (Earth Ground) must always be connected to a reliable low
impedance earth ground. This provides a safety ground to the enclosure,
as well as a return path for electrical noise.
The power requirements for all standard 87/256 display configurations are listed in Appendix A .
1.5 Wiring and Specifications
Reset
The reset input has an internal 10K pull-up resistor to +5 volts. Momentarily sinking this input to
ground with a contact closure or open collector NPN transistor activates the reset function. The
display value will be reset to 0 if a reset input is received. The Reset input is TTL or CMOS
compatible with a minimum high of 3.5 VDC and a maximum low of 1.5 VDC. The reset line is
active on the negative going edge.
Input 1 and Input 2
Input 1 and Input 2 have an internal 3.3K resistor to either +5 volts or signal ground depending on
the selection of the SINK / SOURCE jumper. The SINK / SOURCE jumper (J2) is located to the
lower left of the Input Terminal strip. Both inputs will be affected by the setting of this jumper.
The factory default setting is SINK.
SINK
SOURCE
Active state of input Connect input to ground with a
contact closure or open collector
NPN transistor.
Connect input to +VDC with a
contact closure or open collector
PNP transistor.
Normal state of input Pulled to +5 VDC thru a 3.3K
resistor.
Pulled to Signal ground thru a 3.3K
resistor.
87/256 Users Manual
7
Input characteristics
High Level
Low Level
Input loading
Leakage current accepted
Low Speed
High Speed
Input 1 and Input 2
Circuitry
3.5 to 30 VDC
0 to 1.5 VDC
1.5mA to 10mA (5V-30V)
500 uA
50 Hz (10 millisecond on/off time)
4000 Hz (120 microsecond on/off
time)
33K
Input
1
3.3K
+ 5 VDC
J2
SINK
SOURCE
3.3K
Input
2
33K
Output Voltage
A regulated +12VDC output voltage rated at 100mA is provided for auxiliary use.
Wiring
Input connections are made to the five pin INPUT terminal strip (marked P2). Connect inputs to
this terminal strip as shown below.
5 Pin INPUT Terminal Strip (P2)
Pins 1 to 5
Input Terminal Strip
1
2
3
4
5
Function
1
Reset (RST)
2
Input 1 (IN 1)
3
Input 2 (IN 2)
4
+ 12 VDC
5
Signal GROUND (0VDC)
RST
IN1
IN2
12V
0V
RST
IN1
IN2
12V
0V
RST
IN1
IN2
12V
0V
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Input Device
8
Pin
SINK Input
SOURCE Input
87/256 Users Manual
1.6 Basic Information About Serial Communication Ports
This section provides some basic background information regarding different types of serial
communication ports. Each 87/256 display contains an RS-232 port. An RS-485 port (which is
also compatible with RS-422 communication), is available via a plug in option board. Note: Only
one of the two ports can be used at any given time to communicate with a host device.
RS-232 ports are the most common type of serial ports, although they are more common in an
office environment than an industrial environment. This is because RS-232 can only be run for
short distances (under 50 feet), and in environments where EMI (electromagnetic interference) is
minimal. Also, one host RS-232 port is limited to directly communicating with one device.
RS-422 ports are very common in industrial environments. They are well suited for distances up to
4000 feet, and have substantially superior EMI immunity characteristics. Additionally, one host
RS-422 port can communicate with a minimum of 10 devices without repeating the signal.
RS-485 ports are basically an improved version of RS-422, and in most cases are completely
compatible with RS-422 devices (and vice versa). In fact, many newer products with built in
RS-422 ports actually use driver circuits that meet the RS-485 specification (87 series displays fall
into this class). RS-485 offers better EMI immunity characteristics, and improved drivers that have
the ability to communicate with up to 32 devices without repeating the signal. There is sometimes
confusion regarding RS-485 because it has an additional ability to communicate in both directions
over one pair of wires, a feature not supported by RS-422 or by 87 series displays.
20 mA current loop was commonly used for industrial applications in the past but is less common
today. To use a 20mA current loop serial port with an 87/256 display, all that is required is an
external 20 mA current loop to RS-422 converter. Vorne can provide such a converter if your
application requires it.
1.7 RS-232 Communication To A Single Display
This section provides the information necessary to successfully interface a host RS-232 port to one
87/256 display. If you would like to interface a host RS-232 port to multiple 87/256 displays, read
this section as well as section 1.8.
