Chapter 4 - AutomationDirect

Chapter 4 - AutomationDirect
System Design and
Configuration
14
In This Chapter. . . .
— DL305 System Design Strategies
— Module Placement
— Calculating the Power Budget
— Expansion I/O
— Remote I/O
— Network Connections to MODBUS and DirectNET
— Network Slave Operation
— Network Master Operation
4--2
System Design and Configuration
DL305 System Design Strategies
I/O System
Configurations
The DL350 CPU offers the following ways to add I/O to the system:
S Local I/O -- consists of I/O modules located in the same base as the CPU.
S Remote I/O -- consists of I/O modules located in bases which are serially
connected to the bottom port on a DL350 CPU.
S Expansion I/O -- consists of I/O modules located in expansion bases
located close to the local base. Expansion cables connect them to the local
CPU base’s serial bus in a daisy--chain fashion.
A DL305 system can be developed using many different arrangements of these
configurations. All I/O configurations use the standard complement of DL305 I/O
modules and bases.
Networking
Configurations
The DL350 CPU offers the following way to add networking to the system:
S DL350 Communications Port -- The DL350 CPU has a 25--Pin
connector on Port 2 that provides a built--in RTU MODBUS connection.
S MODBUS Master Module-- MODBUS master modules can be used in
any slot for connecting as a master to a MODBUS network.
S MODBUS Slave Module-- MODBUS slave modules can be used in any
slot for connecting as a slave to a MODBUS network.
Module/Unit
System Design
and Configuration
DL350 CPU
Base
Configurations
Master
DirectNET
MODBUS RTU
Slave
DirectNET
K--Sequence
MODBUS RTU
The DL305 system currently offers two types of bases. Both types come in 5, 8, or 10
slot configurations. All DL305 CPUs will work in either type of base. The xxxxx--1
bases are designed to compliment the features of the DL350 CPU, however all other
DL305 CPUs will work in these bases. You can also mix the bases in a system. By
mixing the bases or by installing the DL350 in an conventional base, you will loose
some of the features of the CPU. The DL350 will revert back to 8--bit addressing and
will virtually function like a DL340 CPU. This section will focus on the xxxxx--1 bases
using the DL350 CPU. If you will be using the DL350 in a conventional base or if you
are mixing bases in a system, refer to Appendix F for base, I/O, and module
placement information.
The xxxxx--1 bases support a 8 bit parallel bus that allows the use of intelligent
modules when using the DL350 CPU. The addressing scheme is simplified and also
extends the number of I/O points you can use. You will have a bigger power budget to
work with due to the increase in the power supply capacity to 2.0A.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
4--3
Module Placement
Slot Numbering
The DL305 bases each provide different numbers of slots for use with the I/O
modules. You may notice the bases refer to 5-slot, 8-slot, etc. One of the slots is
dedicated to the CPU, so you always have one less I/O slot. For example, you have
four I/O slots with a 5-slot base. The I/O slots are numbered 0 -- 3. The CPU slot
always contains a CPU and is not numbered.
The examples below show the I/O numbering for a 5 slot local CPU base with 8 point
I/O and a 5 slot local CPU base with 16 point I/O.
5 Slot Base Using 8 Point I/O Modules
5 Slot Base Using 16 Point I/O Modules
060
to
067
040
to
047
Slot Number: 3 2
I/O Module
Placement Rules
020
to
027
000
to
007
C
P
U
DL305
070
to
077
020
to
027
000
to
007
050 030 010
to
to
to
057 037 017
Slot Number: 3 2
1 0
C
P
U
DL305
1 0
There are some limitations that determine where you can place certain types of
modules. Some modules require certain locations and may limit the number or
placement of other modules. The table on pages 4-6 and 4-7 should clear up any
gray areas in the explanation and you will probably find the configuration you intend
to use in your installation.
In all of the configurations mentioned the number of slots from the CPU that are to be
used can roll over into an expansion base if necessary. For example if a rule states a
module must reside in one of the six slots adjacent to the CPU, and the system
configuration is comprised of two 5 slot bases, slots 1 and 2 of the expansion base
are valid locations.
The following table provides the general placement rules for the DL305
components.
CPU
16 Point I/O
Modules
Analog Modules
ASCII Basic
Modules
High Speed
Counter
Restriction
The CPU must reside in the first slot of the local CPU
base. The first slot is the closest slot to the power supply.
Any slot.
Any slot.
Any slot.
The D3--350 CPU does not support a high speed counter
module.
I/O addresses use octal numbering, starting in the slot next to the CPU. The
addresses are assigned in groups of 16 for each slot regardless of what module is in
the slot. The discrete input and output modules can be mixed in any order, but there
may be restrictions placed on some specialty modules.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
Module
I/O Configuration
060 040
to
to
067 047
4--4
System Design and Configuration
Calculating the Power Budget
Managing your
Power Resource
When you determine the types and quantity of I/O modules you will be using in the
DL305 system it is important to remember there is a limited amount of power
available from the power supply. We have provided a chart to help you easily see the
amount of power available with each base. The following chart will help you calculate
the amount of power you need with your I/O selections. At the end of this section you
will also find an example of power budgeting and a worksheet for your own
calculations.
WARNING: It is extremely important to calculate the power budget. If you
exceed the power budget, the system may operate in an unpredictable
manner which may result in a risk of personal injury or equipment damage.
Base Power
Specifications
This chart shows the amount of current available for the three voltages supplied on
the new xxxxx--1 bases. Use these currents when calculating the power budget for
your system.
5V Power
Supplied in
Amps
9V Power
Supplied in
Amps
24V Power
Supplied in
Amps
Auxiliary
24 VDC
Output at
Base Terminal
D3--05B--1
1.0A (50_C)
0.7A (60_C)
2.0
0.6
100mA max
D3--05BDC
1.4A (50_C)
0.7A (60_C)
0.8
0.6
None
D3--08B--1
1.0A (50_C)
0.7A (60_C)
2.0
0.6
100mA max
D3--10B--1
1.0A (50_C)
0.7A (60_C)
2.0
0.6
100mA max
D3--10BDC
1.4A (50_C)
0.7A (60_C)
1.7
0.6
None
System Design
and Configuration
Bases
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
4--5
I/O Points Required Each type of module requires a certain number of I/O points. This is also true for the
specialty modules, such as analog, counter interface, etc. The table on page 4--5
for Each Module
lists the number and type of I/O points required for each module.
Module Power
Requirements
The next three pages show the amount of maximum current required for each of the
DL305 modules. The column labeled “External Power Source Required” is for
module operation and is not for field wiring. Use these currents when calculating the
power budget for your system. If 24 VDC is needed for external devices, the 24 VDC
(100mA maximum) output at the base terminal strip may be used as long as the
power budget is not exceeded.
