Optica Operator`s Manual - GE Measurement & Control

Optica Operator`s Manual - GE Measurement & Control
GE
Measurement & Control
Moisture
Optica™
Operator’s Manual
A40238752 Rev. E
April 2012
Optica™
General Eastern Dew Point Analyzer
Operator’s Manual
A40238752 Rev. E
April 2012
www.ge-mcs.com
©2012 General Electric Company. All rights reserved.
Technical content subject to change without notice.
[no content intended for this page]
ii
Contents
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Electronics Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.1 Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2.2 Input/Output Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
The System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3.1 System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3.2 System Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.4.1 Dew Point Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.4.2 Temperature Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.4.3 Pressure Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Theory of Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.5.1 Hygrometer Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.5.2 Hygrometer Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.5.3 Other Hygrometer Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
The PACER Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Chapter 2. Installation
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Benchtop Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2.1 Mounting the Benchtop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2.2 Using the Rack Mounting Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2.3 Wiring the Benchtop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Wall-Mount Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3.1 Mounting the Wall-Mount. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
2.3.2 Wiring the Wall-Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Output Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.1 Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.4.2 Alarm Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
2.4.3 Serial Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Sensor Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.5.1 Sampling Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.5.2 Ensuring Heat Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.5.3 High Dew Point Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Sensor Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.6.1 Model 1111H Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.6.2 Model D-2 Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.6.3 Model 1211H Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.6.4 Model 1311DR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.6.5 Model 1311XR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.6.6 Model SIM-12H Heated Sensor and Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.6.7 Connecting the Sensors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
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Contents
Chapter 3. Operation
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
iv
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Normal Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Operating the VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Operating the 4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Network Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
Process Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
3.6.1 Actively Measuring Process Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
3.6.2 Manually Entering Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
3.6.3 Measuring at a Different Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
3.6.4 Scenario 1: Measurement Without Enabling the Process Pressure Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
3.6.5 Measuring Dew Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
3.6.6 Scenario 2: Measurement Requiring the Process Pressure Feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Status Line Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
3.7.1 Factory Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Sensor Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Helpful Hints For Operating the Unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
3.9.1 Supercooled Dew Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
3.9.2 Contamination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
3.9.3 Mirror Flooding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
3.9.4 Sample Line Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
3.9.5 Pressure Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Programming Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
4.2.1 The Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
4.2.2 Data Entry Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
User Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Menu 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.5.1 Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
4.5.2 Pressure Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.5.3 Alarms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.5.4 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.5.5 Data Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.5.6 Buzzer/Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.5.7 Network Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.5.8 Datalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Menu 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
4.6.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.6.2 Special. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.6.3 User Equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
4.6.4 Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.6.5 Serial Output Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
4.6.6 Set Time & Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
4.6.7 Restore Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Saving Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
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Contents
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.1
5.2
5.0.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61
Programming Technique. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
Programmable Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
5.2.1 Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
5.2.2 Communication Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
5.2.3 Serial Output Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
5.2.4 Serial Output Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
5.2.5 Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
5.2.6 Data Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
5.2.7 Pressure Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67
5.2.8 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
5.2.9 Buzzer and Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
5.2.10 General Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
5.2.11 User Equations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
5.2.12 Set Time and Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
5.2.13 Special . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
5.2.14 User Default Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
5.2.15 Factory Calibrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
Chapter 6. Network-Based Programming
6.1
6.2
vi
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Programming Screens. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Contents
Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
B.1
B.2
B.3
C.1
D.1
D.2
Minor Maintenance of Sensor Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7.1.1 Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
7.1.2 Procedure for Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Field Replacement of Sensor Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
7.2.1 Replacing the Sensor Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Test and Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
7.4.1 The Display Doesn’t Light Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
7.4.2 “Service” Appears on the STATUS Display Line. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
7.4.3 Incorrect Dew Point Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
7.4.4 “Balance” Remains on the Status Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
7.4.5 No Analog Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
7.4.6 No Serial Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
A.1.1 Accuracy [complete system at 25°C (77°F)] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
A.1.2 Measurement Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
A.1.3 Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
A.2.1 Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
A.2.2 Operating Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Physical (bench mount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.3.1 Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.3.2 Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.3.3 Shipping Weight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.3.4 Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Physical (wall mount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.4.1 Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.4.2 Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.4.3 Shipping Weight. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
A.4.4 Environmental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Optional Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
A.5.1 T-100E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
A.5.2 PT-30A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
A.5.3 PT-300A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
European Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Vapor Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Humidity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Wiring to a Personal Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Depression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
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vii
Contents
D.3
D.4
F.1
F.2
G.1
G.2
viii
Measurement Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Comparing Optica Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Programming Automatic Balance for a VGA Optica. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Programming Automatic Balance for a 4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Direct Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
Computer Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
G.2.1 Determining the Available Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
G.2.2 Retrieving the Alarm Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
G.2.3 Retrieving the Alarm Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
G.2.4 Retrieving Supported Units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
G.2.5 Retrieving Labels and Functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
G.2.6 Retrieving Analog Output Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
G.2.7 Retrieving the Measured and Calculated Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
G.2.8 4X40 Optica Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
Chapter 1.
1.1
Features and Capabilities
Introduction
The GE Measurement & Control Optica is a multi-purpose chilled-mirror hygrometer, suitable for use in a wide variety
of applications. The Optica can function with any GE Measurement & Control chilled-mirror sensor to provide the
following measurement ranges (depending on the sensor selected):
•
dew/frost point from –80°C to +85°C (–112°F to +185°F)
•
relative humidity from 0.002% to 100%
•
moisture content from 500 ppbv to over 5.71 × 105 ppmv
•
temperature from -100° to +100°C (-212°F to +212°F)
The Optica also measures and displays gas pressure using a GE Sensing PT-30A or PT-300A pressure sensor, or a usersupplied 4–20 mA or 0–5 VDC pressure sensor.
Note: If the pressure is known to be constant, a fixed pressure can be programmed, eliminating the need for a
pressure sensor.
Using the Optica, you can simultaneously measure and display dew point, temperature and pressure, with a wide
variety of units of measure. The Optica is Ethernet-ready, so you can access the unit using the Internet for remote
monitoring applications. You can use the data logging function to record and upload weeks of data.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
1
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.2
Electronics Enclosure
The Optica is available in two configurations:
•
a benchtop model, with an optional rack-mount adapter available
•
a wall-mount unit, housed in a NEMA-4 enclosure, suitable for industrial environments
See Chapter 2, Installation, for details on how to mount the Optica.
1.2.1 Front Panel
The Optica’s front panel is shown in Figure 1 below. The panel includes: a display, an alphanumeric keypad for data
entry, ENTER and TAB keys, and four softkeys to the right of the display screen.
Two display options are available:
•
a high-resolution full-color liquid crystal display (LCD) with data graphing and on-screen programming capability
(referred to as the “VGA” unit). See Figure 1 below.
•
a 4-line by 40-character alphanumeric display (referred to as the “4x40” unit).
Figure 1: Optica Benchtop Version with VGA Display
2
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.2.2 Input/Output Capability
Available inputs and outputs include the following:
•
4-wire Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) input
•
4–20 mA and 0–5 VDC Pressure Sensor inputs
•
two simultaneous analog outputs, each with 4–20 mA and 0–5 VDC capability
•
two independent alarm relays (Form C, 5 Amp)
•
serial communications port
•
Ethernet 10BaseT (on VGA Optica only)
The Optica uses the GE Measurement & Control patented Programmable Automatic Contaminant Error Reduction
(PACER) system for automated self-cleaning and optics rebalancing.
Detailed specifications for the Optica are given in Appendix A.
1.3
The System
1.3.1 System Components
A complete Optica system consists of the following items:
•
Electronic monitor
•
Temperature sensor
(optional)
•
•
•
•
Dew point sensor
•
•
•
Pressure sensor (optional)
Interconnecting sensor cable
AC line cord
Maintenance kit
User’s Manual
Certification that the unit is traceable to the National Institute
of Standards and Technology (Certificate of Conformance)
1.3.2 System Planning
The Optica can be used for a wide variety of measurement applications, including the measurement of dew points of
gasses that are at pressures that exceed the measurement range of GE’s sensors. In this situation be sure to check the
section Process Pressure on page 32 for installation planning.
1.4
Sensors
The Optica can be configured with a chilled-mirror dew point sensor. The specific sensor is chosen according to the
expected dew point range and the environment in which the dew point is to be determined. In addition, the Optica can
be configured with a temperature and/or pressure sensor. GE provides the following sensors for various applications:
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
3
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.4.1 Dew Point Sensors
•
Model 1111H — Single-stage sensor
•
Model 1211H — Two-stage sensor; high pressure and temperature
•
Model D-2 — Two-stage sensor
•
Model SIM-12H — Two-stage heated sensor
•
Model 1311DR — Four-stage, liquid or air cooled sensor
•
Model 1311XR — Five-stage, liquid cooled sensor
1.4.2 Temperature Sensor
•
Model T-100E
1.4.3 Pressure Sensor
•
Model PT-30A or PT-300A
1.5
Theory of Operation
Optical condensation hygrometry is a precise technique for determining the water vapor content in gases by directly
measuring dew point or frost temperatures. Using this technique, a metal mirror is cooled until it reaches a temperature
at which a thin layer of condensation begins to form on it. The dew layer is detected optically, and the mirror is held at
that temperature. The mirror temperature, measured with a platinum resistance thermometer, is an accurate indicator of
the dew or frost point. Because these hygrometers are so accurate, they are widely used as a standard in many of the
world’s metrology laboratories.
1.5.1 Hygrometer Function
Figure 2 on page 5 illustrates how GE Measurement & Control hygrometers detect and measure dew point. The
condensate mirror is illuminated with a solid state, infrared emitter (IR). A photodetector monitors the IR light
reflected from the mirror. The photodetector is fully illuminated when the mirror is clear of dew, and it receives less
light as dew forms. A separate LED and photodetector pair are used as a known reference to compensate for any
thermally induced changes in the optical components. The photodetectors are arranged in an electrical bridge circuit,
the output current of which is proportional to the light reflected from the mirror. The bridge output controls the
electrical current to the thermoelectric cooler.
A large bridge current develops when the mirror is dry, causing the mirror to cool toward the dew point. As dew begins
to form on the mirror, less light is reflected, and the bridge output decreases. This, in turn, causes a decrease in cooling
current. A rate feedback loop within the amplifier ensures critical response, causing the mirror to stabilize quickly at a
temperature that maintains a thin dew or frost layer on the mirror surface. A precision thermometer element embedded
within the mirror directly monitors this dew point temperature.
4
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.5.2 Hygrometer Calibration
The Optica unit can be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland
for certification or to any National Standards lab for calibration against their primary humidity standards. A calibrated
instrument can then be used as a transfer standard in local laboratories to calibrate lower echelon instruments.
CAUTION!
Field calibration is not recommended.
Hygrometers used as calibration standards must have the following characteristics:
•
The mirror thermometer must have suitable long-term accuracy (such as that obtained with a platinum resistance
thermometer).
Optical Reference
Gain
Thermoelectric
Heat Pump Power
LED
Regulation
41.2°F
Dew Point Temperature
(Precision Thermometer)
Figure 2: Chilled-Mirror Hygrometer Diagram
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
5
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.5.3 Other Hygrometer Applications
Many GE Measurement & Control Chilled Mirror Hygrometers are used in industrial applications in addition to
metrology. The optical condensation hygrometer is not readily damaged or contaminated by industrial process gases
that can degrade other secondary measurement schemes such as saturated salt and polymer-based sensors. If the sensor
or sampling components should become contaminated with oils, salts, etc., they can be cleaned without harm to the
sensor or impairment to the system accuracy. The performance of the hygrometer can be checked at any time by
heating the mirror above the dew point, causing the dew deposit to evaporate, then reclosing the servoloop and
checking to see that the system cools and returns to the same dew point.
The GE optical condensation sensors cover a wide range of applications limited only by the heat pumping capabilities
of the thermoelectrically-cooled mirror.
At high dew points (up to 100°C), the sensor is limited by the thermal properties of the solid state optical components
as well as the thermoelectric heat pump capacity.
In a typical application measuring sub-ambient dew points, a two-stage thermoelectrically-cooled mirror can reach a
temperature approximately 65°C lower than an ambient (heat sink) temperature of +25°C. The thermoelectric cooler
pumps heat from the mirror into the heat sink. By reducing the temperature of the heat sink with a coolant such as
chilled water, or by applying the sensor in a low-temperature condition such as monitoring of a test chamber, even
lower dew points can be measured. In meteorological applications where the heat sink temperature is considerably
lower, frost points down to –75°C can be monitored.
Four- and five-stage sensors are available for measuring the lowest dew/frost points.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
1.6
The PACER Cycle
GE Measurement & Control has developed and patented a compensation technique called PACER (Programmable
Automatic Contaminant Error Reduction) that is very effective in reducing the Raoult Effect error associated with
soluble contaminants, particularly for near-ambient dew points. The Optica is equipped with the PACER cycle as well
as AUTO balance as found on earlier models. The user can choose which self-cleaning and balancing routine to run
depending on the severity of contamination.
The PACER cycle, diagrammed in Figure 3 below, begins with a coalescence period, during which the mirror is cooled
well below the dew point of the sample gas, condensing out a large amount of water.
Figure 3: A Typical PACER Cycle
This excess water easily dissolves any water-soluble contaminants. The mirror is then heated. During the heating
phase, the large puddles of water gradually evaporate, carrying increasingly heavy concentrations of salts as the
puddles become smaller. Finally, when all the puddles have evaporated, dry “islands” of crystallized salt are left on the
mirror. The area between the islands (80-85% of the mirror surface) is now clean and shiny, whereas before the PACER
cycle it may have been completely covered. The total amount of contamination has not been reduced, but instead,
redistributed as shown in Figure 4 below, with more clean mirror surface available for dew formation. The reflected
light signal is then electronically balanced against the reference.
Before
PACER Cycle
After
PACER Cycle
Figure 4: Results of the PACER Cycle
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Chapter 1. Features and Capabilities
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
Chapter 2.
2.1
Installation
Introduction
This chapter explains the installation of the benchtop and wall-mount versions of the Optica, the various sensors used
with the system, and the I/O and power wiring.
2.2
Benchtop Installation
2.2.1 Mounting the Benchtop
The Optica benchtop dimensions are shown in Figure 5 below. Two feet on the bottom of the case can be unfolded to
raise up the front for easier viewing, if desired.
Figure 5: Optica Benchtop Dimensions
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
9
Chapter 2. Installation
2.2.2 Using the Rack Mounting Option
There is an optional kit for mounting the benchtop unit in a standard 19-inch rack (see Figure 6 below, Figure 7 on
page 11, and Figure 8 on page 12). The two brackets are attached to the front panel using four No. 8 screws. The Optica
is mounted to the brackets using the eight mounting holes located just in front of and behind the unit’s feet.
Figure 6: Optica Rack-Mount Adapter
10
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
0.38
(9.7)
3.00
(76.2)
2.88
(73.2)
2.74 (69.6)
1.32
(33.5)
2.19 (55.6)
0.50 (12.7)
Note: Dimensions are in inches (millimeters).
8.75
(222.3)
4.00
(101.6)
2.38
(60.5)
0.09
(2.3)
0.59 (15.0)
3.23 (82.0)
18.25 (463.6)
13.53 (343.7)
7.07 (179.6)
12.53 (318.3)
14.62 (371.3)
19.00 (482.6)
1.32
(33.5)
3.91
(99.3)
2.69
(68.3)
6.52
(165.6)
1.11
(28.2)
FH-032-8
4 places
Chapter 2. Installation
Figure 7: Optica Rack-Mount Adapter - Front Panel
11
12
3.19 (81.0)
0.55 (14.0)
0.98 (24.9)
3.91
(99.3)
6.00
(152.4)
0.80 (20.3)
1.82
(46.2)
0.59 (15.0)
5.86
(148.8)
1.09 (27.7)
1.44
(36.6)
0.75 (19.1)
0.66 (16.8)
3.03 (77.0)
1.00 (25.4)
1.00 (25.4)
1.00 (25.4)
12.41 (315.2)
11.00 (279.4)
1.04
(26.4)
Note: Dimensions are in inches (millimeters).
1.13 (28.7)
1.50
(38.1)
Chapter 2. Installation
Figure 8: Optica Rack-Mount Adapter - Bracket
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.2.3 Wiring the Benchtop
2.2.3a
Input Power
The Optica operates with input power from 90 to 126 VAC at 4 amps, or from 208 to 252 VAC at 2.5 amps. It is
designed for a nominal 100, 115 or 230 VAC source. A switch on the rear panel selects the appropriate voltage range
(see Figure 9 below):
•
The 115 VAC setting operates over a range of 90 to 126 VAC
•
The 230 VAC setting operates over a range of 200 to 253 VAC
The Optica’s voltage and frequency rating are listed on the rear panel.
2.2.3b
Sensors
Connect the dew point sensor cable to the 25-pin connector in Slot B on the Optica’s rear panel (see Figure 9 below).
Connect the optional temperature sensor cable to the 9-pin connector in Slot B on the rear panel. The optional pressure
sensor and other I/O wiring connects to the terminal block in Slot A.
*
Optional
LAN
connector*
Serial
Port
Figure 9: Optica Benchtop Rear Panel
Note: *Depending on the model revision, the LAN connector is located in one of two places.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
13
Chapter 2. Installation
2.3
Wall-Mount Installation
The Optica Wall-Mount unit is designed to mount on a flat, vertical surface, such as a wall or panel. To mount the wallmount version, see Figure 10 and Figure 11 below.
2.3.1 Mounting the Wall-Mount
Figure 10: Optica Wall-Mount Dimensions
Ø.261 (6.63 mm)
2 places
1/4" hardware
is recommended.
17.43"
(443 mm)
Allow adequate space
below unit for cabling.
Figure 11: Optica Wall-Mount - Mounting Hole Locations
14
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.3.2 Wiring the Wall-Mount
All connections to the wall-mount unit are made through the panel at the bottom of the case as shown in Figure 12
below. Any I/O cabling is brought into the unit through a gland at the lower left of the case and connects to the terminal
blocks on the left side of the case. Wiring for these connections is shown in Figure 15 on page 16. The dew point sensor
and temperature sensor cable connectors are located near the center of this panel.