Selecting RS-232 Communication
The RS-232 port is the standard communication port available in a 87/256.
87/256 Users Manual
9
RS-232 Connectors
The RS-232 port is available on pins 1 to 3 of the 3 pin communication port terminal strip (marked
P3). The RS-232 terminal strip is shown below.
3 Pin COM PORT Terminal Strip (P3)
Pins 1 to 3
Pin
Function
RS-232 Port
1
2
3
1
RS-232 Transmit Data (TxD)
2
RS-232 Receive Data (RxD)
3
Communication GROUND
Many host devices use either DB25 or DB9 connectors for their RS-232 ports. For your reference,
two common RS-232 DB interfaces are shown below. They are the standard male DB25 interface,
and the standard male IBM/AT® style DB9 interface.
Standard Host Device RS-232 DB Connectors
DB25 MALE
DB9 MALE
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
Signal Ground
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Clear To Send (CTS)
Request To Send (RTS)
Receive Data (RxD)
Transmit Data (TxD)
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
Receive Data (RxD)
Transmit Data (TxD)
Data Transmit Ready (DTR)
Signal Ground
1
2
3
14 15 16
4
5
17 18
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
1
2
6
3
7
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
Ring Indicator (RI)
4
8
5
9
Ring Indicator (RI)
Clear To Send (CTS)
Request To Send (RTS)
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Wiring Diagram For An RS-232 Host Device To One Display
The only connections necessary for two way communication between a host device and an 87/256
display are the ones shown in the diagram below. Please refer to the Guidelines For Wiring RS-232
Devices section below for important wiring recommendations. For one way communication from
the host to the display, the transmit data (TxD) line from the display (pin 1) does not need to be
connected to the host device.
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87/256 Users Manual
PLC
Receive Data (RxD)
Transmit Data (TxD)
1
Transmit Data (TxD)
Receive Data (RxD)
2
Isolated GROUND
3
Signal GROUND
HOST DEVICE
87 SERIES DISPLAY
Guidelines For Wiring RS-232 Devices
For best results when wiring RS-232 devices please follow these guidelines:
1. Use a 50 foot maximum cable length.
2. Use a baud rate of 19,200 or less.
3. Use a shielded cable with the shield connected to Earth Ground only at the 87/256 display.
Belden 9842 is a recommended cable.
4. Carefully check your equipment and cable to ensure that Earth Ground is not connected at
both ends of the cable. If there is a significant difference in Earth Ground potential between
the two ends of the cable, it could cause data transmission errors, or even damage to the
RS-232 communication ports.
5. Keep the cable length as short as possible, and do not run the RS-232 cable parallel to any
power cables.
1.8 RS-422 Or RS-485 Communication To One Or More Displays
To successfully interface a host RS-422 or RS-485 port to one or more 87/256 displays, please
refer to the Add On module Users Manual. Note that the 87/256 display requires an optional
communications board for opto-isolated RS-485 communications.
87/256 Users Manual
11
Chapter 2 Using The Simple Packet Protocol
This chapter describes the communication protocol of Simple Packet. This is for applications
where you can control the data being transmitted to the display, but where you would like to
access advanced features. These features include independently simulating inputs, addressing
multiple displays, flashing the display, or controlling an optional relay in the display. The default
communication settings of the 87/256 are 9600 Baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, Unit
address 0, Group address 0, and Carriage Return <CR> Line Terminator.
2.1
Simple Packet Communication Format
The format of Simple Packet communication is:
<SOH> Type Address : Command Data Terminator Checksum
<SOH>
The symbol <SOH> represents the ASCII "Start Of Header" character
(01 hex/1 decimal), and must be the first character of every transmission. Since
the purpose of the <SOH> character is to mark the beginning of a new packet, it
cannot appear anywhere else within the transmission.
Type
Can be one of two ASCII characters (S or s), and must be the second character of
every transmission. This character lets the display know if the serial data is meant
for an individual address or a group address.
S
s
Serial data for an individual address.
Serial data for a group address.
If your application does not require addressing individual displays or groups of
displays, you should use the type s. This will allow data that you send to be acted
upon by every display that receives it (as explained below).