I/O Points
Required
5V Power
Required (mA)
9V Power
Required in (A)
24V Power
Required (mA)
External Power
Source Required
500
20
0
None
CPUs
D3--350
DC Input Modules
D3--08ND2
8
0
10
112
None
D3--16ND2--1
16
0
25
224
None
D3--16ND2--2
16
0
24
209
None
D3--16ND2F
16
0
25
224
None
F3--16ND3F
16
0
148
68
None
D3--08NA--1
8
0
10
0
None
D3--08NA--2
8
0
10
0
None
D3--16NA
16
0
100
0
None
D3--08NE3
8
0
10
0
None
D3--16NE3
16
0
130
0
None
D3--08TD1
8
0
20
24
None
D3--08TD2
8
0
30
0
None
D3--16TD1--1
16
0
40
96
None
D3--16TD1--2
16
0
40
96
None
D3--16TD2
16
0
180
0
None
D3--04TAS
8
0
12
0
None
F3--08TAS
8
0
80
0
None
F3--08TAS--1
8
0
25
0
None
D3--08TA--1
8
0
96
0
None
D3--08TA--2
8
0
160
0
None
F3--16TA--2
16
0
250
0
None
D3--16TA--2
16
0
400
0
None
AC Input Modules
AC/DC Input Modules
AC Output Modules
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
DC Output Modules
4--6
System Design and Configuration
I/O Point
Required
5V Power
Required in mA
9V Power
Required in mA
24V Power
Required in mA
External Power
Source Required
D3--08TR
8
0
360
0
None
F3--08TRS--1
8
0
296
0
None
F3--08TRS--2
8
0
296
0
None
D3--16TR
16
0
480
0
None
D3--04AD
16
0
55
0
24VDC @ 65mA
max
F3--04ADS
16
0
183
50
None
F3--08AD
16
0
25
37
None
F3--08TEMP
16
0
25
37
None
F3--08THM--n
16
0
50
34
None
F3--16AD
16
0
33
47
None
D3--02DA
16
0
80
0
24VDC @ 170mA
max
F3--04DA--1
16
0
144
108
None
F3--04DA--2
16
0
144
108
None
F3--04DAS
16
0
154
145
None
0
0
0
0
(24 VDC or
5 VDC) @ 100mA
F3--AB128--R
16
0
205
0
None
F3--AB128--T
16
0
205
0
None
F3--AB128
16
0
90
0
None
F3--AB64
16
0
90
0
None
D3--08SIM
8
0
10
112
None
D3--HSC
16
0
70
0
None
200
50
0
Optional
Relay Output
Modules
Analog
Communications and
Networking
FA--UNICON
System Design
and Configuration
ASCII BASIC Modules
Specialty Modules
Programming
D2--HPP
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
4--7
System Design and Configuration
Power Budget
Calculation
Example
Base #
The following example shows how to calculate the power budget for the DL305
system.
Module Type
5 VDC (mA)
9 VDC (mA)
Auxiliary
Power Source
24 VDC Output (mA)
0
Available
Base Power
D3--05B
1000
2000
600
CPU Slot
D3--350
+500
+ 120
Slot 0
D3--16NE3
+ 0
+ 130
+
0
Slot 1
D3--16NE3
+ 0
+ 130
+
0
Slot 2
F3--16TA--2
+ 0
+ 250
+
0
Slot 3
F3--16TA--2
+ 0
+ 250
+
0
Slot 4
Slot 5
+
0
Slot 6
+
0
Slot 7
+
0
+
0
Other
Handheld Prog D2--HPP
Total Power Required
Remaining Power Available
+ 200
+ 200
700
1080
1000--700=300
2000--1080=920
0
600 -- 0
= 600
WARNING: It is extremely important to calculate the power budget. If you
exceed the power budget, the system may operate in an unpredictable
manner which may result in a risk of personal injury or equipment damage.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
1. Use the power budget table to fill in the power requirements for all the
system components. First, enter the amount of power supplied by the base.
Next, list the requirements for the CPU, any I/O modules, and any other
devices, such as the Handheld Programmer or the DV--1000 operator
interface. Remember, even though the Handheld or the DV--1000 are not
installed in the base, they still obtain their power from the system. Also,
make sure you obtain any external power requirements, such as the
24VDC power required by the analog modules.
2. Add the current columns starting with Slot 0 and put the total in the row
labeled “Total power required”.
3. Subtract the row labeled “Total power required” from the row labeled
“Available Base Power”. Place the difference in the row labeled
“Remaining Power Available”.
4. If “Total Power Required” is greater than the power available from the
base, the power budget will be exceeded. It will be unsafe to used this
configuration and you will need to restructure your I/O configuration.
4--8
System Design and Configuration
Power Budget
Calculation
Worksheet
Base #
This blank chart is provided for you to copy and use in your power budget
calculations.
Module Type
0
5 VDC (mA)
9 VDC (mA)
Auxiliary
Power Source
24 VDC Output (mA)
Available
Base Power
CPU Slot
Slot 0
Slot 1
Slot 2
Slot 3
Slot 4
Slot 5
Slot 6
Slot 7
Other
Handheld Prog D2--HPP
Total Power Required
System Design
and Configuration
Remaining Power Available
1. Use the power budget table to fill in the power requirements for all the
system components. First, enter the amount of power supplied by the base.
Next, list the requirements for the CPU, any I/O modules, and any other
devices, such as the Handheld Programmer or the DV--1000 operator
interface. Remember, even though the Handheld or the DV--1000 are not
installed in the base, they still obtain their power from the system. Also,
make sure you obtain any external power requirements, such as the
24VDC power required by the analog modules.
2. Add the current columns starting with Slot 0 and put the total in the row
labeled “Total power required”.
3. Subtract the row labeled “Total power required” from the row labeled
“Available Base Power”. Place the difference in the row labeled
“Remaining Power Available”.
4. If “Total Power Required” is greater than the power available from the
base, the power budget will be exceeded. It will be unsafe to used this
configuration and you will need to restructure your I/O configuration.
WARNING: It is extremely important to calculate the power budget. If you
exceed the power budget, the system may operate in an unpredictable
manner which may result in a risk of personal injury or equipment damage.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
4--9
Local I/O Expansion
Base Uses Table
Local/Expansion
Connectivity
It is helpful to understand how you can use the various DL305 bases in your control
system. The following table shows how the bases can be used.
Base Part #
Number of Slots
Can Be Used As
A Local CPU
Base
Can Be Used As
An Expansion
Base
D3--05B--1
5
Yes
Yes
D3--05BDC--1
5
Yes
Yes
D3--08B--1
8
Yes
Yes
D3--08BDC--1
8
Yes
Yes
D3--10B--1
10
Yes
Yes
D3--10BDC--1
10
Yes
Yes
The configurations below show the valid combinations of local and expansion bases
using the DL350 CPU.
