Genius PowerTRAC Block User`s Manual

Genius PowerTRAC Block User`s Manual
ÎÎ
GE Fanuc Automation
Programmable Control Products
t
Genius
PowerTRAC
t Block
User’s Manual
GFK–0450D
May 1994
GFL–002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages,
currents, temperatures, or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this
equipment or may be associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or damage to
equipment, a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
Note
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to understanding
and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While
efforts have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not
purport to cover all details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for
every possible contingency in connection with installation, operation, or maintenance.
Features may be described herein which are not present in all hardware and software
systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no obligation of notice to holders of this
document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or
statutory with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,
sufficiency, or usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of
merchantability or fitness for purpose shall apply.
The following are trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Alarm Master
Field Control
90–ADS
PowerTRAC
CIMSTAR
GEnet
Genius
Genius PowerTRAC
Helpmate
PROMACRO
Logicmaster Series One
Modelmaster Series Three
ProLoop
Series Five
Series Six CIMPLICITY
Series 90 CIMPLICITY
VuMasterCIMPLICITY
Workmaster
Copyright 1994 GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Preface
t
This book provides information needed to install and use a Genius PowerTRAC block.
It also describes the data transmitted between the block and a host PLC or computer.
For programming details, you should refer to the documentation provided with the host.
Content of This Manual
This book contains the following 6 chapters and 3 appendices.
Chapter 1. Introduction: Provides an overview of PowerTRAC block features and
operation.
Chapter 2. Installation: Explains installation and field wiring for the block.
Chapter 3. Configuration: Describes the configurable features of the PowerTRAC block,
and explains configuration step–by–step.
Chapter 4. Calculated Data and Status Data: Describes the data that is routinely
transferred between a PowerTRAC block and its host PLC or computer. Chapter 4 also
shows how the block’s status data and calculated values can be read with a Hand–held
Monitor.
Chapter 5. Additional Calculated Data: Describes additional data on power quality, line
frequency, and temperature alarm status that is available from the PowerTRAC block.
Chapter 6. Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data: Explains how waveform and
overcurrent data stored by the block can be accessed.
Appendix A. Special Wiring Instructions: Shows how to install the PowerTRAC block
in applications where PTs or CTs cannot be connected to power as shown in the
installation instructions in chapter 2.
Appendix B. Using PTs and CTs with Higher Turns Ratios: Explains how to configure
the block for PTs having primary voltage greater than 327Kv and CTs having turns ratios
greater than 32750:5 (6550:1). Appendix B also explains how to interpret data returned
by the PowerTRAC block when this type of configuration is used.
Appendix C. Using a PowerTRAC Block for Current Monitoring Only: Describes the
necessary wiring and configuration for a PowerTRAC block that will be used to monitor
only current, where the application does not include any PT.
GFK-0450D
iii
Preface
Related Publications
Genius I/O System User’s Manual (GEK–90486): The primary reference for information
about Genius I/O products. It describes types of systems, system planning and
installation, and system components.
PowerTRAC Block Datasheet (GFK–0366): A quick reference to block features, installation,
and specifications.
At GE Fanuc Automation, we strive to produce quality technical documentation. After
you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Jeanne L. Grimsby
Senior Technical Writer
iv
Genius PowerTRAC User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
GFK–0450D
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hand–held Monitor Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Power Required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PTs and CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Data Available from a PowerTRAC Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculated Data and Status Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional Calculated Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Waveform Data and Overcurrent Event Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stand–alone Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical PLC System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hand–held Monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Advanced Data Monitoring Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TypicalApplications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple Load Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Single–phase Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Substation Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-7
1-7
1-8
1-8
1-9
1-9
1-10
1-10
1-11
1-12
1-13
1-13
1-14
1-14
1-15
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Block Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Placing the Block in an Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installation Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Terminal Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Block at the Beginning or End of the Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus Connection for Critical Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stand–alone Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Power Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Block Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring from PTs and CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PT Connections: Line–to–Neutral PTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PT Connections: Line–to–Line PTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CT Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Electronics Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-7
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-10
2-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
v
Contents
Chapter 3
GFK–0450D
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Offline HHM Configuration Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
Select the HHM’s Host CPU Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Connect the HHM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Block ID and Reference Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
Baud Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Block Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Default Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
HHM Configuration Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
PT Connection
...............................................
3-7
Number of PTs
...............................................
3-8
Number of CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-8
Power Display Units
..........................................
3-9
PT Turns Ratio
...............................................
3-10
CT Turns Ratio
...............................................
3-11
NCT Turns Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-11
Current Line Transient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-12
Auxiliary Current Transient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-12
Sign for VARs and Power Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Send Extra Calculated Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-14
BSM Present . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-15
BSM Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-15
CPU Redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-16
Configuration Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-16
Finishing Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-16
Configuration Datagrams for the PowerTRAC Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-17
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
vi
Contents
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
GFK–0450D
Calculated Data and Status Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
Automatic Data Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
CPU Memory Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
Displaying Data With a Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
Status Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
Displaying Status Inputs on a Hand–held Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
Calculated Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Voltage, Line–to–Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Voltage, Line to Neutral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
Line Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-9
Auxiliary Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-9
Active Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-10
Reactive Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-11
Power Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-12
Accumulated Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-13
Command Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-14
HHM Command Outputs Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-15
Additional Calculated Data
................................
5-1
Displaying Additional Calculated Data with a Hand–held Monitor . . . . . .
5-2
Fundamental VARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
Fundamental Power Factor, Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Harmonic VARs as % of Volt–Amps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Total Harmonic VARs as a Percent of V–A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-7
Line Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Temperature Alarm Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
Sending Datagrams to Read Calculated and Status Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
Datagram Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
Read Device Datagram for Calculated and Status Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
Reply Datagram Sent by the PowerTRAC block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
vii
Contents
Chapter 6
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
GFK–0450D
Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
Input Data Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-2
Sampled Waveform Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Harmonic Analysis of Waveform Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overcurrent Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
6-3
6-4
Reading Table Data from a PowerTRAC block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Requesting Data Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notifying the Controller that Data is Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending Data to Monitoring Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sending Datagrams to Read Table Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Datagram Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Read Device Datagram for Table Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reply Datagram Sent to the Requesting Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Converting the Data to Voltage or Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-10
6-10
6-12
6-12
Special Wiring Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
Required PT and CT Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Redefining Power Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Basic Wiring Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 line–to–neutral PTs with 1 or 3 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 line–to–neutral PTs with 2 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 line–to–neutral PT with 1 or 3 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 line–to–line PTs with 2 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1 line–to–line PT with 2 CTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-8
A-9
A-10
Using PTs and CTs With Higher Turns Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
Configuring Fractional Turns Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fractional PT Turns Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fractional CT Turns Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fractional Calculated Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fractional Calculated Power Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recording Changed Turns Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-2
B-3
B-3
Using a PowerTRAC Block for Current Monitoring Only . . . . . . .
C-1
Installation Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
C-2
Monitoring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
iv
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
viii
restart lowapp ARestart oddapp: ARestarts for autonumbers that do not restart in
each chapter. figure bi level 1, reset table_big level 1, reset chap_big level 1, reset1
Lowapp Alwbox restart evenap:A1app_big level 1, resetA figure_ap level 1, reset
table_ap level 1, reset figure level 1, reset table level 1, reset these restarts
oddbox reset: 1evenbox reset: 1must be in the header frame of chapter 1. a:ebx, l 1
resetA a:obx:l 1, resetA a:bigbx level 1 resetA a:ftr level 1 resetA c:ebx, l 1 reset1
c:obx:l 1, reset1 c:bigbx level 1 reset1 c:ftr level 1 reset1 Reminders for
autonumbers that need to be restarted manually (first instance will always be 4)
let_in level 1: A. B. C. letter level 1:A.B.C. num level 1: 1. 2. 3. num_in level 1: 1. 2.
3. rom_in level 1: I. II. III. roman level 1: I. II. III. steps level 1: 1. 2. 3.
Chapter
1 Introduction
1
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
Overview
The Genius PowerTRAC block is used in many types of power monitoring and
industrial applications. The PowerTRAC block monitors current and voltage inputs and
stores digitized waveform values for each input. From these values, the block calculates
RMS voltage, current, active power, reactive power, KWH, and power factor. The block
automatically sends this calculated data to a host PLC or computer approximately twice
per second. The same data can be displayed on a Genius Hand–held Monitor, either
locally or from any connection point the bus.
A PowerTRAC block can be used with a wye– or delta–configured three–phase power
system or with a single–phase power system. It accepts voltage inputs from one to
three potential transformers, and current inputs from up to three line current
transformers, plus a neutral current transformer.
The PowerTRAC block:
GFK-0450D
Accurately measures RMS voltage,
current, power, VARs, power factor,
watt–hours, and line frequency, even
with distorted waveforms.
Provides simple user connections.
Has low current transformer burden (less
than 0.5VA).
Indicates magnitude of system harmonic
content.
Detects and captures overcurrent
transients. Overcurrent threshold is
user–configurable.
Can be mounted in distribution or process
equipment.
Can be installed on a Genius bus up to
7500 feet from the host PLC or computer.
Can be used in stand–alone applications
without a host. The block will
automatically provide operator displays
on a Genius Hand–held Monitor.
Has an integral power supply, and accepts
either 115/230 VAC or 125 VDC inputs.
Is software configurable from the host or
from a Hand–held Monitor.
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a43592
GE Fanuc
GENIUS
POWER
TRAC
UNIT
OK
I/O
ENABLED
HHM
1-1
1
Block Description
The block has two parts: a Terminal Assembly, to which all fixed wiring is attached, and
an Electronics Assembly. The Electronics Assembly may be inserted or removed without
disturbing field wiring or block configuration.
Inputs from current transformers and potential transformers are wired to the Terminal
Assembly. The Terminal Assembly is also used to connect the block to the
communications bus. The Terminal Assembly is normally permanently mounted.
Block Dimensions
Dimensions of the PowerTRAC block are shown below.
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a43595
8.06 (20.47)
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5.21 (13.23)
.18 (.46)
11.00
(27.94)
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DIMENSIONS IN INCHES, CENTIMETERS IN PARENTHESIS
The PowerTRAC block is larger than other Genius I/O Blocks.
LEDs
The OK and I/O Enabled LEDs on the front of the Electronics Assembly indicate the
status of the block and of the communications bus.
Hand–held Monitor Connector
The front of the Electronics Assembly also provides a convenient connector for a Genius
Hand–held Monitor. The Hand–held Monitor is used to complete the block’s software
configuration, and can also be used for monitoring functions during system operation.
Block Power Required
The PowerTRAC block’s universal– input type power supply allows it to be powered from
either 115/230 VAC (90– 265 VAC) at 47 to 63 Hz, or 125 VDC (100– 150 VDC) at 35 VA,
maximum.
1-2
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Specifications
VoltageInputs:
Maximum
Range
Overvoltagerange
Burden per input
Accuracy of measured voltages
Configurable PT turn ratios
PowerMeasurement Accuracy:
Current Inputs:
Maximum
Nominalrange
Overcurrent range
Overcurrentwithstand
Burden per input
Accuracy of measured current
5 amps secondary
Configurable CT turn ratio
Power Requirements, 35 VA maximum:
Terminal Wiring:
three phases
0 to 120 VAC RMS at 47 to 63 Hz
up to 300V peak
less than 0.1 VA
0.25% reading + 0.25% full scale
up to 327670:120 (2730:1). Higher primary voltages may
be scaled external to PowerTRAC block.
0.75% reading + 0.75% full scale
three phases
0 to 5 amps RMS at 47 to 63 Hz
5 to 50 amps RMS at 47 to 63 Hz
50 amp for 5 sec, at 10 minute intervals
less than 0.5 VA
0.50% reading + 0.50% full scale
up to 32750:5 (6550:1)
115 VAC/230V
AC (90–265VAC), 47–63Hz
or 125VDC (100–150VDC), 35VA max.
for Genius I/O bus, one AWG #12 or two AWG #14)
for power, CTs, and PTs: up to AWG #10
LEDs:
Functionality:
Voltage
Current
Active Power
Reactive Power
Power Factor
UpdateRate
Environmental:
OperatingTemperature
Storage Temperature
Humidity
Vibration
Unit OK, Communications OK
Dimensions:
5.21” w. X 11.00” h. X 8.06” d.
13.23cm w. X 27.94cm h. X 20.47cm d.
•
•
Phase to phase (wye and delta) Phase to neutral (wye system)
Per phase and neutral
Per phase
Per phase
Effective system PF
2 / second for calculated values and status data
0C to +60C (+32F to +140F)
–40C to +100C (–40F to +212F)
5% to 95% non–condensing
1.0 G 10–200Hz
Electronics removable from terminal strip while maintaining electrical continuity on CT secondaries.
Designed in accordance with UL and CSA, ANSI 37.90, NEMA 2–230, IEEE 587
Ordering Information
PowerTRAC block
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
IC660BPM100
1-3
1
PTs and CTs
The PowerTRAC block can be used with one to three potential transformers and up to
three current transformers. There must be at least one voltage input with a secondary
voltage of 30 VAC to synchronize the PowerTRAC block to the line frequency. However,
it is possible to use the PowerTRAC block without any current transformer.
Monitoring Current Only
The block can be used to monitor current only if at least one voltage input is connected.
Special instructions for this are given in appendix C.
PTs
The PowerTRAC block can be used with any potential transformer having a secondary
rating of 120 VAC at 47 to 63 Hz. The block automatically calculates primary voltages up
to 327KV (PT turns ratio 2730:1). PTs with higher primary voltages can also be used with
the block (see appendix B for details). Voltage inputs are nominally 120 VAC RMS with
measurement capability up to 300 volts peak. Accuracy specifications are based on 120
volts full scale. Potential transformers may be connected line–to–neutral or
line–to–line.
CTs
Current transformers must have a secondary rating of 5 amps maximum at the
PowerTRAC input. The block automatically calculates primary currents up to 32750
amps for line connections or 3275 amps for auxiliary (neutral) connections, although CTs
with higher primary ratings can be used (see appendix B). Accuracy specifications are
based on 5 amps full scale. For maximum accuracy, you should use the smallest current
transformer that will handle the requirements.
The block processes current inputs to maximize accuracy and resolution over the
nominal 5 amp range with overload capability up to 10x the rated current (50 amps).
Current transformer burden is 0.5VA maximum. For safety, CT burdens are
permanently connected across the Terminal Assembly’s CT input terminals. No spring
type contacts are used, and no shorting bars are required for Electronics Assembly
servicing or replacement; burden is maintained with the Electronics Assembly removed.
1-4
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Block Operation
The PowerTRAC block uses both analog and digital techniques to provide accurate,
stable measurements which are fully updated twice per second.
To accomplish this, the block samples all current and voltage inputs for eight consecutive
cycles at a rate 16 times the line frequency. As a result, each input waveform is digitized
with 128 samples. These composite waveforms are stored in a Working Data Table for
computation of the new measurements. The stored waveforms might also be used for
harmonic analysis; they can be read by a PLC or computer using datagrams.
Both voltage and current inputs are processed to maximize accuracy over the specified
measurement range, while still providing the ability to track overload conditions at a
reduced accuracy. Sampling is referenced to line frequency using phase–lock loop for
repeatability.
From the 128 stored sampled values for each input, the block calculates voltage, current,
active and reactive power, power factor, and power consumed or supplied.
The block automatically updates the calculated data values sent to the programmable
controller and/or host computer on the Genius bus approximately twice per second. The
same data can be displayed on a Hand–held Monitor, which may be connected at any
location in the Genius bus or directly attached to the PowerTRAC block itself.
CURRENT
AND
VOLTAGE
INPUTS
a43593
STATUS
DATA
G
E
N
I
U
S
Ia
Ib
Ic
SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
Ix
Va
MULTIPLEXER
ANALOG
TO
DIGITAL
CONVERTER
WORKING
DATA
Vb
Vc
OVERCURRENT
DATA
CALCULATED
DATA
B
U
S
XMIT
DATA
BUFFER
If a current exceeds a configurable level, the block captures that input waveform, as well
as waveforms present on all other inputs. The digitized inputs are stored in an internal
table called the Overcurrent Data Table. The block will supply waveform data to the
PLC or computer, for harmonic or overcurrent analysis, upon request.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-5
1
Simultaneous Input Sampling
All current and voltage inputs are sampled simultaneously.
INPUTS
A
SIMULTANEOUS
SAMPLE
a44998
PHASE A CURRENT (Ia)
PHASE B CURRENT (Ib)
PHASE C CURRENT (Ic)
NEUTRAL CURRENT (Ix)
PHASE A VOLTAGE (Va)
PHASE B VOLTAGE (Vb)
PHASE C VOLTAGE (Vc)
This sampling technique maintains proper phase relationships in the calculated data.
1-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Data Available from a PowerTRAC Block
A PowerTRAC block can provide three basic types of data:
H
Calculated Data and Status Data
18 words (36 bytes) of calculated values plus 1 word (2 bytes) of handshaking and
status data, which are automatically broadcast by the block, and available to all other
devices on the bus.
H
Additional Calculated Data
12 words (24 bytes) of calculated values, which may be automatically sent, or
requested from a Hand–held Monitor or host.
H
Waveform and Overcurrent Event Data
Two tables of waveform values, which are available by request from the host, using
the handshaking protocol.
Calculated Data and Status Data
Approximately twice per second, the block takes 128 samples from 8 cycles of each
voltage input from potential transformers and each current input from current
transformers. It then calculates the following values:
Voltage phase A to B
Voltage phase B to C
Voltage phase C to A
Voltage phase A to N (for line–to–neutral potential transformers only)
Voltage phase B to N (for line–to–neutral potential transformers only)
Voltage phase C to N (for line–to–neutral potential transformers only)
Current phase A
Current phase B
Current phase C
Auxiliary CT current
Active power phase A
Active power phase B
Active power phase C
Reactive power phase A
Reactive power phase B
Reactive power phase C
Total power factor
Total watt–hours/KWH/MWH
Each bus scan, the block also automatically sends 16 bits of overcurrent event and
handshaking status information. In return, the PLC or computer sends 16 output control
bits to the block. This transfer of status and control bits establishes a handshaking protocol
which can be used by the host to set up transfer of waveform data.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-7
1
Additional Calculated Data
In addition to the calculated data it automatically provides to the host, the PowerTRAC
block calculates the following data. Depending on how the block is configured, this data
may be automatically sent each bus scan, following the regular calculated data.