Address
Can range from 0 to 255, and is an optional part of the packet that specifies an
actual unit or group address. If no address is included in the packet, the default
address of 0 will be used.
Note that a transmitted group address of 0 is a broadcast to all units, regardless of
what the internal address of each display is set to. Thus, when no addressing is
required, you can skip the Address part of the packet, and rely on the fact that a
default address of 0 will automatically be substituted. In this case, the complete
header before the data would be <SOH>s: and the data will be acted on by all
displays that receive it.
For more information about individual and group addressing see Section 2.3
Addressing Multiple Displays.
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87/256 Users Manual
:
The ASCII "Colon" character (3A hex/58 decimal) must be included in every
transmission, and is used to separate the header part of the packet from the data.
Command
Can contain one command string for the display. Command strings can be used to
display data, simulate an input, flash data on the display, or control the optional
relay. The available commands are fully described in Section 2.2 Simple Packet
Commands .
Data
Any ASCII characters you wish to display (refer to Appendix B for a full character
set listing). The control characters <SOH>, <CR> and <LF> cannot be used in
the Data part of the packet, as they are reserved for marking the beginning and
end of packets.
Terminator
A special ASCII character which marks the end of the data (and thus immediately
follows it). Note that the symbol <CR> represents the ASCII "Carriage Return"
character (0D hex/13 decimal), and the symbol <LF> represents the ASCII "Line
Feed" character (0A hex/10 decimal). In cases where the host device transmits a
<CR><LF> combination as the terminator, select <CR>.
Checksum
This is an optional part of the packet that can be used to provide an extra level of
data validation. If used, the checksum immediately follows the Terminator
character. Please request the Advanced Applications Guide if you are
interested in using a checksum.
2.2 Simple Packet Commands
The command portion of the packet can contain one (and only one) command string for the
display. Command strings can be used to Simulate inputs, display data, flash data on the display,
change display color on tri-color displays, or control the optional relay. Each of these commands is
fully described below.
To accomplish more than one command (e.g. flash data on the display and turn the relay on), you
must send a separate packet for each command.
Remember that the control characters <SOH>, <CR> and <LF> cannot be used anywhere in the
data portion of the packet, as they are reserved for marking the beginning and end of packets.
The following examples assume that addressing is not being used, and that Terminator has been
selected as <CR>. Also note that the header of the packet <SOH>s: has the effect of broadcasting
to all displays, overriding any group or individual address a display might be set to.
87/256 Users Manual
13
Simulate An Input
The Input command string begins with the ASCII character I (49 hex/73 decimal). Note that the I
must be upper case. The rest of the data consists of a ASCII character which represent the input to
simulate. The available inputs are:
Input
Input 1
Input 2
Reset
ASCII Character
1
2
R
Hex/Decimal Representation
31 hex/49 decimal
32 hex/50 decimal
52 hex/82 decimal
To Simulate...
Transmit
Input 1
<SOH>s:I1<CR>
Input 2
<SOH>s:I2<CR>
Reset
<SOH>s:IR<CR>
Display Data
Data to be displayed is preceded by the ASCII character D (44 hex/68 decimal). Note that the D
must be upper case. The data will be displayed in a fixed (non-flashing) manner. Data sent to the
unit using this command will remain on the display until an input is received or power loss.
To Show On The Display...
Transmit
1234
<SOH>s:D1234<CR>
888.8
<SOH>s:D888.8<CR>
Flash Data
Data to be displayed flashing is preceded by the ASCII character F (46 hex/70 decimal). Note that
the F must be upper case. The data will be displayed flashing. Data sent to the unit using this
command will remain on the display until an input is received or power loss.
14
To Flash On The Display ...
Transmit
1234
<SOH>s:F1234<CR>
888.8
<SOH>s:F888.8<CR>
87/256 Users Manual
Change Color (For Tri-color Display's)
Some 87 series displays are available with a tri-color display option. With the tri-color option, each
digit color can be individually set to red, yellow or green.
The Color command string begins with the ASCII character C (43 hex/67 decimal). Note that the
C must be upper case. The rest of the data consists of a string of upper case ASCII characters
which represent the color each digit of the display should be set to, starting with the most
significant (left most) digit. The available colors are:
Color
Red
Yellow
Green
ASCII Character
R
Y
G
Hex/Decimal Representation
52 hex/82 decimal
59 hex/89 decimal
47 hex/71 decimal
If the C command is sent with only one color character (for example CR), the entire display will be
set to that color. The Color command takes effect as soon as it is received.