NOTE: You should use one of the configurations listed below when designing an
expansion system. If you use a configuration not listed below the system will not
function properly.
8 slot local CPU base with a
8 slot and 5 slot expansion
base
1.5 ft (0.5m)
1.5 ft (0.5m)
8 slot local CPU base with a
5 slot expansion base
1.5 ft (0.5m)
8 slot local CPU base with a
8 slot expansion base
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
1.5 ft (0.5m) 1.5 ft (0.5m)
5 slot local CPU base
with a maximum of two 5
slot expansion bases
System Design and Configuration
10 slot local CPU base with a
5 slot expansion base
1.5 ft (0.5m)
1.5 ft (0.5m)
8 slot local CPU base with two 8
slot expansion bases
Connecting
Expansion Bases
10 slot local CPU base with a
10 slot expansion base
1.5 ft (0.5m)
4--10
The local CPU base is connected to the expansion base using a 1.5 ft. cable
(D3--EXCBL). The base must be connected as shown in the diagram below.
The top expansion connector on the base is the input from a previous base. The
bottom expansion connector on the base is the output to an expansion base. The
expansion cable is marked with “CPU Side” and “Expansion Side”. The“ CPU Side”
of the cable is connected to the bottom port of the base and the “Expansion Side” of
the cable is connected to the top port of the next base.
Expansion Cable
1.5 ft (0.5 m)
077 057 037 017
C
P
U
Expansion Side
200 160 140 120 100
to
to
to
to
to
CPU Side
217 177 157 137 117
1.5 ft (0.5 m)
System Design
and Configuration
CPU Side
060 040 020 000
to
to
to
to
Expansion Side
DL305
DL305
320 300 260 240 220
to
to
to
to
to
DL305
337 317 277 257 237
Note: Avoid placing the expansion cable in the same wiring tray as the I/O and power source wiring.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
4--11
Setting the Base Switches
Jumper Switch
The 5, and 8 slot bases have a jumper switch between slot 3 and 4 used to set the
base to local CPU base or expansion base. The 10 slot base has two jumpers, one is
located between slots 4 and 5 and the other is located between slot 5 and 6. The
second switch sets I/O addressing ranges for the DL330/340 CPUs. This switch
should always be bridged to the right hand position for the DL350 CPU.
5 and 8 slot bases
10 slot base
System Design
and Configuration
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
4--12
System Design and Configuration
I/O Configurations with a 5 Slot Local CPU Base
Switch settings
5 Slot Base
The 5 slot base has a jumper switch on the inside of the base between slots 3 and 4
which allows you to select:
Type of Base
Switch Position
Local CPU
right side bridged
First Expansion
left side bridged
Last Expansion
right side bridged
Total I/O:
8 pt. modules 32
16 pt. modules 64
EXP
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
Jumper
Switch
5 Slot Base and up
to two 5 Slot
Expansion Bases
Total I/O:
1 Expansion base
8 pt. modules -- 72
16 pt. modules -- 144
2 Expansion Bases
8 pt. modules -- 112
16 pt modules -- 224
EXP
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
DL305
Jumper Switch
EXP
System Design
and Configuration
CPU
200 160
to
to
207 167
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
210 170
to
to
217 177
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
CPU
DL305
Jumper Switch
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
320 300
to
to
327 307
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
330 310
to
to
337 317
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
EXP
DL305
CPU
4--13
System Design and Configuration
I/O Configurations with an 8 Slot Local CPU Base
8 Slot Base
EXP
Total I/O:
8 pt. modules -- 56
16 pt. modules -- 112
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
Jumper Switch
8 Slot Base and
5 Slot Expansion
Base
Total I/O:
8 pt modules -- 96
16 pt modules -- 192
8 Slot Base and
One 8 slot and one
5 slot Expansion
Bases
2 Expansion Bases
1 -- 8 slot 1 -- 5 slot
8 pt. modules -- 160
16 pt. modules -- 320
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
Jumper Switch
EXP
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
200
to
207
160
to
167
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
210
to
217
170
to
177
CPU
DL305
EXP
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
Jumper Switch
EXP
340
to
347
320
to
327
300
to
307
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
200
to
207
160
to
167
350
to
357
330
to
337
310
to
317
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
210
to
217
170
to
177
DL305
Jumper Switch
EXP
460
to
467
440
to
447
420
to
427
400
to
407
360
to
367
470
to
477
450
to
457
430
to
437
410
to
417
370
to
377
DL305
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
CPU
System Design
and Configuration
Total I/O:
1 Expansion Base
8 pt modules -- 120
16 pt modules -- 240
EXP
4--14
System Design and Configuration
8 Slot Base and
two 8 slot
Expansion Bases
Total I/O:
2 Expansion Bases
2 -- 8 slot
8 pt. modules -- 184
16 pt. modules -- 368
Jumper Switch
EXP
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
Jumper Switch
EXP
340
to
347
320
to
327
300
to
307
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
200
to
207
160
to
167
350
to
357
330
to
337
310
to
317
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
210
to
217
170
to
177
DL305
Jumper Switch
System Design
and Configuration
EXP
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
540
to
547
520
to
527
500
to
507
460
to
467
440
to
447
420
to
427
400
to
407
550
to
557
530
to
537
510
to
517
470
to
477
450
to
457
430
to
437
410 370
to
to
417 377
360
to
367
DL305
CPU
4--15
System Design and Configuration
I/O Configurations with a 10 Slot Local CPU Base
700
EXP
160
to
167
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
210
to
217
170
to
177
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
700
EXP
DL305
Jumper
SW1
100
200
to
207
160
to
167
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
210
to
217
170
to
177
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
320
to
327
300
to
307
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
330
to
337
310
to
317
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
C
P
U
CPU
EXP1
CPU
/EXP2
DL305
Jumper
SW1
100
EXP
200
to
207
160
to
167
140
to
147
120
to
127
100
to
107
060
to
067
040
to
047
020
to
027
000
to
007
210
to
217
170
to
177
150
to
157
130
to
137
110
to
117
070
to
077
050
to
057
030
to
037
010
to
017
C
P
U
CPU
DL305
SW2
700
EXP
EXP
DL305
Jumper
SW2
700
EXP
CPU
SW1
100
440
to
447
420
to
427
400
to
407
360
to
367
340
to
347
320
to
327
300
to
307
260
to
267
240
to
247
220
to
227
450
to
457
430
to
437
410
to
417
370
to
377
350
to
357
330
to
337
310
to
317
270
to
277
250
to
257
230
to
237
EXP
DL305
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
CPU
System Design
and Configuration
Total I/O:
8 pt. modules -- 152
16 pt. modules -- 304
200
to
207
Jumper
SW2
Total I/O:
8 pt. modules -- 112
16 pt. modules -- 224
10 Slot Base and
10 Slot Expansion
Base with
16 Point I/O
EXP
100
Total I/O:
8 pt. modules -- 72
16 pt. modules -- 144
10 Slot Base and
5 Slot Expansion
Base with
16 Point I/O
Jumper
SW1
Jumper
SW2
10 Slot Base
4--16
System Design and Configuration
Remote I/O Expansion
How to Add
Remote I/O
Channels
Remote I/O is useful for a system that has a sufficient number of sensors and other
field devices located a relative long distance away (up to 1000 meters, or 3050 feet)
from the more central location of the CPU. The DL350 supports a built--in Remote
master, however the DL305 family does not have any Remote I/O modules.