Alternatively, it may be sent only on request by a Hand–held Monitor or host controller
or computer.
Fundamental VARS phase A
Fundamental VARS phase B
Fundamental VARs phase C
Fundamental Power Factor
Harmonic VARS as % of Volt–Amps phase A
Harmonic VARs as % of Volt–Amps phase B
Harmonic VARs as % of Volt–Amps phase C
Total Harmonic VARs as % of Volt–Amps
Line Frequency
Temperature Alarm
Extended Watt-hours (high)
Extended Watt-hours (low)
Waveform Data and Overcurrent Event Data
The block maintains two 1792–byte tables in its own memory. Each table holds sampled
values representing 8 continuous cycles of each of the 3 voltage and 4 current inputs. In
the waveform table, the data for each input is interleaved to form single–cycle
waveforms consisting of 128 data samples each. The overcurrent event table holds
transient waveform data for each input, consisting of 8 cycles of 16 samples each.
The controller or an optional monitoring device can request data from either table for
harmonics analysis or overcurrent event analysis. Each transfer of this data must be set
up by a prior exchange of handshaking bits, as explained in chapter 6.
1-8
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Systems
A PowerTRAC block can be used in many types of system, from very simple to highly
complex:
H
The simplest type of ”system” consists of a stand–alone PowerTRAC block, a
Hand–held Monitor, and no host PLC or computer.
H
A PLC–host system may have many PowerTRAC blocks and other Genius I/O
blocks on one or more communications busses.
H
An advanced data monitoring system may have one or more computers reading and
analyzing data from multiple PowerTRAC blocks and other blocks, with a host PLC
or computer providing overall control.
Stand–alone Block
A PowerTRAC block can easily be used as a stand–alone power–monitoring device. No
host connection is required. A Genius Hand–held Monitor is used to configure the
block, and to provide operator displays.
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a43693
The Hand–held Monitor can be temporarily attached to the convenient connector on
the front of the block, as shown above, or permanently installed beside the PowerTRAC
block for use as an operator workstation.
The Hand–held Monitor will display all the status and calculated data provided by the
block. Complete descriptions of the HHM screens are given in this book. The only data
that is not available to a HHM in a stand–alone application is waveform and
overcurrent event data.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-9
1
Typical PLC System
The PowerTRAC block can provide information to an application program running in a
PLC or host computer. A PLC is preferred its for extensive control and data transfer
capabilities.
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PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLER
PANEL MOUNTED
HAND–HELD
MONITOR
a43700
TOTAL BUS LENGTH UP TO
7500 FEET (2286 METERS)
INPUTS FROM
UP TO THREE
POTENTIAL
TRANSFORMERS
UP TO THREE
CURRENT
TRANSFORMERS
AUXILIARY
CURRENT
TRANSFORMER
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
PORTABLE
HAND–HELD
MONITOR
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GENIUS BLOCKS
OR POWER TRAC
BLOCKS
The Communications Bus
The Genius I/O bus can be up to 7500 feet (2286 meters) in length. The same bus may
serve other Genius I/O blocks performing a variety of monitoring and control functions.
The maximum baud rate is 153.6 Kbaud for bus lengths up to 3500 feet. For longer
busses, a slower baud rate must be selected. 38.4Kbaud must be used for 7500–foot
busses (with a maximum of 16 devices on the bus).
Additional Devices on the Bus
In addition to the PowerTRAC block, as many as 30 other devices can be connected to a
bus. Any number of these may be PowerTRAC blocks. The number of PowerTRAC
blocks in the system can depend upon the availability of memory in the host.
Hand–held Monitors
One or more Hand–held Monitors can be used to display the block’s calculated data, as
well as status information which is automatically provided by the block. A portable
Hand–held Monitor can be attached to any HHM connector on the bus, or directly to
the PowerTRAC block. A Hand–held Monitor can also be permanently mounted on a
panel for an operator workstation. If the system includes multiple Hand–held
Monitors, they can display different data from the PowerTRAC block simultaneously.
For example, one might display the calculated voltage while another displayed status
information. (The Hand–held Monitors must have different Device Numbers to be
used on a bus at the same time).
1-10
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Advanced Data Monitoring Systems
PowerTRAC blocks can be used with both PLCs and GE Fanuc Cimplicity software
products for host computers, in a variety of industrial power measurement applications
such as system monitoring, multiple load monitoring, and single–phase monitoring.
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PROGRAMMABLE CONTROLLER
TOTAL BUS LENGTH UP TO 7500 FEET (2286 METERS)
MONITORING
COMPUTER
PRINTER
a44673
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CIMPLICITY
MODEL I/W/D
POWER TRAC BLOCKS
The information provided by the PowerTRAC blocks can be displayed in easily
interpreted formats using Cimplicity software products. The Cimplicity products
provide graphics status monitoring, trending, data logging, reporting, and alarming
functions that work well with PowerTRAC blocks in power management systems.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-11
1
Compatibility
The Genius PowerTRAC block is compatible with:
Hand–held Monitor
Hand–held Monitor (IC660HHM501) version 3.5* or later provides basic compatibility
with a PowerTRAC block. HHM version 4.0 or later is needed to display:
H
H
H
H
H
Fundamental VARs
Fundamental Power Factor
Harmonic VARs as % of V–A
Line Frequency
Temperature Alarm Status
Series 90t–70 PLC
H
H
CPUs: IC697CPU731G (rev 2.02) or later, IC697CPU771E (rev 2.02) or later.
H
Genius Bus Controller: version IC697BEM731C or later.
Logicmastert 90–70 Programming Software: release 2.03 (IC641SWP701/702) or
later.
Series Sixt PLC
H
H
H
CPU: rev. 105 or later (Logicmaster 6 will display as 3.01 or later).
Logicmaster 6 Programming Software: release 4.02 or later.
Bus Controllers: IC660CBB902 or 903, version 1.7 or later.
Series Fivet PLC
H
H
H
CPU: rev. 4.0 or later.
Logicmaster 5 Programming Software: release 2.01 or later.
Bus Controller: any version
Host Computers
H
H
H
H
*
1-12
PCIM: any version
QBIM: any version
Cimplicityt System 3000 Models I/W
Cimplicity System 3000 Model D: rev. 3.0 or higher
(For Series Six PLCs only:) use of I/O Table references for the PowerTRAC block is not
fully supported by version 3.8 and earlier of the Hand–held Monitor firmware.
These HHMs assume that a PowerTRAC Block occupies 304 I/O references. When
configuring blocks online, if you assign reference addresses within that range of 304
references to another bus device, the HHM assumes that a reference address conflict
exists. Also, when monitoring the block, the HHM incorrectly displays a different
reference address in the range of 304 inputs for each status and calculated data value.
All values should show the same beginning I/O address. Use of HHM firmware
version 4.0 or later avoids this problem.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Typical Applications
The PowerTRAC block can be used in many types of power monitoring and industrial
applications, such as system monitoring, multiple load monitoring, single–phase
monitoring, and substation monitoring.
System Monitoring
The PowerTRAC block can be used to monitor the magnitude and direction of power
flow. It will provide data for load shedding and/or power factor correction.
a43687
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
POWER
FLOW
DATA TO PLC,
HOST COMPUTER
COGENERATION
PLANT
The PowerTRAC block provides a programmable controller or host computer with
signed Watts and VARs signals for each phase, as well as system Power Factor. The same
data can also be displayed on a Hand–held Monitor, as shown later in this book.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 1 Introduction
1-13
1
Multiple Load Monitoring
The PowerTRAC block can be used in applications where three independent loads from
a single 3–phase feeder must be monitored.
a43685
PT
CT
CT
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
CT
For accurate monitoring in this type of application, the voltage and load on each of the
three phases must be balanced.
Single–phase Monitoring
One PowerTRAC block can be used to monitor up to three independent single–phase
circuits. The circuits can be the same phase or different phases.
a43686
PT
CT
PT
CT
PT
CT
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
For 120 volt lines, no potential transformers are required. If the current is less than or
equal to 5 Amps nominal, no current transformers are required.
1-14
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
1
Substation Monitoring
The PowerTRAC block can be installed in switch gear to monitor power flow on main
and feeder breakers in a factory.
a44674
UTILITY POWER LINES
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
TRANSFORMER
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MAIN
FEEDERS
CIMPLICITY MODEL 3000 I/W/D
GRAPHICS DISPLAY
(OPTIONAL)
PLC
GENIUS BUS
Power usage information can be collected over the Genius bus and displayed by a host
computer, such as the example Cimplicity System 3000 Model I/W or D system
represented below. The information gathered by the system can be used to develop
power management strategies such as load scheduling, load shedding, or power factor
correction. When control is needed, a PLC can be included in the system.
Load Center Substation 2
MAIN
KW = 2693
KVAR = –1493
P F = .875
Feeder 1
KW= 445
KVAR=–261
P F= .862
GFK-0450D
Feeder 2
KW= 481
KVAR=–234
P F= .599
Chapter 1 Introduction
Feeder 3
KW= 0
KVAR=0
P F= 0
Feeder 4
KW= 391
KVAR=–207
P F= .881
Feeder 5
KW= 82
KVAR=–44
P F= .881
Feeder 6
KW= 449
KVAR=–293
P F= .837
Feeder 7
KW= 113
KVAR=–66
P F= .864
Feeder 8
KW= 26
KVAR=–22
P F= .764
1-15
Chapter
2 Installation
2
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes installation and field wiring for the PowerTRAC Block.
Block Location
The block can be individually installed on a machine, in a junction box, or on a rack or
panel. If the block is located in an enclosed space, be sure to allow adequate clearance
for routing wiring and for airflow around the block. Also be sure to leave room at the
front of the block for connecting a Hand–held Monitor.
Placing the Block in an Enclosure
If the intended location is unprotected, the block should be placed in an appropriate
enclosure. The Genius I/O System User’s Manual gives guidelines for enclosure selection.
If the enclosure must be located in direct sunlight, consider placing a shade over it
and/or painting it white. In locations where temperature may be lower than 32_F, the
enclosure should be warmed using an internal heater with a thermostat.
The block should be installed in a reliably grounded location. Normally, a ground
(green) wire is routed from the building power system to each control cabinet.
Installation Steps
For easiest block installation, follow this sequence:
GFK-0450D
1.
Remove the block’s Electronics Assembly from the Terminal Assembly, then install
the Terminal Assembly.
2.
Complete the wiring to the Terminal Assembly.
3.
Install the Electronics Assembly on the Terminal Assembly.
4.
Apply power to the block.
2-1
2
Install the Terminal Assembly
1.
Drill mounting holes as indicated below at the intended location.
a43596
.22
(.56)
5.21 (13.23)
.43
(1.09)
3.25 (8.26)
10.56
(26.82)
11.00
(27.94)
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES,
CENTIMETERS IN PARENTHESIS
2.
Loosen the retaining screws.
3.
Grasp the block firmly, and pull the Electronics Assembly out straight, away from
the Terminal Assembly. Place the Electronics Assembly in a protected location.
Î
Î
a43597
TERMINAL ASSEMBLY
RETAINING SCREWS
(QTY 2)
Î
Î
CONNECTORS
ELECTRONICS ASSEMBLY
4.
2-2
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Line up the notches in the top and bottom of the Terminal Assembly with the drilled
holes. Fasten the Terminal Assembly securely in place using up to #12 screws with
star washers.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
2
Bus Wiring
If the block will be part of a host PLC or computer system, complete the communications
bus wiring using one of the bus cable types recommended in the Genius I/O System
User’s Manual. Connect the Serial 1 terminals of adjacent devices and the Serial 2
terminals of adjacent devices. Connect Shield In to the Shield Out terminal of the
previous device. Connect Shield Out to the Shield In terminal of the next device.
END
OF
BUS
START
OF
BUS
TERMINATING
RESISTOR
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SHIELD IN
SHIELD OUT
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
a40743
TERMINATING
RESISTOR
SERIAL 1
SERIAL 2
SHIELD IN
SHIELD OUT
These terminals can accommodate spade or ring lugs up to 0.27 inch (6.85mm) in width
with a minimum opening for a #6 screw, and up to 0.20 inch (5.1mm) depth from the
screw center to the back barrier.
When making bus connections, the maximum exposed length of bare wires should be
two inches. For added protection, each shield drain wire should be insulated with
spaghetti tubing to prevent the Shield In and Shield Out wires from touching each other.
Installing the Block at the Beginning or End of the Bus
If the block is at the beginning of the bus, its Shield In terminal is not connected. If the
block is at the end of the bus, its Shield Out terminal is not connected.
If the block is at either end of the bus, connect a terminating resistor of the appropriate
impedance across the Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals. Impedance will be 75, 100, 120, or
150 ohms. The impedance selected must be correct for the cable type used for the bus.
For information about cable types and terminating impedance, refer to the Bus Controller
User’s Manual, or to the Genius I/O System User’s Manual.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 2 Installation
2-3
2
Bus Connection for Critical Processes
The recommended method of connecting the block to the bus is to wire the bus directly
to the Terminal Assembly as described above. These bus connections are normally
considered permanent. They should never be removed while the completed system is in
operation; the resulting unreliable data on the bus could cause hazardous control
conditions. If the possible removal or replacement of the block’s Terminal Assembly
would result in breaking the continuity of the bus, the bus should be turned off first. If
the bus controls critical processes that cannot be shut down, the block can be wired to
the bus via an intermediate connector, as shown below.
a43692
Î
Î
ÎÎ Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
I
N
O
U
T
S1
S2
SHLD 1
SHLD 2
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
This will allow the block’s Terminal Assembly to be removed while maintaining data
integrity on the bus. The connector shown is #A107204NL from Control Design, 48
Crompton Street, Charlotte, NC, 28134.
Alternatively, the wire ends can be soldered together before inserting them into the
block terminals. When removing the Terminal Assembly, the ends of the bus wires must
be covered with tape or other insulating material to prevent shorting the signal wires to
one another or to ground.
If the block is connected to the bus in this way, field wiring to the block should also
provide a means of disconnecting power to the block.
2-4
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
2
Stand–alone Installation
If the PowerTRAC block will be used as a stand–alone device, with no connection on a
communications bus, install a 75–ohm terminating resistor across the Serial 1 and Serial
2 terminals.
ATTACH
GROUND
STRAP
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
SER 1
SER 2
a43694
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
SHD IN
SHD OUT
TERMINATOR
PLUG
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
TO
APPROPRIATE
AC OR DC
POWER
Note
When the PowerTRAC block is used as a stand–alone device, its I/O
Enabled LED remains off. This is normal. The I/O Enabled LED lights
only if the PowerTRAC block is receiving outputs from a bus controller.
Configure the block using a Hand–held Monitor, following the instructions in chapter 3.
Even though the block will not be used on a bus, it must be given a Device Number.
Other options can be selected to suit the application.
If a Hand–held Monitor will be used only with a stand–alone PowerTRAC Block, the
HHM can be set up for PCIM host operation. In that mode, the HHM will not expect the
block to have a Reference Number.
If the Hand–held Monitor used with a stand–alone block will also be used with a host
PLC, as a convenience, the block can be configured to have a Reference Number that is
suitable for that PLC type, and the same baud rate used by other devices. The HHM can
then communicate with the stand–alone block without needing to change the HHM’s
host CPU type or baud rate.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 2 Installation
2-5
2
Block Power Wiring
Power wiring connections may be made with wire sizes up to #10. The terminals will
accept bare wires, or spade or ring lugs.
Block power may be from a 115/230 VAC or 125 VDC power source.
The same terminals are used for power connections from either an AC or a DC source.
For AC power, connect the hot (black) wire to the block’s H terminal. Connect the
neutral (white) wire to the N terminal. For DC power, connect the DC+ wire to the H
terminal. Connect the DC– wire to the N terminal.
Do not apply power to the block before completing the rest of the installation steps.
BlockGrounding
Complete the power wiring by attaching the ground wire to one of the ground screws
on the block.
GROUNDING
SCREW
ALTERNATE
GROUND
CONNECTION
POINT
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
a43599
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
One of the block’s ground screws must also be wired to the equipment chassis to ensure
proper grounding.
2-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
2
Wiring from PTs and CTs
Wiring connections from PTs and CTs may be made with wire sizes up to #10. The
terminals will accept bare wires, or spade or ring lugs. If conduit will be used to bring wires
or cables to the block, its size and installation should be in accordance with local electrical
code. For safety, current transformer burdens are permanently connected across the block’s
current transformer input terminals. No spring– type contacts are used.
Power must be NOT be applied to the PowerTRAC block or input terminals when
completing the field wiring.
For correct calculation of power values, PTs and CTs must be connected to the power
phases and to the block as shown in the following diagrams. For PTs, the primary and
secondary connections should be made the same way (either line–to–line or
line–to–neutral) .
Required Connections
Number of
of PTs (L–N)
Number of PTs (L–L)
Number of CTs
three
two
one
A–N
A–N
three
two
one
B–C
B–C
three
two
one
phase A
phase A
B–A
C–N
C–N
B–N
C–A
A–B
A–B
C–A
phase B
phase C
phase C
phase B
If the PTs and/or CTs cannot be connected to the power phases as shown, turn to appendix A.
Connection to Monitor Current Only
The block can be used to monitor only current, without also monitoring voltage.
However, to operate properly, the block needs at least one voltage input. If the block
will be used to monitor current only, refer to appendix C for installation and
configuration instructions.
Connections to Other Instrumentation
The PowerTRAC block does not require dedicated PTs and CTs. The PT inputs can be
wired in parallel with other instrumentation. The CT inputs can be wired in series with
other instrumentation. The total burdens of all instruments including the PowerTRAC
block must not exceed the PT or CT ratings.