Figure 12: Wall-Mount Wiring Entrance Locations
Serial Port
Temperature Sensor
Optional Ethernet
LAN Connector
Gland for
I/O Wiring
COM
TEMP
Dew Point Sensor
LAN
IN/OUT
DEW POINT
AC LINE
Gland for
AC Power
Wiring
90/250 VAC 47-63 Hz
4 ASB 250V TYPE T
Figure 13: Wall-Mount Bottom Panel (viewed from under the unit)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
15
Chapter 2. Installation
2.3.2a
Input Power
Power wiring enters the case through a gland fitting at the lower right of the unit and connects to a screw terminal block
mounted on the right side of the case. Wiring of this terminal block is shown in Figure 14 below. The voltage and
frequency rating and tolerances, as well as fusing data, are listed on the bottom of the unit.
Top
L
G
Front
of
Case
N
Figure 14: Wall-Mount AC Power Wiring
2.4
Output Wiring
The benchtop outputs are connected to removable terminal blocks on the rear panel. Figure 9 on page 13 shows the
location of the benchtop terminal blocks and Figure 15 below shows the Slot A connections.
The Wall-Mount Optica input/output terminal blocks are located inside the front door as shown in Figure 12 on
page 15. Cabling is brought in through the gland on the bottom of the unit and wired to the terminal blocks shown in
Figure 15 below.
Note: Output programming is described in Chapters 4, 5 and 6.
Slot A
ALARM 1
ALARM 2
OUT A
OUT B
PRESSURE
COM
NC
NO
COM
NC
NO
4-20
0-5
4-20
0-5
+V
V in
I in
RTN
Benchtop Unit
Top
COM
AL1
NC
NO
COM
AL2
OUT A
OUT B
NC
NO
Front
of
Case
4-20
0-5
4-20
0-5
+V
PRES
V in
I in
RTN
Wall-Mount Unit
Figure 15: Benchtop and Wall-Mount Input/Output Terminal Blocks
16
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.4.1 Analog Outputs
Note: When the Optica is being programmed, the analog outputs provide 4–20 mA and 0–5 VDC signals representing
the designated parameters.
•
For 4–20mA output, connect to terminals labelled 4–20 (+) and RTN (–).
Note: The maximum load allowed for current output is 500 Ohms.
•
For 0–5 VDC output, connect to terminals labelled 0–5 (+) and RTN (–).
Note: The maximum load allowed for voltage output is 5 mA.
Example:
Assume a temperature output, scaled to range from 0°C (Tlower) to 100°C (Tupper), with a measured actual
temperature of 23°C (Tactual):
The voltage output is calculated by:
 Tactual – Tlower 
Vout = ----------------------------------------------  5
 Tupper – Tlower 
yielding an output voltage of 1.15V.
 23 – 0 
---------------------  5 = 1.15V
 100 – 0 
The current output is calculated by:
 Tactual – Tlower 
Iout  mA  = ----------------------------------------------   20 – 4  + 4
 Tupper – Tlower 
yielding an output current of 7.68 mA.
 23 – 0 
---------------------   16  + 4 = 7.68mA
 100 – 0 
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
17
Chapter 2. Installation
2.4.1a
Additional Voltage Outputs
It is possible to use either of the analog current outputs as an additional voltage output by connecting a precision
resistor from the current output to its return. A voltage will be produced equal to the output current times the load
resistance. To produce a voltage output range of 1 to 5 volts, connect a 250 ohm resistor (0.1% tolerance
recommended).
Using a 250 ohm resistor, the voltage output is calculated by:
 Tactual – Tlower 
Vout = ----------------------------------------------   5 – 1  + 1
 Tupper – Tlower 
yielding an output voltage of 1.92V for this example.
 23 – 0 
---------------------  4 + 1 = 1.92V
 100 – 0 
2.4.2 Alarm Outputs
Each alarm output connects to the contacts of a 5-Amp, Form C (SPDT) relay.
Make connections as follows:
•
For normally open contacts, connect to NO and COM.
•
For normally closed contacts, connect to NC and COM.
Any available parameter can be used to control an alarm relay by programming the parameter name and its threshold
values. An alarm can also be programmed to monitor the state of the Control, PACER Balance, or Service indicators.
(See Chapter 4, 5 or 6 for programming instructions).
Two threshold values are programmed for each parameter—an upper and a lower value. These values designate an
alarm band. How they are used depends on the alarm type programmed. Details of the alarm bands are shown on the
following pages.
2.4.2a
Set Point Alarm
For the Set Point alarm type, the alarm band provides hysteresis to prevent frequent operation of the alarm relay when
the parameter is near the specified value. The relay is activated when the parameter exceeds the upper limit, and
deactivated when the parameter goes below the lower limit.
Figure 16: Set Point Alarm
18
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.4.2b
Inner Band Alarm
For the Inner Band alarm type, the alarm relay activates whenever the parameter value is between the lower and upper
limits.
Figure 17: Inner Band Alarm
2.4.2c
Outer Band Alarm
For the Outer Band alarm, the alarm relay activates whenever the parameter value is greater than the upper limit or
less than the lower limit.
Figure 18: Outer Band Alarm
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
19
Chapter 2. Installation
2.4.3 Serial Output
The Serial Output connector is located at the lower left of the rear panel of the bench-mount unit, and the bottom panel
of the wall-mount unit. The output provides RS-232C serial communications between the unit and a terminal or a PC
running in terminal emulation mode.
The connector is a standard 9-pin D connector. For connection to another serial device, the cable is wired as shown
below. For a basic interface without handshaking, only pins 2, 3 and 5 (RX, TX and GND) on the Optica connector are
needed. Pin connections are given for both 25-pin and 9-pin devices.
Optica Connector
25-Pin Device
9-Pin Device
Pin
Connection
Pin
Connection
Pin
Connection
2
(RX)
3
(TX)
3
(TX)
3
(TX)
2
(RX)
2
(RX)
4
(DTE)
6
(DSR)
6
(DSR)
5
(GND)
7
(GND)
5
(GND)
6
(DSR)
20
(DTE)
4
(DTE)
7
(RTS)
4
(CTS)
8
(CTS)
8
(CTS)
5
(RTS)
7
(RTS)
The baud rate, format of the data, number of stop bits, number of data bits, and parity can all be programmed using the
menus.
20
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.5
Sensor Information
GE Measurement & Control produces a variety of sensors compatible with the Optica, ranging from one to five stages
of thermoelectric cooling. A comparison chart listing specifications of each sensor is given in Appendix D. The
following sections provide information on installing the following GE dew point sensors:
•
Model 1111H — Single-stage sensor
•
Model 1211H — Two-stage sensor; for high pressure and temp.
•
Model D-2 — Two-stage sensor
•
Model SIM-12H — Two-stage heated sensor
•
Model 1311DR — Four-stage heated sensor
•
Model 1311XR — Five-stage water-cooled sensor
When selecting a location for installing a sensor, consider the following criteria:
•
Locate the sensor as close as is practical to the source of the gas to be measured, to keep the sampling lines as short
as possible. This minimizes the system response time and reduces the error rate at low frost points due to sample
line outgassing.
•
Choose a sensor location that provides access to the dewpoint sample cavity cover, to facilitate periodic mirror
cleaning.
CAUTION!
Never place the sensor in a location where temperatures rise above the maximum rated
temperature for the device. See Appendix D for complete sensor specifications.
2.5.1 Sampling Lines
Keep the length of sample tubing between the source and the sensor short, for quick response and highest accuracy.
All sampling line compression fittings provided with the sensor are for ¼-inch diameter tubing, unless otherwise
specified at the time of order.
The material used for the inlet lines can have an important effect on the validity of the readings. Do not use rubber hose
or plastic tubing such as PVC or Tygon, because of their hygroscopic nature.
When measuring frost points below –30°C, sample gas leaving the sensor outlet should be vented through an additional
line three to six feet long, since backflow of ambient moisture into the sensor can take place even under positive
pressure. Use stainless steel tubing and fittings, and ensure that all plumbing is completely free from leaks.
At dew/frost points above –20°C, tubing material is not as critical. Copper, PTFE, polypropylene, aluminum or brass
tubing and fittings may be used. The sampling system should allow for periodic cleaning. It may be helpful to install a
tee and closing valve on the inlet side, to permit the sensor to be shut off while the sampling lines are flushed. At very
low humidities, even a trace amount of contamination can alter measured frost point, so cleanliness is particularly
important.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
21
Chapter 2. Installation
2.5.2 Ensuring Heat Transfer
Be sure the sensor has an adequate heat sink when operating in hot environments. The sensor must never be allowed to
reach a temperature above its rated limit. It is not sufficient merely to ensure that the sensor is in an environment whose
temperature is below the rated limit; a means must be supplied to remove heat from the sensor.
When the Model 1111H or D-2 sensors are used at ambient temperatures of 20° to 24°C, full rated depression can be
achieved by mounting the sensor on a smooth, thermally conductive surface (such as metal), which tends to remain at
the ambient temperature.
If possible, do not operate the sensor continuously at or near full depression. Doing so may decrease the anticipated life
of the thermoelectric heat pump.
2.5.3 High Dew Point Measurements
2.5.3a
Using Heated Sensors
When measuring dew points at or above the ambient temperature, the sensor must be heated to a temperature of at least
5 to 10°C above the highest anticipated dew point (but not higher than the sensor temperature rating). Some sensors can
be mounted on a liquid heat exchanger, or a temperature-controlled electric hot plate, or installed in a heated enclosure.
GE recommends closed-loop active control of the elevated sensor body temperature.
The sensor base should be coated with zinc-oxide-filled silicone thermal grease and securely anchored to the heat sink
with suitable fasteners. Allow ½ hour for the sensor to reach thermal equilibrium after adjusting the temperature of the
heat sink.
The GE SIM-12H high temperature sensor is designed for high-temperature applications. It measures dew points above
ambient temperature without condensation problems.
2.5.3b
Sample Lines for High Dew Point Measurements
Sampling lines carrying gas to the sensor must be heated and insulated when the dew point of the gas is above the
sample line’s ambient temperature. The simplest way to achieve this is to use heater tape (either thermostatically
controlled, or continuously operating, and sized to provide the required temperature rise). At high temperatures, use
stainless steel tubing with adequate insulation to avoid hot and cold sections in the line and to avoid water absorption/
desorption cycling as the heater is thermostatically controlled. Heated sampling lines (HSL) are available from GE
Measurement & Control.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.5.3c
Filter Requirements
If the gas to be monitored is free from particulates and hydrocarbon liquids or vapor, filtering is not necessary.
However, most sample gas streams contain some particulates, and using a filter reduces the need for frequent mirror
cleaning. On the other hand, filtering tends to slow the system’s response, particularly at low frost points.
The series 912 filters manufactured by Balston Company (or equivalent) are effective for most applications. For
particulates and liquid hydrocarbons, use a Balston type DX filter element.
To filter out very fine particles, the type DX can be followed by a type BX filter. A type CI filter can be used to remove
hydrocarbon vapors.
If the sample gas is heavily and routinely contaminated, we recommend using a quick-change filter element. Avoid
using glass wool, cellulose, and other hygroscopic materials as a filter medium.
2.5.3d
Flow Rate
It is important to have adequate flow through the sensor. Too little flow can slow the response (particularly at very low
frost points). Too much flow can cause instability of the control system at high dew points and can reduce the
depression capability of the thermoelectric cooler at very low dew points. Too much flow also accelerates the rate of
system contamination. A flow rate of 2 to 2.5 ft3/h (a little over 1 liter/min) is ideal for most applications. In many
cases, flow rates between 0.2 and 5 ft3/h (0.1 and 2.5 liter/min) may be used.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
23
Chapter 2. Installation
2.6
Sensor Installation
This section provides installation details for the GE Measurement & Control line of chilled-mirror humidity sensors.
2.6.1 Model 1111H Sensor
The Model 1111H is an open-type sensor (see Figure 19 below). It can be threaded into standard pipe fittings or
mounted in a type 0111D pressure boss, which encloses it and adapts it for ¼-inch compression fittings. When
installing the sensor in the pressure boss, remove the black aluminum sensor cover.
For maximum thermal conductivity, the base of the Model 0111D pressure boss should be coated with heat-conducting
grease. When so installed on a surface suitable for dissipating heat, the sensor will achieve its maximum rated
depression. See the Chilled Mirror Sensor Comparison Chart in Appendix D.
Figure 19: Model 1111H Sensor
2.6.2 Model D-2 Sensor
The Model D-2 is a general purpose, two-stage sensor with 65°C (117°F) of depression capability. It features wetted
parts of stainless steel and glass, for durability in demanding industrial applications. The Model D-2 can be used as a
benchtop sensor, mounted to a heat sink, or mounted to a cooling fan for maximum operating range. Advanced features
include field-replaceable optics and cooler assemblies, and auxiliary visible light optics with a viewing window for
inspecting the mirror during operation (see Figure 20 below).
For maximum thermal conductivity, the base of the Model D-2 sensor should be coated with heat-conducting grease.
When so installed on a surface suitable for dissipating heat, the sensor will achieve its maximum rated depression. See
the Chilled Mirror Sensor Comparison Chart in Appendix D.
Figure 20: Model D-2 Sensor
24
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.6.3 Model 1211H Sensor
The Model 1211H is a two-stage sensor with 65°C (117°F) of depression capability. It features wetted parts of stainless
steel and may be used at higher temperature and pressure than the D2 sensor. The Model 1211H can be used as a
benchtop sensor, mounted to a heat sink. Features include a field-replaceable mirror, optics and cooler assembly. See
the Chilled Mirror Sensor Comparison Chart in Appendix D.
2.6.4 Model 1311DR Sensor
The 1311DR is a stainless steel, liquid cooled, four-stage sensor suitable for measuring dew points between –75°C and
+25°C.
Mount the 1311DR sensor so that the air inlet and exhaust openings are free from obstruction (see Figure 21 below). If
the sensor is liquid cooled, vertical wall mounting is recommended, observing the “UP” arrow on the case. This
ensures that condensation forming on cold portions of the 1311DR will drain from the enclosure.
At room temperatures (25°C) with air cooling, dew points from –65°C to +25°C can be measured. When operating it
without liquid cooling, switch on the built-in fan. For lower frost point measurements, a chilled-water coolant loop can
be used for cooling. Make sure the fan switch is off when using liquid cooling.
Sample flow rates from 0.5 to 5 standard cubic feet per hour
(0.25 to 2.5 liters per minute) should be used.
CAUTION!
If it can be avoided, do not operate the sensor continuously at or near full depression. Doing so
may decrease the life of the thermoelectric heat pump.
Liquid cooling is required for measuring frost points below –65°C (at 25°C ambient), and may be used to create faster
response at higher dew point temperatures. If a recirculating chiller is used, it should have a capacity of at least 300
watts at the coolant temperature. Switch the internal fan ON if air cooling is used; leave it OFF for liquid cooling.
Install the gas sampling lines according to the instructions listed in the section Sampling Lines on page 21.
Figure 21: Model 1311DR Sensor
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
25
Chapter 2. Installation
2.6.5 Model 1311XR Sensor
The 1311XR is a stainless steel, water cooled, five-stage sensor (see Figure 22 below) that can measure frost points as
low as –80°C. The sample gas flow rate should be between 1 and 5 ft3/h. The maximum permissible coolant
temperature is +50°C; the minimum is –10°C. A minimum coolant flow rate of 0.1 gallons per minute must be
maintained for most dew point measurements. If the fourth stage power supply control is set below –65°C, the
minimum coolant flow rate is 0.25 gal/min. The coolant temperature affects the maximum dew/frost point depression.
For frost points of –80°C, coolant temperature should be below 20°C.
Figure 22: Model 1311XR Sensor
2.6.5a
Electrical Connections
All the electrical connectors on the Model 1311XR dew/frost point sensor are unique. The cables supplied with the
sensor can only interconnect the system in one way. Connect the cables as follows:
1. Plug the instrument into a 115/230 VAC power outlet.
2. Connect the 37-pin round black connector on the back of the instrument to the 19-pin military-style connector on
the back of the 1311XR sensor.
3. Connect the 17-pin military style connector on the back of the 1311XR sensor to the 24-pin round connector on the
back of the heat pump controller module.
4. Connect the 9-pin round connector on the back of the heat pump controller module to the 8-pin rectangular
connector on the back of the fourth stage heat pump power supply.
5. Plug the heat pump power supply into a 115/230 VAC outlet.
2.6.5b
Coolant
Connect the two 3/8-inch brass compression fittings on the back of the 1311XR sensor to the coolant lines. Do not run
the instrument without sufficient coolant flow.
Suitable coolants include water, glycol and other noncorrosive liquids. The coolant can be recirculated liquid or tap
water that is cooled or chilled. If a recirculating chiller is used, it should have a capacity of at least 600 watts at the
coolant temperature.
2.6.5c
Sample Gas Fittings
The 1311XR sensor has 1/4-inch stainless steel compression fittings for sample gas inlet and outlet at the back of the
sensor chassis.
26
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 2. Installation
2.6.5d
Heat Pump Controller Settings
The 1311XR’s heat pump controller module has the following settings:
Setting
AUTO
Table 1: Model 1311XR Heat Pump Controller Settings
Function
When set to AUTO, the system operates fully automatically, controlling the heat pump
in response to any dew/frost point within its operating range. In AUTO mode, the
controller senses the current supplied by the Optica to the top two stages of the
thermoelectric coolers. The controller switches on the fourth stage power supply, as
required to maintain the mirror temperature at the dew/frost point.
The AUTO setting is recommended for most applications.
Below –55°C
If the frost point is known to be below –55°C, the switch can be set to this position to
provide slightly faster response than the AUTO setting. However, depression is limited
at this setting. If frost points approaching –80°C are to be measured, use the AUTO
setting.