‘
Therefore,
you must use a DL205 or DL405 base for the slave channels. The
methods of adding remote I/O are:
S DL350 CPU: The CPU’s comm port 2 features a built-in Remote I/O
channel.
DL350
Maximum number of Remote Masters supported in
the local CPU base (1 channel per Remote Master)
1
CPU built-in Remote I/O channels
1
Maximum I/O points supported by each channel
512
Maximum Remote I/O points supported
512
Maximum number of remote I/O bases per channel
(RM--NET)
7
Remote I/O points map into different CPU memory locations, therefore it does not
reduce the number of local I/O points. Refer to the DL205 Remote I/O manual for
details on remote I/O configuration and numbering. Configuring the built-in remote
I/O channel is described in the following section.
The following figure shows 1 CPU base with seven remote bases. The remote bases
can be DL205 or DL405 bases.
System Design
and Configuration
Remote I/O
-- 7 Bases per channel (RM--Net)
-- 3050 ft. (1000m) Total distance]
-- 512 I/O Points Total
CPU Base
DL350 CPU Only
RM--Net
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
Configuring the
CPU’s Remote
I/O Channel
4--17
This section describes how to configure the DL350’s built-in remote I/O channel.
Additional information is in the Remote I/O manual, D2--REMIO--M, which you will
need in configuring the Remote slave units on the network.
The DL350 CPU’s built-in remote I/O channel has the same capability as the DL250
and DL450 CPUs. It can communicate with up to seven remote bases containing a
maximum of 512 I/O points, at a maximum distance of 1000 meters.
You may recall from the CPU specifications in Chapter 3 that the DL350’s Port 2 is
capable of several protocols. To configure the port using the Handheld Programmer,
use AUX 56 and follow the prompts, making the same choices as indicated below on
this page. To configure the port in DirectSOFT, choose the PLC menu, then Setup,
then Setup Secondary Comm Port...
Port: From the port number list box at the top, choose “Port 2”.
Protocol: Click the check box to the left of “Remote I/O” (called
“M--NET” on the HPP), and then you’ll see the dialog box shown below.
S
Memory Address: Choose a V-memory address to use as the starting
location of a Remote I/O configuration table (V37700 is the default). This
table is separate and independent from the table for any Remote
Master(s) in the system.
Station Number: Choose “0” as the station number, which makes the
DL350 the master. Station numbers 1--7 are reserved for remote slaves.
Baud Rate: The baud rates 19200 and 38400 baud are available.
Choose 38400 initially as the remote I/O baud rate, and revert to 19200
baud if you experience data errors or noise problems on the link.
Important: You must configure the baud rate on the Remote Slaves (via
DIP switches) to match the baud rate selection for the CPU’s Port 2.
Then click the button indicated to send the Port 2 configuration
to the CPU, and click Close.
S
S
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
S
S
4--18
System Design and Configuration
The next step is to make the connections between all devices on the Remote I/O link.
The location of the Port 2 on the DL350 is
on the 25-pin connector , as pictured to the
right.
S
Pin 7
S
Pin 12
TXD+
S
Pin 13
TXD--
S
Pin 24
RXD+
S
Pin 25
RXD--
1
14
Signal GND
0V
Port 2
TXD+
TXD--
13
25
RXD+
RXD--
Now we are ready to discuss wiring the DL350 to the remote slaves on the remote
base(s). The remote I/O link is a 3-wire, half-duplex type. Since Port 2 of the DL350
CPU is a 5-wire port, we must jumper its transmit and receive lines together as
shown below (converts it to 3-wire, half-duplex).
DL350 CPU Port 2
D2--RSS
Remote I/O Slave
0V 7
Termination Resistor
RXD+
TXD+
TXD--
13
25
RXD--
T
D4--RM
Remote I/O Slave
Jumper
TXD+ / RXD+
1
1
TXD-- / RXD--
2
2
3
3
Signal GND
Connect shield to
signal ground
Remote I/O Master
T
Internal
330 ohm
resistor
G
System Design
and Configuration
(end of chain)
The twisted/shielded pair connects to the DL350 Port 2 as shown. Be sure to
connect the cable shield wire to the signal ground connection. A termination resistor
must be added externally to the CPU, as close as possible to the connector pins. Its
purpose is to minimize electrical reflections that occur over long cables. Be sure to
add the jumper at the last slave to connect the required internal termination resistor.
Ideally, the two termination resistors at
the cables opposite ends and the
cable’s rated impedance will all three
match. For cable impedances greater
than 330 ohms, add a series resistor at the
last slave as shown to the right. If less than
330 ohms, parallel a matching resistance
across the slave’s pins 1 and 2 instead.
Remember to size the termination resistor
at Port 2 to match the cables rated
impedance. The resistance values should
be between 100 and 500 ohms.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
Add series external resistor
T
1
2
3
Internal
resistor
D4--RM -- 330
ohm
D2--RSS -- 150
ohm
System Design and Configuration
4--19
Configure Remote
I/O Slaves
After configuring the DL350 CPU’s Port 2 and wiring it to the remote slave(s), use the
following checklist to complete the configuration of the remote slaves. Full
instructions for these steps are in the Remote I/O manual.
S Set the baud rate to match CPU’s Port 2 setting.
S Select a station address for each slave, from 1 to 7. Each device on the
remote link must have a unique station address. There can be only one
master (address 0) on the remote link.
Configuring the
Remote I/O Table
The beginning of the configuration table
for the built-in remote I/O channel is the
memory address we selected in the Port 2
setup.
The table consists of blocks of four words
which correspond to each slave in the
system, as shown to the right. The first
four table locations are reserved.
The CPU reads data from the table after
powerup, interpreting the four data words
in each block with these meanings:
1. Starting address of slave’s input data
2. Number of slave’s input points
3. Starting address of outputs in slave
4. Number of slave’s output points
37700
Remote I/O data
Reserved V37700
V37701
V37702
V37703
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
Slave 1 V37704
V37705
V37706
V37707
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
xxxx
V37734
V37735
V37736
V37737
0000
0000
0000
0000
Slave 7
DirectSOFT
SP0
LDA
O40000
OUT
V37704
LD
K16
OUT
V37705
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
The table is 32 words long. If your system
has fewer than seven remote slave bases,
then the remainder of the table must be
filled with zeros. For example, a 3--slave
system will have a remote configuration
table containing 4 reserved words,12
words of data and 16 words of “0000”.
