460202008
GE
Security
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
P/N 460202008C • ISS 25MAR10
Copyright
© 2010 GE Security, Inc.
This document may not be copied or otherwise reproduced, in whole or in part, except as
specifically permitted under US and international copyright law, without the prior written
consent from GE Security.
Document number/revision: 460202008C (March 2010).
Disclaimer
THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. GE ASSUMES
NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR INACCURACIES OR OMISSIONS AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY
LIABILITIES, LOSSES, OR RISKS, PERSONAL OR OTHERWISE, INCURRED AS A CONSEQUENCE,
DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, OF THE USE OR APPLICATION OF ANY OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS
DOCUMENT. FOR THE LATEST DOCUMENTATION, CONTACT YOUR LOCAL SUPPLIER OR VISIT US
ONLINE AT WWW.GESECURITY.COM.
This publication may contain examples of screen captures and reports used in daily operations.
Examples may include fictitious names of individuals and companies. Any similarity to names
and addresses of actual businesses or persons is entirely coincidental.
Trademarks and patents
GE and the GE monogram are registered trademarks of General Electric.
Picture Perfect and logo are registered trademarks of GE Security.
Other trade names used in this document may be trademarks or registered trademarks of the
manufacturers or vendors of the respective products.
Intended use
Use this product only for the purpose it was designed for; refer to the data sheet and user
documentation. For the latest product information, contact your local supplier or visit us online
at:
www.gesecurity.com.
iii
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Conventions used in this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xv
Safety terms and symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .xv
Related documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Chapter 1.
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
New in Picture Perfect 4.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Operating features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Optional features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Support services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Enterprise consulting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
National language support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Chapter 2.
Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Starting and stopping Picture Perfect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
Logging on to the system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Selecting one or more facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Navigating Picture Perfect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
The menu bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
The toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
The application window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Search criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Chapter 3.
Configuration checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Configuration steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Chapter 4.
Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Creating records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Editing records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Deleting records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Printing records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
iv
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Assigning system parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
System Parameters Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Configuring LDAP support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Creating facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Setting up printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Setting up workstations (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Setting up SSL Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Client SSL Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Database encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Chapter 5.
System configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configuring modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Configuring ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Configuring email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Defining routings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Defining badge formats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Defining departments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
v
Defining personnel types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Chapter 6.
Operator administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Creating facility permission profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Creating system permission profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Creating form profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Setting up permission groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Setting up permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Defining operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Linking facilities, facility profiles, permissions, and operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Examples: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Chapter 7.
Alarm/activity configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Alarms overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Alarm/activity routing overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Defining routings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Creating route definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
vi
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Defining route points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Creating alarm instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Creating alarm responses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Defining alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Defining alarm colors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Alarm monitor color scheme: Alarm description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Alarm monitor color scheme: Processing state. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Chapter 8.
Device management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Creating output groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
Creating input groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129
Parent input groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Defining micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Dynamic configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
Direct connect micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Dial-up micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Network micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Micro Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
vii
Creating encryption keys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Flashing micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
Micro firmware files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Flashing a micro using eFlash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Network micro parameter block configuration (PXN only) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Defining outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Defining inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Controlling outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Controlling Access Secure operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Verifying time zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Chapter 9.
Area management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
Creating categories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .172
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Creating areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Nested anti-passback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Nested APB Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Defining readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
viii
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Defining doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
Chapter 10. Schedules and modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Creating modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Normal mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Emergency modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Holiday modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Changing modes by command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
Changing modes by scheduling a mode event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .199
Events overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Runtime events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Start/end events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
Scheduling area events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
Scheduling reader events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .206
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Scheduling door events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .210
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Scheduling alarm events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .212
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213
Scheduling input group events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .216
ix
Scheduling output group events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Scheduling backup events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Triggering Emergency modes using input groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Chapter 11. Badge management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Defining badges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Defining personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236
Capturing and displaying images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Printing badges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .242
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Category manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .244
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Category scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Badge manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Temp Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252
Chapter 12. Badge design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
Setting up badge designs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
x
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Mapping badge designs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .259
Setting a default badge design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
Chapter 13. Alarm/activity monitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Monitor toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Monitoring alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .266
Responding to alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Monitoring badge activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274
Monitoring Swipe and Show activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .275
Monitoring input activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
Monitoring operator activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280
Monitoring status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .281
Monitoring users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .283
Monitoring system performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .287
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .289
Monitoring log file messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .289
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .289
Chapter 14. Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Creating and viewing reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .293
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .293
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .296
xi
Importing archived data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .299
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Working with SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300
SQL variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
SQL keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Logical operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Relational operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Scheduling reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .306
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Wide carriage printing of report events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Chapter 15. Backup and restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .310
Backing up your database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .310
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Archiving your database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Restoring your database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .316
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Chapter 16. Data Generator and templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320
Running templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Data Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .321
Data Generator form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Managing templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Chapter 17. User interface customization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330
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Creating and editing custom forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .330
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .331
Creating and editing custom lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334
Related procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334
Chapter 18. Advanced access control features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Occupancy control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
How to set up occupancy control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338
Two man rule (2MR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .342
Modified two man rule (M2MR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .343
How to set up a two man rule (2MR) controlled space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .344
How to set up a modified two man rule (M2MR) controlled space with door control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .348
How to set up a modified two man rule (M2MR) controlled space without door control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .356
Badge transactions for occupancy counting and 2MR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .363
Seed counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Double-badge function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Double-badge reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368
Double-badge configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368
Elevator control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
System configuration standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .369
Elevator access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .369
Elevator access for all categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .371
Free access floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .371
How to set up elevator control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .372
Defining the number of floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .372
Defining micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .372
Defining readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373
Defining outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373
Defining inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373
The Elevators form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .373
Fields and controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .374
How to edit floor labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .376
The Category Floors form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .378
Fields and Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .379
Scheduling elevator free access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .379
Floor tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .379
Pre-alarm notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Pre-alarm function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381
Pre-alarm notification methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381
Disabling pre-alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381
Pre-alarm configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .382
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Controlling alarms using a keypad code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384
Keypad alarm response function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
Violation notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
Keypad response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
Operator response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
Condition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
Process state . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
Multiple access violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
Door operation while violation is active . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
Keypad alarm response configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
Tracing badge holder activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .388
Escort required. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .390
Chapter 19. Troubleshooting, maintenance, support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .394
Troubleshooting your Picture Perfect 4.5 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .394
Troubleshooting tools:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Log on troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Imaging troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .401
Contacting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .406
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415
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Preface
References to Picture Perfect 4.5 for AIX are subject to availability -- currently planned for late 2010.
This document provides instructions for initial setup and configuration of the Picture Perfect system and for
configuration changes to an existing system. It also contains information for operating the system once it is
installed.
This document is intended for system administrators who are responsible for the planning and implementation
of the system design, and who perform system configuration and setup using Picture PerfectTM forms that are
accessible only to the master-level operator.
Operators using the system should read the chapters which relate to their duties.
The material in this document has been prepared for persons responsible for, and familiar with the security
needs of the customer facility.
Read these instructions and all ancillary documentation entirely before installing or operating this product.
Refer to Related documentation on page xvi.
A qualified service person, complying with all applicable codes, should perform all required hardware
installation.
Conventions used in this document
The following conventions are used in this document:
Bold
Menu items and buttons.
Italic
Emphasis of an instruction or point; special terms.
File names, path names, windows, panes, tabs, fields, variables, and other GUI elements.
Titles of books and various documents.
Blue italic
(Electronic version) Hyperlinks to cross-references, related topics, and URL addresses.
Monospace
Text that displays on the computer screen.
Programming or coding sequences.
Safety terms and symbols
These terms may appear in this manual:
CAUTION:
Cautions identify conditions or practices that may result in damage to the equipment or other property.
WARNING:
Warnings identify conditions or practices that could result in equipment damage or serious personal injury.
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Related documentation
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Picture Perfect 4.5 Release Notes (460621001F)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Installation Manual (460620002C)
Picture Perfect 4.5 External Interface User Manual (460588003B)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Interface User Manual (460581004B)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Tables and Fields 460566003B)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Enterprise Edition User Manual (460234008B)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Import/Export User Manual (460219007C)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Guard Tours User Manual (460203007B)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Redundant Edition User Manual (460134009C)
Picture Perfect 4.5 Imaging Installation Manual (460119107B)
UBF Universal Badge Format for Picture Perfect (460625001A)
Graphics Monitoring and Control User Manual (460624001B)
Credential Designer User Manual (460557006B)
CARMA: Card Access Report Management Application for Picture Perfect (460516002C)
Chapter 1 Introduction
This chapter describes Picture Perfect and its features. Readers should familiarize
themselves with the information in this chapter before continuing to other
chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
New in Picture Perfect 4.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Operating features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Optional features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Support services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
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Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Overview
The Picture Perfect system is a powerful, flexible, integrated, computer-based physical access management
system. It is a complete end-to-end solution for today's most commonly deployed physical security
applications, providing real-time monitoring, command and control, automation, database administration and
report management in a single, unified system. Picture Perfect integrates access control, photo identification
and credentialing, video surveillance, alarm monitoring, intrusion detection and visitor management. Picture
Perfect uses industry leading products such as the Linux and AIX operating systems, Informix Dynamic
Server, and a Java RunTime Environment (JRE).
The Picture Perfect platform functions, in large measure, as a database server. The majority of access, alarm,
and time-of-day decisions are made locally by intelligent micro controllers. Data necessary to make these
intelligent decisions is downloaded from the host to the micro controller, or micro as they will be referred to in
this document, as required. Since the majority of the decisions are performed at the micro, the host is free to
concentrate on operator functions such as data entry, database queries (requests for data), and report
generation.
The system controls access readers using various technologies including, magnetic-stripe, barium ferrite,
Wiegand, bar code, and proximity technologies. Smart Card readers and readers with keypads for user-defined
PIN entry are also accommodated.
The smallest system will monitor thousands of badge records, transaction history records, digital inputs (alarm
contacts), and digital outputs. Capacity limits depend on system resources. The system supports multiple
operator work stations and printers, and the Picture Perfect configuration that is deployed.
Scheduling features allow time allocations for use of readers and alarms. Micros, such as the M5, have the
capability to perform the majority of scheduling tasks. This provides the user with full scheduling capabilities,
even when a communication problem has caused the micro and host to temporarily stop talking to each other.
The user interface is menu driven and user-friendly. The menus provide the operator with various options
which lead to input screens, providing the ability to add, change, or delete information. By assigning operator
levels to individuals, operators can be restricted in their control of the system. They can be denied the authority
to change previously set parameters, and may be able to view information on a screen, but may not be
permitted to modify or print out the information.
All conditions sensed by the system can be assigned unique messages, which can be displayed on the computer
screen and made available to the operator. A sensor on a door can be coded within the system, not only to
activate an alarm if the door is opened, but to notify the operator of where the breach occurred and what action
to take. Alarms can be given priorities for action in the event that multiple alarms occur. All alarms are
provided with an audio display tone and a flashing alert to warn security personnel of severe conditions.
The system maintains a history of all occurrences reported by its micros, such as access attempts or alarms.
Management reports are available to provide the system administrator with the activities within the system any
time, on demand.
The program is personalized by the customer to their specific requirements and configuration by simple
windows and menus. An operator can change the size and position of a screen, the forms can be customized to
include specific fields, and custom lists can be added.
Chapter 1
Introduction
The system uses a relational database management system (RDBMS) which allows the operator to query the
database using menu driven forms. These forms allow the operator to specify data fields requested, logical
relationships between the fields, and the order in which the fields are to be selected. Once the request for data
is made, the matching records are displayed in a grid; the operator selects a record from the grid to display the
form. If desired, the operator can print the requested data by selecting the appropriate option.
The system architecture uses a distributed approach, comprised of micros and the host processor.
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On an AIX system, all terminals are graphics terminals except the host console which could be a
character-based terminal.
On a Linux system, all terminals (including the host console) are graphics terminals.
New in Picture Perfect 4.5
Picture Perfect 4.5 introduces the following key capabilities, features, and/or product enhancements:
OS and database technology refresh
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Red Hat Linux 5.3
AIX 6.1
Informix 11.5
Picture Perfect 4.5 new features
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Removed the need for “root” access
Nested Zone Anti-passback – Global and Timed
Mifare Smart Card Encoding capability
New fields for Dept and Category on Badge Monitor
Enhanced LDAP for unique schemas
Permission Form Preferences button
New History Rollover Alarm
Configurable alarm for disk and database full
Enable case-insensitive data queries from GUI
Alarm Blinking – user configurable options
Informix Replication for Picture Perfect Redundant systems (new method of synchronization)
Picture Perfect and Facility Commander 2.2 single server/database install
Client support on Microsoft Vista
Support for Firefox web browser
Improved robustness and reduced vulnerabilities
New Lockdown mode
New database user accounts (important for import/export integrations)
Additionally supported fields for Badge Activity Monitor
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Operating features
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UNIX-like Operating System (AIX or Linux) provides multitasking, multi-user capabilities. Multiple
tasks can be performed by multiple users simultaneously. An operator can view several windows at
once.
Host System architecture is powerful enough to support the operating system and relational database
management systems.
Graphical Menu-Driven Operator Interface almost completely frees you from the keyboard.
Primary and secondary menus lead to input forms (screens) where you can add, change, or delete
information. These forms can be customized to include only those fields necessary for your specific
site.
Pop-Up Window Alarm Messages appear on whatever form (screen) is currently displayed. You can
continue with the current form or exit to an alarm response form.
Online Help can be accessed by clicking the Help button to display a pop-up help window for any
form or field. Help constitutes an online reference manual that explains every form and field in each
form.
Powerful Query Function. Picture Perfect uses Informix Dynamic Server, a relational database
management system (RDBMS) with a query function that reduces the need for printed reports. The
RDBMS frees you from canned search criteria. Use the Find function to query and display data. As an
alternative to printing a report, you can display the report on screen and scroll back and forth through
data. The RDBMS allows you to define direct relationships between separate database tables so that a
single report joins multiple tables. The report function also lets you customize reports with Structured
Query Language (SQL) so you can pinpoint just the data you need.
Real-Time Monitoring. Badge activity displays in real time on a scrolling window with image
thumbnails, where you can scroll backward and forward through the transaction data or perform a
transaction search.
Database Protection. The system database is protected from unauthorized use by the Operator
Permissions feature which controls (using a login ID and password) each operator’s authorization to
display or update forms and to print reports.
User-Defined Schedules. The system provides an interface for user-defined schedules. For example,
an area can be scheduled for general employee access during business hours, but restricted to selected
employees after hours. All schedules can be manually overridden from the operator’s console. If the
host and micros stop communicating, the micros continue processing all resident schedule changes.
Operator Input Validation. All system forms (screens) and menus provide extensive data-entry error
checking. The system will reject a form if fields do not contain acceptable data; therefore, bad data
cannot corrupt the database. Field labels of required entries display in red.
Operator Activity Monitoring. The activity of all system operators can be viewed and is saved to
operator history.
User-Defined Alarms. Alarms may be assigned priorities to control processing in the event of
simultaneous alarms. Multiple-action messages may be configured to notify the operator when and
where the alarm is occurring and what actions to take.
Digital Outputs to Operate Output Devices. Inputs (digital or logical) trigger digital outputs which
can operate output devices (door locks, lights, bells, sirens).
Transaction History Processing. The standard system stores history records online, including badge,
alarm, operator, and system performance activity transactions which can be archived to disk file, or
Chapter 1
Introduction
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tape. Depending on the size of your hard drive, the system can be configured to store more history
records online.
User-Defined Reports. The reports feature provides an SQL (Structured Query Language) interface to
the online Picture Perfect database so that you can use ANSI standard SQL select statements to query
the database and generate reports. (Pre-loaded SQL reports satisfy standard administration
requirements.) The query function allows unlimited selection criteria and up to eight sort criteria,
including the use of user-defined variables as input to the query. The relational database allows an SQL
statement to join multiple database tables in one report, sorting the result by any selected field.
DirecDoor, PXNPlus, M5, M3000, and M2000 series microcontroller support for Readers,
Alarms, Scheduler. During normal operation these micros use their resident databases to make local
access-control decisions. In the event of communication failure with the host, these micros control and
store reader and alarm activity and also implement scheduler events.
Global Anti-passback Supported. Any reader on any M5, M2000, DirecDoor, or M3000 series
microcontroller (except a dial-up micro) can be configured as an anti-passback reader.
Keypad Reader Support for PIN Entry. Keypad reader support is provided to enhance security.
Time Zone Support. The Time Zone feature associates a time zone with items in your database that
have a physical location, such as micros, operators, or hosts. Monitors display dates and times in the
three time zones: Host, Micro, and Operator and can be configured to display only the one you specify.
Date and time entry fields on event forms and on the Category scheduler specify a context of either
Host, Micro, or Operator which allows you to schedule events or categories in any of those contexts.
Templates. You can create master templates for generating new records with the necessary links
predefined. When a template is run, a Wizard guides you through the necessary steps to create a new
record for the form.
Optional features
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Graphics Monitoring and Control. The Graphics Monitoring and Control option allows you to use
site maps of your premises and associate symbols (graphic images or icons) to object types such as
doors, readers, micro controllers, or digital inputs. When the condition of a device property changes,
on or more of the symbols changes it’s appearance based on the condition, if configured to do so.
Import/Export. The Import/Export option enables the transfer of Picture Perfect database
information to and from external databases (such as a personnel database). It allows other applications
to interface with the Picture Perfect database. You can also use odbc and jdbc database connectivity to
connect to the Picture Perfect database and make changes.
Redundant. The Redundant system option allows two host systems (primary and backup) to operate
in a fault-tolerant configuration.
Imaging. The Imaging option allows a picture of the badge holder to be captured, imported, exported,
displayed on screen, and printed. Swipe and Show can be configured, where a valid badge swipe
results in the display of an associated photo on a monitor with authorization to unlock the door.
Thumbnail images are displayed on the Badge Activity Monitor.
Enterprise. The Enterprise option allows several hosts to operate together in a network environment.
Guard Tours. The Guard Tours option allows you to monitor the progress of a security officer as he or
she tours the facility premises at specified intervals, and to obtain hardcopy reports that show a tour
history.
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Support services
GE Security and its business partners offer a full range of customer support services, including site surveys,
installation supervision, systems acceptance, and training, with total turnkey installation capabilities. These
services are options at the discretion of the customer.
Enterprise consulting
Enterprise Consulting is an engineering services team within GE Security that offers custom solutions to GE
integrators and end users in areas where the standard products do not meet specific requirements. Examples
include custom software development including interfacing to third party systems, backup and recovery
solution consultation and implementation, database merge, and migration from one technology platform to
another. Enterprise Consulting takes the worry out of custom software development by handling the full project
management delivery cycle from requirements gathering to project completion including delivery of
documentation.
Training
Training is extensive and all-inclusive. It provides for the needs of customer personnel at all levels—
management, technical, and system operations. Classes are conducted by expert training personnel and provide
extensive hands-on experience.
National language support
Language translations of Picture Perfect and the online help are installed as part of the standard product
installation. New languages will be provided as they become available through standard product maintenance
releases.
If you require support in languages other than those provided by GE, please contact your System Integrator.
Chapter 2 Getting started
This chapter describes how to log on to and out of the Picture Perfect system and
how to navigate the interface and common elements. Readers should familiarize
themselves with the information in this chapter before continuing to other
chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Starting and stopping Picture Perfect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Logging on to the system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Selecting one or more facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Navigating Picture Perfect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
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Overview
Once your installation is complete, perform the steps below to begin using your system. Each of these steps is
discussed in detail in the following sections.
1. Start Picture Perfect.
2. Log on.
3. Select one or more facilities.
4. Familiarize yourself with the user interface and the navigation tools.
Starting and stopping Picture Perfect
Power on your system to start Picture Perfect. On the desktop open a browser that has a Java plug-in, for
example, Internet Explorer or Netscape.
During normal operations the application automatically starts, when the Picture Perfect server is powered on.
There may be occasions when the system administrator shuts down Picture Perfect, and other occasions that
the entire system and Picture Perfect (TPS and Informix) is shut down. For more information, see Related
procedures.
Related procedures
The following procedures are performed from the command line in a terminal window on the server console:
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Stopping Picture Perfect
Shutting down the entire system
Restarting Picture Perfect
To stop Picture Perfect:
Use the following command sequence to shut down the Picture Perfect application.
1. Log on as ppadmin at the console terminal.
2. Make sure no one is logged on as an operator.
To verify if anyone is logged on, from a new window, type:
smutl -o -1
A detailed list of all operator sessions currently logged on displays.
3. Type: rc.pperf -k
—or —
On a redundant system, type: pprscmd stop
To restart Picture Perfect:
Use the following command sequence to restart the Picture Perfect application. The third step is a command to
stop Picture Perfect and is used to verify that Picture Perfect is not already running.
1. Log on as ppadmin at the console terminal.
Chapter 2
Getting started
2. Make sure that no one is logged on as an operator.
3. Stop Picture Perfect:
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For standalone or host/subhost systems, type: rc.pperf -k
For redundant systems, type: pprscmd stop
4. Wait a minimum of 30 seconds for all processes to stop.
5. Start Picture Perfect:
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For standalone or host/subhost systems, type: rc.pperf
For redundant systems, type:
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pprscmd start backup
To shut down the entire system:
Software or hardware maintenance on the Picture Perfect system may require a complete system shutdown. If
this is necessary, perform the following command sequence.
1. Log on as root at the console terminal.
2. Make sure no one is logged on as an operator.
To verify if anyone is logged on, from a new window, type:
smutl -o -1
3. Perform the shutdown:
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For AIX systems, type: shutdown -Fh now
For Linux systems, type: shutdown -h now
Note: Type shutdown -h to halt the system; type shutdown -r to reboot the system. The
shutdown command also stops Picture Perfect before shutting down the system.
4. Wait until the **halt completed** (AIX) or Power Down (Linux) message appears, and then
turn the power off on the computer.
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Logging on to the system
In order to use Picture Perfect, you must log on as an authorized Picture Perfect operator, using a valid Login
ID and Password. The first time you log on to the system, you will use the Login ID and password that were
configured during installation.
To log on to Picture Perfect:
1. In a browser window, type a URL in the address field to connect to the server, for example:
http://<hostname>/Picture
Note:
If you are logging on to an Imaging workstation, you must close all existing browser windows and open a new
window.
The Picture Perfect Webtop displays from which you may launch Picture Perfect.
Figure 1. Picture Perfect Webtop
2. Click the Picture Perfect button in the upper left hand corner. The button color will display white if the
server is active, red if it is inactive, and yellow if it is the backup server.
The system prompts you to acknowledge the signed Java certificate after which the Picture Perfect
Operator Login window appears.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Figure 2. Login window
3. Type your Login ID and Password. They tell the system who you are and which functions you are
authorized to perform. Both of these fields are case sensitive, so enter the information carefully. For
more information about the Login window fields, refer to Table 1.
4. Click Log on.
The Picture Perfect desktop appears.
Note:
When logging on to Picture Perfect, with SSL enabled, the following message displays.
Figure 3. SSL Security warning:
Note:
Click Yes. This window appears because Picture Perfect self-signs the SSL certificates and does not obtain
them from a third party. If you wait too long to click Yes, the application will time out and you will be denied
access. If the timeout occurs, close Picture Perfect and try again.
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 1.
Login window fields
Field Name
Description
Login ID
This identifies you as an authorized Picture Perfect operator. It typically incorporates your name and consists of
an alphanumeric string of up to eight characters.
Password
Your password keeps unauthorized personnel from logging on to the system and should remain confidential. It
typically consists of six to eight characters and, for security reasons, does not display on the screen as you type it.
Related procedures
The following procedures are sometimes required in day-to-day operations and administration:
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Logging off.
Logging on as the “root” user.
Logging on as the “install” user.
To log off of Picture Perfect:
It is important to log off of the system when you leave your workstation. This protects the system from
unauthorized use, and also allows the next operator to log on.
1. Save any new or changed data.
2. Close open forms by clicking Close
on the application window title bar.
3. From the File menu, select Log off.
To log on as the “root” user:
For some of the procedures, you will be instructed to log on as root. Logging on is the process of “signing
on” to the system as a user. The root user (also known as the superuser) is a special user that has access to
every program and file on the system. You will be doing the installation and configuration of the operating
system as the root user. You will install Picture Perfect as the root user, as well.
1. At the prompt for user name in the console terminal, type: root
2. At the prompt for password, type the root password, as configured during installation.
Note:
If you received your system preconfigured by GE, the default root password is pperf1, however it is strongly
recommended that you change it, once the initial installation is complete, using the passwd command.
3. Open a terminal window.
4. If Picture Perfect is installed, at the command prompt, type:
. /cas/sbin/profile Enter
To log on as the “ppadmin” user:
For some of the procedures, you will be instructed to log on as ppadmin. The ppadmin user is a special user
that has access to every program and file on the Picture Perfect system. The ppadmin user performs such
Chapter 2
Getting started
tasks as starting and stopping the Picture Perfect application, monitoring the system from the command line,
and running all tools available in Picture Perfect.
1. At the prompt for user name in the console terminal, type: ppadmin
2. At the prompt for password, type the ppadmin password, as configured during installation.
Note:
If you received your system preconfigured by GE, the default ppadmin password is ppadmin, however it is
strongly recommended that you change it, once the initial installation is complete, using the passwd
command.
3. Open a terminal window.
4. If Picture Perfect is installed, at the command prompt, type:
. /cas/bin/profile
Enter
To log on as install:
Another user called install will automatically be set up when you install Picture Perfect. The install
user account (that is, log on as install) is used to configure Picture Perfect for your site. This user performs
such tasks as creating operators, configuring micros, and administrating personnel data.
1. At the prompt for user name in the client workstation login window, type: install
Enter
2. At the prompt for password, type the install operator’s password.
After the system loads, the Primary Navigation menu displays the Picture Perfect menu items you are
authorized to use.
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Selecting one or more facilities
Picture Perfect allows you to create and delete facility records. These records, combined with Facility Profiles
and Permissions, allow you to restrict operator access to records assigned to those facilities. Selecting a facility
allows the user to view records within that facility that they have permission to view. Following a successful
login, the Facility Set Manager window displays a list of those facilities included in your facility profile. If you
have access to only one facility, it is automatically enabled.
Figure 4.
Facility Set Manager
Fields and controls
Table 2.
Facility Set Manager form
Fields
Description
Select All
Click to select all of the available facility sets.
Unselect All
Click to de-select all of the available facility sets.
Time Zone
By default, when you log on to Picture Perfect, the Time Zone selected is that assigned to your Operator record.
Example: If you are traveling and log on to a Picture Perfect session in a different time zone, you can select the
appropriate time zone from this list.
See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Related procedures
To select a facility:
1. Click on a facility to select or de-select it or click Select All or Unselect All to select or de-select all of
the available facility sets.
2. Click OK.
3. By default, when you log on to Picture Perfect, the Time Zone selected is that assigned to your
Operator record. If, for example, you are traveling and log on to a Picture Perfect session in a different
time zone, you can select the appropriate time zone from this pick-list.
4. To change the active facility set during a session, display the Facility Set window by one of the
following methods. The change will not affect forms that are already open.
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From the File menu, select Facility Set.
Chapter 2
Getting started
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Right click on the desktop and select Facility Set from the resulting window.
Press CTRL + F to display the Facility Set window
Navigating Picture Perfect
The majority of Picture Perfect applications, specifically those that manipulate data contained in the Picture
Perfect database tables, are based on a common framework. A typical Picture Perfect application window is
shown in Figure 5.
The elements that make up the framework are described in more detail in the sections that follow.
Figure 5. Application Framework
Primary navigation Secondary navigation
menu item
menu item
Custom Toolbar
Application window
Menu bar
Host Indicator
Status Indicator
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The menu bar
When Picture Perfect is initially launched in your browser window, the desktop is comprised of a primary
navigation menu bar, and a toolbar. Each primary navigation menu item consists of secondary navigation
items, each of which is an application or a function. Only those applications to which an operator has
permission, and only those actions that an operator has permission to perform are available. Depending on
those permissions, the following primary navigation items are available: File, Access, Monitor, Configuration,
Control, Setup, Reports, Window, and Help, and optional packages such as Tours.
See Table 3 through Table 12 to view the secondary navigation items and a description of their functions.
Table 3.
File Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Facility Set...
Provides a list of facilities available for selection, based on the operator’s facility profiles.
Customize
Toolbar...
Displays a list of applications from which you can select/deselect those that you want to display on your
toolbar.
Debug
Levels...
Displays a list of packages. Debug levels can be set for each package to be used for troubleshooting. The log
file, avatar.log, is written to c:\avatar\logs.
Log off
Closes all windows and displays the Login screen.
Table 4.
Access Menu
Sub-Menu
Form
Function
People
Personnel
Application used to create and edit Personnel records that identify each badge holder.
Personnel Type
Application used to create and edit Personnel Type records: to define different types of
personnel that are assigned to each badge holder.
Department
Application used to create and edit Department records: to assign to each badge holder.
Badges
Application used to create and edit: Badge records: to control the functions and capabilities of
the badge
Badge Format
Application used to create and edit Badge Format records: to add custom formats in addition
to the predefined 10-digit badge format.
Area
Application used to create and edit Area records: to describe areas of your site requiring the
same level of access control.
Category
Application used to create and edit Category records to identify groups of badge holders by
type, title, function, or shift.
Area Events
Application used to create and edit Area Events records: to define and schedule the desired
characteristics for all the readers, doors, and routings in an area during an event.
Badges
Places
Table 5.
Monitors Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Alarm
A monitor used to view, respond to, and remove alarms.
Badge
A monitor used to control and view real-time badge activity.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Table 5.
Monitors Menu (continued)
Sub-Menu
Function
Input
A monitor used to control and view the states of input devices, such as door sensors or exit requests.
Operator
A monitor used to view operator history transaction activity.
Status
A monitor used to view the current operating characteristics (status) for a micro controller's areas, categories,
readers, doors, inputs, input groups, outputs, output groups, alarms, modes, elevators, category floors, and/or
version. You can also view the status of an area's readers and/or doors.
User
A monitor used to view who is logged on and using the system.
Performance
A monitor used to view server system performance.
Log
A real time monitor that lists the contents of the Picture Perfect log file, /cas/log/log.xxxx where
xxxx is the current month and day.
Example: /cas/log/log.1105 for the log file for November 5th
Tour
Table 6.
If you have the optional Guard Tours package, this monitor will display tour activity.
Configuration Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Facilities
An application used to create and edit Facility records that group your database records into meaningful units.
Micros
Micros
An application used to create and edit Micro records to identify each micro controller and
define how it operates and communicates.
Ports
An application used to create and edit Port records to define serial ports for micro controller
communications.
Modems
An application used to create and edit Modem records: to define the types of modems that
you intend to use for dial-up communication.
Network Ports
An application used to create and edit Network Port records to define ports for network
micro controller communication.
Keys
An application used to secure transmission between the host and the network micro by
means of a key to create an encryption pattern.
Input Groups
An application used to create and edit Input Group records to trigger output groups when
any individual inputs in the input group are detected.
Inputs
An application used to create and edit Input records: to define the characteristics and the
purpose of each input point.
Output Groups
An application used to create and edit Output Group records to which individual outputs can
be assigned. When an input group triggers an output group, all outputs assigned to the
group activate.
Outputs
An application used to create and edit Output records to define the characteristics and the
purpose of each output point.
Input Group
Events
An application used to create and edit Input Group Event records to enable or disable a
specific input group and/or to change its state to off according to a schedule.
Output Group
Events
An application used to create and edit Output Group Event records to enable or disable a
specific output group and/or to change its state to off according to a schedule.
Inputs
Outputs
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Table 6.
Configuration Menu (continued)
Sub-Menu
Function
Doors and
Readers
Doors
An application used to create and edit records: that define how each door operates.
Readers
An application used to create and edit records that define the readers to which the doors
are connected.
Reader Events
An application used to create and edit records that define and schedule the desired
characteristics of a single reader during an event.
Door Events
An application used to create and edit records that define and schedule the desired
characteristics of a single door during an event.
Elevator
An application used to create and edit records to control access to floors serviced by an
elevator.
Category Floors
An application used to create and edit records: to assign a category to certain floors of each
elevator, which is then used to establish a match between a badge and a floor when
granting access.
Alarm
An application used to create and edit records: to define both physical and logical alarms.
Alarm Colors
An application used to create and edit records to define the colors used in the Alarm Monitor
so that the color scheme reflects the alarm state.
Alarm Events
An application used to create and edit records to define and schedule the desired
characteristics of a single alarm during an event.
Alarm Messages
An application used to create and edit records to define alarm instructions displayed on the
Alarm or Activity Monitor.
Alarm Responses
An application used to create and edit records to define alarm responses the operator can
select when responding to an alarm.
Elevators
Alarms
Time Zone
An application used to assign a unique time zone to each host, device, and operator in the system. See Verifying
time zones on page 168.
Data
Generator
An application used to add new readers, doors, and areas with all the necessary associated records
automatically created and properly linked. See Running templates on page 320.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Table 7.
Control Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Operators
Operator
An application used to create and edit Operator records to define those
individuals who will log on to the Picture Perfect system.
Permission Group
An application used to create and edit Permission Group records: to limit
operator permission to specific categories, areas, and/or reports.
Permission
An application used to create and edit Permission records that combine
system, form, and facility permission profiles. This permission is then
assigned to an operator.
System Permission Profile
An application used to create and edit System Permission records that
define the functions each operator level is permitted to perform. The
functions included on this form are system related and are not filtered
by facility.
Facility Permission Profile
An application used to create and edit Facility Permission Profile records
that describe an operator’s level of access to the various forms and
fields. The functions included on this form are filtered by facility.
Form Profiles
An application used to associate custom forms with an operator's
permission.
Change Mode
A function that allows you to change your system operating mode when
a different operating strategy, such as an emergency, requires an
immediate change.
Modes
An application used to create and edit Mode records: to define
operating modes (in addition to the system defined Normal Mode), that
are activated either by schedule or by command.
Modes Email
An application used to create an email notification for a mode event.
Mode Events
An application used to create and edit mode events.
Emergency
An application used to create and edit emergency mode records: to
assign the mode, input group, and facility that will define the emergency
mode.
Routings
An application used to create and edit Routing records to define where
certain types of messages are sent, in addition to the predefined
routings.
Route definition
An application used to create and edit Route definition records: to
define where alarm and activity messages are routed.
Route points
An application used to create and edit Route point records to specify
when and to which operators, alarm and activity messages are routed.
Email Recipients
An application used to create and edit E-mail records: to allow alarms to
be routed to e-mail addresses.
Modes
Routings
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Table 7.
Control Menu (continued)
Sub-Menu
Function
Backup/Restore
Backup Events
An application used to create and edit backup event records that
schedule a system backup to run automatically at a specified day and
time.
Backup
An application used to generate a backup of your system to one of the
following media: tape, or diskfile.
Archive
An application used to archive your history data to one of the following
media: tape, or diskfile.
Restore
An application used to restore data from one of the following media:
tape, or diskfile.
Access Secure
Doors/Inputs/Input Groups
An application used, in lieu of scheduling an event, to accommodate
situations that require operator control. It allows state changes for
multiple devices rather than applying the change to each device
individually through the applicable form.
Hosts
Hosts
An application used to configure hosts in an Enterprise Picture Perfect
system.
Control Outputs
Control Outputs
An application used to allow an authorized operator to turn outputs on
or off for the duration of time entered on the Output form.
Table 8.
Setup Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
System Parameters
An application used to assign system parameters used by the system during the setup procedures.
Printers
An application used to create and edit Printer records to define the printers configured during
installation.
Workstations
An application used to create and edit workstation records to define client terminals that will be used as
imaging stations.
Badge Designs
Badge Designs
An application used to create and edit Badge design records to be used
for printing.
Design Mappings
An application used to create and edit design map records used for
linking a person to one or more badge designs.
Custom Lists
An application used to create and edit custom lists to appear on your forms to satisfy specific
requirements.
Example: You can create a drop-down list of hair or eye color.
Custom Form
An application used to create and edit Picture Perfect forms that include the fields and tabs of your
choice, in addition to required fields.
Example: If your facility does not use expiration dates/times on badges, you could exclude those fields. A
custom form may be set as the default.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Table 9.
Reports Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Reports
An application used to control which activities are stored in history and how to view, format, print, and
save reports.
Report Events
An application used to create and edit report event records that schedule history or SQL reports to run at
specific times.
Table 10. Window Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Minimize All
Reduces all windows to an icon.
Restore All
Opens all minimized windows.
Cascade
Arranges windows in an overlapped fashion.
Tile Horizontally
Arranges windows in non-overlapped tiles, one on top of the other.
Tile Vertically
Arranges windows in non-overlapped tiles, side by side.
Open windows
Displays a list of open windows. The window that is currently active displays a check mark next to it. By
clicking on a window in this list, it becomes the active window.
Table 11. Help Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Help Topics
Displays an index of topics on which you can get help.
About Picture
Perfect
Displays the Picture Perfect version and patch levels of any packages installed. It also displays license
information, memory usage, and allows you to run the “Garbage Collector” utility, which attempts to free
up unused memory.
Table 12. Optional Package Menu
Sub-Menu
Function
Tours
When the optional Guard Tours package is installed, this application is used to define the characteristics
of a tour, the exception codes, points definition, and tour functions.
Table 13. Status Indicator
Status
Function
Red
A red LED indicates that communication with the server has been lost.
Green
A green LED indicates that the client is communicating with the host.
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The toolbar
When Picture Perfect is initially launched in your browser window, the desktop is comprised of a menu bar,
and a toolbar. The toolbar is user configurable and can be used to display your most frequently used
applications.
Note:
Prior to configuration, the toolbar will appear empty.
Figure 6. Custom Toolbar
To add an application icon to the toolbar:
1.
From the File menu, click Customize Toolbar.
The Customize Toolbar window displays a list of applications and a list of text options.
Figure 7. Customize Toolbar
2. From the list of applications, expand the directories and select/deselect those applications that you
want to display on your toolbar. Selecting the main branch selects all of the sub-branches.
3. From the Toolbar Settings pane, check the Hyperlink Visibility check box to view the selected
application as a hyperlink on the toolbar.
4. From the list of text options, select from the following:
•
•
•
Show text labels
The text label displays below the icon.
Selective text on right
The text label displays to the right of the icon.
No text labels
Only the icon displays. The icons include tooltips.
5. From the Digital Clock Settings pane, select the time (Operator, Host, or Custom) that you want the
toolbar clock to display. Custom time allows you to select from a drop-down list of time zones.
Chapter 2
Getting started
6. Click Save to save your toolbar preferences to the database. The current settings are retained for your
next login session. Click Cancel to retain the settings for the current session only.
Note:
If a large number of applications are selected, they could exceed the viewable area of the monitor.
The application window
The majority of Picture Perfect applications, specifically those that manipulate data contained in the Picture
Perfect database tables, are based on a common framework. A typical Picture Perfect application window is
made up of a title bar, a toolbar, a grid on the left, and the form on the right, similar to Figure 8.
See Table 14 through Table 20 to view detailed information on these components.
The size of the data grid and the form window can be adjusted by dragging the splitter pane left or right, or
resizing the Application window. When you close the Application window, the window size and splitter
location settings last used will be retained.
Figure 8.
Application Window
Grid
Shortcut Links
Results Tab
Tabbed Panes
Splitter Pane
Toolbar
Filter List
Drop-down List
Form
Title Bar
Manage
Progress Bar
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Table 14. Title bar
Item
Description
Title Bar
The Title Bar runs across the top of the window. It displays the label of the primary navigation menu item and
contains three buttons:
• Minimize: Click to resize your window to a smaller size.
• Maximize: Click to resize your window to a larger size.
• Close: Click to exit the window.
Table 15. Toolbar
Item
Find
Description
Click to locate specific data records based on selection criteria entered into any of the fields. This is useful if you
want to change data of an existing record. If you click Find without entering any search criteria, the system will
find all of the data records in that table. The records found for the search will be displayed in the grid to the left
of the form.
You must have View record permission to perform a search. The number of results returned is limited to the
settings on the Systems Parameters form.
New
Click to add a new record as the last row in the record list. Any default values are filled in or cleared if there is no
default.
You must have Insert record permission to create a new record and Update permission for all required fields.
Copy
Click to create a new record and copy the values of the currently selected record to it. This is a quick way to
create a new record that is similar to an existing record. A record must be currently selected in order to copy it.
If multiple records are selected, a new record will be created for each one selected. The copied records will be
placed at the bottom of the record list and marked with the new record icon .
You must have Insert record permission to copy a record. Only fields that you have permission for will be copied
to the new record.
Save
Click to save the data record currently displayed to the database. If you have created a new record, it will be
added to the database. If you displayed an existing record and made changes to it, this new version will replace
the old record in the database.
You must have Update record permission to save any changes.
Delete
Click to mark the record currently displayed for deletion. The record will be deleted from the database upon
saving.
You must have Delete record permission to mark a record for deletion and the record table must support
deletion. If the record has record dependencies, a list displays indicating those records that are dependent on it.
Undo
Click to cancel the previous action and restore the values of the previously edited data.
Clear
Click to clear the fields and selections on the form. All option settings are set to an unselected state.
Run Template Click to display a list of master records that contain information that can be used as a starting point or rough
draft for creating a new record. The necessary links have already been defined.
You must have Run Template action permission to perform this function.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Table 15. Toolbar (continued)
Item
Manage
Template
Description
Click to display the Template Manager from which you can create, edit, or delete master records. You can lock
certain fields so that they cannot be changed when running the template. Records created from a template
display in the custom format in which the template was created.
You must have Manage Template action permission to perform this function.
Preferences
Click to display the Preferences form that allows you to reposition and filter the grid columns, as well as
reposition the entire grid.
The Preferences button on the form applications is controlled by the Form Preferences action permission on the
Operator’s system permission profile.
Print
Click to print records in a tabular or form format to your default printer of your client workstation.
Help
Click to display online help about the current form and its fields. To navigate the entire Picture Perfect help
system, click Show.
Table 16. Data grid
Item
Description
Grid
The record list window, or data grid, shows the results of search operations and allows you to quickly navigate
through the records found by a search. The data displayed in the grid columns consists of one or more fields of
the Picture Perfect database table that is being manipulated. The number and order of the fields displayed, as
well as the placement of the grid on the screen (left, right, top, or bottom), is configurable by clicking
Preferences on the form toolbar. When an application is started, the record list window is initially empty.
You use the data grid mainly for record navigation. A single record or multiple records may be selected for
manipulation. Each row in the data grid represents a record. The records are obtained by performing a search,
by creating a new record, or by copying a record. When a search is performed, the grid is filled with all of the
records matching the search criteria. All previous records that were in the grid are removed. When adding new
records, the records are placed at the bottom of the grid, and are marked with the new record icon
.
Clicking on a single row in the grid will highlight and select that record for editing. The keyboard up and down
arrows can also be used to move from one record to the next. The record's field values appear in the various
pages of the form. If any field value is changed, the Edit icon
appears next to the row.
More than one row can be selected in order to change a value for multiple records at one time, for example,
updating a time value for all records. Multiple rows can be selected by left-clicking the first desired record, then
dragging the mouse, and releasing it on the last desired record. Non-connected rows may be added to the
selection by holding down the CTRL key on the keyboard while selecting the row with the mouse. All selected
rows will be highlighted. When multiple rows are selected, the pages of the form window will be cleared and the
values replaced by asterisks. Changing a field value changes it for all selected records. If any field value is
changed, the Edit icon
appears next to the selected rows.
To quickly access an item in a long list in a grid, click in any cell and begin to type the first letters of the item for
which you are searching. See Type ahead search on page 28.
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Table 17. Form
Item
Description
Form
The Form window provides the primary interaction between an operator and an application. It allows direct
access to all fields within a single record or a selection of records from a host database table. A standard form is
provided, however, it may be customized to display only those fields an operator needs to see or the fields can
be arranged differently.
Table 18. Progress bar
Item
Description
Progress Bar
The current status of operations performed.
Table 19. Status bar
Item
Description
Status
The number of records retrieved as well as any errors encountered during creation are displayed here.
Table 20. Drop-down lists
Item
Description
Drop-down List
A drop-down list has an arrow at the right of the box, and when clicked, displays a list of options. The
contents of a list consist of items you added using other forms.
Example: If you have not defined any micros in the system (using the Micros form), the Micros drop-down picklist will be empty.
Selecting an item from a drop-down list will limit the search to records with matching selections. Dropdown lists will auto-complete, allowing you to type in leading characters of a desired item to jump to that
point. A blank or an empty drop-down list does not limit the search.
Note:
You must have, at minimum, View permission to the form to which the drop-down list
corresponds, to view that drop-down list.
Note:
Only drop-down items that are part of the active facility set are available.
Manage
Picture Perfect forms contain various drop-down lists, such as Facility, Input Group, and so on, that are
populated with records created from other Picture Perfect forms. The Manage button next to these lists
allows you to access the appropriate form and create or delete records. You must have Manage permission
to perform this function.