Power Flow
Transformers should be connected to the block with the dots as shown in the wiring
diagrams. If this is done, power flow in the direction indicated by the arrow in each
illustration will provide a + reading for that input.
Warning
For personal safety, PT AND CT SECONDARIES MUST BE GROUNDED.
Recommended grounding is shown in the diagrams that follow.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 2 Installation
2-7
2
PT Connections: Line–to–Neutral PTs
Refer to the following example to connect line–to–neutral PTs to the PowerTRAC block.
For proper calculation of power values, the block’s R, S, and T terminals must be
connected to these line–to–neutral PTs:
R terminals:
Phase A to neutral PT
S terminals:
Phase B to neutral PT
T terminals:
Phase C to neutral PT
If there are just two line–to–neutral PTs, one PT must be connected from phase A to
neutral and to the block’s R terminals. The other must be connected from phase C to
neutral, and to the block’s T terminals; eliminate S. The PowerTRAC block will
synthesize the third voltage (S inputs) from R and T by assuming that R + S + T = 0 at
each sample period.
If there is just one PT, it must be connected from Phase B to neutral, and to the
PowerTRAC block’s S terminals. Do not use R and T. The block will synthesize the other
voltages as explained above.
Short any unused inputs together or to ground.
If there are one or two PTs and they cannot be connected to power as shown, refer to
appendix A for wiring information.
The PT inputs can be wired in parallel with other instrumentation. The total burdens of
all instruments including the PowerTRAC block must not exceed the PT or CT ratings.
Line–to–Neutral
Potential Transformers
a43600
(LINE SIDE)
N
A
B
C
R+
R–
POWER
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
(LOAD SIDE)
2-8
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
2
PT Connections: Line–to–Line PTs
Connections for line–to–line PTs are shown by the examples below. If PTs cannot be
connected to power as shown, refer to appendix A for wiring information.
3 Line–to–Line Potential Transformers
For proper calculation of power values, the block’s R, S, and T terminals must be
connected to these line–to–line PTs:
R terminals:
Phase B to phase C PT
S terminals:
Phase C to phase A PT
T terminals:
Phase A to phase B PT
(LINE SIDE)
A
B
a43601
C
R+
R
POWER
S+
S
T+
T
(LOAD SIDE)
2 Line–to–Line Potential Transformers
If there are just two line–to–line PTs, one PT must be connected from phase B to phase
C and to the block’s R terminals. The other must be connected from phase A to phase B,
and to the block’s T terminals. Connect the S terminals as shown.
(LINE SIDE)
A
B
a43602
C
R+
R
POWER
S+
S
T+
T
(LOAD SIDE)
GFK-0450D
Chapter 2 Installation
2-9
2
1 Line–to–Line Potential Transformer
If there is just one PT, it must be connected from phase C to phase A, and to the
PowerTRAC block’s S terminals. Do not use R and T.
(LINE SIDE)
A
B
a43603
C
R+
R
POWER
S+
S
T+
T
(LOAD SIDE)
CT Connections
Refer to the following example to connect CTs to the PowerTRAC block. For proper calculation
of power values, the block’s A, B, and C terminals must be connected to these CTs:
A terminals:
Phase A
B terminals:
Phase B
B terminals:
Phase C
The CT inputs can be wired in series with other instrumentation. The total burdens of all
instruments including the PowerTRAC block must not exceed the PT or CT ratings.
3 Line Current Transformers
1 Neutral Current Transformer
a43604
(LINE SIDE)
N
A
B
C
A+
A
POWER
B+
B
CURRENT
C+
C
X+
X
(LOAD SIDE)
2-10
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
2
2 Line Current Transformers
1 Neutral Current Transformer
If there are just two CTs, one must be connected from phase A to the block’s A terminals.
The other must be connected from phase C to the block’s C terminals; eliminate B.
a43605
(LINE SIDE)
N
A
B
C
A+
A
POWER
B+
B
C+
C
X+
X
(LOAD SIDE)
1 Line Current Transformer
1 Neutral Current Transformer
If only one CT is used, total power as used in the Watt–hour and Power Factor
calculations is assumed to be three times the measured power on phase 2.
a43606
(LINE SIDE)
N
A
B
C
A+
A
B+
B
C+
C
X+
X
(LOAD SIDE)
Caution
NEVER disconnect any current transformer wiring from the
PowerTRAC block when current is flowing in the primary circuit. The
resulting hazardous voltages MAY CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 2 Installation
2-11
2
Install the Electronics Assembly
The Electronics Assembly and Terminal Assembly are keyed to assure correct installation
of the Electronics Assembly.
1.
Align the Electronics Assembly, using the shoulder screws on the side of the
Terminal Assembly as a guide.
2.
Push the Electronics Assembly down quickly.
Caution
Do not exert excessive force. Damage to the equipment can result.
If unusual resistance is met, remove the Electronics Assembly. Check the keying,
and inspect the Terminal Assembly, connector receptacle, and connector edge board
on the Electronics Assembly. If necessary, remove any obstacles and reinsert the
Electronics Assembly. Pay close attention to the alignment of the guide pins.
3.
Secure the Electronics Assembly with the screws on the top and bottom.
4.
Apply power to the block. The OK and I/O Enabled LEDs on the front of the
Electronics Assembly indicate the status of the block and of the communications bus.
Both LEDs should be ON within 2 minutes of receiving power.
OK
I/O Enabled
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
blinking
blinking
ON
blinking
OFF
synchronousblinking
non–synchronous blinking
OFF
OFF
Meaning
Block functioning
CPUcommunicating
Block functioning
No CPU communications for 3 bus scans
Data force in effect
EEPROM failure or other block fault
CPUcommunicating
EEPROM failure or other block fault
No CPU communications for 3 bus scans
No CPU communications–block number conflict
Device fault and I/O force
No power to the block, or block faulty
For information about Genius communications, please refer to the Genius I/O System
User’s Manual (GEK–90486).
Note
When upgrading firmware, or using the Electronics Assembly to replace
an Electronics Assembly that has version 2.2 firmware, it is necessary to
reconfigure the block’s PT Turns Ratio. If the PT Turns Ratio is less than
10:1, it will be corrected automatically by the PowerTRAC block.
2-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Chapter
3
3 Configuration
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how to configure the PowerTRAC block using a Hand–held
Monitor or Write Configuration datagrams.
Note that the configuration of an operating block cannot be changed while it is
transmitting waveform or overcurrent data (while output bit 1, “Send Data”, is set to 1).
For more information, see chapter 6.
Overview
Each Genius I/O block must be configured to assign it a Device Number for
communications on the bus. For some CPU types, each block must also be assigned a
Reference Address, which is the beginning memory location in the CPU for the block’s
inputs and outputs. These features must be configured with a Hand–held Monitor
connected directly to the block.
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
a43693
The Hand–held Monitor (IC660HHM501) must be version 3.5 or later (see page 1-12 for
more information about HHM/PowerTRAC compatibility). The HHM’s Configuration
Protection option must be disabled to configure the block.
GFK-0450D
3-1
3
Offline HHM Configuration Setup
The block can be configured either while connected to a bus or offline. If the block will
be configured offline, it must be set up as described below. If the block is to be installed on a
bus operating at a baud rate other than 153.6 standard, you must configure at least the Device
Number and baud rate offline.
When configuring a block offline, be careful not to assign a Device Number or Reference
Address already being used by another device on the same bus where the PowerTRAC
block will be installed.
1.
Connect a 75–ohm resistor across the block’s Serial 1 and Serial 2 terminals. A
suitable terminator plug (IC660BLM508) is available.
2.
Attach a grounding strap to one of the ground screws on the side of the block.
Connect the grounding strap to earth ground.
Warning
If the block is not properly grounded, hazardous voltages may exist.
Death or injury may result from contact with the block.
3.
Wire the block to an appropriate AC or DC power source, as explained in chapter 2.
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
Î
ATTACH
GROUND
STRAP
a43694
SER 1
SER 2
SHD IN
SHD OUT
TERMINATOR
PLUG
TO
APPROPRIATE
AC OR DC
POWER
Warning
DO NOT TOUCH the connectors or wiring after powering up the
block. Hazardous voltages exist, and death or injury may result.
4.
3-2
Apply power to the block.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
Select the HHM’s Host CPU Type
The same Hand–held Monitor can be used with a Series 90 PLC, a Series Five or Series
Six PLC, or a computer–host Genius I/O system. For a new Hand–held Monitor, the
default host CPU type is Series Six PLC. If the PowerTRAC Block will be controlled by
another type of host, the HHM display format should be changed before continuing
with the configuration.
To check or change the HHM’s selection for Host CPU type, follow these steps:
1.
Turn the Hand–held Monitor ON. After the HHM completes its powerup
sequence, a prompt menu to verify the baud rate setting appears. After verifying
the baud rate, press F4 (OK) and the Home menu will appear.
2.
To change the Hand–held Monitor features, press F1 (HHM Utilities) then F1 (HHM
Configure).
3.
Press the F4 (Next) key twice to step the display to the Host CPU menu. This screen
shows the current host CPU selection:
S E L E C T
H O S T
(current host CPU selection)
C P U
If the wrong type of host CPU is shown, press the F2 (TGL) key to change the host
CPU type. (The HHM keyswitch must be in the CFG position to change this
parameter). When the correct host type is displayed, press F3 (Enter).
Connect the HHM
If the block is on an operating bus, the Hand–held Monitor used for its configuration
must be the ONLY Hand–held Monitor currently plugged into a block on the bus.
1.
Begin with the Hand–held Monitor turned OFF. Attach the Hand–held Monitor to
the block.
2.
From the Home menu, select F3 (configuration).
F 1 : P R O G
B L O C K
I D
F 2 : C O N F I G
B L O C K
F 3 : C O P Y
C O N F I G
GFK-0450D
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-3
3
Block ID and Reference Number
The first step in configuring a new PowerTRAC block is to assign its Device Number. For
some host types, a Reference Number is also configured with the Hand–held Monitor.
Select F1 (prog block ID). A display like this example will appear.
P
I
B
r
R
/
L
e
O G
B L O C K
I D
O
? –
?
G
O C K
N O .
( ID number)
f
b l k
e n t r
n x t
For some hosts, the Hand–held Monitor may not include the Reference Number field
and F1 (ref) key assignment.
BLOCK ID is the block’s Device Number on the bus. The Hand–held Monitor is usually
assigned Device Number 0. The bus interface block (bus controller) is usually assigned
Device Number 31. Other devices are assigned numbers from 1 to 30. Each block is
shipped from the factory with an inoperable ID number. A correct number must be
assigned before the block can be configured.
Each Device Number assigned must be unique on the bus. When the block is placed on
the bus, it will check to be sure its number is not assigned to another device. If it is, the
block will not transmit data on the bus until the Device Number is changed.
The REFERENCE NUMBER is the beginning CPU reference address used for the block’s
status data, calculated values, and command data (for more information, see chapter 4).
3-4
1.
The Hand–held Monitor must be attached directly to the device where the Device
Number is to be programmed. Press F2 (blk) to enter or change the block’s Device
Number (Block ID). The menu then changes to permit the number to be entered.
Enter a number from the keypad, then press the F3 (entr) key. If the selected Device
Number is already being used by another device on the bus, the HHM displays an
error message. Press the Clear key to clear the display, then repeat the process using
a different Device Number.
2.
To enter or change the block’s Reference Number, press F1 (ref). The menu changes
to allow a reference type and number to be entered. The number you enter must be
appropriate for the CPU. After entering the number, press F3 (entr). If the selected
reference number is already being used by another device on the bus, the HHM
displays an error message. Press the Clear key to clear the display, then repeat the
process using a different reference number.
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to check the block’s currently–configured baud rate, and change it if
necessary.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
Baud Rate
The bus will not operate unless all the devices on it are set for the same baud rate.
Selections are 153.6 Kbaud standard, 153.6 Kbaud extended, 76.8 Kbaud, or 38.4 Kbaud.
By default, the block operates at 153.6 Kbaud (standard). The programmed baud rate
does not become active until the PowerTRAC block has been power–cycled.
If the PowerTRAC block is to be installed on a bus operating at a baud rate other than
153.6 Kbaud standard, it will be necessary to program the baud rate before installing the
block on the bus. If the block is being configured for the first time, to assign its Device
Number the Hand–held Monitor must be operating at 153.6 Kbaud standard. Refer to
the information about offline configuration at the start of this chapter.
S E L E C T
A C T I V E =
P R O G
=
t g
B A U D
1 5 3 . 6
1 5 3 . 6
l
e n t
R A T E
K
S T
K
S T
r
n x t
1.
If the baud rate shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
If the baud rate is changed while the block is installed on an operating bus, it must
be changed for all devices on the bus. After changing the baud rate, cycle power at
the same time to all devices on the bus to use the new baud rate. In systems where
this is not possible, change the baud rate of all devices before power–cycling any of
them.
3.
Once these required configuration parameters have been entered, the optional
selections can be changed by returning to the Configuration Menu.
Configuration Menu
To complete the block’s configuration using the Hand–held Monitor, press Menu, then
F2 (configure block).
F 1 : P R O G
B L O C K
I D
F 2 : C O N F I G
B L O C K
F 3 : C O P Y
C O N F I G
GFK-0450D
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-5
3
Block Features
The features listed below can be configured using the Hand–held Monitor, or by using
Write Configuration datagrams from the application program.
Default Configuration
Some configurable features have a default configuration, which will be suitable for many
applications and will not need to be changed.
Feature
PT Connection
Number of PTs
Number of CTs
Power Display Units
PT Turns Ratio
CT Turns Ratio
NCT Turns Ratio
Current Line Transient
Auxiliary Current Transient
Sign for VARs and Power Factor
Send Extended Calculated Data
Baud Rate
BSM Present
CPU Redundancy
Config. Protect
Selections
line to line, line to neutral
1–3
1–3
Watts, MegaWatts, KiloWatts
1.0 to 2730.0
1 to 6550
1 to 655
up to 32767A
up to 4600A
Mode A or Mode B
no, yes
153.6 st, 153.6 ex, 76.8, 38.4 Kbaud
yes/no
none, hot standby
enabled/disabled
Default
L–N
3
2
KWatts
60.0
200
5
3276
327
Mode A
no
153.6 st
no
none
disabled
HHM Configuration Steps
When Block Configuration is selected, a sequence of HHM displays appears for
configuring these features. Configuration steps are described below in the same order as
these displays.
3-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
PT Connection
The block can be connected to potential transformers either line–to–neutral or
line–to–line. Default is line–to–neutral.
P T
C O N N E C T I O N
L – N = 0
L – L = 1
r n g
c h n g
1
n x t
On this and the following configuration screens, pressing F1 (rng) will display the
range of configurable entries. After pressing F1, press any function key or the Menu
key to return to the same configuration screen.
The number (0 or 1) on line 3 shows whether potential transformers are connected
line–to–neutral (0) or line–to–line (1).
GFK-0450D
1.
If the number shown should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the number 0 or 1 from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-7
3
Number of PTs
Specify the number of PTs that will be connected to the block (1 to 3). The default is 3.
N U M B E R
O F
P T S
( 1
T O
3 )
r n g
c h n g
3
n x t
1.
If the number on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Number of CTs
Next, specify the number of current transformers (not including an optional neutral current
transformer) that will be connected to the block (1 to 3). The default selection is 2.
N U M B E R
O F
C T S
( 1
T O
3 )
r n g
3-8
c h n g
2
n x t
1.
If the number on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
Power Display Units
The block can report power measurements as Watts, KiloWatts, or MegaWatts. The
selection made here will also be used for Vars, KiloVars, or MegaVars, and for Watt
Hours, Kilowatt Hours, or Megawatt Hours. The default units are
KiloWatts/Kilovars/Kilowatt
Hours.
The range for configured units is –32768 to +32767. If Watts are selected, the block will
calculate values from –32768 to +32767 Watts.
If KiloWatts are selected, the block will calculate values from –32768Kw to +32767Kw
(–32768000 to +32767000 Watts, in 1,000–Watt increments).
If MegaWatts are selected, the block will calculate values from –32768Mw to +32767Mw
(–32768000000 to +32767000000 Watts, in 1,000,000–Watt increments).
Note
The units selected should be sufficient for the block to calculate active
power (Power Factor X Volts X Amps) and reactive power without an
overflow occurring. Because the scaling selected here determines the
resolution of some calculated data, you should select the lowest power
display units possible.
P W R
D I S P L A Y
U N I T
W = 0 ,
K W = 1 ,
M W = 2
r n g
GFK-0450D
c h n g
0
n x t
1.
If the number (0, 1, or 2) shown on line 3 should be changed, press the F2 (chng)
key.
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press the F3 (entr) key.
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-9
3
PT Turns Ratio
The block must know the PT turns ratio to calculate line voltage for PTs. The default is
60.0:1, represented on the HHM screen by the number 60.0. The range of entries is up to
1.0:1 to 2730.0:1 (327670.0:120). For PTs with a higher turns ratio, refer to appendix B for
instructions.
If a PT Turns Ratio greater than 273.0:1 is configured, the block will calculate and report
voltage in kilovolts, with 1/100’s resolution.
P T
T U R N S
R A T I O
( 1 . 0
T O
2 7 3 0 . 0 )
6 0 . 0
r n g
c h n g
n x t
1.
If the turns ratio shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Note
If PowerTRAC block firmware version 2.2 or earlier is upgraded (or an
Electronics Assembly having that firmware is replaced with a later
version), it is necessary to reconfigure the block’s PT Turns Ratio. If the
PT Turns Ratio is less than 10:1, it will be corrected automatically by the
PowerTRAC block.