To Set The Display Color To...
Transmit
All Yellow
<SOH>s:CY<CR>
2 Digits Red, 2 Digits Green
<SOH>s:CRRGG<CR>
Activate Relay
An optional relay output board can be added to the 87/256 display for additional annunciation.
WARNING
Use the relay for annunciator applications only.
Do not use it for control.
The Relay command string begins with the ASCII character R (52 hex/82 decimal). Note that the
R must be upper case, and must be followed by one character (which determines what relay action
will occur). The available actions are:
Action
Turn relay on
Turn relay off
Sequence A
ASCII Character
1
0
A
Hex/Decimal Representation
31 hex/49 decimal
30 hex/48 decimal
41 hex/65 decimal
Sequence A is a user definable relay sequence (e.g. cycle the relay 20 times with each cycle
consisting of 1.0 second on and 2.0 seconds off), which can be triggered with one command. For
more information about the user definable relay sequence, please refer to Chapter 3 Advanced
Features Of The 87 Series Display.
87/256 Users Manual
15
To....
Transmit
Turn the relay on
<SOH>s:R1<CR>
Turn the relay off
<SOH>s:R0<CR>
Trigger Sequence A
<SOH>s:RA<CR>
2.3 Addressing Multiple Displays
Using an RS-422 or RS-485 network (described in the Add On Module Users Manual) together with
addressing allows a host computer or PLC to communicate with specific individual displays or
groups of displays in a network. Each display in the network may be assigned a unit address and a
group address. If you do not need to address individual displays, or groups of displays, skip this
section.
Unit Address
Individual unit addresses can range from 0 to 255, allowing up to 256 displays to be individually
addressed in a network. The factory default unit address is 0.
If a packet is directed to a specific unit address, only units set to that address will respond to the
data. More than one display may use the same unit address. Remember, if the data in the packet is
meant for a specific unit address, the serial data type S must follow the <SOH> character in the
transmission packet (as shown in the examples below).
The following examples assume that Unit Address is set to 10, checksums are not being used, and
that Terminator has been selected as <CR>. Also note that an upper case S follows the <SOH>
indicating that the serial data is intended for an individual display address, and the D command
character is being used to display data.
To Show Only On Displays With A Unit Address Of 10...
Transmit
1234
<SOH>S10:D1234<CR>
888.8
<SOH>S10:D888.8<CR>
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87/256 Users Manual
2.4 Using Checksums And Command Acknowledgments
Using checksums and command acknowledgments can improve the reliability of data transfer
between the host device and the display. They are optional features of the simple packet protocol either or both can be used.
Checksums allow the display to check if data has become corrupted during transmission from the
host device to the display. Command acknowledgments are used to let the host device know if data
received by the display can be acted upon (i.e. the data is valid for the command transmitted, and
the command and data are appropriate for the particular display). If checksums are being used,
command acknowledgments also provide a means of letting the host device know that the data was
received with a proper checksum.
If you are interested in using checksums and/or command acknowledgment to improve data
transfer reliability, please request the Advanced Applications Guide.
87/256 Users Manual
17
Chapter 3
Advanced Features Of the 87 Series Display
The 87/256 has been designed in such a way that it can be customized to meet a users specific
requirements. The unit is shipped from the factory set to DIP switch settings. The DIP switch
settings allow the user to select the Unit type, Input speed for input 1 and input 2, and the counter
type. The DIP switch settings have been selected so that a majority of users can setup the display
with minimal effort.
Additional settings such as right justified data, leading zeroes blanked, no fixed decimal point, and
a factor of 1 are programmed at the factory and are not DIP switch selectable. Applications that do
not fit the DIP switch settings can be accommodated by using VDP4 to customize the operation of
the 87/256 display. VDP4 is a WindowsTM based utility that is available from Vorne. To bypass the
DIP switch settings, DIP switch 2 should be set to VDP4 (off). Setting the unit to VDP4 settings
allows the unit to operate with the settings that are stored in a EEPROM on the displays logic
board.
For additional information on topics discussed in this chapter, request the Advanced
Applications Guide.