Filter
Picture Perfect forms contain various drop-down lists, such as Facility, Input Group, and so on, that are
populated with records created from other Picture Perfect forms. The Filter button next to these lists allows
you to filter the list by description and/or facility using wildcards and operators as described in Search
criteria on page 27. From the results of the search, select and click Ok.
Chapter 2
Getting started
Search criteria
When performing a search for data, you may want to view all records or only certain records. Prior to clicking
Find
, search criteria may be entered as follows:
Text boxes
•
•
•
•
A blank text box returns all records.
A text box containing text only returns records that contain the text specified.
Wildcards and operators can be used to help delimit the search. For instance, the asterisk can expand
the search in either direction around a string of characters.
Text searches are not case sensitive.
Table 21. Wildcards and operators
Item
Function
Son*
The system will find records such as Sonesta, sonya, SONNY.
*son
The system will find records such as Robinson, jackson, NELSON.
*son*
The system will find records such as Masonry, seasonal.
Other symbols and their functions include the following:
Table 22. Other symbols
Symbol
Function
Equal to (no symbol required)
!
Not equal to
>
Greater than
<
Less than
*
Match string
?
Match a single character
&
Logical and
|
Logical or
>=
Greater than or equal to
<=
Less than or equal to
Radio buttons
•
•
Selecting radio buttons limits the search to records with matching selections.
Radio buttons cannot be cleared. Therefore, when a radio button selection is not required, an additional
button “Do Not Care” is included in case a radio button is selected in error.
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Check boxes
•
•
•
Checking a check box limits the search to those records that have those options enabled.
Clearing a check box limits the search to those records that do not have those options available.
Leaving the check box as is, with the ?, indicates the value in this field does not participate in the
search.
Schedule control
•
•
When searching for scheduled events when an Event Time is selected, a specific time of the day must
be entered. The search will return only those records that contain a start time that matches the time
entered.
To search for scheduled events based on any time of the day, do not select the At time/mode buttons.
Select the days of the week for which scheduled events are desired, and then click Find.
Drop-down lists
•
•
Selecting an item from a drop-down list will limit the search to records with matching selections.
Drop-down lists will auto-complete, allowing you to type in leading characters of a desired item to
jump to that point.
A blank or an empty drop-down list does not limit the search.
List window
•
•
Adding an item from the Available window to the Selected window limits the search to those records
with matching selections.
If more than one item is selected, the search is limited to those records containing all of the selected
items in the exact order shown.
Note:
A blank Selected window does not limit the search.
Type ahead search
To quickly access an item in a grid, click in any cell and begin to type the first letters of the item for which
you are searching.
For example, if you type m0 (where 0 is zero), the first item
beginning with m0 is highlighted
However, if you type mo (where o is oh), the first letter typed,
m, takes you to an entry beginning with m, but when you type
the o, the text displays in red, indicating that there is no entry
beginning with mo.
Chapter 3 Configuration checklist
This chapter describes the preferred order of tasks required for setting up your
Picture Perfect system. Readers should familiarize themselves with the
information in this chapter before continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Configuration steps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
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Overview
Because the Picture Perfect applications build off one another, it is important that the setup procedures follow a
logical flow. The steps below are listed in the preferred order to make the configuration of your system a
smooth one.
Configuration steps
Table 23. The steps for configuring a Picture Perfect system
Step
Task
Menu
Reference
1
Assign system parameters to be used by the system during
operations.
Setup
See Assigning system parameters
on page 40.
Create facility records in order to partition your database
records.
Configuration
Facilities
2
System
Parameters
See Creating facilities on page 53.
Facility Tab
3
Create printer records for the printers configured during
installation.
Setup
See Setting up printers on page 54.
Printers
Printers Tab
4
Optional:
Set up imaging workstations.
Setup
Workstations
See Setting up workstations
(optional) on page 56.
Workstations Tab
5
6
Create modem records to define the types of modems that
you intend to use for dial-up micro controller
communication.
Configuration
Create a port record to define a serial port for micro
controller communications.
Configuration
Micros
See Configuring modems on
page 64.
Modems Tab
See Configuring ports on page 66.
Micros
PortsTab
7
Create a network port record to define a port for network
micro controller communication.
Configuration
See Configuring ports on page 66.
Micros
Network Ports Tab
8
Create e-mail records to allow alarms to be routed to email addresses.
Control
See Configuring email on page 70.
Routings
Email Recipients
Tab
9
10
Create routing records, in addition to the predefined
routings, to define where certain types of messages are
sent.
Control
Create badge format records to define formats required in
addition to the predefined 10-digit and 12-digit badge
formats.
Access
See Defining routings on page 72.
Routings
Routings Tab
Badge
Badge Format Tab
See Defining badge formats on
page 74.
Chapter 3
Configuration checklist
Table 23. The steps for configuring a Picture Perfect system (continued)
Step
Task
Menu
Reference
11
Create department records to assign departments to
badge holders.
Access
See Defining departments on
page 76.
People
Department Tab
12
13
14
15
Create personnel type records, in addition to those
provided by the system, so you can assign a personnel type
to badge holders.
Access
Create facility permission profile records, in addition to
Global provided by the system, that describe an operator’s
level of access to the various forms and fields. The
functions included on this form are filtered by facility.
Control
Create system permission profile records, in addition to
Global provided by the system, to describe the functions
each operator level is permitted to perform. The functions
included on this form are system related and are not
filtered by facility.
Control
Create form profile records, to associate custom forms with
an operator's permission.
Control
People
See Defining personnel types on
page 77.
Personnel Type
Tab
Operators
See Creating facility permission
profiles on page 81.
Facility Permission
Profile Tab
Operators
See Creating system permission
profiles on page 85.
System Permission
Profile Tab
Operators
See Creating form profiles on
page 89.
Form Profile Tab
16
17
18
Create permission group records, in addition to the default
record All Groups Allowed, to be used to limit operator
permission to specific categories, areas, and/or reports.
Control
Create permission records that combine system, form, and
facility permission profiles. This permission is then assigned
to an operator.
Control
Create operator records for those individuals who will log
on to the Picture Perfect system.
Control
Operators
See Setting up permission groups
on page 91.
Permission Groups
Tab
Operators
See Setting up permissions on
page 93.
Permission Tab
See Defining operators on page 95.
Operators
Operators Tab
19
20
21
Create route definition records to define where alarm and
activity messages are routed. This is typically a physical
location, such as a building.
Control
Create route point records to be used to specify when and
to which operators, alarm and activity messages are
routed.
Control
Create message records to define alarm instructions that
will display on the Alarm or Activity Monitor.
Configuration
Routings
See Creating route definitions on
page 109.
Route Definition
Tab
Routings
See Defining route points on
page 110.
Route Points Tab
Alarms
Alarm Messages
Tab
See Creating alarm instructions on
page 114.
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Table 23. The steps for configuring a Picture Perfect system (continued)
Step
Task
Menu
Reference
22
Create response records to define alarm responses that the
operator can select when responding to an alarm.
Configuration
See Creating alarm responses on
page 115.
Alarms
Alarm Responses
Tab
23
Create alarm records to define each alarm, both physical
and logical.
Configuration
See Defining alarms on page 117.
Alarms
Alarms Tab
24
Define the colors that will be used in the Alarm Monitor so
that the color scheme reflects the alarm state.
Configuration
Alarms
See Defining alarm colors on
page 120.
Alarm Colors Tab
25
Create output group records to be used to activate all
outputs assigned to the same group.
Configuration
Inputs Outputs
See Creating output groups on
page 126.
Output Groups Tab
26
27
Create input group records to be used to trigger output
groups when any individual inputs in the input group are
detected.
Configuration
Create micro records to identify each micro controller and
define how it operates and communicates.
Configuration
Inputs Outputs
See Creating input groups on
page 127.
Input Groups Tab
See Defining micros on page 132.
Micros
Micros Tab
28
Create encryption keys to encrypt data between the host
and the micro.
Configuration
Micros
See Creating encryption keys on
page 149.
Keys Tab
29
Flash the Picture Perfect application code into the micro
controllers.
eFlash
See Flashing micros on page 151.
MicTool
Micro Flash Utility
30
31
32
Create an output record to define the characteristics and
the purpose of each output point and the output group to
which it belongs.
Configuration
Create an input record to define the characteristics and the
purpose of each input point and the input group to which it
belongs.
Configuration
Define category records to identify groups of badge
holders by type, title, function or shift.
Access
See Defining outputs on page 158.
Inputs Outputs
Outputs Tab
See Defining inputs on page 161.
Inputs Outputs
Inputs Tab
Places
See Creating categories on
page 172.
Categories Tab
33
Define area records to describe areas of your site that
require the same level of access control.
Access
Places
Areas Tab
See Creating areas on page 174.
Chapter 3
Configuration checklist
Table 23. The steps for configuring a Picture Perfect system (continued)
Step
Task
Menu
Reference
34
Create reader records to define how each reader operates
and to associate it with any links required to process reader
activity.
Configuration
See Defining readers on page 182.
Create door records to define how each door operates and
to associate any links required to process door status or
alarm activity.
Configuration
Create records to define operating modes, in addition to
the system defined Normal mode, that are activated either
by schedule or by command.
Control
Create mode event records to assign the starting date and
time that a mode goes into effect when scheduling a mode
change, such as a holiday.
Control
Create area events records to define and schedule the
desired characteristics for all the readers, doors, and
routings in an area for the duration of the event.
Access
Create reader events records to define and schedule the
desired characteristics of a single reader for the duration of
the event.
Configuration
Create door events records to define and schedule the
desired characteristics of a single door for the duration of
the event.
Configuration
Create alarm events records to define and schedule the
desired characteristics of a single alarm for the duration of
the event.
Configuration
Create input group event records to schedule placing an
input group online or offline and to control the output
groups or alarms that are triggered for the duration of the
event.
Configuration
Create output group event records to schedule enabling or
disabling a specific output group and/or to change its state
to off or on for the duration of the event.
Configuration
Create backup event records to schedule a system backup
to run automatically at the specified day and time.
Control
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Doors and Readers
Readers Tab
See Defining doors on page 187.
Doors and Readers
Doors Tab
See Creating modes on page 194.
Modes
Modes Tab
Modes
See Changing modes by scheduling
a mode event on page 198.
Mode Events Tab
Places
See Scheduling area events on
page 201.
Area Events
See Scheduling reader events on
Doors and Readers page 206.
Reader Event Tab
See Scheduling door events on
Doors and Readers page 209.
Door Events Tab
Alarms
See Scheduling alarm events on
page 211.
Alarm Events Tab
Inputs Outputs
See Scheduling input group events
on page 213.
Input Group Events
Tab
Inputs Outputs
See Scheduling output group
events on page 217.
Output Group
Events Tab
Backup
See Scheduling backup events on
page 219.
Backup Events Tab
45
Create report event records to schedule SQL reports to run
at specific times.
Reports
Reports Events
Report Events Tab
See Scheduling reports on
page 306.
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Table 23. The steps for configuring a Picture Perfect system (continued)
Step
Task
Menu
Reference
46
Create badge records to control the functions and
capabilities of the badge.
Access
See Defining badges on page 224.
Badges
Badges Tab
47
Create personnel records to identify each badge holder.
Access
People
See Defining personnel on
page 231.
Personnel Tab
48
Optional:
Set up badge designs.
Setup
Badge Designs
See Setting up badge designs on
page 256.
Badge Designs Tab
49
Optional:
Create custom forms.
Setup
Custom Forms
See Creating and editing custom
forms on page 330.
Custom Forms Tab
50
Optional:
Create custom lists.
Setup
Custom Lists
See Creating and editing custom
lists on page 333.
Custom Lists Tab
51
Optional:
Create master templates for generating new records with
the necessary links predefined.
Any Form Toolbar
See Managing templates on
Manage Templates page 324.
Chapter 4 Setup
This chapter describes information related to using the Picture Perfect forms. It
also includes information on optional setup procedures.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Assigning system parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Creating facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Setting up printers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Setting up workstations (optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Setting up SSL Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Database encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
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Overview
When using Picture Perfect, some of the forms contain default information that you can change as required. All
forms may be customized to display the fields you choose to display. You may also create custom lists as
needed, such as a list box of company or division names.
This chapter includes information on setting your system parameters, working with Picture Perfect forms, and
setting up optional items such as printers and imaging stations.
Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records
All Picture Perfect forms use a standard method to add, edit, or delete records.
Note:
You must allow appoximately 90 seconds for the cache to update when saving changes to a record.
Creating records
To create a record:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab. For example: Access, People, Personnel.
2. Click New
.
The record list window, or data grid, displays a row marked with the error record icon
. If a search
has been performed, the grid is filled with all of the records matching the search criteria. When adding
new records, the records are placed at the bottom of the grid, and are marked with the error record icon
.
3. Complete the form.
A detailed explanation of each field on the form can be found on the Fields and Controls section for
each form in this manual. Because all Picture Perfect forms are user-customizable, not all fields may
appear on your form or they may appear in a different order. All required fields are indicated by red
text. When all required information is complete, the error icon
is replaced by the new record icon
and the Save
icon is enabled.
4. Click Save
. This icon is unavailable if all required information is not entered or if you do not have
the required permissions for the form.
Editing records
To edit a record:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab. For example: Access, People, Personnel.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
Chapter 4
Setup
The record list window, or data grid, shows the results of search operations and allows you to quickly
navigate through the records found by a search. When an application is started, the record list window
is initially empty.
3. Select a record from the list in the data grid.
•
The number and order of the fields displayed, as well as the placement of the grid on the screen
(left, right, top, or bottom), is configurable by clicking Preferences
on the form toolbar.
•
Clicking on a single row in the grid will highlight and select that record for editing. The keyboard
up and down arrows can also be used to move from one record to the next. The record’s field
values appear in the various pages of the form.
More than one row can be selected in order to change a value for multiple records at one time, for
example, updating a time value for all records. Multiple rows can be selected by left-clicking the
first desired record, then dragging the mouse, and releasing it on the last desired record. Nonconnected rows may be added to the selection by holding down the CTRL key on the keyboard
while selecting the row with the mouse. All selected rows will be highlighted. When multiple rows
are selected, if the field data is the same for all records, the field value displays. However, if the
field data is not the same in all records the field value is replaced by an asterisk. Changing a field
value changes it for all selected records.
•
•
If any field value is changed, the Edit icon
appears next to the selected rows.
4. Make the necessary changes to the form.
•
•
A detailed explanation of each field on the form can be found on the Fields and Controls section
for each form in this guide. Because all Picture Perfect forms are user-customizable, not all fields
may appear on your form or they may appear in a different order.
When editing a form, if you fail to supply required information, the Error icon
appears in the
Function tab label as well as next to the record in the data grid. The field that requires correction is
labeled in red.
5. Click Save
. This icon is unavailable if all required information is not entered or if you do not have
the required permissions for the form.
Deleting records
To delete a record:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab. For example: Access, People, Personnel.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
The record list window, or data grid, shows the results of search operations and allows you to quickly
navigate through the records found by a search. When an application is started, the record list window
is initially empty.
3. Select a record from the list in the data grid.
•
The number and order of the fields displayed, as well as the placement of the grid on the screen
(left, right, top, or bottom), is configurable by clicking Preferences on the form toolbar.
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•
•
Clicking on a single row in the grid will highlight and select that record for editing. The keyboard
up and down arrows can also be used to move from one record to the next. The record’s field
values appear in the various pages of the form.
More than one row can be selected in order to delete multiple records at one time. Multiple rows
can be selected by left-clicking the first desired record, then dragging the mouse, and releasing it
on the last desired record. Non-connected rows may be added to the selection by holding down the
CTRL key on the keyboard while selecting the row with the mouse. All selected rows will be
highlighted. When multiple rows are selected, if the field data is the same for all records, the field
value displays. However, if the field data is not the same in all records the field value is replaced
by an asterisk.
4. Click Delete
.
The selected records appear in the data grid with the deleted icon
next to them.
5. Click Save . This icon is not available if all required information is not entered or if you do not have
the required permissions for the form. If any record dependencies exist for the record you are deleting,
a list of those records displays. The list must be cleared before the record can be deleted from the
database.
Printing records
To print a record:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab. For example: Access, People, Personnel.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
The record list window, or data grid, shows the results of search operations and allows you to quickly
navigate through the records found by a search. When an application is started, the record list window
is initially empty.
3. Select a record from the list in the data grid.
4. From the form toolbar, click Print
. The Print Grid displays.
Figure 9. Print Grid
•
Select Tabular to preview a page layout similar to the following:
Chapter 4
Setup
Figure 10. Print Preview: Tabular
•
Select Form to preview a page layout similar to the following:
Figure 11. Print Preview form
5. When you are satisfied with the preview, click one of the following:
To close and exit the print window.
To print an electronic file in .pdf format. A window similar to the following will display.
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Figure 12. Print to a PDF
To print to your default printer. A window similar to the following displays:
Figure 13. Print to a default printer
Assigning system parameters
System Parameters Form
The System Parameters form is used to assign system parameters that will be used by the system during the
setup procedures. Some fields, as indicated in Table 24, Parameter Form Fields on page 42 are pre-set, based
on the system installation settings. These should not be changed unless you are directed to do so by Customer
Support.
Chapter 4
Setup
Figure 14. System Parameters form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown
inthe following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
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Table 24. Parameter Form Fields
Tab
Field name
Description
Parameters
Node Name
Node name of the host (normally set to NODE
1). This field is pre-set and should only be
changed as directed by your customer
support representative.
Xon Threshold
The number of queued messages that control
TPS message buffering. Xon must be smaller
than Xoff. This field is pre-set and should only
be changed as directed by your customer
support representative.
Xoff Threshold
The number of queued messages that control
TPS message buffering. Xoff must be larger
than Xon. This field is pre-set and should only
be changed as directed by your customer
support representative.
Shared Memory Size
The size (KBytes) of shared memory used. This
field is pre-set and should only be changed as
directed by your customer support
representative.
Diagnostic Buffer Size
The size (KBytes) of the diagnostic buffer. This
field is pre-set and should only be changed as
directed by your customer support
representative.
Alarm Monitors
This field is reserved for future use. Default is
2 for the current version.
Diagnostic Monitors
This field is reserved for future use. Default is
1 for the current version.
Event Monitors
This field is reserved for future use. Default is
2 for the current version.
Date Format
Specify the date format of Month (MM), Day
(DD), and Year (YY or YYYY) that the system will
use. Click a radio button to select one system
date format.
Schedule Updates Database
When a micro runs a schedule, a SUP
(Schedule Update) message is sent to the
host. This SUP message gets logged in the /
cas/log/sup.mmdd log file where mm is the
current month and dd the day. If this value is
set to Yes, the database is updated to reflect
the value changed by the schedule.
Note:
If this feature is enabled, Area
Events will update the database if
all micros associated with all
readers in the specified Area are
within the same timezone.
Chapter 4
Setup
Tab
Field name
Description
Enforce Report Permissions
These radio buttons are used if you want to
restrict report access to certain permission
groups. By default, report permissions will be
not be available. Select Yes to enable this
option.
Backup Directory
The default file system in which to store
backups when backing up to Disk File.
Archive Directory
The default file system in which to store
archives when archiving to Disk File.
Flash Directory
Specifies the source directory to search for
flash files. This replaces the default directory
of: /cas/flash/eflash
System Poll Interval
Specifies the frequency with which the
Performance Monitor data is refreshed.
Time Format
cooSpecify the way the hour, minutes, and
seconds appear in the time of day (HH:MM:SS
or HHMMSS). Time displays in military (24hour) format.
Click a radio button to select the system time
format. Even though the system will display
time in one format or the other, it should be
noted that a time value can be entered in
either format. It should also be noted that
time values can be entered in abbreviated
format. The only abbreviated formats
supported for data entry are the following:
SS
MMSS
HH:MM
Alarms
Enforce UL Specification
This field will alter the operation of the
Remove button in the Alarm Response
window. If the No button is selected, the
Remove button will operate normally, that is,
it will always be available. If Yes is selected
(recommended), the Remove button will be
grayed out unless the alarm is in reset state.
This means that the operator will be unable
to remove the alarm until it has been reset.
The exception is alarms with the Immediate
Reset Input control option set. Because these
alarms move instantly into reset state, the
Remove button will always be available.
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Tab
Field name
Description
Alarm Filter
Micro: If this radio button is selected, the
alarm will be assigned the same facility as
the micro record from which it originated.
Input: If this radio button is selected, the
alarm will be assigned the same facility as
the input record with which it is associated.
Input Group: If this radio button is selected,
the alarm will be assigned the same facility
as the input group record with which it is
associated.
Alarm: If this radio button is selected, the
alarm will be assigned the same facility as
the alarm record with which it is associated.
Location: The Location column in the Alarm
Monitor displays the name of the door, reader,
input, or micro that the alarm originated
from. If this radio button is selected, the
alarm will be assigned the facility of the door,
reader, input, or micro displayed in the
Location column.
Alarm Monitor Color Scheme
Select one of the two radio buttons,
depending on how you want to implement
alarm color.
Processing State
Select this button if you want all alarms of
one state to be of the same color. The
Processing States are Active, Bumped,
Notified, Remote, Pending, and Completed.
Example, if you want all Active alarms to be
white text on a red background and all
Completed alarms to be white text on a green
background, select this button.
See Alarm monitor color scheme: Processing
state on page 121.
Alarm Description
Select this button if you want to select text
and background colors on an individual
alarm basis. If you choose this option, the
Alarm Color window will be displayed on the
Alarms form. See Defining alarm colors on
page 120.
Duress Code
Enter the PIN number used to signal duress
situations.
Chapter 4
Setup
Tab
Badging
Field name
Description
Alarm Delay (sec) (RAN)
This field will only appear if the optional RAN
(Remote Alarm Notification) package is
installed. The Alarm Delay field defines the
length of time the operator is given to
acknowledge the alarm. Once the notify time
is reached and the operator has not
responded to the alarm, a message will be
sent to the Alarm Monitor. The Alarm Monitor
process state for that alarm will be changed
to Remote in the case of RAN.
Alarm Priority (RAN)
This field will only appear if the optional RAN
(Remote Alarm Notification) package is
installed. The Alarm Priority field sets the
upper limit for the priorities of alarms that will
be sent to RAN. Any alarms with an alarm
priority between 1 and the setting specified
here will be examined.
Default Badge Encode Format
This is a required field that represents the
default badge encode setting for the system.
Click Default Badge Encode Format and
choose a badge encode format from the list
box. If the operator does not set a badge
encode format on the Badges form, this
default setting is used.
Default Badge Design
The system default for a badge design is set
in a manner similar to setting a printer
default. When selected, the system default
will be used when no other design is
specified.
For more information on this field, see Setting
a default badge design on page 260.
Image Types
This field is only enabled if the optional Image
package is installed. Click to change
properties of images such as the aspect ratio.
These changes apply to all badge images
captured or printed on the Imaging
workstation where the changes are made. If
there are multiple Imaging workstations, the
changes must be made on each workstation.
Warning: These parameters are critical to the
operation of the Image component! Consult
Customer Support before making any
changes.
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Tab
Field name
Description
History
Alarm/Badge/Operator/Event/Tour History
Size
The number of transaction records (alarm,
badge, or operator) that can be stored in the
history table or backup table. This value is set
according to the amount of alarm, badge, or
operator activity expected, considering the
desired archive frequency. These three fields
are grayed out which means that they are
read-only fields. These fields are set during
installation. These fields are pre-set and
should only be changed as directed by your
customer support representative.
Routing
Default Routing
Define a default routing to ensure that all
messages (alarm and activity) are routed
somewhere. Whenever the routing of a
function is unassigned, the system will use
this setting as the default. Click Default
Routing to display a list box of routings. Select
the desired routing, and then click Close.
Operator Routing
Define an operator routing for operator
activity. Click Operator Routing to display a
list box of routings. Select the desired routing,
and then click Close.
Person Trace Routing
Define a routing for traced badges. Click
Person Trace Routing to display a list box of
routings. Select the desired routing, and then
click Close. (See Tracing badge holder activity
on page 388 for details on this feature.)
Max View Recs
Enter the maximum number of records the
system will have the ability to find and view.
This is usually set to 500. If this value is not
defined, the system will assume a value of
500. If this value is greater than 2500, the
system will assume a value of 2500. This field
controls the number of records shown in a list
box.
Max Records
Note:
This figure is dependent on system
memory and number of users. Do
not change this field to a higher
number unless authorized to do so
by your customer support
representative. If set too high, the
system will use excessive memory
and may slow down and become
non-responsive.
Chapter 4
Setup
Tab
Field name
Description
Record Remove Interval
Specifies a period of time (in minutes) during
which a group of badge records may be
removed. The system removes badge records
for this period of time, or until the number of
badge records set under Record Remove
Maximum has been reached, whichever
comes first. If more badges are to be
removed, the system waits until the
beginning of the next interval, then
automatically initiates the badge removal
process again. This process is repeated until
all listed badges have been removed. The
minimum setting is one minute. It is not
required to restart Picture Perfect or the
Badges form when changing this setting.
Note:
Advanced Features
The badge removal process is
initiated by clicking the Remove
function button on the Badges
form. See To permanently remove a
badge from the database: on
page 230.
Record Remove Maximum
Specifies the maximum number of badge
records that can be removed during the
Record Remove Interval. It is not required to
restart Picture Perfect or the Badges form
when changing this setting.
Number of Person Categories
This field is read-only and is set to 96 during
installation. It is the maximum number of
categories that can be assigned to a person.
Number of User Fields
This field displays the number of User Fields
that appear on the Badges form. User Fields
are used for detailed badge holder
identification. This field is read-only and is set
to 40 during installation.
Number of Area Categories
This field is read-only and is set to 32 during
installation. It is the maximum number of
categories that can be assigned to an area.
Number of Floors
Enter the number of floors (0 to 64) serviced
by an elevator associated with the Elevator
Control feature. See Elevator control on
page 369.
Configured Devices
Click Refresh to display the total number of
devices currently connected to the host.
Alarm State
Click Refresh to display information about the
most recent alarm as well as the current total
number of active and pending alarms.
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Tab
Password
Alarm Email
Field name
Description
History Flags
Click Refresh to view an archive indicator for
each history type. Yes indicates it is time to
archive.
History Counts
The total number of history records in the
database for each history type.
System Diagnostics
A list of all Picture Perfect sub-systems from
which you may select to generate diagnostic
information to a log file.
Minimum Length
The minimum number of alpha/numeric
characters that a password must contain,
within the range of 6 to 60.
Cannot Begin with Numeric Character
Check to require that passwords begin with
an alpha character.; they can not start with a
numeric character.
Cannot End with Numeric Character
Check to require that passwords end with an
alpha character; they can not end with a
numeric character.
Must be Mixed Case
Check to require that passwords contain both
upper and lower case characters.
Must Contain Alpha Numeric Characters
Check to require that passwords contain both
alpha and numeric characters. If selected,
enter the minimum number of numeric
character required, within the range of 6 to
59.
Cannot be Same as Login ID
Check to require that passwords be different
than the Login ID.
Include All Occurrences
Check to include each occurrence of an
alarm process state change (for example
active or pending) in the email message
generated. By default, this requirement is not
available.
Include Priority
Check to include the priority of an alarm in
the email message generated. By default, this
requirement is not available.
Include Condition
Check to include the condition of an alarm
(for example, alarm/reset) in the email
message generated. By default, this
requirement is not available.
Include Input State
Check to include the input state of an alarm
(for example, open/closed) in the email
message generated. By default, this
requirement is not available.
Chapter 4
Setup
Tab
Field name
Description
Include Process State
Check to include the process state of an
alarm (for example, active/pending) in the
email message generated. By default, this
requirement is not available.
Include Count
Check to include the number of times an
alarm has set and reset in the email message
generated. By default, this requirement is not
available.
Modes
Number of Auths for Mode Change
The number of distinct operator
authenticators required to allow a mode
change.
Notes
Saved Notes
All saved notes applicable to this record are
listed including the Date/Time the note was
created and the operator that created it. Click
on a column heading to sort by Date/Time,
Operator, or alphabetically by note.
By hovering the mouse over the note, the
entire note displays.
Notes
This is a free form text field where you can
add information pertinent to System
Parameter records.
Example: Changed password length 12/12/09.
Note:
Notes cannot exceed 210
characters - they will be truncated if
exceeded.
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Related procedures
To edit system parameters:
1. From the Setup menu, select System Parameters, and then click the System Parameters tab.
2. Edit the System Parameters form as necessary. Note only certain fields can be edited. See Table 24,
Parameter Form Fields on page 42 for a description of each field.
3. Click Save . This icon is not available unless all required information is entered, or if you do not
have the required permissions to use the form.
4. To implement the system parameters you have changed, perform shutdown and restart procedures
using the command line. See Starting and stopping Picture Perfect on page 8.
Configuring LDAP support
Picture Perfect supports the use of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) interface to provide
single sign on (SSO) where one password for a user is shared between many services. LDAP is configured on
the LDAP Server and LDAP DN forms.
Figure 15. LDAP form
Chapter 4
Setup
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 25. LDAP Server form fields
Tab
Field name
Description
LDAP Server
Description
A description of the LDAP server.
IP Address or host name The physical address of the LDAP server, for example 204.171.64.2 or the
hostname.
Port Address
The address that identifies the port to be used for communication between the
Picture Perfect server and the LDAP server.
Enable SSL
Click Yes to enable DES encrypted transmission between the LDAP server and the
Picture Perfect server.
Note:
In order for the Picture Perfect server to verify the identity of your LDAP
server, Picture Perfect must know the LDAP Certificate filename. Prior to
enabling SSL:
•
•
Log in to Picture Perfect as root.
At the command prompt, type:
EnableLdapSSL <certificate filename>
Version
The version of the LDAP interface, for example: 3
Priority
When there are multiple LDAP servers, this is the priority by which to attempt
access.
Test Connection
To test the connection between the LDAP server and the Picture Perfect server,
type the LDAP distinguished name (DN) and password and then click Test.
Figure 16. LDAP DN form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 26. LDAP DN form fields
Tab
Field name
Description
LDAP DN
Description
A description of the DN entry. For example, Headquarters Security Personnel.
DN
An LDAP distinguished name (DN) is an LDAP entry that identifies and describes the full
path on the LDAP server used to authenticate an authorized user.
Distinguished names consist of the name of the entry itself as well as the names, in
order from bottom to top, of the objects above it in the LDAP directory.
Supported DNs:
ou=people,dc=mycompany,dc=com
cn=[operator.user_name],ou=people,dc=mycompany,dc=com
cn=[operator.login_id],ou=people,dc=mycompany,dc=com
cn=[operator.employee_id],ou=people,dc=mycompany,dc=com
When an authorized user types in their username, this path is used by Picture Perfect to
authenticate the user’s password.
Priority
When there are multiple LDAP servers, this is the priority by which to attempt access.
Related procedures
To configure LDAP:
1. Add the IP address and host name of the LDAP server to the local host file.
2. From the Picture Perfect Setup menu, select System Parameters, and then click the LDAP Server
tab.
3. Fill in the fields with the appropriate data as described in Table 25.
4. Click Save
. This icon is unavailable if all required information is not entered or if you do not have
the required permissions for the form.
5. From the Picture Perfect Setup menu, select System Parameters, and then click the LDAP DN tab.
6. Fill in the fields with the appropriate data as described in Table 26.
7. Click Save
. This icon is unavailable if all required information is not entered or if you do not have
the required permissions for the form.
8. Under Test Connection, fill in the DN and Password fields and click Test.
9. From the Picture Perfect Control menu, select Operators.
10. For each operator record required, enable the LDAP Authentication check box.
Chapter 4
Setup
Creating facilities
The Picture Perfect system allows you to group your system database records according to facilities. A facility
is comprised of records associated with a group of buildings in a city, a building, a floor in a building, a tenant,
or a room on a particular floor in a building.
Facility records are text descriptions of these places. Database records can be grouped together by assigning
them to a common facility. All Picture Perfect forms support facilities. A facility field is displayed on each
form with the following exceptions:
•
•
Although the Monitor forms do not have a Facility field, incoming messages are filtered by facility.
Although the following forms do not have a Facility field, access to them is governed by system
permissions profiles: Backup and Restore, Custom, Edit SQL Statements, Force Logoff, Form
Preferences, Log Monitor, Monitor Preferences, Performance Monitor, Purge All Alarms, Send
Message, Status Monitor, Tour Functions, User Monitor, Access Secure, Alarm Colors, Control
Outputs, Data Generator, Emergency DI, Facilities, LDAP DN, LDAP Server, and Parameters.
At installation, a facility, Global, is created and, by default, all database records are assigned to it. If an existing
Picture Perfect system is being upgraded, all existing database records will be assigned to this facility, unless
they are already associated with a facility.
Use the Facilities form to create and delete facility records. These records, combined with Facility Profiles and
Permissions, allow you to restrict operator access to records assigned to those facilities.
Figure 17. Facilities form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 27. Facility form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a text description, up to 60 alphanumeric characters long, that defines a logical grouping, such as a
group of buildings, a building, a floor in a building, or a room on a particular floor in a building.
Example: Headquarters
E-mail
Select the target e-mail recipients to receive mode change notifications.
Note:
If it is necessary to send a notification to a large group of recipients (for example, all employees)
then an e-mail alias should be used.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Facility record:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Facilities, to display the Facility tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Note:
Before deleting a facility, you should ask yourself two questions:
a. What do you want to do with the records that have the facility assigned to them?
You will be given the opportunity to re-assign the facility for those related records to Global or
to change them to an existing facility. If you choose to re-assign them to an existing facility,
you should keep in mind who has access to that facility because that operator will now have
access to those records using their existing facility profile.
b. What operators are already using that facility?
When a facility is deleted, it will remove the facility-to-facility profile relationships for any
operator using that facility. The facility record is deleted but the facility profile record is left
intact. This means you may need to re-assign the facility profile to a new facility for each
operator that may have been using the deleted facility. Deleting an existing facility will
effectively remove an operator’s access to that facility.
Setting up printers
Use the Printers form to add each printer configured during installation for server-side printing. This only
applies to Activity Routing and Report Events.
Chapter 4
Setup
Figure 18. Printers form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 28. Printer form fields
Field name
Description
Description
A description of the printer, including type, quality, location, etc. as required (up to 30 alphanumeric
characters).
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility that this record is assigned to. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Queue Name
The exact name of the print queue specified when printers were configured in the Picture Perfect installation
procedure on the server. The print queue name matches the printer name.
Example: If the printer name is lp0, then the printer queue should be lp0.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Printer record:
1. From the Setup menu, select Printers, and then click the Printers tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Setting up workstations (optional)
Use the Workstations form to configure terminals that may be used by Picture Perfect as badge issue
workstations, or if you have the optional Imaging package installed, as Imaging workstations.
Figure 19. Workstations form
Note:
Do not define the host console terminal as a Workstation. The host terminal functions only as an administrative
terminal; not as a workstation.
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 29. Workstation form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 characters).
Example: Command Center Workstation
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
IP Address or Host Name
Type the IP address or hostname of the client workstation. This must be specified in the
operating system file /etc/hosts on the host system.
Imaging Workstation
Select this check box if this terminal will be used as an Imaging workstation
Reader Issue
The reader used as the Badge Issue reader. See Reader Issue on page 225.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a workstation record:
Chapter 4
Setup
1. From the Setup menu, select Workstations, and then click the Workstations tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
To set up your Imaging workstations:
1. Install the capture card (optional).
To capture your images, you can use any device that has a TWAIN, WINTAB, or Video for Windows
(VFW) driver installed. Follow the instructions provided by the device manufacturer for installing the
device.
2. Install the print driver.
The Imaging package requires the installation of print drivers. Refer to the instructions shipped with
your printer.
3. Install signature pad drivers (optional).
Depending on the signature pad you are using, you may need to install additional TWAIN or WINTAB
drivers to make them compatible with the Imaging package. After installing the pad, install a TWAIN
or WINTAB driver for the pad.
4. Install the Imaging software.
•
•
•
The optional image package must be installed on the host to perform imaging activities on a client
workstation. See the Picture Perfect 4.5 Imaging User Manual for details.
A client workstation that will be used as an imaging terminal requires the installation of the client
imaging software on the workstation. First, install the Java Runtime Environment on the
workstation. Click the J2SE Java Runtime Environment (JRE) link on the host web page. Then,
install the imaging software by clicking the EPIBuilder Imaging Installation link on the host web
page.
Remember to add this workstation as an imaging terminal.
5. Install the software licence key.
Obtain and install new Picture Perfect server license to activate the optional image package installed
on host. See the Picture Perfect 4.5 Installation Manual for details.
6. Set up cameras and lighting (optional).
Refer to the following document on your documentation CD for helpful information on camera and
lighting setup:
Image Quality Enhancements
Setting up SSL Encryption
Client SSL Encryption
The activation and deactivation of SSL encryption for events and requests transmitted between the Picture
Perfect host and its clients is controlled by the EnableSSL script. This script can be run anytime after Picture
Perfect has been installed.
Note:
Turning on Client SSL Encryption will have a negative impact on client performance.
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To activate client SSL encryption, perform the following steps:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
rc.pperf -k
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd stop
3. Log on to the system as root by typing:
su - root
4. Type the following command to enable SSL:
EnableSSL 1
Enter
5. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
6. Start Picture Perfect again by typing:
rc.pperf
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, start Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd start <primary or backup>
7. From a client PC browser window, type the following secure URL to connect to the server:
https://<hostname>/Picture/
Note:
Once SSL has been enabled, operators should access the client using the secure HTTPS URL (note the “s” after
http):
https://<hostname>/Picture/
If you are using Internet Explorer 7, and you receive a certificate warning screen, follow these steps:
a. Click on the “Continue to this website (not recommended)” hyperlink.
b. Click on “Certificate Error” at the top of the window, just to the right of the URL drop-down list.
8. In the Certificate Invalid Alert window, select View Certificate.
9. In the Certificate window, select Install Certificate.
10. In the Certificate Import Wizard - Welcome window, select Next.
11. In the Certificate Import Wizard - Certificate Store window, select the Automatically select the
certificate store based on the type of certificate radio button. Click Next to continue, and then click
Finish.
12. In the Security Warning window, click Yes to install the certificate. The install is complete when the
Certificate Import Wizard displays the message “The import was successful.” Click OK to close the
window.
13. In the Security Alert window, click Yes to proceed.
14. In the Picture Perfect webtop, click the Picture Perfect button in the upper left corner to display the
Login screen.
15. Log on to the system.
Chapter 4
Setup
16. When logging on to Picture Perfect, with SSL enabled, the following window displays:
17. In the Warning - Security window, check the Always trust content from this publisher check box, and
then click Yes. This window appears because Picture Perfect self-signs the SSL certificates and does
not obtain them from a third party. If you wait too long to click Yes, the application will time out and
you will be denied access. If the timeout occurs, close Picture Perfect and try again.
Note:
When toggling between SSL disabled to SSL enabled, a client may encounter the following error message when logging
in:
In order for the client to successfully login, it will be necessary to first close down the client applet window and close
down all open web-tops and perform the login again. This only needs to be done once.
To deactivate client SSL encryption, perform the following steps:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
rc.pperf -k
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd stop
3. Log on to the system as root by typing:
su - root
4. Type the following command to disable SSL:
EnableSSL 0
Enter
where 0 = zero.
5. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
6. Start Picture Perfect again by typing:
rc.pperf
Enter
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If this is a redundant configuration, start Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd start <primary or backup>
7. From a client PC browser window, type in the following URL to connect to the server:
http://<hostname>/Picture/
8. When the Picture Perfect webtop displays, click the Picture Perfect button in the upper left corner to
display the Login screen.
9. Log on to the system.
Note:
Note: Once SSL has been disabled, operators should access the client using the standard HTTP URL: http://<hostname>/
Picture/
Database encryption
The activation and deactivation of encryption for client-server database connections is controlled by the
DbSecComm script. This script can be run anytime after Picture Perfect has been installed.
The Informix CSM module for database encryption requires the libstdc++.so.5 library, which is installed
by the compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm package.
Note:
Turning on database encryption will have a negative impact on client performance. You do not need to have database
encryption enabled in order to have client ssl enabled, or vice versa.
To determine if the libstdc++.so.5 library is installed:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt type the following:
rpm -qa | grep "libstdc++"
Enter
3. If compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm appears in the list of packages, then
libstdc++.so.5 is already installed on the Picture Perfect host.
If the libstdc++.so.5 library is already installed on the host, continue to To activate database
encryption: on page 61.
If the libstdc++.so.5 library is not installed on the host, continue to Step To download and
install the compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm package:.
To download and install the compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm package:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
rc.pperf -k
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd stop
3. Change to the /tmp directory by typing the following command:
cd /tmp
Enter
Chapter 4
Setup
4. Navigate to the following web address to obtain the compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.361.i386.rpm.
http://rpm.pbone.net/index.php3/stat/4/idpl/12267595/com
/compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm.html
Right-click on one of the mirrors, and then select Properties. Copy the Address: (URL), and then type
the following command. Paste the URL in place of the <mirror>.
wget <mirror>
Enter
5. Install the compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm package by typing the following
command:
rpm -i /tmp/compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61.i386.rpm
Enter
To activate database encryption:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
rc.pperf -k
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd stop
3. Log on to the system as root by typing:
su - root
4. Type the following command to enable database encryption:
DbSecComm 1
Enter
5. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
6. Start Picture Perfect again by typing:
rc.pperf
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, start Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd start <primary or backup>
7. Log on to the Picture Perfect application.
8. Check the Picture Perfect log file for database errors by typing the following command:
logtail
Enter
9. Press CTRL C to exit and return to the command prompt.
10. Query the database by typing:
query operator
Enter
Observe the output. If an error occurs due to the CSM module or Picture Perfect configuration, it may
appear here. The correct output will resemble the following:
1 Systems Adminstrator 0000 install 1 1 -1 89fb511ffe93ee7826661ca1e3bb468dc1ad0ff2
0 0 1 1
-1 20041006 170806 -1 System System system 1 1 -1
0 0
-1
20041018 194738
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To deactivate database encryption, perform the following steps:
1. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
2. At the command prompt, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
rc.pperf -k
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, stop Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd stop
3. Log on to the system as root by typing:
su - root
4. Type the following command to disable database encryption:
DbSecComm 0
Enter
where 0 = zero.
5. Log on to the system as ppadmin.
6. Start Picture Perfect again by typing:
rc.pperf
Enter
If this is a redundant configuration, start Picture Perfect by typing:
pprscmd start <primary or backup>
7. Log on to the Picture Perfect application.
Chapter 5 System configuration
This chapter describes the system hardware and site configuration required to start
using your system. Readers should familiarize themselves with the information in
this chapter before continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configuring modems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configuring ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Configuring email . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Defining routings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Defining badge formats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Defining departments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Defining personnel types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
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Overview
After your installer completes the initial hardware and software installation, there are Picture Perfect forms that
allow you to configure your system according to your specific requirements. Some of the forms contain default
information that you can change as required.
The various forms are presented in the order recommended in Configuration steps on page 30.
Configuring modems
Use the Modems form to describe each modem type that you intend to use for dial-up communications.
Modem types that you define using the Modems form appear in a list box for assignment to a micro (on the
Micros form) and a port (on the Ports form). A micro can dial up the host on any available port that is
compatible, meaning the modem type matches. Only compatible modem types can establish a connection.
The DirecDoor, PXNPlus, and Micro/5-PX support 9600 baud only.
A dial-up micro uses standard modem communication and standard telephone lines to dial up and respond to
the host. Each dial-up micro has a dedicated phone line and a modem for communication with the host. The
modem connects via RS-232 cable at the micro's host port (RS-232 serial port).
The host has a list of user-definable phone numbers available for calling any dial-up micro in the system;
likewise, all dial-up micros have a list of user-definable phone numbers available for dialing the host.
You can configure modems without having to restart the Picture Perfect system. You will need to refer to your
modem manual when filling out the fields on the Modems form. If a default value appears in a field, you can
accept that value if the modem type is Hayes-compatible.
Figure 20. Modems form
Chapter 5
System configuration
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
If a default value appears in a field, you can accept that value if the modem type is Hayes-compatible.
Note:
There are system-supplied forms for the Hidex modem, Hayes 1200, 2400, and 9600 modems, the Cardinal 28.8 V.34
modem, and the STAR Comm 144F.1 modem.
Table 30. Modem form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a modem description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long that specifies the modem type. This
modem description will appear in a list box on the Micros form and the Ports form so that you can assign a
modem type to micros and ports. Example: Hayes 2400
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Autodialer
Prefix
Enter the command string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) used to tell the modem to dial the number that
follows.
Dial Stored
Prefix
Enter the command string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that tells the modem to dial the phone number
stored in the modem’s non-volatile memory.
Note:
Some modems can store phone numbers at multiple memory locations. On your modem, location
0 is not available for stored phone numbers because it is reserved for the host phone number.
Attention
Command
Enter the wake-up string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) required to put the modem into command
mode, so that it can receive other configuration commands (and eventually the hang-up command).
Attention
Response
Enter the string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that the modem returns to indicate that it received the
attention command.
Initialization
Command
Enter the command string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) used when preparing to dial out or answer.
Initialization
Response
Enter the string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that the modem returns to indicate that it received the
initialization command.
Deinitialization
Command
Enter the command string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) used to de-initialize the modem when hanging
up.
Deinitialization
Response
Enter the string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that the modem returns to indicate that it received the
de-initialization command.