3-10
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
CT Turns Ratio
The block must know the turns ratio of the CTs to calculate line current for CTs. The
default CT turns ratio is 200:1 (1000:5), which is represented on the Hand–held Monitor
screen by the number 200. The range of entries is 1:1 to 6550:1 (32750:5) maximum*. For
CTs with a higher turns ratio, refer to appendix B for instructions.
C T
T U R N S
R A T I O
( 1
T O
6 5 5 0 )
r n g
2 0 0
n x t
c h n g
1.
If the number on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Note
If a CT Turns Ratio up to and including 655:1 is configured, the data will
be reported in tenths of Amps.
If a CT Turns Ratio greater than 655:1 is configured, the data will be
reported in whole Amps instead.
NCT Turns Ratio
If there is a neutral current transformer, its turns ratio must also be specified. The
default turns ratio is 5:1 (25:5). It would be represented on the Hand–held Monitor
screen by the number 5. The range is up to 655:1 (3275:5) *.
1.
If the number shown on line 3 should be changed, press the F2 (chng) key.
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press the F3 (entr) key.
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
N C T
( 1
r n g
T U R N S
R A T I O
T O
6 5 5 )
5
n x t
c h n g
Note
If an NCT Turns Ratio up to and including 65:1 is configured, the data
will be reported in hundredths of Amps.
If a CT Turns Ratio greater than 65:1 is configured, the data will be
reported in tenths of Amps instead.
*
GFK-0450D
For PowerTRAC blocks prior to version IC660BPM100F (firmware version 3.0), the maximum
CT Turns Ratio is 655:1, and the maximum NCT Turns Ratio is 65:1.
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-11
3
Current Line Transient
The overcurrent threshold represents amperes of instantaneous current on the current
transformers. If a current transient above this threshold occurs, the block will store the
waveform present on all seven inputs for the three preceding and five subsequent
cycles, and inform the host that an overcurrent event has occurred. The default CT line
overcurrent level is 3276 amperes. The range is up to 32767 amperes*.
I
l i n e
T R A N S I E N T
( 1
T O
3 2 7 6 7 A )
3 2 7 6
r n g
c h n g
n x t
1.
If the overcurrent level shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Auxiliary Current Transient
This overcurrent threshold represents amperes of instantaneous current on a neutral
current transformer. If a current transient above this threshold occurs, the block will
store the waveform present on all seven inputs for the three preceding and five
subsequent cycles, and inform the host that an overcurrent event has occurred. The
default NCT line overcurrent level is 327 amperes. The range is up to 4600 amperes**.
I
a u x
T R A N S I E N T
( 1
T O
4 6 0 0 A )
3 2 7
r n g
c h n g
n x t
*
**
3-12
1.
If the auxiliary overcurrent level shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2
(chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
For PowerTRAC blocks prior to version 2.5, the peak current line transient was 4500 Amps.
For PowerTRAC blocks prior to version 2.5, the peak aux. current transient was 450 Amps.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
Sign for VARs and Power Factor
The block’s sign conventions can be configured. For most systems, the default sign
conventions (Mode A) are appropriate.
V A R / P F
M O D E :
r n g
S I G N
A = 0
c h n g
C O N V
B = 1
0
n x t
1.
To change the selection on line 3 of the display (0 for no, 1 for yes), press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Sign of VARs: The block associates +VARs with capacitive circuits (current leads voltage) and
Mode A
Configuration – VARs with inductive circuits (current lags voltage).
(0 on display) Sign of Power Factor: The sign of Power Factor is based only on the direction of power flow.
+VARS (capacitive)
+VARS (capacitive)
y
–WATTS
(export)
b
0
–PF
+WATTS
(import)
θ
VxA
–WATTS
(export)
+PF
+WATTS
(import)
θ
0
–PF
VxA
+PF
–VARS (inductive)
–VARS (inductive)
Sign for VARS: “Mode A”
Sign for Power Factor: “Mode A”
Sign for VARs: The block associates +VARs with inductive circuits and –VARs with
Mode B
Configuration capacitive circuits.
(1 on display) Sign for Power Factor: The sign of Power Factor is based on the relationship among the
direction of power flow, the phase angle (capacitive or inductive) and the load. Power
Factor is positive if power is being received and the circuit is inductive (VARs are being
imported), or if power is being delivered to the load and the circuit is capacitive (VARs
are being exported). Power Factor is negative if power is being imported and the circuit
is capacitive or if power is being exported and the circuit is inductive.
+VARS (inductive)
–PF
+PF
+VARS (inductive)
y
–WATTS
(export)
VxA
θ
0
b
θ
+WATTS
(import)
–VARS (capacitive)
Sign for VARS: “Mode B”
GFK-0450D
Chapter 3 Configuration
VxA
–WATTS
(export)
0
+WATTS
(import)
+PF
–PF
–VARS (capacitive)
Sign for Power Factor: “Mode B”
3-13
3
Send Extra Calculated Data
The PowerTRAC block calculates, but does not automatically sent out, the following data
about the application:
H
H
H
H
H
H
Fundamental (phase shift) VARs for each phase
Harmonic VARs as a percent of V–A for each phase
Total harmonic VARs as a percent of V–A
Line frequency for each phase
Temperature alarm for the PowerTRAC block
Extended Watthour accumulator
This data is always displayable on a Hand–held Monitor (version 4.0 or later). By
default, it is NOT ordinarily provided to the CPU, and is not assigned reference
addresses. However, if your application requires this data regularly, the block’s
configuration can be changed to enable sending the data each bus scan. Alternatively,
the extra data could be requested on an as-needed basis using datagrams, as described
in chapter 5.
S E N D
E X T R A
M O D E :
0 = N O
r n g
c h n g
D A T A
1 = Y E S
0
n x t
1.
To change the selection represented on line 3 of the display (0 for no, 1 for yes),
press F2 (chng).
2.
Enter the correct number from the keypad. Press F3 (entr).
3.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Note
If you re-configure this feature while the PowerTRAC block is online, you should expect
the block to stop communicating on the bus for approximately 1.5 seconds. This
temporary loss of communications is noted on a Hand-held Monitor as a
“Communications Error”.
Configuration Note for the Series 90-70 PLC
If the block is controlled by a Series 90-70 PLC, it is important to match the “broadcast
data length” to the length configured using the programming software. Changing this
option changes the %AI data length required for the block. If set to NO, the PowerTRAC
block uses 18 %AI references. If set to YES, the block uses 30 %AI references.
If the programming software is version 5.0 or earlier, configure a PowerTRAC that has
been set up to send the extra data as “GenericI/O” with %I length of 16, %AI length of
30, %Q length of 16 and %AQ length of 0. A later version of the programming software
will provide suitable PowerTRAC selections.
3-14
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
BSM Present
The next screen indicates whether the block is wired downline from a dual serial bus via
a bus switching device. The default configuration is NO.
B S M
P R E S E N T
?
R E F S (number)
S T A T U S
= N O
t g l
e n t r
n x t
1.
If the selection should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3 (entr).
2.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
BSM Controller
If BSM Present status is set to YES, the BSM Controller screen is displayed. This screen is
used to specify whether a device will function as the BSM Controller (controlling bus
selection on a dual bus). For the PowerTRAC block, it should always be set to NO.
B S M
C O N T R O L L E R ?
R E F S (number)
S T A T U S
= N O
t g l
e n t r
n x t
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-15
3
CPU Redundancy
If the PowerTRAC block will be used on the same bus with two controllers (PLCs or host
computers), each of which will send it outputs, the block must be set up for CPU
Redundancy. For a new PowerTRAC block as shipped from the factory, this feature is
not enabled. If Hot Standby Redundancy is selected, the block will receive outputs from
two controllers which have been assigned Device Numbers 30 and 31. The block will
use the outputs received from Device Number 30 only if Device 31 stops sending outputs or
communications with device 31 are otherwise disrupted.
C P U
R E D U N D A N C Y
R E F S (number)
N O
C N T L
R E D U N
t g l
e n t r
n x t
1.
If the selection shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Do not select
“Duplex”, it is not suitable for this block. Press F3 (entr).
2.
Press F4 (nxt) to display the next configuration screen.
Configuration Protection
This feature can be used to protect the block’s configuration, preventing changes from
the CPU or Hand–held Monitor. It can only be selected from the Hand–held Monitor.
To make subsequent changes, protection must be removed again using the Hand–held
Monitor. Before the block is used, its configuration should be protected.
C O N F I G
P R O T E C T
R E F S (number)
D I S A B L E D
t g l
e n t r
n x t
1.
If the selection shown on line 3 should be changed, press F2 (tgl). Press F3
(entr).
2.
This is the last configuration screen.
Finishing Configuration
That completes configuration of the PowerTRAC block. The new configuration entries
are stored in EPROM memory in the block’s Terminal Assembly. The configuration will
be saved through loss of power.
If the baud rate for the block was changed, and the block is on an operating bus, cycle
power to all devices on the bus at the same time to activate the new baud rate.
When any configuration parameter is changed, the PowerTRAC Module resets the watt–hour accumulator to 0.
3-16
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
3
Configuration Datagrams for the PowerTRAC Block
After the initial block setup using a Hand-held Monitor, configurable features can be
changed using Datagrams. For more information about datagrams, see the Genius System
and Communications Manual (GEK-90486–2).
Configuration data format for PowerTRAC blocks is listed below. For more information
about configurable features, refer to the pages listed.
By specifying an offset, as listed in the left column, and a length in bytes, any portion of
the configuration data can be read or written. If more than 16 bytes are being read or
written, data is transmitted in multiple bus scans up to 16 bytes at a time.
Configuration Data Format
Offset
(Byte #)
0
1
2, 3
GFK-0450D
Byte Description
Page
Number for
More
Information
Block type READ ONLY
Software revision number READ ONLY
3-18
BlockConfiguration
3-18
4
5
Input Data length in bytes (38 (default) or 62 if byte 28 is set to 1)
Output Data length in bytes (always 2)
6
7
Configuration Data length in bytes (always 30)
Diagnostic Data length in bytes (always 4)
8
9
Potential Transformer Connection (0=L-L, 1=L-N)
not used
3-7
10
11
Number of Potential Transformers (1–3)
not used
3-8
12
13
Number of Current Transformers (1–3)
not used
3-8
14
15
Power Display Units (0 = Watts, 1 = kW, 2 = MW)
not used
3-9
16, 17
PT Turns Ratio (1.0 to 2730.0 (:1)). (Lsb in byte 16, msb in byte 17)
3-10
18, 19
CT Turns Ratio (1 to 6550 (:1))
3-11
20, 21
NCT Turns Ratio (1 to 655 (:1))
3-11
22, 23
Current Line Transient (1 to 32767A)
3-12
24, 25
Aux. Current Transient (1 to 4600A)
3-12
26
27
Sign for VARS and Power Factor (Mode A = 0, Mode B = 1)
not used
3-13
28
29
Send Extra Calculated Data (No = 0, Yes = 1)
not used
3-14
Chapter 3 Configuration
3-17
3
Block Type (byte 0)
Block Type
CatalogNumber
Decimal
PowerTRAC Block
(IC660BPM100)
127
Block Configuration (bytes 2, 3)
byte 2
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
unlabelled bits not used
reserved
Configuration Protected (0 = not protected, 1 = protected) READ ONLY
byte 3
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Duplex Default State (0 = off, 1 = on)
Outputs Default Time (0 = 2.5 sec, 1 = 10 sec)
CPU redundancy: 00 = no redundancy
01 = Hot standby
10 = Duplex redundancy
not used
BSM Present (0 = absent, 1 = present)
BSM Controller (0 = no, 1 = yes)
BSM actual state (0 = bus A, 1 = bus B) READ ONLY
BSM Forced (0 – unforced, 1 = forced) READ ONLY
3-18
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Chapter
4 Calculated Data and Status Data
4
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how to access and interpret data which is automatically
transmitted to and from a PowerTRAC block. It covers the following topics:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
Automatic data transfer
Bus scan times
CPU interface
Displaying data with a Hand–held Monitor
Status inputs
Calculated values
Command outputs
Automatic Data Transfer
Once each bus scan, the PowerTRAC block automatically broadcasts the following 18
words (36 bytes) of calculated data and 1 word (2 bytes) of status data.
Byte No.
0, 1
2, 3
4, 5
6, 7
8, 9
10, 11
12, 13
14, 15
16, 17
18, 19
20, 21
22, 23
24, 25
26, 27
28, 29
30, 31
32, 33
34, 35
36, 37
GFK-0450D
Bit Nos.
1–
17 –
33 –
49 –
65 –
81 –
97 –
113 –
129 –
145 –
161 –
177 –
193 –
209 –
225 –
241 –
257 –
273 –
289 –
16
32
48
64
80
96
112
128
144
160
176
192
208
224
240
256
272
288
304
Description
Status inputs
Voltage, phase A to B
Voltage, phase B to C
Voltage, phase C to A
Voltage, phase A to neutral
Voltage, phase B to neutral
Voltage, phase C to neutral
Current, phase A
Current, phase B
Current, phase C
Current,auxiliary
Active power, phase A
Active power, phase B
Active power, phase C
Reactive power, phase A
Reactive power, phase B
Reactive power, phase C
Total power factor
Total Watt/Kilowatt/Megawatt–hours
4-1
4
The data is received by the host, and stored in the block’s assigned input references.
Because this data is broadcast, other devices on the bus can also monitor the block’s
inputs.
a43695
MONITOR
CONTROLLER
16 STATUS INPUTS
36 BYTES OF CALCULATED DATA
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
When the host has its turn on the bus, it directs 16 bits of control data from the
application program to the block. Only the host can send outputs to the block; a
monitoring device cannot.
a43696
MONITOR
CONTROLLER 16 OUTPUT
BITS
POWER
TRAC
BLOCK
Use of this output data is optional. The application program logic can set or clear output
bits to set up a communications “handshake” between the block and the CPU, required
for reading Working Data or Overcurrent Data. This data can also be displayed on a
Hand–held Monitor, but is not available to any other devices on the bus. If the
application does not require the use of this data, these bits should ALWAYS be set to 0.
CPU Memory Usage
A device controlling a PowerTRAC block must reserve memory space for its status
inputs, calculated values and command outputs. If the “Send Extra Data” function (as
described on page 3-14) is not enabled for a PowerTRAC block, it uses 304 input
references (bits) and 16 output references If the “Send Extra Data” function is enabled
for a PowerTRAC block, it uses 496 input references (bits) and 16 output references.
Different controllers handle this data as explained below:
Series 90
PLC
4-2
When a PowerTRAC block’s Reference Number is assigned using Logicmaster 90 release
3.02 or later, separate starting addresses can be selected. If the block is not configured to
“Send Extra Data”, it requires 16 %I input bits, 16 %Q output bits, and 18 %AI references.
If the block is configured to “Send Extra Data”, it requires 16 %I input bits, 16 %Q output
bits (as above), and 30 %AI references. Note that separate starting references will not be
displayed on a Hand–held Monitor. If an earlier version of Logicmaster is used, all three
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
4
data types must use the same starting address (for example, %I0001, %Q0001, and
%AI0001).
Series Six
PLC
A block can be assigned either an I/O or register Reference Number in the Series Six
PLC. If the block is assigned to I/O memory, it will use 24 input references and 16 output
references. As an example, if the Reference Number I/O0001 were assigned, the block’s
status inputs and calculated values would occupy I0001 through I0024. The command
outputs would occupy O0001 through O0016. If the “Send Extra Data” function is not
enabled for a PowerTRAC block, it sends 38 bytes of status and calculated data to the bus
controller each bus scan. If the “Send Extra Data” function is enabled for a PowerTRAC
block, it sends 62 bytes of status and calculated data to the bus controller each bus scan.
The Series Six bus controller stores this information, sending 24 bits at a time to the CPU.
The bus controller multiplexes these values in the same 24 Input Table references. The
first 16 bits contains one data item: first the Status Inputs, then the A/B Voltage, then the
B/CVoltage, and so on. The entire data transfer takes 19 successive CPU sweeps if the
“Send Extra Data” feature is NOT enabled, or 31 CPU sweeps if it is enabled. The
uppermost 8 bits contain the data item number currently available. The program must
include logic to capture each value before it is replaced by the next one. Alternatively,
the application program can read ALL input data from the bus controller at the same
time by issuing a Read Analog Inputs command.
Assigning the block to register memory conserves I/O memory space and permits the
use of more PowerTRACs on the same bus. If a PowerTRAC block is assigned to register
memory it uses 20 registers if “Send Extra Data” is not enabled, or 32 registers if it is
enabled. For example, if the Reference Number R0001 were assigned, the block’s status
inputs would occupy R0001. The calculated values would occupy R0002 through R0019
(or R0031). The command outputs would occupy R0020 (or R0032).
Whether a PowerTRAC block is assigned to I/O or register memory, special
programming is always required. For instructions, refer to the Series Six Bus Controller
User’s Manual (GFK–0171).
Series Five
PLC
Either I/O or register references can be assigned to a PowerTRAC block used with a
Series Five PLC. See the example Reference Number assignments for the Series Six PLC.
If I/O references are assigned, one block’s 304 inputs will occupy a significant portion of
the available I/O space. This can be avoided by assigning the block to register (global)
memory. It will use 20 registers if the “Send Extra Data” feature is NOT enabled, or 32
registers if it is enabled. No special programming is required. Note that the 304 outputs
(496 with “Send Extra Data” enabled) that correspond to the block’s 304 (or 496) inputs
will also be unusable by other applications, even though only the first 16 are actually
used by the PowerTRAC block.
Host
Computer
The PCIM in the computer stores inputs in a 128–byte area of on–board shared RAM.
The application program can overlay a data structure on this data to distinguish its
individual elements. Reference Number assignments are not used by the PCIM.
Status and calculated input data occupy the first 19 data words (31 data words if the
PowerTRAC block’s “Send Extra Data” feature is enabled) of the 128–byte input area.