If the dew/frost point is known to be between –65°C and –10°C, the switch can be set
–65°C to –10°C to this position to reduce overshoot and settling time.
Above –25°C
If the dew/frost point is known to be above –25°C, the switch can be set to this position
to reduce overshoot and settling time.
Note: The third-stage power indicator may blink in any setting. This is normal.
2.6.5e
Fourth-Stage Power Supply Control Knob
The control knob on the 1311XR’s fourth-stage power supply sets the power consumption limit and the coolant
requirement when measuring dew/frost points using the AUTO or BELOW –55°C settings. Set this knob to the lowest
anticipated dew/frost point.
If the control is set lower than necessary, the system dissipates excess power and requires additional cooling to remove
the extra heat generated. If the setting is too high, the system may not be able to reach the true dew/frost point.
To allow the 1311XR sensor to act as a turnkey system (whereby it will cover its entire range automatically), set the
switch to AUTO and the power supply control knob to the –80°C position.
2.6.5f
Heat Pump Controller Error Indicators
The heat pump controller module has two overheat indicators connected to thermal shutdown switches. If either
indicator comes on, check for and correct any problems before continuing operation. Check the cable connections,
coolant flow and coolant temperature.
2.6.5g
Purging the Sensor
CAUTION!
The 1311XR must be purged after each use, either with the sample gas after measuring it, or
with another dry gas source. Otherwise, condensation inside the sensor housing may cause
corrosion and eventual failure of the thermoelectric coolers.
For extremely dry gas measurements, the 1311XR sensor enclosure must be purged with a gas having a frost point
lower than –20°C. For intermediate temperatures, any gas having a frost point at least as low as the sample gas can be
used.The sample gas outflow from the sensor can be used for this purpose, if it is suitable (non-explosive, non-lethal,
etc.). Introduce the purge gas to the enclosure via the purge fitting on the rear of the sensor. The simplest method for
purging is to run the sample gas outflow through the U-tube supplied with the sensor.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
27
Chapter 2. Installation
2.6.6 Model SIM-12H Heated Sensor and Components
The SIM-12H heated sensor module is suitable for measuring dew/frost points between –10°C and +85°C. It contains
precision heating, as well as cooling, capability. Three separate heaters are located in the sensor walls, 120 degrees
apart. Three temperature sensors measure the body temperature at those points, and three control circuits precisely
adjust the temperature of each heater. Any detected temperature gradient across the sensor cavity is immediately
eliminated, resulting in very even control. All three heaters are controlled by the temperature set by the front panel
selector knob. The sensor is a two-stage unit, providing 65°C of depression capability, and 60°C actual measurement
range.
2.6.6a
Type SIM-HFT Heated Filter Module
The SIM-HFT heated filter module allows the sample gas to be purged of particulate contaminants prior to entering the
sensor.
The incoming gas is first passed through a 90-micron prefilter, then a 15-micron final filter. All parts in contact with the
sample are heated to a constant 105°C, eliminating any possibility of condensation. The sintered filters are easily
removed for cleaning or replacing if required.
2.6.6b
Type SIM-HFM Heated Flow Meter
The SIM-HFM heated flow meter module allows the sample gas flow rate to be both measured and controlled at a rate
that is optimum for the sensor. A metering valve mounted on the front panel allows control over a range of 0 to 2 ft3/h.
All parts in contact with the sample gas are heated to a constant 105°C, so that no condensation occurs. The flow meter
is normally mounted downstream from the heated sensor.
2.6.6c
Type SIM-HSL Heated Sampling Line
The SIM-HSL heated sampling line is self-regulated at a temperature high enough to ensure that no condensation
occurs. The line is made of ¼-inch outside diameter PTFE, with stainless steel fittings.
2.6.6d
Type SIM-MPL Mounting Plate
The SIM-MPL mounting plate is designed to accept one, two or three heated modules: the heated sensor, the heated
filter, and the heated flow meter. The mounting plate provides a convenient method of wall-mounting the entire heated
sampling system. When ordered with one or more modules, the factory performs all mounting, plumbing and wiring
work, thus providing a complete system ready for installation.
2.6.7 Connecting the Sensors
Dew point, temperature and pressure sensors provided by GE for the Optica monitor are pre-wired with connectors
installed. Plug these connectors into their corresponding sockets as shown in Figure 9 on page 13 for the benchtop unit,
or Figure 12 on page 15 for the wall-mount unit.
28
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
Chapter 3.
3.1
Operation
Introduction
Operating instructions fall into three categories:
•
Normal Operation - Using the unit’s controls.
•
Setup and Programming - Customizing the unit for specialized applications (not required for many conventional
applications).
Note: The unit is shipped pre-programmed to meet typical requirements. The factory default settings are listed in
Table 3 on page 37. Complete programming instructions are given in Chapters 4, 5, and 6.
•
Maintenance - Manually testing the unit’s cooling capacity, cleaning the mirror, and other operations that might be
required on a regular basis, or when a problem is suspected, depending on the application. Details are given in
Chapter 7, Maintenance.
3.2
Normal Operation
Normal operation of the Optica is very simple. To turn the unit on, check that the main power switch on the rear of the
benchtop unit is set to ON (—), then press the right-hand side of the power switch (located at the lower left corner on
the front of the unit).
The Optica begins its power-up sequence, which lasts about a minute. The unit’s software version is displayed on the
initial screen. The status line displays Initializing. Next, the Optica performs a PACER balance. The PACER balance
typically requires five to fifteen minutes, depending on the sensor chosen and the humidity of the sample gas during the
balance cycle. The status line displays Balance Acquiring.
Once the balance cycle is completed and the unit reaches steady state, Control is displayed in the status bar at the
bottom of the screen.
The sensor can be controlled using the softkeys to the right of the display, shown on the screen in Figure 23 on
page 30. The operator can manually heat or cool the sensor, or initiate a PACER balance cycle.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
29
Chapter 3. Operation
3.3
Operating the VGA Optica
The parameters chosen during programming are displayed numerically in the top half of the screen, and graphically at
the bottom (see Figure 23 below). To program the unit, see Chapter 4.
A balance indicator is shown as a vertical bar on the right side of the screen. It shows the state of the feedback control
loop controlling the mirror temperature. When the system reaches steady-state (the Control status indicator is
displayed), the balance indicator should be near the center of its range. If the balance indicator is near the top or bottom
of its range, the dew point sensor may need to have its optics signal level adjusted (see Minor Maintenance of Sensor
Optics on page 77).
Figure 23: Typical VGA Display Screen
3.4
Operating the 4x40 Optica
The parameters chosen during programming are displayed numerically on the top three lines of the display. For
programming, see Chapter 5. A typical 4x40 display screen is shown below. The system status is shown in the lower
left, and the balance indicator is shown in the lower right.
Control
Tdew ° C 8.47996
%RH 10.3
Tmp ° C 25.355
Heat
Cool
Pacer
Figure 24: Typical 4x40 Display Screen
30
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
3.5
Network Operation
The VGA Optica can be operated and programmed remotely over a network. Networked operation is very similar to
operation using the front panel. For programming from a network, see Chapter 6. A typical network screen is shown in
Figure 25 below.
Figure 25: Typical Network Screen
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
31
Chapter 3. Operation
3.6
Process Pressure
The Optica provides several ways of measuring or specifying sample gas pressure (needed for pressurized humidity
measurements). You can:
•
actively measure the pressure at the dew point sensor, or
•
manually enter the pressure, if it is known and stable, or
•
“sample-off” a high-pressure gas sample for measurement at a lower pressure (usually atmospheric) and let the
Optica calculate dew point at the process pressure.
For example: a sensor with a maximum pressure rating of 300 psi cannot be subjected to a process pressure of 500
psi. A sampling system can be arranged to allow the measurement to be made at atmospheric pressure. The Optica
can then calculate and display the dew point at the process pressure (see Scenario 2 on page 34).
3.6.1 Actively Measuring Process Pressure
Use when the process pressure is within the specifications of the dew point sensor and can be measured directly. In the
Pressure Input menu, set the Pressure Input to V or I as appropriate for the pressure sensor. Set the Process Pressure
Status to Disabled.
Note: The pressure measured by the pressure sensor will be used to compute the vapor pressure.
3.6.2 Manually Entering Pressure
Use when the process pressure is a known and fixed value, and will not be actively measured. In the Pressure Input
menu, set the Pressure Input to Use Default. Enter the pressure into the Default field. Set the Process Pressure Status to
Disabled.
Note: The default pressure entered will be used to compute the vapor pressure.
3.6.3 Measuring at a Different Pressure
Use when: the humidity must be measured at a pressure that is lower or higher than the process pressure, but the
reported value must represent the humidity at the process pressure. Scenario 2 below gives examples of programming
the Optica for this case.
Note: The process pressure is entered manually and the humidity sensor pressure may be measured or manually
entered.
Examples of the use of the Process Pressure menu are shown
32
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
3.6.4 Scenario 1: Measurement Without Enabling the Process Pressure Feature
Process pressure is 100 psi, within the range of a typical GE chilled mirror sensor. Since vapor pressure and dew point
are pressure-dependent, a flow meter is installed downstream of the sensor to assure that the sensor cavity is at the
process pressure (see Figure 26 below).
Figure 26: Measurement Scenario 1
3.6.4a
Measuring Vapor Pressure Without a Pressure Sensor
To measure vapor pressure without a pressure sensor, make the following entries in the Pressure Input menu section for
this example:
•
Input: Use Default
•
Units: psia
•
Default: 100
•
Process Status: Disabled
3.6.4b
Measuring Vapor Pressure With a Pressure Sensor
To measure vapor pressure with a 4-20 mA, 0-30 psia pressure sensor, connect the sensor to the Optica’s terminal block
and make the following entries in the Pressure Input menu:
•
Input: In 4-20
•
Units: psia
•
Upper: 30.00
•
Lower: 0.00
•
Process Status: Disabled
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
33
Chapter 3. Operation
3.6.5 Measuring Dew Point
In this scenario, dew point can be measured without knowledge of gas pressure. Connect the equipment as shown
above, with or without a pressure sensor, and follow the normal operating procedures.
3.6.6 Scenario 2: Measurement Requiring the Process Pressure Feature
Process pressure is 500 psi, above the measurement range of a typical GE chilled mirror sensor. A flow meter is
installed upstream of the sensor cavity to expand the gas to be within the measurable range of the dew point sensor.
Since we wish to measure the dew point of the process gas and dew point is pressure dependent, an accurate dew point
measurement at the process pressure requires accommodating for the expansion to the sensor cavity pressure by using
the Optica’s Process Pressure feature (see Figure 27 below).
Figure 27: Measurement Scenario 2
3.6.6a
Measuring Vapor Pressure Without a Pressure Sensor
To measure vapor pressure without a pressure sensor, make the following entries in the Pressure input menu section for
this example:
•
Input: Use default
•
Units: psia
•
Default: 14.7 (the pressure at the dew point sensor)
In addition, to accommodate the pressure expansion, the following entries are required in the Process section:
34
•
Status: enabled
•
Pressure: 500 (specify the process pressure with the same units as the default pressure specified above)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
3.6.6b
Measuring Vapor Pressure With a Pressure Sensor
To measure vapor pressure with a 4-20 mA, 0-30 psia pressure sensor, connect the equipment as shown above and
make the following entries in the Pressure Input menu section.
•
Input: In 4-20
•
Units: psia
•
Upper: 30.00
•
Lower: 0.00
In addition, to accommodate the pressure expansion, the following entries are required in the Process section:
•
Status: enabled
•
Pressure: 500 (specify the process pressure with the same units as the default pressure specified above)
3.6.6c
Measuring Dew Point With or Without a Pressure Sensor
In Scenario 2, the dew point measurement requires both the sensor pressure and the process pressure to be known.
Sensor pressure can be entered as a default value, or measured, as above, and the process pressure must be entered in
the Process Pressure field.
Example (using standard atmospheric conditions at 25°C)
P1 = 500 psia
P2 = 14.7 psia
As measured by the GEI chilled mirror dew point sensor:
Tdew2 = –40°C @ P2
e2 = 0.1283 mbar
Per Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure:
e1 = (P2/P1) × e2 = (500/14.7) × 0.1283 = 4.36 mbar
Using standard vapor pressure equations, the actual pressurized dew point is calculated by the Optica to be:
Tdew1 = –4.022°C
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
35
Chapter 3. Operation
3.7
Status Line Indications
The status line at the bottom of the display shows whether the unit is ready for normal operation, or is still in its start-up
phase, or needs service. The following is a complete list of status indications:
Indication
36
Table 2: Status Indications
Meaning
Initializing
The unit is initializing.
Balance
The unit is performing a PACER balance to clear
the mirror.
Acquiring
The unit is acquiring stable mirror temperature.
Service
The sensor optics require service, cleaning or
adjustment.
Control
The unit is actively controlling the mirror
temperature at a stable dew point.
Alarm 1
Alarm 1 has activated.
Alarm 2
Alarm 2 has activated.
Lockout
Heat, Cool, and PACER front panel controls are
disabled.
Heat
Sensor Heating is active.
Cool
Sensor Cooling is active.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
3.7.1 Factory Default Settings
As shipped from the factory, the Optica is normally programmed with the configuration shown in Table 3 below.
Function
Analog Output A
Analog Output B
Pressure Input 1
Alarm 1
Alarm 2
Auto Balance
Data Field 1
Data Field 2
Data Field 3
Data Field 4
Data Field 5
Data Field 6
Table 3: Factory Default Values
Setting
Humidity, Units: Tdew °C, Range: –40°C to +60°C
Temperature, Units: Tmp °C, Range: 0 to 100°C
Units: psia, Range: 0–30, Default pressure: 14.70,
Process pressure: disabled, 14.70
Disabled, Humidity, Units: Tdew °C, Set Point: 100.00
Disabled, Temperature, Units: Tmp °C, Set Point: 100.00
Interval: 720 minutes, Automatic, Disabled, Hold
Humidity, Units: Tdew °C, Range: –40.000 to +60.000°C, Color: green, 1 decimal
Humidity, Units: %RH, Range: 0 to 100, Color: blue, 1 decimal
Temperature, Units: Tmp °C, Range: 0 to 100, Color: red, 1 decimal
Pressure, Units: psia, Range: 0 to 100, Color: yellow, 1 decimal
Humidity, Units: ppmv, Range: 0 to 1,000,000, Color: brown, 1 decimal
Humidity, Units: ppmw, Range: 0 to 100, Color: violet, 1 decimal
Buzzer
15 msec
General
Data Fields: 3, Lockout: disabled, Offsets and filters: 0
Special
Molecular Weight of Gas: 28.9645
User Equation
None entered
Communication Mode: All, Baud rate: 9600, Parity: none, Data bits: 8, Stop bits: 1,
Parameters
Flow control: none
Serial Outputs
Humidity: Units: Tdew °C, Format: DP=##.#, Separator: CR-LF, Terminator: CR-LF,
Interval: 1 second, Time Stamp: Enabled, Show Status: Enabled
Temperature: Units: Tmp °C, Format: DP=##.#, Separator: CR-LF, Terminator: CR-LF,
Interval: 1 second, Time Stamp: Enabled, Show Status: Enabled
Pressure: Units: psia, Format: DP=##.#, Separator: CR-LF, Terminator: CR-LF,
Interval: 1 second, Time Stamp: Enabled, Show Status: Enabled
Selected
Outputs
Humidity, Units: Tdew °C
Humidity, Units: % RH
Temperature, Units: Tmp °C
Data Log
Status: Disabled, Interval: 1 second, Separator: comma, Terminator: CR-LF,
Parameters: humidity, Units: Tdew °C
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
37
Chapter 3. Operation
3.8
Sensor Balancing
During normal operation, the sensor mirror surface may become partially obscured with salts or other contaminants
from the sample gas. The balance indicator displayed on the screen shows whether the system is operating near the
center of its normal range, or has been forced away from the center by mirror contamination. In general, it is
recommended to start with an AUTO balance cycle provided relatively clean gases are being used. If the Service status
indicator is displayed after an AUTO cycle, the mirror is likely still dirty and may require use of a PACER cycle
(described in detail on page 7). In most applications, it is desirable to perform a balance operation periodically to
maintain optimum performance. The interval and type of balance are configurable as described in the Optica
programming chapters.
If the Service indicator is displayed after a balance operation, the sensor may need to be adjusted (see Minor
Maintenance of Sensor Optics on page 77).
3.9
Helpful Hints For Operating the Unit
Time response: At dew points above 0°C, the system stabilizes within a few minutes at a consistent dew layer. The
status Control is displayed when the system is stable and readings are valid.
When the system is operating at low frost points (below –40°C), extra care may be required when interpreting readings
because of the longer response times of the system. Time response depends on a number of factors including dew/frost
point, slew rate, upstream filtering, and flow rate.
•
As the dew/frost point becomes lower, water molecules in the air sample become scarcer, and it takes longer to
condense a frost layer on the mirror thick enough to establish an equilibrium condition.
•
Mirror temperature slew rate depends on dew point and depression (the temperature difference between the mirror
and the sensor body); at higher dew points and moderate depressions, it is typically 1.5°C/second. At lower dew
points and/or larger depressions, the slew rate is slower.
•
Flow rate affects response by determining the rate at which water vapor is supplied or carried off.
There is, of course, a trade-off between response time, control system stability, and sensitivity to contamination.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 3. Operation
3.9.1 Supercooled Dew Points
Slightly below the freezing point, water can exist in a supercooled liquid state for extended periods of time. Extra care
may be needed when making measurements in the frost point region of 0 to –20°C, because the mirror temperature may
temporarily stabilize at the supercooled dew point, 0.5 to 1°C below the actual frost point.
To assure that the unit is operating in the ice phase within this temperature range, allow the instrument to operate
continuously. Before manually clearing a frost layer, take a reading, and afterwards allow sufficient time to reform a
stable frost layer before taking further readings.