EOL ASCII Value Enter the character (expressed in ASCII value) that terminates every command string.
Hangup
Command
Enter the command string (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) used to disconnect or hang up the modem.
Low Speed
Baud
For multi-speed modems, enter the lowest baud rate that this modem can use for a connection. The line
speed can downgrade to this lower baud rate to accommodate older modems or poor line quality.
Lo-speed
Connect Msg
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that the modem returns when it connects using its
low-speed baud rate.
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Table 30. Modem form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
High Speed
Baud
For multi-speed modems, enter the highest baud rate that this modem can use for a connection. The
modem uses its highest baud rate when it first tries to connect. If it does not receive a carrier using the
high-speed baud rate, it steps down to lower baud rates until the connection occurs.
Hi-speed
Connect Msg
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that this modem returns when it connects using its
high-speed baud rate.
Error Message
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that this modem gives when it rejects an invalid
command.
No Carrier Msg
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that this modem gives when it fails to connect; this
message differentiates between No Carrier, No Answer, and Busy.
No Answer
Message
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that this modem gives when it fails to connect; this
message differentiates between No Carrier and No Answer.
Busy Msg
Enter the message (0 to 30 alphanumeric characters) that this modem gives when it fails to connect; this
message differentiates between No Carrier and Busy.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a modem record:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Micros, and then click the Modems tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Configuring ports
Many of the port characteristics for micro communication lines are already configured at the time of
installation, so all you need to provide is a port description, tty number, and line settings. If the port supports
dial-up micros, you specify a phone number and modem type.
Use the Ports form to define a serial port and the Network Micro Ports form to define a network port. The
system then allows you to assign the device port (line) to a micro.
•
•
•
•
Unidirectional direct-connection micros require only a primary port.
Bidirectional direct-connection micros require both a primary and a secondary port.
Dial-up micros do not require a port assignment, but do require a Ports form.
Network micros require only a network primary port.
The Ports form supports dynamic configuration for all fields except tty. Dynamic configuration means that you
can configure ports without having to restart the Picture Perfect system. If you change the tty name, you must
restart Picture Perfect.
Note:
The fields on the Ports form will differ when on a redundant system. Refer to the Picture Perfect Redundant Edition User
Manual for more information.
Chapter 5
System configuration
Figure 21. Ports form
Figure 22. Network ports form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 31. Port form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a port description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long. The ports that you define appear in a list box
on the Micros form so that you can assign a serial port to direct-communication micros (unidirectional or
bidirectional). None appears in the list box so that you can indicate no secondary port for a unidirectional
micro and no primary or secondary port for a dial-up micro.
A typical description of a host port includes the line number and the port number.
Example: Line 1 Port 1 tty2
There are two serial ports on the host, and additional serial ports are available if a multi-port adapter is
attached.
Note:
Serial port (S1) on the RISC/6000 is used by the system console, in the case of an ASCII console.
Modem Type
A port used for direct-communication micros does not require a modem type (select None). None is the
default selection. If modems are connected, click Modem Type to display a list box of modems. Select the
modem type that matches your modem, and then click Close.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to restrict operator
access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Phone
The dial-up (micro-to-host) telephone number. Include the area code but not the PBX prefix or country code. A
dial-up micro can use this number to dial the host.
A dial-up micro uses a dynamic list of phone numbers to call the host on any compatible port that is
available. When the port is assigned the same modem type as the micro, that port becomes compatible.
Note:
Baud Rate
A port used for direct-communication micros does not require a phone number. (Leave this field
blank for direct-connection micros.) The port used for dial-up communications requires a phone
number.
For direct-communication micros, select the desired baud rate.
For dial-up micros, 9600 is the required line setting for the Micro/5-PX.
Data Bits
The required line setting is 8.
Stop Bits
The required line setting is 1.
Parity
The required line setting is None.
Chapter 5
System configuration
Table 31. Port form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
tty
AIX: Type the full path name of the port as defined in AIX, such as /dev/ttyN, where N=line number. This must
be typed in lower-case characters, and must not be the port assigned to the operator’s console. (Typically,
tty0 is assigned to the console.)
Linux: Refer to the following for Port Device Naming conventions for Linux systems:
Com Ports
com1 /dev/ttyS0
com2 /dev/ttyS1
PCI 8/16 Serial Port Adapter
1
/dev/ttya01
2
/dev/ttya02
3
/dev/ttya03
Table 32. Network port form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a port description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long. The ports that you define here will appear in a
list box on the Micros form so that you can assign a network port to network micros. (None will automatically
appear in the list box so that you can indicate no secondary port.)
A typical description of a network micro port should allow an operator to identify it on the ports list box on the
Micros form. It should also allow the operator to distinguish it from a serial port. Example: Network Micro 0
Port.
Host Name
Type the host name of the network micro. The host name of the network micro must be listed in the
/etc/hosts file or a Domain Name Server (DNS). This can be either the IP address or the name.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Note:
Firewall users: If your installation requires ANY micro and its corresponding host to communicate through a firewall,
the firewall must be configured to allow for connections through the following ports: 6767, 6768, 7777.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Port or a Network port record:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Micros, and then click the Ports tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Configuring email
Use the Email Recipients form to add email addresses for the routing of alarms and mode changes.
When an alarm is generated, a message will be emailed to the address listed in the Email Address field. Each
time an alarm is set or reset, another message will be sent. Configuration parameters of the output included in
the email message can be set using the Parameters form. See System Parameters Form on page 40.
Note:
In order for the Email feature to work properly, the Sendmail subsystem must be properly configured. See your System
Administrator or your IS department for assistance.
Example
Alarms that are assigned a routing of Email are sent to Emily.Lee@xyz.com.
Figure 23. Email Recipients form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 33. Email form fields
Field name
Description
Description
The name of the person to whom the e-mail is to be sent, or a description of the group, if using an alias (up
to 60 alphanumeric characters).
Email Address
The e-mail address to which the alarm is to be sent. If you want the message to go to multiple addressees,
enter a valid e-mail alias. An alias is used if you want to have an message sent to more than one email
address. Any messages sent to this address will be handled by the Sendmail subsystem and routed to the
appropriate e-mail addresses in the e-mail alias.
Phone Number
The phone number of the person specified by the e-mail address.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Test Email
Click the Test Email button to send a test email to the email address entered.
Chapter 5
System configuration
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an email record:
1. Select Control, Routings, and then Email Recipients tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
To set up an alias:
1. Open a new terminal window.
2. Change to the root user by typing: su
3. Using an editor, such as vi, add the new alias to the /etc/aliases file. Each alias must be
unique and must start on a new line. Aliases are in the form:
alias: name@somedomain.com, name2@someotherdomain.net
For more information, at the command prompt, type: man aliases
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Defining routings
Use the Routings form to define where messages are to be sent. There are eleven predefined routings already
entered. The system lets you use these routings to send messages to a printer, history log, e-mail, and/or to the
monitor. The routings you create populate list boxes that are used in various aspects of the system.
Example
Incoming alarm messages are assigned a routing of Monitor.
Figure 24. Routings form
Chapter 5
System configuration
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 34. Routing form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description (0 to 60 characters) to identify the type of messages to be routed.
Example: Badge Activity, Operator Messages, Overnight Messages, or ALL
A single routing description can include multiple routing destinations.
Example: You may want messages received overnight to be routed to the printer, the monitor, and the history
log.
Printer
Select Yes to select a printer as a destination where you want messages to be routed. From the Printer dropdown list, select the specific printer queue.
Monitor
Select Yes to display the message on the alarm and activity monitor; this choice does not create a history
record.
Note:
Monitor must be selected as a routing destination in order for an operator to respond to an alarm.
History
Select Yes to record the transaction message in the database history table; this allows the message to be
referenced for history reporting.
Email
Select Yes to route messages to an email address or alias. The Email drop-down list contains all of the email
addresses currently defined in the system. Select the desired addresses from the list box.
Note:
Facility
Yes must be selected for Monitor in order for this feature to be enabled.
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a routing record:
1. Select Control, Routings, and then Routings tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Defining badge formats
The format of the encoded badge is identified by a special character sequence that optionally starts with
constant data (such as a facility code common to all badges) and always ends with variable data that indicates
the length of the character string required in the Badge Encode Number field on the Badges form. A % sign
indicates the beginning of the variable data and a lower-case s marks the end. The entire badge ID must be
between 1 and 16 characters long.
Example
For example, the badge ID format 002%10s can be described as a facility code of 002 and a badge encode
number of 10 characters. The system comes with one pre-loaded format, %10s, which is the format for 10-digit
Wiegand readers. If additional formats are needed, they can be added on the Badge Formats form.
Figure 25. Badge Format form
Constant data (such as a facility code) is data common to all badges, and will be entered in front of the % in
this field. (Constant data does not appear in the Badge Encode Number field of the Badges form.)
Chapter 5
System configuration
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 35. Badge Format form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description (0 to 60 characters) to identify the badge format. Example: 10 Digit Badge
The badge formats that you define appear in a list box on the Parameters and the Badges forms.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Badge Id
Format
Type a badge ID format (1 to 16 characters) using the sequence: Constant data (optional)
% Variable data s
Recommended: To ensure the Auto Generate function produces a unique badge ID number, the variable
portion of the badge ID format must be at least 10 digits.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a badge format record:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badge Formats tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Defining departments
Use the Departments form to define a department. The department names entered here populate a list box that
will be used on the Personnel form to assign a department to each badge holder.
Example
Employees working in research and development are assigned to the Engineering department.
Figure 26. Department form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 36. Department form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description (1 to 60 characters) to identify the department. Example: Marketing
Division
Type a site-specific abbreviation (0 to 3 characters). Example: ABC
Location
Type where the department is located (0 to 20 characters) in a building or city. Example: Lower Level
Manager
Type the name of the manager of the department (0 to 23 characters).
User Fields
Type comments (0 to 40 characters).
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Chapter 5
System configuration
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a department record:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Departments tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining personnel types
Use the Personnel Type form to define different types of personnel. These entries populate a list box used on
the Badges form to assign a personnel type to each badge. Four personnel types are already entered into the
system: Permanent, Temporary, Contractor, and Visitor. Additional types can be entered as described in To
create, edit, or delete a personnel type record: on page 78.
Note:
Available Categories and Temporary Categories: When a category is assigned to a person as a temporary category, that
category will continue to remain in the "Available" list. This is to allow for the operator to set up multiple schedules for
that category on the same person. An example - A cleaning crew needs access from 5pm - 10pm Tuesday - Friday, on
Saturday they need access from Noon - 5pm.
Example
Full time employees are assigned a Personnel Type of Permanent.
Figure 27. Personnel Type form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 37. Personnel Type form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter the identification name of the personnel type to be added (up to 60 alphanumeric characters).
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to restrict operator
access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a personnel type record:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel Type tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 6 Operator administration
This chapter describes how to control the operations that an operator can perform
and the applications in which they can be performed. Readers should familiarize
themselves with the information in this chapter before continuing to other
chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Creating facility permission profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Creating system permission profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Creating form profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Setting up permission groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Setting up permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Defining operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Linking facilities, facility profiles, permissions, and operators . . . . . . . 98
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Overview
The Picture Perfect system allows you to group your system database records according to facilities. A facility
can be records associated with a group of buildings in a city, a building, a floor in a building, a tenant, or a
room on a particular floor in a building.
Facility records are text descriptions of these places. Database records can be grouped together by assigning
them to a common facility. At installation, a facility, Global, is created and, by default, all database records are
assigned to it. Operators using your Picture Perfect system require access to different forms and facilities
depending on their function and location. They also require different levels of authority depending on their
position.
A Permissions Profile is a way of defining the record and field level access permissions as well as action
permissions that control what applications an operator can run. There are two types of profiles: Facility
Permission Profiles which define permissions for Picture Perfect forms that are partitioned by facility, and
System Permission Profiles that define permissions for the Picture Perfect forms that are not partitioned by
facility. Default profiles are created at installation for System and Facility permissions: All, Insert, Update,
View, and No. These profiles are locked (cannot be changed), but they may be copied and then edited to create
additional profiles.
Once a permission profile is defined, it can be associated with a facility and assigned to a permission. This
permission is then assigned to an operator and determines what records the operator is allowed to access and
what they are allowed to do with them, based on the facility of the particular record. For example, when the
Global facility is paired with the All Facility Permission profile and assigned to an operator, that operator has
full access to the database records associated with the Global facility.
The following diagram depicts the relationship of the Picture Perfect tables when setting up facilities in your
system. All of the records stored in the Picture Perfect database are either facility based or system based. By
default, a Global facility is defined on the system if no other facility is defined. Records that are not associated
with a facility are assigned to the Global facility. To determine the records that an operator can access, facilities
are paired with a profile defining the level of access, and are then assigned to the operator’s permission.
Category and Reports availability are not governed by facility or system, but by permission groups.
Figure 28. Operator administration overview
A facility consists
of database
Facility based forms
Non-facility based forms
Custom Forms
Profiles and Permission Groups
determine the level of access an
operator has to Picture Perfect
forms, actions, and applications.
Facility Permission
Profile
System Permission
Profile
Form Profile
Permission Groups for
Areas, Categories, and
Reports
Access to database records is
determined when an operator is
assigned a permission.
Permission
A permission consists
of profiles paired with
facilities.
Operator
Chapter 6
Operator administration
After completing the initial system configuration, records need to be created in order to assign the proper
permission sets to each operator. The following forms are required to create these records and are presented in
the order recommended in Chapter 3 Configuration checklist.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Facility Permission Profile
System Permission Profile
Form Profile
Permission Groups
Permissions
Operators
Examples of the relationship of these records and how to link them is discussed in the section, See Linking
page 98.
facilities, facility profiles, permissions, and operators on
Creating facility permission profiles
A facility permission profile is a way of defining an operator’s record and field level access permissions for the
Picture Perfect forms that are partitioned by facility. It defines, for each facility, what the operator can do with
records assigned to that facility.
Example
When the All Facility Permissions facility profile is assigned to the Global facility and assigned to an operator,
the operator has access to all database records in the Global facility only. The term “Global” defines a default
facility; it does not encompass other facilities.
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Figure 29. Facility Permissions Profile form
Default facility permission profiles are created during installation and, when paired with a facility, give an
operator varying levels of access to the associated database records, as referenced in Table 38.
This feature allows an administrator to grant an operator a different level of permission for each set of records
(Facility) to which he has access. For example, an operator may be assigned the facility permission profile, All
Facility Permissions, at the one facility which allows full access or the ability to view, update, insert, and
delete at the record level on all Picture Perfect forms. Full access also grants view and update permission at the
field level. At another facility, that same operator may be assigned the No Facility Permissions, which does not
allow the operator any access to the records at all.
Table 38. Default Facility Permissions profiles
Profile:
No
View
Update
Insert
All
Page (Form) Permission
Delete
9
Insert
Update
View
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
None
Action Permission
Manage Template
9
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Table 38. Default Facility Permissions profiles
Profile:
No
View
Update
Insert
All
Run Template
9
Change Mode
9
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 39. Facility Permission Profile form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description will appear in the Facility list box of the
Permission form.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Actions
This section can be used to restrict or enable actions that affect Picture Perfect forms globally, such
as:
Change Mode
Clicking this box enables the Change Mode feature for this operator. See
Changing modes by command on page 196 for more information.
Encode Badges
Clicking this box enables the operator to encode smart cards.
Encode Setup
Clicking this box enables the operator to access the Encoder Setup button.
Manage Templates
Clicking this box allows the operator to manage templates. See Chapter 17
User interface customization for more information.
Print Badges
Clicking this box enables the operator to print badges if the optional Imaging
package is installed. See Printing badges on page 242 for more information.
Run Templates
Clicking this box allows the operator to run templates. See Chapter 17 User
interface customization for more information.
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Table 39. Facility Permission Profile form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Page Level Permission
This section is used to set up the record level permissions for the selected form. The toggle buttons
allow you to determine the level of permission of the operator assigned to this facility permission
profile.
Some of these buttons affect the control (field) level permissions. Example: If the Page Level
Permission for Update is toggled off, the Control Level Permission: Update column will be cleared and
unavailable for selection.
Name
The labels displayed correspond to the Picture Perfect forms. Select the one
you currently want to work with. Example: Badges
Select the appropriate None, View, Update, Insert, or Delete radio button for
each form. If None is selected, the form will not be available to the operator.
None
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed access to the selected form.
If selected, the Control Level Permission: None column will be activated.
Control Level
Permission
View
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to view a record associated
with the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: View column
is selected by default.
Update
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to update a record
associated with the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission:
Update column is selected by default.
Insert
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to insert or add a record
using the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: Insert
columns will be selected by default.
Delete
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to delete a record using the
selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: Delete columns will
be selected by default.
This section is used to set up the field level permissions. This window becomes active with data when
a form has been selected from the Page Level Permission section.
The data in the Control Level Permission window is shown in three columns: None, View, and Update.
This window should be used to set the field level permissions for the selected form by selecting one of
the columns.
Name
This column contains the field description of each of the fields that can be
selected.
None
This column determines if the field displays on the selected form.
VIew
This column determines if the data in this field is viewable on the selected
form. The Page Level Permission: View, Update, Insert, or Delete must be
selected for this column to be active.
Update
This column determines if the field can be edited or not from the selected
form. The Page Level Permission: Update, Insert, or Delete button must be
selected for this column to be active.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Facility Permission Profile record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then Facility Permission Profile tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Creating system permission profiles
A system permission profile is a way of defining an operator’s record and field level access permissions for
Picture Perfect forms that are not partitioned by facility, such as the System Parameters or the Facility form. It
also controls the ability to perform certain actions, such as Purging Alarms. See Table 40.
Example
For example, All System Permissions allows the operator to view, update, insert, and delete records on all
non-facility partitioned Picture Perfect forms. It also grants full action permission. No System Permissions, on
the other hand, does not allow the operator any access to the records at all.
Figure 30. System Permissions Profile form
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Table 40. Default System Permissions Profiles
Profile:
No
View
Update
Insert
All
9
9
Action Permission
Backup and Restore
Custom Form
9
Edit SQL Statements
9
9
9
Execute SQL Statements
9
9
9
Force Logoff
9
Log Monitor
9
9
9
Performance Monitor
9
9
9
Purge All Alarms
9
9
9
Send Message
9
Status Monitor
9
9
9
Tour Functions
9
9
9
User Monitor
9
9
9
Page (Form) Permission
Access Secure
9
9
9
9
Alarm Colors
9
9
9
9
Control Outputs
9
9
9
9
Facilities
9
9
9
9
Parameters
9
9
9
9
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 41. System Permission Profile form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description will appear in the System Permissions Profile list
box of the Permission form.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Actions
This section can be used to restrict or enable certain actions that are typically performed at a System
Administrator level, such as:
Backup and Restore
Enables the operator to perform database backup and restore activities. See
Chapter 15 Backup and restore.
Custom Forms
Enables the operator to create and edit custom forms. See Creating and editing
custom forms on page 330.
Edit or Execute SQL
Statements
Enables the operator to create and modify SQL reports. If this is not selected,
the operator can only view pre-defined SQL reports. See Creating and viewing
reports on page 293.
Force Logoff
Enables the Force Logoff menu item on the User Monitor, which allows the
operator to force another operator to log off the system. See Monitoring users
on page 281.
Form Preferences
Enables the Preferences button on forms.
Log Monitor
Enables operator access to the Log Monitor. See Monitoring log file messages
on page 289.
Monitor Preferences
Enables the Preferences button on monitors.
Performance Monitor
Enables operator access to the Performance Monitor. See Monitoring system
performance on page 286.
Purge All Alarms
Enables the use of the Purge button on the Alarm monitor. See Monitoring
alarms on page 264.
Send Message
Enables the Send Message icon on the User Monitor, which displays the Send
Message dialog. This dialog allows the operator to broadcast a message to an
individual or to all users. See Monitoring users on page 281.
Status Monitor
Enables operator access to the Status Monitor. See Monitoring status on
page 280.
Tour Functions
Enables the operator to perform tour functions such as starting or stopping a
tour. See the Picture Perfect 4.5 Guard Tours User Manual.
User Monitor
Enables operator access to the User Monitor. See Monitoring users on
page 281.
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Table 41. System Permission Profile form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Page Level
Permission
This section is used to set up the record level permissions for the selected form. The toggle buttons allow you
to determine the level of permission of the operator assigned to this facility permission profile.
Some of these buttons affect the control (field) level permissions. Example: If the Page Level Permission for
Update is toggled off, the Control Level Permission: Update column will be cleared and unavailable for
selection.
Name
The labels displayed correspond to the Picture Perfect forms. Select the one
you currently want to work with. Example: Badges
Select the appropriate None, View, Update, Insert, or Delete radio button for
each form. If None is selected, the form will not be available to the operator.
None
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed access to the selected form.
If selected, the Control Level Permission: None column will be activated.
Control Level
Permission
View
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to view a record associated
with the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: View column is
selected by default.
Update
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to update a record associated
with the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: Update
column is selected by default.
Insert
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to insert or add a record using
the selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: Insert columns will
be selected by default.
Delete
Used to determine if the operator will be allowed to delete a record using the
selected form. If selected, the Control Level Permission: Delete columns will be
selected by default.
This section is used to set up the field level permissions. This window becomes active with data when a form
has been selected from the Page Level Permission section.
The data in the Control Level Permission window is shown in three columns: None, View, and Update. This
window should be used to set the field level permissions for the selected form by selecting one of the
columns.
Name
This column contains the field description of each of the fields that can be
selected.
None
This column determines if the field displays on the selected form.
VIew
This column determines if the data in this field is viewable on the selected form.
The Page Level Permission: View, Update, Insert, or Delete must be selected for
this column to be active.
Update
This column determines if the field can be edited or not from the selected form.
The Page Level Permission: Update, Insert, or Delete button must be selected
for this column to be active.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a System Permission Profile record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then System Permissions Profile tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Creating form profiles
A form profile is a way of associating custom forms with an operator’s permission. Each Picture Perfect form
can have multiple custom forms that display different fields. One operator may need access to different fields
than another operator. By assigning a Form Profile to a permission, you can have specific fields display on the
various forms when an operator with that permission accesses them.
Example
Jane Doe is responsible for issuing badges to the Manufacturing personnel. She is assigned a Form Profile that
displays a custom badge form designed specifically for Manufacturing.
Figure 31. Form Profile Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 42. Form Profile fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description will appear in the Form Profile list box of the
Permission form.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Form Set
Page: The Picture Perfect form such as, Badges.
Custom Form: The custom form that you want to display when the operator accesses the Picture Perfect
form.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Form Profile record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then Form Profile tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Setting up permission groups
Another step in restricting operator access is by defining permission groups, which are assigned to areas,
categories, and reports.
Note:
Permission Groups are not groups of permissions. They are simply a way of grouping areas, categories, and reports to
restrict access by operators.
There are two types of permission groups: Area/Category and Report.
•
•
An Area/Category permission group defines the categories and areas that an operator is permitted to
assign. The system requires at least one permission group, in addition to the default permission group:
All Groups Allowed. The All Groups Allowed permission group gives an operator full access to all
Category groups and all Area groups. Each permission group created with the Area/Category type, will
appear on both the Area Permission Group and Category Permission Group list boxes of the
Permissions form along with the default All Groups Allowed.
A Report Permission Group can be assigned to reports if the Enforce Report Permissions option is
enabled through the System Parameters form. This offers the capability to assign reports to report
permission groups and to restrict operator report access to only those reports that the operator
permission record specifies. The All Groups Allowed permission group gives an operator full access to
all Report Groups. Each permission group created with the Report type will appear on the Report
Permission Group list box of the Permissions form along with the default All Groups Allowed.
Use the Permission Groups form to divide responsibilities among operators by creating a separate permission
group for each group of categories and/or areas. For example: Building 1, Building 2, Building 3. Then remove
the special permission group, All Groups Allowed, and assign one or more of the newly created permission
groups. An operator can have permission to assign up to 20 category and area groups and, if enabled, 5 report
groups.
Figure 32. Relationship Between Permissions and Permission Groups
Categories and
Areas
Category and Area
Permission Groups
Reports
Report
Permission Groups
Permissions
Example
Operator Jane Doe works in a facility made up of two buildings. The personnel working in this facility are
divided into different categories, such as Manufacturing, General Access, High Security, Maintenance,
Executive staff. Jane is responsible for issuing badges to the Manufacturing personnel in both buildings. She is
assigned the permission, Badge Administrator. This permission is assigned to the Area/Cat Manufacturing
permission group, which restricts badge-issue functions to those records in that permission group; no
permission is granted to issue badges for other permission groups.
If your site does not require this kind of operator restrictions, use the default permission group All Groups
Allowed. For example, a Badge Administrator permission can be assigned the permission group All Groups
Allowed which gives this operator permission to issue badges to all area and category permission groups
without restrictions.
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Figure 33. Permission Groups Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 43. Permission Groups form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description to identify the area, category, or report type permission group (0 to 60 characters).
Example: Manufacturing.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Permission Group
Type
• Area/Category
Select the Area/Category radio button if the permission group is to be used to control the
categories and areas that an operator is permitted to assign.
• Reports
A Report permission group can be assigned to reports if the Enforce Report permissions option is
enabled through the System Parameters form. Select the Reports radio button if the permission
group is to be used to restrict operator report access to only those reports that the operator
permission record specifies.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Permission Group record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then Permission Groups tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Setting up permissions
Use the Permissions form to define the functions that each operator level is permitted to perform, such as
System Administrator, Badge Administrator, or Alarm Operator. That permission can then be assigned to
individual operators from a list box.
By default, the system provides the permission of System Administrator. This permission should be assigned to
one or more operators who have total responsibility for the Picture Perfect system and therefore require all
functions.
Figure 34. Relationship Between Permissions, Profiles, and Permission Groups
Facility based forms
Non-facility based forms
Custom Forms
Facility Permission
Profile
System Permission
Profile
Permission
Operator
Form Profile
Permission Groups for
Areas, Categories, and
Reports
Example
Operator Jane Doe is responsible for issuing badges to the Manufacturing plant in the Global facility. She is
assigned the permission Badge Admin. The Badge Admin permission is assigned the Form Profile:
Manufacturing that has a custom Badge form, the System Permission Profile: View System Permissions, and
the Facility Permission Profile: Update Badges that grants update permission on the Badges form only.
Figure 35. Permission Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 44. Permissions form fields
Field name
Description
Description
The job description of the operators that will be assigned to this permission (1 to 60
characters). Example: Badge Administrator
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record
is assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Form Profile
Controls the custom forms that display for an operator with this permission.
System Permissions Profile
Controls the level of access the operator has to the Picture Perfect forms that are not
controlled by Facilities, such as the Facility and the System Parameter forms.
Facility Permissions
Controls the level of access the operator has to the Picture Perfect forms that are controlled
by Facilities, such as Doors, Readers, and the majority of the Picture Perfect forms.
This window displays the facilities currently defined. If the facility has an associated profile,
that profile description will appear after it. Select a facility and click on it to display a facility
profile list box. If you want to assign a facility profile to this facility, select a profile from the
list.
Note:
In addition to any other facility permissions, all users should have access to the
Global facility in order to properly use the system.
Category Permission Group
List of permission groups used with categories. Select the permission groups that designate
categories this operator permission is allowed to assign to areas and badges. You can select
up to 20 Category Permission Groups, or All Groups Allowed which gives operators of this
group access to all categories. A category cannot be assigned or removed from an area or
badge if that category’s permission group is not assigned here.
Area Permission Group
List of permission groups used with areas. Select the permission groups that designate areas
this operator permission is allowed to assign to readers and doors. You can select up to 20
Area Permission Groups, or All Groups Allowed which gives operators of this group access to
all areas. An area cannot be assigned or removed from a reader or door if that area’s
permission group is not assigned here.
Report Permission Group
If enforcement of report permissions is enabled, the Report Permission Group button is
available and will display a list of permission groups used with PPSQL reports. Only those
operators with a permission that has a report permission group selected that matches the
report permission group assigned to a certain PPSQL report, may access that report. The
selection of All Groups Allowed gives an operator of this permission access to all PPSQL
reports. Up to 5 report permission groups may be assigned.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Permission record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then Permissions tab.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining operators
Use the Operators form to assign operator permissions to individual operators and to give them login
capabilities on the system.
Note:
Always have more than one operator with System Administrator permissions.
Figure 36. Relationship Between Permissions and Operators
Permission
Operator
Example
Jane Doe is the badge administrator at the manufacturing plant of Global Corporation. Her employee
identification number is 555666777 and her Login Id is jadoe. She is assigned the permission Badge Admin.
Figure 37. Operator Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 45. Operator form fields
Field name
Description
User Name
Description of the person using the Login ID (1 to 12 characters).
Employee Id
Company identification number assigned to the person using the Login ID.
Login Id
Login name the user types to gain access to the operating system and Picture Perfect. Each
operator must have a unique Login ID. The Login ID is case sensitive.
Locale
The locale used by this operator. The list box is created at system installation based on available
locales. A locale is a language for a specified region. Example: English in the United States,
Portuguese in Brazil
Time Zone
Select, from the drop-down list, the time zone in which the operator is located. This allows
Picture Perfect to display badge and alarm activity in the operator’s local time. See Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Note:
In order for an operator to use this field, they must have at least View page level
permission for the Time Zone form. See Creating facility permission profiles on page 81.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Permission
The functions the operator can perform. Example: System Administrator
This list box reflects the permissions created with the Permissions form.
Receive Alarm Alert
Select if this operator is to receive Alarm Alert messages.
Receive Reset Alarm Alert
Select is this operator is to receive Reset Alarm messages.
Receive System
Notifications
Select if this operator is to receive System Notification messages.
LDAP Authentication
Select to enable LDAP authentication. See Configuring LDAP support on page 50.
Permission to Change
Password
Select to allow this operator to change their password. If this option is not selected, the
password can only be changed by the System Administrator.
Change Password on Next
Login
Select to force this operator to change their password the next time they log on to the system.
Password Expiration
• Password Never Expires: If checked, the password has no expiration date.
• Expires in (days): From the list of values in the drop-down list, select the frequency at which
the password should expire.
• Warn prior to Expiration (days): Enter a numeric value (less than that specified in Expires
in) that represents the number of days prior to expiration that the operator should receive a
warning message. The warning message includes the number of days before the password
expires. If the operator has permission to change their password, they are prompted to
change it. If they do not have permission to change their password, they are prompted to
contact their System Administrator.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Table 45. Operator form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Idle Session Time
The amount of time, in minutes, during which there is no operator activity after which the
system will attempt to log the operator off. Operator activity can be mouse movements, button
clicks, or keystrokes.
The default value of 0 indicates no session timeout is enforced. The maximum value is 17800
minutes.
Change Password
Displays the Password dialog used to set the operator's password. The * character displays as
you type; the actual password is not visible. When changing an existing password, the old
password must be entered before being prompted to enter the new one. A text box lists the
password rules that must be followed, according to the parameters specified in the Parameters
form.
Notes:
• This dialog is not available if the operator does not have permission to change their
password.
• When adding a new operator, you must enter a password before saving the record.
• Passwords are restricted to contain only 7-bit ASCII characters such as: a-z, A-Z, 0-9.
Foreign language characters such as: à, ê, æ, cannot be used within passwords.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Operator record:
1. Select Control, Operators, and then Operators tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Linking facilities, facility profiles, permissions, and
operators
Examples:
Table 46. Examples of Operator/Permission/Profile/Facility relationship
Operator
Permission
Profile
Facility
Result
install
System Administrator
(responsible for the
system administrative
functions for the entire
system)
All Facility/System
Global
This combination allows operator, install, to
perform all functions on all records assigned to
the Global Facility on all forms.
Facility X
This combination allows operator, install, to
perform all functions on all records assigned to
Facility X on all forms.
Facility Y
This combination allows operator, install, to
perform all functions on all records assigned to
Facility Y on all forms.
Facility Z
This combination allows operator, install, to
perform all functions on all records assigned to
Facility Z on all forms.
Facility X
This combination allows operator, John Smith,
to perform update functions on all records
assigned to Facility X on all forms.
Global
This combination allows operator, John Smith,
to view all records assigned to the Global
facility on all forms.
Global
This combination allows operator, Jane Doe, to
update all records assigned to the Global
Facility on the Badges form.
Global
This combination allows operator, Jane Doe, to
view all records assigned to the Global Facility
on the Operator form.
(allows full access
on all forms)
All Facility/System
(allows full access
on all forms)
All Facility/System
(allows full access
on all forms)
All Facility/System
(allows full access
on all forms)
John Smith
Site Administrator
(responsible for the
system administrative
functions for Facility X)
Update
(allows update
access on all forms)
View
(allows View only
access on all forms)
Jane Doe
Badge Administrator
Update Badges
(allows update
access to records
on the Badges
form)
View Operator
(allows view access
to records on the
Operator form)
To link facilities, profiles, permissions, and operators:
1. Define the facilities in your system, using the Facility form to describe the group of records.
Example: Facility X, Facility Y, and Facility Z.
Note:
If your system consists of a single facility, you do not need to create additional facility records.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
2. Define facility and system profiles, using the Facility Permission Profile form and the System
Permission Profile form to describe the level of access the operator will have.
Example: Full access, View only, Insert only, or Monitor.
3. Define the permission records required, using the Permissions form to describe what function the
operator will perform.
Example: System Administrator, Site Administrator, Badge Administrator, or Guard.
Then, assign a facility profile to the permission for each facility required. You can assign the same
facility profile to multiple facilities and permission records.
Example: You could assign the Monitor facility profile to a Guard permission in Facility X and Facility
Y as well as to a Badge Administrator in Facility Z.
4. Assign the permission to an operator, using the Operator form.
Example: An operator may be assigned as a Guard at Facility X with a Monitor profile and at Facility
Y with a Full access profile.
On the following pages we will perform the steps necessary to achieve the following result for operator, Mary
Smith,
Mary
Smith
Badge
Administrator
Update Badges
Facility X
This combination allows operator, Mary Smith, to
update all records assigned to Facility Y on the
Badges form.
Global
This combination allows operator, Mary Smith, to
view all records assigned to the Global Facility on
the Operator form.
(allows update access to
records on the Badges form)
View Operator
(allows view access to
records on the Operator
form)
Step 1. Define Facilities
1. From the Configuration menu, select Facilities, and then the Facilities tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Add
.
3. In the Description field, enter a unique text description. Example: Facility X.
4. From the toolbar, click Save
.
5. Repeat step 3 and step 4 for Facility Y and Facility Z.
6. The Facility records will look similar to the following:
Figure 38. Defining Facilities
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Step 2. Defining Facility Profiles
To create the Update Badges facility profile:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then the Facility Permission Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Add
.
3. In the Description field, type: Update Badges
4. From the list of forms in the Page Level Permissions pane, select Badges and click Update.
5. To set the desired Control Level permissions, click Update for all the fields you want the operator to
be able to edit.
6. From the toolbar, click Save
.
The Update Badges facility permission profile record will look similar to the following.
Figure 39. Defining a facility profile
To create the View Operator facility profile:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then the Facility Permission Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Add
.
3. In the Description field, type: View Operator
4. From the list of forms in the Page Level Permissions pane, select Operator and click View.
5. To set the desired Control Level permissions, click View for all the fields you want the operator to be
able to see.
6. From the toolbar, click Save
.
Chapter 6
Operator administration
The View Operator facility profile record will look similar to the following.
Figure 40. Defining a facility profile
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Step 3. Defining Permissions and Assigning a Facility Profile
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then the Permission tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Add
.
3. In the Description field, type: Badge Administrator
4. Click Facility and select: Global
5. Under Facility Permissions, from the list of facilities, select Facility X and click in the adjacent
Permission Profile cell.
A list of the defined facility profile records displays.
6. From the list, select: Update Badge.
7. Repeat step 5 and step 6, substituting Global in step 5 and View: Operator in step 6.
8. From the toolbar, click Save
.
In the Facility Permissions pane, the Permission Profile column will reflect the newly selected profile.
In our example, the Badge Admin permission record will now look like this:
Figure 41. Defining a permission
Chapter 6
Operator administration
Step 4. Assign the Permission to an Operator
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then the Operators tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Add
.
3. In the User Name field, type: Mary Smith
4. In the Employee ID field, type: 222333444
5. In the Login Id field, type: msmith
6. Click the Permission button and select: Badge Administrator<GLOBAL>
7. Click the Locale button and select: English in US
8. Click the Time Zone button and select: US-FL-United States-Florida
9. Click Facility and select: Global
Figure 42. Assigning a permission to an operator
The facility
<Global>
here is a
reference to
where these
records are
stored. It has
no bearing
on the
facilities this
operator can
access when
assigned this
permission.
10. Click Change Password and set a password for this operator.
11. Click Ok to return to the Operators form.
12. From the toolbar, click Save
.
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The operator, Mary Smith, has the permission of Badge Administrator, which allows her to update all badge
records assigned to Facility X and to view all operator records assigned to the Global facility.
When Mary Smith logs on to Picture Perfect:
•
If she selects Facility X from the Facility Manager, she will have access to the Badges records assigned
to Facility X:
•
If she selects Global from the Facility Manager, she will have access to the Operators records assigned
to the Global facility:
•
If she clicks Select All, she will have access to the Badges records assigned to Facility X and the
Operators records assigned to the Global facility:
•
Depending on the System Permission Profile assigned, there may be other menu options (those not
partitioned by facility) available, such as the following:
Chapter 7 Alarm/activity configuration
This chapter describes how to configure alarm and activity messages, how to
define alarms, and how to control the way they display on the monitors. Readers
should familiarize themselves with the information in this chapter before
continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Alarms overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Alarm/activity routing overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Defining routings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Creating route definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Defining route points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Creating alarm instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Creating alarm responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Defining alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Defining alarm colors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
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Alarms overview
Alarms are used to notify an operator of an exceptional condition by displaying the information on one or more
monitors. The alarm display can be configured to include what caused the alarm, the action required, the alarm
priority, the way it looks on the screen, as well as the operators by whom it will be viewed.
The Picture Perfect system monitors digital inputs (DIs), such as sensors or contacts, for alarm conditions and
then activates digital outputs (DOs), such as horns or lights, as alarms and output devices. The system notifies
the operator of alarms using pop-up windows, and in a scrolling window called the Alarm Monitor.
When an alarm occurs, the system beeps and displays a pop-up window that notifies the operator. The operator
then displays alarm instructions by selecting the alarm from a scrolling list on the Alarm Monitor. The operator
records a response to an alarm either by selecting a pre-written alarm response from the Alarm Response
window or by typing a response.
Alarm/activity routing overview
The Picture Perfect administrator may configure the system so that one set of alarms and activity is routed to a
given operator while another set of alarms and activity is routed to another operator. This allows Picture Perfect
operators to monitor alarms and activity that affect their own areas.
It should also be noted that activity routing is restricted to badge activity and digital input (DI) activity. Other
activity, such as operator activity, cannot be routed to a specific operator.
To route all alarms and activity to all operators:
1. Define alarm routings, that describe where messages are sent. See Defining routings on page 107.
2. Assign a routing to each alarm. See Defining alarms on page 117.
To restrict the display of alarms and activity to specific operators:
1. Define alarm routings, that describe where messages are sent. See Defining routings on page 107.
2. Create route definition records, that generally correspond to an area of your site, such as a building.
See Creating route definitions on page 109.
3. Create and schedule route point records, that indicate the operators and when the alarms and activity
are routed. See Defining route points on page 110.
4. Assign a route definition and an alarm routing to each alarm. See Defining alarms on page 117.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Defining routings
Use the Routings form to define where messages are to be sent. There are eleven predefined routings already
entered. The system lets you use these routings to send messages to a printer, history log, e-mail, and/or to the
monitor. The routings you create populate list boxes that are used in various aspects of the system.
Example
The ABC Corporation is comprised of a single facility, Global. Therefore they use the default routings supplied
with the system.
Figure 43. Routings Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 47. Routing form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description (0 to 60 characters) to identify the type of messages to be routed.
Example: Badge Activity, Operator Messages, Overnight Messages, or ALL
A single routing description can include multiple routing destinations.
Example: You may want messages received overnight to be routed to the printer, the monitor, and the history
log.
Printer
Select Yes to select a printer as a destination where you want messages to be routed. From the Printer dropdown list, select the specific printer queue.
Monitor
Select Yes to display the message on the alarm and activity monitor; this choice does not create a history
record.
Note:
Monitor must be selected as a routing destination in order for an operator to respond to an alarm.
History
Select Yes to record the transaction message in the database history table; this allows the message to be
referenced for history reporting.
Email
Select Yes to route messages to an email address or alias. The e-mail drop-down list contains all of the email
addresses currently defined in the system. Select the desired addresses from the list box.
Note:
Facility
Yes must be selected for Monitor in order for this feature to be enabled.
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Routing record:
1. Select Control, Routings, and then Routing tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Creating route definitions
This feature can be used, in conjunction with route points, if you want to restrict the display of alarms and
activity. If you want all alarms and activity to be displayed for all operators, you do not need to configure this
feature. Note also that activity routing is restricted to badge activity and digital input (DI) activity. Other
activity, such as operator activity, cannot be routed to a specific operator.
Your site should be partitioned into sections that represent various sets of alarms and activity (inputs, input
groups, output devices, and alarm priorities). A route definition corresponds to one section of your Picture
Perfect site.
For example, assume a Picture Perfect site consists of two buildings: Building A and Building B. In each of
these buildings, there is an operator at an alarm monitoring station: Operator A and Operator B. During the day,
two operators monitor the site; one operator in Building A, and one operator in Building B. At night, only one
operator monitors the site from Building A.
One possible configuration could be that the day shift operators monitor alarms and activity that occur in their
respective building, and the night shift operator would monitor alarms and activity that occur in both buildings.
This configuration could be extended such that, during the day, if an operator did not respond to an alarm in his
building, the alarm would be "bumped" to the operator in the other building.
Note:
Changes made to route points will not take effect until Picture Perfect is restarted.
Example
The ABC Corporation is comprised of a single facility, Global. This facility is made up of two buildings:
Buildings 1 and 2 and the route definitions are defined as “Building 1” and “Building 2”.
Figure 44. Route Definition Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 48. Route Definition form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description will appear in the Route Definition list box of the
Route Points, Alarms, Inputs, and Areas forms.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Route Definition record:
1. Select Control, Routings, and then Route Definitions tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining route points
A route point, assigned to a route definition, indicates to whom and when alarms and activity are routed. A
route point can also indicate which alarms are bumped and when they are bumped. A route point belongs to
only one route definition, but several route points can belong to the same route definition.
Example
The Global facility is made up of two buildings: Buildings 1 and 2 and the route definitions are defined as
“Building 1” and “Building 2”.
Jeff Jackson is the guard at Building 1 and Sean Ackerman is the guard at Building 2. They each view the
alarm and activity for their respective buildings during the day. A night shift guard, Barry Evans, views alarm
and activity for both buildings at night.
During the day, if Jeff does not respond to an alarm in Building 1, the alarm is “bumped” to Sean in Building 2
and vice-versa.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Figure 45. Route Point Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 49. Route Point form fields
Field name
Description
Route Definition
This field identifies the current route point’s route definition. Click the Route Definition button to
display a list box. Select the desired Route Definition, and then click OK. Example: Building A
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Route To Operators
This field identifies the operators to whom the message is to be routed. A list of selected operators is
displayed. To add an operator to the list, click the arrow on the Operator drop-down list. One or more
operators may be selected for this route point. As operators are selected or unselected from the list
box, the Route to Operator window is updated. This is not a required field; however, if no operators are
selected, alarms with this route point’s route definition cannot be responded to. This field should be
ignored if you are creating a route point that is used only for Activity Monitor routing.
Bump to Operators
This field identifies an alternate operator to use if the message is not responded to within the time
specified in Bump Time. A list of selected operators is displayed. To add an operator to the list, click
the arrow on the Operator drop-down list. One or more operators may be selected for this route
point. As operators are selected or unselected from the list box, the Bump to Operator window is
updated. This is not a required field; however, if no operators are selected, alarms with this route point’s
route definition will not be bumped. This field should be ignored if you are creating a route point that is
used only for Activity Monitor routing.
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Table 49. Route Point form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Route to Permission
This field specifies the permissions that an operator must have for a message to be routed to this
operator. A list of selected permissions is displayed. To add a permission to the list, click the arrow on
the Permission drop-down list. One or more permissions may be selected for this route point. As
permissions are selected or unselected from the list box, the Route to Permission window is updated.
Only operators with the selected permissions will receive activity and alarms that have this route
point's route definition assigned. This field should be ignored if you are creating a route point that is
used only for Activity Monitor routing.
Bump to Permission
This field identifies an alternate permission to use if the message is not responded to within the time
specified in Bump Time. A list of selected permissions is displayed. To add a permission to the list,
click the arrow on the Permission drop-down list. One or more permissions may be selected for this
route point. As permissions are selected or unselected from the list box, the Bump to Permission
window is updated. This field should be ignored if you are creating a route point that is used only for
Activity Monitor routing.
Route to Email
This field identifies which email addresses are associated with the route point. A list of selected email
addresses is displayed. To add an address to the list, click the arrow on the Email drop-down list. One
or more addresses may be selected for this route point. As addresses are selected or unselected from
the list box, the Route to Email window is updated. Only operators with the selected email addresses
will receive activity and alarms that have this route point assigned.