Command outputs occupy the first word of the 128–byte output area.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
4-3
4
Displaying Data With a Hand–held Monitor
All data automatically transmitted to and from a PowerTRAC block can be displayed on
a Hand–held Monitor. Status data is most easily viewed from the Monitor Block
displays. Calculated values are most easily viewed from the Monitor/Control Reference
displays.
Status data is always displayed first. Pressing F1 ( > ) displays data in the sequence
shown in the table below. Specific values may be displayed by pressing F2 (ref), then
entering a reference offset. To access output data, press (ref), the desired reference
number, and the TGL key to select the memory type.
Value to Display
Data Format
Status Inputs
Binary word
Voltage, phase A to B
Voltage, phase B to C
Voltage, phase C to A
Voltage, phase A to neutral
Voltage, phase B to neutral
Voltage, phase C to neutral
Signed integer. If PT Turns Ratio is 327.0 or less, range is
–32,768 to +32,767 volts.
If PT Turns Ratio is above 273.0, range is –327.68 to
+327.67 Kv.
Current, phase A
Current, phase B
Current, phase C
Signed fixed point. If CT Turns Ratio is configured as 655:1
or less, data format is XXXX.X, –3276.8 to +3276.7. If CT
Turns Ratio is configured above 655:1, data format is XXXXX,
–32768 to +32767.
Current, auxiliary
Signed fixed point. If NCT Turns Ratio is configured as 65:1
or less, data format is XXXX.X, –327.68 to +327.67. If NCT
Turns Ratio is configured above 65:1, data format is XX.XXX,
–32.768 to +32.767.
Signed integer, –32,768 to +32,767.
Units defined by Hand–held Monitor.
Active power, phase A
Active power, phase B
Active power, phase C
Reactive power, phase A
Reactive power, phase B
Reactive power, phase C
Total Power Factor
Total Watt/Kwatt/Mwatt–hours
Commandoutputs
Signed integer, units defined
by Hand–held Monitor.
Signed fixed point. Format: +/– X.XXX
Signed integer, units defined by Hand–held Monitor.
Range is 0 to 32767.
Binary word
Definitions and example Hand–held Monitor displays are given on the following pages.
4-4
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
4
Status Inputs
The first 16 input bits are the status inputs.
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8
byte 1
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
byte 0
reserved
Data Ready
Overcurrent on Phase A
Data Type
Overcurrent on Phase B
Data Target
Overcurrent on Phase C
Overcurrent Captured
Overcurrent on aux.
Phase-lock Loop Locked
Overflow
reserved
These inputs provide diagnostic information and are used to establish a communications
handshake between the PowerTRAC block and the PLC or host computer.
Overflow
If set, this bit indicates that the block’s voltage, current, active power, or
reactive power calculations have resulted in a value outside the range
–32768 to +32767. If this happens, a larger unit multiplier should be
configured as instructed in chapter 3. If an overflow occurs, the
overflowed items are set to minimum or maximum values. When the
overflow condition is corrected, this bit is automatically cleared.
Overcurrent
If one or more of these bits is set, it indicates that the corresponding
current input has exceeded its configured safe overcurrent level. The
“overcurrent captured” bit is also set.
Phase–lock This bit should be always be equal to 1. It indicates whether the block’s
Loop Locked phase–lock loop is synchronized with the incoming AC voltage (on any
voltage input). If this bit is 0, possible causes are:
A. AC voltage is too low, or not present.
B. The PowerTRAC block is faulty.
GFK-0450D
Overcurrent
Captured
The block sets this bit to 1 when a current transient occurs. The input(s)
on which the overcurrent occurred are indicated by the overcurrent bits
described above. The application program can issue a Read Device
Datagram to read the captured overcurrent data. For information about
this and the following three status bits, see chapter 6.
Data Target
If the controller commands the block (see Command Outputs) to
transmit table data, this bit determines whether the data will be read by
the CPU (bit = 0), or another device on the bus (bit = 1).
Data Type
This bit indicates which data table (see above) will be read. If this bit is
0, the block will buffer the contents of the working data table. If this bit
is 1, the block will buffer the contents of the overcurrent data table.
Data Ready
If set, this bit indicates that requested table data has been copied to the
block’s transmit buffer and is ready to be read by the CPU or monitoring
device.
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
4-5
4
Displaying Status Inputs on a Hand–held Monitor
Status inputs can be displayed together on the Monitor Block screen, or individually on
the Monitor/Control Reference screens.
Monitor Block Status Display
The HHM’s Monitor Block screen shows all 16 status inputs at the same time. For
example:
R E F S
1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
>
r e f
f o
–
1 6
I
9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0
r c e
d i a g
z (Series 90 PLC)
z bit numbers
z bits’ status
Line 2 represents each of the 16 possible bit locations for status data. Line 3 shows the
current status of all inputs. To display status inputs on the Monitor Block screen:
1.
From the Home menu, select F2 (analyze).
2.
Select F1 (Monitor Block).
From this screen, press F1 ( > ) or F2 (ref) to display higher references. Calculated data
values (such as voltage and current) can be displayed, but the values are not labelled. It
is easier to monitor these values from the Monitor/Control References screens.
Monitor/Control Reference Status Display
The HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference screens show the status inputs one at a time. For
example:
M N T R / C T
S T A T U S
S T A T E :
>
r e f
f
R L
1 I
I N P U T S
0
o r c e
d i a g
z (for Series 90 PLC)
z bits’ status
Line 1 indicates the bit whose status is currently being displayed. Line 3 displays the
bit’s status. On the example display shown above, bit 1 status is 0. This example shows
that the first status input is currently 0. To display status inputs on the Monitor/Control
Reference screen:
1.
From the Home menu, select F2 (analyze).
2.
Select F2 (Monitor/Control Reference).
From this screen, press F1 ( > ) to display the other status bits individually. Following
the status inputs, the calculated values are displayed.
4-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
4
Calculated Values
The calculated values are reported as 16–bit twos complement numbers. Active power,
reactive power, and power factor are signed, with the sign indicating the direction of
power flow.
The Hand–held Monitor displays calculated values on its Monitor Block screens and on
its Monitor/Control Reference screens. New values are displayed every 2–3 seconds.
When displayed from the Monitor Block screen, calculated values are not labelled.
To display calculated values on the Hand–held Monitor’s Monitor/Control Reference
screens:
H
H
Voltage,
From the Home menu, select F2 (analyze).
Select F2 (Monitor/Control Reference). Screens appear in the sequence shown on
the following pages. The first screen to appear is the first status input screen. From
the status display, press F1 ( > ) to display successive references or press F2 (ref), and
enter the appropriate number as shown previously. Then press F4 (entr).
Line–to–Line
The calculated primary line voltage is a true RMS voltage even if the voltage waveform
is distorted. Allowable values are 0 to 327 Kilovolts. Line–to–line voltages are
calculated whether the configuration is line–to–line or line–to–neutral.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustrations show the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display for
phase A to phase B voltage. Phase B to phase C and phase C to phase A voltage are
displayed on the next two screens.
If the PT Turns Ratio is between 1.0:1 and 273.0:1 (32767:120), the voltage is displayed on
these screens in volts:
M N T R
V a b
S T S
>
r e f
1 7 –
3 2
1 1 9
f o r c e
I
z Voltage A to B
z volts
d i a g
If the PT Turns Ratio is greater than 273.0:1, these screens display voltage in kilovolts:
M N T R
1 7 –
3 2
I
V a b
( K V )
S T S
0 . 1 2
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
GFK-0450D
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
z kilovolts
4-7
4
Voltage, Line to Neutral
Line–to–neutral voltage is a true RMS voltage even if the voltage waveform is
distorted. Allowable values are 0 to 327 Kilovolts.
The block will also calculate the line–to–line voltages from the sensed line–to–neutral
voltages. If the block is configured for line–to–line PTs, line–to–neutral voltages are
not calculated.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustrations show the HHM’s phase A line–to–neutral voltage Monitor
Control Reference display. Phase B and phase C line–to–neutral voltage are displayed
on the next two screens.
If the PT Turns Ratio is between 1.0:1 and 273.0:1 (32767:120), the voltage is displayed on
these screens in volts:
M N T R
V a n
S T S
>
r e f
6 5 –
8 0
I
6 8
f o r c e
d i a g
z Voltage A to N
z volts
If the PT Turns Ratio is greater than 273.0:1, these screens display voltage in kilovolts:
M N T R
6 5 –
8 0
I
V a n
( K V )
S T S
0 . 0 7
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
4-8
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
z Voltage A to N
z kilovolts
GFK-0450D
4
Line Current
Line current is a true RMS current even if the current waveform is distorted. If the CT
Turns Ratio is configured as 655:1 or less, data is displayed as tenths of Amps (–3276.8 to
+3276.7). If the CT Turns Ratio is configured above 655:1, data is displayed as Amps
(–32768 to +32767).
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration shows the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display for
phase A line current. Phase B and phase C and auxiliary current are displayed on the
next three screens.
M N T R
1 1 3 –
1 2 8
I
I a
S T S
9 7 . 8
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
z Current, phase A
z calculated value
In the example shown, data is displayed as tenths of Amps, indicating that the CT Turns
Ratio has been configured as 655:1 or less.
Auxiliary Current
The auxiliary current is calculated in amperes. If the NCT Turns Ratio is configured as
65:1 or less, data is displayed as hundredths of Amps (–32.768 to +32.767). If the NCT
Turns Ratio is configured above 65:1, data is displayed as tenths of Amps (–327.68 to
+327.67).
This input is used to detect a flowing current in an independent line. For example, it can
be used to detect current in the neutral leg of a three–phase circuit.
Since auxiliary current input is not included in the power calculations but does support
overcurrent detection, it may be used for other monitoring.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration represents the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display of
auxiliary current.
M N T R
1 6 1 –
1 7 6
I
I a u x
S T S
3 . 2 2
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
z aux. current
z amperes
In the example shown, data is displayed as hundredths of Amps, indicating that the
NCT Turns Ratio has been configured as 65:1 or less.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
4-9
4
Active Power
The active power value represents the amount of real power being monitored. It is
calculated approximately twice per second. The calculated active power is the numerical
integration of V x A over one cycle (128 samples) for either delta or wye configurations.
In the following equation, V is the equivalent line–to–neutral voltage.
W=
s VxA
Active power is measured in units of Watts, KiloWatts, or MegaWatts. The unit
multiplier is selected when the block is configured. The numeric range for the active
power calculation is –32768 to +32767. If the product of the calculation exceeds either
limit, an overflow occurs. The block automatically sets the numeric value to the nearest
limit, and sets its Overflow status bit to 1. If this happens, larger units (kiloWatts or
megaWatts) should be configured for the block as explained in chapter 3.
The sign of the active power value indicates the direction of power flow. If the sign is
positive, power is being delivered to the load. If the sign is negative, power is being fed
back into the system (toward the source). Power can be measured in either direction,
depending on the polarity of the user connections.
a43697
WATTS
0
ÎÎ
WATTS
VxA
The angle Θ represents the amount by which current leads or lags voltage. If current
and voltage were in phase, with current neither leading nor lagging voltage, the angle Θ
would be either 0_ or 180_, and Watts would be equal to volts x Amps. When current
leads or lags voltage, the angle Θ increases and active power is less than the product of
volts x Amps.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration represents the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display for
phase A active power. Phase B and phase C active power are displayed on the next two
screens.
M N T R
1 7 7 –
1 9 2
I
P a
S T S
5 6 2 5
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
4-10
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
z Power phase A
z calculated value
GFK-0450D
4
Reactive Power
The calculated value for reactive power indicates the amount of non–useful power in
the system. It is calculated approximately twice per second. The calculated reactive
power is calculated over one cycle (128 samples). In the following equation, V is the
equivalent line–to–neutral voltage.
VAR TOT = ( VA2 – W2
)
Reactive power is measured in VARs, KiloVARS, or MegaVARs. The unit multiplier
corresponds to the selection for made for Watts when the block is configured. For
example, if KiloWatts is selected for the active power units, reactive power will be
measured in KiloVARs.
The range is –32768 to +32767. The sign indicates whether the system is operating
inductively or capacitively. If the sign is positive, the system is capacitive. If the sign is
negative, the system is inductive. If the block’s reactive power calculations result in a
value which is out of range, an overflow occurs. The block sets the reactive power value
to its nearest limit, and sets the overflow status input to 1. If that happens, a larger unit
multiplier should be configured as explained in chapter 3.
a43698
VARS
0
ÎÎ
VxA
VARS
Here also, the angle Θ represents the amount by which current leads or lags voltage. If
current and voltage were in phase, with current neither leading nor lagging voltage, the
angle Θ would be either 0_ or 180_, and VARs would be equal to 0. When current leads
or lags voltage, the angle Θ increases and the reactive power value also increases.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration represents the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display for
phase A reactive power. Phase B and phase C reactive power are displayed on the next
two screens.
M N T R
2 2 5 –
2 4 0
I
V A R a
S T S
2 7 7
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
GFK-0450D
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
z Units, phase
z calculated value
4-11
4
Power Factor
Power Factor (PF) indicates the relationship between useful power (Watts) and
non–useful power (VARs). The block calculates power factor based upon the relative
magnitudes of active and reactive power. In the following equation V is the equivalent
line–to–neutral voltage.
PFtot = COS Θtot =
W
VA
If both are in phase, angle Θ is either 0_or 180_, and power factor is either +1.000 or
–1.000. Power factor should be as close to +1 as possible; this would indicate no VARs
(no non–useful power). As current increasingly leads or lags voltage, the angle Θ
increases and power factor decreases. A power factor of 0 would indicate that there was
no useful power in the system.
The sign of the power factor indicates the direction of power flow. If the sign is positive,
power is being delivered to the load. If the sign is negative, power is being fed back into
the system.
a43699
VARS
PF
WATTS
PF
0
Î
Î
WATTS
VxA
PF
PF
VARS
The resolution of the Power Factor data depends on the block’s configured Power
Display Units. Therefore, it is important to configure the lowest possible Power Display
Units. See page 3-9 for information about configuring Power Display Units.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration represents the HHM’s Monitor Control Reference display of
the calculated power factor.
M N T R
2 7 3 –
2 8 8
I
P F
T o t a l
S T S
0 . 8 6 4
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
4-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
z Power factor
z calculated value
GFK-0450D
4
Accumulated Power
The PowerTRAC block begins sampling data and calculating current, voltage, and power
values as soon as it is turned on. As active power values are calculated, the block adds
them to a running total stored in its internal memory. The numeric range for this value
is 0 to +32767, which may indicate Watt–hours, KiloWatt–hours, or MegaWatt–hours.
The multiplier is the same as that for Watts (see above).
The total accumulated power value can vary either upward or downward depending
upon whether power is being consumed or supplied. When either maximum value is
reached, the total assumes the greatest opposite value (it goes from 32767 to 0 or from 0
to 32767). It continues to increase or decrease, depending upon the direction of power
flow. This event should be captured by logic in the application program.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The following illustration represents the HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference display of
total watt–hours. Line 2 indicates Watt–hours, KWH, or MWH, depending on the
block’s configuration.
M N T R
2 8 7 –
3 0 4
I
W A T T
H O U R S
S T S
5 1 0 2
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
GFK-0450D
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
z power units
z calculated value
4-13
4
Command Outputs
Command outputs are automatically sent from the CPU to the PowerTRAC Block. They
contain data from the block’s assigned output references. Content of these bits is
controlled by the application program. These bits should be set to 0 unless the host controller
or data monitoring device are reading table data. After completing the data transfer, all bits should
be cleared immediately, competing the handshake.
Note that these outputs automatically default to 0 if communications with the bus
controller are disrupted. *
Content of the Command Outputs
Each bus scan, the host bus controller directs the following two bytes of control data to
the block. The data is sent from the block’s assigned output references:
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8
byte 1
7
6
5
not used
4
3
2
1
0
byte 0
Send Data
Data Type
Data Target
Reset Watt-hour
Accumulator
not used
Unlike inputs, which are broadcast by the PowerTRAC block to all devices on the bus,
outputs are directed; they may only be sent by the controller CPU, and they may only be
received by the block to which they are directed.
Chapter 6 explains how these outputs can be used to set up data transfer between the
PowerTRAC block and the controller, or a monitoring device.
Send Data
The application program can set this bit to 1 to instruct the block to
capture and freeze a copy of the data table specified by the Data Type
bit. When this bit is set to 1, block configuration changes are locked out and the
captured data table will remain frozen.
Data Type
This bit indicates which data table is to be read. If this bit is 0, data from
the Working Data Table will be read. If this bit is 1, data from the
Overcurrent Data Table will be read.
Data Target
The program should set this bit to 1 if a monitoring device is to read the
specified table.
This bit can be used to restart the Watt-hour Accumulators. Both the
Reset
regular and extended Watt-hour Accumulators clear and begin
Watt-hour
accumulating when this bit transitions from 0 to 1. **
Accumulator
*
**
4-14
PowerTRAC blocks with firmware prior to version 2.5 hold outputs in their last states if communications are disrupted.
PowerTRAC blocks with firmware prior to version 3.0 do not have this capability.
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
4
HHM Command Outputs Displays
Command outputs can be displayed on the HHM’s Monitor Block screen, or on the
Monitor/Control Reference screens.
Monitor Block Display
The HHM’s Monitor Block screen shows all 16 command outputs at the same time.
R E F S
1
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
>
r e f
f o
–
1 6
Q
9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
r c e
d i a g
z (Series 90 PLC)
z bit numbers
z bits’ status
Line 2 represents each of the 16 possible bit locations for command data. The least
significant bit is on the left. Only the three least significant bits are used by the block.
Line 3 shows the current status of the bits. To display command outputs on the Monitor
Block screen:
1.
From the Home menu, select F2 (analyze).
2.
Select F1 (Monitor Block). Enter the reference as explained previously.