3.9.2 Contamination
3.9.2a
Mirror Cleanliness
Proper operation of a condensation hygrometer depends on the condition of the mirror surface. In general, accuracy is
reduced when contaminants accumulate on the mirror.
However, the mirror does not have to be microscopically clean. In fact, the mirror performs best a few hours after
cleaning, when nucleation sites have formed. On an unscratched, freshly cleaned mirror, there are relatively few
nucleation sites on which dew or frost deposits can form, and more time is required to collect a condensation layer at
low frost points. Also, overshoot may occur, which can cause oscillations as the temperature stabilizes.
3.9.2b
Particulate Contaminants
Particulate matter that is insoluble in water may accumulate on the mirror surface, but does not affect the instrument
accuracy until the mirror reflectance is reduced substantially. In many cases, particulates improve instrument response
by providing condensation sites.
3.9.2c
Water-Soluble Contaminants
Contaminants which readily dissolve in water, such as naturally occurring salts, are detrimental to accurate vapor
concentration measurement by any condensation method. These materials readily go into solution with the water
condensate on the mirror surface, and then reduce the vapor pressure in accordance with Raoult’s Law. As the
concentration increases with time, the saturation vapor pressure of the liquid solution decreases.
The unit responds to this lower vapor pressure by elevating the mirror temperature in order to maintain a vapor pressure
that is in equilibrium with the partial pressure of atmospheric water vapor. The displayed dew point, therefore, drifts
upward above the true dew point. Because the measurement error increases gradually, it often goes undetected.
To determine whether dissolved contaminants are affecting dew point measurement, perform the following steps:
1. Note the indicated dew point.
2. Clean the mirror.
3. Balance the detector by initiating a PACER cycle.
4. Measure the dew point again.
If the new reading is lower than the first reading, it is likely that soluble material was present in sufficient quantity to
cause a measurement error.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
39
Chapter 3. Operation
3.9.2d
Gaseous Contaminants
When a gaseous material that has a higher condensation temperature than that of water is present (even in very low
concentrations), the unit will eventually control on that material, rather than on water. The system then displays the
condensation temperature of the contaminant, not of water. Such material accumulates on the mirror only when chilled.
In the normal atmosphere, gaseous contaminants do not have a detectable effect.
3.9.2e
Minimizing the Effects of Contaminants
The following steps are suggested for maintaining optimum performance:
•
Use the PACER feature to reduce the effect of contaminants on the unit’s performance (see The PACER Cycle on
page 7).
•
Reduce the gas flow rate to reduce the rate of accumulation of contaminants on the mirror.
•
Clean the mirror according to the recommended optics cleaning procedure (see Minor Maintenance of Sensor
Optics on page 77). To determine the proper cleaning interval for a given set of conditions, take a dew point
reading before and after the cleaning. Any appreciable shift indicates that under these conditions, the mirror should
be cleaned more often.
3.9.3 Mirror Flooding
If there is an abrupt transition from dry to moist conditions (particularly when accompanied by a transition from cold to
warm temperatures), the mirror may accumulate an overload of moisture. It then may take several minutes before the
sensor dries out and valid readings can be obtained. The drying process can be accelerated by heating the sensor.
3.9.4 Sample Line Maintenance
Contaminated sample lines slow the unit’s response time and can cause erroneous readings, usually on the high side.
Clean the sample lines as often as necessary. To determine the required cleaning frequency, take dew point readings
before and after cleaning the lines, sensor cavity, and mirror. If the two readings differ appreciably, the sampling lines
should be cleaned more often. To reduce the rate of contamination, reduce flow and/or install a filter upstream.
3.9.5 Pressure Effects
If the pressure of the gas is increased or reduced from atmospheric pressure, but the mixing ratio (moisture content)
stays constant, the dew point is correspondingly increased or decreased. The Optica displays the dew/frost point at the
pressure to which the sensor chamber is exposed. The sensor location and hookup arrangement can influence the
pressure.
When the pressure at the sensor is different from the process pressure, the Optica can perform a conversion from the
measured pressure to the desired process pressure (see Process Pressure on page 32 for details).
Alternatively, the dew point change due to pressure change can be calculated by using Dalton’s Law and the
Smithsonian Tables or a proper nomograph. Appendix C contains basic data for these calculations.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
Chapter 4.
4.1
Programming the VGA Optica
Introduction
The Optica is programmed at the factory to display and output the data required for many applications (see Table 3 on
page 37). In these cases, no further programming is required.
By programming the Optica, the following categories of data can be customized for your application:
•
the front panel display (up to six parameters displayed numerically and, on the VGA screen, a graphical display)
•
pressure input
•
analog outputs
•
serial output
•
built-in alarms
•
datalogging
•
miscellaneous functions
A built-in help system is included to answer questions you may have while operating the unit. Select the HELP button
and press ENTER to access it.
4.2
Programming Fundamentals
Programming is accomplished using two main menu screens and several secondary screens. Each screen displays data
fields and control buttons. Use the TAB key to step through the fields on each screen—through both the data fields and
the control buttons.
•
When a data field is selected, you can change the value of the field as described on page 42.
•
When a control button is selected, pressing ENTER performs the button’s function.
•
The MORE control button accesses the next programming menu.
•
The OK control button returns to the previous level.
•
The HELP button accesses the unit’s built-in help system.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
41
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.2.1 The Keys
The following keys on the Optica’s front panel are used for programming:
•
ENTER Performs the function shown on a selected control button.
•
TAB Moves cursor to the next field or control button to select it.
•
SHIFT An alternate action key—each press toggles SHIFT-KEY mode on or off. When SHIFT-KEY mode is on, a
green annunciator is displayed in the lower left corner of the screen. SHIFT-KEY mode does the following:
•
accesses the alphabetic characters below the keys on the alphanumeric keyboard.
•
causes the TAB key to move the cursor backwards through the fields.
•
Ten alphanumeric keys For entering numbers, letters and math functions.
•
BSP (Backspace) During direct data entry, deletes the character to the left of the cursor.
•
Four softkeys:
•
during normal operation, control the sensor heating and cooling, and balance function.
•
during programming, move the cursor on the screen and select specific characters for each key on the
alphanumeric keyboard.
4.2.2 Data Entry Fields
There are two types of data entry fields:
•
direct entry
•
drop-down boxes
4.2.2a
Direct-Entry Fields
Direct-entry fields allow new values to be entered directly from the alphanumeric keyboard. Use the left and right
softkeys to move the flashing cursor on the screen to the desired character.
•
To enter numeric data, just press the appropriate key.
•
To enter alphanumeric data, first press SHIFT to access the letters on the keypad, and then press the appropriate
key containing the desired letter. Finally, press the UP or DOWN arrow softkeys to step through the letters available
for that key, both upper and lower case.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.2.2a Direct-Entry Fields (cont.)
Note: It is NOT necessary to press ENTER after setting each value into its field.
Figure 28 below shows a typical direct-entry field, with the GrphMin (Graph Minimum) field selected and ready for
numeric input from the keypad.
Figure 28: Typical Direct-Entry Field
4.2.2b
Drop-Down Boxes
Most programming is done using drop-down boxes that allow the user to select from a list of possible choices for the
field.
First, select the field with the TAB key. A drop-down list showing the available options opens immediately below the
selected field. Be careful not to confuse this drop-down list with other fields below the selected one—they look similar.
Use the UP and DOWN arrow softkeys to select the desired value for the field. When finished, press TAB to move to
the next field.
Figure 29 below shows a drop-down entry box, with the GrphColor (Graph Color) field selected and ready for
choosing the desired color using the UP and DOWN arrow softkeys.
Figure 29: Typical Drop-Down Box
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
43
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.3
Units of Measure
Table 4 below shows the units of measure available for each parameter:
Parameter
Humidity
Tdew °C, Tdew °F, %RH, Twet °C, Twet °F, ppmv, ppmw,
Grains/lb, Grains/SCF, g/kg, g/m3, lb/mft3,
kj/kg(0), kj/kg(32), BTU/lb(0), BTU/lb(32), pw (mbar)
Temperature
Tmp °C, Tmp °F, Tmp °K, Tmp °R
Pressure
4.4
Table 4: Available Units of Measure
Available Units
psia, mbar, bar, Pa, kPa, mmHg, inHg, kg/Cm2,
Dyne/Cm2
User Equations
In some applications an output may be needed that is not a simple function of a single parameter, but a combination of
two or three. One or more user equations can be defined within the Optica to calculate new parameters that meet the
application’s requirements. The equation can be formed from following elements:
•
the identifiers for the measured or derived parameter units (listed in Table 5 on page 45).
•
the math operators +, –, ×, /, (,) and ^ (accessed through the math key in SHIFT mode)
•
the math functions LOG and LN
•
constants
•
other user equations
The new parameter defined by this equation is given a name and can be displayed or output just like any other
parameter.
User Equations are entered from Menu 2 (see page 55). A list of parameters and other elements is displayed. Each
element is specified by an identifier such as “A1.” Use these identifiers to form the equation. In addition, another user
equation can be used as an equation element by entering its identifier.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.4
User Equations (cont.)
Table 5: User Equation Parameters
Identifier
Units
Humidity Units:
A0
Tdew °C
Identifier
Units
Temperature Units:
A17
Tmp °C
A1
Tdew °F
A18
Tmp °F
A2
%RH
A19
Tmp °K
A3
Twet °C
A20
Tmp °R
A4
Twet °F
A5
ppmv
A21
PSIA
A6
ppmw
A22
mbar
A7
grains/lb
A23
bar
A8
grains/scf
A24
Pa
A9
g/kg
A25
kPa
A10
g/m3
A26
mmHg
A11
lb/mft3
A27
inHg
A12
kj/kg(0)
A28
kg/cm2
A13
kj/kg(32)
A29
Dynes/cm2
A14
BTU/lb(0)
A31
User Equation 1
A15
BTU/lb(32)
A32
User Equation 2
A16
pw(mbar)
A33
User Equation 3
Pressure Units:
The equation 2 × Tdew °F + (%RH / Twet°C) would be entered as 2 × A1 + (A2 / A3)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
45
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5
Menu 1
The first menu is shown in Figure 30 below. This menu is accessed by selecting the Menu control button on the main
screen and pressing ENTER.
Figure 30: Menu 1
Menu 1 allows programming of the following items:
4.5.1 Analog Outputs
For more information on using the analog outputs, see Analog Outputs on page 17.
Item
Output
Parameter
Units
46
Table 6: Analog Output Options
Function
Available Options
Choose which output channel is being programmed
A and/or B
Choose which parameter will be output on the
selected channel
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure
or User Equation
Choose the units for this parameter
(See Table 4 on page 44
for the parameter chosen)
Upper Limit
Set the parameter value that will produce full-scale
output
Lower Limit
Set the parameter value that will produce zero output (Enter a number)
(Enter a number)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.2 Pressure Input
For more information on using these items, see Process Pressure on page 32.
Item
Table 7: Pressure Input Options
Function
Available Options
Input
Choose which pressure input channel is in use, or
disable this input.
V in (0-5), I in (4-20), or Use
Default
Units
Choose the units for the pressure input.
(See Table 4 on page 44 for
parameter chosen.)
Upper Limit
Set the pressure that corresponds to full-scale input.
(Enter a number.)
Lower Limit
Set the pressure that corresponds to zero volts or
4 mA input.
(Enter a number.)
Default
Pressure value to be used if the measured input is
disabled.
(Enter a number.)
Process
Enter a process pressure when it is different from the
pressure at the dew point sensor (see page 32).
Status
Set whether the process pressure is active (enabled).
Enable/Disable
Pressure
Enter the process pressure, if this feature is enabled.
(Enter a number.)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
47
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.3 Alarms
For more information on using the alarms, see Alarm Outputs on page 18.
Item
Table 8: Alarm Options
Function
Alarm
Choose which alarm relay is being programmed.
1 and/or 2
Status
Set whether or not the alarm is enabled.
Enabled or Disabled
Set the parameter that can activate this alarm.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure
or User Equation
Parameter*
Units*
Type
Set the units for this parameter.
Set the type of condition that will activate the alarm
Upper*
The upper side of the alarm band
Lower*
The lower side of the alarm band
Available Options
(See Table 4 on page 44
for parameter chosen.)
SetPoint, Inner Band, Outer Band,
Control, Service, PACER
Enter a number.
Enter a number.
*These fields are ignored if the alarm is set to Control, Service, or PACER.
The Upper and Lower limits set the alarm thresholds as described below for each alarm type (see details on page 18):
•
SetPoint: alarm activates when parameter exceeds upper limit, and deactivates when parameter is less than lower
limit.
•
Inner Band: alarm activates when parameter is between upper and lower limits.
•
Outer band: alarm activates when parameter is outside upper and lower limits.
•
Control: alarm activates when Optica is actively controlling mirror temperature.
•
Service: alarm activates when Service indicator is activated.
•
PACER: alarm activates when PACER balance is active.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.4 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function
Note: For Optica Analyzers with earlier versions of software, see Appendix F.
Optica Analyzers with version 1.4.1a software have been upgraded to include the ability to program the PACER selfcleaning and rebalancing cycle to run once per day at a preset time. This is referred to as a Clock Time Interval. When
the unit is programmed in this manner, the front panel PACER softkey is disabled. The Elapsed Time Interval initiates
the PACER at a preset time after the last PACER was run. The automatic balance cycle will always run upon power up
of the analyzers.
To program the Automatic Cleaning & Balance Function on the Optica VGA monitor:
1. Make sure the internal clock of the Optica has the correct time.
a. From the main screen enter Menu, then More, then Set Time and Date.
b. Highlight the Date and Time fields and use the Keypad and Softkeys to set the correct time.
2. Set the Time Programmed Balance Cycle.
a. Enter Menu and go to the Automatic Balance Section.
b. Open the Type pull down menu and choose one of the four selections (see Table 9 below).
Table 9: Automatic Cleaning and Balance Functions
Item
Function
Type
AUTO
Heats the mirror and balances the optics.
Elapsed Time Interval
PACER
First cools the mirror to develop a thick dew/frost layer,
then heats and balances the optics.
Elapsed Time Interval
AUTO-D
Heats the mirror and balances the optics.
Clock Time Interval
PACER-D
First cools the mirror to develop a thick dew/frost layer,
then heats and balances the optics.
Clock Time Interval
Note: The PACER function will provide more thorough cleaning than the AUTO function because it first develops a
thick dew/frost layer into which soluble contaminants dissolve. When heated, some of the contaminants are
flash-evaporated and the remaining residue accumulates in clusters, resulting in an approximately 85%
cleaner surface. The PACER cycle generally takes longer to complete.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.4 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function (cont.)
3. Manually clean the mirror as required.
Note: Manual cleaning provides the most thorough cleaning.
4. After manual cleaning, initiate the Automatic Cleaning & Balancing.
5. To program a specific time of day at which to initiate the Automatic Cleaning and Balancing:
a. Highlight either Auto-D or Pacer-D.
b. In the Enter Time dialog box, input the time of day that you would like to initiate the balance cycle in a 24hour format (for example, 13:30 would be 1:30 PM).
Note: In this mode the front panel PACER initiation function is disabled. Powering down and restarting the unit will
have no effect on the time programmed; however, the PACER will run on startup as is the normal function.
6. To program an elapsed time to initialize the Automatic Cleaning and Balancing:
a. Highlight either Auto or Pacer.
b. In Interval dialog box, input the elapsed time in minutes (for example, 720 would enable the balance cycle to
run every 12 hours).
Note: If the unit is powered down and restarted, or the Automatic Balance is initiated from the font or by using a
LAN, the elapsed time will reset.
Note: Show Status should read “Enabled”.
7. Select either Track or Hold for the analog outputs (4-20 mA/0-5 VDC).
Note: If Track is selected, the actual temperature of the mirror will be transmitted. If Hold is selected, the last
prevailing dew point, measured before the balance cycle was initiated, will be transmitted during the time that
the balance cycle is running.
IMPORTANT: For environments or a gas sample where the mirror accumulates contamination rapidly, the use of an
inline filter is recommended. Lower flow rates will also reduce the accumulation of contaminants.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.5 Data Fields
Item
Field
Parameter
Table 10: Data Field Options
Function
Graph line number and numeric display number to be
programmed
Available Options
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6
For the field selected above, choose which parameter Humidity, Temperature, Pressure
will be output.
or User Equation
Units
Choose the units for this parameter
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
GrphMax
Set the parameter value that will produce full-scale on
the graph.
(enter a number)
GrphMin
Set the parameter value that will produce zero on the
graph.
(Enter a number.)
GrphColor
Set the color for the selected graph line.
Black, Red, Green, Orange, Blue,
Violet, Yellow or Brown
Decimals
The number of decimal places for the numeric display
Enter a number (6 maximum).
4.5.6 Buzzer/Sound
Item
Table 11: Buzzer/Sound Option
Function
Available Options
Buzzer/Sound Sets the length (apparent loudness) of keyclick sounds. Enter length of keyclick sound in
msec (150 msec maximum).
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
51
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.7 Network Menu
Networking settings including IP Address, Subnet Mask and Default Gateway. Generally, you will obtain these settings
from your network administrator. This menu is accessed by selecting the Network control button on Menu 1 and
pressing ENTER.
Figure 31: Network Menu
Table 12: Network Settings Options
Function
Item
Host Name
Domain
Available Options
Enter the host name for the Optica unit of the LAN.
Enter the Domain name for the local network.
IP Address
Type*
Use the left and right arrow keys to select between
DHCP and Static IP.
Get the IP from the Server,
or Specify an IP Address.
IP Address*
If you choose to specify an IP address, you must enter
it here.
Enter four decimal integers
between 0 and 255.
Subnet Mask*
If you choose to specify an IP address, you must enter
a Subnet Mask.
Enter four decimal integers
between 0 and 255.
Default
Gateway*
If you choose to specify an IP address, you must enter
a Default gateway.
Enter four decimal integers
between 0 and 255.