A portion of the ladder program must
configure this table (only once) at
powerup. Use the LDA instruction as
shown to the right, to load an address to
place in the table. Use the regular LD
constant to load the number of the slave’s
input or output points.
The following page gives a short program
example for one slave.
Memory Addr. Pointer
4--20
System Design and Configuration
Consider the simple system featuring Remote I/O shown below. The DL350’s built-in
Remote I/O channel connects to one slave base, which we will assign a station
address=1. The baud rates on the master and slave will be 38400 kB.
We can map the remote I/O points as any type of I/O point, simply by choosing the
appropriate range of V-memory. Since we have plenty of standard I/O addresses
available (X and Y), we will have the remote I/O points start at the next X and Y
addresses after the main base points (X60 and Y40, respectively).
Main Base with CPU as Master
Remote Slave Worksheet
1
16
16
O
O
16
16
16
I
I
I
Remote Base Address_________(Choose 1--7)
DL350
CPU
Port 2
Y20-Y37 Y0-Y17 X40-X57 X20-X37
V40501 V40500 V40402 V40401
X0-X17
V40400
1
08ND3S
2
08TD1
Y040
8
3
08TD1
Y050
8
X070
OUTPUT
Output Addr.
No.Outputs
8
4
Remote Slave
D2
RSSS
Slave
0
INPUT
Module
Name Input Addr.
No. Inputs
08ND3S
X060
8
Slot
Number
5
6
8
8
8
8
I
I
O
O
7
X060
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address:V_______
40403
16
Total Input Points_____
Y040
40502
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address:V_______
X60-X67 X70-X77 Y40-Y47 Y50-Y57
V40403 V40404 V40502 V40503
System Design
and Configuration
Remote I/O
Setup Program
Using the Remote Slave Worksheet
shown above can help organize our
system data in preparation for writing our
ladder program (a blank full-page copy of
this worksheet is in the Remote I/O
Manual). The four key parameters we
need to place in our Remote I/O
configuration table is in the lower right
corner of the worksheet. You can
determine the address values by using the
memory map given at the end of Chapter
3, CPU Specifications and Operation.
The program segment required to transfer
our worksheet results to the Remote I/O
configuration table is shown to the right.
Remember to use the LDA or LD
instructions appropriately.
The next page covers the remainder of the
required program to get this remote I/O
link up and running.
16
Total Output Points_____
DirectSOFT
SP0
LDA
O40403
OUT
V37704
LD
K16
OUT
V37705
LDA
O40502
OUT
V37706
LD
K16
OUT
V37707
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
Slave 1
Input
Slave 1
Output
System Design and Configuration
When configuring a Remote I/O channel
for fewer than 7 slaves, we must fill the
remainder of the table with zeros. This is
necessary because the CPU will try to
interpret any non-zero number as slave
information.
We continue our setup program from the
previous page by adding a segment which
fills the remainder of the table with zeros.
The example to the right fills zeros for
slave numbers 2--7, which do not exist in
our example system.
4--21
DirectSOFT
LD
K0
OUTD
V37710
OUTD
V37736
C740
SET
On the last rung in the example program above, we set a special relay contact C740.
This particular contact indicates to the CPU the ladder program has finished
specifying a remote I/O system. At that moment the CPU begins remote I/O
communications. Be sure to include this contact after any Remote I/O setup
program.
Remote I/O
Test Program
Now we can verify the remote I/O link and
setup program operation. A simple quick
check can be done with one rung of ladder,
shown to the right. It connects the first
input of the remote base with the first
output. After placing the PLC in RUN
mode, we can go to the remote base and
activate its first input. Then its first output
should turn on.
DirectSOFT
X60
Y40
OUT
System Design
and Configuration
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
4--22
System Design and Configuration
Network Connections to MODBUS and DirectNET
Configuring
the CPU’s
Comm Port
This section describes how to configure the CPU’s built-in networking ports. for
either MODBUS or DirectNET. This will allow you to connect the DL305 PLC system
directly to MODBUS networks using the RTU protocol, or to other devices on a
DirectNET network. MODBUS hosts system on the network must be capable of
issuing the MODBUS commands to read or write the appropriate data. For details on
the MODBUS protocol, please refer to the Gould MODBUS Protocol reference
Guide (P1--MBUS--300 Rev. B). In the event a more recent version is available,
check with your MODBUS supplier before ordering the documentation. For more
details on DirectNET, order our DirectNET manual, part number DA--DNET--M.
You will need to determine whether the network connection is a 3-wire RS--232 type,
or a 5-wire RS--422 type. Normally, the RS--232 signals are used for shorter
distances (15 meters max), for communications between two devices. RS--422
signals are for longer distances (1000 meters max.), and for multi-drop networks
(from 2 to 247 devices). Use termination resistors at both ends of RS--422 network
wiring, matching the impedance rating of the cable, for example, to match the
termination resistance to Belden 9841 use a 120 ohm resistor. Resistors should be
insatlled close to the end of the cable at the master and last slave connections.
14 TXD+
16 TXD-9 RXD+
10 RXD-19 RTS+
18 RTS-11 CTS+
23 CTS-7 GND
14 TXD+
16 TXD-9 RXD+
10 RXD-19 RTS+
18 RTS-11 CTS+
23 CTS-7 GND
System Design
and Configuration
PC/PLC
Master
Slave
14 TXD+
16 TXD-9 RXD+
10 RXD-19 RTS+
18 RTS-11 CTS+
23 CTS-7 GND
Last Slave
The recommended cable for RS422 is Beldon 8102 or equivalent.
1
13
14
25
25-pin Female
D Connector
Port 2 Pin Descriptions (DL350 CPU)
Port 2 Pin Descriptions (Cont’d)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
not used
TXD
Transmit Data (RS232C)
RXD
Receive Data (RS232C)
RTS
Ready to Send (RS--232C)
CTS
Clear to Send (RS--232C)
not used
0V
Power (--) connection (GND)
0V
Power (--) connection (GND)
RXD + Receive Data + (RS--422)
RXD -- Receive Data (RS--422)
CTS + Clear to Send + (RS422)
TXD + Transmit Data + (REMIO)
TXD -- Transmit Data -- (REMIO)
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
TXD +
not used
TXD -not used
RTS -RTS +
not used
not used
not used
CTS -RXD +
RXD --
Transmit Data + (RS--422
Transmit Data -- (RS--422)
Request to Send -- (RS--422)
Request to Send -- (RS--422)
Clear to Send -- (RS--422)
Receive Data + (REMIO)
Receive Data -- (REMIO)
System Design and Configuration
MODBUS Port
Configuration
4--23
In DirectSOFT, choose the PLC menu, then Setup, then “Secondary Comm Port”.