Monitor/Control Reference Display
The HHM’s Monitor/Control Reference screens show the command outputs one at a
time. For example:
M N T R / C T R L
1
Q
C O M M A N D
O U T P U T S
S T A T E :
0
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
z (for Series 90 PLC)
z bits’ status
Line 1 indicates the bit whose status is currently being displayed. In this example, where
the host computer is a Series 90 PLC, the bit shown is Q0001. Line 3 displays the bit’s
status. On the example display shown above, bit 1 status is 0.
The next 2 Monitor/Control reference screens show the other command output bits in turn.
To display command outputs on the Monitor/Control Reference screen:
1.
From the Home menu, select F2 (analyze).
2.
Select F1 (Monitor Block). Enter the reference as explained previously.
Forcing Outputs
Outputs can be forced regardless of the presence of communications with the bus controller.*
*
GFK-0450D
Outputs on PowerTRAC blocks with firmware prior to version 2.5 cannot be forced while the
PowerTRAC block is offline or communications with the bus controller are disrupted.
Chapter 4 Calculated Data and Status Data
4-15
Chapter
5 Additional Calculated Data
5
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
The PowerTRAC block calculates the following additional data about the application:
H
H
H
H
H
Fundamental (phase shift) VARs for each phase
Harmonic VARs as a percent of V–A for each phase
Total harmonic VARs as a percent of V–A
Line frequency for each phase
Temperature alarm for the PowerTRAC block
This data is always displayable on a Hand–held Monitor (version 4.0 or later). By
default, it is NOT ordinarily provided to the CPU, and is not assigned reference
addresses. However, if your application requires this data regularly, the block’s
configuration can be changed to enable sending the data each bus scan (see page 3-17).
Alternatively, the data can be requested on an as-needed basis using datagrams, as
described later in this chapter.
GFK-0450D
5-1
5
Displaying Additional Calculated Data with a Hand–held Monitor
The additional calculated data is displayed on a Hand– held Monitor after the calculated
and status data. Data is most easily viewed from the Monitor/Control Reference displays.
Pressing F1 ( > ) displays data in the sequence listed below. When displaying the
additional calculated data, the blinking number on line 1 of the HHM indicates the
relative data word being shown.
Value to Display
Format
Status inputs
(see previous chapter)
CalculatedData
(see previous chapter)
Commandoutputs
(see previous chapter)
Fundamental VARs
Fundamental Power Factor
Harmonic VARs as % of V–A
Line frequency
TemperatureAlarm Status
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator
Signed integer, units defined by Hand–held Monitor.
Signed fixed point. Format: +/– XX.XXX
Signed integer from 0 to +100.
Signed integer.
–1, 0, +1
8–digit decimal, occupying two adjacent registers. Uses the
same scaling factor configured for regular Watt-hour Accumulatordata.
Format of the HHM Display
When displaying the additional calculated data, the HHM screen format shown below.
Serial Bus Address of PowerTRAC Block (here, #1)
Data Type (W means word data)
Number of the data word
being displayed
“Low-priority I/O”
Input Table
L P
F
S T
>
I O
# 1 W
U N D .
V A R
S
– 2 7 0
r e f
2 0
I
Description
a
Present Value
d i a g
The format shown above appears if the PowerTRAC block is NOT configured to
automatically send its additional calculated data each bus scan.
If the block is configured to automatically send its additional calculated data, the top line
shows the references assigned to the data item currently being viewed:
M N T R
3 0 5 –
F U N D .
V A R
S T S
– 2 7 0
>
r e f
3 2 2
a
I
d i a g
Data Description
Definitions and example Hand–held Monitor displays are given on the following pages.
5-2
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
5
Fundamental VARs
Fundamental VARs represent loss of useful power caused by phase shift. The following
example illustrates a 30–degree phase shift.
Phase Shift Waveforms
a44675
V
C
Volts:
109.99
Amps:
5.013
Watts:
481.5
VARs:
–270.0
P. F.:
0.873
F. VARs:
–270.0
F. P. F.:
0.873
Harmonic VARs
as % of V–A:
0
The block automatically calculates Fundamental VARs approximately twice per second.
The calculated Fundamental VARs is the numerical integration of V times quadrature
current over one cycle (128 samples). The following equation is based on
line–to–neutral voltage.
VARfun =
s
V x A ( Θ + 90 )
Fundamental VARS can be compensated by adding inductance if current leads voltage,
or by adding capacitance if current lags voltage.
Hand–held Monitor Display
The Hand–held Monitor displays fundamental VARS for each phase.
L P
F
S T
>
I O
# 1 W
U N D .
V A R
S
– 2 7 0
r e f
2 0
I
a
d i a g
Phase B and phase C fundamental VARS are displayed on the next two screens. The
Device Number and word address fields flash at 3–second intervals.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 5 Additional Calculated Data
5-3
5
Fundamental Power Factor, Total
Fundamental power factor indicates the relationship between useful power (Watts and
fundamental VARs. The block calculates fundamental power factor approximately twice
per second, based upon the relative magnitude of active power and fundamental VARs.
PFfun = COS Θ fun =
W
( W2 + VARfun2 )
The sign of the fundamental power factor indicates the direction of power flow. If the
sign is positive, power is being delivered to the load. If the sign is negative, power is
being fed back into the system.
Hand–held Monitor Display
Following the HHM screens for fundamental VARs, the next screen shows fundamental
power factor.
L P
F
S T
>
5-4
I O
# 1 W
2 3
I
U N D .
P F
T o t a l
S
0 . 8 7 3
r e f
d i a g
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
5
Harmonic VARs as % of Volt–Amps
Harmonic VARs are a measurement of reactive power caused by harmonics. Harmonics,
which may represent a significant loss of useful power, are commonly caused by
equipment such as computers, motor drives, uninterruptable power supplies, and
transformers. In addition to degrading power quality, harmonics can cause overheating
in mechanical equipment, and other problems.
The following example illustrates a 33% Third Harmonic with no phase shift on the
current waveform.
Current Harmonics Waveforms
Volts:
109.99
Amps:
5.234
Watts:
551.7
VARs:
166.8
P. F.:
0.957
F. VARs:
6.6
F. P. F.:
0.999
Harmonic VARs
as % of V–A:
28
V
C
a44676
The next example combines a 33% Third Harmonic with a 30 degree phase shift.
Current Harmonics and Phase Shift Waveforms
GFK-0450D
Volts:
109.99
Amps:
5.258
Watts:
482.7
VARs:
–320.
5
P. F.:
0.835
F. VARs:
–272.
2
F. P. F.:
0.873
Harmonic VARs
as % of V–A:
8
Chapter 5 Additional Calculated Data
V
C
a44677
5-5
5
Harmonic VARs on a per–line basis are defined as:
VARhar = VARtot – VARfun
The result shows the percent of useful power being wasted due to harmonics, on each
phase. Fourier analysis using the PowerTRAC block’s waveform data can be used to
pinpoint the cause and correctly compensate for harmonics.
a44679
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ ÎÎ
V–A
TOTAL
VARs
HARMONIC
VARs
TOTAL
VARs
FUNDAMENTAL
FUND
WATTS
USEFUL POWER
GAINED BY
ELIMINATING
HARMONICS
Hand–held Monitor Display
The Hand–held Monitor displays harmonic VARS for each phase.
L P
H
S T
>
I O
A R .
S
r e f
# 1 W
V A R a,
2 8
2 4
I
% V – A
d i a g
Phase B and phase C harmonic VARS as a % of V–A are displayed on the next two
screens.
5-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
5
Total Harmonic VARs as a Percent of V–A
The block also provides a total harmonic VARS value for all three phases. In the
following equation, V is the equivalent line–to–neutral voltage.
Harmonic Content =
VARhar
x 100%
VA
The sign of the result indicates the direction of power flow. If the sign is positive, power
is being delivered to the load. If the sign is negative, power is being fed back into the
system.
Hand–held Monitor Display
Following the HHM screens for harmonic VARs on each phase, the next screen shows
total harmonic VARs.
L P
H
S T
>
GFK-0450D
I O
A R .
S
r e f
Chapter 5 Additional Calculated Data
# 1 W
V A R t ,
2 8
2 7
I
% V – A
d i a g
5-7
5
Line Frequency
The PowerTRAC block monitors the line frequency. Momentary fluctuations in
frequency are ignored. Changes in frequency are generally recognized 1 or 2 seconds
after stabilizing. Resolution is tenths of a Hertz.
Hand–held Monitor Display
Following the screens for total harmonic VARs, the HHM displays the line frequency.
L P
L
S T
>
I O
I N E
S
r e f
# 1 W
2 8
I
F R E Q U E N C Y
6 0 . 0
d i a g
Temperature Alarm Status
The host or Hand–held Monitor can query the PowerTRAC block to find out whether its
internal temperature is within normal operating limits. The block will respond with one
of the following indications:
0
–1
1
if the temperature is between 5C and 55C
if the temperature is near or below the lower limit
if the temperature is near or above the upper limit
Hand–held Monitor Display
After the screen for line frequency, the HHM displays the internal temperature alarm
status.
L P
I
S T
>
5-8
I O
N T .
S
r e f
# 1 W
T E M P
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
2 9
I
A L A R M
0
d i a g
GFK-0450D
5
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator
The Extended Watt-hour Accumulator contains an eight-digit decimal number with a
maximum value of 32,768,999. To make it possible to display the number on a Hand-held
Monitor, it has been divided into two portions: the lower three digits and the upper five
digits.
The Extended Watt-hour Accumulator uses the same units (Watt-hours, KiloWatt-hours,
or MegaWatt-hours) configured for the regular Watt-hour Accumulator. The second line
of the HHM display indicates the configured scale factor.
Hand–held Monitor Display
After the screen internal temperature alarm status, the HHM displays the five upper
digits of (indicated by the designation HI) of the Extended Watt-hour Accumulator:
L P
E
S T
>
I O
X T .
S
r e f
# 1 W
3 0
I
K W – H
( H I )
3 2 7 6 7
d i a g
Press F1 ( > ) from this screen to display the three lower digits (indicated by the
designation LO):
L P
E
S T
>
I O
X T .
S
r e f
# 1 W
3 1
I
K W – H
( L O W )
9 9 9
d i a g
Note: The “Low” portion of the extended Watt-hour data should always be interpreted
as three digits. Leading zeros are not displayed.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 5 Additional Calculated Data
5-9
5
Sending Datagrams to Read Calculated and Status Data
Status and calculated data is always available in the PowerTRAC block’s assigned
references in the host; the block supplies the data automatically. However, it is also
possible to read all status and calculated data directly from the block using Read Device
or Read Block I/O datagrams. These datagrams are the ONLY way to read the
calculated data (fundamental and harmonic VARs, fundamental Power Factor, Line
Frequency, and Temperature Alarm Status) that is not automatically transmitted by the
block as part of its regular input data.
Instructions for using a Read Device datagram are given below. The process is similar
for a Read Block I/O datagram. If you prefer to use the Read Block I/O datagram, please
refer to the Genius I/O System and Communications Manual (GEK–90486–1, version D or
later) for details. The data offsets described in the Read Device datagram table are also
correct for Read Block I/O offsets.
Unlike the procedure for reading Waveform Data or Overcurrent Event Data from a
PowerTRAC block (which is explained in chapter 6), reading calculated and status data
directly from the PowerTRAC block does NOT require monitoring or setting any status bits.
The block replies to each Read Device or Read Block I/O datagram with a reply
datagram of the requested length.
Datagram Timing
These datagrams are always sent using normal priority. Since only one normal priority
datagram can be sent by any device on a bus during a single bus scan, transmission of
the data may be delayed it there is other datagram traffic on the bus.
Any of the following errors will cause the PowerTRAC block to ignore the datagrams:
1.
incorrect message format
2.
invalid data address or length specification.
Read Device Datagram for Calculated and Status Data
When used to read calculated and status data from a PowerTRAC block, the Read Device
datagram has the following content:
function code
subfunction code
priority
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
5-10
20h
1Eh
normal
Description
must be 0
Data Offset (see table)
must be C0 hex
must be FF hex
must be 0
Length of data, in bytes
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
5
The data offset specified in byte 1 is the beginning location in the PowerTRAC Block’s
internal memory where data should be read from. Any beginning location may be
selected. The length in bytes is the amount of data to be transferred in one datagram.
Each individual data item is 2 bytes in length.
Data Type
StatusInputs
CalculatedData
All of this data is
automaticallysent
by PowerTRAC block
each bus scan.
Additional Data
The block can be configured to
send this extra data
automatically*.
This data can also be read with
Read Device datagram.
*
GFK-0450D
To Read Data Beginning
Here
Enter this Data Offset in
Byte 1 of Read Device
Datagram
Status Inputs
Voltage A–B
Voltage B–C
Voltage C–A
Voltage A–N
Voltage B–N
Voltage C–N
Current A
Current B
Current C
Current, aux
Watts A
Watts B
Watts C
VARsA
VARs B
VARs C
Power Factor
Accumulated Power
00
02
04
06
08
0A
0C
0E
10
12
14
16
18
1A
1C
1E
20
22
24
Fund. VARsA
26
Fund. VARs B
Fund. VARs C
Fund. Power Factor
28
2A
2C
Har. VARsA
2E
Har. VARs B
30
Har. VARs C
32
Total Har. VARs
34
Line Frequency
Temp. Alarm Status
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator (high 5 digits)
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator (low 3 digits)
36
38
3A
3C
PowerTRAC blocks with firmware prior to version 3.0 do not have this capability.
Chapter 5 Additional Calculated Data
5-11
5
Reply Datagram Sent by the PowerTRAC block
The block replies to each Read Device datagram with a Read Device Reply datagram
containing the requested data. When Status or Calculated Data is requested, this
datagram has the following content:
function code
20h
subfunction code
1Fh
priority
normal
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6–n
Description
00
Data Offset
C0 hex
FF hex
00
Length in bytes
the requested data
The first five bytes of the reply datagram are the same as the Read Device datagram.
Note
Some bus controllers, such as the Series 90–70 PLC bus controller, add
data to the Read Device Reply datagram before passing it on to the host.
Refer to your Bus Controller User’s Manual for details.
5-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Chapter
6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter explains how the PowerTRAC block stores sampled values representing
waveform and overcurrent event data, and how that data can be accessed.
Input Data Tables
Approximately twice per second, the block samples eight cycles of each voltage and
current input. Sampling rate is 16 times the frequency of the monitored voltage. The
result is 128 sampled values for each of the seven inputs. The block digitizes these
inputs and stores them in the Working Data Table.
CURRENT
AND
VOLTAGE
INPUTS
Ia
Ib
Ic
Ix
Va
Vb
Vc
a43593
CALCULATED
DATA
G
E
N
I
U
S
XMIT
DATA
BUFFER
B
U
S
STATUS
DATA
SIGNAL
CONDITIONING
MULTIPLEXER
ANALOG
TO
DIGITAL
CONVERTER
WORKING
DATA
OVERCURRENT
DATA
The block uses the values in the Working Data Table as the basis for the voltage, current,
and other values which it automatically calculates (see chapter 4 for more information
about this calculated data). Input values in the Working Data Table can also be read by a
PLC or computer for detailed waveform analysis.
The same input data is also sampled continuously, and stored in the Overcurrent Data
Table in a circular queue. If, at any time, one of the current inputs exceeds a configurable
overcurrent level for two successive samples, the contents of the Overcurrent Data Table
are frozen, trapping the digitized overcurrent waveform. The block automatically
informs the controlling PLC or computer that a current overcurrent has occurred by
setting the appropriate status bits in the “status inputs” data word. Input values in the
Overcurrent Data Table can be read by a PLC or computer for overcurrent analysis.
GFK-0450D
6-1
6
Table Format
Both the Working Data Table and the Overcurrent Data Table are 1792 bytes in length,
with each voltage and current input occupying 256 bytes. Inputs are stored in this
sequence in both tables:
a43705
DIGITIZED
INPUTS FROM:
BYTE #
0
Va
R TERMINALS
256
Vb
S TERMINALS
512
Vc
T TERMINALS
768
Ia
A TERMINALS
1024
Ib
B TERMINALS
1280
Ic
C TERMINALS
1536
1792
Iaux
X TERMINALS
The only table segments that will contain meaningful data are those which have
connections at the associated terminals. However, if the PowerTRAC block is configured
with two line–to–neutral PTs, the Vb data is meaningful; it synthesized by the block
from the Va and Vc data.
6-2
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
6
Sampled Waveform Data
The block samples each input at a rate which is 16 times per cycle of the monitored
voltage. After each cycle (16 samples), the block delays 1/128 of a cycle before beginning
the next 16 samples.
CYCLE 1
CYCLE 2
1/128 CYCLE
SAMPLING DELAY
CYCLE 3
1/128 CYCLE
SAMPLING
DELAY
a43690
1/128 CYCLE
SAMPLING DELAY
The delay at the end of each cycle (16 samples) allows a single–cycle, 128–point
waveform to be synthesized for each input.
To do this, values taken over 8 cycles are interleaved in the Working Data Table to
represent a composite waveform which consists of 128 values.
a43691
ONE COMPOSITE
WAVEFORM
MADE UP OF 128
SAMPLED POINTS
This composite will reveal repetitive high harmonic content distortions in the current
waveform.
Harmonic Analysis of Waveform Values
The values in the Working Data Table can be accessed for harmonic analysis of the input
waveforms. Read Device datagram information for obtaining some or all of the data in
the Working Data Table is shown in this chapter.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6-3
6
Overcurrent Data
When the block is configured, two overcurrent levels are selected, one for the three
current–phase inputs, the other for the auxiliary current input. If any of the four
current inputs exceeds the configured level for 1/8 of the input waveform period, the
block stores the values read during the three cycles before the event, plus the five
following cycles of data, for all of its inputs, in its internal Overcurrent Data Table. It
then freezes the contents of the Overcurrent Data Table. (The block continues sampling
inputs and reporting calculated data, but the Overcurrent Data Table remains frozen
until the controller reads it).