OK button
Save changes and return to the previous screen.
Enter a number (6 maximum).
Help button
Display help for the network screen.
*You may need to contact your local network administrator for this information.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.8 Datalog
Enter parameters for automatically logging data within the Optica. This menu is accessed by selecting the Data Log
control button on Menu 1 and pressing ENTER.
Figure 32: Datalog Menu
The large window below the center of the screen shows a list of parameters chosen for logging.
Table 13: Datalog Options
Item
Function
Available Options
Status*
Enable or disable datalog.
Interval*
Enter the logging interval in seconds.
Enabled/Disabled
Enter a number.
Decimals
Enter the number of decimal places for logged data.
Enter a number (6 maximum).
Separator*
Choose separator to be used between parameters.
Space, Comma, Tab
Terminator*
Choose the terminator(s) for each group of data.
CR, CR-LF, LF
Parameters
Set the parameter to be programmed (below).
Humidity, Temperature,
Pressure, or User Equation
Units
Set the units for the selected parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44.
REMOVE
Control button to remove selected item from the list.
Select button and press ENTER.
ADD
Control button to add the selected unit to the list.
Select button and press ENTER.
RESET
Delete datalog files.
Select button and press ENTER.
DOWNLOAD
Control button to display the logged data on the
Download screen (see below).
Select button and press ENTER.
*Indicated items apply to the entire datalog file.
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Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.5.8 Datalog (cont.)
Use the UP and DOWN arrow keys to select items in the center window.
Logged data are stored in a file, named with the file’s creation time and date. If logging is in progress at midnight, a
new file is automatically started at that time. To view or output the logged data, select the Download control button
and press ENTER. The Optica will display the Download screen, described below.
4.5.8a
Download Screen
The Download Screen is accessed by pressing Download on the Datalog screen. It contains the following elements:
•
a list of any saved files containing logged data (upper left)
•
an area for displaying logged data (center)
•
View button — displays the contents of the selected file name
•
OK button — return to the previous screen
•
Download button — send the selected file to the serial port
•
HELP button — display help system
•
Up arrow button — scroll the displayed data upwards
•
Down arrow button — scroll the displayed data downwards
Figure 33: Download Screen
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.6
Menu 2
Menu 2 is shown in Figure 34 below. This menu is accessed by selecting More on Menu 1, and pressing ENTER.
Figure 34: Menu 2
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
55
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.6.1 General
Table 14: General Options
Function
Item
Available Options
Number of Data
Set the number of parameters to be displayed.
Fields
Lockout
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Set whether or not Heat, Cool, and PACER functions
can be activated by the softkeys on the front panel.
Disabled/Enabled
Dew Point
Offset
Enter offset value for Dew Point parameter in °C.
Enter value by which the Dew Point
parameter will be offset.
Dew Point
Filter
Enter filter value for Dew Point parameter.
Enter number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Dew Point.
Temperature
Offset
Enter offset value for Temperature parameter in °C.
Enter the value by which the
Temperature parameter will be offset.
Temperature
Filter
Enter filter value for Temperature parameter.
Enter number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Temperature.
Pressure
Offset
Enter offset value for Pressure parameter in psia.
Enter value by which Pressure
parameter will be offset.
Pressure
Filter
Enter filter value for Pressure parameter.
Enter number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Pressure.
4.6.2 Special
Item
Mol. Wt. Gas:
Table 15: Special Option
Function
The molecular weight of the gas being analyzed
(Default value is molecular weight of dry air: 28.9645)
Available Options
Enter a number.
4.6.3 User Equation
Item
Selection
56
Table 16: User Equation Options
Function
Select which equation to enter or edit.
Available Options
1, 2, 3
Label:
Enter the test label for the selected equation.
Enter an alphanumeric name.
Equation
Enter the user equation (see User Equations on
page 44).
Using the keypad, enter the
alphanumeric codes for the
equation elements, shown in
Table 5 on page 45.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.6.4 Communication Parameters
Table 17: Communication Parameter Options
Function
Available Options
Item
4.6.4a
All (Data is sent continuously.);
Query (Data is sent when
requested by receiving device.)
Query mode is described below.
Mode
Set the method for sending data.
Baud
Set the baud rate as required by the receiving device.
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200, 38400, 57600
Parity
Set the parity as required by the receiving device.
None, Odd or Even
Data Bits
Set the number of data bits as required by the
receiving device.
7 or 8
Stop Bits
Set the number of stop bits as required by the
receiving device
1, 1.5 or 2
Flow Control
Set the Flow Control mode as required by the
receiving device.
None, X-OFF, RTS/CTS
Query Mode Format:
Command:
Returns . . .
$HELP < >
Help string
Note: The symbol < > indicates a carriage return.
$GETDATA 0 <item> <item> <item>... <item>
Requested data items
$GETSTATUS 0 < >
Status string
Query mode examples:
$GETDATA 0 0 1 < >
returns the Dew Point °C, Dew Point °F
Note: The 0 and 1 above, following the “GETDATA 0” command, reference the numeric suffix of
the parameter identifier from Table 5 on page 45. For example A0 has units Tdew °C, so the 0
requests Tdew °C.
$GETSTATUS < >
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Returns a string of 1s and 0s corresponding to PACER,
Service, Control, Heat, Cool, Alarm 1, Alarm 2
57
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.6.5 Serial Output Data
Item
Selected
Outputs
The units of currently selected parameters are shown,
along with the number of decimals for each unit.
Available Options
Units of selected output are
displayed. Select one with the
UP/DOWN keys to change it or
delete it using REMOVE.
Time Stamp*
Output date and time with each data string.
Enabled/Disabled
Show Status*
Output dew point sensor status with each data string
(Heat, Cool, Balance, PACER, Service, Alarm 1,
Alarm 2).
Enabled/Disabled
Parameter
Select a parameter to configure.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure
or User Equation
Units
Set the units for the selected parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for
available units.
Format*
Choose output format for the selected parameter.
Dp=##.#, ###.#(Dp), No Label
Separator*
Choose separator to be used between parameters.
Space, Comma, TAB, CR, CR-LF
Terminator*
Choose the terminator(s) for each group of data.
Comma, CR, CR-LF
Interval (sec)*
Enter the output interval in seconds.
Enter a number.
Decimals
Enter the number of decimal places for the selected
parameter.
Enter a number (6 maximum).
ADD button
REMOVE
button
58
Table 18: Serial Output Data Options
Function
Control button to add the configured parameter to the
output list, using the units and number of
Select button and press ENTER.
decimals designated.
Control button to remove from the output list the
parameter selected at the top of the serial output
menu.
Select button and press ENTER
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.6.6 Set Time & Date
The Time and Date menu is accessed by selecting Set Time and Date on Menu 2, and pressing ENTER.
To set the Optica’s internal clock, press TAB to select each field of the date and time, and press the up and down
softkeys to set each field. When the settings are correct, tab to the OK button and press ENTER.
Figure 35: Time and Date
4.6.7 Restore Defaults
To access this choice, select the Restore Defaults button on Menu 2, and press ENTER.
This screen resets all programmable items to the factory defaults shown in Table 3 on page 37. Press TAB to select Yes,
and press the ENTER key.
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59
Chapter 4. Programming the VGA Optica
4.7
Saving Configuration Files
This option allows the user to save a configuration file and then load it onto the system for future use.
Note: To activate the selected configuration, the system must be reset.
To save the current configuration file:
1. Select Configuration on the Main Screen. A screen similar to the one shown below in Figure 36 appears.
2. Type a file name under Save Configuration File and click SAVE. The name will appear under Load
Configuration File.
3. To load or delete an existing configuration file, highlight the name under Load Configuration File and click LOAD
or DELETE as desired.
4. To exit the Configuration screen, click OK.
Figure 36: Configuration Screen
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
Chapter 5.
Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.0.1 Introduction
The 4x40 Optica can be easily programmed to choose the data to be displayed, the data to be output on the analog or
serial outputs, and the alarm settings. A typical data display is shown in Figure 37 below:
Control
Tdew ° C 8.47996
%RH 10.3
Tmp ° C 25.355
Heat
Cool
Pacer
Figure 37: 4x40 Optica Typical Data Display
Table 19 below lists the 4x40 Optica’s programmable functions. Each function has a number of settings (listed on the
following pages). Values for some settings are selected from a list of choices; others are entered as numeric or
alphanumeric data using the keypad.
Table 19: Programming Functions
Function
About
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Settings
Displays software version
Analog Outputs
Parameter choice, units and scaling
Communication Parameters
Baud rate, parity, # data bits, etc.
Serial Output Units
Parameter choice, units/data format
Serial Output Setup
Serial data string format
Alarms
Parameter choice and alarm limits
Data Fields
Parameters & units for displayed data
Pressure Input
Units, scaling and default values
Automatic Balance
Frequency and type of balance
Buzzer and Sounds
Keyclick loudness
General Settings
Offsets, filters, lockout
User Equations
Set user defined calculated values.
Set Time and Date
Enter the current time and date.
Special
Set molecular weight of sample gas.
User Default Settings
Restore default settings.
Factory Calibration
For factory use only.
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.1
Programming Technique
The functions of the four softkeys to the right of the display change according to the current state of the unit. These
functions, if any, are displayed at the right edge of the screen. While programming, these keys are labelled UP, DOWN,
LEFT (displayed as <<<<) and RIGHT (displayed as >>>>).
Below is the general method for programming the unit:
1. To access the programming menus, press the ENTER/MENU key.
2. Press the DOWN key to step through the functions that can be programmed (shown in Table 19 on page 61).
3. For a particular function, press the RIGHT key to display the first setting for the function. Press the DOWN key to
step through its available settings.
4. For a particular setting, press the RIGHT key to open the setting for editing.
If the setting uses a list of specific choices, the DOWN key and/or UP key are shown. Press them to step through the
choices.
If the setting requires a numeric or alphanumeric entry, use the keypad to enter the data.
Note: To enter numeric data, just press the appropriate key.
To enter alphanumeric data, first press SHIFT to access the letters on the keypad, and then press the
appropriate key containing the desired letter. Finally, press the up or down arrow softkeys to step through the
letters available for that key, both upper and lower case.
Note that certain settings have numeric values that are restricted to certain choices. For example, the number
of stop bits for serial output may be 1, 1.5, or 2, and may have no other values. This entry is selected from a list
of choices, not entered as a numeric value.
5. After choosing a value for a setting, press ENTER to lock it in.
Or, you can press the LEFT key to cancel the entry (restoring the original value) and return to choose another
setting.
To return to the function choice, press the LEFT key.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.1
Programming Technique (cont.)
A typical programming screen (for setting the Analog Outputs) is shown in Figure 38 below.
Analog Outputs
Output A Parameter
>> Temperature
UP
DOWN
<<<<
Figure 38: Typical Analog Outputs Programming Screen
An example of programming the Serial Baud Rate is shown in Figure 39 below. Press the DOWN and RIGHT (>>>>)
softkeys as shown to select the parameter to be programmed, choose the value using the UP and DOWN softkeys, and
press ENTER.
Analog Outputs
Down
Up
Communication
Parameters
Down
Up
Serial Output
Units
Down
Press "left" softkey (<<<<) to cancel
and/or return to previous position.
Up
>>>>
Serial Mode
DOWN
UP
>>>>
Baud
1200
UP
DOWN
DOWN
UP
DOWN
Parity
DOWN
600
UP
ENTER
UP
Baud rate
set
300
DOWN
UP
Figure 39: Programming the 4x40 Optica
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2
Programmable Functions
5.2.1 Analog Outputs
Table 20: Analog Output Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Output A Parameter
Choose which parameter will be
output on analog channel A.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or
User Equation
Output A Units
Choose the units for scaling this
parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Output A Upper
Set the parameter value that will
produce full-scale output.
Enter a number.
Output A Lower
Set the parameter value that will
produce zero output.
Enter a number.
Output B Parameter
Choose which parameter will be
output on analog channel A.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or
User Equation
Output B Units
Choose the units for scaling this
parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Output B Upper
Set the parameter value that will
produce full-scale output.
Enter a number.
Output B Lower
Set the parameter value that will
produce zero output.
Enter a number.
5.2.2 Communication Parameters
Table 21: Communication Parameter Options
64
Setting
Description
Available Options
Serial Mode
Set whether data is transmitted
continuously or on demand.
All, Query (see Query Mode Format on
page 57)
Baud
Set the baud rate to be compatible with
the receiving device.
300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200,
38400, 57600
Parity
Set the parity as required by the
receiving device.
None, Odd, Even, Mark or Space
Number of Data Bits
Set the number of data bits as required
by the receiving device.
7 or 8
Number of Stop Bits
Set the number of stop bits as required
by the receiving device.
1, 1.5 or 2
Serial Flow Control
Set the flow control as required by the
receiving device.
None, Software, Hardware
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.3 Serial Output Units
Table 22: Serial Output Unit Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Humidity Units*
Set the units for humidity.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Temperature Units*
Set the units for temperature.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Pressure Units*
Set the units for pressure.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
User Units*
Set the selected user equation.
Choose from any available User
Equation.
*Note: The TAB key selects or deselects the desired output units. If selected, the number of decimals can be
set using a keypad entry (0-6).
5.2.4 Serial Output Setup
Table 23: Serial Output Setup Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Format
Choose the output format for the
selected parameter.
For humidity, e.g., Dp=##.#, ###.#(Dp),
No Prompt
Field Separator
Choose the separator to be used
between parameters.
Space, Comma, Tab, CR, CR-LF
Record Terminator
Choose the terminator(s) for each group
of data.
Comma, CR, CR-LF
Interval in seconds
Enter the output interval in seconds (for
Serial Mode: All).
Enter a number.
Show Status*
Output dew point sensor status with
each data string (Heat, Cool, Balance,
PACER, Service, Alarm 1, Alarm2).
Enabled/Disabled
Time Stamp
Output date and time with each data
string.
Enabled/Disabled
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.5 Alarms
For more information on using the alarms, see Alarm Outputs on page 18.
Table 24: Alarm Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Alarm #1
Enable or disable Alarm 1.
Enabled/Disabled
Alarm #1 Parameter
Choose the parameter to control Alarm
1.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or
User Equation
Alarm #1 Units
Set the units for this parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Alarm #1 Type
Set the type of condition that will
activate Alarm 1.
Set Point, Inner Band, Outer Band,
Control, Service, PACER
Alarm #1 Upper
The upper side of the alarm band.
Enter a number.
Alarm #1 Lower
The lower side of the alarm band.
Enter a number.
Alarm #2
Enable or disable Alarm 2.
Enabled/Disabled
Alarm #2 Parameter
Choose the parameter to control Alarm
2.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or
User Equation
Alarm #2 Units
Set the units for this parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the
parameter chosen.
Alarm #2 Type
Set the type of condition that will
activate Alarm 2.
Set Point, Inner Band, Outer Band,
Control, Service, PACER
Alarm #2 Upper
The upper side of the alarm band.
Enter a number.
Alarm #2 Lower
The lower side of the alarm band.
Enter a number.
The Upper and Lower limits set the alarm thresholds. Alarm types are listed below (see details on page 18):
•
SetPoint: Alarm activates when parameter exceeds upper limit; deactivates when parameter is less than lower limit.
•
Inner Band: Alarm activates when parameter is between upper and lower limits.
•
Outer band: Alarm activates when parameter is outside upper and lower limits.
•
Control: Alarm activates when the Optica is actively controlling mirror temperature.
•
Service: Alarm activates when the Service indicator is activated.
•
PACER: Alarm activates when the PACER balance is active.
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.6 Data Fields
Table 25: Data Field Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Line 1 Parameter
Choose which parameter will be
output on Line 1.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or User
Line 1 Units
Set the units for the selected
parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the parameter chosen.
Line 1 Decimals
Enter the number of decimal places for
displayed data.
Line 2 Parameter
Choose which parameter will be
output on Line 2.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or User
Line 2 Units
Set the units for the selected
parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the parameter chosen.
Line 2 Decimals
Enter the number of decimal places for
displayed data.
Line 3 Parameter
Choose which parameter will be
output on Line 3.
Humidity, Temperature, Pressure or User
Line 3 Units
Set the units for the selected
parameter.
See Table 4 on page 44 for the parameter chosen.
Line 3 Decimals
Enter the number of decimal places for
displayed data.
Enter a number (0-6).
Enter a number (0-6).
Enter a number (0-6).
5.2.7 Pressure Input
Table 26: Pressure Input Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Analog Input #
Choose which pressure input channel is
in use, or disable this input.
4-20 mA, 0-5 volt, User Default
Input Units
Choose the units for pressure units.
See Table 4 on page 44 for units.
Input Upper
Set the pressure that corresponds to
full-scale input.
Enter a number.
Input Lower
Set the pressure that corresponds to
zero volts or 4 mA input.
Enter a number.
Input Default
Pressure value to be used if a
measured input is disabled.
Enter a number.
Set whether the process pressure is
active (enabled) (see page 32).
Enabled/Disabled
Enter the process pressure (if this
feature is enabled).
Enabled/Disabled
Process Pressure Default
Process Pressure
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.8 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function
Note: For Optica Analyzers with earlier versions of software, see Appendix F.
Optica Analyzers with version 1.4.1a software have been upgraded to include the ability to program the PACER selfcleaning and rebalancing cycle to run once per day at a preset time. This is referred to as a Clock Time Interval. When
the unit is programmed in this manner, the front panel PACER softkey is disabled. The Elapsed Time Interval initiates
the PACER at a preset time after the last PACER was run. The automatic balance cycle will always run upon power up
of the analyzers.
To program the Automatic Cleaning & Balance Function on the Optica 4X40 monitor:
1. Make sure the internal clock of the Optica has the correct time. From the main screen:
a. Press the ENTER key.
b. Press the DOWN soft key until Set Time and Date is displayed.
c. Press the >>>> soft key.
d. Press the >>>> soft key.
e. Highlight the Date and Time fields using the tab key. Use the keypad and softkeys to set the correct time.