3.1
VDP4 Options
The following is a list of 87/256 options that can be programmed using VDP4.
Display Justification
Available selections are Left or Right Justify.
Leading Zeroes
Available selections are Do Not Blank or Blank leading zeroes.
Fixed Decimal Point After Digit
Available selections are None, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8.
Number of Display Digits
Available selections are 2, 3, 4, 6, or 8.
Counter Mode
The function of Input 1, Input 2 and the reset input can be defined. Available options include count
up, count down, reset, count / rate, quadrature X1 X2 and X4.
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87/256 Users Manual
Input Active Level
The input active level for each input can be set to active high or active low.
Debounce Time
The debounce time of each input can be individually set. The debounce time is used to filter out
false inputs due to contact bounce from a relay or switch input.
Counter Reload Value
Counter Reload value is the value that the unit will display when a reset input is received.
Scale Factor
A scale factor can be defined for each count input. The scale factor setting determines the amount
that each input event will increment or decrement the display value.
Save on Power Down
Saving the current display value in memory upon loss of power can be enabled or disabled.
Count Below Zero
Counter modes defined with count down inputs can be defined to count below zero (negative
numbers) or stop at zero.
Trigger Value
Two trigger values are available. When the display value crosses a trigger value, a number of
operations can be simultaneously triggered. Available operations are two different flash rates,
Relay activation, Stop counting, Reset to reload value or change display color (tri-color displays
only).
Relay Setup
Relay Sequence A is user definable as either a Delay On Relay or Cycle Relay. The Delay On
Relay selection allows adjustment of the delay and duration time. These settings are adjustable
from .1 to 25.5 seconds. The Cycle Relay selection allows specifying the ON time (.1 to 25.5
seconds), OFF time (.1 to 25.5 seconds), and number of cycles (adjustable from 1 to 255 times).
Baud Rate
Available selections are 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, or 57600.
87/256 Users Manual
19
Data Bits
Available selections are 7 or 8.
Terminator
The Terminator selection specifies which character ends the transmission. Available selections are
<CR> or <LF>.
Unit Address
Unit Address allows you to select an individual unit address. Individual unit addresses can range
from 0 to 255, allowing up to 256 displays to be individually addressed in a network.
Member of Group(s)
Member of Group(s) allows you to select any combination of up to eight display groups that the
display can belong to. A packet addressed to a specific group or combination of groups will only
be acted on by displays belonging to the group(s). Available selections are 1 to 8.
Checksum
This is an optional part of the packet that can be used to provide an extra level of data validation.
If used, the checksum immediately follows the Terminator character.
Command Acknowledgment
Command acknowledgments are used to let the host device know if data received by the display
can be acted upon (i.e. the data is valid for the command transmitted, and the command and data
are appropriate for the particular display). If checksums are being used, command
acknowledgments also provide a means of letting the host device know that the data was received
with a proper checksum.
Output Transmission
Output transmission data can be used to poll an auxiliary device for data, or send the display value
to a remote computer. The format of the data to be transmitted and the transmit interval can be
defined.
20
87/256 Users Manual
Appendix A Operating Specifications
LED Life
Peak Wavelength
Red
Yellow
Green
100,000 hours typical
660nm
592nm
568nm
Count Input characteristics
High Level
Low Level
Input loading
Leakage current accepted
Low Speed
High Speed
3.5 to 30 VDC
0 to 1.5 VDC
1.5mA to 10mA (5V-30V)
500 uA
50 Hz (10 millisecond on/off time)
4000 Hz (120 microsecond on/off time)
Memory
100,000 Read / Write cycles, 100 year retention
Serial Input
RS-232, RS-485 Optional
Optional Relay Output
Single Pole Double Throw Rated 120VAC @ 1A
Power Supply
120 VAC +/- 15% (50 - 60 Hz)
12 VDC +/- 5%
Power Requirements All power requirements in the following table are listed in VA (Volt Amps).
Red Or Yellow Display
Digit Type
2
3
4
6
8
Digit Digit Digit Digit Digit
4" Discrete Segment
NA
6.62
8.3
11.65
15
4" Solid Segment
NA
13.25 16.6
23.3
30
6" Discrete Segment
9.9
13.25 16.6
23.3
30
8" Discrete Segment 14.84 19.87 24.9 34.95 45.01
12" Discrete Segment 19.79 26.49 33.2
46.6 60.01
For Green Displays, multiply the current value in the table by 1.25.