Format of the Overcurrent Data Table
In the Overcurrent Data Table, the 128 sampled point values for each input are stored
sequentially (rather than interleaved, as they are in the Working Data Table).
I (A)
a43594
CURRENT TRANSIENT ABOVE
CONFIGURED LEVEL FOR TWO
SUCCESSIVE SAMPLES. NEXT 5
CYCLES WILL BE SAMPLED.
35
30
CONFIGURED OVERCURRENT TRANSIENT LEVEL
25
THESE TWO CYCLES OCCURRED BEFORE THE OVERCURRENT TRANSIENT
20
CYCLE 2
15
CYCLE 3
CYCLE 4
10
5
How the Block Reports an Overcurrent Condition
If an overcurrent transient occurs, the PowerTRAC block reports it by setting the
appropriate status bits in the “status inputs” word, which is sent to the host each Genius
bus scan.
a45022
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
OVERCURRENT
EVENT OCCURS
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
HOST
1
6-4
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
HOST
2
“ OVERCURRENT
CAPTURED ”
GFK-0450D
6
Block Sets the Status Bits
The first 16 bits of the data that is sent by the block each bus scan are its status inputs.
When an overcurrent transient occurs, the block sets its Overcurrent Captured input
status bit and the overcurrent channel bit(s) corresponding to the channel(s) on which
the overcurrent event occurred.
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8
byte 1
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
byte 0
reserved
Data Ready
Overcurrent on Phase A
Data Type
Overcurrent on Phase B
Data Target
Overcurrent on Phase C
Overcurrent Captured
Overcurrent on aux.
Phase-lock Loop Locked
Overflow
reserved
This status information is automatically broadcast by the block the next time it receives
the bus token following the occurrence of the overcurrent. The controller receives this
status data, and stores it in the block’s assigned input status references. See chapter 4 for
more information about status inputs.
For example, if an overcurrent transient occurred on phase A, the block would set the
following Status Inputs:
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
8
byte 1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
on phase A
byte 0
Overcurrent Captured
Monitoring the Status Bits
To read overcurrent data or allow it to be read by one or more monitoring devices, the
application program in the controller should monitor the Overcurrent Captured bit. If
this bit is set to 1, the application program should request the overcurrent data as
described on the next page.
Clearing the Overcurrent Data
As already explained, the Overcurrent Data Table remains frozen until the
controller/data monitoring device initiates the handshaking sequence to read
Overcurrent data, described later in this chapter. The frozen Overcurrent Table is copied
to the transmit buffer, the Overcurrent flags are cleared, and the Overcurrent Capture
function is re–enabled. If an overcurrent event occurs while reading captured data
from a previous event, that data remains frozen in the Overcurrent Data table until a
subsequent Overcurrent Data read handshaking sequence is initiated.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6-5
6
Reading Table Data from a PowerTRAC block
There are three basic steps to read either Waveform Data or Overcurrent Event Data
from a PowerTRAC block. They are:
1.
The application program sets the appropriate “Send Data”, “Data Type”, and “Data
Target” output bits in the block’s assigned output references. As explained below,
these bits tell the PowerTRAC block what type of data is being requested, and they
specify the device that will read the data. The PowerTRAC block responds by
making the necessary preparations, and then mirrors these bits in the corresponding
“Status Inputs” bits.
2.
The application program in the intended receiving device (which is usually the
controller, but may be another host on the bus) then monitors the block’s status
inputs for a “Data Ready” indication.
3.
When the “Data Ready” status inputs are detected, the application program ithat wants
to read the table data may send datagrams to the block to read the data.
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
HOST
1
HOST
2
“ SEND DATA ”
a45023
POWERTRAC
BLOCK
MONITOR
HOST
3
“ DATA READY ”
MONITOR
“ DATAGRAMS ”
The individual steps in this process are explained in detail below.
Note
The application program must allow a minimum delay of second from
the end of one complete table reading sequence to the start of the next one.
Requesting Data Transfer
To request input values from the Overcurrent Data Table or the Working Data Table, the
application program in the controller must set up the data transfer by setting or clearing
the appropriate output command bits.
These bits must specify the data type to be transmitted, and whether the data should be
read by the controller or another device on the bus.
To initiate a request, the Send Data bit must be set to 1. If Overcurrent Table data will be
read, the Data Type bit must also be set to 1. Finally, if one or more monitoring devices
in addition to or instead of the controller will read the data, the Data Target bit must be
set to 1. All other bits are 0. Note that the PowerTRAC block’s “Data Ready” bit must be
0 before initiating a data transfer request sequence.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
Controller Outputs
Send Data
Overcurrent Data (Working Data = 0)
Data Target
6-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
6
When Working Data is requested, the block copies the current contents of the Working
Data Table into the Transmit Data buffer, writing over data already stored there. If
Overcurrent Data is requested, and the Overcurrent Data Table is currently frozen
because an Overcurrent Event has been captured, the block copies the current content of
the table into the buffer. If no new Overcurrent Event Data has been captured then:
A. if the Transmit Data buffer contains Overcurrent Data that has already been read,
that data can be read again.
B. if the buffer contains Working Data the request is ignored, since there is no available
Overcurrent Data to read.
Manipulation of the control output bits is NOT necessary for transmission of normal
status and calculated data. If the application does not require working or overcurrent
data, all control output bits should be 0.
Notifying the Controller that Data is Ready
After moving the data, the PowerTRAC block broadcasts the following Input Status bits
during its next turn on the bus.
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
Status Inputs
Data Ready
Overcurrent Data (Working Data = 0)
Data Target (Data Monitor = 1)
Data Ready indicates that the block has data to transfer. The Data Type and Data Target
bits are copies of the corresponding output command bits.
Upon receiving the input status bits with Data Ready set to 1, program logic in the
device(s) designated by the Data Target bit should issue the necessary Read Device
datagrams to the block. Datagram format is shown later in this chapter.
Clearing the Data Ready Bit
The block clears the Data Ready bit after it has transmitted a reply to a read request
containing the LAST BYTE OF THE TRANSMIT DATA BUFFER.
Note
If more than one device is reading data from the block simultaneously,
and the last byte of the data buffer is read before all the devices have
finished reading the data, the block will clear the Data Ready bit.
However, data in the Transmit Data buffer will remain frozen and the
PowerTRAC block will continue to service all data requests until the host
controller device clears the “Send Data” Control Output.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6-7
6
Sending Data to Monitoring Devices
If any other device on the bus is to read data from the PowerTRAC block, that device’s
application program should monitor the block’s status input bits. When the device
detects that the “Data Ready” and “Data Target” bits are set to 1, it should issue the
appropriate Read Device datagrams to the block.
Completing the Process
When the block has finished responding to the request(s) for table data, the controller
and monitoring devices must end the data transmission appropriately.
If the controller alone, and/or one monitor are reading data, the host should monitor the
Data Ready input status bit. When the block clears this bit (indicating that the last data
byte has been read), the application program should clear the output bits. The exception
to this would be if the same data will be sent again to another device. In that case, the
“Send Data” output bit should not be cleared until the second data transmission is
finished.
If multiple devices will be reading the data, the controller device should take care to
ensure that all data monitoring devices have completed all data requests before clearing
the “Send Data” Control Output. This may be accomplished by providing a fixed delay
or by having monitoring devices report “Read Status” to the host controller via Global
Data or status inputs of their own.
If the Data Ready bit stays set for a prolonged period of time after reading the last byte
of the data buffer (for example, thirty seconds or more), the application program in the
controller can assume that an incomplete data transmission occurred, and that the block
has failed to clear the bit. The program can attempt to request the data transmission
again.
It is imperative that the “Send Data” Control Output is cleared after the data read
transaction has completed.
6-8
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
6
Example
The following diagram represents the timing of output command bits from the
controller and input status bits from the block, for a system with a host controller and
one data monitoring device. In this example, the application program in the controller
first requests that the block send Overcurrent Table Data to itself. Following completion
of that data transfer, the application program then requests that the same data be read
by a monitoring device.
HOST
a43701
OUTPUT BITS
SEND DATA
DATA TYPE
DATA TARGET
POWERTRAC BLOCK
INPUT BITS
DATA READY
DATA TYPE
DATA TARGET
1
2 3
4 5
6 7
8 9 10
1.
The controller sets the Send Data and Data Type output command bits to 1. The
Data Target bit is 0, indicating to the data will be received by the controller.
2.
Upon receiving these output command bits, the PowerTRAC block prepares the
data, then sets Data Ready input status to 1. The Data Type and Data Target input
status bits are copies of the corresponding output bits.
3.
When the controller detects that the Data Ready input bit is set it begins sending
Read Device datagrams to the block.
4.
After all the data has been sent, the block clears the Data Ready input status bit.
5.
When the controller receives all requested data and detects that the Data Ready bit
is cleared, it sets the Data Target output command bit.
6.
When the block detects that the Data Target output command bit has changed state,
it sets the Data Ready input bit, and copies the Data Target output to the Data Target
status input bit.
7.
When the monitoring device detects that the block has data ready, and that the Data
Target bit is set, it begins sending Read Device datagrams to the block.
8.
After all the data has been sent, the block again clears the Data Ready input status
bit.
9.
When the controller detects that the Data Ready input bit is cleared, it clears all the
output command bits.
10. The block then clears the remaining status input bits.
GFK-0450D
Chapter 6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6-9
6
Sending Datagrams to Read Table Data
After setting up data transfer using the status and control bits, as described previously,
the device that wants to read table data from the PowerTRAC block must send it a Read
Device datagram. The block sends back a reply datagram with the requested
information. Read Device datagram formats are described below.
Datagram Timing
These Read Device datagrams are always sent using normal priority. Since only one
normal priority datagram can be sent by any device on a bus during a single bus scan,
transmission of table data may be delayed it there is other datagram traffic on the bus.
Any of the following errors will cause the PowerTRAC block to ignore the datagrams:
1.
Incorrect handshake
2.
incorrect message format
3.
invalid data address or length specification. The entire address/length specified
must fall within the range 0 – 1791.
Read Device Datagram for Table Data
When used to read table data from a PowerTRAC block, the Read Device datagram has
the following content:
function code
20h
subfunction code
1Eh
priority
normal
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6-10
Description
must be 0
Device Address byte 1
Device Address byte 2
must be 0
must be 0
Length in bytes (maximum = 128 per message)
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
6
The device address specified in bytes 1 and 2 of the datagram is the byte number
location in the transmit buffer that data should be read from. Any beginning location
may be selected. The first byte of data is considered to be byte #0. The range of the
reply is address through address + (length – 1).
Device Address
Decimal
0
Hex
0000
128
0080
256
0100
384
0180
512
0200
640
0280
768
0300
896
0380
1024
0400
1152
0480
1280
0500
1408
0580
1536
0600
1664
0680
(Last Byte) 1791
06FF
For this Input
Va
For Overcurrent Data
Only: Input Cycles
1–4
5–8
Vb
1–4
5–8
Vc
1–4
5–8
Ia
1–4
5–8
Ib
1–4
5–8
Ic
1–4
5–8
Iaux
1–4
5–8
The length in bytes is the amount of data to be transferred in one datagram. The entire
transmit buffer contains 1792 bytes of data, arranged in the same format as the table
data. Each input occupies 256 bytes of the table, beginning at the byte location shown in
the figure. Reading all of the data for one input would require two Read Device
Datagrams of length 128. Reading an entire table would require 14 Read Device
datagrams of length 128. The last byte (1791) must always be read. This indicates to the
PowerTRAC block that the requesting device has read all the data and may serve as an
acknowledgement to the host controller device that the last request has been received
and processed. The data in the table will remain frozen, and the block will continue to
service datagrams until the Send Data Control Output has been cleared.
Example Datagram:
To read the Overcurrent Table Data for the phase A current input (Ia) only, the
requesting device would send at least three Read Device Datagrams.
GFK-0450D
Datagram #1:
device address = 768
length = 128 bytes
Datagram #2:
device address = 896
length = 128 bytes
Datagram #3:
device address = 1791
length = 1 byte
Chapter 6 Waveform Data and Overcurrent Data
6-11
6
Reply Datagram Sent to the Requesting Device
The block replies to each Read Device Datagram with a Read Device Reply datagram
containing the requested data. This datagram has the following content:
function code
20h
subfunction code
1Fh
priority
normal
Byte No.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6–n
Description
must be 0
Device Address byte 1
Device Address byte 2
must be 0
must be 0
Length in bytes (maximum = 128 per message)
the requested table data
The first five bytes of the reply datagram are the same as the Read Device datagram.
Note
Some bus controllers, such as the Series 90–70 PLC bus controller, add
data to the Read Device Reply datagram before passing it on to the host.
Refer to your Bus Controller User’s Manual for details.
Converting the Data to Voltage or Current
The waveform and overcurrent data returned by the PowerTRAC block is unscaled
counts; to obtain voltage or current values, the data must be converted as described
below.
To convert counts to volts
Use this equation:
counts * 0.0739 * PT turns ratio = Volts
To convert counts to current
Use this equation:
counts * 0.0035 * CT turns ratio = Amperes
6-12
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Appendix A Special Wiring Instructions
A
Follow these instructions only if PTs and CTs
are not connected to the PowerTRAC block
as shown in chapter 2.
To operate properly, the block needs at least one voltage input. If the block will be used
to monitor current only, you must jumper the power inputs to the R voltage inputs.
Required PT and CT Connections
For correct calculation of power values, PTs and CTs must be connected to the following
input terminals on the PowerTRAC Block.
Required Connections
Numberof
PTs (L–N)
two
Numberof
PTs (L–L)
two
Number
of CTs
two
A–N
one
C–N
B–N
B–C
one
A–B
C–A
phase A
one
phase C
phase B
If PTs and CTs are connected as shown above, turn to chapter 2 “Installation” for wiring
instructions.
The block can be used with PTs and CTs which are already connected to power in a
different way. The diagrams in this appendix show special wiring for:
2
2
1
3
2
2
1
GFK-0450D
line–to–neutral PTs with 1 or 3 CTs.
line–to–neutral PTs with 2 CTs.
line–to–neutral PT with 1 or 3 CTs.
line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs.
line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs.
line–to–line PTs with 2 CTs.
line–to–line PT with 2 CTs.
A-1
A
In each diagram, power phases and block terminals are shown in the following manner:
(LINE SIDE)
a43609
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
PTs and CTs must be connected to the block as shown in the diagrams.
Redefining Power Phases
The PowerTRAC block always defines line 1 as “phase A”, line 2 as “phase B”, and line 3
as “phase C”:
1
2
3
A
B
C
a43610
Depending on how PTs and CTs are connected to power, the actual phase relationships
in the diagrams shown in this appendix may be either of the following:
1
A-2
2
3
C
A
B
B
C
A
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
a43611
GFK-0450D
A
The block will report data correctly, but it will be reported for the EXPECTED phases,
with no indication of the changed connections; the block always reports line 1 as phase
A, line 2 as phase B, and line 3 as phase C.
For example, suppose that the PTs and CTs were connected like this:
1
2
3
C
A
B
a43612
The block would identify (to a Hand–held Monitor and to the CPU) phase C values as
phase A, phase A as phase B, and phase B as phase C.
It is important to inform personnel responsible for monitoring data from the block or
creating application programs that data is not being reported for the expected phases.
Note
Mark the changed phases in this manual and in any other
documentation that will be used with the block. In addition, post this
information where it will be noticed by personnel reading data from the
block using a Hand–held Monitor.
Basic Wiring Instructions
Wiring connections from PTs and CTs may be made with wire sizes up to #10. The
terminals will accept bare wires, or spade or ring lugs. If conduit will be used to bring
wires or cables for field inputs to the block, its size and installation should be in
accordance with local electrical code. For safety, current transformer burdens are
permanently connected across the block’s current transformer input terminals. No
spring–type contacts are used.
Power must be NOT be applied to the PowerTRAC block or input terminals when
completing the field wiring.
Connect transformers to the block with the dots as shown. If this is done, power flow in
the direction indicated by the arrow in each illustration will provide a + reading for that
input.
Warning
For personal safety, PT AND CT SECONDARIES MUST BE
GROUNDED. Recommended grounding is shown in the diagrams
that follow.
GFK-0450D
Appendix A Special Wiring Instructions
A-3
A
2 line–to–neutral PTs with 1 or 3 CTs
a43613
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R and T terminals. If there is just one CT, connect it to the
B terminals. An NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current, power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
The PowerTRAC will synthesize the third voltage (S inputs) from R and T by assuming
that R + S + T = 0 at each sample period.
If only one CT is used, total power is calculated to be three times the measured power on
phase B.
A-4
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
A
2 line–to–neutral PTs with 2 CTs
a43614
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R and T terminals. Connect the CTs to the A and C
terminals. An NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current, power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
The PowerTRAC will synthesize the third voltage (S inputs) from R and T by assuming
that R + S + T = 0 at each sample period.
GFK-0450D
Appendix A Special Wiring Instructions
A-5
A
1 line–to–neutral PT with 1 or 3 CTs
a43617
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R and T terminals. If there is just one CT, it must sense
line 2, and it must be connected to input B; otherwise, no power measurement is made.
An NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current, power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
Total power is calculated to be three times the measured power on phase B.
A-6
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
A
3 Line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs
a44956
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R, S, and T terminals. An NCT can be connected to the X
terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current, power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
GFK-0450D
Appendix A Special Wiring Instructions
A-7
A
2 line–to–line PTs with 1 or 3 CTs
a43615
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R and T terminals. If there is just one CT, connect it to the
B terminals. An NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
A-8
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
A
2 line–to–line PTs with 2 CTs
a43616
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
N
C
B
1
A
C
2
B
A
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PTs to the block’s R and T terminals. Connect the CTs to the A and C
terminals. An NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current, power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
GFK-0450D
Appendix A Special Wiring Instructions
A-9
A
1 line–to–line PT with 2 CTs
a43618
(LINE SIDE)
ACTUAL INPUT PHASES
OR
C
B
A
C
B
A
N
1
2
3
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
A+
A–
B+
B–
CURRENT
C+
C–
X+
X–
(LOAD SIDE)
Connect the PT to the block’s S terminals. Connect the CTs to the A and C terminals. An
NCT can be connected to the X terminals as shown in chapter 2.