Note:
Bump to Email
This field identifies an alternate email address to use if the message is not responded to within the
time specified in Bump Time. A list of selected email addresses is displayed. To add an address to the
list, click the arrow on the Email drop-down list. One or more addresses may be selected for this route
point. As addresses are selected or unselected from the list box, the Bump to Email window is
updated. This field should be ignored if you are creating a route point that is used only for Activity
Monitor routing.
Note:
Start Time
The alarm record (Alarm form) must be associated with a routing record (Routing form) that
includes e-mail in order to use this feature.
The alarm record (Alarm form) must be associated with a routing record (Routing form) that
includes e-mail in order to use this feature.
This field identifies when a route point becomes enabled. The format of the value entered should
conform to the time format in system configuration. To enable a route point 24 hours, set this time to
00:00:01.
If this value is blank, the route definition will not be enforced.
Stop Time
This field identifies when a scheduled route point becomes disabled. The format of the value entered
should conform to the time format in system configuration. To enable a route point 24 hours, set this
time to 23:59:59.
If this value is blank, the route definition will not be enforced.
Time Zone
From the drop-down list, select the time zone of one of the following: the host receiving the alarm, the
micro from which the alarm originates, or the operator monitoring the alarm. See Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Note:
Sun - Sat
In order for an operator to use this field, they must have at least View page level permission
for the Time Zone form. See Creating facility permission profiles on page 81.
These toggle buttons indicate what days of the week this route point should be enabled. Select the
desired days of the week by clicking the appropriate toggle button.
If no days are selected, the route definition will not be enforced.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Table 49. Route Point form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Bump Time
The value in this field must be in seconds (minimum=1, maximum=86400). The operator has this
number of seconds to respond to the alarm before the alarm is bumped to the operators selected in
Bump To Operators. This field should be ignored if you are creating a route point that is used only for
Activity Monitor Routing. The default value in this field is blank, meaning that there is no bump time.
Mode
This field identifies the system mode of the Global facility under which this route point is valid. Click
the Mode button to display the Mode list box. Select the desired Global facility mode, and then click
OK. This is not a required field. If this field is blank, the route point is valid for all system modes.
Note:
If you are following the setup sequence recommended in Chapter 3 Configuration checklist, the Mode list box will only
show the default Normal and Holiday modes. See Creating modes on page 194 to create your own custom modes;
then return to this procedure to assign routing points for that mode.
Route point rules and restrictions
There may be times when you question whether an alarm should or should not appear on the Alarm Monitor.
Since a system configured for Alarm /Activity Monitor Routing may consist of many route points, it is possible
for two route points to have conflicting route operators. For example, assume that Route Point A and Route
Point B belong to Route Definition A. Route Point A explicitly routes all alarms to no operators, whereas
Route Point B explicitly routes all alarms to all operators. In this case, Route Point B has precedence. Because
of the many possible combinations of operators, start times, stop times, bump operators, bump times, and
modes, it may be confusing as to where an alarm or activity should be routed. The following lists some rules
and restrictions that may be used to configure or troubleshoot Alarm/Activity Monitor Routing.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
If there is an operator route conflict between two route points, the route point that displays the alarm
has precedence.
If an alarm is supposed to be bumped to a given operator and two different bump times are given in
two different route points for the alarm’s route definition, the shortest length of time determines when
the alarm is bumped.
Once an alarm is displayed on an operator’s monitor, only the operator can remove it. The disabling of
a scheduled route point will not remove an existing alarm from the Alarm Monitor.
When a scheduled route point is enabled, affected operators are updated immediately. This event may
cause alarms that were already in the system to appear on the Alarm Monitor.
Alarms and activity with no route definitions are sent to all operators and printers/Email addresses on
the alarm routing.
Alarms and activity with a route definition that has no route points defined, are sent to all operators
and printers/Email addresses on the alarm routing.
If a route definition consists of scheduled route points, every time slot throughout the day and week
must be accounted for by a scheduled route point. Times that are not accounted for will default to all
operators in the system. This means that if a route definition has a scheduled route point from 8:00:00
to 17:00:00, then alarms and activity with that route point’s route definition will be routed to only
those operators listed in the route point during that time period. But there are two other time periods
for which there are no route points: 23:59:00 to 8:00:00 and 17:00:00 to 23:59:00. During these two
time periods, alarms and activity with this route definition will be routed to all operators in the system.
The Alarm Monitor will reflect any changes made to the Alarm Monitor Routing configuration.
Database updates will, however, only add entries to the Alarm Monitor; they cannot remove entries.
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The Alarm Monitor Routing feature not only affects the Alarm Monitor; it also affects the Alarm Alerts popup. The same rules that apply to the Alarm Monitor also apply to the Alarm Alert. It will display only if alarms
can be viewed on the Alarm Monitor.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Route Point record:
1. Select Control, Routings, and then Route Points tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Creating alarm instructions
Use the Alarm Messages form to write instructions that will display when the various alarms occur, and when
they reset. Keep in mind that the same alarm may occur at different times of the day or week. Your instructions
(who to call, who to dispatch) may change depending on the shift. These alarm messages appear in a list box
that is used in the Alarms form.
Example
The policy at Global Corporation is to dispatch a security guard whenever an alarm comes in indicating that a
door has been forced open. Therefore, they have created a message that appears on all Door Forced alarms
instructing the operator to dispatch a guard.
Figure 46. Alarm Messages Form
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 50. Alarm Messages form fields
Field name
Description
Alarm Message
Type an alarm instruction for the operator to follow (up to 60 alphanumeric characters). You can assign
up to five messages to each alarm. Write generic messages that are common to most of your alarms.
Example: A forced-door alarm on a perimeter door should use a generic alarm instruction such as Forced
Door - Send Security Guard, and a response message such as Guard Dispatched.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Alarm Message record:
1. Select Configuration, Alarms, and then Alarm Messages tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Creating alarm responses
Use the Alarm Responses form to write alarm responses that the operator can select when responding to an
alarm. The system allows the operator to enter multiple responses to each alarm.
Create at least one response message that is appropriate for all alarms. Example: Alarm Acknowledged.
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Example
In keeping with Global Corporation’s Door Forced alarm policy, once the operator on duty has dispatched the
guard, he selects the response, Guard Dispatched, from the list box on the Alarm Monitor.
Figure 47. Alarm Response Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 51. Alarm Response form fields
Field name
Description
Alarm Response
Type an alarm response for the operator to use (up to 60 alphanumeric characters). These alarm
responses appear in a list box that is used when the operator responds to an alarm. When the operator
selects a response, the response and the alarm event automatically route to the log. Pre-written
responses save time, but if none of the responses on the list box are appropriate, the operator can type
a unique alarm response.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Alarm Response record:
1. Select Configuration, Alarms, and then Alarm Responses tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Defining alarms
Use the Alarms form to define each alarm—both physical alarms (such as door forced open) and logical alarms
(such as invalid badge). Define the alarm priority, whether or not it can be scheduled, how the alarm inputs and
outputs reset, where it is routed, and which alarm instructions display when the alarm occurs. These entries
form a list box that is used in the Input Groups form, where alarms are assigned to a specific input group. (See
Input Groups Form on page 129.)
Example
Ann Davis is the system administrator at Global Corporation and she has defined the Door Forced Open alarm
as a priority 1 alarm, to be routed to the Alarm Monitor on the Lobby workstation. The instruction “Forced
Door-Send Security Guard” will display in red letters on a yellow background.
Figure 48. Alarms Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 52. Alarms form fields
Tab
Field name
Description
Alarm
Description
Description
Type a description for this alarm (up to 30 alphanumeric characters).
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this
record is assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Priority
Select an alarm priority so that when several alarms occur simultaneously, this alarm
displays in order of priority. Highest priority is 1 and lowest is 500. Slide the scroll bar until
the number you want to select appears. You may also use the up arrow/down arrow keys
to increase or decrease the priority level.
One strategy is to leave gaps between the priority numbers so that when you add alarms
later, you will not have to re-assign priorities among the existing alarms. The same
priority number can be assigned to more than one alarm.
Route Definition
Click to display the Route Definitions list box. This list box allows the operator to restrict
the display of alarms and activity to specific operators. If this field is left blank, this alarm
will be routed to all operators.
Alarm Routing
Click to display the Alarm Routing list box. The monitor should always be included in the
routing choice of an alarm. If an alarm is not routed to the monitor, the operator cannot
respond to the alarm.
Online
Toggle this button On if you want this alarm to occur when an associated Input Group is
activated.
Do not click this button until the alarm is ready to be brought online.
Inhibit Schedule
Changes
Toggle this button On if you want to inhibit schedule changes for this alarm. Otherwise,
the system implements alarm schedules created using the Alarm Events form.
You may want to inhibit schedule changes for an alarm if no schedules yet exist for
alarms, or if you are not ready to implement the schedules you have created.
Immediate Reset
Input
Click Yes if you want the system to reset this alarm as soon as an associated input group
triggers this alarm.
Logical alarms, such as invalid, suspended, unknown, or lost badges, must have this
feature set as there is no reset condition for this type of alarm.
Immediate reset allows the operator to remove (clear) an alarm without waiting for the
reset condition.
Immediate Dial
Required
This feature is used for dial-up micros only. Click Yes if you want the associated micro to
dial the host immediately when this alarm condition occurs.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Table 52. Alarms form fields (continued)
Tab
Field name
Reset Outputs
Description
• Auto Reset Outputs
Select to allow the system to automatically reset any output groups associated with
this alarm (when the input resets). The system resets any devices (lights, sirens, etc.)
operated by outputs in an output group.
Example: You may decide to use an auto reset for an output device (such as a camera)
that requires toggling on or off.
• Manual Reset Outputs
Click this button to require an operator to manually reset any outputs associated
with this alarm. The system resets any devices associated with the alarm. Any
devices (lights, sirens, etc.) operated by outputs stay on until manually reset.
Example: You may decide to use a manual reset for a motion sensor that activates
floodlights in a parking lot. The manual reset requires the operator to turn the output
off using the Output button on the Alarm Response window.
• Duration Reset Outputs
Click this button to allow the system to reset any outputs associated with this alarm
when the output duration time elapses. Any devices (lights, sirens, etc.) operated by
outputs stay on for the duration time (set on the Outputs form).
Example: You may use a duration reset for an alarm that triggers flood lights to go on.
The time duration can be set for the maximum amount of time required to implement
the alarm instructions.
Note:
Both the Alarms form and the Outputs form define reset methods for outputs.
Output resets can be overridden as follows:
• A Manual Reset of an output overrides any other reset method that is defined for
that output.
Example: If the Outputs form specifies Reset On Duration for an output, but the
Alarms form assigns it Manual Reset, the Manual Reset overrides.
• A Duration Reset overrides an Auto Reset defined for an output. Example: If the
Alarms form specifies Auto Reset for an output, but the Outputs form assigns it
Reset On Duration, the Duration Reset overrides.
• A Duration Reset overrides a Reset On Input for an output. If the Outputs form
defines a Reset On Input for an output, but the Alarms form assigns it Duration
Reset, the Duration Reset overrides.
Color Picker
Color Sample
Click Change Colors to display a palette of colors. Toggle the button at the top of the
palette to set the foreground color (for the text) and the background color (for the
background of the alarm message) that you want displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
Foreground
A sample is displayed representing the selected color for the text of the alarm message
that will be displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
Background
A sample is displayed representing the selected color for the background of the alarm
message that will be displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
Alarm Blink
Yes - The alarm will blink for specified number of seconds (10 seconds is the default).
No - The alarm will not blink.
Blink Until Acknowledged - The alarm will blink until acknowledged.
Note:
Instructions
Alarm
Instructions
When an alarm that is configured with blink options is bumped, it will blink
until acknowledged on the operator client workstation that it was bumped to.
Click to display a list box. Select up to five alarm instructions. The selected messages will
appear as instructions to the operator on the Alarm Monitor when this alarm is activated.
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Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Alarm record:
1. Select Configuration, Alarms, and then Alarms tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining alarm colors
Alarm monitor color scheme: Alarm description
If you have selected Alarm Description in the Alarm Monitor Color Scheme box of the Parameters form, the
Alarm Color box will appear on the Alarms form. This box contains the Foreground Color, Background Color,
and the Change Color button.
Example
Ann Davis is the system administrator at Global Corporation and she has defined the Door Forced Open to
display in red letters on a yellow background. She is considering changing the background color to blue.
Figure 49. Alarm Color Form
Related procedures
To define alarm colors:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Alarms, and then click the Alarms tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
3. Select an alarm record from the list in the data grid.
4. Click Change Colors to open the color palette.
5. Toggle the button at the top of the palette to set the foreground color (for the text) and the background
color (for the background of the alarm message) that you want displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
6. Click Save
new colors.
. Once these changes are made, the next alarm that comes in will be displayed with the
Alarm monitor color scheme: Processing state
It is possible to define the colors that will be used in the Alarm Monitor so that the color scheme reflects the
alarm state. This option will be used if Processing State is selected in the Alarm Monitor Color Scheme box of
the Parameters form.
Each alarm in the Alarm Monitor will have a foreground and background color based on its processing state
and logical state. The Alarm Color form is used to set foreground and background colors for each possible
combination of alarm logical and processing states.
The logical states are:
•
•
•
Set
Alarms that are in the active alarm state.
Reset
Alarms that have been reset (turned off) and are no longer active.
Tamper
The wiring of the alarm input has been cut or tampered with.
The processing states are:
•
•
•
•
•
Active
Alarms that are not yet acknowledged.
Bumped
Alarms received by the alarm monitor (a specific terminal) that are not acknowledged in a defined
amount of time, and are sent to another terminal defined by the user.
Remote
Used by RAN (Remote Alarm Notification) alarms that are received by the alarm monitor, but are not
acknowledged in a defined amount of time, and are forwarded to a configured remote non-Picture
Perfect system.
Pending
Alarms that are acknowledged but not removed.
Completed
Alarms that are removed (still displayed on the monitor), waiting for a physical reset.
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Example
Joe Smith is the system administrator at Global Corporation and he wants all alarms with a Logical State of
Tamper and a Processing State of Bumped to reflect the background color Purple and the foreground text color
Green.
Figure 50. Alarm Colors: Processing State
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 53. Processing alarm states
State
Description
Logical State
This field reflects the logical state (Set, Reset, or Tamper) of the selected alarm.
Processing State
This field reflects the processing state (Active, Bumped, Remote, Pending, or Completed) of the selected
alarm.
Color Picker
Click Change Colors to display a palette of colors. Toggle the button at the top of the palette to set the
foreground color (for the text) and the background color (for the background of the alarm message) that
you want displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
Chapter 7
Alarm/activity configuration
Related procedures
To set Processing State colors:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Alarms, and then click the Alarm Colors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
3. Select an alarm state from the list in the data grid.
4. Click Change Colors to open the color palette.
5. Toggle the button at the top of the palette to set the foreground color (for the text) and the background
color (for the background of the alarm message) that you want displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
6. Click Save
new colors.
. Once these changes are made, the next alarm that comes in will be displayed with the
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Chapter 8 Device management
This chapter describes how to manage and control the various devices that
comprise your Picture Perfect system, such as digital inputs (door contacts, push
buttons, or sensors), digital outputs (bells, horns, lights), and the micro controllers
that control them. Readers should familiarize themselves with the information in
this chapter before continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Creating output groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Creating input groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Defining micros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Creating encryption keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Flashing micros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Defining outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Defining inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Controlling outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Controlling Access Secure operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Verifying time zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
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Overview
The Picture Perfect software monitors input devices connected to one or more micro controllers and when an
alarm condition is detected, outputs, such as horns, lights, or door strikes, are activated.
Each of the inputs and outputs as well as the micro controllers must be defined in the system. In order to
accomplish these tasks, the following forms need to be completed:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Output Groups
Input Groups
Micros
Keys
Outputs
Inputs
Time Zones
Creating output groups
Before you define individual outputs, you must create output groups to which individual outputs can be
assigned. When an output group triggers, all outputs assigned to the group activate. (An input group triggers
one or more output groups.) Link selected outputs together by assigning the same output group to each output
using the Outputs form.
Example
The sprinkler system in Building 1 is assigned to the output group, 01-1-00 Fire Output Device. The first part
of the description indicates the wiring address to which the system is connected.
01 (Micro1) - 1 (Reader board 1) -00 (the address on the board)
The second part of the description tells the function of the output group, Fire Output Device.
Figure 51. Output Groups Form
Chapter 8
Device management
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 54. Output Groups form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). You can write descriptions for output group names to reflect how the
outputs in the group function. The description becomes part of the transaction message, telling the monitoring
operator what happened and where. One part of this description may include non-technical language for
operator information, and the other part may include a wiring address or location.
Example:
001-0-01 FIRE OUTPUT DEVICE
001-0-02 PERIMETER SURVEILLANCE DEVICE
Facility
Enabled
Note:
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. By default, the output group record will be assigned the same
facility as the micro to which the door is assigned however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign an
output group’s facility. This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for
instance two companies occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more
information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
• Select Yes to allow this output group to activate when triggered by an input group.
• Select No to prevent the outputs in this output group from activating when triggered by an input group.
An output cannot belong to more than one output group; but more than one output can be assigned to one output
group.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Output Group record:
1. Select Configuration, Inputs/Outputs, and then Output Groups tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Creating input groups
Before defining individual inputs, you must create input groups to which individual inputs can be assigned.
Input groups trigger output groups when all or any of the inputs assigned to the group are detected. Input
groups are needed for physical inputs such as readers and sensors and for logical events determined by the
system or micro.
Logical Input Events for a micro are:
•
•
•
•
•
Badge History Overflow
Alarm History Overflow
Upstream Communication Failure
Downstream Communication Failure
Reader Communication Failure
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Logical Input Events for an area are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Invalid Badge
Unknown Badge
Lost Badge
Suspended Badge
Antipassback Violation
Duress
Logical Input Events for a door are:
•
•
•
Door Held Open
Door Forced Open
Door Pre-alarm
Example
Building 1 contains three smoke detectors (one on each floor), and all three of these inputs go to one Fire
Emergency input group. A fire breaks out on the ground floor. If this input group is set up with the Any
condition, the input group will change state and activate the alarm as soon as the first floor’s smoke detector is
activated. If this input group is set up with the All condition, the input group will change state and activate the
alarm only after all three smoke detectors have been activated. This input group will activate an alarm, and will
trigger an output group, which will activate the sprinkler system.
The smoke detectors are wired to the following address:
01 (Micro1) - 1 (Reader board 1) -00 (the address on the board)
Chapter 8
Device management
Figure 52. Input Groups Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 55. Input Groups form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description of the Input Group, usually including a micro wiring address.
Note:
Delay Time
In both single input groups and in a hierarchy of input groups, all inputs in any given group or
hierarchy must be associated with the same micro.
Type the number of seconds an input must be true (On State or Change State) before the input group is true.
This delay helps avoid false input detections.
Notes:
• The Off To On Delay Time and On To Off Delay Time set on the Inputs form overrides the Delay Time set
on the Input Groups form.
• Set Delay Time to zero for any input group assigned to an exit push button.
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Table 55. Input Groups form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Boolean Type
Boolean refers to an Any or an All condition. If the specified Any or All condition occurs, an input group will
change its state. Select one of the following radio buttons:
OR
(Any)
AND
(All)
Individual
Click this radio button if you want the Input Group to change state when any of its inputs
are activated (Boolean).
Click this radio button if you want the Input Group to change state only when all of its
inputs are activated (Boolean).
Click this radio button if you want the Input Group to pass along information that one of
its inputs has changed state. This is an individual input group that activates each time one
of its inputs changes state. To the system, this input group is transparent, because the
message sent by this input group actually reflects the description of the input itself, not
the input group.
Notes:
• Logical alarms must always use Individual (Non-Boolean).
• Only Individual (Non-Boolean) input groups appear on the Input Group list boxes of
the Readers, Areas, Doors, and Micros forms.
Input Group
State
Select Enabled to allow this input group to activate. Select Disabled if this input group should not activate.
Open Condition
Select Detected to allow this input group to trigger associated outputs when the input group detects an
open-condition state change. This field is for supervised input. Select Ignored if this is not a supervised input.
Short Condition
Select Detected to allow this input group to activate associated outputs when the input group detects a
short-condition state change. This field is for supervised input. Select Ignored if this is not a supervised input.
Broadcast
State Changes
Select Yes to broadcast any input state changes in this input group to all micros on the system. Select Yes if
you want the inputs in this input group to trigger outputs on other micros, or if you want an input from this
input group to trigger an Emergency mode. Normally this is set to No.
Alarm
Displays a description of the selected alarm (if any) associated with this input group.
Click the Alarm button to display the Alarm list box. Select the desired alarm. When this input group activates,
the selected alarm triggers.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. By default, the output group record will be assigned the same
facility as the micro to which the door is assigned; however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign an
output group’s facility. This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for
instance two companies occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more
information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Parent Input
Group
Displays a description of the selected parent input groups (if any) associated with this (child) input group.
Output Group
Displays a description of the selected output group associated with this input group.
Click a Parent Input Group button to display the Parent Input Group list box, which is a list of input groups,
and select an input group to be the parent for this child. You can select up to three parent input groups for a
(child) input group. For more information, see Parent input groups on page 131.
Click an Output Group button to display the Output Groups list box. Select up to five output groups (one for
each button). When this input group activates, all of the selected output groups trigger.
Chapter 8
Device management
Parent input groups
Keep the following in mind, when working with Parent Input Groups:
•
•
•
•
Note:
An input group that is connected to a parent input group becomes, in essence, an input of that parent
input group, and is subject to the parent’s boolean or non-boolean settings.
Each input group can have up to three input groups as its parents, and each input group can be the
parent of any number of input groups. An input group cannot be its own parent.
A tree-like hierarchy of input groups can be built, with each input group propagating its state changes
on to its parent input group. Do not create a circular hierarchy, such as A is a parent of B, and B is a
parent of A.
An input group’s alarm and output groups are not affected by its association with a parent. They will
all work independently.
Changes to parent input groups through schedules will only take effect on the child input groups after the controller has been
reset.
Example of a parent input group
A high-security vault is equipped with three motion detectors and a security guard patrols the vault
periodically. Any one of the motion detectors must be able to activate the alarm, but the alarm must be disabled
during the patrol.
This scenario can be resolved as follows: (See Figure 53, Example of a Parent Input Group on page 132)
1. Assign the three motion detectors (inputs 1, 2, and 3) to a Motion input group. This input group would
have a boolean type of Any, so any single motion detector could activate this group.
2. Assign Motion the parent input group of Vault. No alarms or outputs will be associated directly with
Motion.
3. Assign Vault the appropriate alarm and output groups desired for motion being detected in the vault
area, and assign it a boolean type of All.
4. Associate a toggle reader (see Toggle on page 186) with an input group called Control. The toggle
reader will be the only input in this group. Control will be a Trigger on Input (Individual) input group
which is non-boolean, so a badge swipe through this reader will toggle the input group’s state on or off.
5. Assign Control the parent input group of Vault. No alarms or outputs will be associated directly with
Control.
Vault’s only inputs are its child input groups, Motion and Control. Both of these must be activated in order to
trigger the alarm, since Vault’s boolean type is All.
When the vault is unpatrolled, the toggle reader is used to toggle-on Control, meaning that this input group is
activated. If any of the three motion detectors should activate, the Motion input group will be triggered (since
its boolean type is Any). The Vault input group will then receive the activated state change of Motion. When
that happens, the All condition of Vault has been met, and the associated alarm and output groups will be
triggered.
To deactivate the motion-detector alarm during a routine patrol, the security guard simply swipes their
authorized badge through the toggle reader. Control’s input is deactivated; therefore, the Vault input group
cannot trigger an alarm, even though the motion detectors will activate the Motion input group while the guard
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is in the area. When the patrol of the vault is finished, the guard swipes their badge through the toggle reader
again, this time to activate it.
Figure 53. Example of a Parent Input Group
Input Group 1
(motion detector)
Input Group 2
(motion detector)
Input Group 3
(motion detector)
Toggle
Reader
On/Off
Output Group
“Vault”
Input Group
“Motion”
Boolean type: ANY
Parent Input Group
“Vault”
Boolean type: ALL
Input Group
“Control”
Non-boolean:
TRIGGER ON INPUT
Alarm
“Vault”
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Input Group record:
1. Select Configuration, Inputs/Outputs, and then Input Groups tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining micros
Each micro controller (micro) controls specific input and output devices, such as readers, doors, and alarms.
For the micro to work correctly, you must define communication-port characteristics such as communication
retries, polling interval, port assignment, and micro address. (The micro address set in the software must match
the micro address in the hardware.) Micro error conditions need to be associated with alarms, input groups, and
output groups. The required associations should be defined using the various Picture Perfect forms, such as
Ports, Modems, InGroups, and Alarms, before attempting to complete the Micros form.
Picture Perfect supports three kinds of micro communications: direct, dial-up and network. All three types of
communications can be combined on a single host.
Note:
Depending on the amount of traffic on a system, to avoid performance degradation, a line of micros should contain no
more than eight M5 controllers or 64 readers.
For more information refer to:
•
•
•
Direct connect micros on page 140
Dial-up micros on page 140
Network micros on page 143
Do not add or change a micro until you have configured the input groups that you need for the micro and the
alarm and output groups that you want to have associated with the selected input groups.
Chapter 8
Device management
A micro can be configured in the following ways:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Non-existent
Direct connect
Dial-up
Downstream dial-up
Network
Network dial-up
All of these options are explained in the sections that follow. However, if you prefer, you can configure all of
your micros as non-existent and then you can go back later and reconfigure them.
Example
Micro 1 controls all of the inputs, outputs, doors, and readers in Building 1.
Figure 54. Micros Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
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Table 56. Micros form fields
Tab
Field
Description
Micro
Description
Type a micro description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long; Example: Building 1 Micro 0.
This micro description appears in a Micros list box for selection on the Inputs, Outputs, and
Readers forms.
Facility
You must assign a facility to a micro. Other devices, such as readers and inputs, that are
connected to the micro will default to this facility, unless they are specifically assigned to another
facility.
Micro Address Type a number from 0 to 4095 to identify the address of this micro as set in the micro’s hardware
address switches. Once a micro’s address is set, it cannot be changed.
Upstream
Micro
Displays the selected upstream micro.
Downstream
Micro
Displays the selected downstream micro.
Type Normal/
Elevator
Select whether this is a Normal micro or an Elevator micro type. Only an M5 can be used with
Elevator Control. See Elevator control on page 369 for more details on this feature.
Click the Upstream Micro button to display the Micros list box. Select the micro or host that is
upstream from this micro.
Click the Downstream Micro button to display the Micros list box. Select the micro or host (or
None) that is downstream from this micro.
Note:
An Elevator micro configured with multiple readers, uses Reader 1 to control the
elevator.
Configure
Online/
Offline/Nonexistent
Select whether the micro is being configured Online, Offline or Non-existent. If neither are
selected, the micro is configured as non-existent, that is, not on the system.
• Select Online to bring a micro online that was either configured offline or non-existent. The
micro will be automatically reset when configured online.
• Select Offline to allow this installed and connected micro to be configured before it goes
online. This allows normal operations to continue without interruption by a flood of
unexpected error messages related to this micro.
• Select Non-existent to configure a micro that is not yet installed (physically connected). Once
the micro is installed, bring up this form and select Online to put the micro online.
Time Zone
Select the time zone in which the micro is located from the drop-down list. This allows Picture
Perfect to display badge and alarm activity in the micro's local time. It also allows schedules that
span multiple time zones to execute in the respective local times. See Verifying time zones on
page 168.
In order for an operator to use this field, they must have at least View page level permission for
the Time Zone form. See Creating facility permission profiles on page 81.
Primary Port
Displays the selected primary port for micro communications.
Click the Primary Port button to display the Ports list box. Select the primary port to which this
micro is wired.
• Uni-directional micros require a primary port assignment (and None specified for the
secondary port).
• Bi-directional micros require both a primary and a secondary port assignment.
• Dial-up micros do not require a port assignment (assign None to both the primary and
secondary port).
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 56. Micros form fields (continued)
Tab
Timing
Field
Description
Secondary
Port
Displays the selected secondary port for micro communications.
Firmware
Version
The revision of application code that is contained in the micro. This field is read-only.
Facility Code
Optional: Type a facility number (1 to 5 digits long). If the 8RP board loses communication with the
micro’s CPU board, access can still be granted to all badges with a facility code that matches this
field. If this field is left empty, the 8RP will grant access to all badges while in this degraded mode.
This applies only for 8RP boards in a Micro/2 or Micro/4.
Shunt Code
Optional: Type a shunt code (1 to 10 digits long). With Shunting Enabled on the Area and Reader
forms, this code entered on a keypad allows a badge holder to prop a door open (for the time
specified on the Doors form) without triggering a door-held-open alarm.
Alarm
Response
Code
Optional: Type an Alarm Response Code (1 to 10 digits long). With Keypad Alarm Response
Enabled on the Doors form, this code entered on a keypad allows an authorized badge holder to
respond to and reset an active alarm. This Alarm Response Code must be different from the Shunt
Code on the Micros form. See Controlling alarms using a keypad code on page 384.
Badge History
Threshold
Type the percentage at which the micro triggers the Badge History Overflow input group to notify
the host that its Badge Transaction table has reached this percentage of capacity.
Alarm History
Threshold
Type the percentage at which the micro triggers the Alarm History Overflow input group to notify
the host that its Alarm Transaction table has reached this percentage of capacity.
Controller
Type
Read only indicator of controller type that is set when the controller establishes communication
with the host.
Controller
Features
Read only indicator of new firmware feature capabilities supported by this controller.
Upstream
Retries
Enter the number of times the micro will try to contact its upstream micro before triggering the
Upstream Communications Failure input group (normally set to 3). This input group must be
defined prior to completing the Micro form. See Creating input groups on page 127.
Upstream
Retry Interval
Enter the number of seconds between each upstream retry (normally set to 2 seconds).
Downstream
Retries
Enter the number of times the micro will try to contact its downstream micro before triggering the
Downstream Communications Failure input group (normally set to 3). This input group must be
defined prior to completing the Micro form. See Creating input groups on page 127.
Downstream
Retry Interval
Enter the number of seconds between each downstream retry (normally set to 2).
Click the Secondary Port button to display the Ports list box. Select the secondary port that will be
activated if communication is lost on the primary line.
• Uni-directional micros require a primary port assignment (and None specified for the
secondary port).
• Bi-directional micros require both a primary and a secondary port assignment.
• Dial-up micros do not require a port assignment (assign None to both the primary and
secondary port).
Host-Micro
Enter the number of times the host will try to contact this micro before triggering the Upstream
Polling Retries Communications Failure input group (normally set to 3). This input group must be defined prior to
completing the Micro form. See Creating input groups on page 127.
Host-Micro
Polling Retry
Interval
Enter the number of seconds between each host-to-micro retry (normally set to 2 seconds for
direct connect micros and 8 seconds for dial-up micros).
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Table 56. Micros form fields (continued)
Tab
Field
Description
Polling
Interval
Enter the number of days, hours, minutes and/or seconds that must elapse without
communication to the host before the host polls this micro to verify that it is still capable of
communicating (normally set to 60 seconds).
If the polling interval is set to 0, no polling occurs.
Note:
To be UL compliant, the polling interval must be less than 200 seconds.
CAUTION:
Input
Groups
Select the appropriate input group for each error condition field: Badge History Overflow, Alarm History Overflow,
Upstream Comm Failure, Downstream Comm Failure, Reader Comm Failure
Note:
Advanced
Features
If the micro is configured as Network Dialup, the polling interval is interpreted
differently based on the current communications channel open to the micro. If
using the primary channel (network), the polling interval is interpreted as-is. If,
however, the secondary channel (dialup) is being used, the polling interval is
shifted, seconds are interpreted as minutes, minutes as hours, and hours as days.
One side effect of this is that secondary channel communication failures are
reported at the “shifted” interval. For example: A network dialup micro is
configured with a polling interval of 30 seconds. The polling interval is actually 30
minutes when running on the secondary channel and communication failures are
only detectable every 30 minutes.
Only Individual input groups which are non-boolean are displayed in the list box.
Lock on
Duress
This feature allows you to configure a micro to lock a door when a special PIN number, used to
signal emergency situations, is entered on a keypad reader.
Passive Time
& Attendance
Used to log a badge holder In and Out using the same reader by swiping the card the normal way
for In and reversing the card or turning the card backwards for Out.
Taped Badge
Suspend
This feature can be configured to ignore multiple consecutive badge reads or to suspend the
badge when multiple consecutive badge reads occur. If this option is enabled, the Taped Badge
Count field is activated.
Taped Badge
Count
The number of consecutive badge reads before the system will suspend the badge.
Micro Reset
Click Reset Now to manually reset the micro.
Micro State
Click Get Micro State to display the current state of the selected micro’s attributes.
(Minimum count = 2; Maximum count = 255)
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 56. Micros form fields (continued)
Tab
Field
Description
Dial Up
Modem Type
Displays the selected modem type.
Click the Modem Type button to display the Modems list box. Select the type of modem to
connect to at the host.
• For direct communication micros, select None.
• For network micros, without Dial-Up, select None.
• For network micros, with Dial-Up, select the host modem type.
The modem type selected for the micro must match the modem type (and baud rate) indicated by
the micro’s DIP switch settings on Switch Bank 2. See the appropriate installation manual for
information on DIP switch settings. The modems in this list are created using the Modems form.
See Configuring modems on page 64 for information on setting up modems.
Micro Dialout
Prefix
Enter the PBX prefix, area code or country code (or other prefix) to be pre-pended to the host
phone number in order for the micro to call the host.
Micro Backup
Dialout Prefix
For redundant configurations in which the primary and backup servers are located in two
different area codes, enter the PBX prefix, area code or country code (or other prefix) to be prepended to the backup host phone number in order for the micro to call the backup host.
Micro Phone
Number
Enter the phone number to be used to call this dial-up micro from the host, including area code,
PBX prefix, or country code as necessary.
Micro Backup
Phone
Number
For redundant configurations in which the primary and backup servers are located in two
different area codes, enter the phone number to be used to call this dial up micro from the
backup host, including area code, PBX prefix, or country code as necessary.
Idle Time
Enter the number of days, hours, minutes and/or seconds that the line must be idle before the line
is dropped. This field must be greater than [(Host-micro retries) x (Host-micro retry interval)+1].
Maximum
Connect Time
Enter the maximum number of days, hours, minutes and/or seconds (0 to 65536) that the micro
and host may be connected. After a reset to allow for badge download, the default maximum
connect time is one hour.
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Table 56. Micros form fields (continued)
Tab
Field
Description
Callback
Specify whether a callback is required from the host, the micro, or neither. In a callback situation,
the host or micro receiving the call flags the sender for a callback, then disconnects without a
data transaction taking place. This strategy prevents a foreign system from communicating with
the host or micro. This strategy may also be cost effective if host-to-micro calls are less expensive
than micro-to host calls, or vice versa.
• Host
The host will call back the micro.
• Micro
The micro will call back the host.
Note:
A controller configured as Micro Callback cannot be flashed with upgraded application
code. If you need to update the application code, set Callback to None prior to running
the flash program. Upon completion, set it back to Micro.
• None
No callbacks are required.
Dial on
Updates
Specifies when the host should dial the micro with record changes:
• Always
The host always dials the micro for any record changes that affect it.
• Never
The host will not dial the micro for any record changes. Updates are made during the next
communications session.
• Ask Operator
The host will prompt the operator to see if it should dial the micro for each record change.
Dial on
Startup
Specify whether the host should dial the micros whenever the system is started:
• Always
The host always dials the micro whenever the system is started.
• Never
The host will not dial the micro immediately whenever the system is started. Rather, it will
wait a random amount of time, no greater than the polling period, before it dials the micro.
Dial Host on
Schedule
Update
Specify whether the micro should dial the host whenever changes occur due to a micro schedule.
• Always
The micro always dials the host for any schedule updates that affect it.
• Never
The micro will not dial the host for any schedule updates. Updates are made during the next
communications session.
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 56. Micros form fields (continued)
Tab
Field
Description
eFlash
eFlash is a method of flashing your DirecDoor, PXNPlus, Micro/5-PX, Micro/5-PXN, M/PX-2000, and M/PXN-2000
micros. It does not require the micro to be in maintenance mode while the flash code is being downloaded. All
communication is handled by the host.
The eFlash download program is installed as part of the base Picture Perfect product and can be run on
standalone systems, network subhosts, and on the primary host of a redundant system. On a networked system,
eFlash should not be run on the network host. It can run on all subhosts simultaneously and is capable of flashing
the micros connected to each subhost.
eFlash can be run either from the Micros form or from the UNIX command line.
Using an optional file, .eflashrc, you can define flashing requirements for the entire system once, and then use
part or all of the definition to flash or re-flash micros as needed. This file can be used for scheduling unattended
flashing.
Note:
Only one instance of eFlash can be run on a system. When eFlash begins, it creates a lock file:
/cas/log/.eflashrc
If the lock file exists, indicating that the program is running, when you attempt to launch eFlash, an error
message will display and the program will exit.
Dynamic configuration
Micros (firmware 4.03 or later required) can be configured dynamically, meaning the Picture Perfect system
does not have to be restarted for the changes to take effect. However, there are some rules that must be met. If
these rules are not met, an error message displays and none of the changes are made until that rule is satisfied.
The error message window remains open until you click OK.
Note:
All of the fields on the Micros form support dynamic configuration, except for Micro ID. Once a micro’s ID is set, it cannot
be changed.
Dynamic configuration rules:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Every micro must have a head (or upstream) micro.
Every micro must have a tail (or downstream) micro.
A micro can be upstream from at most one micro.
A micro can be downstream from at most one micro.
The primary port must be the same for a micro and its downstream micro.
The secondary port must be the same for a micro and its downstream micro.
An upstream micro must have a matching downstream micro.
A downstream micro must have a matching upstream micro.
The last micro in a bi-directional line must have a host downstream.
Two head micros cannot have the same primary port.
Two tail micros cannot have the same secondary port.
A network dial-up micro must have a matching downstream micro.
A network micro must have a matching downstream micro.
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Direct connect micros
A direct communications micro requires direct connection to the host. Communication can be uni-directional
as in Figure 55 or bi-directional as in Figure 56.
In uni-directional communication, each line of micros is connected to the host from a unique port (In the
example below, Micro 0 through 3 are connected to tty1; Micro 4 through 5 are connected to tty2). If
communication is lost between downstream micros, the host continues to communicate only with those micros
upstream from the break. An alarm is generated, indicating the loss of communication. For example, if a break
occurs between Micro 1 and 2, the host will only have communication with Micro 0 and 1 from tty1, and it will
maintain communication with Micro 4 and 5 from tty2. Communication with Micro 2 and 3 is lost.
Figure 55. Example of direct communication - Uni-directional micros
In bi-directional communication, the micros are connected to the host using a primary port at one end (tty1)
and an alternate port at the other end (tty2). If communication is lost between any micros, the host will
communicate from the primary port to all micros upstream from the break and from the alternate port in the
opposite direction, to all micros upstream from the break. Using this method, communication with all micros is
maintained. For example, if a break occurs between Micro 1 and 2, the host will communicate with Micro 0
and 1 from tty1, and it will communicate with Micro 3 and 2 from tty2. No communication is lost.
Figure 56. Example of direct communication - Bi-directional micros
Dial-up micros
A dial-up micro requires an attached modem, a dedicated phone line, and one or more compatible modems
attached to the host ports.
Chapter 8
Device management
There is only one possible configuration for dial-up communication: uni-directional which is detailed in
Figure 57, Example of Dial-up communication.
Figure 57. Example of Dial-up communication
The table below shows the micros that are supported downstream from dial-up micros
Table 57. Dial-Up micro downstream support
Dial-Up micro
Downstream support
Micro/5-PX
M/PX-2000
Micro/5-PXN
M/PXN-2000
DirecDoor
PXNPlus
DirecDoor
No
No
No
No
PXNPlus
Yes
No
No
Yes
Micro/5-PX
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
M/PX-2000
Micro/5-PXN with dial-up
M/PXN-2000 with dial-up1
1.
If the network connection fails and the micro has the dial-up option, it will behave as a dial-up Micro/5-PX after it connects to the host for the first
time.
There are events that cause the micro to automatically dial up the host and there are events (usually operator
activities such as updates or commands) that cause the host to automatically dial up the micro.
Table 58. Events requiring micro-to-host calls
Event
Micro to host response
Power-on Reset
After a power-on reset, the micro reads its DIP switch settings to determine its attached modem
type and the required baud rate for communication to the modem, assumes that the modem is
connected to the host port, and then tries to dial the host (using the modem’s hard-coded
phone number).
Alarm
The micro immediately dials the host when a priority micro alarm activates. Immediate Dial-Up
is user-defined. See Immediate Dial Required on page 118.
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Table 58. Events requiring micro-to-host calls
Event
Micro to host response
Alarm and Badge
Threshold
The micro dials the host when the micro’s alarm or badge history buffer reaches its threshold
(user-defined) and requires uploading to the host.
Badge Table Request
The micro dials the host when there is no micro database record for a badge just presented to a
reader. The micro’s resident database reduces the requirement for micro-to-host calls for badge
records.
Table 59. Events requiring host-to-micro calls
Event
Host to micro response
Database Updates
The host dials out to send database updates to micros. Whether the host does this
automatically, never, or on request is user-defined for each individual micro. For micros that
do not require immediate updates, the host stores the updates until the next host-to-micro
or micro-to-host call occurs and then downloads the new records.
Outputs and Output Group
Commands
The host dials the micro immediately whenever the operator changes the state of an output
or output group on that micro.
Note:
For details that show how an operator can command state changes and control
outputs using input groups, output groups, or selected outputs, see Figure 109,
Control Output Groups on page 268.
Operator-generated
Commands
The host allows the operator to dial any micro in the system to check the status. See
Monitoring status on page 280.
Micro Reset Request
Command
The host dials the micro to send a reset command when an update to the system database
requires major updates to one or more micro configurations.
The host dials the micro to send a reset request when an operator uses CMENU to reset a
micro.
Note:
Micro Poll
Before the reset sequence starts, the micro terminates the call and disconnects to
free the communications line; after reset, the micro dials the host to request its
database and configuration
The host can poll micros that have not communicated with the host for a user-defined time
period. A zero Polling Interval setting tells the host that no polling is required. See Polling
Interval on page 136.
Chapter 8
Device management
Network micros
A network micro requires an ethernet connection to the host. A network micro with the optional dial-up backup
feature also requires a PCMCIA modem card in the other available slot, a dedicated phone line, and one or
more compatible modems attached to the host port in addition to the network lines.
Figure 58. Sample Ethernet configuration
up host
PXNPLUS
down none
down none
Micro/5-PXN
up host
up host
DirecDoor
down none
down DirecDoor
PXNPLUS
up micro
up host
Micro/5PXN
Host
down PXNPLUS
Micro/5-PX
up micro
Ethernet
tty 1
LAN
Gateway
WAN
Ethernet
tty 2
Modem
down none
DirecDoor
up PXNPLUS
down micro
Micro/5-PX
up micro
down micro
Micro/5-PX
up micro
PCMCIA
Modem
up host
Micro/5-PXN
down micro
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Micro Network Map
The network map on the Micro form provides a visual display of all the micros on the system and their relative
position on their respective port lines. To access the network map, click the Network Map tab on the bottom of
the navigation pane.
Figure 59. Network Map
Micro State
Virtual Display
Online
Blue icon
Pending online
Blue flashing icon
Offline
Orange icon
Pending offline
Orange flashing icon
Flash failure
Red icon
Resetting
Purple flashing icon
Flashing in progress
Yellow flashing icon
Configured nonexistent
Grayed out (dimmed) icon
Micro with resent list
Blue icon with hourglass
Place your cursor over the micro to display a tooltip containing detailed communication status, as shown in
Figure 60.
Figure 60. Detailed micro status
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 60. Detailed communication status
Event
Micro to host response
Micro ID
Displays the micro’s identification number.
Firmware Version
The revision of application code currently flashed in the micro.
Next in Line
Displays the ID number of the downstream micro.
Primary Port
Displays the primary port of the micro.
Secondary Port
Displays the secondary port of the micro.
Last Communication
In the case of a downstream micro, this field shows the last time a non-ACK packet was
received from the micro.
In the case of a head of line micro, this field shows the last time any packet was received,
including ACK packets (an acknowledgement that the last message was received).
Primary Channel
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro is communicating via the primary port.
Secondary Channel
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro is communicating via the secondary
(backup) port.
Online
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro is online.
Trace
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro is traced.
Reset
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro is resetting. If the micro requests a
mandatory reset (during power-up) or if the host initiates a mandatory reset command (by
operator request), this flag is set to Y until the micro is reset and a final synchronization
message is sent to indicate that it is online.
Ack
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating whether the micro has any pending Ack messages. Under
normal circumstances for a Head-of-line micro, this flag is set to N. If it is set to Y it indicates an
unresponsive micro and a problem that requires troubleshooting.
Timeout
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating if a packet is not acknowledged within the number of
attempts specified in the Micro record. When this occurs the micro is considered to be in “error”
condition. After an alarm is generated the condition changes to “alarm” and this flag is cleared.