S Port: From the port number list box at the top, choose “Port 2”.
S Protocol: Click the check box to the left of “MODBUS” (use AUX 56 on
the HPP, and select “MBUS”), and then you’ll see the dialog box below.
Setup Communication Ports
S
S
S
S
S
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
S
Timeout: amount of time the port will wait after it sends a message to
get a response before logging an error.
Response Delay Time: The amount of time between raising the RTS
line and sending the data. This is for devices that do not use RTS/CTS
handshaking. The RTS and CTS lines must be bridged together for the
CPU to send any data.
Station Number: For making the CPU port a MODBUS master, choose
“1”. The possible range for MODBUS slave numbers is from 1 to 247,
but the DL350 network instructions used in Master mode will access
only slaves 1 to 90. Each slave must have a unique number. At
powerup, the port is automatically a slave, unless and until the DL350
executes ladder logic network instructions which use the port as a
master. Thereafter, the port reverts back to slave mode until ladder logic
uses the port again.
Baud Rate: The available baud rates include 300, 600, 900, 2400,
4800, 9600, 19200, and 38400 baud. Choose a higher baud rate initially,
reverting to lower baud rates if you experience data errors or noise
problems on the network. Important: You must configure the baud rates
of all devices on the network to the same value. Refer to the appropriate
product manual for details.
Stop Bits: Choose 1 or 2 stop bits for use in the protocol.
Parity: Choose none, even, or odd parity for error checking.
Then click the button indicated to send the Port configuration to
the CPU, and click Close.
4--24
System Design and Configuration
DirectNET Port
Configuration
In DirectSOFT, choose the PLC menu, then Setup, then “Secondary Comm Port”.
S Port: From the port number list box, choose “Port 2 ”.
S Protocol: Click the check box to the left of “DirectNET” (use AUX 56 on
the HPP, then select “DNET”), and then you’ll see the dialog box below.
Setup Communication Ports
S
System Design
and Configuration
S
S
S
S
S
S
Timeout: amount of time the port will wait after it sends a message to
get a response before logging an error.
Response Delay Time: The amount of time between raising the RTS
line and sending the data. This is for devices that do not use RTS/CTS
handshaking. The RTS and CTS lines must be bridged together for the
CPU to send any data.
Station Number: For making the CPU port a DirectNET master,
choose “1”. The allowable range for DIrectNET slaves is from 1 to 90
(each slave must have a unique number). At powerup, the port is
automatically a slave, unless and until the DL350 executes ladder logic
instructions which attempt to use the port as a master. Thereafter, the
port reverts back to slave mode until ladder logic uses the port again.
Baud Rate: The available baud rates include 300, 600, 900, 2400,
4800, 9600, 19200, and 38400 baud. Choose a higher baud rate initially,
reverting to lower baud rates if you experience data errors or noise
problems on the network. Important: You must configure the baud rates
of all devices on the network to the same value.
Stop Bits: Choose 1 or 2 stop bits for use in the protocol.
Parity: Choose none, even, or odd parity for error checking.
Format: Choose between hex or ASCII formats.
Then click the button indicated to send the Port configuration
to the CPU, and click Close.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
4--25
Network Slave Operation
This section describes how other devices on a network can communicate with a CPU
port that you have configured as a DirectNET slave or MODBUS slave (DL350). A
MODBUS host must use the MODBUS RTU protocol to communicate with the DL350
as a slave. The host software must send a MODBUS function code and MODBUS
address to specify a PLC memory location the DL350 comprehends. The DirectNET
host uses normal I/O addresses to access the applicable DL305 CPU and system. No
CPU ladder logic is required to support either MODBUS slave or DirectNET slave
operation.
MODBUS Function The MODBUS function code determines whether the access is a read or a write, and
Codes Supported whether to access a single data point or a group of them. The DL350 supports the
MODBUS function codes described below.
MODBUS
Function Code
DL305 Data Types
Available
01
Read a group of coils
Y, CR, T, CT
02
Read a group of inputs
X, SP
05
Set / Reset a single coil
Y, CR, T, CT
15
Set / Reset a group of coils
Y, CR, T, CT
03, 04
Determining the
MODBUS Address
Function
Read a value from one or more registers V
06
Write a value into a single register
V
16
Write a value into a group of registers
V
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
There are typically two ways that most host software conventions allow you to
specify a PLC memory location. These are:
S By specifying the MODBUS data type and address
S By specifying a MODBUS address only.
4--26
System Design and Configuration
If Your Host Software Many host software packages allow you to specify the MODBUS data type and the
Requires the Data
MODBUS address that corresponds to the PLC memory location. This is the easiest
Type and Address... method, but not all packages allow you to do it this way.
The actual equation used to calculate the address depends on the type of PLC data
you are using. The PLC memory types are split into two categories for this purpose.
Discrete -- X, SP, Y, CR, S, T, C (contacts)
S Word -- V, Timer current value, Counter current value
In either case, you basically convert the PLC octal address to decimal and add the
appropriate MODBUS address (if required). The table below shows the exact
equation used for each group of data.
S
DL350 Memory Type
QTY
(Dec.)
PLC Range
(Octal)
For Discrete Data Types .... Convert PLC Addr. to Dec.
+
Start of Range
MODBUS
Data Type
+ Data Type
Inputs (X)
512
X0
--
X777
2048
--
2560
Input
Special Relays (SP)
512
SP0
--
SP777
3072
--
3584
Input
Outputs (Y)
512
Y0
--
Y777
2048
--
2560
Coil
Control Relays (CR)
1024
C0
--
C1777
3072
--
4095
Coil
Timer Contacts (T)
256
T0
--
T377
6144
--
6399
Coil
Counter Contacts (CT)
128
CT0
--
CT177
6400
--
6271
Coil
Stage Status Bits (S)
1024
S0
--
S1777
5120
--
6143
Coil
For Word Data Types ....
Timer Current Values (V)
System Design
and Configuration
MODBUS
Address Range
(Decimal)
Convert PLC Addr. to Dec.
256
V0
--
V377
Counter Current Values (V) 128
V1000
--
V1177
V--Memory, user data (V)
3072
4096
V1400 -V10000 --
V--Memory, system (V)
256
V7400
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
--
+
Data Type
0
--
255
Input Register
512
--
639
Input Register
V7377
V17777
768
4096
---
3839
8191
Holding Register
V7777
3480
--
3735
Holding Register
System Design and Configuration
4--27
The following examples show how to generate the MODBUS address and data type
for hosts which require this format.
Example 1: V2100
Find the MODBUS address for User V
location V2100.