For Tri-Color Displays, multiply the current value in the table by 2.5.
Temperature Range
Operating
Humidity
5% to 95% non-condensing
87/256 Users Manual
32 to 122 degrees F (0 to 50 degrees C)
21
Appendix B Character Set Listing
This table lists the full 87/256 character set in a standard ASCII format. As a primarily numeric, seven
segment display, many non-numeric characters can be displayed in only a limited fashion. The hex and
decimal ASCII codes are shown for each character. The upper and lower case alpha character sets are
identical. They are designed to be as readable as possible, within the constraints of a seven segment
display. If a character is not listed it will be displayed as blank (as will all characters 20h and below).
22
20h
32d
21h
33d
22h
34d
23h
35d
24h
36d
25h
37d
26h
38d
27h
39d
28h
40d
29h
41d
2Ah
42d
2Bh
43d
2Ch
44d
2Dh
45d
2Eh
46d
2Fh
47d
30h
48d
31h
49d
32h
50d
33h
51d
34h
52d
35h
53d
36h
54d
37h
55d
38h
56d
39h
57d
3Ah
58d
3Bh
59d
3Ch
60d
3Dh
61d
3Eh
62d
3Fh
63d
40h
64d
41h
65d
42h
66d
43h
67d
44h
68d
45h
69d
46h
70d
47h
71d
48h
72d
49h
73d
4Ah
74d
4Bh
75d
4Ch
76d
4Dh
77d
4Eh
78d
4Fh
79d
50h
80d
51h
81d
52h
82d
53h
83d
54h
84d
55h
85d
56h
86d
57h
87d
58h
88d
59h
89d
5Ah
90d
5Bh
91d
5Ch
92d
5Dh
93d
5Eh
94d
5Fh
95d
60h
96d
61h
97d
62h
98d
63h
99d
64h
100d
65h
101d
66h
102d
67h
103d
68h
104d
69h
105d
6Ah
106d
6Bh
107d
6Ch
108d
6Dh
109d
6Eh
110d
6Fh
111d
70h
112d
71h
113d
72h
114d
73h
115d
74h
116d
75h
117d
76h
118d
77h
119d
78h
120d
79h
121d
7Ah
122d
7Bh
123d
7Ch
124d
7Dh
125d
7Eh
126d
7Fh
127d
87/256 Users Manual
Appendix C Display Dimensions
The 87 Series display was designed to be suspended from a pair of chains. Make sure that the
supporting chain can support the weight of the display. Failure to follow this warning could result
in damage to property, or personal injury.
1.6
.65
B
D
C
A
3.2
A
B
4" Display 3 Digit
12.75
8.40
11.75
5.70
4" Display 4 Digit
16.30
8.40
15.30
5.70
4" Display 6 Digit
23.40
8.40
22.40
5.70
4" Display 8 Digit
30.50
8.40
29.50
5.70
4" Display 12 Digit
44.70
8.40
43.70
5.70
4" Display 16 Digit
58.90
8.40
57.90
5.70
4" Display 20 Digit
73.10
8.40
72.10
5.70
6" Display 2 Digit
12.90
10.40
11.90
7.70
6" Display 3 Digit
18.30
10.40
17.30
7.70
6" Display 4 Digit
23.70
10.40
22.70
7.70
6" Display 6 Digit
34.50
10.40
33.50
7.70
6" Display 8 Digit
45.30
10.40
44.30
7.70
8" Display 2 Digit
15.90
12.40
14.90
9.70
8" Display 3 Digit
22.80
12.40
21.80
9.70
8" Display 4 Digit
29.70
12.40
28.70
9.70
8" Display 6 Digit
43.50
12.40
42.50
9.70
8" Display 8 Digit
57.30
12.40
56.30
9.70
12" Display 2 Digit
22.80
16.40
21.80
13.70
12" Display 3 Digit
33.15
16.40
32.15
13.70
12" Display 4 Digit
43.50
16.40
42.50
13.70
12" Display 6 Digit
64.20
16.40
63.20
13.70
12" Display 8 Digit
84.90
16.40
83.90
13.70
87/256 Users Manual
C
D
23
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