Alarm
A yes/no (Y/N) flag field indicating that a micro is in a communication “alarm” condition. Once a
valid ACK or data packet is received from the micro this flag is cleared as well as the “offline”
flag if it is set.
Call
Indicates the host is calling the micro using a dial-up connection.
Dial
Indicates the host is dialing the micro using a dial-up connection.
Connected
Indicates the host is connected to the micro using a dial-up connection.
Resend
Indicates the number of messages in queue for the micro.
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Related procedures
To create a Direct-connect Micro record:
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form with special attention to the items below. The following fields must be set
to the given value.
•
•
•
Primary port: You must select a direct port.
Secondary port: For bi-directional micros, you must also select a secondary port which must be a
direct port.
Modem type: None.
4. Leave the remaining fields on the Dial Up screen blank.
To create a Dial-up Micro record:
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form with special attention to the items below. The following fields must be set
to the given value.
•
•
Specify None for port assignment (primary and secondary), since dial-up micros call the host on
any available port that is compatible (same modem type).
Select the modem type of the host’s modem.
4. Complete the remainder of the Dial Up portion of the screen.
To create a Network Micro record:
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form with special attention to the items below. The following fields must be set
to the given value.
•
•
•
For the primary port, you must select a network micro port.
For the secondary port, you must select None.
Select a modem type of None.
4. Leave the remaining fields on the Dial Up screen blank.
To create a Network Dial-up Micro record:
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form with special attention to the items below. The following fields must be set
to the given value.
•
•
For the primary port, you must select a network micro port.
For the secondary port, you must select None.
Chapter 8
Device management
CAUTION:
•
If the micro is configured as Network Dialup, the polling interval is interpreted differently based on the current
communications channel open to the micro. If using the primary channel (network), the polling interval is
interpreted as-is. If, however, the secondary channel (dialup) is being used, the polling interval is shifted, seconds
are interpreted as minutes, minutes as hours, and hours as days. One side effect of this is that secondary channel
communication failures are reported at the “shifted” interval. For example: A network dialup micro is configured
with a polling interval of 30 seconds. The polling interval is actually 30 minutes when running on the secondary
channel and communication failures are only detectable every 30 minutes.
Select the modem type of the host’s modem.
4. Complete the remainder of the Dial Up screen.
To add a configuration for a micro that is downstream from a dial-up micro:
For micros downstream from dial-up communication micros, ports must be configured before adding or
changing a micro and the head-end dial-up micro must be configured. Refer to Table 61 on page 148 for a list
of the type of micros that can be downstream.
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form with special attention to the items below. The following fields must be set
to the given value.
•
•
•
Review the items that directly relate to direct connect micros.
Callback: None
Modem type: Downstream Dial up
To configure a micro before it is on the system:
Picture Perfect allows you to configure a micro without the micro being on the system by configuring it as
Non-existent.
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
3. Complete the Micros form. The Configure field must be set to Non-existent.
To change a micro configuration:
Changing a micro is simply locating the record and changing the necessary fields. Keep in mind that if you
change the port or modem setting, you may be changing the type of communications that this micro is using.
Before you modify a micro’s configuration, you may want to check the initial settings. There are basically five
fields on the Micro form that determine the type of micro communications being used: Primary Port,
Secondary Port, Upstream, Downstream, and Modem Type. Refer to Table 61 on page 148 to determine what
type of micro communications is being used.
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Table 61. Micro communication
Type of micro
communication
Micro form fields
Primary Port
Secondary
Port
Upstream
Downstream
Modem Type
Direct Uni-directional
Direct Port
None
If a head-of-line
micro: Host1
If an end-of-line
micro: None2
None
Direct Bi-directional
Direct Port
Direct Port
If a head-of-line
micro: Host1
If an end-of-line
micro: Host2
None
Dial-up
None
None
If a head-of-line
micro: Host2
If an end-of-line
micro: None2
Anything except: None
or Downstream Dial up
None
Anything except:
Host or None
If an end-of-line
micro: None2
Downstream Dial up
and the Callback field
is set to None
Downstream from Dial-up
Network
Network Port
None
If a head-of-line
micro: Host2
If an end-of-line
micro: None2
None
Network Dial-up
Network Port
None
If a head of line
micro: Host1
If an end of line
micro: None2
If a head of line micro,
anything except: None
or Downstream Dial up
Otherwise:
Downstream Dial up
1.
2.
Otherwise, anything except Host
Otherwise, anything except Host or None
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Micro tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to retrieve all the micro records or enter specific search criteria to limit
the search and then click Find.
3. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
The updated micro will be reset automatically if the Configure field has been changed to Online. After
the micro resets, it requests its new configuration from the host so that it can operate according to its
new parameters. The host downloads the new micro configuration. System operations and
communications continue normally during a micro reset.
Chapter 8
Device management
Creating encryption keys
In order to secure transmission between the host and the network micro, the data is encrypted using DES (Data
Encryption Standard). This is accomplished by means of a key to create the encryption pattern for
transmission.
Example
Triple DES encryption is used between the micro and the host.
Figure 61. Keys form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
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Table 62. Keys form fields
Field name
Description
Micro
The micro that will be transmitting data to/from the host.
Encryption Mode
This is a required field which defines the encryption mode to be used. It can be set to one of three values:
None
No encryption is used; the original or plain text is transmitted.
Note:
DES
None is the default. In order to activate this feature, one of the following must be
selected.
Both sender and receiver use a single key (Key 1) to encrypt and decrypt data.
Triple DES Both sender and receiver use three keys (Key 1, Key 2, and Key 3) to encrypt and decrypt
data.
Encryption Key
Type
System
Encryption is performed using the default system keys.
Custom
Encryption is performed using user customized keys. This method is more secure.
Encryption Key 1
This key is used for a single DES algorithm as well as the first key used to encrypt the Data Keys in the
Triple DES algorithm, before transmitting those keys to the micro.
Encryption Key 2
The second key used to encrypt the Data Keys in the Triple DES algorithm, before transmitting those keys
to the micro.
Encryption Key 3
The third key used to encrypt the Data Keys in the Triple DES algorithm, before transmitting those keys to
the micro.
Data Key 1
The length of this field must be eight alphanumeric characters. This key is used for a single DES algorithm
as well as the first key used in the Triple DES algorithm.
Data Key 2
The length of this field must be eight alphanumeric characters. This is the second key used in the Triple
DES algorithm.
Data Key 3
The length of this field must be eight alphanumeric characters. This is the third key used in the Triple DES
algorithm.
Related procedures
To manage the DES keys used:
1. Select Configuration, Micros, and then Keys tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Note:
Due to the sensitive information presented on the screen, you will be prompted for root’s password if you
attempt to perform any operations with the keys.
Chapter 8
Device management
Flashing micros
When the micro is powered up, you may need to flash download the Picture Perfect application code into the
micro. You can use the eFlash utility which is included in Picture Perfect 4.5.
Before you begin flashing your micros, review the following:
•
•
•
If the micro is configured for Micro Callback, the Callback feature must be disabled (the Callback
field on the Micro form must be set to None) in order to perform a flash download. Upon completion
of the download, the feature can be enabled (the Callback field can be set back to Micro).
If this is a dial-up micro, it must be disconnected from the host before attempting to flash.
A PXN or PX micro must already be flashed with firmware 4.03 or later to use the eFlash feature.
Micro firmware files
In the /cas/flash/eflash directory, there is a separate directory for each type of micro’s firmware (hex
file).
Flashing a micro using eFlash
This download procedure can be used with Picture Perfect version 2.0 host systems or later. The eFlash
download program is installed as part of the base Picture Perfect 4.5 product and can be run on standalone
systems, network subhosts, and on the primary host of a redundant system.
On a networked system, eFlash should not be run on the network host. It can run on all subhosts
simultaneously and is capable of flashing the micros connected to each subhost.
eFlash includes the following features:
•
•
•
eFlash is a new flash method which does not require the micro to be in maintenance mode while the
flash code is being downloaded.
Flashes DirecDoor, PXNPlus, Micro/5-PX, Micro/5-PXN, Micro/PX-2000, and Micro/PXN-2000
micros.
All communication is handled by the host.
Note:
Micros must first be flashed with Picture Perfect micro firmware version 4.03 or later.
eFlash can be run either from a Graphical User Interface (the default) or from the UNIX command line.
Operating eFlash in a graphical mode
To flash a micro using the eFlash GUI:
1. Log on to a Picture Perfect client PC.
2. From the Configuration menu, select Micros to display the Micro form.
3. Click Find
to search for the micro you want to update.
4. Click the Network Map tab located at the bottom of the grid, to display a graphical layout of your
micros.
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Figure 62. Network Map Tab
5. Click the eFlash tab to display the eFlash form.
Figure 63. eFlash Form
6. On the Network Map, click the micro that you want to flash.
7. Click Browse next to the selected micro, to display a list of firmware files and select the file to be used
for flashing.
Chapter 8
Device management
Figure 64. Select File
8. Click Flash Micro to begin the flash procedure.
The flash procedure begins and the micros being flashed are highlighted in yellow.
Figure 65. eFlash in Progress
9. Wait until the flash is complete. You cannot flash another micro until the current selections are
complete.
Note:
Only one instance of eFlash can be run on a system. When eFlash begins, it creates a lock file:
/cas/log/.eflash.<pid>
If the lock file exists, indicating that the program is running, when you attempt to launch eFlash, an error
message will display and the program will exit.
This file is normally removed automatically when the program closes however, under some circumstances, it
may still exist and will need to be removed manually.
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Operating eFlash from the command line
One or more of the arguments listed in Table 63 can be included in a command line.
Note:
If an option is repeated, only the last value is used with the exception of -m and -l, which may be repeated multiple
times. For example, to flash micro id 0 and micro id 2, the entry would be: eflash -m 0 -m 2
Enter
Table 63. eFlash command line arguments
-c
Command line selection option
-p<directory>
Specifies the source directory to search for flash files. This replaces the default directory of /cas/flash/
eflash.
-f<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the 5PX micro, instead of the default flash.
-n<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the 5PXN micro, instead of the default flash.
-r<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the DirecDoor controller.
-s<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the PXNPlus controller.
-x<number>
Specifies the maximum number of micros that can be flashed at one time.
-h
Starts the HTML based online help.
-u or -?
Prints out the usage message.
-m<micro selection>
Specifies the micro to be flashed. This option can be repeated multiple times.
• To flash all active micros in the Picture Perfect database, use:
eflash -m a
Enter
• To flash a specific micro, use:
eflash -m <microid> Enter
where <microid> is the ID of the micro you wish to flash.
-l<microid>
Specifies a line of micros to be flashed.
• To flash a line of micros, use:
eflash -l <microid> Enter
where <microid> is the ID of any micro on the line. eFlash adds all other micros on the line to
the flash list in the correct order.
To flash a micro using eFlash from the command line:
1. Log on as root and open a terminal window.
2. At the command prompt, enter a command using the following parameters:
eflash -c -m01 -p /cas/flash/eflash -f mspe170.dfl
Enter
where m01 is the micro id and mspe170.dfl is the flash file.
After the flashing has completed, one of the following messages will be displayed:
Flashing is successful
or
Flashing is unsuccessful. See the log file<filename> for details.
Chapter 8
Device management
The eFlash configuration file
This is an optional file, .eflashrc, that resides on the host in the root user’s home directory. The purpose of
the file is to allow a Picture Perfect operator to define flashing requirements for the entire system once, and
then use part or all of the definition to flash or reflash micros as needed. This file can be used for scheduling
unattended flashing.
This file can contain a combination of command line arguments, processing rules, and comments.
Table 64. eFlash configuration file
Arguments
All of the following command line options can be included, either one per line or you may concatenate
many options per line.
-p<directory>
Specifies the source directory to search for flash files. This replaces
the default directory of: /cas/flash/eflash
-f<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use instead of the default flash used for direct
connect type micros (PX).
-n<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use instead of the default flash used for
network type micros (PXN).
-r<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the DirecDoor controller.
-s<filename>
Specifies a flash file to use for the PXNPlus controller.
-m<micro id>
Specifies the micro or micros to be flashed.
-m a
Specifies that all active micros in the Picture Perfect database be
flashed.
-l<micro id>
Specifies a micro in a line of micros, where the entire line is to be
flashed.
Note:
Processing Rules
If options are repeated, only the last value read from the file is used. The exceptions are the -m
and -l options, which use all specified micros.
Parameters that control the flashing of the micros during the current execution of eFlash may be
included. The following parameters may be included:
flashwait=value(in seconds)
Sets the time that eFlash waits for the micro to actually flash the
EPROM. The flash of a micro is considered a failure if the flash times
out. The default is 90 seconds.
maxflash=value(in seconds)
Sets the maximum number of micros that can be flashed
simultaneously. The actual number of micros that is being currently
flashed will always be less than this value due to restrictions on
flashing multiple micros in the same line. The default is 5.
Note:
Comments
Setting this number to a higher value can impact the
response time of the system. You should keep this number
low for best performance.
The eFlash configuration file may contain comments. A comment is a line that begins with the pound sign
(#). The pound sign and all characters up through the next carriage return are ignored.
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Network micro parameter block configuration (PXN only)
The ppnwmcfg command allows the ppadmin user to configure a network micro’s parameter block from the
host by connecting to the network micro. Once connected, the ppnwmcfg utility will put the network micro
in maintenance mode and display the current settings.
To display the ppnwmcfg utility:
1. Log on to Picture Perfect as ppadmin and type:
ppnwmcfg [ -v] microid micro_hostname
A flag that turns on verbose
output.This is useful when
troubleshooting connection
problems.
The ID of the network micro.
Enter
The host of the micro.
The ppnwncfg utility will display.
Table 65. ppnwmcfg menus
Menu
Description
S
Show parameter block
Displays the contents of the network micro’s parameter block.
C
Clear parameter
Clears a specific value.
U
Update parameter block
Writes the current values to the parameter block.
l-n
Modify parameter
Selecting a number will prompt you for a new value.
E
Edit all
Prompts you for each parameter block value.
Q
Quit
Exits out of ppnwmcfg. Once you have quit the ppnwmcfg utility, the network
micro will require about 30 seconds of idle communication before it resets.
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 66. ppnwmcfg parameters
Parameters
Description
The fields shown below may vary depending on your firmware version.
address
The micro ID which is not necessary unless you are configuring a network dialup micro.
phone1
Primary host number for a network dial-up micro to call.
phone2
Secondary host number for a network dial-up micro to call.
mmdmm_init
Modem initialization string.
mdmm_dinit
Modem de-initialization string.
rx_idle_time
The minimum number of characters (20 - 254) to process a buffer.
hop_count
The number of hops (network boards that must be crossed) between the network micro and host.
ring_speed
Specifies ring speed for token ring networks only. (Not supported)
source_ip
The network micro’s IP address.
destination_ip
The Picture Perfect host’s IP address.
alternate_ip
The backup machine’s IP address in a Picture Perfect redundant system.
gateway_ip
The network micro’s gateway IP address to reach the destination_ip.
subnet_ip_mask
The network micro’s subnet mask.
alt_gateway_ip
The network micro’s gateway IP address to reach the alternate_ip.
Note:
The network micro will accept connections only from the host defined in this field. If this field is updated incorrectly,
the network micro can only be configured from a laptop computer.
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Defining outputs
The Picture Perfect system monitors digital inputs (DIs) for contacts and digital outputs (DOs) for controlling
output devices. Outputs are triggered when associated inputs activate. Outputs can operate devices such as
door strikes, bells, and lights. Inputs may be physical connections to a micro controller or logical events such
as a transaction buffer overflow or an invalid access attempt.
Outputs that operate devices such as door strikes, lights, or sirens must be described to the system. Use the
Outputs form to define where this output point is connected, how it is wired to activate, how long it remains on
when activated, how it resets, and what output group is associated with it.
Example
An output may control a light indicating the back door is open. A typical description is: 002-01-07
Back Door
Open
The first part of the description indicates that the output is connected to DO point 07 on CPU board 01 of
Micro ID 002. The last part of the description indicates the purpose of the output.
Note:
How you format output descriptions is entirely an administrative decision, but this format makes the system messages
easier to use. To make reports easier to read, the number description should be first so that the text description is
aligned with the other records.
Figure 66. Outputs Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 67. Output form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description usually includes a micro board address and a text
description.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. By default, the output record will be assigned the same facility
as the micro to which the output is assigned however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign an
output’s facility. This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for
instance two companies occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more
information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Output Group
Displays a description of the selected output group to link this output point with a group of outputs.
Click the Select Output Group button to display the Output Groups list box. Select the desired output group.
Reset on
Duration
Select this button if the output should reset after the number of seconds specified in the Duration field.
(There is a possible alarm override for a duration reset. See Reset Outputs on page 119)
Example: You may want an output to reset on duration if the output device is a door strike and you want it to
stay on for a limited duration of time.
Reset on Input
Note:
Select this button if the output should reset as soon as the input resets.
If neither Reset On Duration nor Reset On Input is selected, the output stays on. If Reset On Input is selected, the door
does not unlock with a valid badge read.
Enable Output
Toggle the button On if this output is to be activated when its output group triggers.
Normally Open
The inactive state of an output is either normally open or normally closed. Toggle this button On if it is
normally open.
Note:
Board
Ask your installer how the output point is wired. Door DOs are usually wired “normally open.”
Type a board number from 0 to 8. The micro controller’s power/comm board is always board 0.
Use Table 69 on page 160 to find the board number and address where an output point is located. Verify the
board number with your installer.
Address
Type 0, 1, 8, 9, or 16 to 31 for the digital output address where the output is wired to the connector on the
board.
Duration
Type the number of seconds this output remains on when activated, if this output is allowed to reset when
the duration time expires. The maximum value is 32,767. If 0 is selected, the output will not reset but will
remain activated continuously. See Reset on Input on page 159.
Micro
Displays a description of the selected micro where this output is connected.
Click Select Micro to display the Micros list box. Select the desired micro.
Table 68. M/PX-2000 wiring chart - Outputs
Element
Board number
DO address
Reader address
CPU
--
--
--
Door DO 1 - 2
Picture Perfect Board 1
0-1
0-1
Door DO 3 - 4
Picture Perfect Board 2
0-1
0-1
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Table 68. M/PX-2000 wiring chart - Outputs
Element
Board number
DO address
Reader address
Aux DO 1 - 2
Picture Perfect Board 1
0-1
0-1
Aux DO 3 - 4
Picture Perfect Board 2
0-1
0-1
Element
Board number
DO address
Reader address
CPU
--
--
--
2RP/2SRP Board
1-4
0-1
0-1
8RP
1
(Picture Perfect Board 1-4)
0-1
0-1
2
(Picture Perfect Board 5-8)
0-1
0-1
1-4
16 - 31
--
Table 69. M5 wiring chart - Outputs
16DO/DOR Board
• Optional boards include four 20DI boards (20 supervised input points), four 16DO boards (16 output points), four 2RP/
2SRP boards (2-reader board), and two 8RP boards (8-reader board).
• The M5 cabinet has a seven-slot capacity. Two slots are used by the mandatory Power/Communications and CPU
boards. The remaining five slots may be configured to meet your site requirements with any combination of boards,
within the limitations listed above.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Output record:
1. Select Configuration, Inputs/Outputs, and then Outputs tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 8
Device management
Defining inputs
Physical inputs such as sensors or detectors must be described to the system. Use the Inputs form to define
where each input point is connected, how it is wired to activate, what kind of state changes activate it, how
long it remains detected before it activates, which input group is associated with it, and where messages about
this input are routed.
Example
An input controls a door sensor. The sensor detects when the doors is open or closed. A description for this
input could be: 01-1-00 Door DI
The first part of the description indicates that the input is connected to DI point 00 on DI board 1 of Micro ID
01. The last part of the description indicates the purpose of the output
Figure 67. Inputs Form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 70. Inputs form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a description of the input, usually including a wiring address and a written description.
Board
Type a board number from 0 to 8. The micro controller’s power/comm board is always board 0.
Use Table 71 on page 163 to find the board number and address where this input point is located. Verify
the board number with your installer.
Address
Micro ID
The Address field indicates what digital input point on the board this input is using. Type a number 0, 1, 8 to
9, or 16 to 35 (for the M5). The address depends on how the input is wired to the connector on the board.
Ask your installer.
Displays the selected micro where this input point is located.
Click to display the Micros list box from which you can select the desired micro.
Off to On Delay
Time
The Off To On Delay Time delays the effect of the input described on this form when it changes state from
Off to On. This delay helps avoid false input detections. Type the number of seconds (0 to 65535) required
for the delay. Leaving this field blank or typing a 0 (zero) causes no delay. Set this delay to 0 for an Exit DI.
This field overrides the Delay Time set on the Input Groups form. See Delay Time on page 129.
On to Off Delay
Time
The On To Off Delay Time delays the effect of the input described on this form when it changes state from
On to Off. This delay helps avoid false input detections. Type the number of seconds (0 to 65535) required
for the delay. Leaving this field blank or typing a 0 (zero) causes no delay. Set this delay to 0 for an Exit DI.
This field overrides the Delay Time set on the Input Groups form.
Routing
Displays the selected routing where messages about this input are displayed. Click Routing to display the
Routings list box. Select the desired routing. The typical routing is None which means that it is not routed.
Input Group
Displays the selected input group for this input. Click Input Group to display the Input Groups list box. Select
the desired input group.
Note:
• In both single input groups and in a hierarchy of input groups, all inputs in any given group or
hierarchy must be associated with the same micro.
• Use the Doors form to assign a door DI.
• Assign a door exit button to the same input group as the reader for that door.
• Do not assign a door DI to an input group.
• If an input group is unselected from an input and a new input group is assigned to the input, the micro
has to be reset.
Route
Definition
Displays the selected route definition for this input. This route definition is used for Activity Monitor routing.
Click Route Definition to display the Route Definition list box. Select the desired route definition. If this field
is left blank, this input’s activity will be routed to all operators.
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 70. Inputs form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Facility
Click Facility to display the Facilities list box. By default, the input record will be assigned the same facility
as the micro to which the input is assigned; however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign an
input’s facility. This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for
instance,
two companies occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more information,
see Creating facilities on page 53
Normally
Closed
The inactive state of an input is either normally open or normally closed. If it is Normally Open, toggle this
button Off by deselecting it. If it is Normally Closed, toggle it to On by selecting it.
Note:
Input Enabled
Toggle this button On by selecting it, to allow this input to activate.
Note:
Input
Ask your installer how the input point is wired. Door DIs are usually wired “normally closed” and
exit request DIs are usually wired “normally open.”
If an input is to be used as an Exit Button input in an area designated as M2MR with Door Control,
the Normally Closed and Input Enabled buttons must be deselected (the default).
• Normal: Toggle this button On to configure this input as a standard input point.
• Tour: Toggle this button On to configure this input as a Tour point. This button will only be enabled if
the optional Guard Tours package is installed.
• Elevator: Toggle this button On to configure this input as an elevator input.
Table 71. M5 wiring chart - Inputs
Element
Board number
DI address
Reader address
Exit DI address
CPU
--
--
--
--
2RP Board
1-4
0-1
0-1
8-9
20DI Board
1-4
16 - 35
--
--
• Optional boards include four 20DI boards (20 supervised input points), four 16DO boards (16 output points), four 2RP
boards (2-reader board), and one 8RP board (8-reader board).
• The M5 cabinet has a seven-slot capacity. Two slots are used by the mandatory Power/Communications and CPU
boards. The remaining five slots may be configured to meet your site requirements with any combination of boards,
within the limitations listed above.
• On a M5, the Tamper and AC Power Fail inputs must be wired to connector 6 on the Power/Communications board. The
AC Power Fail input will always be defined as Board 0, Address 0; the Tamper input will always be defined as Board 0,
Address 1.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Input record:
1. Select Configuration, Inputs/Outputs, and then Inputs tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Controlling outputs
Outputs are devices that can turn on or off due to an input condition or operator intervention. An authorized
operator can turn outputs on or off using the Control Outputs function for the duration of time entered on the
Output form.
You can select a single input group, output group, or an individual output from this window. Click the
corresponding icon to display the Control Outputs window or the Control Output Groups window.
Figure 68. Control Outputs Form
Example
The Control Output Groups window allows you to manually control all associated output devices such as lights
or sirens. For example, you may decide to use a manual reset for a motion sensor that activates floodlights in a
parking lot.
To control all outputs associated with the selected output group, click the On or Off radio button.
Figure 69. Control Output Group Window
To control an individual output associated with the selected output group, double click the output group to
display the Control Outputs window.
Figure 70. Control Outputs Window
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than shown in the
following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Chapter 8
Device management
Table 72. Control Outputs form fields
Field name
Description
Input Group
Select an input group from the list and click Input Group to display a list of all associated output groups.
Select an output group and click the On or the Off radio button to fire all the associated outputs.
Output Group
Select an output group from the list and click Output Group to display a list of all associated outputs. Select
an output and click the On or the Off radio button.
Output
Select the output you wish to control, and click Output. Select an output and click the On or the Off radio
button.
Note:
Each transaction is recorded in operator history.
Related procedures
To control an output from an output group:
When you select an output group from the list on the Control Outputs window, you can trigger any or all of the
outputs associated with this output group.
1. From the Control menu, select Control Outputs.
2. Select an output group from the Output Group list.
3. Click Output Group. A list of all associated outputs displays.
4. Click the appropriate radio button to turn the desired output on or off.
To control an individual output:
When you select an output from the list on the Control Outputs window, you can trigger the individual output.
1. From the Control menu, select Control Outputs.
2. Select an output from the Outputs list.
3. Click Outputs. A list of all outputs displays.
4. Click the appropriate radio button to turn the desired output on or off.
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Controlling Access Secure operations
Devices, such as Inputs, Input Groups, or Doors, normally exist in an Access state in which they are disabled or
unlocked, or in a Secure state in which they are enabled or locked. These states are reflected on the appropriate
device form.
It may be desirable to change this state back and forth to allow for unscheduled conditions, such as heightened
security levels or unscheduled peak access times. This feature can be used, in lieu of scheduling an event, to
accommodate situations that require operator control. It allows state changes for multiple devices rather than
applying the change to each device individually through the applicable form.
Example
For example, you may want all doors to be opened when the security guard arrives at his post, rather than at a
scheduled time.
Figure 71. Access Secure Form
Chapter 8
Device management
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 73. Access Secure form fields
Device
Fields and controls
Description
Doors
Current State: Access
The door state is Unlocked.
Current State: Secure
The door state is Locked.
Current State: Access
The input state is Enabled
Current State: Secure
The input state is Disabled
Current State: Access
The input group state is Enabled
Current State: Secure
The input group state is Disabled
Inputs
Input Groups
Related procedures
To display the Access/Secure Operations window:
This option does not appear on the Control menu, unless it has been enabled. See How to enable Access/Secure
Operations.
1. From the Control menu, select Access Secure. Then click the appropriate tab: Doors, Inputs, or Input
Groups.
2. From the list displayed, select the item whose state you wish to change. Multiple selections may be
made.
3. Click the appropriate Change State arrow button.
To enable Access Secure Operations:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the System Permissions Profiles tab.
2. Click Find
to locate the System Permission Profile record to alter.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, make sure the profile for Access Secure is set to Update, Insert, or
Delete.
4. Click Save
.
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Verifying time zones
The Time Zone feature associates a time zone with items in your database that have a physical location, such as
micros, operators, or hosts.
Monitors display dates and times in all three time zones: Host, Micro, and Operator. Using the Preferences icon
on the Monitor toolbar, you can choose which columns to display.
Date and time entry fields on event forms and on the Category scheduler specify a context of either Host,
Micro, or Operator which allows you to schedule events or categories in any of those contexts.
Note:
Some Picture Perfect systems may experience a temporary discrepancy in transaction date and time during the DST
change. This will only affect systems with servers or micro controllers that span multiple time zones. For example, if a
server is located in Central DT and microcontrollers are in Eastern DT they may experience a one-hour divergence. The
time will correct itself at the conclusion of DST.
Example
Example 1:
You have three offices, one in New York, one in San Francisco, and one in Houston. You are the system
administrator and you are in New York; the host is in Houston. You want to schedule all of the doors in the
system to open at 08:00.
•
•
•
Host Context: If you select Host as the context for this door event, all doors in the system will open
simultaneously, at 08:00 Houston time. However, it will be 09:00 in New York and 06:00 in San
Francisco.
Operator Context: If you select Operator as the context for this door event, all doors in the system
will open simultaneously, at 08:00 New York time. However, it will be 07:00 in Houston, and 05:00 in
San Francisco.
Device Context: If, however, you select Device as the context for this door event, all doors in the
system will open at 08:00 local time -- the time local to the micro to which the doors are connected.
The doors in New York will open first at 08:00 local time, and then, one hour later, the doors in
Houston will open at 08:00 local time, and finally, two hours after that, the doors in San Francisco will
open at 08:00 local time.
Example 2:
You have three offices, one in New York, one in San Francisco, and one in Houston. You are the system
administrator and you are in New York; the host is in Houston. You want to expire a badge at 16:00 today.
•
•
•
Host Context: If you select Host as the context to expire this badge at 16:00, the badge expiration will
take effect at 17:00 in New York, 16:00 in Houston, and at 14:00 in San Francisco.
Operator Context: If you select Operator as the context to expire this badge at 16:00, the badge
expiration will take effect at 16:00 in New York, 15:00 in Houston, and at 13:00 in San Francisco. This
would effectively deny access immediately.
Device Context: If you select Device as the context to expire this badge at 16:00, the badge expiration
will take effect at 16:00 in New York, one hour later at 16:00 in Houston, and 3 hours later at 16:00 in
San Francisco.
Chapter 8
Device management
Figure 72. Time Zone form.
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. The list is in the
order that the fields appear on the form. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 74. Time Zone form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a description (up to 60 characters). This description should include the name of the country and region
as well as the GMT time offset. Example: US-TX-United States-Texas-{GMT-6.00}
Location ID
The location code based on the ISO 3166-1 standard (up to 10 characters).Example:US-TX
Locale
The name of the country (up to 60 characters). Example: United States
Region
The name of the region if there is more than one time zone (up to 60 characters). Example: Texas
City List
A list of some major cities in this specific region or country (up to 255 characters).Example: Austin, Dallas,
Houston, San Antonio
Std. Bias (+/HHMM)
The normal difference in hours and minutes of time in this location from UTC. UTC (Coordinated Universal
Time) is more commonly referred to as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) and is the basis for the worldwide
system of civil time.
Enable DST
Click Yes to enable Daylight Savings Time.
Click No to disable Daylight Savings Time.
DST Bias (+/HHMM)
The normal difference in hours and minutes of time in this location from UTC. UTC (Coordinated Universal
Time) is more commonly referred to as GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) and is the basis for the worldwide
system of civil time.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
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Table 74. Time Zone form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Time Zone DST
• Year (YYYY)
The year that this DST is in effect
• DST Start Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time begins, in local time.
• DST Start Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time begins, in local time.
• DST End Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time ends, in local time.
• DST End Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time ends, in local time.
• UTC Start Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time begins, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC Start Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time begins, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC End Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time ends, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC End Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time ends, in UTC or GMT time.
Edit Daylight
Savings Time
• Year (YYYY)
The year that this DST is in effect
• DST Start Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time begins, in local time.
• DST Start Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time begins, in local time.
• DST End Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time ends, in local time.
• DST End Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time ends, in local time.
• UTC Start Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time begins, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC Start Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time begins, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC End Date (YYYYMMDD)
The date when Daylight Savings Time ends, in UTC or GMT time.
• UTC End Time (HHMMSS)
The time when Daylight Savings Time ends, in UTC or GMT time.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Time Zone record:
1. Select Configuration, Time Zone, to display the Time Zone tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 9 Area management
This chapter describes how to manage the different areas of access control in your
system. Readers should familiarize themselves with the information in this
chapter before continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Creating categories. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Creating areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Defining readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Defining doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
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Overview
Your Picture Perfect system uses readers to control access to doors. An area contains a group of one or more
readers and doors. You can assign categories to these areas to restrict access to certain authorized badge
holders.
The readers and doors must be defined in the system and logically grouped according to their location and the
categories of access required. In order to accomplish these tasks, the following forms need to be completed:
•
•
•
•
Categories
Areas
Readers
Doors
Creating categories
Categories are both the locks and the keys of the Picture Perfect system. A category assigned to an area can act
as a lock on the doors in that area. When you assign that same category to a badge, the category functions as
the badge holder’s key to those doors. There are 96 categories available for assignment to a badge, and 32
categories for assignment to an area or an area event.
Use the Categories form to create descriptions of each group of people who use the facility. Categories describe
users by type, title, group, or shift. Then associate each category with a permission group. The categories form
a list box that is used on the Areas, Badges, Generator, and Area Events forms.
Note:
A facility map helps identify categories of people who require access. The permission assigned to an operator
determines what categories that operator can assign. See Chapter 6 Operator administration.
Example
The cleaning crew is required to clean the building from 5 PM to 8 PM. Create a category: Cleaning Crew
17:00-20:00
Figure 73. Categories form
Chapter 9
Area management
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 75. Category form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Enter a category description up to 30 alphanumeric characters long.
Permission
Group
From the list box, select the permission group to be associated with the category.
Type
None
Access to an M2MR controlled area is not permitted while M2MR control is
enabled.
This button is only available to operators with Occupancy Control permission
granted. See Occupancy control on page 338.
Guest
A Guest is not allowed entry to an M2MR controlled area unless two (2) team
members are already present in the area.
This button is only available to operators with Occupancy Control permission
granted. See Occupancy control on page 338.
Team Member
If an M2MR controlled area is empty, a Team member is allowed entry only
with a second Team member. Additional team members can enter
individually after the initial two (2) team members are present in the M2MR
controlled area. Additionally, the final two (2) team members will not be
permitted to exit until no Guests remain.
This button is only available to operators with Occupancy Control permission
granted. See Occupancy control on page 338.
Escort Required
Facility
A badge with this category must be accompanied into an area by an escort
with valid a non-Escort category match. See Escort required on page 390 for
more information.
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Category record:
1. Select Access, Places, and then Categories tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Creating areas
An area is a group of one or more readers. Identify functions within the facility that require the same kind of
access control and give descriptive names to these areas. For example: Accounting, MIS, R&D, Lobby,
Stairwells, Cafeteria.
A single area may be assigned to multiple readers and doors. For example, the Accounting Management Area
may be assigned to a reader using the Area button on the Readers form. The same area may be assigned to a
door using the Area button on the Doors form. Additional readers and doors may be assigned to the same area,
but an individual reader or door can only belong to one area.
The permission assigned to an operator determines which areas that operator can assign to readers and doors.
See Chapter 6 Operator administration.
Example
The following areas require restricted access: Computer Room, the Archive Tape Room, and the MIS
Equipment Room. Create an area called: High Security.
Figure 74. Areas form
Chapter 9
Area management
Nested anti-passback
Nested anti-passback requires that readers be used only in a designated sequence to enter or leave a highlysecured area. For each reader that is defined as a nested anti-passback reader, you can specify which area of the
building the badge is coming from and which area it is going to. For example, the reader may allow a badge to
go from area 1 (e.g., main lobby) to area 2 (e.g., computer room).
The system remembers which area each badge (and each person) is in and updates this information whenever
the badge is used and access granted at a reader (all valid transactions update the area of the person and badge).
An anti-passback alarm or event is generated if the reader's From area does not match the badge's currentlyrecorded area. For example, an alarm or event is generated if the From area of the reader is area 3, but the
badge is currently recorded as being in area 1. When an area is successfully entered, the new current area will
be retained on both the badge that entered the area and on the person record. It is the last area on the person
record (not the badge, as a person can have multiple badges) that is recorded by a controller on a reset or learn
of a badge.
There are two default areas included in the Picture Perfect application:
•
•
Neutral cannot be edited or deleted
Outside can be edited but not deleted
The area on a new person record is set to NEUTRAL (a default area with id=-1). The controller grants access
to a badge whose current area is NEUTRAL. The OUTSIDE area is a default area that represents the outside of
the facility.
Note:
If a badge's currently-recorded area and the From area (of the reader that the badge is being used at) get out of sync,
either because of some violation of the system (e.g. a person has previously climbed over a turnstile) or for a legitimate
reason (e.g. a person has passed through a fire exit during a fire drill), some means is required to bring the two back into
sync. This can be accomplished from the Person form by resetting the last access area to NEUTRAL, so that the next
transaction at a nested anti-passback reader is always accepted without violation, and the reader's To area becomes
the badge's new area.
To accommodate different performance requirements, the system supports two methods of obtaining the
Nested APB status of a badge prior to allowing access. These methods are only to support the Nested APB
feature (available on the Reader form when the reader is the Global Nested APB type).
•
•
Host Broadcasts to Controllers. This method broadcasts the badge’s last access area status to all
associated controllers for each incoming valid APB legacy and nested transaction at the host; this is
primarily used for individual, high-traffic readers that need to avoid longer wait times.
Controller Requests from Host. This method relies on the controllers requesting the badge’s last
access area status on a per-transaction basis before evaluating access; this involves less overhead
(network traffic) at the host, but imposes a longer wait time at the reader for the badgeholder if the host
is processing many learn requests at that time.
“Fail Safe” and “Fail Secure”
To accommodate different offline behaviors when using the Controller Requests from Host method,
there are two modes of operation (Fail Safe and Fail Secure) that can be configured on a per reader
basis for readers that have been configured for Global Nested APB operations. If the controller has lost
communication with the host and the reader is configured for "Fail Secure," no access is granted at
nested APB readers. If the controller has lost communication with the host and the reader is configured
for "Fail Safe," access is granted based on categories but not based on the "From" area.
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Figure 75. Anti-passback example transactions
Here are the transactions in order with resulting current area after each:
Table 76. Anti-passback example transactions
Person/Badge
Last Access Area Transaction
Controller 1
Person/
Person Area (Host
Badge
Broadcast to
Current Area Controllers)
Controller 2
Person Area
(Host
Broadcast to
Controllers)
Controller 1
Person Area
(Controller
Requests
from Host)
Controller 2
Person Area
(Controller
Requests from
Host)
Neutral
Initial State
Neutral
Neutral
Neutral
Neutral
Neutral
Neutral
Badge at
Reader 1,
enters Area A
Area A
Area A
Area A
Area A
Neutral
Area A
Badge at
Reader 3,
enters Area B
Area B
Area B
Area B
Area A
Area B
Area B
Badge at
Reader 5,
enters Area C
Area C
Area C
Area C
Area A
Area C
Area C
Badge at
Reader 7,
enters Area A
Area A
Area A
Area A
Area A
Area C
Chapter 9
Area management
Nested APB Configurations
Two APB configurations are supported:
•
•
Global Nested APB
Timed (Local) Nested APB
Global Nested APB - Host Broadcasts to Controllers
The current area status of a badge is synchronized across all relevant controllers on a server (for example, in an
Enterprise system at a subhost, but not to the nethost or other subhost controllers).
On all valid APB legacy and nested transactions (VALID_APB_IN, VALID_APB_OUT, PASSIVE_APB_IN,
PASSIVE_APB_OUT, VALID_NESTED_APB, PASSIVE_NESTED_APB, FAIL_SAFE) that occur, all
controllers (except dial-up) that know the badge and have at least one Host Broadcasts to Controllers type,
Global Nested APB reader are notified of the Current Area of the badge.
Global Nested APB - Controller Requests from Host
When Global Nested APB is configured to Controller Requests from Host, every controller will request the
"Current Area" for the person the badge belongs to (since the person's current area may have been set from a
different badge on that person) from the host for each nested APB transaction that is about to occur prior to
evaluating access, when the badge is presented to a reader.
This approach has the least overhead at the host, but will incur longer wait times on badge learn transactions at
a Nested APB reader.
Timed (Local) Nested APB
The current area status of a badge is not synchronized across controllers on a server. The status is known local
to each controller. The controller will reset the current area status back to NUETRAL once the timeout period
has expired.
Note:
Local/Timed Nested APB is only useful if all readers are on a single controller.
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 77. Areas form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type an area description up to 30 alphanumeric characters long. Example: Lobby
The lobby area may include more than one location if the facility has multiple entrances or buildings.
An area may be one contiguous physical space (such as the Computer Room) or it may be a number of
separate but related spaces that require the same level of access control.
Example: Computer Room, MIS Lab, Computer Vault, MIS Equipment Room
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Permission Group
Click display the Permission Group list box. Select the desired permission group for this area to identify
operators who can assign this area to readers and doors.
Physical State
Enabled indicates that the system allows readers in this area to read badges. Disabled indicates that the
system does not allow the area’s readers to operate.
Logical State
Online indicates that the readers in this area operate in normal mode. Offline indicates that the readers
are not allowed to unlock doors, but are allowed to read badges, pass badge data, route and archive
access messages, and activate associated alarms.
Shunting
Enabled indicates that the system allows use of keypad override of shunt time on doors and readers in
this area. Disabled indicates that shunting is not allowed.
This has no effect on Door Held Open or Door Forced Open. See Held Open Sensing on the Doors form and
Shunting on the Reader form.
Scheduling
Enabled indicates that the system recognizes scheduled changes associated with this area. Disabled
indicates that the system ignores scheduled changes.
Antipassback
Enforcement
If anti-passback is set to Normal for this area, it works in conjunction with the anti-passback status setting
on each badge used to access this area. If set to Passive, anti-passback will not be enforced in this area
which means that access will be granted regardless of the anti-passback status. However, violations will
still be reported.
See APB Control on the Personnel form.
Occupancy
Control
Occupancy Counting
The ability to control occupancy counting is available only if the operator has
occupancy control permission granted. See Occupancy control on page 338.
When enabled, it allows the number of persons in a controlled space to be
monitored. The occupancy count is reset to zero and the two man rule radio
buttons are enabled. When disabled, the two man rule mode is forced to
disabled and the two man rule radio buttons are grayed out and not
selectable. Picture Perfect will update the occupancy count when a valid entry
or exit to/from the area occurs. The default is for this to be disabled.
Occupancy Count
The value in this field shows the current occupancy count for the area.
Reset
This button is enabled only if the operator has occupancy control permission
granted and occupancy counting has been enabled. It allows the occupancy
count for an area to be reset to zero.
Chapter 9
Area management
Table 77. Areas form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Two Man Rule
Control
These radio buttons are enabled only if the operator has occupancy control permission granted and
occupancy counting has been set to Enabled. Two man rule (2MR) or modified two man rule (M2MR) can
only be enabled if the occupancy count is zero. If the operator violates this rule, an error message will
appear in the status window. The record cannot be saved unless the count is reset to zero or two man rule
mode is set to Disabled.
Category
Manager
Disabled
Select this radio button to deactivate two man rule mode if it is currently
enabled.
Standard
Select this radio button to activate the standard two man rule mode which
ensures that at least two badge holders occupy a given controlled space.
Modified Door Control
Select this radio button to activate the modified two man rule mode which
restricts access to a controlled area based on their M2MR category type. The
first two badge holders to enter a controlled space must be of the Team
member category type and at least two Team members must be present in the
controlled space until all Guests have exited. Additionally, a Team member
within the controlled space must press a door release button in order to allow
entry to any subsequent badge holders. The door release button must be
pressed within the time specified in the Door Release Timeout field or the door
will not be unlocked.
Modified No Door
Control
Select this radio button to activate the modified two man rule mode which
restricts access to a controlled area based on their M2MR category type. The
first two badge holders to enter a controlled space must be of the Team
member category type and at least two Team members must be present in the
controlled space until all Guests have exited.
Door Release Timeout
This field is enabled only if the operator has occupancy control permission
granted. Valid values range from 0 (no timeout) to 32767 seconds.
This tab contains the active categories, ordered by slot number, that can be assigned to an area or an
area event. To access an area, a badge must match at least one category that is assigned to that area.
You may add, remove, or replace a category in a slot.
Click Filter to enter search criteria to limit the category list or use the type ahead search feature by
clicking in any cell and typing the first letters of the item for which you are searching.
For more information, see Category manager on page 244.
Note:
This field is position sensitive when used in conjunction with area category schedules.
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Table 77. Areas form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Input Groups
Invalid
The input group to trigger when an invalid badge error condition occurs:
• Deleted - The badge presented has been deleted from the Picture Perfect
database.
• Invalid PIN number - The PIN number entered in the keypad reader does
not match the PIN number in the badge record.
• Category mismatch - The category identified in the badge record does not
match the area category where the badge read occurred.
Click the Invalid Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the desired
Input Group, and then click Close.
Suspended
The input group to trigger when a suspended badge read occurs. A suspended
badge is one that has been identified in its badge record as suspended.
Click the Suspended Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the
desired Input Group for a suspended badge read, and then click Close.
Lost
The input group to trigger when a lost badge read occurs. A lost badge is one
that has been reported and identified in its badge record as lost.
Click the Lost Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the desired
Input Group for a lost badge violation, and then click Close.
Unknown
The input group to trigger when an unknown badge read occurs. An unknown
badge is one whose BID (The hidden number that uniquely identifies each
badge) is not recorded in the Badges table of the Picture Perfect database and
therefore is not recognized by the system.
Click the Unknown Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the
desired Input Group for an unknown badge violation, and then click Close.
Antipassback
The input group to trigger when an anti-passback violation occurs. When used
in conjunction with anti-passback readers, the anti-passback status (In, Out, or
Privileged) of a badge plus a category match, regulate its ability to open a door.