1. Find V memory in the table.
2. Convert V2100 into decimal (1088).
3. Use the MODBUS data type from the table.
V Memory, user data (V)
Example 2: Y20
3072
12288
V2100 = 1088 decimal
1088 + Hold. Reg. = Holding Reg. 1088
V1400
-V7377
V10000--V37777
768
4096
---
3839
16383
Holding Register
Find the MODBUS address for output Y20.
PLC Addr. (Dec) + Start Addr. + Data Type
1. Find Y outputs in the table.
Y20 = 16 decimal
2. Convert Y20 into decimal (16).
16 + 2048 + Coil =
Coil 2064
3. Add the starting address for the range
(2048).
4. Use the MODBUS data type from the table.
Outputs (Y)
1024
Y0
--
Y1777
Example 3: T10 Current Find the MODBUS address to obtain the
current value from Timer T10.
Value
1. Find Timer Current Values in the table.
2. Convert T10 into decimal (8).
3. Use the MODBUS data type from the table.
256
V0
--
2048
--
3071
Coil
PLC Address (Dec.) + Data Type
T10 = 8 decimal
8 + Input Reg. = Input Reg. 8
V377
0
--
255
Input Register
Find the MODBUS address for Control Relay PLC Addr. (Dec) + Start Addr. +Data Type
C54.
C54 = 44 decimal
1. Find Control Relays in the table.
44 + 3072 + Coil = Coil 3116
2. Convert C54 into decimal (44).
3. Add the starting address for the range
(3072).
4. Use the MODBUS data type from the table.
Control Relays (CR)
2048
C0
--
C3777
3072
--
5119
Coil
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
Timer Current Values (V)
Example 4: C54
PLC Address (Dec.) + Data Type
4--28
System Design and Configuration
If Your MODBUS
Host Software
Requires an
Address ONLY
DL350 Memory Type
Some host software does not allow you to specify the MODBUS data type and
address. Instead, you specify an address only. This method requires another step to
determine the address, but it’s still fairly simple. Basically, MODBUS also separates
the data types by address ranges as well. So this means an address alone can
actually describe the type of data and location. This is often referred to as “adding the
offset”. One important thing to remember here is that two different addressing
modes may be available in your host software package. These are:
S 484 Mode
S 584/984 Mode
We recommend that you use the 584/984 addressing mode if your host
software allows you to choose. This is because the 584/984 mode allows access
to a higher number of memory locations within each data type. If your software only
supports 484 mode, then there may be some PLC memory locations that will be
unavailable. The actual equation used to calculate the address depends on the type
of PLC data you are using. The PLC memory types are split into two categories for
this purpose.
S Discrete -- X, SP, Y, CR, S, T, C (contacts)
S Word -- V, Timer current value, Counter current value
In either case, you basically convert the PLC octal address to decimal and add the
appropriate MODBUS addresses (as required). The table below shows the exact
equation used for each group of data.
QTY
(Dec.)
PLC Range
(Octal)
System Design
and Configuration
For Discrete Data Types ... Convert PLC Addr. to Dec. +
MODBUS
Address Range
(Decimal)
Start of Range
484 Mode
Address
584/984
Mode
Address
MODBUS
Data Type
+ Appropriate Mode Address
Inputs (X)
512
X0
--
X777
2048
--
2560
1001
10001
Input
Special Relays (SP)
512
SP0
--
SP777
3072
--
3584
1001
10001
Input
Outputs (Y)
512
Y0
--
Y777
2048
--
2560
1
1
Coil
Control Relays (CR)
1024
C0
--
C3777
3072
--
4095
1
1
Coil
Timer Contacts (T)
256
T0
--
T377
6144
--
6399
1
1
Coil
Counter Contacts (CT)
128
CT0
--
CT177
6400
--
6527
1
1
Coil
Stage Status Bits (S)
1024
S0
--
S1777
5120
--
6143
1
1
Coil
For Word Data Types .... Convert PLC Addr. to Dec.
Timer Current Values (V)
256
V0
--
V377
Counter Current Values (V)
128
V1000
--
V1177
V Memory, user data (V)
3072
4096
V1400 -V10000 --
V Memory, system (V)
256
V7400
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
--
+
Appropriate Mode Address
0
--
255
3001
30001
Input Reg.
512
--
639
3001
30001
Input Reg
V7377
V17777
768
4096
---
3839
8192
4001
40001
Hold Reg.
V7777
3840
--
3735
4001
40001
Hold Reg.
System Design and Configuration
4--29
The following examples show how to generate the MODBUS addresses for hosts
which require this format.
Example 1: V2100
584/984 Mode
Find the MODBUS address for User V
location V2100.
1. Find V memory in the table.
2. Convert V2100 into decimal (1088).
3. Add the MODBUS starting address for the
mode (40001).
V Memory, system (V)
320
V700
-V777
V7400 -- V7777
Outputs (Y)
1024
Y0
--
Y1777
2. Convert T10 into decimal (8).
3. Add the MODBUS starting address for the
mode (3001).
256
V0
--
V377
---
768
3735
4001
40001
Hold Reg.
PLC Addr. (Dec) + Start Addr. + Mode
Y20 = 16 decimal
16 + 2048 + 1 = 2065
2048
Example 3: T10 Current Find the MODBUS address to obtain the
current value from Timer T10.
Value
484 Mode
1. Find Timer Current Values in the table.
Timer Current Values (V)
V2100 = 1088 decimal
1088 + 40001 = 41089
448
3840
Find the MODBUS address for output Y20.
1. Find Y outputs in the table.
2. Convert Y20 into decimal (16).
3. Add the starting address for the range
(2048).
4. Add the MODBUS address for the mode
(1).
Example 2: Y20
584/984 Mode
PLC Address (Dec.) + Mode Address
--
3071
1
1
Coil
PLC Address (Dec.) + Mode Address
T10 = 8 decimal
8 + 3001 = 3009
0
--
255
3001
30001
Input Reg.
Control Relays (CR)
Determining the
DirectNET Address
2048
C0
--
C3777
3072
--
5119
1
1
Coil
Addressing the memory types for DirectNET slaves is very easy. Use the ordinary
native address of the slave device itself. To access a slave PLC’s memory address
V2000 via DirectNET, for example, the network master will request V2000 from the
slave.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
Find the MODBUS address for Control Relay PLC Addr. (Dec) + Start Address + Mode
C54.
C54 = 44 decimal
1. Find Control Relays in the table.
44 + 3072 + 1 = 3117
2. Convert C54 into decimal (44).
3. Add the starting address for the range
(3072).
4. Add the MODBUS address for the mode
(1).
Example 4: C54
584/984 Mode
4--30
System Design and Configuration
Network Master Operation
This section describes how the DL350 can communicate on a MODBUS or DirectNET
network as a master. For MODBUS networks, it uses the MODBUS RTU protocol,
which must be interpreted by all the slaves on the network. Both MODBUS and
DirectNET are single master/multiple slave networks. The master is the only
member of the network that can initiate requests on the network. This section teaches
you how to design the required ladder logic for network master operation.