2. Set the Time Programmed Balance Cycle:
a. Press the ENTER key to access the Main menu.
b. Press the DOWN soft key until Auto Balance is shown.
c. Press the >>>> soft key.
d. Press the >>>> to set the interval. Use the soft keys and the key pad.
e. Press the ENTER key when done.
f.
Press the DOWN soft key to select the pacer type.
g. Press the >>>> to enter selection mode.
h. Press the DOWN soft key until the desired pacer type is displayed.
i.
Press the ENTER key to select.
j.
Press the DOWN soft key to enable the PACER status.
k. Press the >>>> soft key to enter selection mode.
l.
Press the UP or DOWN soft key until the enabled status is displayed.
m. Press the ENTER key to save the selection.
n. Press the <<<< key several times to exit the menu.
o. Under the Type pull down menu there will be four selections (see Table 27 below)
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.8 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function (cont.).
Table 27: Automatic Cleaning and Balance Functions
Item
Function
Type
AUTO
Heats the mirror and balances the optics.
Elapsed Time Interval
PACER
First cools the mirror to develop a thick dew/frost
layer, then heats and balances the optics.
Elapsed Time Interval
AUTO-D
Heats the mirror and balances the optics.
Clock Time Interval
PACER-D
First cools the mirror to develop a thick dew/frost
layer, then heats and balances the optics.
Clock Time Interval
Note: The PACER function will provide more thorough cleaning than the AUTO function because it first develops a
thick dew/frost layer into which soluble contaminants dissolve. When heated, some of the contaminants are
flash evaporated and the remaining residue accumulates in clusters, resulting in the cleaning of much of the
mirror’s surface. The PACER cycle generally takes longer to complete.
3. Manually clean the mirror as required.
Note: Manual cleaning provides the most thorough cleaning.
4. After manual cleaning, initiate the Automatic Cleaning & Balancing cycle. (This can be done by powering the
analyzer off then on again, if the front panel softkey is disabled).
5. To program a specific time of day at which to initiate the Automatic Cleaning and Balancing:
a. Highlight either Auto-D or Pacer-D.
b. In the Set Time section, input the time of day that you would like to initiate the balance cycle in a 24-hour
format (for example, 13:30 will be 1:30 PM).
Note: In this mode the front panel Pacer initiation function is disabled. Powering down and restarting the unit will
have no effect on the time programmed; however, the PACER will run on startup as is the normal function.
6. To program an elapsed time to initialize the Automatic Cleaning and Balancing:
a. Highlight either AUTO or Pacer.
b. In the set time section, input the elapsed time in minutes. (For example: 720 would enable the balance cycle to
run every 12 hours).
Note: If the unit is powered down and restarted, or the Automatic Balance is initiated from the font or using a LAN,
the elapsed time will reset.
Note: Show Status should read “Enabled”.
7. Select either Track or Hold for the analog outputs (4-20mA/0-5VDC).
Note: If Track is selected, the actual temperature of the mirror will be transmitted. If Hold is selected, the last
prevailing dew point, measured before the balance cycle was initiated, will be transmitted during the time that
the balance cycle is running.
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.8 Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function (cont.)
8. Power down and restart the Optica 4x40 display analyzer for the settings to take effect.
IMPORTANT: For environments or a gas sample where the mirror accumulates contamination rapidly, the use of an
inline filter is recommended. Lower flow rates will also reduce the accumulation of contaminants
5.2.9 Buzzer and Sounds
Table 28: Buzzer and Sounds Option
Setting
Description
Available Options
Buzzer Timing
Sets the length (apparent loudness) of
keyclick sounds.
Enter length of keyclick sound in msec
(150 msec maximum).
5.2.10 General Settings
Table 29: General Setting Options
70
Setting
Description
Available Options
Dew Point Offset
Enter the offset value for the Dew Point
parameter.
Enter the value by which the Dew Point
parameter will be offset.
Dew Point Filter
Enter the filter value for the Dew Point
parameter.
Enter the number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Dew Point.
Temperature Offset
Enter the offset value for the
Temperature parameter.
Enter the value by which the
Temperature parameter will be offset.
Temperature Filter
Enter the filter value for the Temperature
parameter.
Enter the number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Temp.
Pressure Offset
Enter the offset value for the Pressure
parameter.
Enter the value by which the Pressure
parameter will be offset.
Pressure Filter
Enter the filter value for the Pressure
parameter.
Enter the number of readings to be
averaged to create filtered Pressure.
Lockout
Set whether or not the Heat, Cool, and
PACER functions can be activated by the
softkeys on the front panel.
OFF / ON
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
5.2.11 User Equations
See User Equations on page 44 for programming information.
Table 30: User Equation Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Select Equation
Choose an equation to enter or edit.
1, 2, or 3
Edit Label #1*
Enter or edit the label identifying
equation 1.
Alphanumeric
Edit Equation #1*
Enter or edit equation 1 using the
equation elements shown in Table 5 on
page 45.
See Table 5 on page 45.
*The equation number shown is the one chosen in “Select Equation.”
5.2.12 Set Time and Date
Table 31: Set Time and Date Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Set Time
Sets the time.
Set Date
Sets the date.
Enter digits, one at a time, pressing TAB
to move to the next digit.
5.2.13 Special
Table 32: Special Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Gas Mole Weight
The molecular weight of the gas being
analyzed. (The default value is the
molecular weight of air: 28.9645)
Enter a number.
5.2.14 User Default Settings
Table 33: User Default Setting Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
Restore Defaults
Restore settings to factory defaults
shown in Table 3 on page 37.
NO, YES
5.2.15 Factory Calibrations
Table 34: Factory Calibration Options
Setting
Description
Available Options
For factory use only.
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Chapter 5. Programming the 4x40 Optica
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 6. Network-Based Programming
Chapter 6.
6.1
Network-Based Programming
Introduction
The VGA Optica can also be programmed remotely from a computer over a network, using a browser program such as
Internet Explorer.
It may be necessary to download and install the Sun Java Runtime Environment (JRE) obtained from the GE
distribution CD or Sun’s website. If the Sun JRE is not installed on a machine that connects to Optica via Ethernet, a
web page will direct the user to Sun’s website.
To set up the Optica’s networking configuration, see Chapter 4 for programming using the Optica’s VGA programming
method, and follow the instructions listed in Network Menu on page 52.
6.2
Programming Screens
Detailed information on using the Optica Web interface is available via the Help buttons. Programming is very similar
to programming of the VGA unit described in Chapter 4, Programming the VGA Optica. Of course, you use the mouse
to click directly on fields and control buttons instead of selecting items with the TAB key described in Chapter 4.
A typical main data screen is shown below:
Figure 40: Typical Main Data Screen
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Chapter 6. Network-Based Programming
6.2
Programming Screens (cont.)
Click on Menu to display the Data programming screen:
Figure 41: Data Programming Screen
Press More... to display the Other Options screen.
Figure 42: Typical Main Data Screen
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 6. Network-Based Programming
6.2
Programming Screens (cont.)
Press Display from the main data screen to configure the Main Display screen.
Figure 43: Main Display Screen
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 6. Network-Based Programming
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 7. Maintenance
Chapter 7.
7.1
Maintenance
Minor Maintenance of Sensor Optics
Periodically inspect and maintain the sensor optics as described in the following chapter. These procedures can be
performed at any time, but are only necessary when the Service indicator appears on the status display, indicating that
service is required.
7.1.1 Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror
Under normal conditions, the system is self-checking and self-balancing. However, there are occasions when
particulate matter and water-soluble contaminants reduce sensor mirror reflectance and system accuracy (see
Contamination on page 39). Three features of the Optica system allow users to monitor and adjust the mirror:
•
The balance indicator (shown in Figure 44 below) provides a graphic display of how much light is received by the
mirror’s photodetector. It is also an indicator of the dew layer thickness. This indicator increases and decreases in
digital steps.
•
The bias screw adjusts the light signal received by the reference photodetector and is used as a “coarse
adjustment.”
•
The automatic balance, or PACER cycle (discussed on page 7), electronically fine tunes the optical balance
between the IR emitters and reference photodetectors.
In operation, the position of the balance indicator will depend on the level of humidity and the sensor used. As the
humidity changes, the chilled mirror system will seek to establish control.
As contaminants deposit on the mirror, the optical balance indicator will increase, as will the dew point readings. The
PACER cycle or manual cleaning and balancing (followed by the PACER cycle) will mitigate the contamination.
Note: If the mirror is severely scratch or pitted, you may not be able to balance it. It may be replaced in the field, as
discussed on page 82. For industrial applications, GE recommends the solid platinum mirror.
Balance
Indicator
Status
Indicator
Figure 44: Balance and Status Indicator on Optica Display
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.1.2 Procedure for Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror
When necessary, use the procedure below to clean and balance the sensor mirror. To clean the mirror, you will require
the MSK Kit, which includes essential supplies:
•
Cotton swabs
•
Screwdriver or hex driver for some sensors
•
Cleaning solution
1. From the Optica analyzer, press the soft-key next to the HEAT button, or, from the Optica Java applet running on
your PC, move your mouse pointer over the HEAT button and click. The button will turn red, as shown in Figure 71 on the previous page.
2. Allow the dew point temperature (mirror temperature) to attain the maximum value.
3. To clean the mirror:
a. Remove the cap or open the cover of the chilled mirror sensor.
b. Put one drop of cleaning solution on a cotton swab.
c. Gently rub the cotton swab on the mirror in a circular motion (spiral outwards) to clean the mirror.
d. Use a dry swab to dry and buff the mirror. The mirror should be bright and shiny.
e. Discard the used swabs.
IMPORTANT: If the contamination is severe, then solvents such as alcohol, acetone or hexane may be used, followed by
a rinse of the cleaning solution then distilled water. Be sure to dry and buff the mirror with a dry swab.
4. Observe the balance indicator. It should have only one bar segment illuminated. Figure 45 below shows the
possible variations for the indicator while the mirror is heated.
a - underbalanced
b - balanced
c - overbalanced
Figure 45: Coarse Adjust Balance Indicator While Mirror is Heated
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.1.2 Procedure for Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror (cont.)
5. If more than one bar segment or no bars are illuminated, use the screw or hex driver to adjust the optical bias screw
(shown in Figure 46 below) on the sensor until only one bar is illuminated. You are performing a coarse balance
adjustment.
Model D2
Sensor Balance
adjustment screw
Model 1111H
Model 1311H
Figure 46: Balance Adjustment Screw Locations
IMPORTANT: This adjustment is made while the cap or cover is on the 1111H & D2 sensors. For the 1211H, SIM-12H,
1311-DR & 1311-XR, the adjustment is made with the cap removed. In these cases the adjustment should
not be made in sunlight, bright incandescent or infrared light. It might be useful to shade the sensor cavity
with your hand or place a coin over the sensor cavity.
6. Once balanced, replace the sensor cap and make sure the balance indicator does not change.
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Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.1.2 Procedure for Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror (cont.)
7. From the Optica analyzer press the soft-key next to the PACER button, or, from Optica Java applet running on your
PC, move your mouse pointer over the PACER button and click. The button will turn magenta, as shown in
Figure 47 below.
Figure 47: Display with PACER Button Activated
If the “Automatic Balance” is set for “Pacer,” the system will first cool, then heat. If the unit is set for “Auto,” it will
only heat. The system will then automatically fine tune the optical balance. The word Balance will appear in the lower
left of the display, followed by the phrase Balance_acquiring.
The unit will then cool to the dew point and the balance indicator will increase when dew or frost condenses on the
mirror. The dew point reading might overshoot, then it will stabilize (assuming the sensor is exposed to constant
humidity). Figure 48 below shows the possible stages of the balance indicator.
a - underbalanced: clean & rebalance
b - mirror in dry state
c - control at low humidity
d - control at low-medium humidity
e - control at medium-high humidity
f - control at high humidity
g - over balanced or contaminated: clean & rebalance
Figure 48: Stages of Balance Indicator
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.1.2 Procedure for Cleaning and Balancing the Sensor Mirror (cont.)
When a stable dew or frost layer is attained, you will see the word Control in the lower left. The Optica is now reading
the correct dew/frost point and a stable dew or frost layer has been established. When the Optica is exposed to typical
room humidity, this process takes 5-6 minutes. For very dry conditions, the unit may not display Control for several
hours; however, the PACER indicator will go out. The sensor must first accumulate a dew or frost layer on the mirror
before it can display Control.
8. If you see the word Service displayed in the lower left, repeat steps 1-7.
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Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.2
Field Replacement of Sensor Mirrors
One advantage of using a GE Measurement & Control chilled mirror dew point sensor is that the mirror is userreplaceable. The sensor does not have to be returned to the factory for replacement of the reflective surface, unless that
is desired.
A mirror may require replacement for any of the following reasons:
The mirror is constructed of silver/rhodium plated copper. Copper provides excellent thermal conductivity to the
platinum thermometer. However, some gas constituents, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) may react with the copper and
eventually pit the surface or form a copper sulfate coating.
The reflective surface may be gradually abraded by sharp dirt particles in the gas being measured.
The mirror surface may be accidentally scratched or gouged during use or cleaning.
If the sensor mirror has reacted with a corrosive material in the gas sample, such as an acid or sulfur compound, it
should be replaced with a solid platinum mirror to remove any possibility of copper corrosion.
In extreme cases, a solid platinum mirror can make possible a successful application of chilled mirror technology. For
example, measurements in tobacco factories and malting houses have drastically improved after this change, since both
locations have sample gas constituents that attack copper.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.2.1 Replacing the Sensor Mirror
Required equipment: torque driver, set to 20-30 inch-ounces of torque. GE type TW-1 is recommended.
The kit supplied by the factory contains the replacement mirror, a container of white thermal compound for proper heat
transfer, and (in some models) a mylar washer that is to be placed under the mirror.
1. Deactivate the sensor cooler, using one of the following actions:
•
Turn the sensor power off, or
•
Place the sensor switch to heat, or
•
Disconnect the sensor cable
2. Turn off the sample gas. Make sure the sensor cavity is depressurized before continuing with the next step.
3. Open the sensor by removing the sensor cover.
4. Unscrew and discard the old mirror, using a 3/16-inch (0.187) hex socket.
5. Use a toothpick or similar tool to place a small amount of thermal compound in the hole supporting the mirror.
CAUTION!
Do not apply thermal compound to the mirror stem.
Do not use an amount large enough to leak out when the mirror is tightened.
Do not allow any compound to get on the mirror surface, as it is very difficult to remove
completely.
6. Carefully screw in the new mirror and tighten to the proper torque as specified for the particular sensor.
7. Carefully clean the mirror surface, using a cotton swab and the GE cleaning solution supplied with the maintenance
kit. Distilled alcohol or diluted alcohol is also acceptable.
8. Replace the cover and return the sensor to normal operation. Under some circumstances, a new mirror may operate
in a somewhat unstable manner for the first hour or two.
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Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.3
Test and Calibration
The procedures in this section effectively test and/or calibrate the following aspects of the Optica:
•
Startup and power supply voltage
•
Normal sensor operation
•
Front panel display
•
Digital and analog outputs.
The unit has been completely tested and calibrated at the factory, and is ready to plug in and operate. As shipped, it
meets all of our published specifications.
When ordered as a complete hygrometer system with a chilled mirror sensor and cable, it is verified at a number of
points against a dew point system that has been certified by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology
(NIST). A Certificate of Compliance is supplied with the unit to indicate traceability.
7.4
Troubleshooting
7.4.1 The Display Doesn’t Light Up
1. Check the POWER switch on the rear panel. Make sure it’s ON.
2. Check the line cord. Make sure both ends are plugged in and that it is plugged into a proper source of AC voltage.
3. Check the power supply. Make sure it is connected and has the proper output voltage.
4. Check the fuse. Make sure the proper fuse size is installed. Make sure the fuse is not open.
7.4.2 “Service” Appears on the STATUS Display Line
The text “Service” displayed on the STATUS line means service is required. The most frequent problem requiring
service is that the mirror surface is contaminated and should be cleaned.
Clean and balance the sensor mirror (refer to Minor Maintenance of Sensor Optics on page 77). Next, run the
instrument through a PACER cycle. If, at the end of the cycle, the Service status appears again, repeat the cleaning and
balancing procedure, or contact the factory.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.4.3 Incorrect Dew Point Display
If the dew/frost point reads incorrectly, first check the standard preventive maintenance items:
Clean and balance the sensor mirror (refer to page 77).
An alternative method for checking the accuracy of the unit’s electronics is to use a precision resistance decade box in
place of the platinum thermometer. Wire the decade box to the unit’s sensor connector as shown in Figure 49 below,
and verify that the resistance settings shown in the table produce the temperatures shown.
Optica
J
K
T
L
1123HK
Sensor
Cable
Connector
7
15
8
14
HIGH
Optica
D2
Sensor
Cable
Connector
LOW
Resistance
Decade Box
RX100
RX10
RX1
RX0.1
RX0.01
Resistance Table
Din Type 100 Ohms at 0°C 0.385 Ohms/°C
Resistance
Display Reading
Ohms
°C (±0.1)
°F (±0.2)
76.33
–60.0
–76.0
96.09
–10.0
14.0
100.00
0.0
32.0
103.90
10.0
50.0
123.24
60.0
140.0
Figure 49: Using a Resistance Decade Box
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Chapter 7. Maintenance
7.4.4 “Balance” Remains on the Status Line
When the word Balance remains displayed on the front panel for more than 15 minutes, the instrument has not
recovered from a PACER cycle.
Check that the sensor and sensor cable are connected. If necessary, connect them, and the unit will complete the
PACER cycle after a short time (5 to 15 minutes).
The sensor optical bridge may be out of balance (refer to page 77).
7.4.5 No Analog Output
If there is no analog output, but the digital display indicates correctly, check the analog output scaling. For the VGA
unit, see Analog Outputs on page 46. For the 4x40 unit, see Function 1 — Analog Outputs on page 64.