Example: If a badge holder starts to enter an anti-passback area by swiping
their badge, then allows the door to close without entering, he will not be able to
re-enter that area because the system has already registered him as In.
Click the Antipassback Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the
desired Input Group for an anti-passback violation, and then click Close.
Duress
The input group to trigger when a valid duress-code badge read occurs.
Duress codes can be used with Badge and Keypad or Keypad readers to alert
the system that a valid badge read was made under forced conditions or
duress.
Click the Duress Grp button to display the Ingroups list box. Select the desired
Input Group for a duress-code entry, and then click Close.
Note:
Do not assign a reader’s valid input group to one of the above
groups. This will result in an unlocked door.
Chapter 9
Area management
Table 77. Areas form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Routings
Select routings for the following types of conditions:
Route Definition
Select the desired route definition for this area. This route definition is used for
Activity Monitor routing. If this field is left blank, this area’s activity will be
routed to all operators.
Invalid Routing
Click the Invalid Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select the
desired routing for an invalid badge read, and then click Close.
Suspended Routing
Click the Suspended Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select the
desired routing for a suspended badge read, and then click Close.
Lost Routing
Click the Lost Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select the desired
routing for a lost-badge read, and then click Close.
Unknown Routing
Click the Unknown Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select the
desired routing for an unknown badge read, and then click Close.
Antipassback Routing
Click the Antipassback Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select
the desired routing for a valid anti-passback transaction, and then click Close.
Escort Routing
Select the desired routing for a valid escort transaction.
See Escort required on page 390 for more information.
Valid Routing
Click the Valid Routing button to display the Routings list box. Select the
desired routing for a valid badge read, and then click Close.
When you assign an area to a door or a reader, the categories (and controls) defined for the area become valid
for all doors and readers that belong to that area.
Some of the controls on the Areas form are also available on the Doors form and the Readers form. In some
cases, this may allow an individual door or reader to have controls that differ from the assigned area. Table 78
lists the controls that Areas, Readers, and Doors have in common.
Table 78. Common controls
Areas
Readers
Doors
Scheduling
Scheduling
Scheduling
Shunting
Shunting
Physical State
Physical State
Logical State
Logical State
Note:
A setting of Disabled in any of these fields on any of these forms overrides a setting of Enabled in the same field on
another form. For example, if Shunting is Enabled for an area, but a reader in that area has Shunting Disabled, the
Shunting feature will not work for that reader. Shunting must be set to Enabled on both the Areas and Readers forms.
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Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Area record:
1. Select Access, Places, and then Areas tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining readers
Use the Readers form to define how each reader operates and to associate the reader with an area, a micro, and
input group so that the system can process reader activity.
Example
A bank vault employs the added security offered by the Two Man Rule option, requiring a minimum of two
occupants in the area. The door to the vault room is controlled by a reader. The vault reader is wired to the
following address: 01 (Micro 1) - 1 (Reader board 1) -00 (the address on the board).
Figure 76. Readers form
Chapter 9
Area management
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 79. Readers form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a reader description up to 60 characters long. Example: 00-1-00 LOBBY DOOR
Board
Type the board number of the reader board where this reader is connected. See Table 69, M5
wiring chart - Outputs on page 160 of Chapter 8 Device management.
Address
Type the physical address of this reader on its reader board. See Table 69, M5 wiring chart Outputs on page 160 of Chapter 8 Device management.
Micro
Click the Select Micro button to display the Micros list box. Select the micro where this reader is
wired.
Facility
Click the Facility list box to display a list of available facilities. The facility set determines which
facility will be able to view the associated badge and trace activity on the Activity Monitor if the
Badge and Trace options are selected.
By default, the reader record will be assigned the same facility as the micro to which the
reader is assigned however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign a reader’s facility.
This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for instance
two companies occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more
information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
To Area
Click the To Area list box to display a list of available areas. Select the area that this reader
protects, and then click Close. The area that you select should have categories and controls
appropriate for this reader.
From Area
Click the From Area list box to display a list of available areas. If configuring a nested APB
reader, select an area. Refer to Nested APB in this table for more information.
Interval Time
Type the maximum number of seconds allowed to elapse between stages of a transaction,
such as entering a PIN number in a keypad reader after a badge swipe, and/or between
separate badge transactions on a double-badge reader. (See Double-badge function on
page 366 for details on this feature.) The time starts after the first transaction.
Valid In Group
Click to display the Input Groups list box. Select the input group to be triggered when a valid
badge is swiped through this reader.
Note:
Invalid In Group
Only Trigger on Input (Individual) which are non-boolean input groups, are displayed
in the list box. See Boolean Type on page 130.
Click to display the Input Groups list box. Select the input group to be triggered when an invalid
badge is swiped through this reader.
Note:
Only Trigger on Input (Individual) which are non-boolean input groups, are displayed
in the list box. See Boolean Type on page 130.
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Table 79. Readers form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Two man rule output
A drop down list from which you may optionally select an output to associate with an indicator
device, such as a blinking light. The indicator device will be activated when the first of two
required valid badge reads for entry or exit from a two man rule enabled area has occurred at
the reader. When the indicator device is activated, the second person should present their
badge at the reader before the timeout period expires, in order to unlock the door to permit
entry or exit from the area. The indicator will be deactivated when a timeout or a second valid
badge read or an invalid badge read occurs at the reader. The Two man rule output is a digital
output (DO) point configured to control the indicator device. The value in the drop down list
may only be changed by an operator with Occupancy control permission granted.
Physical State
Enabled means this reader is allowed to read badges. Disabled means the reader cannot read
badges.
Note:
If a reader is not operational, set Physical State to Disabled.
Logical State
Online permits the normal operating mode for this reader. Offline means the reader is allowed
to read badges, pass badge data, route and archive access messages, and activate associated
alarms -- but is not allowed to unlock associated doors.
Number of Badges
Single means the reader requires only one valid badge read to open the door. Double means
the reader requires two separate valid badge reads to open the door.
Physical Reader Function
Select the desired physical reader type for this reader:
Badge Only
A reader used only to read badges using a badge swipe.
Keypad Only
A reader used only as a keypad, where, in lieu of a badge swipe, the
badge encode number must be entered using the keypad. Press * or +,
enter the badge encode number, and then press #.
Badge and Keypad
A badge reader used in conjunction with a keypad, where a PIN, a
duress code, a shunt override code, or an alarm response code can be
entered in addition to the badge swipe. See the procedures for each
type of code below:
PIN or Duress Code
• Swipe the Badge.
• Press * or + , enter the PIN or Duress Code, and then press #.
• Shunt Override Code
• Press * or +, enter the Shunt Code, and then press #.
• Swipe the Badge.
• Press * or +, enter the PIN or Duress Code, and then press #.
Alarm Response Code
• Press * or +, enter the Alarm-Response Code, and then press #.
• Swipe the Badge.
• Press * or +, enter the PIN or Duress Code, and then press #.
Badge or Keypad
The reader can be used either as a badge reader or a keypad. If Badge
is selected, then the reader is used only to read badges using a badge
swipe. If Keypad is selected, the badge encode number is entered
using the keypad in lieu of a badge swipe. Press * or +, enter the badge
encode number, and then press #.
Chapter 9
Area management
Table 79. Readers form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Swipe and Show Control
This feature is only visible when the optional Image package is installed. See Monitoring Swipe
and Show activity on page 274 for more details on Swipe and Show.
Swipe and Show
Select Enabled to enable Swipe and Show on this reader. Select
Disabled to disable Swipe and Show on this reader.
Note:
Authorization
Required
Select Yes to designate a reader that will display a photo in a popup
window beside the Activity Monitor and require an operator to unlock a
door. Select No to designate a reader that will display a photo in a
popup window beside the Activity Monitor and will unlock a door
without operator intervention.
Note:
Logical Reader Function
APB
A reader cannot be defined as Toggle when Swipe and Show
is Enabled. See Toggle on page 186.
The Yes and No buttons are not available unless Swipe and
Show is Enabled. Access cannot be granted through readers
defined as Authorization Required while communications to
the micro are down.
Select the desired Logical Reader Function for this reader:
Normal
Used to grant access into an area.
Anti-Passback In
Used to log a badge holder “in” when entering.
Anti-Passback Out
Used to log a badge holder “out” when exiting.
Time and Attendance
In/Out
Used to log a badge holder “in” and “out” using the same reader (such
as the Model 100 Wiegand reader) by swiping the badge the normal
way for “in” and reversing the badge or turning the badge backwards
for “out”.
Time and Attendance
In
Used to log a badge holder “in” at the start of a work shift.
Time and Attendance
Out
Used to log a badge holder “out” at the end of a work shift
Nested APB
Used to configure APB on nested areas.
If the Logical Reader Function is set to APB In, APB Out, or Nested APB, select the desired APB
Type for this reader:
Global APB
Used as the default, this allows the host to share APB status/nested
APB area status with participating controllers.
Timed APB
Used to designate the reader as a Timed APB reader in which a badge
holder’s APB status/nested APB area will return to Neutral after a
defined period of time. A Timed APB reader is useful in a site where a
badge holder may enter a site by going through an APB reader but is
not required to exit the site by going through an APB reader. If this
option is selected, a Timed APB Duration must also be defined. A Timed
APB status/nested APB area is local to the micro.
Reset Timed APB
Immediately
Used to reset the Timed APB status/nested APB area back to Neutral
immediately following a badge swipe.
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Table 79. Readers form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Timed APB Duration
Enter a value to represent how long a badge holder’s Timed APB
status/nested APB area will be set when their badge is used on the
reader. The Timed APB Duration cannot exceed one day. A duration of
0 allows the micro to reset the status to Neutral immediately,
producing the same effect as Reset Timed APB Immediately.
Global Nested APB
Status Method
This control is enabled only if Nested APB under Logical Reader
Function has been chosen.
Host Broadcasts to Controllers - The host actively sends nested APB
area information to participating controllers.
Controller Requests from Host - The controller requests nested APB
area information from the host as needed.
Global Nested APB
Micro Offline
Operation Mode
This control is enabled only if Controller Requests from Host has been
chosen.
Fail Safe - While the controller is offline, the controller will not consider
nested APB area information when granting access.
Fail Secure - While the controller is offline, the controller will deny
access to nested APB readers.
Note:
There is a period of time when the controller loses
communication with host, where it is not offline yet and
during this time, when a badge is swiped on a Controller
Requests From Host type (Fail Safe) reader, a learn timeout is
generated. Once the controller is offline, the fail safe/fail
secure rules are followed to provide or deny access.
Scheduling
Enabled means established schedule changes will control this reader. Disabled means
established schedule changes will not affect this reader.
Shunting
Enabled means this reader allows the use of keypad override of shunt time. Disabled means
the reader will not allow shunting. When enabled, the Alarm Shunting feature allows a valid
badge holder to keep a door open (for the time specified, in minutes, in the Keypad Shunt Time
field of the Doors form) without getting a Door Held Open alarm. The badge holder enters the
shunt code (defined on the Micros form) using the reader keypad, presents their badge, and
then enters their PIN number.
Toggle
A reader used in special applications only, in which a badge swipe toggles the reader’s valid
input group (non-boolean) On (yes) or Off (no), such as to arm/disarm a burglar alarm system.
Toggle readers are not intended for door control, but can be used that way with some
limitations. To do this, the door must be configured without a sensor, and the doorstrike output
must be configured to reset with an input rather than on duration. With this configuration, the
reader can toggle the door between locked and unlocked, but since there is no sensor, there
can be no detection of the door being forced open or held open too long.
For an example of toggle-reader use, see Creating input groups on page 127 of Chapter 8
Device management.
Note:
Limited Usage
If Toggle is set to Yes and Authorization Required is set to Yes, photos are displayed
for invalid transactions, but not valid transactions. See Monitoring Swipe and Show
activity on page 274.
Selecting Enabled defines the reader as a limited usage reader, which will only grant access to
a badge holder for the number of times specified in the Usage Count field of the Badges form.
There is no limit to the number of readers that can be defined as limited usage readers. See
Chapter 11 Badge management for related information. The count must be manually reset.
Chapter 9
Area management
Table 79. Readers form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Elevator Reader
Selecting Yes defines the reader as an elevator reader. A maximum of 16 readers on a micro
can be configured as elevator readers.
Note:
Swipe and Show cannot be enabled when the reader is defined as elevator.
See Elevator control on page 369 for related information.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Reader record:
1. Select Configuration, Doors and Readers, and then Readers tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Defining doors
Use the Doors form to define how each door operates. Depending on the features that it should have, you may
want to associate the door with an area and with inputs, input groups, and outputs--so that the system can
process door status information and operate optional door hardware or alarm devices.
The Doors form links all access and control features of the physical door. These include mechanical and
electronic locking devices that keep the door opened or closed, such as: door strikes, magnetic locks, exit
buttons, and push bars. They also include sensing and monitoring devices such as door sensors, exit requests,
and alarm points. The Doors form fields required for activation of particular features are listed with those
features below. Depending on the features required for each door, all fields may or may not be applicable.
Note:
To ensure proper operation when the micro runs offline, the door sensor, reader, door strike, and exit button must be
wired to the same micro.
Example
The vault area of ABC Bank is accessed through a door equipped with an exit button.
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Figure 77. Doors Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 80. Doors form fields
Field name
Description
Door Values
Define the door and the times allowed before alarms are enabled.
Description
Type a door description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long.
Unlock Time
(secs)
Enter the number of seconds that this door may remain unlocked due to a valid badge read or an exit button
being pushed. This field controls how long the door strike is unlocked for the badge holder to open the door.
After that, the Allowable Open Time controls how long the badge holder may keep the door open while the
badge holder is passing through.
Forced Open
Shunt Time
(secs)
Enter the number of seconds that the Door Forced Open alarm will be shunted before an alarm is generated.
When the shunt time expires, the Door Forced Open alarm is enabled.
Allowable
Open Time
(secs)
Enter the number of seconds that this door may be open (due to a valid badge read) before an alarm condition
exists. Be sure to set the Held Open Sensing button to Detected (in the Door Control box) to activate this
feature.
The number of seconds set here must be greater than the Unlock Time. This field controls how long a door
strike will remain unlocked after the Unlock Time expires so a badge holder can open the door and not get a
Door Forced Open alarm.
Chapter 9
Area management
Table 80. Doors form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Keypad
Shunt Time
(mins)
Enter the number of minutes that this door may remain open due to a badge holder entering an override code
into a keypad reader.
Door Area
Click Door Area to display the Areas list box. Select the desired area for this door. If a reader is associated with
this door, select the same area that is assigned to the reader.
Strike Output
Click the Strike Output button to display the Outputs list box. Select the desired door strike output associated
with this door, and then click Close. The door output is a digital output (DO) point associated with the door
strike.
Example: Shipping and Receiving may use the override time to keep a shipping door open beyond the Allowable
Open Time.
Note:
Select a door strike output that is wired to the same micro as the associated door sensor input. The
system displays a popup message to the operator if an output point is selected on the wrong micro.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. By default, the door record will be assigned the same facility as the
micro to which the door is assigned however, you do have the ability to manually re-assign a door’s facility.
This might be desirable in a case where one micro controls more than one facility, for instance two companies
occupying the same building that use separate doors for entry/exit. For more information, see Creating
facilities on page 53.
M2MR
Output
Click M2MR Output to display a list box from which you may optionally select an output to associate with a
warning device, such as a horn or a strobe light. The device is used by the Modified two man rule with door
control to notify the team members in an area that a person desiring access has presented a valid badge at
the reader. The M2MR output is a digital output (DO) point configured to control the warning device. The value
in the list box may only be changed by an operator with Occupancy control permission granted. When the
warning device is triggered, team members in the area should press the button connected to the exit button
input before the door time-out has elapsed (at which point the warning will terminate) to cause the door to
unlock and allow entry to the area. The M2MR output must be physically located on the same micro as the
strike output.
Door Sensor
Click Door Sensor to display the Input list box. Select the desired input for this door sensor. A door sensor is
associated with a digital input (DI) point connected to a door sensor.
Note:
Exit Button
Click Exit to display the Inputs list box. Select the desired input for this exit button. Be sure the Exit Button
Asserts Strike field (in the Door Control box) is set to Enabled.
Note:
Forced Open
In Group
Select an exit button input that is wired to the same micro as the associated door strike output. The
system displays an operator message if you select an input point on the wrong micro. Make sure the
exit input is tied to the reader’s valid input group.
Click to display the Input Groups list box. Select an input group to activate. The associated alarm will be
triggered when a Forced Open condition occurs. (Be sure the Forced Open Monitoring field is set to Detected.)
Note:
Held Open In
Group
Select a door sensor input that is wired to the same micro as the associated door strike output. The
system displays an operator message if you select an input point on the wrong micro. Do not attach
an input group to the input unless the input is a supervised input.
Only Trigger on Input (non-boolean) input groups are displayed in the list boxes.
Click to display the Input Groups list box. Select an input group to activate. The associated alarm will be
triggered when a Held Open condition occurs. (Be sure the Held Open Sensing field is set to Detected.)
Note:
Only Trigger on Input (non-boolean) input groups are displayed in the list boxes.
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Table 80. Doors form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Pre-Alarm In
Group
Click to display the Input Groups list box. Select an input group to activate. The associated alarm will be
triggered when a Pre-Alarm condition occurs. (Be sure the Pre-Alarm field is set to Enabled.)
Note:
Only Trigger on Input (non-boolean) input groups are displayed in the list boxes.
Door State
Indicate whether the door is normally Locked (pending a valid badge read or other event) or Unlocked.
Scheduling
Select Enabled to allow scheduled changes set for this door to take place. Select Disabled to prevent
scheduled changes set for this door from taking place.
Held Open
Sensing
Select Detected to allow an alarm condition to occur on this door when the door remains open (with a valid
badge reader or exit button) for too long, based on the Allowable Open Time (set in the Door Values box). Select
Ignored if the sensing function on this door is not used.
Forced Open
Monitoring
Select Detected to allow an alarm condition on this door to occur immediately when the door is forced open
without a valid badge read or exit device. Select Ignored if the Monitoring function on this door is not used.
Exit Button
Select Enabled to allow an exit button to unlock this door for the number of seconds in the Unlock Time field
Asserts Strike and remain open for the number of seconds in the Allowable Open Time field (both set in the Door Values box).
Be sure to make a selection in the Exit Button field in the Inputs box. Select Disabled if an exit button is not
allowed to unlock this door but will shunt the door DI.
Pre-Alarm
Select Enabled to allow the Pre-alarm Notification feature to activate. See Pre-alarm notification on page 381
for details on this feature. Select Disabled if the Pre-alarm Notification feature is not used.
Note:
Input groups for the above can be generic, that is, one input group and alarm can be used by all
doors for forced, held, and pre-alarm.
Keypad
Alarm
Response
Select Enabled to allow the Keypad Alarm Response feature to activate. See Controlling alarms using a keypad
code on page 384 for details on this feature. Select Disabled if the Keypad Alarm Response feature is not used.
Forced
Relock
If enabled, this feature provides further security by locking a door if a second person presents a badge to the
reader before the first person opens the door.
Example: If a person badges into a reader but does not open the door, and a second person badges into the
same reader before the first person’s Unlock Time expires, the door will immediately lock. This will show on the
Activity Monitor as two Double Door Locked transactions (one for each person).
Door Strike
Relock
Door Strike Relock provides additional security by incorporating the ability to relock the door upon a door
opening or closing, or after a specified period of time.
On Door Open
When the door is opened, the door strike will relock. Do not use this option if
you are using magnetic locks with built-in door open sensors.
On Door Closed
When the door is closed (after being open), the door strike will immediately
relock.
On Door Unlock Duration
The door strike will relock after the Unlock Time (set in the Door Values box)
has expired.
Chapter 9
Area management
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Door record:
1. Select Configuration, Doors and Readers, and then Doors tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
To define a door sensor:
A door contact functions as a sensor for two door-open conditions: Door Open Too Long and/or Door Forced
Open.
If you are using the alarm shunting function on a door, when a valid badge unlocks the door strike and the
badge holder opens the door, the system begins to count the number of seconds of Allowable Open Time. If the
door is still open when this time elapses, an associated alarm can occur.
If you are using the monitoring function on a door, when a door is forced open, an associated alarm can occur
immediately.
Note:
You must define this sensor input (on the Inputs form) before you can select the appropriate Door Sensor Input (on the
Doors form).
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Complete the following fields of the Doors form.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Description
Forced Open Shunt Time
Allowable Open Time
Keypad Shunt Time (optional - so the badge holder can use a code to override the Allowable Open
Time).
Held-Open Sensing
Forced-Open Monitoring
Input Groups (Forced Open/Held Open/Pre-Alarm)
Inputs, Door sensor (associated with a DI point wired to the door sensor)
4. Click Save
.
To define a door strike setting:
A door strike associated with a reader (and/or an exit device) releases to unlock a door when a valid badge read
occurs (or when an exit device is pushed).
When the door strike releases, the system starts counting the Unlock Time set for the door strike and then
closes the door strike when the time elapses. The badge holder opens the door during the Unlock Time.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Complete the following fields of the Doors form.
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•
•
•
Description
Unlock Time
Strike Output DO (digital output point wired to the door strike)
4. Click Save
.
To define an exit device:
An exit device releases the door strike on a door. Exit devices are often used on lobby doors. The exit button is
associated with a door strike so that the latch unlocks (and the sensor is shunted) when the exit button is
pushed. You can enable the exit button and define how long the latch remains unlocked using the Doors form.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Complete the following fields of the Doors form.
•
•
•
•
•
Description
Unlock Time
Exit Button Asserts Strike - Enabled
Strike Output DO (digital output point wired to the door strike)
Inputs, Exit Button
4. Click Save
.
Chapter 10 Schedules and modes
This chapter describes how to create modes, how to change your system to a
different operating mode (by schedule or command), and how to schedule events
within a mode. Readers should familiarize themselves with the information in this
chapter before continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Creating modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Events overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
Scheduling area events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
Scheduling reader events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Scheduling door events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Scheduling alarm events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
Scheduling input group events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Scheduling output group events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Scheduling backup events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
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Overview
Schedules allow you to change a variety of operational characteristics based on mode, day of week, and time of
day. Using the Schedule feature, you can specify when you want a particular type of change to occur. That
change will remain in effect until overridden by another schedule or mode event, or manually changed by an
operator.
Picture Perfect supports multiple modes of operation, such as emergency and non-emergency modes.
Examples of non-emergency modes are Normal or Holiday mode; examples of emergency modes are Fire or
Lockdown. When you initially set up the system, make sure that all the values and schedules that you define
(for readers, doors, areas, etc.) are associated with your normal operating mode. Weekdays and weekends
occur within your normal operating mode, so the system does not need a unique “weekend mode.” An
“evening mode” is not required either, as the normal mode can contain schedules for multiple shifts and
weekends.
To operate the system in a different mode during holidays (or other special events based on the calendar), you
must create a mode, re-define the schedules to occur during that mode, and then schedule the mode to become
active on a selected date and time.
When a mode becomes active, it remains active until changed by an operator (Change Mode), another
scheduled Mode Event, or by a DI-triggered emergency mode. A Mode Event is a scheduled change to one or
more of the operating characteristics. Events can occur when a mode starts, when a mode ends, or at a given
time of day and day of week within the mode. Typical events are locking and unlocking lobby doors for general
access, turning on motion detectors after hours, and changing categories on areas to control access for shift
workers.
Administrative procedures can also be scheduled, such as performing backups and running reports. For details
on these procedures, see Scheduling backup events on page 219 and Scheduling reports on page 306.
Creating modes
Use the Modes form to define each system operating mode. Operating modes are an administrative decision, as
each facility has unique requirements.
Examples of scheduled operating modes are Normal mode and Holiday mode. Examples of command
operating modes are emergency modes such as Fire or Lockdown mode, which can be initiated by the operator
at any time. (See Changing modes by command on page 196.) A mode that you can design to provide tighter
security in case working conditions change from the routine is Restricted-access mode, which can be scheduled
or commanded.
After a mode is created using the Modes form, you will define its characteristics by using the various Events
forms.
Normal mode
Normal mode usually does not require any start/end events to be scheduled. A start/end event is something you
schedule to happen once; it is not subject to weekly or 24-hour cycles.
Use runtime events to schedule the necessary cycles. You do not need “weekend” or “evening” modes, since
the runtime events in a single mode allow you to set different operating characteristics for all days of the week
and all times of the day.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Emergency modes
Create Emergency modes to handle situations such as fires, accidents, or other emergency situations. Define
these modes on the Modes Tab > Mode Creation form by checking the Emergency Mode check box. Enter a
description such as Emergency or Fire.
Emergency modes are usually activated by the operator using Mode Command, and typically use start/end
events. Remember that most mode-start events require parallel mode-end events. Unless there are events that
need to cycle during the emergency mode, you do not need to set up runtime events.
Holiday modes
Create Holiday modes to handle access-requirement changes during scheduled holidays. Define the mode on
the Modes Tab > Mode Creation form using a description such as Holiday or Vacation.
Holiday modes are usually activated automatically by scheduling them using Mode Events, and typically use
start/end events. Remember that most mode-start events require parallel mode-end events.
Be sure to schedule the start of a Holiday mode so that its events are timed properly in regard to events of the
normal operating mode. For example, a setting of Holiday mode may be to leave the lobby doors locked.
Normal mode, however, always unlocks the lobby doors at 7 AM. If Holiday mode starts on Monday morning
at 8 AM, and no schedule has been created to lock the doors when the Holiday mode starts, the lobby doors
will already have been unlocked by Normal mode an hour before; therefore, the lobby doors will remain in an
unlocked state throughout the Holiday mode.
One way to keep the doors locked is to schedule Holiday mode to start when the doors are still in a locked state
(prior to 7 AM). Another option is to make a mode-start event that locks the doors when Holiday mode goes
into effect.
When you set up a Holiday mode, you do not need to set up runtime events unless you want weekly and daily
cycles to occur. If you want any of the runtime events in your normal operating mode to occur during your
holiday mode, you must duplicate those runtime events within Holiday mode.
Example
An Emergency mode allows you to conduct fire drills as needed to comply with safety requirements.
Figure 78. Modes form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 81. Modes form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters) for Description. Example:
Emergency
Emergency Mode
Click the Emergency Mode button if you want to designate this mode as an Emergency mode.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Mode record:
1. Select Control, Modes, and then Modes tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Changing modes by command
Modes can be changed by command, using the Change Mode form, or by schedule, using the Mode Events
form. Use the Change Mode form to change your system operating mode immediately. For example,
emergency events (such as fire, accident, or work disruption) require an immediate change to a different
operating strategy. Mode Command lets you do this.
Example
While in Normal mode, change to Holiday mode.
Figure 79. Change Mode form
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 82. Change Mode form fields
Field name
Description
Current Modes for Facilities
This pane reflects the mode that is currently in effect, and the previous mode for each
facility. Select a facility from this pane to rollback or change a mode. For more information,
see Creating facilities on page 53.
Select All Facilities
Click this button to select all active facilities.
Mode
Click to display the Modes list box. Select the operating mode to which you want to change.
Permit schedule mode changes:
Select Yes or No, to indicate whether you want the system to allow future mode changes to
occur as scheduled. You can change this option even if you don’t change the mode itself.
Yes
No
Select Yes to allow scheduled mode changes to occur.
Select No to override scheduled mode changes in an emergency.
Example: If you change to an emergency mode on the day before a scheduled
holiday and you permit scheduled mode changes to occur, the system will
switch to holiday mode as scheduled. If you do not permit scheduled changes
to occur, the system will stay in the emergency mode until you use the Mode
Command form to change the mode again.
Email
Change Mode
Rollback
Send Email
Select Send Email to send a notification to all email addresses associated
with the selected facilities.
Do Not Send
Email
Select if sending an email notification is not necessary.
Default
Mode Email
Setting
Select to send an email as defined on the Modes form.
Click the Change Mode button to tell the system to change to the selected mode and/or to
allow or disallow scheduled mode changes.
Select the Rollback button to revert back to the previous mode.
Note: Rollback from Emergency mode is not allowed.
Related procedures
To change mode by command:
1. From the Control menu, select Modes, then click the Change Mode tab.
2. Select one or more facilities that you want to change to the new operating mode.
3. Select the operating mode to which you want to change.
4. Select Yes or No on the field titled Permit Scheduled Mode Changes, to indicate whether you want the
system to allow future mode changes to occur as scheduled. You can change this option even if you
don't change the mode itself.
•
Yes allows scheduled mode changes to occur.
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•
No allows you to override scheduled mode changes in an emergency.
For example, if you change to an alternate mode on the day before a scheduled holiday and you permit
scheduled mode changes to occur, the system, will switch to holiday mode as scheduled. If you do not
permit scheduled changes to occur, the system will stay in the alternate mode until you use the Mode
Command form to change the mode again.
5. Select an e-mail method under Email.
6. Click Change Mode to tell the system to change to the selected mode and/or to allow or disallow
scheduled mode changes. A message window displays the message: Mode Change Successful.
Changing modes by scheduling a mode event
Use the Mode Event form to schedule a mode change such as from Normal to Holiday. To have the system
return to normal operations when the mode event is over, schedule another mode event that activates Normal
mode.
When the system enters a new mode, it does not execute events for the new mode that are scheduled to occur
before the new mode starts. For example, if an event scheduled for 7 AM in normal operating mode unlocks
the lobby doors, but the system does not return to normal mode until 8 AM, then the lobby doors will remain
locked until the next day at 7 AM.
Exception: If communication with the micro is lost, when the micro resets it will go back to midnight and
execute all events scheduled to begin from midnight until the current time. If the event that was in progress,
when the micro reset, was scheduled to start before midnight, the micro will not recognize it and will default to
the normal mode. To ensure that a schedule is restored when a micro resets, schedule events to begin after
midnight, for example 00:01.
If you schedule or command the system to return to normal operating mode after the time when scheduled
runtime events for normal mode are supposed to occur, it is a good idea to schedule start/end events such as
unlocking (or locking) the lobby doors. See Start/end events on page 200.
It is important to note that if there are three or more modes in the system, activating an event at mode end does
not determine the mode to which the system is switching. For example, assume the following three modes are
in the system, Normal, Holiday, and Emergency. If the system is currently in Holiday mode, at the end of
Holiday mode, the system could switch to either Normal or Emergency mode. Therefore, it is recommended
that you activate an event at mode start, if there are three or more modes in the system.
Example
The New Year Holiday mode could be triggered by a New Year Start mode event scheduled at 5 AM on New
Year’s Day, then returned to Normal mode by an New Year End mode event scheduled at 7 AM on the day after
New Year’s Day.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Figure 80. Mode Events form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 83. Mode Events form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters) for Description. Example: Normal
to Thanksgiving
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Time Zone
Select the time zone in which the micro is located from the drop-down list. This allows Picture Perfect to
display badge and alarm activity in the micro’s local time. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Note:
In order for an operator to use this field, they must have at least View page level permission for
the Time Zone form. See Creating facility permission profiles on page 81.
New Mode
Click New Mode to display the Modes list box. Select the mode that is to go into effect during this mode
event, and then click Close to close the list box.
Date
Type the date this mode event begins or click the calendar button.
Time
Type the time this mode event begins or click the clock button.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Mode Event:
1. From the Control menu, select Modes, and then click the Mode Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Events overview
Use the Events forms to define and schedule the desired characteristics for Area Events, Reader Events, Door
Events, Alarm Events, Input Group Events, Output Group Events, Backup Events, or Report Events, and
assign the appropriate mode to each of them.
Two types of event scheduling options are available: Runtime and Start/End.
•
•
Note:
Runtime lets you schedule an event to cycle within a mode, and can occur at a particular time on any
days of the week.
Start/End schedules the event to take place only once, either at mode start or at mode end.
Schedules that run on the micros can update the database. This is configurable on the Parameters form using the field
Schedules Update Database. With this feature enabled, as long as there is communication with the micro, the host will
reflect the scheduled state of the device. (For example, if a door is scheduled to unlock at 8 AM, the host record will be
updated to reflect the change.) If this feature is disabled, the host record will only reflect the host database information
Runtime events
Runtime Events are events scheduled to occur in weekly cycles for selected areas, readers, doors, alarms, input
groups, and output groups. A runtime event can occur on one or more days per week at the start time that you
select. Runtime events are frequently used for the normal operating mode.
Runtime events must be created in “pairs,” so that the entire cycle of events can be completed. Therefore, you
need to create two events for each cycle and make sure both events are assigned to the same mode.
For example, an “unlock door at 8 AM” event is paired with a “lock door at 5 PM” event to define a 24-hour
cycle for that door. Both events are scheduled for weekdays only. The door does not require a runtime schedule
for weekends, because the door locks at 5 PM on Friday and remains locked until Monday at 8 AM when the
“unlock door” event occurs (unless someone manually unlocks the door).
Runtime events can be used to allow certain people access to an area at certain times, such as with multiple
shifts of workers. You can assign an area certain categories from 8 AM to 5 PM, and other categories for later
shifts or for weekends. (Each shift must have its own category, which must be on the appropriate badges.) To
do this, set up a series of Area Events that change categories. After you set the days and the time for each event
(category change) to occur, the events continue to occur on a weekly cycle.
Start/end events
Start/end events occur only once during the mode, either at mode start or at mode end. Start/end events are
frequently used for Emergency and Holiday modes.
A mode-start event may require a parallel mode-end event to “undo” the change. This may not be necessary,
however, since the next normal mode change may accomplish the desired change.
For example, a Fire Mode could be set up using mode-start and mode-end events. When the operator uses the
Mode Command form to select Fire Mode, all the events associated with this mode will immediately activate,
such as triggering a continuous siren and unlocking all doors so people can exit or enter the building without
badges.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Scheduling area events
To schedule changes for all the readers, doors, and routings in an area, use an area event. An event can also put
the entire area online or offline.
Use the Area Events form to define area events for each mode. You can create events that affect all doors and
readers in an area. Defining an event requires you to select a mode, set the time of the event, select an area, and
specify one or more changes to the area, readers, or doors.
Note:
Do not set up the Area Events form to match the fields on the Area form. Fields that do not need to be scheduled should
not be selected, for example, if the area is already online, do not select Online on the Area Event schedule.
Example
An area defined as General Access is made up of several readers and doors. It can be accessed Monday through
Friday from 8 AM to 5 PM. To accomplish this, an Unlock Door at 8 AM runtime event is paired with a Lock
Door at 5 PM runtime event on weekdays only.
Figure 81. Area Event form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 84. Area Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters) for Description. This event may
include more than one location if the facility has multiple entrances or buildings. Example: Unlock Door at
08:00
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to restrict
operator access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see Creating facilities on
page 53.
Area
Select the area in which the event will occur.
Area Online/
Offline
Two Man Rule
• Online: All readers in the area operate online during the event.
• Offline: All readers in the area operate offline during this event: not able to unlock doors, but able to
read badges, pass badge data, route and archive access messages, and activate associated alarms.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
These radio buttons are enabled only if the operator has Occupancy Control permission granted. To leave
Two Man Rule unaffected, when the event is triggered, none of the radio buttons should be selected. See
Radio buttons on page 27.
Note:
Mode
If the micro is unable to activate a scheduled Two Man Rule event, an alarm, “Schedule did not
run,” will be sent to the Alarm Monitor. This could occur if the area configuration changed since
the schedule was set up. For example, if the Logical Reader Function of a reader in the area was
inadvertently changed to Normal, the micro would be unable to activate the schedule.
Disabled
Select this radio button to deactivate Two Man Rule mode.
Standard
Select this radio button to activate the standard Two Man Rule mode
which ensures that at least two badge holders occupy a given controlled
space.
Modified with Door Control
Select this radio button to activate the Modified Two Man Rule mode
which restricts badge holder access to a controlled area based on their
M2MR category type. The first two badge holders to enter a controlled
area must be team members. At least two team members must be
present in the controlled space until all Guests have exited. Additionally, a
team member within the controlled space must press a door release
button to allow entry to any subsequent badge holders. The door release
button must be pressed within the time specified in the Door Release
Timeout field or the door will not be unlocked.
Modified without Door
Control
Select this radio button to activate the Modified Two Man Rule mode
which restricts badge holder access to a controlled area based on their
M2MR category type. The first two badge holders to enter a controlled
space must be team members. At least two team members must be
present in the controlled space until all Guests have exited.
Select the mode in which the area event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not assigned to a
mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Table 84. Area Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the
start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the
end of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to activate at
a specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to schedule
another event as the pair of this one. Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be
turned off at some time later that day.
Time Zone
Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See Verifying
time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Category
Manager
This tab contains the active categories, ordered by slot number, that can be assigned to an area or an
area event. To access an area, a badge must match at least one category that is assigned to that area.
You may add, remove, or replace a category in a slot.
Click Filter to enter search criteria to limit the category list or use the type ahead search feature by
clicking in any cell and typing the first letters of the item for which you are searching.
For more information, see Category manager on page 244.
Note:
Routings
This field is position sensitive when used in conjunction with area category schedules.
Routings for selected badge activities (valid, invalid, suspended, lost, unknown, anti-passback) in an area
can be routed to one or all destinations: log, monitor, printers.
Example:
• For after hours in a high security area, you can set up an area event that routes all badge activity to the
Activity Monitor; or
• You can set up an area event to route selected activities to a printer or to online history files to be
examined later.
Reader Online/
Offline
Physical Reader
Type
• Online: All readers in the area operate online during the event.
• Offline: All readers in the area to operate offline: not able to unlock doors, but able to read badges,
pass badge data, route and archive access messages, and activate associated alarms.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
There are four ways to define the physical reader type of a reader: Badge Only, Badge And Keypad,
Keypad Only, and Badge Or Keypad. A reader’s physical type may be changed with a reader event.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Example: To provide higher security at certain hours, you can define a badge-and-keypad reader as a
badge-only reader from 8 AM to 5 PM and a badge-and-keypad reader from 5 PM to 8 AM. To gain access
after 5 PM, a badge holder must swipe their badge and also use the keypad to enter a unique PIN code.
Number of
Badges
There are two badge controls available: Single and Double.
• Single: Only one valid badge is required.
• Double: Two complete, valid, and distinct transactions are required.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
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Table 84. Area Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Swipe and Show
Control
This feature is only visible if you have the Image package installed. You can schedule a specific time
period for any of the following functions to be active:
Select Enabled to enable Swipe And Show on this reader. Select Disabled to disable Swipe And Show on
this reader.
Note:
A reader cannot be defined as Toggle when Swipe And Show is Enabled. See Toggle on
page 186. If Toggle is set to Yes and either Authorization Required or Authorization Not Required
is turned on, photos will be displayed for invalid transactions, but not valid transactions.
Authorization Required
• Yes: Designate a reader that will display a photo on the Activity
Monitor and require an operator to unlock a door.
• No: Designate a reader that will display a photo on the Activity
Monitor and will unlock a door without operator intervention.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Notes:
• The Yes and No buttons are not available unless Swipe And Show
Enabled is selected.
• Access cannot be granted through readers defined as Authorization
Required while communications to the micro are down.
Logical Reader
Type
To change the way the reader functions, schedule a reader event that changes the logical reader function:
Normal, Anti-passback In, Anti-passback Out, Time & Attendance In, Time & Attendance Out, or Time &
Attendance In/out.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Example: To provide higher security after hours, you can set up certain readers as anti-passback-in readers
and others as anti-passback-out readers;
or
To provide data about shifts that badge in and out of an area, you can set up a reader event that changes a
normal reader to a Time & Attendance In (or Out) reader.
APB Type
To change the way the anti-passback feature functions, schedule an area event that changes the APB
Type of all readers in the area: Global APB or Timed APB.
Global APB
Used as the default, this allows the host to share APB status/nested APB
area status with participating controllers.
Timed APB
Used to designate the reader as a Timed APB reader in which a badge
holder’s APB status/nested APB area will return to Neutral after a defined
period of time. A Timed APB reader is useful in a site where a badge
holder may enter a site by going through an APB reader but is not
required to exit the site by going through an APB reader. If this option is
selected, a Timed APB Duration must also be defined. A Timed APB
status/nested APB area is local to the micro.
Reset Timed APB Immediately Used to reset the Timed APB status/nested APB area back to Neutral
immediately following a badge swipe.
APB Duration
A value that represents how long a badge holder’s Timed APB status (In or
Out) is set when the badge is used on a reader, before being returned to
Neutral.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Table 84. Area Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Door State:
Unlocked/Locked
You can set up area events to open all doors in an area during normal business hours
Example: Lobby doors or common interior doors such as hallways.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Held Open
Sensing:
Detected/Ignored
You can set up area events to ignore doors that are held open. Example: Lobby doors or common interior
doors such as hallways that are held open in an area during peak business hours.
Forced Open
Monitoring:
Detected/Ignored
You can set up area events to ignore doors that are forced open in an area.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Example: To keep a loading dock door open indefinitely during business hours without an alarm occurring.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Area Event:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Area Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
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Scheduling reader events
If you want to change the characteristics of a single reader (rather than a group of readers in an area), use a
reader event instead of an area event.
Use the Reader Events form to define reader events for each mode. Defining an event requires you to select a
mode, set the time of the event, select a reader, and specify one or more changes to the reader.
Note:
Do not set up the Reader Events form to match the fields on the Reader form. Fields that do not need to be scheduled
should not be selected, for example, if the reader is already online, do not select Online on the Reader Event schedule.
Example
For increased security, the reader controlling access to the computer room is set for anti-passback control.
During Emergency mode this feature is disabled.
Figure 82. Reader Event form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
.
Table 85. Reader Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters) for Description.
Example: Unlock Lobby Door at 08:00.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Table 85. Reader Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Reader
Select the reader where the event will occur.
Mode
Select the mode in which the reader event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not
assigned to a mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the end of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to
activate at a specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to
schedule another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later that
day.
Time Zone Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See
Verifying time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Physical Reader Type
There are four ways to define the physical reader type of a reader: Badge Only, Badge And
Keypad, Keypad Only, and Badge Or Keypad. A reader’s physical type may be changed with a
reader event.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Example: To provide higher security at certain hours, you can define a badge-and-keypad reader
as a badge-only reader from 8 AM to 5 PM and a badge-and-keypad reader from 5 PM to 8 AM. To
gain access after 5 PM, a badge holder must swipe their badge and also use the keypad to enter a
unique PIN code.
Reader Online/Offline
Online: All readers in the area operate online during the event.
Offline: All readers in the area to operate offline: not able to unlock doors, but able to read
badges, pass badge data, route and archive access messages, and activate associated alarms.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Number of Badges
There are two badge controls available: Single and Double. Single: Only one valid badge is
required.
Double: Two complete, valid, and distinct transactions are required.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
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Table 85. Reader Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Swipe and Show Control
This feature is only visible if you have the Image package installed. You can schedule a specific
time period for any of the following functions to be active:
Select Enabled to enable Swipe And Show on this reader. Select Disabled to disable Swipe And
Show on this reader.
Note:
A reader cannot be defined as Toggle when Swipe And Show is Enabled. See Toggle on
page 186. If Toggle is set to Yes and either Authorization Required or Authorization Not
Required is turned on, photos will be displayed for invalid transactions, but not valid
transactions.
Authorization Required
• Yes: Designate a reader that will display a photo on the Activity
Monitor and require an operator to unlock a door.
• No: Designate a reader that will display a photo on the Activity
Monitor and will unlock a door without operator intervention.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Notes:
• The Yes and No buttons are not available unless Swipe And
Show Enabled is selected.
• Access cannot be granted through readers defined as
Authorization Required while communications to the micro are
down.
Logical Reader Function
To change the way the reader functions, schedule a reader event that changes the logical reader
function: Normal, Anti-passback In, Anti-passback Out, Time & Attendance In, Time &
Attendance Out, or Time & Attendance In/out.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Example: To provide higher security after hours, you can set up certain readers as anti-passback-in
readers and others as anti-passback-out readers; or
To provide data about shifts that badge in and out of an area, you can set up a reader event that
changes a normal reader to a Time & Attendance In (or Out) reader.
APB Type
To change the way the anti-passback feature functions, schedule an area event that changes
the APB Type of all readers in the area: Global APB or Timed APB.
Global APB
Used as the default, Global APB allows the reader to function as a
normal APB reader.
Timed APB
Used to designate the reader as a Timed APB reader, a badge
holder’s APB status will be set to In or Out and will return to Neutral
after a defined period of time. A Timed APB reader is useful in a site
where a badge holder may enter a site by going through an APB In
reader but is not required to exit the site by going through an APB
Out reader. If this option is selected, a Timed APB Duration must also
be defined. A Timed APB status is local to the micro.
Reset Timed APB
Immediately
When selected, this option sends a message to the micro to reset
the Timed APB status back to Neutral immediately following a
badge read.
APB Duration
A value that represents how long a badge holder’s Timed APB status
(In or Out) is set when the badge is used on a reader, before being
returned to Neutral.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Reader Event:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Reader Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Scheduling door events
When you want to change the characteristics of a single door (rather than a group of doors in an area) use a
door event instead of an area event.
Use the Door Event form to define door events for each mode. Defining an event requires you to select a mode,
set the time of the event, specify a door, and change one or more of the operating characteristics of the door
Note:
Do not set up the Door Event form to match the fields on the Door form. Fields that do not need to be scheduled should
not be selected, for example, if the door is already unlocked, do not select Unlocked on the door schedule.