Data returned by the block for line 1 will be identified as “phase A” current power, and
voltage. Data returned for line 2 will be identified as “phase B”. Data returned for line 3
will be identified as “phase C”.
Total power as used in the Watt–hour and Power Factor calculations is assumed to be
three times the measured power on phase B.
A-10
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Appendix B Using PTs and CTs With Higher Turns Ratios
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
B
The PowerTRAC block can accept inputs from any PT with a secondary rating of 120V
and any CT with a secondary rating of 5A. However, the range of configurable turns
ratios for PTs and CTs is:
PT Turns Ratio:
CT Turns Ratio:
1.0:1 to 2730.0:1 (120V to 327kV primary voltage)
1:1 to 6550:1 (5A to 32750A primary current)
If PTs and/or CTs used with the block have higher turns ratios, refer to the following instructions.
Configuring Fractional Turns Ratios
If the turns ratio of PTs and/or CTs is too great to be configured directly, it is possible to
configure a turns ratio that will produce an easily–understood calculated value. The
configured turns ratio may be a fraction (such as 1/10) of the actual turns ratio.
Fractional PT Turns Ratio
The block uses the configured PT Turns Ratio to calculate primary line–to–line or
line–to–neutral voltage from the secondary input voltage. If a fraction of the actual PT
turns ratio is entered, the block will calculate voltage values that represent the same
fraction of the primary voltage. For example, configuring 1/10 of the actual PT turns
ratio will produce calculated voltages that are 1/10 of the actual primary voltage. As an
example, for a PT turns ratio of 5000:1, the value 500 might be configured instead. When
configuring the block with a Hand–held Monitor, the value is entered on this screen:
P T
T U R N S
R A T I O
( 1 . 0
T O
2 7 3 0 . 0 )
5 0 0 . 0
r n g
c h n g
n x t
GFK-0450D
B-1
B
Fractional CT Turns Ratio
The block uses the configured CT Turns Ratio to calculate primary line current from the
input secondary current. If a fraction of the actual CT turns ratio is entered, the block
will calculate current values that represent the same fraction of the primary current. For
example, entering 1/10 of the actual turns ratio will produce calculated currents that are
1/10 of the actual line current. As an example, for a CT turns ratio of 8000:1, the value
800 might be entered on this Hand–held Monitor block configuration screen:
C T
r n g
T U R N S
R A T I O
( 1
T O
6 5 5 0 )
c h n g
8 0 0
n x t
Fractional Calculated Values
If the block is configured with a fractional PT turns ratio and/or CT turns ratio, the
voltage and current calculations based upon those turns ratios will represent the same
fraction of the primary voltage or current, as explained above.
These fractional values will be reported to a Hand–held Monitor and to the CPU. For
example, if the PT turns ratio has been configured at 1/10 of the actual turns ratio, the
calculated voltages will be 1/10 of the actual voltages. If the actual primary line–to–line
voltage were really 75000 volts, the Hand–held Monitor would display 1/10 of that
value:
HHM Monitor/Control Reference Display
M N T R
1 7 –
3 2
I
V a b
( K V )
S T S
7 5 . 0 0
>
r e f
f o r c e
d i a g
z Voltage A to B
z displayed value
Similarly, if the CT turns ratio has been configured at 1/10 of the actual CT turns ratio,
the calculated current will be 1/10 of the actual line current. If fractional CT turns ratios
are programmed, the configured line transient/overcurrent event should be
programmed as 1/10 of the desired actual line threshold.
B-2
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
B
Fractional Calculated Power Values
The block calculates active and reactive power by multiplying calculated voltage and
current values. If a fractional turns ratio has been entered for PTs or CTs but not for
both, the calculated power values will represent the same fraction of the actual power
values. For example, if the PT turns ratio is configured at 1/10 of the actual PT turns
ratio, but the CT turns ratio is configured at the actual turns ratio, the calculated power
values will be 1/10 of the actual power values.
However, if BOTH a fractional PT turns ratio and a fractional CT turns ratio are
configured, the calculated power values are reduced by a fraction equal to the product of
the PT and CT turns ratio fractions. For example, if both the PT turns ratio and the CT
turns ratio are configured at 1/10 of the actual turns ratios, the calculated power values
represent 1/100 of the actual power values (1/10 x 1/10).
Recording Changed Turns Ratios
If a PT and/or CT turns ratio is configured as a fraction of the actual turns ratio, it is
important to explain to operations and programming personnel how to correctly
interpret data received from the PowerTRAC block.
Note
Mark changed PT and CT turns ratios in this manual and in any other
documentation that will be used with the block. Record how to
correctly interpret the voltage and/or current and power values
reported by the block. In addition, post appropriate instructions for
interpreting the block’s data where they will be noticed by personnel
reading the data with a Hand–held Monitor.
GFK-0450D
Appendix B Using PTs and CTs with Higher Turns Ratios
B-3
Appendix C Using a PowerTRAC Block for Current
Monitoring Only
C
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
This appendix describes the necessary wiring and configuration for a PowerTRAC block
that will be used to monitor only current where the application does not include any PT.
Even though the block will not be used to monitor voltage, an appropriate voltage input
must be provided.
Note
The PowerTRAC block must have input voltage connected to operate
properly, and that voltage must be at the same frequency as the current
inputs.
Installation Instructions
When installing the PowerTRAC block to monitor current only, connect the CTs
normally, as described in chapter 2 or appendix A.
Connect the voltage source to the block’s S terminals. Be sure to observe the correct
polarity. Voltage can be obtained from an external source, or from the block itself.
If the block will be operated on 120VAC, the voltage source can be obtained by
jumpering the block’s power inputs to the S terminals. This is diagrammed below.
a43618
120 VAC
H
N
R+
R–
S+
VOLTAGE
S–
T+
T–
If the block will be operated on some other type of input power, a separate source of
120VAC can be connected to the S terminals instead.
GFK-0450D
C-1
C
Configuration
If the block is wired as described above, configure it as follows:
PT Connection
Line–to–neutral
Number of PTs
2
Power Display Units
Not used
PT Turns Ratio
1.0:1
All other features can be configured to reflect the actual installation.
Monitoring Data
Because actual system voltage is not being monitored, the block’s power calculations are
not meaningful. For this reason, it is not necessary to configure power display units.
The installation and configuration setup described above will cause the block to supply
zero or very low values in all its calculations that are based on voltage.
C-2
Genius PowerTRAC Block User’s Manual – May 1994
GFK-0450D
Index
A
AC voltage too low, 4-5
Accumulated Power, explanation and
HHM display, 4-13
Accuracy of voltage and current measurements, 1-3
Active Power, 1-7
data, in message structure, 4-1
explanation and HHM display, 4-10
HHM display format, 4-4
Auxiliary Current
explanation and HHM displays, 4-9
transient, HHM configuration, 3-12
transient, range and default, 3-6
B
Baud rate, 1-10
configuring for block, 3-5
cycling power after changing, 3-16
offline configuration, 3-2
selections and default, 3-6
stand–alone block, 2-5
Block
description, 1-2
dimensions, 1-2
failure, LED indication, 2-12
features, 1-1
operation, description and diagram, 1-5
, 6-1
Block ID configuration, 3-4
Block power, 1-2
applying, 2-12
disconnect, 2-4
LED indication, 2-12
needed for offline configuration, 3-2
wiring, 2-6
BSM Controller, HHM configuration, 3-15
BSM Present, HHM configuration, 3-15
BSM Present, selections and default, 3-6
Burden Per Input, 1-3
Bus, 1-10
connector, 2-4
removal, 2-4
termination, 2-3
wiring, 2-3
GFK-0450D
C
Calculated Data, 1-7
data, in message structure, 4-1
displaying with HHM, 4-7
for fractional turns ratios, B-2
HHM screen sequence, 5-1
types not automatically supplied, 5-1
Catalog number, PowerTRAC block, 1-3
Cimplicity, 1-12 , 1-15
Command Outputs, 4-14
HHM displays, 4-4 , 4-15
Communications failure, LED Indication,
2-12
Communications handshake, 1-7 , 6-8 , 6-9
, 6-10
Configuration, 3-1 , 3-6
data format for datagrams, 3-17
defaults, 3-6
offline, 3-2
stored through loss of power, 3-16
Configuration Protection
HHM configuration, 3-16
selections and default, 3-6
Counts to voltage or current, converting,
6-12
CPU Memory Usage, 4-2
CPU Redundancy
HHM configuration, 3-16
selections and default, 3-6
CPU References
Host Computer, 4-3
Series 90 PLC, 4-2
Series Five PLC, 4-3
Series Six PLC, 4-3
CT Turns Ratio
configurable range, 1-4
configuring fractional, B-1
HHM configuration, 3-11
range and default, 3-6
CTs, 1-4
disconnecting from block, 2-11
grounding secondaries, 2-7
maximum burden, 1-4
not needed if current less than 5A, 1-14
number of, configuration steps, 3-8
number of, selections and default, 3-6
power flow, 2-7
primary and secondary ratings, 1-4
Index-1
Index
wiring to block, 2-7 , 2-10 , 2-11
Current, 1-7
Line current, explanation and HHM display, 4-9
transient, 6-4
transient, HHM configuration, 3-12
Electronics Assembly, 1-2
installing, 2-12
upgrading, 2-12
Enclosure, using to protect block, 2-1
Extended Watt-hour Accumulator, explanation and HHM display, 5-9
Current burden, 1-1
Current inputs, 1-1
auxiliary, HHM display format, 4-4
data, in message structure, 4-1
HHM display format, 4-4
monitoring only, C-1
G
Grounding, 2-7
for offline configuration, 3-2
PowerTRAC, 2-6
PT and CT secondaries, 2-7 , A-3
Current monitoring only, 1-4
H
D
Data monitoring system, 1-9 , 1-11
Data read sequence, example, 6-9
Data Ready bit, clearing, 6-6 , 6-7
Data Ready output bit, 6-6
Data Ready status bit, 4-5 , 6-8
Data scaling, 6-12
Data Target output bit, 4-14 , 6-6
Data Target status bit, 4-5
Data transfer to and from PowerTRAC,
4-1
Data Type output bit, 4-14 , 6-6
Hand–held Monitor, 1-10 , 5-2
compatibility, 1-12
connect to block, 3-3
data displays, 4-4
keyswitch position, 3-3
PowerTRAC connector, 1-2
status inputs displays, 4-6
using to configure block, 3-1
Handshake, communications, 1-7 , 1-8 ,
4-1 , 4-14 , 6-9 , 6-10
Harmonic analysis, 1-5 , 1-8 , 6-3
Harmonic VARs, 1-8
as % of Volt–Amps, 5-5
explanation and HHM display, 5-5
HHM format, 5-1
Total, explanation and HHM display, 5-7
Data Type status bit, 4-5
Datagram ignored by block, 6-10
Datagrams, 1-5
returned data format, 5-11
timing, 5-10 , 6-10
using to read block data, 5-10
Harmonics waveforms, 5-5
Host computer, reference usage, 4-3
Host computer, using, 1-10
Host CPU type, setting up HHM, 3-3
Humidity tolerance, 1-3
Delta system, 1-1
Design standards, 1-3
Device Number, 3-4 , 3-16
Devices on the Bus, 1-10
Dimensions, block, 1-2 , 1-3
Distance from host, maximum, 1-1
E
EEPROM failure, LED indication, 2-12
Index-2
I
Input data format, 6-2
Input data tables, 6-1
Input sampling, simultaneous, 1-6
Installation Steps, 2-1
L
LEDs, 1-2 , 2-12
indications at powerup, 2-12
GFK-0450D
Index
operation on stand–alone block, 2-5
Line frequency
calculated, 1-8
configuring automatic reporting of, 3-14
Line frequency, explanation and HHM
display, 5-8
Load Monitoring, 1-14
Load scheduling, 1-15
Load shedding, 1-13 , 1-15
Overcurrent Data Table, 1-5
clearing when frozen, 6-5
organization, 6-2
reading, 4-14
reading, example, 6-9
Overflow, caused by incorrect configuration, 3-9
Overload capability, 1-4
P
Locations for block, 2-1
PCIM/QBIM versions, 1-12
Logicmaster software, versions required,
1-12
Phase relationships of calculated data, 1-6
Phase shift, 5-3 , 5-5
Phase–lock Loop status bit, 4-5 , 6-5
M
Module status LEDs, 2-12
Monitoring current only, 2-7
Monitoring devices, sending data to, 6-8
Multiplexed input data, Series Six PLC, 4-3
N
NCT Turns Ratio, HHM configuration,
3-11
NCT Turns Ratio, range and default, 3-6
PLC, using with PowerTRAC blocks, 1-10
PLC, versions required, 1-12
Power Display Units
HHM configuration steps, 3-9
selections and default, 3-6
Power Factor, 1-7
configuring sign for, 3-13
data, in message structure, 4-1
explanation and HHM display, 4-12
Fundamental, explanation and HHM
display, 5-4
HHM display format, 4-4
Power flow, monitoring, 1-13
Power Phases, redefining, A-2
Power supply, block, 1-1 , 1-2
O
Operating temperature range, 1-3
PowerTRAC block, configuration data,
3-17
Outputs from host, explanation, 4-14
PowerTRAC Block Specifications, 1-3
Outputs, setting to 0, 4-1
PT and CT connections, required, A-1
Overcurrent
configurable threshold, 1-1
data, 1-7
Data Table, 6-4 , 6-6
data, reading, 5-10
location status bits, 6-5
Overcurrent Captured status bit, 6-5
status bit, 4-5
PT Connection, HHM configuration steps,
3-7
Overcurrent Captured status bit, 4-5 , 6-4
PTs, 1-4
120–volt lines without, 1-14
grounding secondaries, 2-7
Overcurrent Data, explanation and diagram, 6-4
GFK-0450D
Power Units, range and resolution, 3-9
PT connection, selections and default, 3-6
PT Turns Ratio, 1-3
configuring fractional, B-1
HHM configuration, 3-10
range and default, 3-6
reconfiguring, 2-12
Index-3
Index
line–to–line, wiring to block, 2-9 , 2-10
number of, configuration steps, 3-8
number of, selections and default, 3-6
operating without, 1-4 , C-1
power flow, 2-7
primary and secondary ratings, 1-4
wiring to block, 2-7 , 2-8
reference usage, 4-3
Series SIx PLC, reference usage, 4-3
Series Six PLC, compatibility, 1-12
Shorting bars, 1-4
Single–phase Monitoring, 1-14
Specifications, 1-3
Q
QBIM, compatibility, 1-12
R
Reactive Power, 1-7
data, in message structure, 4-1
explanation and HHM display, 4-11
HHM display format, 4-4
Read Block I/O datagram, 5-10
Read Device datagram, 5-10 , 6-10
Read Device Reply Datagram, 5-12 , 6-12
Stand–alone Block, 1-9
installation, 2-5
operation, 1-1
Standards, design, 1-3
Status Data, 1-5 , 1-7
HHM formats, 4-6
location in message structure, 4-1
Status Inputs, 4-5
Data Ready, 4-5
Data Target, 4-5
Data Type, 4-5
Overcurrent, 4-5
Overcurrent Captured, 4-5
Overflow, 4-5
Phase–loop Locked, 4-5
Reading table data, sending datagrams,
6-10
Storage temperature range, 1-3
References
configuration, 3-4
required, 4-2
selection, 4-2
stand–alone block, 2-5
Switch gear, using with PowerTRAC, 1-15
Requesting data transfer via Output Command bits, 6-6
S
Substation Monitoring, 1-15
System Monitoring, 1-13
System, PLC and PowerTRAC, 1-10
T
Temperature Alarm
calculated, 1-8
configuring automatic reporting of, 3-14
Sampling, simultaneous, 1-6
Secondary ratings, 1-4
Send Data output bit, 4-14
Send Data output bit, clearing, 6-8
Temperature ranges, 1-3
Sending Datagrams to Read Table Data,
6-10
Terminal Assembly, 1-2
installation, 2-2
removal, 2-2 , 2-4
Series 90–70 PLC
compatibility, 1-12
reference usage, 4-2
Termination, 2-3
block, for offline configuration, 3-2
needed for stand–alone block, 2-5
Series 90–70 PLC, reference usage, 4-2
Transmit buffer, 1-5
reading last byte, 6-6
Series Five PLC
compatibility, 1-12
Index-4
Temperature Alarm Status, explanation
and HHM display, 5-8
Troubleshooting: LEDs, 2-12
GFK-0450D
Index
Typical Applications, 1-13
U
synthesized with 1 or 2 PTs connected,
2-8
Voltage inputs, 1-1
data, in message structure, 4-1
Update rate, 1-3 , 1-5
W
V
VARs
configuring automatic reporting of, 3-14
configuring sign for, 3-13
Fundamental, explanation and HHM
display, 5-3
Fundamental, HHM format, 5-1
Harmonic, explanation and HHM display, 5-5
Harmonic, HHM format, 5-1
Vibration tolerance, 1-3
Voltage, 1-7
HHM display format, 4-4
L–L, explanation and HHM displays,
4-7
L–N, explanation and HHM displays,
4-8
GFK-0450D
Watt–hours, 1-7
accumulator, reset to 0, 3-16
data, in message structure, 4-1
explanation and HHM display, 4-13
HHM display format, 4-4
Waveform Data, 1-7 , 1-8
reading, 5-10
sampling technique and diagrams, 6-3
transmitting, 3-1
Wiring instructions
basic, 2-7 , A-3
special, A-1
Wiring PTs and CTs, 2-7
Working Data Table, 1-5 , 6-6
organization, 6-2
reading, 4-14
Wye system, 1-1
Index-5
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