7.4.6 No Serial Output
Check the serial port programming for proper settings. For the VGA unit, see instructions on page 58. For the 4x40
unit, see instructions on page 65.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Appendix A. Specifications
Appendix A. Specifications
A.1 Performance
A.1.1 Accuracy [complete system at 25°C (77°F)]
A.1.1a
Dew/Frost Point:
±0.2°C (±0.36°F)
A.1.1b
Temperature (optional):
±0.15°C (±0.27°F)
A.1.1c
Pressure (optional):
A.1.1d
±0.5% of full scale
A.1.1e
Relative Humidity (optional):
Governed by accuracy of dew point and temperature sensors
A.1.1f
Other Humidity Parameters: (optional)
Governed by accuracy of dew point, temperature and pressure sensors
Sensitivity. > 0.05°C (0.09°F)
Repeatability. ± 0.05°C (±0.09°F)
Hysteresis. Negligible
A.1.2 Measurement Ranges
A.1.2a
Chilled Mirror Sensors: (available)
1111H, 1211H, D-2, SIM-12H, 1311DR, 1311XR
A.1.2b
Range:
–80°C to +85°C (–112°F to +185°F)
dew/frost point, depending on sensor used
A.1.2c
Temperature Sensor: (optional)
T-100E: –100°C to +100°C (–148°F to +212°F)
A.1.2d
Pressure Sensors (optional):
PT-30A: 0 – 30 psia (0 to 2 bar)
PT-300A: 0 to 300 psia (0 to 21 bar)
User supplied 4-20mA or 0-5 volt signal
Recommended Sample Flow. 0.5 to 5.0 scfh (0.25 to 2.5 L/min)
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Appendix A. Specifications
A.1.3 Response Time
A.1.3a
Dew/Frost Point Cooling Rate:
1.5°C (2.7° F)/sec [typical, above 0°C (32°F)]
A.1.3b
Temperature Response: (optional)
< 7 sec for step change within +25°C to +70°C (+77°F to +158°F)
A.1.3c
Pressure Response (optional):
1 sec to 90% of steady state (10% to 90% change)
Update Time. 1 sec
A.2 Functionality
Outputs. 4–20mA DC, 500 Ohm maximum load, 0–5 VDC, 5mA maximum
Digital Output. Serial port
A.2.1 Alarms
A.2.1a
Relay (optional):
Form C (SPDT) 5A, 250 VAC (resistive load)
Displays. 640 X 480 pixel color LCD or 4-line X 40-char LCD
Power. 95 to 265 VAC (+/-10%), 50-60 Hz, 200 W
A.2.2 Operating Ranges
A.2.2a
Dew Point Sensors
Ambient Temperature:
–15°C to +80°C (+5°F to + 176°F), depending on sensor
Pressure:
0 to 300 psig (0 to 22 bar), depending on sensor)
A.2.2b
Electronics
Ambient Temperature:
0°C to +50°C (+32°F to +122°F)
Relative Humidity:
85% maximum
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Appendix A. Specifications
A.3 Physical (bench mount)
A.3.1 Dimensions
13.5"W x 6.5"H x 13"D (353 x 165 x 330 mm)
A.3.2 Weight
8 lbs (3.6 kg)
A.3.3 Shipping Weight
15 lbs (7 kg)
A.3.4 Environmental
General purpose bench-, panel-, or rack-mount
A.4 Physical (wall mount)
A.4.1 Dimensions
3.5"W x 16.5"H x 6.5"D (343 x 419 x 165 mm)
A.4.2 Weight
10 lbs (4.5 kg)
A.4.3 Shipping Weight
15 lbs (7 kg)
A.4.4 Environmental
Surface-mount, industrial environment (NEMA-4)
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Appendix A. Specifications
A.5 Optional Accessories
19" rack mount adapter
A.5.1 T-100E
Temperature sensor
A.5.2 PT-30A
Pressure transducer (0 – 30 psia)
A.5.3 PT-300A
Pressure transducer (0 – 300 psia)
A.6 European Compliance
Complies with EMC Directive 2004/108/EC and 2006/95/EC Low Voltage Directive (Installation Category II,
Pollution Degree II)
Note: Product has reduced limits for Radiated immunity between 88 and 108 MHz and conducted immunity between
11 and 32 MHz.
Specifications subject to change without notice.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Appendix B. Humidity Equations and Conversion Chart
Appendix B. Humidity Equations and Conversion Chart
B.1 Introduction
The following symbols appear in the equations below:
e=
Vapor Pressure, millibars
ei =
Vapor Pressure with respect to ice, millibars
ew =
Vapor Pressure with respect to water, millibars
eis =
Saturation vapor pressure, ice, millibars
ews =
Saturation vapor pressure, water, millibars
P=
Total Pressure, millibars
T=
Temperature, °C
Ta =
Ambient temperature, °C
Td =
Dew point temperature, °C
Tf =
Frost point temperature, °C
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
91
Appendix B. Humidity Equations and Conversion Chart
B.2 Vapor Pressure
Saturation vapor pressure with respect to water is a function of temperature only and is given by the following:
17.502T
E WS = 6.1121EXP ----------------------240.97 + T
Saturation vapor pressure with respect to ice requires a minor adjustment of the constants as given by the following:
22.452T
E IS = 6.1115EXP ----------------------272.55 + T
In addition to yielding saturation vapor pressure as a function of ambient temperature, the above equations also yield
ambient vapor pressure as a function of dew/frost point.
The total pressure of a gas mixture is equal to the sum of the partial pressure each gas would exert, were it to occupy
the same total volume, according to Dalton’s law.
B.3 Humidity
Relative Humidity is defined as the ratio of the water vapor pressure (e) to the saturation vapor pressure (eS) at the
prevailing ambient or dry bulb temperature (Ta):
EW TD 
E
%RH = 100  ----- = 100 ------------------E 
E WS  T A 
S
Absolute humidity is expressed as water vapor density: water vapor mass per unit volume of dry air, according to the
following:
216.7E  T D 
G
------- = ------------------------3
T + 273.16
M
Water vapor content expressed as parts per million by volume is given by the following:
6 E  TD 
PPM V = 10 --------------------P – E  TD 
Expressing water vapor content as parts per million by weight (or mixing ratio) requires multiplication of the above by
the ratio of the molecular weight of water to that of air as given by the following:
6 E
PPM W = 0.622  10 ----------P–E
See Figure 50 on page 93 for a graphical humidity conversion chart.
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Appendix B. Humidity Equations and Conversion Chart
Figure 50: Graphical Humidity Conversion Chart
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
93
Appendix B. Humidity Equations and Conversion Chart
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Appendix C. Configuring the Serial Interface
Appendix C. Configuring the Serial Interface
C.1 Wiring to a Personal Computer
The Optica is configured as Data Terminal Equipment (DTE). The following pins are used on the Serial interface:
•
2 - Transmitted data (TXD)
•
3 - Received data (RXD)
•
5 - Signal ground (GND)
To send the output of the Optica to a personal computer, use the cable arrangement shown in Figure 51 below.
Optica
2
3
9-Pin Male
3
5
2
5
9-Pin
PC
Figure 51: Wiring Diagram - Optica to Personal Computer
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Appendix C. Configuring the Serial Interface
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Appendix D. Chilled Mirror Sensors
Appendix D. Chilled Mirror Sensors
D.1 Introduction
GE offers a choice of six, fully interchangeable, chilled mirror sensors which differ primarily in their depression
(cooling) capability. Depression capacity determines the minimum dew point that can be measured. All of the sensors
feature low-noise, infrared optics, a field-replaceable mirror, and can be located up to 300 ft (91 m) from the
electronics. Other advanced features—depending on the sensor selected—include heating capability, four- or five-stage
thermoelectric cooling, air and water cooling for additional depression, and modular, field-replaceable optics and
cooling assemblies
Many of these features were pioneered by GE Measurement & Control, and are available only on GE products.
A chilled mirror sensor is generally selected so that its depression capability will allow it to measure the lowest dew/
frost point anticipated for the application.
D.2 Depression
A Peltier device is a solid-state heat pump. It has one surface thermally bonded to the body (base) of a dew point sensor
and the other surface bonded to the mirror block. When current is supplied to the Peltier device, heat is “pumped” from
the mirror block to the sensor body where it is dissipated. With full cooling current, the mirror block will eventually
cool to its minimum temperature. The difference between the temperatures of the mirror block and the sensor body
when the mirror block is at this minimum temperature is defined as the depression capability of the sensor.
Depression capability is a function of how many “stages” the Peltier device has stacked in series. Thus, a two-stage
sensor typically has 60°C to 65°C (108°F to 117°F) of depression capability, and can measure lower dew/frost points
than a one-stage sensor which has 45°C (81°F) of depression capability. Depression is normally specified at 25°C
(77°F) ambient temperature. For liquid-cooled sensors, it is specified at the coolant temperature. As ambient
temperature (and, therefore, sensor body temperature) is decreased, depression capability also decreases, due to the
drop-off in efficiency of the thermoelectric cooler.
Therefore, there are limitations to using liquid-cooled sensors to increase low-end measurement range. At nominal
dew/frost points, approximately one third of the additional cooling is lost due to cooler inefficiency, and does not result
in additional measurement range. At low dew/frost points, as much as one half may be lost. As ambient temperature is
increased, depression capability increases, resulting in a wider measurement range.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
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Appendix D. Chilled Mirror Sensors
D.3 Measurement Range
The measurement range of a chilled mirror sensor is defined as the temperature range over which a stable dew or frost
layer can be maintained on the mirror. Note that in order to acquire a dew or frost layer on the mirror, the depression
capability of a sensor must extend below its measurement range. The minimum required differential between
depression range and measurement range is 5°C (9°F) at nominal dew/frost points, and increases to 10°C to 12°C (18°F
to 22°F) at very low frost points.
Measurement range is normally specified at 25°C (77°F) ambient temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. For
sensor body temperatures other than 25°C (77°F), measurement range can be estimated by first estimating depression
capability, and then decreasing this range according to the minimum required differential. For most gases other than air,
the effect on measurement range is negligible. However, gases such as hydrogen or helium, which are more thermally
conductive than air, will result in a decrease of several degrees in the measurement range. Measurement range will
decrease as gas pressure is increased, because the increased density (and, therefore, increased thermal conductivity) of
the gas results in an increased heat load. For air or nitrogen, each 50 psi (3 bar) increase above atmospheric pressure
will result in a loss of approximately 2°C (4°F) of depression capability. Conversely, operating under vacuum may
result in a small increase.
Other factors influencing sensor selection include temperature and pressure ratings, and whether anticipated dew points
will be higher than ambient temperature.
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Appendix D. Chilled Mirror Sensors
D.4 Comparing Optica Models
Table 35: Chilled Mirror Sensor Comparison Chart
Model
1111H
Model
D-2
Model
1211H
Model
SIM-12H
Model
1311DR
Model
1311XR
0.15°C
System Performance
Standard
Accuracy*
0.2°C
0.2°C
0.2°C
0.2°C
0.2°C
Optical
Accuracy*
0.15°C
0.15°C
0.15°C
0.15°C
0.15°C
Cooling Stages
1
2
2
2
4
5
112°C with
15°C coulant
@ 25°C
ambient
45°C
65°C
65°C
65°C
95°C, air;
105°C with
15°C coulant
@25°C
ambient
@ 25°C
ambient
@ 25°C
ambient
@ 85°C
ambient
@ 25°C
ambient
Dew/Frost Point
–15° to
+25°C
–35° to
+25°C
–35° to +25°C
–10° to
+85°C
RH (equivalent)
6% to 100%
1.5% to
100%
Depression (at
25°C (77°F), 1
atm, in air)
Typical
Measurement
Range (at given
ambient, 1 atm)
1.5% to 100%
1% to
100%
–60° to +25°C, air
–70°C to +25°C, liquid –80° to +25°C
0.03% to 100%, air
0.007% to 100%, liq.
0.0003% to
100%
Functional Characteristics:
Power
From Optica
From Optica
From Optica
115/
230VAC
75 watts
115/230VAC
300 watts
115/230VAC
700 watts
Ambient
Temperature
Range
–15° to
+80°C
–25° to
+85°C
–15° to
+100°C
–15° to
+50°C
0° to +35°C
0° to +35°C
Pressure Range
(psig)
–3 to +200
–14.7 to
+150
0 to +300
–3 to +50
0 to +300
0 to +100
Auxiliary Cooling
No
No
No
No
Standard: air or liquid
Standard:
liquid
Sensor Cavity
Material
Epoxycoated
Aluminum
Stainless
Steel
Stainless Steel
Stainless
Steel
Anodized
Stainless Steel Aluminum
*Complete system at 25°C (77°F)
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Appendix D. Chilled Mirror Sensors
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Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Appendix E. Glossary
Appendix E. Glossary
Depression Capability
The temperature difference by which the chilled mirror can be lowered from the ambient temperature.
Network
A Local Area computer Network (LAN) or Wide Area Network (WAN) such as the Internet. The Optica can be
operated or programmed remotely over a network.
PACER
GE Sensing patented Programmable Automatic Contaminant Error Reduction system, which consolidates soluble
contaminants to reduce their effect on system accuracy (see The PACER Cycle on page 7).
Parameter
A measured quantity available for display by the unit, such as Dew Point in °C, Humidity in Grams/Kilograms, or
Pressure in Bar.
Process Pressure
The gas pressure of the system under test. In some applications, humidity of this gas may be measured at a lower
pressure.
Scaling
The process of selecting the maximum and minimum output values of a chosen parameter.
SHIFT
Pressing the SHIFT key enters Shift Key mode, reversing the direction of the cursor motion when pressing TAB, and
accessing the non-numeric characters on the keypad.
Softkeys
The four keys to the right of the display. The functions of these keys change depending on the context, and the current
function is displayed to the left of each key.
VGA
Video Graphics Array Generic description of a 640 by 480 pixel display; used to identify the large-screen Optica.
4x40
Four lines by 40 characters per line; used to identify the small-screen Optica.
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Appendix E. Glossary
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Appendix F. Automatic Balance (for earlier software versions)
Appendix F. Automatic Balance (for earlier software versions)
F.1
Programming Automatic Balance for a VGA Optica
Note: For Optica Analyzers with software version 1.4.1a or later, see Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function on
page 49.
Table 36: Automatic Balancing Options
Function
Item
Interval
Set how often the automatic balance takes place.
Type
Set the type of balance
(see Sensor Balancing on page 38).
Status
Set whether the balance will take place.
Track/Hold
F.2
Available Options
Enter the interval in minutes
(60 minutes minimum).
Auto, PACER
Enabled, Disabled
Set whether the display, analog outputs, and
alarms will track the sensor condition during a
cleaning cycle, or hold the last process reading.
(Serial outputs always hold the process reading).
Track, Hold
Programming Automatic Balance for a 4x40 Optica
Note: For Optica Analyzers with software version 1.4.1a or later, see Automatic Cleaning and Balance Function on
page 68.
Setting
Table 37: Automatic Balancing Options
Description
Available Options
Interval in Minutes
Set how often the balance takes
place.
Enter the interval in minutes
(60 minutes minimum).
Type
Set the type of balance (see Sensor
Balancing on page 38).
Auto, PACER
Enable
Analog Output
Tracking
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Set whether the balance will take
place.
Set whether display, analog outputs
and alarms will track the sensor
condition during a cleaning cycle, or
hold the last process reading. (Serial
output will always track the process
reading.)
Enabled, Disabled
Track, Hold
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Appendix F. Automatic Balance (for earlier software versions)
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.1 Direct Communication
The networking configuration for an OPTICA VGA model can be done using the front panel. The networking
configuration for a 4x40 with Ethernet capability can be configured using the RS-232 port and the following
commands:
Note: <> means carriage return.
$SetIPAddress <IPADDRESS><>
(i.e 127 0 0 0)\r\n
Example: $SetIpAddress 127 0 0 0 0 <>
$SetSubnetMask <SubNetMask>
(i.e 255 255 255 0)\r\n
Example: $SetSubnetMask
255 255 255 0 <>
$SetDefaultGateway <Gateway>
(i.e 0 0 0 0)\r\n
$SetHostName <HostName><>
(i.e Optica)\r\n
$SetIPSource <STATIC><>
$SetIPSource <DHCP><>
$GetNetworkSettings<>
(STATIC IP)\r\n
(DHCP IP)\r\n
Displays the network settings\r\n
$SaveNetworkSettings<>
(Write Network settings to the registry)\r\n
$DeleteNetworkSettings<>
(Deletes registry entries - removes .FDF & .CRC File)\r\n
$SaveAllSettings<>
(Write all settings to non-volatile memory)\r\n
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2 Computer Communication
The Optica communicates over port 28005. The general format for accessing the Optica is:
<IP address>:28005/Command
The command set of the Optica is broken into two categories: Those used to set parameters and those used to retrieve
parameters from the Optica. Commands that are used to retrieve information from the Optica are preceded with the
prefix Get, and those that are used to set parameters at the Optica are preceded with the prefix Set. Only the commands
that enable the user to retrieve information from the Optica are detailed in this document. The examples below assume
that a web browser is being used.
G.2.1 Determining the Available Commands
The available commands can be determined by entering the line below in the address line of the browser. This
command returns a list of API commands supported by the Optica.