Example
The lobby door can be accessed Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 5 PM. To accomplish this, an Unlock
Door at 8 AM runtime event is paired with a Lock Door at 5 PM runtime event on weekdays only.
Figure 83. Door Event form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 86. Door Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters) for Description. This
event may include more than one location if the facility has multiple entrances or buildings.
Example: Unlock Door at 08:00
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to
restrict operator access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see
Creating facilities on page 53.
Door
Select the door where the event will occur.
Door State
Locked/Unlocked
• Unlocked: To schedule an individual door in an area to unlock at the same time each day,
use a door event that sets the Door State field to Unlocked.
Note:
An area event that locks all area doors and occurs after this door event will also lock
this individual door.
• Locked: To schedule an individual door in an area to lock at the same time each day, use
a door event that sets the Door State field to Locked.
Note:
An area event that unlocks all area doors and occurs after this door event will also
unlock this individual door.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Held Open Sensing:
Detected/Ignored
• Detected: To allow an alarm condition on this door to occur during this event when the
door is held open beyond the Unlock Time specified in the Doors form.
• Ignored: To allow a door to remain open during this event, beyond the Unlock Time
specified in the Doors form, without generating an alarm.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Forced Open Monitoring:
Detected/Ignored
• Detected: To allow an alarm condition on this door to occur immediately when the door is
forced open without a valid badge read or exit device.
• Ignored: Select Ignored if the Monitoring function on this door is not used.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Mode
Select the mode in which the area event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not
assigned to a mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the
start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the
end of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to activate
at a specified time.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Table 86. Door Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to
schedule another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later
that day.
Time Zone Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator.
See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Door Event:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Door Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Scheduling alarm events
When you want to change the characteristics of a single alarm (without changing the input group or output
group assigned to the alarm) use an alarm event. Use the Alarm Event form to define alarm events for each
mode. Defining an event requires you to select a mode, set the time of the event, select an alarm, and specify
one or more of the changes to the alarm.
Example
During the business day you want invalid-badge alarms to route to the log and monitor but after hours and
weekends, you want them to route to the monitor and a printer. Set an alarm event for MTWTF at 17:00 to start
routing invalid-badge alarms to the alarm monitor and to a selected printer. Set a parallel alarm event to occur
on MTWTF at 08:00 to start routing the alarm to the history log and monitor.
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Figure 84. Alarm Event form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 87. Alarm Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type an alarm event description up to 30 alphanumeric characters long.
Example: Door Held Offline 08:00 M-F.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Alarm
Select the alarm for which the event will occur.
Routing
To send an alarm to a different routing at certain times, schedule an alarm event that specifies the new
routing and time. You can send the alarm message to the alarm monitor, a printer, the history log, or to a
combination of the three.
Example: If you want invalid-badge alarms to route to the log and monitor during the business day but to the
monitor and a printer after hours, set an alarm event for MTWT at 17:00 to start routing invalid-badge
alarms to the alarm monitor and to a selected printer. Set a parallel alarm event to occur on MTWTF at 08:00
to start routing the alarm to the history log and monitor. If no one watches the alarm monitor on weekends,
another alarm event (F at 17:00) can start routing this alarm to the log and to the printer. On Monday,
scheduled alarm events begin to repeat the cycle.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Table 87. Alarm Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Online
Description
• Online: To set an alarm online when the facility is closed for a holiday, use an alarm event that does
not cycle daily. Use a mode-start alarm event associated with your holiday mode. When the system
starts to operate in holiday mode, events that cycle during normal operating stop cycling. Set this
alarm to remain online until the system switches back to normal operating mode.
Note:
You may need to schedule a parallel mode-end alarm event (in case the system does not return
to normal operating mode) for other scheduled events to occur. However, the preferred way is to
schedule the input group offline/online. This way no input activity (ISC) is sent to the host. See
Input Group Events.
• Offline: To ensure that normal daytime activity does not trigger an alarm, use a runtime alarm event
to put this alarm offline during the day.
Example: Use an alarm event to set this alarm offline before the business day starts (MTWTF at 07:30).
Use a parallel alarm event to set this alarm online after hours (MTWTF at 17:00). During the weekend
(between Friday at 5 PM and Monday at 7:30 AM), this alarm is online and does not cycle daily.
• Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Mode
Select the mode in which the alarm event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not assigned to a
mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the start of
the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the end of
the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to activate at a
specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to schedule
another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later that day.
Time Zone
Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See Verifying
time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Alarm Event:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Alarms, and then click the Alarm Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Scheduling input group events
You can use an input group event to place an input group online or offline and to control what output groups or
alarms trigger when this input group activates. An event can place an input group online/offline at a scheduled
time on a daily/weekly cycle within the normal operating mode; or this event can be set to occur At Mode Start
and to continue (with no daily or weekly cycles) until a parallel At Mode End event occurs to reverse the
change.
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For example:
For use with Fire mode, you could create an event that sets the fire-detector input group to offline, so that Open
condition and/or Short condition state changes do not continue to be detected. This input group event prevents
the system from receiving a flood of alarms when a fire occurs. Remember that a mode-start event requires a
parallel mode-end event.
You could also schedule an event to place a motion detector input group offline during the day and online at
night, if after-hours activity in this area indicates a security violation. Or, to conserve electricity after hours,
schedule the input group for hallway motion detectors to trigger lights to turn on for a duration, to provide
lighting only when required.
An input-group event can change the output groups associated with an input group.
For example:
To have security lights turn on when someone opens an exterior door at night (using a badge or using force),
schedule an input group event to occur at sundown. Select the output group that operates the security lights.
When an exterior door opens, this output group triggers the outdoor security lights.
To have an alarm sound when someone uses an invalid badge between the hours of 5 PM and 8 AM, schedule
an input group event. Select the output group that operates a siren. When the reader detects an invalid badge,
the reader’s invalid input group activates, the associated output group triggers, and associated output devices
operate, in this case, a siren.
Example
Schedule two parallel events to place a motion detector input group offline during the day and online at night;
after-hours activity in this area indicates a security violation.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Figure 85. Input Group Event form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 88. Input Group Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 alphanumeric characters).
Example: Lobby AC Fail Off 17:00 M-F
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Input Group
Select the input group that will be triggered by the event.
Online
Online: To allow an associated alarm and/or output group to trigger if the input is triggered, use an
input group event to place an input group online.
Offline: To prevent an associated alarm and/or output group from triggering if the input is triggered,
use an input group event to place an input group offline.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Mode
Select the mode in which the alarm event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not assigned to
a mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
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Table 88. Input Group Event form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the end of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to
activate at a specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to schedule
another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later that day.
Time Zone Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See
Verifying time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Output Group
Click to change the output group associated with an input group during the input group event.
Output groups are position sensitive and follow the same scheduling rules as categories on the Area
Events form. It is possible to overwrite an existing output group, depending on which output group
slot is changed, so familiarize yourself with the existing output groups associated with the input group
being changed.
Notes:
• When you add a new output group, make sure you don't overwrite something, such as the
existing “door unlock” output group.
• If scheduling outputs, they must reside on the same micro.
• Remember to define the duration of the output using the Outputs form. A duration of zero turns
on the output indefinitely.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Input Group Event:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Inputs/Outputs, and then click the Input Group Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Scheduling output group events
Use the Outgroups Events form to define output group events for each mode. Defining an event requires you to
select a mode, set the time of the event, select an output group, and specify one or more changes to the output
group.
An output group event can enable or disable a specific output group, and/or change the state of its outputs to
Off or On for the period of time entered in the Time field of the Output form associated with this output group.
For example:
•
•
•
You can define an output group event to enable an output group made up of lights or perimeter cameras
and have them turned on only during the night.
You can define an output group event for Emergency mode that turns on sirens and emergency lights
for the duration of Time.
You can define output group events for Normal mode to turn on lights late at night and turn them off in
the morning.
Example
Define an output group event for Emergency mode that turns on sirens and emergency lights for the duration of
Time.
Figure 86. Output Group Event form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow
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.
Table 89. Output Group Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type an output group event description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long.
Example: Parking Lot Lights On 18:00 M-F.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to restrict
operator access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see Creating facilities on
page 53.
Enabled
Output groups such as lights or perimeter cameras can be enabled to operate as required at
scheduled times
Yes: To allow an output group to operate as required at scheduled times.
No: To disable an output group during scheduled times.
Do Not Care: See Seed counter on page 366.
State
The outputs in the output group, such as emergency lights or sirens, can be turned on or off.
Note:
Remember to define the duration of the output using the Outputs form. A duration of zero
turns on the output indefinitely.
On: To turn the outputs in an output group On at scheduled times.
Off: To turn the outputs in an output group Off during scheduled times.
Do Not Care: See Radio buttons on page 27.
Mode
Select the mode in which the output group event will occur. An event will not take place, if it is not
assigned to a mode and it will only occur in those modes to which it is assigned.
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at
the end of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to
activate at a specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to schedule
another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later that day.
Time Zone Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See
Verifying time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete an Output Group Event:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Inputs/Outputs, and then click the Output Group Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Scheduling backup events
The Backup Events feature allows you to schedule a system backup to pre-selected media. The backup will
then run automatically at the day and time settings specified on the Backup Events form. The backup can go to
either tape or disk file, and can include one or more of the following backup types: Badge table, base system,
history tables, and any optional packages, such as Alarm Graphics tables.
The scheduled backup will not span multiple tapes, and there will be no prompt for inserting the backup media.
Before the backup is to take place, an operator must make sure that the correct media is properly inserted.
All error messages and completion messages generated as a result of the scheduled backup process will be
written to a log file in the /cas/log directory called bak.mmdd where mmdd = system date (For example:
0302 = March 2nd). You must check the bak log file for messages after the scheduled backup process has
executed, since there are no pop-up window messages associated with this feature.
Archives of Badge, Alarm, or Operator History cannot be scheduled.
Example
Define a backup event that schedules an automatic tape backup of the Badge, Base, History, Guard Tours and
Tour History database tables to occur at 11 PM every Friday.
Figure 87. Backup Event form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 90. Backup Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type an output group event description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long.
Example: Parking Lot Lights On 18:00 M-F
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is
assigned. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Backup Type
Select the databases to be backed up on this schedule.
Begin Event
At Mode Start
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the
start of the mode.
At Mode End
If this is a Start/End event, click if you want the event to activate at the end
of the mode.
Time
If the event is a Run Time event, click if you want the event to activate at a
specified time.
HHmmss
If the event is a Run Time event, select the time of day that the event will start. Remember to
schedule another event as the pair of this one.
Example: If something is turned on every day at 8 AM, it must be turned off at some time later that
day.
Time Zone Context
Select the time zone context in which the schedule should execute: Host, Micro, or Operator. See
Verifying time zones on page 168.
Days of the Week
If the event is a Run Time event, select the days of the week that the event will occur.
Media Type
Select the media to use for the backup: Tape or Disk File.
Note:
Filename
If Disk File is selected, the file /cas/db/text/diskfile.cfg must exist.
If you chose to save to a Disk File, enter the name of the filesystem to store the backup. Click
Browse to select from a list. If your backup file is expected to exceed 2 GB, ensure that the
location where the file is to be stored is defined as a Large File System. Otherwise, the backup file
will be incomplete.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Backup Event:
1. From the Control menu, select Backup/Restore, and then click the Backup Events tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Triggering Emergency modes using input groups
Use the Emergency form to define emergency mode triggers for selected facilities. This requires you to select
an Emergency mode, Input Group, and one or more facilities. This will allow an input group to trigger a mode
change to the assigned facilities.
Chapter 10
Schedules and modes
Figure 88. Emergency Form
Table 91. Emergency Form
Field name
Description
Description
Type an emergency trigger description up to 60 alphanumeric characters long.
Example: CAMPUS LOCKDOWN
Mode
Select the Emergency mode that will take effect when the emergency trigger occurs.
Input Group
Select the input group that will trigger the emergency mode.
Only input groups with Broadcast State Change selected on the Input Groups form will be
available in this list box.
Rollback on Input Reset
Check to rollback to the previous mode when the input is reset.
Facilities
Available Facilities
Displays the active facilities available to the operator.
Assigned Facilities
Displays the assigned facilities that the trigger will effect.
To trigger an Emergency Mode using an Input Group:
1. First, create an Input Group record. See Creating input groups on page 127.
2. Next, create an Emergency Mode record by selecting Control, Modes, and then Emergency.
3. Enter a description for this Emergency mode.
4. Select a Mode from the Mode list box.
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5. Select an Input Group from the Input Group list box.
6. Select the Facilities this Emergency Mode will be assigned to.
7. Save the record.
8. For detailed information on creating records, refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records
on page 36.
Chapter 11 Badge management
This chapter describes how to manage badge and personnel records. Readers
should familiarize themselves with the information in this chapter before
continuing to other chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Defining badges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224
Defining personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231
Capturing and displaying images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
Printing badges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Category manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Badge manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
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Overview
When a person attempts to access an area and at least one category on the badge matches at least one category
of that area, the system grants access; if the person attempts to access an area and no categories on the badge
match any categories of that area, the system denies access.
This chapter explores various methods of managing the badges, badge holders, and the categories in your
system. You will need to become familiar with the following forms:
•
•
•
•
Badges
Personnel
Category Manager
Badge Manager
Defining badges
Information on the Badges form identifies the badge ID and format, and also controls the function and
capabilities of the badge.
Example
In addition to his normal access control badge, a security guard is issued a tour badge to be used when
conducting a facility tour at specified intervals. The guard stops at pre-determined tour points along the way,
where he swipes the tour badge in a reader so the system can track his progress.
Figure 89. Badges form
Chapter 11
Badge management
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable, some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 92. Badges form fields
Field name
Description
Description
A person or badge holder can have multiple badges. Type a description that defines the purpose of this
particular badge.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. Selecting a facility will allow the administrator to restrict operator
access to those records in a specific facility. For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
BID
BID
This field contains the unique encoded number of a badge.
Note:
The Badge Encode Format field will have no effect on the Badge Encode Number
(BID) displayed. The BID displayed will always be the actual full BID read from the
badge. If Save is clicked, then the BID entered will be checked against the badge.
Format to ensure it satisfies its specifications. If the BID is OK, then the field will be updated
and the record saved.
Note:
Badge Format
This field displays the selected format for this badge (10, 12 or 16 digit).
Note:
Reader Issue
If the Seed Counter and the Copy to BID options are enabled, the Badge Format, BID
and Reader Issue fields are disabled, even on new records. The Badge Format is set
to the default chosen during Seed Counter installation and the BID is generated
automatically. See Seed counter on page 366.
If you are using a Mifare Wiegand Badge ID 5502 fomat, select Standard 16 Digit
Badge. If you are using a Mifare Wiegand Badge ID 26-bit select Standard 10 Digit
Badge. Refer to To create a Mifare badge design: on page 257.
Click to allow the Badge Encode Number to be entered by swiping a badge in a local console reader assigned to
the workstation used to issue the badge. A prompt advises you when to swipe the badge. The badge encode
number appears in the Badge Encode Number field.
For information on setting up a badge issue workstation, see To set up your Imaging workstations: on page 57.
Note:
Badge
Format
Click to display the Badge Format list box. Select the desired format. This is not necessary unless the system
has more than one badge format.
Note:
Status
If the Seed Counter and the Copy to BID options are enabled, the Badge Format, BID and Reader Issue
fields are disabled, even on new records. The Badge Format is set to the default chosen during Seed
Counter installation and the BID is generated automatically. See Seed counter on page 366.
If the Seed Counter and the Copy to BID options are enabled, the Badge Format, BID and Reader Issue
fields are disabled, even on new records. The Badge Format is set to the default chosen during Seed
Counter installation and the BID is generated automatically. See Seed counter on page 366.
Select one of the four badge status descriptions. There is one type of Valid badge status (Active) and three types
of Invalid badge statuses (Suspended, Lost, Deleted).
You should update the badge status as needed.
Example: If a valid badge is lost, this status change should be indicated in the Badge Status box. Then, if the lost
badge is later tried in a reader, the system will deny access.
Note:
The Status field on the Personnel form overrides this field on the Badges form. For example, if a
personnel record has multiple badges assigned to it, and that person is suspended, you can change
the status to Suspended on the Personnel form and all related badges will be suspended.
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Table 92. Badges form fields (continued)
Field name
Print Badge
Description
Badge Design
Select a badge design to print from the list box. This option will be available if you have the
optional Imaging package installed. For more information on printing badges, see Printing
badges on page 242.
Print
Select this button to print a badge.
Note:
Preview
Select this button to preview a badge before printing.
Note:
Page Setup &
Options
To print a badge that contains personnel data , refer to Table 98., Badge Manager
form fields on page 251.
To preview a badge that contains personnel data , refer to Table 98., Badge Manager
form fields on page 251.
Select this button to view page setup options for a badge.
Note:
Encode
To view the page setup options for a badge that contains personnel data , refer to
Table 98., Badge Manager form fields on page 251.
Click this button to encode a badge. Refer to
Note:
External
Encoder Setup
Issued
Date
Click to launch the External Encoders Setup dialog.
Type the date the badge was issued. If this field is left blank, the system will automatically
enter the current date.
Note:
Time
Type the slashes (/) if the system date format requires them.
Type the time the badge was issued. If this field is left blank, the system will automatically
enter the current time.
Note:
Expires
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Imaging
troubleshooting on page 401 for assistance.
Type the colons (:) if the system time format requires them.
Time Zone
Context
Select the time zone context in which the badge was issued. For examples, see Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Date
Type the date the badge expires.
Note:
Time
Type the time the badge expires.
Note:
Time Zone
Context
Type the slashes (/) if the system date format requires them.
Type the colons (:) if the system time format requires them.
Select the time zone context in which the badge expired. For examples, see Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Table 92. Badges form fields (continued)
Field name
Return
Description
Date
Type the date the badge was turned in.
Note:
Time
Type the time the badge was turned in.
Note:
Time Zone
Context
Last Access
Type the slashes (/) if the system date format requires them.
Type the colons (:) if the system time format requires them.
Select the time zone context in which the badge was turned in. For examples, see Verifying
time zones on page 168.
The system tracks the badge and displays information about when it was last used. This reflects information
captured as of the moment the badge record was displayed.
Note:
Type the slashes (/) if the system date format requires them.
Type the colons (:) if the system time format requires them.
Date
The date the badge was last granted access.
Time
The time the badge was last granted access.
Time Zone
The time zone in which the badge was last granted access. For examples, see Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Reader
Indicates the reader last granted access to this badge.
Area
Indicates the area this badge was last granted access to.
Person
Indicates the Personnel record to which this badge is assigned. This field is view only - you can perform a
search, but it cannot be edited.
Temporary
Set to On, if this badge record is to be used as a temporary badge. A pool of badges can be created and used
repeatedly for this purpose. A temporary badge must be expired in order to be reissued.
Usage Count
Limited Usage
To limit the number of times a badge may be used, set the Limited Usage check box to On.
Count
Type a specific number in the Count field. Each time the badge is used in a Limited Usage
reader, the usage count is decremented by 1. When the count is 0, the badge will no longer
grant access into a Limited Usage reader.
Tour Badge
If you have the optional Guard Tours package installed, select this option to designate a badge as a tour badge
used to conduct guard tours of a facility at specified intervals. This badge will not operate for normal access
control.
Reissue
Count
If the Seed Counter option is enabled, every time a badge is issued to a person this incremental number is
stored to the badge. This field shows the issue number of this badge and the total number of badge issues for
the badgeholder to whom this badge is assigned, for example 3 of 5. If a badge has not been assigned to a
person, the Reissue Count is 00. The maximum number of badge issues allowed is 99. This field is view only you can perform a search, but it cannot be edited. For more information, see Seed counter on page 366.
Reprint
Count
If the Seed Counter option is enabled, for non-MIFARE badge designs, this field indicates the number of times
the badge has been printed. For MIFARE badge designs, this field indicates if the badge has been encoded. A
new badge will set the reprint count to 00. For non-MIFARE badge designs, any time the badge is printed or
previewed, the badge will increment the number, store this number on the badge, and allow a maximum reprint
of 99 times. For MIFARE badge designs, when the badge is encoded, the reprint count is set to 01 and is stored
on the badge. MIFARE badge designs can only be encoded once.
For more information, see Seed counter on page 366.
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Table 92. Badges form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Unique Id
If the Seed Counter option is enabled, the seed counter assigns a unique number to each badge. It is a global
counter that is incremented each time a new badge is created. The range is determined by the number of digits
allocated to the counter. This field is view only - you can perform a search, but it cannot be edited. For more
information, see Seed counter on page 366.
Saved Notes
All saved notes applicable to this record are listed including the Date/Time the note was created and the
operator that created it. Click on a column heading to sort by Date/Time, Operator, or alphabetically by note.
By hovering the mouse over the note, the entire contents of the note displays.
Notes
This is a free form text field where you can add information pertinent to Badge or Person records.
Example: Employee work visa will expire on 12/12/05.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Related procedures
To create a Badge record using the Console-Reader method:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Click Reader Issue
.
4. Swipe the badge in the console reader assigned to the terminal. The badge ID number will appear in
the BID field.
5. Complete the Badges form. For details on completing each field, see Badges form fields on page 225.
6. Click Save
.
To create a Badge record using the manual method:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Type the badge encode number into the BID field.
4. Complete the Badges form. For details on completing each field, see Badges form fields on page 225.
5. Click Save
.
To change a badge record:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. Find the desired badge record in one of two ways:
•
When the Badges form appears, click Reader Issue
and then click Find
•
. Swipe the badge in a console reader,
to display the existing badge holder data; or:
When the Badges form appears, enter search criteria in one or more fields and click Find
Note:
.
A search
using “indexed” fields improves the time required to find the records. Some examples of indexed
fields on the Badges form include: Person, Description, and BID.
3. Complete the Badges form for the fields that require updating. For details on completing each field,
see Badges form fields on page 225.
4. Click Save
.
To change a badge status to deleted:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. When the Badges form appears, enter search criteria in one or more fields and click Find
.
3. Click the Status field and select Deleted. Although the badge no longer grants access, the badge record
remains in the database.
4. Click Save
.
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To permanently remove a badge from the database:
CAUTION:
This procedure removes badge records from the database. Since it is possible to remove badge records that
should be retained, you should back up your database before running this procedure.
The Delete
button will be on the Badges form toolbar if the correct permissions have been set on the
Permissions form for the current operator. The Delete
button is used to permanently remove badge records
from the Picture Perfect database. This process also removes the badge records from all micros that have
learned the badges and have the badge records in their database.
Before any badge can be removed, it must have a badge status of Deleted. To assign the Deleted status, see To
change a badge status to deleted: on page 229.
Note:
Badge delete on person delete is controlled by a setting on the Badge Manager control of the form; by default it is set
not to delete associated badges when a person is deleted.
All badge removal activity is recorded in the operator history table.
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. When the Badges form appears, enter search criteria in one or more fields and click Find . Select
Deleted in the Status field as part of the criteria when using the Find button to select a range of
records.
3. Click the Delete
button. The Badge Removal popup asks if you want to remove the records. If
record dependencies exist (for example if the badge is assigned to a Personnel record), a list of these
records displays. You must remove the dependencies before the badge record can be deleted.
4. If no dependencies exist, click OK to confirm your intention to remove the badge records. If you do
not want to proceed with the removal process, click Cancel.
Note:
If you are removing a large number of records, the system removes records in increments according to the
Record Remove Maximum and Record Remove Interval set on the Parameters form. See Assigning system
parameters on page 40.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Defining personnel
Information on the Personnel form identifies the badge holder by name, employee number, address, and badge
ID, and also controls the function and capabilities of the badge.
We recommend that Picture Perfect operators ensure that every modified Person record is saved after every
individual action of assignment of a badge or un-assignment of a badge. Separating these workflow steps into
two save operations is a recommended best practice that ensures integrity of data between host and micro
controller.
Note:
A search (FIND) using “indexed” fields improves the time required to find the records. Some examples of indexed fields
on the Personnel form include: Last Name, First Name, Employee ID, Phone1, Last Access Reader, and Last Access Area.
Example
Jane Doe is a temporary employee assigned to the Accounting Department.
Figure 90. Personnel Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 93. Personnel form fields
Field name
Description
Last Name
Enter the badge holder’s last name (up to 60 characters).
First Name
Enter the badge holder's first name (up to 60 characters).
Initials
Enter the badge holder's initials (up to 60 characters).
Title
Enter the badge holder's title (up to 60 characters). Example: Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr.
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Table 93. Personnel form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Employee Id
Enter an alphanumeric employee identification (up to 36 characters). Example: social security number.
PIN
Enter a personal identification number (1 to 10 digits) for the badge holder to use with a badge-and-keypad
reader.
Type
Click to display the Personnel Types list box. Select the desired type.
Status
Select one of the three personnel status descriptions. There is one type of Valid status (Active) and two types
of Invalid badge statuses (Suspended and Deleted).
You should update the status as needed.
Note:
The Status field on the Personnel form overrides this field on the Badges form.
Example: If a valid personnel record is suspended, this status change should be indicated in the Status box.
Then, if the suspended person’s badge is later tried in a reader, the system will deny access.
Department
Click Department to display the Departments list box. Select the desired department for this badge holder.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Address 1
through
Address 5
Enter the badge holder's address (up to 60 alphanumeric characters per field). The Address 1 through
Address 5 field names can be changed using the Custom Form option.
Phone1
Enter the badge holder's phone number (up to 30 characters). You may type dashes or spaces between digits
in the Phone field.
Phone2
Enter the badge holder's alternate phone number (up to 30 characters). You may type dashes or spaces
between digits in the Phone field.
Download
Upon Save
WARNING:
Use of this feature can severely impact system performance, and is recommended for GE
Security Support personnel only.
If you select this button, any time a badge record is saved, it is downloaded to all micros, subject to the
following conditions:
• New Records: New records that are created by copying an existing record that has this field set to On
will be automatically changed so that this field is set to Neutral. This prevents accidental downloads to
all micros when using the Copy feature of the New button. You must manually set this field to On.
• Updated Records: Updated records are only downloaded to all micros if the previous setting was set to
Off. The next time a badge record field is changed for a badge record that previously had this field set to
On, the record will only be sent to those micros that have learned this badge.
To resend an updated badge record to all micros:
1.
Set the Download Upon Save field to Off.
2.
Save the record.
3.
Make any other field changes, if needed.
4.
Set the Download Upon Save field to On.
5.
Save the record.
If you select Off, any time a badge record is saved, it is only sent to those micros that have learned this badge
record, which is the normal method of operation. This is the default for any new record, including those that
were copied from an existing record.
Note:
Dial-up micros are handled according to the Dial Up settings on the Micros form.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Table 93. Personnel form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Person Trace
Use this field only when you want to trace the activity of a particular badge. Set to On to allow the Person
Trace feature to track this badge. The letter “T” is inserted in front of the transaction when it appears on the
Badge Monitor.
Set to Off when you no longer need to trace the badge.
See Tracing badge holder activity on page 388 for details on this feature. Person trace routing is defined on
the System Parameters form.
Person Trace
Alarm
If Person Trace is enabled, this check box is available for selection. When checked, an alarm is generated
every time the badge is read.
Keypad
Response
Set to On to give this badge holder the ability to respond to special alarms requiring keypad input.
Set to Off if this feature is not required.
See Controlling alarms using a keypad code on page 384 for details on this feature.
Activation
Active Date
Active Time
Enter the date the personnel record became active. If this field is left blank,
the system will automatically enter the current date.
Note:
Change of a person’s Activation date/time/context so it falls ahead
of its badges issue date/time/context will change all its badges
issue date/time/context to be the same as person's activation
date/time/context.
Note:
Type the slashes (/) if the system date format requires them.
Enter the time the personnel record became active. If this field is left blank,
the system will automatically enter the current time.
Note:
Deactivation
Type the colons (:) if the system time format requires them.
TZ Context
The time zone to which the Activate Date and Time apply. See Verifying time
zones on page 168.
Deactive Date
The date when the personnel record becomes deactivated by the system. If
the date is in the past, none of the badges belonging to this badge holder
will be usable.
Note:
Change of a person's Deactivation date/time/context so it falls
before its badges expiration date/time/context will change all its
badges expiration date/time/context to be the same as person's
deactivation date/time/context.
Deactive Time
The time when the personnel record becomes deactivated by the system. If
the date is in the past, none of the badges belonging to this badge holder
will be usable.
TZ Context
The time zone to which the Deactivate Date and Time apply. See Verifying
time zones on page 168.
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Table 93. Personnel form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
APB Control
When used in conjunction with anti-passback readers, the Antipassback status of any badge belonging to
this badge holder (plus a category match) regulate its ability to open a door.
Example: If a badge holder enters an anti-passback area without using his own badge (such as by following
someone else through the open door), that person will not be able to exit that area with his own badge,
because the system never registered him as having entered that area. Likewise, if a person exits an antipassback area without using his badge, he cannot re-enter that area, since the system has not registered his
exit.
Antipassback status is global, meaning the system will register whether someone is in or out, but it does not
regulate the status on a per-reader basis.
Example: Someone can badge in at an anti-passback reader in one room, follow someone out of that room
and into another anti-passback-controlled room without using his own badge, and then be able to badge out
of the second room. The system registered him globally as in (without regard to reader location); therefore, he
can badge out of any room. If he followed someone out of the first room and then tried to badge in at the
second room, however, he would not be given access, because the system has him already registered as in.
This example does not apply to Nested APB readers.
If the badge holder is required to use an anti-passback reader, assign the badge an anti-passback status of
neutral; otherwise, leave these buttons unselected.
Neutral
Indicates an neutral user state, neither In nor Out. The next time any badge
belonging to this badge holder is used in an anti-passback reader, the
system will set the appropriate In/Out state. Use this setting when creating a
new badge, or when a badge holder gets locked in or out of an antipassback area. This status is not used by nested APB readers.
In or Out
Indicates whether the last use of any badge belonging to this badge holder
logged the badge holder In or Out of the anti-passback reader’s area. This
reflects information captured as of the moment the badge record was
displayed, but the information will not be updated automatically while it is on
the screen. It can be changed manually if necessary. This status is not used
by nested APB readers.
Privileged
Indicates that whenever any badge belonging to this badge holder is read by
an anti-passback reader, the system ignores the anti-passback status.
Access is granted if categories match the area, regardless of whether the
badge holder was logged into or out of the area. Assign this status to a
badge holder who has to use anti-passback readers, but is not to be
governed by them. This status is used by nested APB readers.
Reset Timed APB
This button sends a message to the micro to reset the Timed APB status
back to Neutral.
Reset Nested APB to Neutral
This button sets the Person Last Access area to neutral and sends a
message to micros that have Nested APB readers configured to set APB area
back to neutral.
Note:
Area
You must have Schedule Updates Database enabled to use this
feature if configuring NAPB with a reader event. See Assigning
system parameters on page 40.
Indicates which area the badge was last granted access to.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Table 93. Personnel form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Access
The system tracks the badge and displays information about when it was last used. This reflects information
captured as of the moment the badge record was displayed. This information can also be changed
manually.
Category
Manager
Date
The date the badge was last granted access. The system supplies this data.
Time
The time the badge was last granted access. The system supplies this data.
Time Zone Context
The time zone context in which the badge was last granted access. The
system supplies this data. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Reader
Indicates which reader last granted access to this badge. The system
supplies this data.
This tab contains the active categories, ordered by slot number, that can be assigned to an area or an area
event. To access an area, a badge must match at least one category that is assigned to that area. You may
add, remove, or replace a category in a slot.
Click Filter to enter search criteria to limit the category list or use the type ahead search feature by clicking in
any cell and typing the first letters of the item for which you are searching.
For more information, see Category manager on page 244.
Note:
This field is position sensitive when used in conjunction with area category schedules.
Badge
Manager
The Badge Manager allows you to assign a badge to a person or to issue a temporary replacement badge.
For more details, see Badge manager on page 251.
Badge Form
You can access the Badge Form directly from the Badge Manager tab on the Personnel Form. For details on
the Badge Form, see Defining badges on page 224.
Images
This tab is available if you have the optional Imaging package installed. For information on capturing images
and signatures, see Capturing and displaying images on page 237.
User Fields
Enter information (up to 40 characters) in one or more user fields to identify the badge holder.
Example: license tag number
The number of user fields that appear on the Badges form is set to 40 on the Parameters form. The names of
the user fields can be changed using Custom Forms. Custom lists can be assigned to user fields when
creating custom forms.
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Table 93. Personnel form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Saved Notes
All saved notes applicable to this record are listed including the Date/Time the note was created and the
operator that created it. Click on a column heading to sort by Date/Time, Operator, or alphabetically by note.
By hovering the mouse over the note, the entire contents of the note displays.
Notes
This is a free form text field where you can add information pertinent to Badge or Person records.
Example: Employee work visa will expire on 12/12/10.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Personnel record:
1. Select Access, People, and then Personnel tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Capturing and displaying images
Once Imaging is installed, you can capture, import, and view photographs and signatures from a variety of
sources including digital cameras, video cameras, and signature pads.
During normal operations, images are not downloaded from the host. In order to view an existing image for a
badge record, the image(s) must be loaded to the PC.
Figure 91. Personnel form: Images
Fields and controls
Table 94. Image tab fields
Field name
Control name
Photograph
Capture:
Click to capture an image. Depending on the input device used (such as a
digital or video camera), the appropriate interface for capturing or loading
a new image will display.
Load:
Click to download the image associated with this personnel record.
Export:
Click to export the image associated with this personnel record.
Has Photograph:
Description
Indicates that this personnel record has a photograph associated with it. Use this as a
search criteria when searching for personnel with photographs.
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Table 94. Image tab fields (continued)
Field name
Control name
Signature
Capture:
Click to capture a signature. Depending on the input device used (such as
a signature pad), the appropriate interface for capturing or loading the
signature will display.
Load:
Click to download the signature associated with this personnel record.
Export:
Click to export the signature associated with this personnel record.
Has Signature:
Description
Indicates that this personnel record has a signature associated with it. Use this as
search criteria when searching for personnel with signatures.
Related procedures
To select a capture input device:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab.
2. Select the Images tab, and then click Find
to display a current list of records.
3. Select the Personnel record that the image is to be associated with, and then click Capture
.
The Capture screen displays.
Figure 92. Capture dialogs
Capture Signature Dialog
Capture Photo Dialog
4. Click Capture Photo or Capture Signature to display the Select Image Source dialog box listing the
available input devices on your computer. By default, the input device loads from a file.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Figure 93. Select Image Source dialog
5. Select the device you will be using and click Ok. The next time you capture a photo or a signature, the
program will use the input device you selected.
6. Repeat these steps to set up an input device for signature pads. The program recognizes a separate
input device for photos and signatures.
To capture a new image for a record:
1. Click on the Capture Photo or Capture Signature button to capture a new image.
Based on the input device selected, the proper interface will come up for capturing or loading a new
image. When the new image is captured (live capture or loaded from a database), the Image
Enhancement dialog box displays.
Figure 94. Image Enhancement screen
2. Note the eight sizing handles around the center of the image. Size the image as desired and press Ok.
3. At this point, you can either capture the portion of the image “as is,” or adjust the highlighting box to
capture a different portion of the image.
To move the crop box:
1. Place your mouse pointer within the highlighting box’s cropping area.
2. Press and hold down your left mouse button, and drag (move) the cropping area to the desired location
on the image. Release the left mouse button when you are satisfied with the new location of the
highlighting box.
3. Click Ok.
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To resize the crop box:
1. Place your mouse pointer directly over one of the highlighting box handles.
The pointer will change from a four-headed arrow to a two-headed arrow. This allows you to resize the
cropping area.
2. Press and hold down your left mouse button, and drag (move) the handle toward the center of the
cropping area.
The size of this highlighting box is fixed to the aspect ratio of the image type: 4 x 5 for photos; 5 x 1
for signatures.
3. When the cropping area is sized to your satisfaction, move the highlighting box so that it covers the
portion of the image that you want to capture.
4. Click Ok.
5. When you have completed your changes, click Ok. Then, from the Epi Capture menu, select Accept
and Close.
6. From the Images tab toolbar, click Save
to save the record to your database.
To load the images for a record:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab.
2. Select the Images tab, and then click Find
to display a current list of records.
3. Select the Personnel record that the image is to be associated with, and then click Load
The image associated with the record displays.
Figure 95. Personnel form: Load Image
.
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To Crop and enhance:
1. Click Capture to display the Epi Capture menu.
Figure 96. EPI Capture menu
2. This offers the option to individually Enhance the current image which allows you to adjust the
existing image without having to recapture it.
Figure 97. Image Enhancement
3. When you have completed your changes, click Ok. Then, from the Epi Capture menu, select Accept
and Close.
4. From the Images tab toolbar, click Save
to save the record to your database.
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Printing badges
Once the optional Imaging package is installed, the Print Badge dialog on the Badge form and on the Badge
Manager of the Personnel form is enabled.
Figure 98. Print Badge
Fields and controls
Table 95. Print badge controls
Control name/icon
Description
Badge
Design:
Select a badge design or a design mapping from the drop-down list. Beside each
design one or two icons appear.
• The Person icon indicates the design references a field on the Personnel form
and therefore a personnel record must be selected in order to print a badge
using this design.
• The Badge icon indicates the design references a field on the Badge form
and therefore a badge record must be selected to print a badge using this
design.
• If both icons display, both a personnel and a badge record must be selected
in order to print the badge.
Print:
Click to print a badge.
Note:
Preview:
Click to view a badge without printing to a printer.
Note:
Page Setup
and Options
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Overview on page 394 for
assistance.
Click to display the Print Options dialog from which you can select the following
options:
Page Setup
Click to select the page orientation, Portrait or Landscape, and the number of
badges to be displayed across and down a page.
Note:
Encode
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Overview on page 394 for
assistance.
The page orientation must match the badge design orientation for the
badge to print correctly.
Encoder Setup
Displays the Card Printer Encoder Setup dialog which allows you to set encoding
parameters specific to your Magstripe, Smartchip, or Proximity cards.
Show print setup dialog
When this option is selected, the Print Dialog displays before printing a badge.
This allows you to change the printer selection and properties prior to printing.
Print Badges to:
Select the printer to be used for printing the badge design.
Click this button to encode a MIFARE badge.
Note:
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Overview on page 394 for
assistance.
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Table 95. Print badge controls
Control name/icon
Description
External
Encoder
Setup
Click to launch the External Encoders Setup dialog.
Related procedures
To print a badge from the Badges form:
1. From the Access menu, select Badges, and then click the Badges tab.
2.
Click Find
to display a current list of records.
3. Select the badge record that you want to print. Then, under Print Badges, select a badge design or a
design mapping from the drop-down list.
Note:
Make sure there is not a Person icon beside the design. If the design is associated with a Personnel record, an
error message similar to the following displays:
Figure 99. Error message
4. Click Print
.
The badge will print to the printer designated as the default printer for the Imaging terminal.
Note:
If a secondary Printer Setup dialog box displays in the background, access the window either from the
Windows taskbar or by typing Alt + Tab. Then, close the window.
Note:
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Overview on page 394 for assistance.
To print a badge from the Personnel form:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab.
2. Click Find
to display a current list of records.
3. Select the personnel record whose badge you want to print.
4. Click the Badge Manager tab. The active badges assigned to the selected badge holder are displayed.
5. Select the badge to print and under Print Badges, select a badge design or a design mapping from the
drop-down list.
6. Click Print
.
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The badge will print to the printer designated as the default printer for the Imaging terminal.
Note:
If a secondary Printer Setup dialog box displays in the background, access the window either from the
Windows taskbar or by typing Alt Tab. Then close the window.
Note:
If this button appears dimmed, refer to Overview on page 394 for assistance.
Category manager
Use the Areas, Badges, and Area Events forms to assign new categories or to change or remove categories
already assigned. Each of these forms contain a Category Manager tab, that displays the active categories
assigned to the selected personnel (badge holders), area, or area event on one side and the categories that are
available for assignment on the other.
Example
You can assign categories to an area and then schedule area events to change the categories depending on
access requirements. Categories are position-sensitive, so be careful not to overwrite categories that should
remain intact.
For example:
•
•
•
An area event can change the categories on an area for a specific time to control which badge holders
have access to the area during that time. If you assign a different category to each computer-operator
shift, then you can control when certain staff members can access the computer room. Set up area
events that add and remove the categories from the area.
A series of area events that add and remove a single category can control the time frame in which a
contractor’s job is performed. For example, one area event adds a category to the R&D Lab at 4:00 PM
to allow the cleaning crew access; another area event removes the category at 4:30 PM to restrict the
time spent in this area. You can use the same strategy to restrict access to a computer vault where daily
backups are stored. The categories on an area control who can enter the area, when they can enter, and
how long they can remain.
An area event can change the categories of an area at a specific time. For example, two MIS shifts need
to access the computer room during separate times, but the MIS Manager needs access 2 hours a day.
The two shifts also require a 30-minute overlap during shift changes. To provide 24-hour access for the
MIS manager, create a category (such as MIS 24-Hour) on the Areas form and do not overwrite this
category with an area event. The two shifts will require separate categories (such as MIS Shift 1 and
MIS Shift 2), which will be used on the Area Events form. Use the None category (pre-defined) to
remove an existing category from its slot.
Figure 100.Category Manager form
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Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 96. Category Manager form fields
Field name
Description
Assigned
This is a list of all assigned categories in alphabetical order. Categories which have already been assigned,
have their slot number indicated to their left. Active categories, assigned to a temporary category schedule,
have an icon before their slot number.
Available
This is a list of all available categories in alphabetical order. To jump quickly to an item in the list, use the type
ahead search feature by clicking in any cell and typing the first letters of the item for which you are searching.
Add
Click on this button to add a permanent category to a slot. The category list on the form will be refreshed and
will display the new category. This button is enabled when an available category and an empty slot number
are selected. By default, the next empty slot number is selected when you select an available category.
Note:
Remove
Double clicking will also move the category from the Available to the Assigned column.
Click on this button to remove a permanent category from a slot. The category list on the Badges form will be
refreshed and will no longer display the removed category slot number. This button is enabled if an active
category or the corresponding slot number is selected.
Note:
Double clicking will also move the category from the Assigned to the Available column.
Slot
This spin box displays the next available slot. Click the up/down arrow to select a specific slot.
Calendar
When you click the calendar on the Category Manager, the Category Scheduler displays. From here you may
define the properties of the schedule.
Filter
Click Filter to enter search criteria to limit the category list. The following wildcards can be used to help delimit
the search:
* An asterisk can expand the search in either direction around a string of characters. For example, map* would
return map, maps, mapped, mapping, etc.
. A period replaces a specific character. For example, map. would return maps
? A question mark can replace a single character if one exists or ignore it if it does not. For example, map? would
return map and maps.
Related procedures
To add a category to the next available slot:
1. Click the Category Manager tab. A list of all assigned categories, in alphabetical order, will display
on the left pane. If a category has been assigned a slot, the slot number will be displayed beside it. All
available categories will display on the right pane.
2. Select the desired category from the Available column on the right.
The next available slot will be highlighted.
3. Click
or double click the selected category. The new category and the slot number to which it
was assigned displays in the Assigned column on the right.
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To add a permanent category to a specific available slot:
1. Click the Category Manager tab.
A list of all assigned categories, in alphabetical order, will display on the left pane. If a category has
been assigned a slot, the slot number will be displayed beside it. All available categories will display
on the right pane.
2. Select the desired category from the Available column on the right.
The next available slot will be highlighted.
3. Select the specific slot to which you want to assign the new category and then click
.
The new category and the slot number to which it was assigned displays in the Assigned column on the
right.
To remove a category from a slot:
1. Click the Category Manager tab.
A list of all assigned categories, in alphabetical order, will display on the left pane. If a category has
been assigned a slot, the slot number will be displayed beside it. All available categories will display
on the right pane.
2. Select the desired category from the Assigned column on the left.
3. Click
or double click the selected category.
The category is moved to the Available column and the slot number is removed.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Category scheduler
When you click the calendar on the Category Manager, the Category Scheduler displays. From here you may
define the properties of the schedule. Category schedules are set to be enabled during certain times of the day
and will expire on a certain date and time. They are selected and set based on an individual personnel record.
Note:
Micros must be properly installed before Category schedules become active. In addition, for this feature to work,
communications must be present between the host and micro.
Figure 101.Category Scheduler form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 97. Category Scheduler form fields
Field name
Description
Start Date
Enter the date on which the category schedule is to be enabled. Use the format of your system date as set
on the Parameters form or use the Calendar icon to set the date.
Start Time
Enter the time at which the category schedule is to be enabled each day (for a Daily schedule type).
Example: Select start times that occur on the hour or half hour. Use the format of your system time as set on
the Parameters form or use the Clock icon to set the time.
Stop Date
Enter the date on which the category schedule is to expire. Use the format of your system date as set on the
Parameters form.
Stop Time
Enter the time at which the category schedule is to expire each day (for a Daily schedule type).
Example: Select stop times that occur on the hour or half hour. Use the format of your system time as set on
the Parameters form.
The enabling and disabling of temporary categories is logged in operator history.
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Table 97. Category Scheduler form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Context
Specify a context of either Host, Micro, or Operator. This allows you to schedule categories in any of those
contexts.
Schedule Type
Choose a schedule type of Daily or Continuous.
• A Daily schedule type means that the category will be enabled each day at the Start Time and will be
disabled each day at the Stop Time. The default schedule type is Daily.