Master
Slave #1
Slave #2
Slave #3
System Design
and Configuration
MODBUS RTU Protocol, or DirectNET
When using the DL350 CPU as the master
station, you use simple RLL instructions to
initiate the requests. The WX instruction
initiates network write operations, and the
RX instruction initiates network read
operations. Before executing either the
WX or RX commands, we will need to load
data related to the read or write operation
onto the CPU’s accumulator stack. When
the WX or RX instruction executes, it uses
the information on the stack combined
with data in the instruction box to
completely define the task, which goes to
the port.
Master
Slave
WX (write)
RX (read)
Network
Network 1
The following step-by-step procedure will provide you the information necessary to
set up your ladder program to receive data from a network slave.
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design and Configuration
Step 1:
Identify Master
Port # and Slave #
Step 2:
Load Number of
Bytes to Transfer
The first Load (LD) instruction identifies
the communications port number on the
network master (DL350) and the address
of the slave station. This instruction can
address up to 90 MODBUS slaves, or 90
DirectNET slaves. The format of the word
is shown to the right. The “F” in the upper
nibble tells the CPU the port is internal to
the CPU (and not in a slot in the base). The
second nibble indicates the port number,
1. This is the logical port number (0 for top
port and 1 for the bottom). The lower byte
contains the slave address number in
BCD (01 to 90).
F
1
0
4--31
1
Slave address (BCD)
Port number (BCD)
Internal port (hex)
LD
KF101
The second Load (LD) instruction
determines the number of bytes which will
be transferred between the master and
slave in the subsequent WX or RX
instruction. The value to be loaded is in
BCD format (decimal), from 1 to 128
bytes.
1
2
8
(BCD)
# of bytes to transfer
LD
K128
The number of bytes specified also depends on the type of data you want to obtain.
For example, the DL305 Input points can be accessed by V-memory locations or as
X input locations. However, if you only want X0 -- X27, you’ll have to use the X input
data type because the V-memory locations can only be accessed in 2-byte
increments. The following table shows the byte ranges for the various types of
DirectLOGIC™ products.
DL205 / 305 / 405 Memory
Bytes
V--memory
T / C current value
16
16
2
2
Inputs (X, SP)
8
1
Outputs
(Y, C, Stage, T/C bits)
8
1
Scratch Pad Memory
8
1
Diagnostic Status
8
1
Bits per unit
Bytes
Data registers
T / C accumulator
8
16
1
2
I/O, internal relays, shift register
bits, T/C bits, stage bits
8
1
Scratch Pad Memory
8
2
Diagnostic Status(5 word R/W)
16
10
DL305C (DL330/340 CPUs)
Memory
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
Bits per unit
4--32
System Design and Configuration
Step 3:
Specify Master
Memory Area
The third instruction in the RX or WX
sequence is a Load Address (LDA)
instruction. Its purpose is to load the
starting address of the memory area to be
transferred. Entered as an octal number,
the LDA instruction converts it to hex and
places the result in the accumulator.
For a WX instruction, the DL350 CPU
sends the number of bytes previously
specified from its memory area beginning
at the LDA address specified.
For an RX instruction, the DL350 CPU
reads the number of bytes previously
specified from the slave, placing the
received data into its memory area
beginning at the LDA address specified.
4
0
6
0
0
(octal)
Starting address of
master transfer area
LDA
O40600
MSB
V40600
LSB
15
0
MSB
V40601
LSB
15
0
NOTE: Since V memory words are always 16 bits, you may not always use the whole
word. For example, if you only specify 3 bytes and you are reading Y outputs from the
slave, you will only get 24 bits of data. In this case, only the 8 least significant bits of
the last word location will be modified. The remaining 8 bits are not affected.
Step 4:
Specify Slave
Memory Area
The last instruction in our sequence is the
WX or RX instruction itself. Use WX to
write to the slave, and RX to read from the
slave. All four of our instructions are
shown to the right. In the last instruction,
you must specify the starting address and
a valid data type for the slave.
SP116
LD
KF101
LD
K128
LDA
O40600
System Design
and Configuration
RX
Y0
S
S
S
DirectNET slaves -- specify the same address in the WX and RX
instruction as the slave’s native I/O address
MODBUS DL405, DL305 (DL350 CPU), or DL205 slaves -- specify the
same address in the WX and RX instruction as the slave’s native I/O
address
MODBUS 305C (DL330/340 CPUs) slaves -- use the following table to
convert DL305 addresses to MODBUS addresses
DL305C (DL330/340 CPUs) Series CPU Memory Type--to--MODBUS Cross Reference
PLC Memory type
PLC base
address
MODBUS
base addr.
PLC Memory Type
PLC base
address
MODBUS
base addr.
TMR/CNT Current Values
R600
V0
TMR/CNT Status Bits
CT600
GY600
I/O Points
IO 000
GY0
Control Relays
CR160
GY160
Data Registers
R401,
R400
V100
Shift Registers
SR400
GY400
Stage Status Bits (D3--330P only)
S0
GY200
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
4--33
System Design and Configuration
Communications
from a
Ladder Program
Typically network communications will
last longer than 1 scan. The program must
wait for the communications to finish
before starting the next transaction.
SP117
Y1
SET
SP116
LD
KF101
Port Communication Error
LD
K0003
Port Busy
LDA
O40600
RX
Y0
The port which can be a master has two Special Relay contacts associated with it
(see Appendix D for comm port special relays).One indicates “Port busy”(SP116),
and the other indicates “Port Communication Error” (SP117). The example above
shows the use of these contacts for a network master that only reads a device (RX).
The “Port Busy” bit is on while the PLC communicates with the slave. When the bit is
off the program can initiate the next network request.
The “Port Communication Error” bit turns on when the PLC has detected an error.
Use of this bit is optional. When used, it should be ahead of any network instruction
boxes since the error bit is reset when an RX or WX instruction is executed.
Multiple Read and
Write Interlocks
Interlocking Relay
SP116 C100
LD
KF101
LD
K0003
LDA
O40600
Interlocking
Relay
SP116 C100
RX
Y0
C100
SET
LD
KF101
LD
K0003
LDA
O40400
WX
Y0
C100
RST
DL350 User Manual, 2nd Edition
System Design
and Configuration
If you are using multiple reads and writes
in the RLL program, you have to interlock
the routines to make sure all the routines
are executed. If you don’t use the
interlocks, then the CPU will only execute
the first routine. This is because each port
can only handle one transaction at a time.
In the example to the right, after the RX
instruction is executed, C0 is set. When
the port has finished the communication
task, the second routine is executed and
C0 is reset.
If you’re using RLLPLUS Stage Programing,
you can put each routine in a separate
program stage to ensure proper execution
and switch from stage to stage allowing only
one of them to be active at a time.
1
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