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIInfo>
<help>---- OpticaAPI.xml?FunctionName+channel ----</help>
<OpticaAPI>GetAlarmData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetAlarmTypes</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetAllGraphingData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetAllLabels</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetAnalogOutData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetAutoBalanceTypes</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetChannelInfo</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetCurrentData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetDataFields</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetDataLogSettings</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetHTPLabels</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetHTPParam</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetPressureData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetOpticaInfo</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSerialCommData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSerialData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSupportedBaudRate</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSupportedDataBits</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSupportedSerialDataFormat</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetSupportedDataLogDataFormat</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>GetUserDefinedEquations</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>UpdateGraphingData</OpticaAPI>
<help>---- Set functions are not accessible with GET ----</help>
<OpticaAPI>SetAlarmData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetAlarmTypes</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetAnalogOutData</OpticaAPI>
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.1 Determining the Available Commands
<OpticaAPI>SetAutoBalanceTypes</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetChannelInfo</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetCoolState</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetCurrentData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetDataFields</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetDataLogSettings</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetHeatState</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetHTPLabels</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetHTPParam</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetPacerOn</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetPressureData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetOpticaInfo</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetSerialCommData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetSerialData</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetSupportedBaudRate</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetSupportedDataBits</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetSupportedSerialDataFormat</OpticaAPI>
<OpticaAPI>SetUserDefinedEquations</OpticaAPI>
</OpticaAPIInfo>
G.2.2 Retrieving the Alarm Settings
Command:
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetAlarmData+0
Function Name: GetAlarmData
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetAlarmData">
<channel>0</channel>
<AlarmType>2</AlarmType>
<Enabled>true</Enabled>
<UnitOffset>2</UnitOffset>
<type>2</type>
<LowerLimit>30.000000</LowerLimit>
<UpperLimit>60.000000</UpperLimit>
<AlarmType>2</AlarmType>
<Enabled>true</Enabled>
<UnitOffset>17</UnitOffset>
<type>17</type>
<LowerLimit>18.000000</LowerLimit>
<UpperLimit>26.000000</UpperLimit>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.2 Retrieving the Alarm Settings (cont.)
The Optica supports two alarm set points: The above response shows the settings for alarm 1 and alarm 2 in that order.
(Note that the index is referenced from 0 , not 1). Alarm 1 parameters are described below.
Alarm 1 Settings:
Alarm type = 2
(SetPoint, InnerBand, Outerband, Control, Service, Pacer)
2 here indicates Outerband
Enabled = True (Alarm 1 is enabled.)
Unit Offset = 2 (% RH)
See the Optica manual or use the GetHTPLabels for the list of
available units and the order.
Type = 2 ( ignore this value)
LowerLimit = 18.000000 (the Lower limit is 18 %RH)
UpperLimit = 26.000000 (The Upper limit is 26 %RH)
G.2.3 Retrieving the Alarm Types
This command enables the user to retrieve different alarm types that are supported by the Optica, and the order in
which they are referenced.
Command:
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetAlarmTypes
Function Name: GetAlarmTypes
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetAlarmTypes">
<NumAlarmTypes>6</NumAlarmTypes>
<AlarmType>SetPoint</AlarmType>
<AlarmType>Inner Band</AlarmType>
<AlarmType>Outer Band</AlarmType>
<AlarmType>Control</AlarmType>
<AlarmType>Service</AlarmType>
<AlarmType>Pacer</AlarmType>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn>
This Response indicates that 6 alarm types are supported. They are listed in order with the reference being 0.
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.4 Retrieving Supported Units
This command enables the user to retrieve different units that are supported by the Optica and the order in which they
are referenced.
Command: http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetAllLabels
Function Name: GetAlarmTypes
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetAllLabels">
<channel>0</channel>
<sLabels>Tdew °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tdew °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>%RH</sLabels>
<sLabels>Twet °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Twet °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>ppmv</sLabels>
<sLabels>ppmw</sLabels>
<sLabels>Grains/lb</sLabels>
<sLabels>Grains/SCF</sLabels>
<sLabels>g/kg</sLabels>
<sLabels>g/m3</sLabels>
<sLabels>lb/Mft3</sLabels>
<sLabels>Kj/Kg (0)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Kj/Kg (32)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Btu/lb (0)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Btu/lb (32)</sLabels>
<sLabels>pw(mbar)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °K</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °R</sLabels>
<sLabels>psia</sLabels>
<sLabels>mbar</sLabels>
<sLabels>bar</sLabels>
<sLabels>Pa</sLabels>
<sLabels>kPa</sLabels>
<sLabels>mmHg</sLabels>
<sLabels>inHg</sLabels>
<sLabels>KgCm2</sLabels>
<sLabels>DyneCm2</sLabels>
<sLabels />
<sLabels>UserEquation2</sLabels>
<sLabels>UserEquation3</sLabels>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn>
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.5 Retrieving Labels and Functions
This command enables the user to retrieve different units that are supported by the Optica, and the order in which they
are referenced. It also indicates which labels are humidity labels, temperature labels and pressure labels.
Command:
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetHTPLabels+0
Function Name: GetHTPLables
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetHTPLabels">
<channel>0</channel>
<iHumidityLabels>17</iHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Tdew °C</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Tdew °F</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>%RH</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Twet °C</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Twet °F</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>ppmv</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>ppmw</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Grains/lb</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Grains/SCF</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>g/kg</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>g/m3</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>lb/Mft3</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>kj/kg (0)</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>kj/kg (32)</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Btu/lb (0)</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>Btu/lb (32)</sHumidityLabels>
<sHumidityLabels>pw(mbar)</sHumidityLabels>
<iTemperatureLabels>4</iTemperatureLabels>
<sTemperatureLabels>Tmp °C</sTemperatureLabels>
<sTemperatureLabels>Tmp °F</sTemperatureLabels>
<sTemperatureLabels>Tmp °K</sTemperatureLabels>
<sTemperatureLabels>Tmp °R</sTemperatureLabels>
<iPressureLabels>9</iPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>psia</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>mbar</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>bar</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>Pa</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>kPa</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>mmHg</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>inHg</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>kg/cm2</sPressureLabels>
<sPressureLabels>DyneCm2</sPressureLabels>
<iUserLabels>3</iUserLabels>
<sUserLabels />
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.5 Retrieving Labels and Functions (cont.)
<sUserLabels>UserEquation2</sUserLabels>
<sUserLabels>UserEquation3</sUserLabels>
<iLabels>33</iLabels>
<sLabels>Tdew °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tdew °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>%RH</sLabels>
<sLabels>Twet °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Twet °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>ppmv</sLabels>
<sLabels>ppmw</sLabels>
<sLabels>Grains/lb</sLabels>
<sLabels>Grains/SCF</sLabels>
<sLabels>g/kg</sLabels>
<sLabels>g/m3</sLabels>
<sLabels>lb/Mft3</sLabels>
<sLabels>Kj/Kg (0)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Kj/Kg (32)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Btu/lb (0)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Btu/lb (32)</sLabels>
<sLabels>pw(mbar)</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °C</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °F</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °K</sLabels>
<sLabels>Tmp °R</sLabels>
<sLabels>psia</sLabels>
<sLabels>mbar</sLabels>
<sLabels>bar</sLabels>
<sLabels>Pa</sLabels>
<sLabels>kPa</sLabels>
<sLabels>mmHg</sLabels>
<sLabels>inHg</sLabels>
<sLabels>KgCm2</sLabels>
<sLabels>DyneCm2</sLabels>
<sLabels />
<sLabels>UserEquation2</sLabels>
<sLabels>UserEquation3</sLabels>
<HumidityUnitsBaseIndex>0</HumidityUnitsBaseIndex>
<TemperatureUnitsBaseIndex>17</TemperatureUnitsBaseIndex>
<PressureUnitsBaseIndex>21</PressureUnitsBaseIndex>
<UserUnitsBaseIndex>30</UserUnitsBaseIndex>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn>
This response indicates how many humidity labels (iHumidityLabels), temperature labels (iTemperatureLabels),
pressure labels (iPressureLabels) and UserLabels there are. The iLabels value indicates how many labels there are all
together (33).
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.6 Retrieving Analog Output Information
This command enables the user to retrieve settings for the two analog outputs.
Command:
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetAnalogOutData+0
Function Name: GetAnalogOutData
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetAnalogOutData">
<channel>0</channel>
<UnitOffset>0</UnitOffset>
<LowerLimit>-40.000000</LowerLimit>
<UpperLimit>60.000000</UpperLimit>
<UnitOffset>17</UnitOffset>
<LowerLimit>0.000000</LowerLimit>
<UpperLimit>100.000000</UpperLimit>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn>
UnitOffset is an index to the list of labels. In this case 0 refers to Tdew °C
G.2.7 Retrieving the Measured and Calculated Values
This command enables the user to retrieve measured and calculated values for all supported units. The status
information is also returned.
Command:
http://3.112.160.36:28005/OpticaAPI.xml?GetCurrentData+0
Function Name: GetCurrentData
Channel: 0
Response:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes" ?>
<OpticaAPIReturn Function="GetCurrentData">
<channel>0</channel>
<channelName />
Note: iNumber is the number of data values returned.
This number is the same as "iLabels" of GetHTPLabels and those labels coincide with these values.
<iNumber>33</iNumber>
<fAllData>-4.892536</fAllData>
<fAllData>23.193436</fAllData>
<fAllData>16.158667</fAllData>
<fAllData>9.333572</fAllData>
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.7 Retrieving the Measured and Calculated Values (cont.)
<fAllData>48.800430</fAllData>
<fAllData>4014.087158</fAllData>
<fAllData>2496.681885</fAllData>
<fAllData>17.476774</fAllData>
<fAllData>6.832514</fAllData>
<fAllData>2.496682</fAllData>
<fAllData>2.985780</fAllData>
<fAllData>186.449982</fAllData>
<fAllData>43.695812</fAllData>
<fAllData>26.523333</fAllData>
<fAllData>19.541956</fAllData>
<fAllData>11.861956</fAllData>
<fAllData>4.055074</fAllData>
<fAllData>21.146547</fAllData>
<fAllData>70.100189</fAllData>
<fAllData>294.306549</fAllData>
<fAllData>529.753784</fAllData>
<fAllData>14.710732</fAllData>
<fAllData>1014.265686</fAllData>
<fAllData>1.014266</fAllData>
<fAllData>101426.570313</fAllData>
<fAllData>101.426567</fAllData>
<fAllData>760.761841</fAllData>
<fAllData>29.239281</fAllData>
<fAllData>1.034267</fAllData>
<fAllData>1014265.687500</fAllData>
<fAllData>0.401409</fAllData>
<fAllData>0.000000</fAllData>
<fAllData>0.000000</fAllData>
<iBarGraphMin>0</iBarGraphMin>
<iBarGraphMax>10</iBarGraphMax>
<iBarGraphValue>6</iBarGraphValue>
<bHeatState>false</bHeatState>
<bCoolState>false</bCoolState>
<bPacerState>false</bPacerState>
<sStatus>Control Alarm1</sStatus>
<retval>GEIAPI_SUCCESS</retval>
</OpticaAPIReturn>
bHeatState, bCoolState and bPacerState indicate whether the unit is in MaxHeat, MaxCool, or Pacer, respectively.
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Appendix G. Communicating with the OPTICA Using Ethernet
G.2.8 4X40 Optica Configuration
Using an RS-232 communication link, the user can set the network settings. To see the set of supported commands,
type "$Help<>"
1. $SetIPAddress <IP ADDRESS><>
(i.e. $SetIPAddress 3 112 60 36)
2. $SetIPSource <STATIC><> (Assuming STATIC IP)
3. $SaveNetworkSettings<>
4. $GetNetworkSettings<> (Displays the current network settings)
It takes time to execute the "SaveNetworkSettings" command. Wait until the display updates to determine when to reset
the unit. In order for the settings to take effect, power to the unit must be cycled.
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Index
A
Accessory Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Alarm Outputs
Inner Band Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Outer Band Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Set Point Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Alarms
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Retrieving Settings with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Retrieving Types with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Analog Outputs
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Retrieving Information with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . 112
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Automatic Balance
4x40 Optica (earlier software). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
VGA Optica (earlier software) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Automatic Cleaning and Balancing
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 69, 70
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
B
Balancing a Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Balancing, Automatic
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 69, 70
4x40 Optica (earlier software). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
VGA Optica (earlier software) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Benchtop
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Wiring Input Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Wiring Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Wiring Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
C
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Chilled Mirror Sensor
Comparison Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Chilled Mirror Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Cleaning Sensor Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Cleaning, Automatic
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 69, 70
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Communication Parameters
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Setting with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Computer Communication with Ethernet . . . . . . . . 106
Configuration Files, Saving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Contamination
Gaseous Contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Minimizing the Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Mirror Cleanliness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Particulate Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Water-Soluble Contaminants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Coolant
Model 1311XR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
D
Data Fields
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Date of Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Depression Capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97, 101
Dew Point
High Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Sampling Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Supercooled. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Direct Communication with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Display
"Balance" Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Incorrect Dew Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
VGA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Document Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
E
Electronics Enclosure
Benchtop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Wall-Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
115
Index
Enclosure
Benchtop, Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Benchtop, Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Rack Mount, Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Ethernet
4x40 Optica Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Alarm Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Alarm Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Analog Output Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Available Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Direct Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Labels and Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Measured and Calculated Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Supported Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Using a Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
F
Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Flow Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Functions
Retrieving with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
G
Gaseous Contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
General Settings
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
H
Heat Pump Controller Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Humidity
Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Humidity Equations
Vapor Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Hygrometer
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
116
I
Inner Band Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Installation
Benchtop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Rack Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Sampling Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Wall-Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Wall-Mount Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
M
Maintenance
Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Cleaning the Sensor Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Replacing Sensor Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Sample Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Sensor Optics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Measurement
At a Different Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Dew Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 35
High Dew Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Process Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32, 33, 34
Range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Ranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Retrieving Values with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Vapor Pressure with a Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 35
Vapor Pressure without a Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 34
Mirror
Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Flooding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Mirror, Cleaning and Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Model 1311XR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Control Knob. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Coolant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Electrical Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Error Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Heat Pump Controller Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Purging the Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Sample Gas Fittings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Index
Model SIM-12H Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
P
N
PACER
Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Parameter Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Particulate Contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Pressure
Effects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Manually Entering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Measuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Vapor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Pressure Input
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Process Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Measuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Programming
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Network-Based . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Network
Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Network-Based Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
O
Operation
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Helpful Hints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Normal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Theory of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Optica 4x40
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Automatic Balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Buzzer and Sounds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configuration with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Data Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Display Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Factory Calibrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
General Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Pressure Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Programmable Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Serial Output Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Serial Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Setting Time and Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Special Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
User Default Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
User Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Optica Models Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Outer Band Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
R
Return Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
S
Sample Gas Fittings
Model 1311XR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Sample Line Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Sampling Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 22
Scaling, Definition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Sensor Mirror, Cleaning and Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . 77
117
Index
Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Chilled Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Cleaning the Mirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Comparison Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Dew Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Heat Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Heated. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 24
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77, 82
Model 1111H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Model 1211H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Model 1311DR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Model 1311XR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Model D-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Model SIM-12H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Replacing Mirrors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Serial Outputs
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Service Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Set Point Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
SHIFT Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Softkeys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Specifications
Functional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Optional Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Physical (Benchtop) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Physical (Wall-Mount) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Status Line Indications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Supercooled Dew Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
System
Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
"Balance" on Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
"Service" Required. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Incorrect Dew Point Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
No Analog Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
No Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
No Serial Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
U
Units
Retrieving with Ethernet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
User Default Settings
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
User Equations
4x40 Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
VGA Optica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
V
Vapor Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Measuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
T
Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
118
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Index
VGA Optica
Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Automatic Balance (earlier software) . . . . . . . . . 103
Buzzer/Sound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Communication Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Data Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Data Entry Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Data Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Data Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Download Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
General Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Menu 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Menu 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Network Menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Pressure Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Programming Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Query Mode Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Restoring Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Serial Output Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Setting Time and Date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Special Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Units of Measure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
User Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44, 56
VGA, Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Wiring
Additional Voltage Outputs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Alarm Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Analog Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Model 1311XR Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Serial Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Wall-Mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
W
Wall-Mount
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Wiring Input Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Wiring Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Water-Soluble Contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
119
Index
120
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Warranty
Warranty
Each instrument manufactured by GE Sensing is warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship.
Liability under this warranty is limited to restoring the instrument to normal operation or replacing the instrument, at
the sole discretion of GE Sensing. Fuses and batteries are specifically excluded from any liability. This warranty is
effective from the date of delivery to the original purchaser. If GE Sensing determines that the equipment was
defective, the warranty period is:
•
one year from delivery for electronic or mechanical failures
•
one year from delivery for sensor shelf life
If GE Sensing determines that the equipment was damaged by misuse, improper installation, the use of unauthorized
replacement parts, or operating conditions outside the guidelines specified by GE Sensing, the repairs are not covered
under this warranty.
The warranties set forth herein are exclusive and are in lieu of all other warranties whether
statutory, express or implied (including warranties or merchantability and fitness for a
particular purpose, and warranties arising from course of dealing or usage or trade).
Return Policy
If a GE Sensing instrument malfunctions within the warranty period, the following procedure must be completed:
1. Notify GE Sensing, giving full details of the problem, and provide the model number and serial number of the
instrument. If the nature of the problem indicates the need for factory service, GE Sensing will issue a RETURN
AUTHORIZATION NUMBER (RAN), and shipping instructions for the return of the instrument to a service
center will be provided.
2. If GE Sensing instructs you to send your instrument to a service center, it must be shipped prepaid to the authorized
repair station indicated in the shipping instructions.
3. Upon receipt, GE Sensing will evaluate the instrument to determine the cause of the malfunction.
Then, one of the following courses of action will then be taken:
•
If the damage is covered under the terms of the warranty, the instrument will be repaired at no cost to the owner and
returned.
•
If GE Sensing determines that the damage is not covered under the terms of the warranty, or if the warranty has
expired, an estimate for the cost of the repairs at standard rates will be provided. Upon receipt of the owner’s
approval to proceed, the instrument will be repaired and returned.
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
121
Warranty
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122
Optica™ Operator’s Manual
Customer Support Centers
U.S.A.
The Boston Center
1100 Technology Park Drive
Billerica, MA 01821
U.S.A.
Tel: 800 833 9438 (toll-free)
978 437 1000
E-mail: [email protected]
Ireland
Sensing House
Shannon Free Zone East
Shannon, County Clare
Ireland
Tel: +353 (0)61 470291
E-mail: [email protected]
An ISO 9001:2000 Certified Company
www.ge-mcs.com/about_us/quality.html
www.ge-mcs.com
©2012 General Electric Company. All rights reserved.
Technical content subject to change without notice.
A40238752 Rev. E
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