• A Continuous schedule type means that the category will be enabled at the Start Time of the Start Date
and will be disabled at the Stop Time of the Stop Date.
Days
You can restrict the days of the week that a category schedule will be enabled. A week day that is selected
means that the schedule can run on that day. A week day that is not selected prevents the schedule from
running on that day. This has no effect on the Continuous schedule type.
Related procedures
Examples of how to use category assignment
The categories on an area control who can enter the area, when they can enter, and how long they have access
to the area.
Example 1: Control who can enter
An area event can change the categories on an area for a specific time to control which badge holders have
access to the area during that time. If you assign a different category to each computer-operator shift, then you
can control when certain staff members can access the computer room.
Four area events are defined:
one to start Shift 1 at 07:45 AM,
one to end it at 5:15 PM,
one to start Shift 2 at 4:45 PM,
and one to end it at 1:15 AM.
Example 2: Control how long they have access to the area
A series of area events that add and change a single category can control the time frame in which a contractor’s
job is performed. For example, one area event adds a category to the R&D Lab at 4:00 PM to allow the cleaning
crew access; another area event replaces the category at 4:30 PM to restrict the time spent in this area. You can
use the same strategy to restrict access to a computer vault where daily backups are stored.
Two
one
ing
one
area events are defined:
to allow access to the Cleancrew at 4:00 PM,
to end it at 4:30 PM.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Example 3: Control when they can enter
An area event can change the categories of an area at a specific time. For example, two MIS shifts need to
access the computer room during separate times, but the MIS Manager needs access 24 hours a day. The two
shifts also require a 30-minute overlap during shift changes.
To control when they can enter:
1. First, create three categories, using the Categories form: MIS 24 Hour, MIS Shift 1, and MIS Shift 2.
2. To provide 24-hour access for the MIS manager, assign the MIS 24 Hour category on the Areas form.
(Do not overwrite this category with an area event.)
Only badges with the
MIS 24Hour category
will have access to
this area.
3. To provide access to the two shifts, create separate categories, MIS Shift 1 and MIS Shift 2 to an area
event using the Area Events form. Use the category, NO ACCESS (use w/sched only) to end the event.
When you assign the area events to a slot, remember that the MIS 24 Hour category was placed in the
first position (slot) on the Areas form; since categories are position sensitive, when you add a category,
do not overwrite an existing category. Notice that categories entered on previous forms do not display
on the current Events form, so you must be familiar with what is already in place.
Four area events are defined:
one to start Shift 1 at 07:45 AM,
one to end it at 5:15 PM,
one to start Shift 2 at 4:45 PM,
and one to end it at 1:15 AM.
4. When the area events occur, the Category Manager on the Areas form will reflect the new categories.
Note:
The Schedule Updates Database field on the System Parameters field must be set to Yes. See Table 24,
Parameter Form Fields on page 42.
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At 7:45 AM, badges with
MIS 24 Hour and MIS Shift
1 categories will have
access to this area.
At 4:45 PM, badges with
MIS 24 Hour, MIS Shift 1,
and MIS Shift 2 categories
will have access to this
area.
At 5:15 PM, when Shift 1
ends, badges with MIS
24Hour and MIS Shift 2
categories will have
access to this area, but
MIS Shift 1 will have
NO ACCESS.
At 1:15 AM, badges with
the MIS 24 Hour category
will have access to this
area, but MIS Shift 1 and
MIS Shift 2 will have NO
ACCESS.
Chapter 11
Badge management
Badge manager
Use the Personnel forms to assign new badges or to change or remove badges already assigned. The Badge
Manager tab displays the active badges assigned to the selected badge holder on one side and the badges that
are available for assignment on the other.
Example
In addition to his normal access control badge, a security guard is issued a tour badge to be used when
conducting a facility tour at specified intervals.
Figure 102.Badge Manager form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 98. Badge Manager form fields
Field name
Description
Assigned
Badges
This is a list of all badges assigned to this badge holder (personnel record), regardless of facility. If the
badge’s facility is not in the operator’s selected facilities, the operator will only be able to view, not edit, the
badge assignment.
If multiple personnel records are selected, only those badges that are common to all records will be
displayed.
Available
Badges
This is a list of all available badges not assigned to this badge holder (personnel record). Only those records
in the operator’s selected facilities will be displayed.
The operator must have Update permission to the Badge Manager.
Assign Button
Click on this button to add a badge to a personnel record. The badge will appear in the Assigned grid.
Remove Button
Click on this button to remove a Temporary badge or to remove a permanent badge from a personnel
record prior to the record being saved. The badge will be removed from the Assigned grid.
Temp Issue
Click to display the Temp Issue dialog. This is used to assign an available badge to a personnel record with
an expiration date. Current active badges are suspended.
Badge Form
Fields
See Table 92 on page 225.
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Temp Issue
You may replace a permanent badge with a temporary badge, when an employee forgets or misplaces their
permanent badge. The permanent badge is suspended, the categories and employee details are copied to the
temporary badge and the temporary badge is activated. A pool of badges can be used for temporary reissues.
Figure 103.Temp Issue form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 99. Temp Issue form fields
Field name
Description
Expires Date
The date the temporary badge expires.
Expires Time
The time the temporary badge expires.
Context
The time zone context in which the badge expires: Host, Micro, or Operator. See Verifying time zones on
page 168.
Suspend Badge All of the active badges that are currently assigned to this personnel record are listed. If desired, select which
badge to suspend. By default, the first badge in the list will be suspended.
Related procedures
To create a pool of temporary badges:
1. Select Access, Badges, and then Badges tab.
2. Complete the Badges form. Under Options, click the Temporary button.
3. Press Save
.
To issue a temporary badge:
1. Select Access, People, and then Personnel tab.
Chapter 11
Badge management
2. Click Find
to search for the badge holder record for which you are issuing a temporary
replacement badge.
3. Click the Badge Manager tab.
4. From the Available Badges column, select a temporary badge and click the Temp Issue button
The Temp Issue window will display.
5. Enter the date and time that the temporary badge will expire.
6. Click Suspend to select the permanent badge that should be suspended.
7. Click Ok.
.
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Chapter 12 Badge design
This chapter describes how to set up photo badge designs and link the designs to
badge holder (Personnel) records, signatures, and images stored in the Picture
Perfect database. These features are available if you have the optional Imaging
package installed.
In this chapter:
Setting up badge designs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256
Mapping badge designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Setting a default badge design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
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Setting up badge designs
The first step in producing printed badges is to create a badge design or card layout. The badge design
determines the card’s background, size, and placement of objects, such as logo, photo, signature, text, or
barcode fields that will be displayed on the badge. A specific design can be selected, at print time, using a
design mapping based upon field values in the badge or personnel record or a specific design can be assigned
to print the badge.
Figure 104.Badge Designs form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 100. Badge Designs form fields
Field name
Description
Description
The name used to describe the badge design. Example: Temporary
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Requires badge
to print
By default, this toggle button is checked, which requires a badge record be associated to the design in order
to print. There may be cases where you want to print a badge design for identification purposes only, such
as a temporary paper badge, in which case you should toggle this button off.
Edit Badge
Design
Click to access the Badge Designer. When you have completed your changes, save the new badge design.
For further information, see the Credential Designer Manual included on your documentation CD.
Related procedures
To create, edit, or delete a Badge Design record:
1. From the Setup menu, select Badge Designs, and then click the Badge Designs tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
Chapter 12
Badge design
To encode a Mifare badge:
1. From the Access menu, select People, Personnel, and then the Badge Manager tab.
2. Under Print Badge, select the External Encoder Setup button.
3. In the External Encoders Setup dialog, select the Specialized tab. Select the Mifare badge, and then
click the right arrow to move it from the Unused encoders pane to the Defined encoders pane.
4. Click the Setup button to open the Mifare Generic Encoder Setup window.
5. Select the Key Pairs tab to create a new key pair ID. You must contact Customer Support to generate a
new key pair ID. Refer to Contacting Technical Support on page 406.
Note:
By default, a GEKey pair ID is already set in the Mifare badge design. However, for security purposes, it is
important to create a unique key pair ID, and then set the Mifare badge design to use that key.
To create a Mifare badge design:
1. From the Setup menu, select Badge Designs, and then click the Badge Designs tab.
2. Click the plus sign to create a new record. This will open the New Badge Design form.
3. Complete the form, and then check the Mifare Encoding check box. Click OK.
The Badge Designer application opens to allow you to customize this badge. Refer to the Credential
Designer User Manual for more information on using Badge Designer.
4. In the Badge Designer, select File, and then Layout Properties.
5. On the General tab, click on the Encoding button. The Card Encoding dialog opens.
6. In the Card Encoding dialog, click on the Define button, and then select the Security tab.
7. By default, a Mifare badge design has the GEKey Key-Pair ID defined on sector 1. Once you have
created your own key pair ID, you must enter it here. Refer to Mapping badge designs on page 257.
Click OK.
8. In the Card Encoding dialog, click on the Define button, and then select the Data tab.
9. In the left-hand pane, click WiegandData. Under Field or Expression Definition, Badge ID 5502 is the
default selected value. If required, click the list box to select Badge ID 26-bit. Click OK.
Note:
Badge ID 5502 requires badge format Standard 16 Digit Badge. Badge ID 26-bit requires badge format
Standard 10 Digit Badge.
10. Close all open windows, and then close the Badge Designer. Click OK to save all changes.
Mapping badge designs
A design mapping allows you to select a badge design based on a field value in the Personnel record. For
instance, all members of a certain department may require the same badge design.
Example
A design mapping, “mapping personnel type,” links the following badge designs to the Personnel Type field:
Temporary, Consultant, Employee, and Vendor.
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Figure 105.Design Mappings form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 101. Design Mappings form fields
Field name
Description
Description
The name that identifies the design mapping. Example: Facility Mapping, to map all badge records belonging
to a specific facility.
Facility
This is a required field. Assigning a badge design record a facility, allows the administrator to filter the
records that can be viewed. See Creating facilities on page 53.
Map Values
• Map Fields: The field to be used for mapping: Department, Facility, or Personnel Type. After a design
mapping has been saved, the field used for the mapping cannot be changed and will be dimmed or
“grayed out.”
• Mapped Designs: The designs assigned to the corresponding field value are displayed in this column.
Design
Mappings
• Field Value: A drop-down list of values associated with the selected field. The Default value allows you to
set a default design for any values not directly mapped.
• Design: A drop-down list of existing badge designs. A blank value removes the mapping from the
Mapped Designs list.
Chapter 12
Badge design
Related procedures
To create a new design mapping:
1. From the Setup menu, select Badge Designs, and then click the Design Mapping tab.
2. Refer to Creating, editing, deleting, and printing records on page 36.
To assign a new design to a design mapping:
1. From the Setup menu, select Badge Designs, and then click the Design Mapping tab.
2. Click Find
and select the design mapping you want to edit.
3. In the Map Values pane, click New . The Field Values and Design buttons are enabled. Click Field
Values and select the new value to add to the design mapping.
4. Click Design to display a list of badge designs. Select a design to associate with each Field Value.
To remove a design from a design mapping:
1. From the Setup menu, select Badge Designs, and then click the Design Mapping tab.
2. Click Find
and select the design mapping you want to edit.
3. In the Map Values pane, select the mapping entry to be removed.
4. Click Delete
to remove the entry.
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Setting a default badge design
The system default for a badge design is set in a manner similar to setting a printer default. When selected, the
system default will be used when no other design is specified.
The Default Badge Design field appears on the System Parameters form and displays a list of defined badge
designs. See Assigning system parameters on page 40
Beside each design one or two icons appear.
•
•
•
Note:
The Person icon indicates the design references a field on the Personnel form and therefore a personnel
record must be selected in order to print a badge using this design.
The Badge icon indicates the design references a field on the Badge form and therefore a badge record
must be selected to print a badge using this design.
If both icons display, both a personnel and a badge record must be selected in order to print the badge.
A personnel or a badge record must be selected in order to print a badge.
Example
In Figure 106, a default badge design “Employee” is used if no other design is selected when printing a badge.
Figure 106.Parameters form: Default badge design
Related procedures
To set a default badge design:
1. From the Setup menu, select System Parameters, and then click the System Parameters tab.
2. Under Badging, click Default Badge Design and select a design from the list.
3. Click Save
.
Chapter 13 Alarm/activity monitors
This chapter shows you how to view and control incoming alarms and messages
that display on the various system monitors. Readers should familiarize
themselves with the information in this chapter before continuing to other
chapters in this document.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Monitor toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Monitoring alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Responding to alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Monitoring badge activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
Monitoring input activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Monitoring operator activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Monitoring status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
Monitoring users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
Monitoring system performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Monitoring log file messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
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Overview
Picture Perfect allows you to monitor various aspects of your system using alarm and activity monitors, as well
as system monitors that monitor file systems, database usage, and TPS alarms.
Real-time activity displays in a scrolling window. The queue of messages on the monitor scrolls upwards as
new messages appear at the bottom. You can control the amount of information the monitor displays by
clicking Preferences from the toolbar and selecting the desired columns. You can configure your system to
control the inputs and outputs associated with these alarms and messages and the way in which an operator
responds to them.
To see all the columns on a monitor, stretch the window frame (use the point-and-drag method).
Monitor toolbars
The following icons appear on the toolbar of the various monitors.
Table 102. Monitor toolbar icons
Icon
Description
Freeze/Unfreeze
To temporarily stop the Monitor from scrolling, click Freeze. The system continues to queue messages and
will resume scrolling the stored information when you click Unfreeze.
Search
The Search function is available when the number of incoming alarms cannot be displayed in a single
screen. If it is possible to display all alarms on a single screen, this function will be disabled. Click to open a
search text criteria dialog box where you can enter a string of text. Choose a column from which to search,
such as Valid, Invalid, Suspended. The row containing the results of the search is highlighted in green.
Save
Use the Save function to temporarily save the data in the Monitor to a file on the operator’s workstation,
which can be used later for troubleshooting. The next time the Save function is used, the current file is
overwritten by the new file.
Print
Click to preview the data displayed in the monitor in a report format. You have the option of printing to a
default printer or saving the report in electronic format (.pdf file).
Preferences
Click to display the Preferences window where you can manipulate the columns that you want displayed.
Example: If you do not want to view alarms in Host time, you can remove those columns, by moving them
from the Active to the Inactive column.
You can also access the Active Facility Set window where you can change the facility set and the time zone
selection for the current session. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Note:
Active Facility Set settings/selections from the preferences dialog apply only to that page.
The Preferences button in the Monitor applications is only available if the “Monitor Preferences” action
permission is enabled for this operator’s system permission profile.
Chapter 13
Alarm/activity monitors
Table 102. Monitor toolbar icons (continued)
Icon
Description
Clear
Click to clear the contents of the monitor.
Help
Click to display online help about the Monitor. To navigate the entire Picture Perfect help system, click
Show.
Execute
(Status Monitor
only)
Click Execute to generate a status report of the selected characteristics. The report displays in the Results
window at the bottom of your screen. Use the scroll bar to view the entire contents of the report.
Purge
(Alarm Monitor
only)
If you are having hardware problems and need to clear alarms that will not reset, click Purge in the Alarm
Monitor. The system logs the alarms and deletes them all from the monitor, even if they are not reset.
Remove
(Alarm Response
Window)
To clear a single alarm that is not in a reset condition, highlight the alarm and click Remove in the Alarm
Response window. The system logs the alarm (and its responses) and deletes it from the Alarm Monitor.
Purge
(Alarm Response
Window)
If you are having hardware problems and need to clear individual alarms that will not reset, click Purge in
the Alarm Response window.
Outputs
(Alarm Response
Window)
An alarm may have associated outputs that require manual reset. You can turn the entire output group on
or off, or turn each individual output on or off. See To control Alarm Outputs: on page 268.
The Alarm Response window can be configured to have the Remove button unavailable unless the alarm is
in reset state or has the alarm control Immediate Reset Input set (done on the Alarm form). The
configuration is determined by the Enforce UL Specifications parameter in the System Parameters form.
The default is No, indicating the Remove button is always available. When set to Yes, the Remove button
will be grayed out when an alarm is not in a reset condition.
If you have Send Message permission, this icon is enabled on the User Monitor which launches the Send
Message dialog. Click this icon to send a message to all logged on users. See Monitoring users on page 281.
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The Alarm Monitor displays incoming alarms and their priority, count, status, and time of occurrence. Alarms
display on the Alarm Monitor in order of their priority. The display of alarms within the Alarm Monitor is
filtered by the operator’s active facility set, so that the operator will only see alarms that are tagged with a
facility in their active facility set. By default, incoming alarms are assigned the facility of the micro from which
they originate, but this can be changed to assign the facility based on Input, Input Group, Alarm, or Location
using the Alarm Filter fields on the System Parameters form.
New alarms will blink for the time specified by the alarm’s configuration. When an alarm occurs, the system
beeps and displays a pop-up window to notify the operator. Instructions for the alarm are displayed by selecting
the alarm from the Alarm Monitor. The operator records a response to an alarm either by selecting pre-written
alarm responses from the Alarm Response window or by typing a response.
Figure 107. Alarm Monitor
Fields and controls
Table 103. Alarm Monitor columns
Field name
Description
Priority
The priority level assigned to the alarm in the Alarms form. This tells the system in which order it should
alert the operator, should multiple alarms occur at the same time.
Alarm Description
The alarm’s text description as defined in the Alarms form.
Location
The alarm location can be an 8RP board number or the description field of any of the following forms:
Inputs, Readers, Micros, or Input Groups.
Condition
Alarm
The alarm is in the active alarm state (either Open or Closed). The active alarm state
for an alarm is defined in the Alarms form.
Reset
The alarm has been reset or turned off. It is no longer in the active alarm state.
Tamper
The wiring of the alarm input has been cut or tampered with.
Chapter 13
Alarm/activity monitors
Table 103. Alarm Monitor columns (continued)
Field name
Description
Input State
Open
The wires connecting the input are registering more than normal (infinite) resistance,
indicating the connection has been broken.
Closed
The input contacts are in the closed position.
N/A
This field is not applicable for this type of alarm.
Short
The wires connecting the input are registering less than normal or no resistance,
indicating the contact has been bypassed.
Cut
Device Date
The date the alarm occurred, in the time zone context of the device. See Verifying time zones on
page 168.
Device Time
The time the alarm occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Date
The date the alarm occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Time
The time the alarm occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Date
The date the alarm occurred, in the time zone of the operator. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Time
The time the alarm occurred, in the time zone of the operator. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Process State
Active
Alarms that have not been acknowledged.
Pending
Alarms that have been acknowledged but not removed.
Completed
Alarms that have been removed but not reset.
Bumped
Active alarms that have been bumped to another operator.
Notified
Active alarms sent to the Network alarm Notification manager.
Remote
Alarms sent to the Remote Alarm Notification manager.
Facility
The facility of the alarm as determined by the Alarm Filter setting on the System Parameters form.
Count
The number of times the alarm has set and reset.
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Related procedures
To view alarms on the Alarm Monitor:
Use the Alarm Monitor window to view and select any alarms that occur: active, pending, or completed.
Alarms that are not yet acknowledged are active; alarms that are acknowledged but not removed are pending;
and alarms that are removed but not yet reset are completed.
1. From the Monitor menu, select Alarm Monitor.
2. To view all the columns on the Alarm Monitor, stretch the window frame or use the scroll bar.
To jump to a record from the Alarm Monitor:
Note:
If an operator does not have permission to view the associated record, the option is dimmed.
1. From the Monitor menu, select Alarm Monitor.
2. Right-click an alarm to display the following menu.
3. If you select Jump to Alarm, the associated alarm record displays, such as the following:
Chapter 13
Alarm/activity monitors
If you select Jump to Device, the associated device record displays, such as the following:
To use the Alarm Alert pop-up:
1. When an alarm occurs, a pop-up Alarm Alert window appears for every operator that is configured to
receive alarms. The window beeps and displays the number of new alarms, the number of unanswered
alarms, and the highest priority alarm that is pending.
2. Click Silence, to stop the beeping. The button will change to Stand By. If another alarm occurs, the
beeping resumes and the information displayed is updated.
To remove all alarms from the Alarm Monitor:
If you are having hardware problems and need to clear alarms that will not reset, use Purge
in the Alarm
Monitor. The system logs the alarms and deletes them all from the monitor, even if they are not reset.
Note:
An operator must have system permission to have access to the Alarm Monitor Purge button.
1. Click Purge
located on the Alarm Monitor (not the Alarm Response window). The Purge All
Alarms window appears.
Figure 108. Purge All Alarms
2. Type the reason for clearing all alarms (for log records).
3. Click OK in the Purge All Alarms window.
To clear a single alarm that is in a reset condition:
Click Remove
in the Alarm Response window. The system logs the alarm (and its responses) and deletes it
from the Alarm Monitor.
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Note:
The Alarm Response window may now be configured to have the Remove function button unavailable unless the alarm
is in reset state or has the alarm control Immediate Reset Input set (Alarm form). The configuration is determined by the
Enforce UL Specifications parameter in the System Parameters form. The default is No, indicating the Remove function
button is always available. When set to Yes, the Remove function button will be grayed out when the alarm is not in the
reset condition.
To clear a single alarm that is not in a reset condition:
Click Purge
in the Alarm Response window, if available. The system logs the alarm (and is responses) and
deletes it from the Alarm Monitor.
To control Alarm Outputs:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Alarm Monitor.
2. Select the alarm. The Alarm Response window appears and the instructions for this alarm will be
listed. The alarm type is displayed in the title bar of the window.
3. Click Outputs
on the Alarm Response window toolbar to display the Control Outputs window.
Figure 109. Control Output Groups
4. Click a radio button to turn the entire output group on or off, and then click OK.
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Responding to alarms
The system allows the operator to respond to (acknowledge) alarms and to manually reset alarm outputs (if
manual reset was selected using the Alarms form).
Open the Alarm Monitor window and select the alarm to display the Alarm Response window. The alarm type
is displayed in the title bar of the window. Pre-written alarm responses appear in the Responses list box. When
you select a response and clear the alarm, the system will archive the alarm record and the response. The prewritten response saves time. If none of the responses on the selection list are appropriate, the operator can type
a unique response.
Figure 110. Alarm Response window
Fields and controls
Table 104. Alarm Response form fields
Field name
Description
Instructions
Displays alarm instructions, such as who to call or who to dispatch to the area. Messages can be defined
in the Alarm Messages form. Up to five messages can be assigned to each alarm in the Alarm form.
Responses to Date
Displays all the responses to the alarm event up to the current time.
Date/Time
The date and time of the response.
Operator
The operator’s user name.
Response
The response text.
Enter new response Use to enter a custom text response. Use up to 255 characters.
RSVP
Click to select from a list of predefined alarm responses. To create a new response based on a
predefined alarm response, click Add. The selected response displays in a window where you may edit it
and save as a new response.
Related procedures
To respond to an alarm:
1. Silence the alarm by clicking Silence on the Alarm Alert window.
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2. Select Monitor, and then Alarm Monitor.
3. Select the alarm. The Alarm Response window appears.
4. Optional: Click Outputs
to toggle associated outputs on or off.
5. Optional: Enter a response--either click the RSVP button to select from a list of alarm responses, or
type a new response. When you click Add, the selected response appears in the Enter New Response
box. The maximum length of a response is 255 characters. If the responses selected from the
Responses list box exceed this limit, a warning will pop-up indicating this and the response will be
truncated down to the maximum length. The response may then be edited in the Enter New Response:
box to make the truncated response more presentable.
6. Log the response.
•
•
To log the response without clearing the alarm, click OK. You can continue to select this alarm
again to enter new responses. The previous responses appear in the Responses To Date box.
To log the response and clear the alarm, click Remove on the Alarm Response window. See
Related procedures on page 266.
7. Optional: Click the close button (X button) to close the window without altering the state of the alarm.
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Monitoring badge activity
The Badge Monitor displays the following types of badge activities:
Table 105. Badge activities - Valid
Valid transactions
APB In
A valid read occurred in an Antipassback In reader.
APB Out
A valid read occurred in an Antipassback Out reader
Degraded Open
A read occurred when an 8RP board was offline from the Micro/4 CPU.
Open
A valid read occurred in a Normal reader or a Keypad reader and the door was opened.
Open Duress
A valid read occurred in a Keypad reader but was followed by a duress code. The door was
opened.
Open Shunt
The door was opened as part of an alarm shunting process.
Passive APB In
A badge holder was granted access in two successive APB IN readers.
Passive APB Out
A badge holder was granted access in two successive APB OUT readers.
Swipe And Show
A valid read occurred on a reader configured for Swipe and Show. This will be followed by
another valid transaction, indicating how the transaction ended.
T&A In
A valid read occurred in a Time & Attendance In reader.
T&A Out
A valid read occurred in a Time & Attendance Out reader.
Valid Door Locked
In a Double Badge reader, the first badge read was valid but will not open the door until the
second is validated.
Valid Floor
A valid floor number was selected with elevator reader/DI/DO configuration.
Valid No Passage
A valid read occurred but the door was not opened.
Valid Toggle
A valid read occurred in a Toggle reader which reversed the current state of the Input Group.
Valid Nested APB
A valid read occurred at a nested APB reader.
Valid Timed Nested APB
A valid read occurred at a timed nested APB reader.
Passive Nested APB
A badgeholder was granted access at a nested APB reader despite a nested APB violation.
Fail Safe
A badgeholder was granted access at a global nested APB reader configured for “Controller
Requests from Host” and the micro was offline. Additionally, the offline operation mode was
configured for “Fail Safe.”
Table 106. Badge activities - Invalid
Invalid transactions
Area Offline
The area was selected as offline.
Badge Deleted
A deleted badge was used in a reader.
Badge Expired
An expired badge was used in a reader.
Badge Lost
A lost badge was used at a reader.
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Invalid transactions
Badge Suspended
A suspended badge was used at a reader.
Badge Unknown
An unknown badge was used at a reader.
Invalid APB In
An invalid read occurred in an APB IN reader.
Invalid APB Out
An invalid read occurred in an APB OUT reader.
Invalid Code
The number entered was not a valid code for a Shunt or Keypad reader.
Invalid Floor
An invalid floor number was selected with elevator/DI/DO configuration.
Invalid KR BDG
The badge used at a Keypad reader was not a keypad response badge.
Invalid PIN
The pin entered at the Keypad reader was invalid.
Invalid Shunt
The shunt value was entered at a reader not enabled as a Shunt reader.
Invalid T&A In
An invalid read occurred at a T&A IN reader.
Invalid T&A Out
An invalid read occurred at a T&A OUT reader.
KR INVLD Open DR
A keypad response was given while the door was still open.
KR Not Enabled
A keypad response was given at a reader not enabled as a Keypad reader.
Learn Timeout
A badge was not learned by the micro within the set amount of time of 5 seconds.
No Categ Match
An invalid badge read occurred because the badge holder’s categories did not match one of
the area’s categories.
Not Validated
In a Double-Badge reader, the second badge read was not validated because the first was
invalid.
Reader Offline
A read took place in an offline reader.
Usage Exhausted
The badge holder’s usage count for limited usage readers has been exhausted.
Double Door Locked
A second valid read occurred before the door was opened for the first valid read.The door
then locks.
Invalid Nested APB
An invalid read occurred at a nested APB reader.
Invalid Timed Nested APB
An invalid read occurred at a timed nested APB reader.
Fail Secure
An invalid read occurred at a global nested APB reader configured for “Controller Requests
from Host” and the micro was offline. Additionally, the offline operation mode was
configured to be “Fail Secure.”
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Figure 111. Badge Monitor
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Fields and controls
Table 107. Badge Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Image
If Show Thumbnails in Monitor is selected in Preferences, a thumbnail image of the badge holder that
generated the transaction displays in this column.
Classification
The type of valid or invalid badge transaction displayed. Example: Badge Expired
Type
Displays B to denote badge activity, or T to denote trace activity.
Device Date
The date the badge activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Device Time
The time the badge activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Date
The date the badge activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Time
The time the badge activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Date
The date the badge activity occurred, in the time zone context of the operator. See Verifying time zones on
page 168.
Operator Time
The time the badge activity occurred, in the time zone context of the operator. See Verifying time zones on
page 168.
Employee ID
The badge holder’s employee number.
Initials
The badge holder’s initials.
Last Name
The badge holder’s last name.
First Name
The badge holder’s first name.
Reader
The description of the reader that read this badge.
Category
The description of the category that resulted in the valid transaction.
Area
The description of the area where the reader is located.
Department
The description of the department that the badge holder belongs to.
BID
The unique identification number associated with this badge.
Facility
The facility of the input as defined in the Facility field of the Badges form.
Monitoring Swipe and Show activity
When properly configured for Swipe and Show, the Activity Monitor displays a photo when a valid badge read
is received from a reader. The photo is imported from the photo database. For double badge transactions, the
photo is displayed when the first swipe is detected, and the door is allowed to be unlocked when the second
swipe is detected.
To enable the Swipe And Show function, the reader must be designated as Authorization Required or
Authorization Not Required on the Reader form. Enable Swipe And Show Monitor must be selected on the
Image Options tab of the Badge Monitor Preferences window. This option is available only when the Image
package is installed in the system.
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Figure 112. Swipe and Show Monitor
If Authorization Required is active, a dialog allows the operator to unlock the door or advises the operator why
the door cannot be unlocked. If the door is allowed to be unlocked, the dialog includes an OK button and a
Cancel button. The OK button unlocks the door and dismisses the dialog. The Cancel button dismisses the
dialog, but does not unlock the door. If the door is not allowed to be unlocked, the dialog only shows a Close
button, which dismisses the dialog.
If the operator clicks the OK button to unlock the door, the door strike output command event is recorded in
operator history. Any invalid transaction denies the operator the option of unlocking the door.
The monitor is frozen while the photo is being displayed to allow the operator to read the text description of the
transaction. The text description includes the name of the badge holder and the name of the reader where the
transaction originated. If a photo cannot be displayed, a dialog advises the operator of the reason. This dialog
includes a Close button to dismiss the dialog and free the Activity Monitor.
Save, Search, and Print affect the contents of the window, but not the photo. New clears the monitor window,
but does not dismiss the photo. Freeze freezes the monitor, but will not free the monitor while it is frozen by a
photo. The monitor returns to normal when the operator dismisses the photo by clicking the Close box.
If Authorization Not Required is active, the photo will appear and the door will automatically unlock if this
was a valid badge read.
Related procedures
To view badge activity:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Badge Monitor.
2. To view badge activity make sure that routing for each of the badge transaction types, as listed on page
271, is routed to the Badge Monitor.
3. If you want to create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
To view swipe and show activity:
To enable Swipe and Show, the reader must be designated as Authorization Required or Authorization Not
Required on the Reader form.
1. Select Monitors, and then Badge Monitor.
2. From the toolbar, click Preferences
3. Click the Image Options tab.
, to display the Badge Monitor Preferences window.
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4. Select Enable Swipe and Show Monitor and click Ok.
To jump to a record from the Badge Monitor:
Note:
If an operator does not have permission to view the associated record, the option is dimmed.
1. From the Monitor menu, select Badge Monitor.
2. Right-click an entry to display the following menu.
3. If you select Jump to Reader, the record for the reader where the badge activity occurred displays,
such as the following:
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If you select Jump to Person, the person record of the badgeholder displays, such as the following, or
in the case of an Unknown Badge, a blank person record displays:
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Monitoring input activity
The Input Monitor displays input activity transactions.
Figure 113. Input Monitor
Fields and controls
Table 108. Input Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Activity Type
The type of input transaction displayed: INPUT
State
The actual state of the input, either open, closed, short, ground, or error.
Device Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Device Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the operator. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the operator. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Description
A description of the input, usually including a wiring address and a written description.
Facility
The facility of the input as defined in the Facility field of the Input form.
Related procedures
To view input activity:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Input Monitor.
2. To view input activity make sure that routing for each of the input transaction types, as listed on page
278, is routed to the Input Activity Monitor.
3. If you want to create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
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Monitoring operator activity
Select Operator Monitor to view the incoming operator activity transactions. Operator transactions include
Inserts, Updates, and Deletes to records in the database tables. The system can log this activity and the
operator’s ID.
Make sure that an operator routing is defined on the System Parameters form. Make sure that Global facility is
chosen as part of the active facility set.
Figure 114. Operator Monitor
Fields and controls
Table 109. Operator Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Login ID
The Login name the operator types to gain access to Picture Perfect, as defined in the Login ID field of the
Operator form.
Employee ID
The company identification number assigned to the operator using the system, as defined in the Employee
Id field on the Operator form.
Action
One of the following types of activity performed by the operator:
Log on, Log off, Update, Delete, Query, Command Event, Status request, Shutdown request, or Insert.
Operator Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the operator.See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Operator Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the operator. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Device Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Device Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the device. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Date
The date the activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Host Time
The time the activity occurred, in the time zone of the host. See Verifying time zones on page 168.
Record
Description
The description of the record viewed, updated, or deleted. Example: Smith, David
Table
The Picture Perfect table to which the record that was changed belongs. Example: person
Field
The field name of the record that was changed on the form. Example: Address 5
Value
The change that was made in the field. Example: FL
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Related procedures
To view operator activity:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Operator Monitor.
2. Operator transactions include Inserts, Updates, and Deletes to records in the database tables. Make
sure that routing on the System Parameters screen is set up to the Operator Monitor. If you want to
create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
Monitoring status
The Status Monitor lets you see a micro’s current operating characteristics (status) for its areas, categories,
readers, doors, inputs, input groups, outputs, output groups, alarms, modes, elevators, category floors, and/or
version. You can also view the status of an area’s readers and/or doors.
Scheduled events change the micro database and can also be used to update the host database. The Status
Monitor allows the operator to view the micro database in real time to see any changes the scheduler has made.
You must first select to view by micro or by area.
Figure 115. Status Monitor
Fields and controls
Table 110. Status Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Micro/Area ID
Click to display a drop-down list from which you can select the micro or area whose status you want to
view.
Request status on:
Enable the check boxes of the characteristics that you want to include in the status report.
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Related procedures
To view status by micro:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Status, and then click the Micro tab.
2. From the Micro ID drop-down list, select a micro.
3. From the Request status on: selections, check the characteristics that you want to view.
4. Click Execute
.
5. A report displays in the Results window at the bottom of your screen. Use the scroll bar to view the
entire contents of the report.
6. Click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
To view status by area:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Status, and then click the Area tab.
2. From the Area ID drop-down list, select an area.
3. From the Request status on: selections, check the characteristics that you want to view.
4. Click Execute
.
5. A report displays in the Results window at the bottom of your screen. Use the scroll bar to view the
entire contents of the report.
6. Click Save
Note:
to save the report as a .txt file.
You can also receive status information from the command line by typing statuscmd. The command
statuscmd is the only option where badge status information can be viewed.
Monitoring users
The system records the operators that are logged on to the system and displays other details about the session
and the operator.
Figure 116. User Monitor
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Fields and controls
Table 111. User Monitor fields
Field name
Description
User ID
The Login name the operator types to gain access to Picture Perfect, as defined in the Login ID field of the
Operator form.
User Name
The description of the operator using the Login ID, as defined in the User Name field on the Operator form.
Employee ID
The company identification number assigned to the operator using the system, as defined in the Employee
Id field on the Operator form.
Permission
The operator's database access control, as defined in the Permission field of the Operator form.
Session
A system generated unique number identifying the session to which the operator is logged on.
IP Address
A multi-digit number (such as 10.41.200.57) that identifies a unique location within a network of the
computer to which the operator is logged on.
Port
This is a number that identifies the port through which the host and the client communicate when
transmitting real-time events.
Login Date
The date the operator logged on to the session.
Login Time
The time the operator logged on to the session.
Facility
The facility of the operator as defined in the Facility field of the Operator form.
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Related procedures
To view user activity:
1. From the Monitor menu, select User Monitor.
2. If you want to create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
To jump to an operator record from the User Monitor:
Note:
If an operator does not have permission to view the associated record, the option is dimmed.
1. From the Monitor menu, select User Monitor.
2. Right-click an entry to display the following menu.
3. Select Jump to Operator. The operator record associated with that user displays, such as the
following:
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To force a selected user to log off the system:
Note:
In order to perform this action, you must have Force Logoff permission. From the Main menu select Control, Operators,
System Permissions Profile. Make sure the Force Logoff action is selected on your System Permission profile.
Note:
You can not force the user that you are logged in as to log off. The option will appear dimmed.
1. From the Monitor menu, select User Monitor.
2. Right-click the user entry to display the following menu.
3. Select Force Logoff. The user is immediately logged off of the system.
Note:
You can also force logoff from the command prompt. Type: pplogoff <userid>
To force all users to log off the system:
1. Make sure you are logged on to the operating system. Open a terminal window.
2. At the command prompt, type: pplogoff all
To broadcast a message to all users that are logged into the system:
Note:
In order to perform this action, you must have Send Message permission. From the Main menu select Control,
Operators, System Permissions Profile. Make sure the Send Message action is selected on your System Permission
profile.
1. From the Monitor menu, select User Monitor.
2. From the toolbar, click the Send Message icon.
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Figure 117. Send Message: All Operators
3. All operators that are currently logged in display under Selected Operators. If you do not want one or
more operators to receive the message, highlight the login IDs and click the right arrow to move the
selections to the Available Operators column.
Note:
You can not send a message to the user that you are logged in as. Your user ID will not display in the list.
4. Type the message in the Type your text area.
5. Click Send Message to send or Cancel to quit.
To broadcast a message to a selected user that is logged into the system:
Note:
In order to perform this action, you must have Send Message permission. From the Main menu select Control,
Operators, System Permissions Profile. Make sure the Send Message action is selected on your System Permission
profile.
1. From the Monitor menu, select User Monitor.
Figure 118. User Monitor: Send Message
2. Select the User ID of the operator to whom you want to send a message and right-click to display a
context menu.
3. Select Send Message. Under Selected Operators, only the UserID of the operator you selected
displays.
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Note:
You can not send a message to the user that you are logged in as. The Send Message option will appear dimmed.
Figure 119. Send Message: Selected Operator
4. Type the message in the Type your text area.
5. Click Send Message to send or Cancel to quit.
Monitoring system performance
The Performance monitor allows an operator to view the overall performance characteristics of the Picture
Perfect host. Vital statistics such as memory usage, history usage, CPU usage, and queue sizes are refreshed
periodically and are logged temporarily on Picture Perfect’s system history table.
This data can be useful when optimizing the system or when diagnosing host-related performance issues.
Figure 120. Performance Monitor
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Fields and controls
Table 112. Performance Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Memory
Management
TPS Mode
Standalone, Primary, or Backup
Displays the current TPS mode when using a standalone or redundant system.
TPS Network Mode
Network Host or Subhost
Shows the type of host in an Enterprise system.
Communications
Comm Serial
Serial number for I/O messages.
Message Count
Total number of messages on all queues.
Shared Memory Used
The size (Bytes) of shared memory currently in use.
Shared Memory Free
The amount (Bytes) of shared memory currently available.
Shared Memory Total
The total amount (Bytes) of shared memory (used + free) on the system.
Shared Memory
Graphical display of used shared memory capacity.
Badges Processed
The number of badge transactions processed since the time shown in Start Date/
Start Time.
Messages Processed
The number of messages processed since the time shown in Start Date/Start
Time.
Start Date
The date the system was last started.
Start Time
The time the system was last started.
Comm XON
Yes: Communicating with devices
No: Not communicating with devices (buffer too full)
Comm XOFF
Yes: Not communicating with devices (buffer too full)
No: Communicating with devices
History Usage
Alarm History
Alarm History capacity used
The number of alarm transactions in the history table.
Badge History
Badge History capacity used
The number of badge transactions in the history table.
Event History
Event History capacity used
The number of event transactions in the history table.
Operator History
Operator History capacity used
The number of operator transactions in the history table.
Tour History
Tour History capacity used
The number of tour transactions in the history table.
System History
System History capacity used
The number of system transactions in the history table.
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Table 112. Performance Monitor fields (continued)
Field name
Description
CPU Usage
CPU Idle %
The percent of Server CPU clock cycles unused.
CPU Wait %
The percent of server CPU clock cycles waiting on resources.
CPU User %
The percent of server CPU clock cycles used by user processes.
CPU Sys %
The percent of server CPU clock cycles used by system processes.
BDG/s
The number of badge transactions currently being processed per second.
ALM/s
The number of alarm transactions currently being processed per second.
EVT/s
The number of event transactions currently being processed per second.
OPR/s
The number of operator transactions currently being processed per second.
TOUR/s
The number of tour transactions currently being processed per second.
sndmgr
Send Manager queue size.
dbmgr
Database Manager queue size.
prmgr
Print Manager queue size.
ui
UI Manager queue size.
bdgmgr
Badge Manager queue size.
almmgr
Alarm Manager queue size.
oprmgr
Operator Manager queue size.
rcvmgr
Receive Manager queue size.
snddrv
Send Driver queue size.
stsmgr
Status Manager queue size.
netalm
Network Alarm Manager queue size.
evtmgr
Event Manager queue size.
moddrv
Modem Driver queue size.
timer
Timer Manager queue size.
tourmgr
Tour Manager queue size.
mrtmgr
Routing Manager queue size.
cfgmgr
Configuration Manager queue size.
ucs
UCS Manager queue size.
eflash
eFlash Manager queue size.
timerd
Timer Daemon queue size.
Queues
Chapter 13
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Related procedures
To view performance:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Performance Monitor.
2. If you want to create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
Monitoring log file messages
The Log monitor allows an operator to view, in real time, the contents of the Picture Perfect log file:
/cas/log/log.xxxx
where xxxx is the current month and day. For example: /cas/log/log.1105 is the log file for
November 5th.
Figure 121. Log Monitor
Fields and controls
Table 113. Log Monitor fields
Field name
Description
Type
The type of message sent to the log file, such as information, warning, or error.
Time
The time the messages was generated.
Source
The sub-system that generated the message.
Message
The text of the message sent to the log file.
Related procedures
To view the log monitor:
1. From the Monitor menu, select Log Monitor.
2. If you want to create a report of this information, click Save
to save the report as a .txt file.
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Chapter 14 Reports
This chapter shows you how to create and schedule SQL and History reports.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
Creating and viewing reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Importing archived data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
Working with SQL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Scheduling reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
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Overview
The Reports form provides an interface to the online Picture Perfect database, so you can use ANSI standard
SQL select statements to query the database and generate reports. The SQL query function allows unlimited
selection criteria and up to eight sort criteria. The relational database allows a query to join separate database
tables into one report.
To optimize complex queries used for reporting and decision making, Picture Perfect uses Informix-OnLine, a
Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) designed to run on a wide range of UNIX-like operating
systems in standalone or networked environments. Informix optimizes the processing of large databases that
are shared by many concurrent users. Some advantages of Informix file management are:
•
•
The operating system does not limit the number of tables used at one time. For example, the SQL form
lets you select data from all Picture Perfect database tables for a single report.
The size of a database table is not limited, except by disk size.
The Picture Perfect system captures history information for alarms, badges, and operator activity. This
information can then be manipulated into various reports that can be viewed on screen or sent to a printer.
Alarm history includes acknowledged alarms. Badge history includes access attempts by valid, invalid, lost,
and suspended badges, plus Swipe and Show transactions on readers. Operator history includes database
changes, login transactions, control outputs, alarm graphics, and Swipe-and-Show record changes to output
state.
You can control which activities go to history. The History log is online history, and is one of the destinations
specified by routing instructions used throughout the system. You can set up routing-control information to
direct selected operator activity and badge activity to selected destinations: Printer, Monitor, or History. The
routings that you define on the Routings form appear in the Routings list box on the Areas, Inputs, and Alarms
forms. If the current routing on a form includes History, the activities defined on that form are captured in
history. If there is no current routing assigned, the activity routes to the default routing as defined on the
System Parameters form. If the default routing does not include History in its setting, the activity will not be
captured in history.
Chapter 14
Reports
Creating and viewing reports
Example
The following example is a Badge History report.
Figure 122.Reports Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 114. Reports form fields
Field name
Description
Select a Report
Category
When you select a category, the existing reports in that category display in the Select a Report list pane.
You can create a new category by clicking New Category, rename an existing category by clicking Rename
Category, or delete a category by clicking Delete Category.
Select a Report
A list box from which you can open a predefined report. Select the desired report.
Note:
If report permissions are enabled, only the reports that the operator has access to will be
displayed
SQL Keywords and
Operators
This list box displays SQL reserve words, relational operators, and logical operators which you select and
apply to an SQL statement. When you select a name and click Apply, the name appears wherever your
cursor is located in the Enter SQL Statement window. See Working with SQL on page 300 for more
information.
SQL Variables
This list box displays pre-defined variables. See SQL variables on page 300 for a description of the syntax
of these variables.
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Table 114. Reports form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Table Names
Select and apply table names to SQL statements after FROM. This list box includes all the table names in
the Picture Perfect database, and each contains different types of data that you may want to include in
your report. When you select a table name and click Apply, the name appears wherever your cursor is
located in the Enter SQL Statement window.
Column Names
Select and apply column names from the Column Names list box which includes all the column names in
the selected database table. When you select a column name and click Apply, the name appears wherever
your cursor is located in the SQL window.
Enter SQL
Statement
Enter the following SQL reserved words in the SQL window to form the beginning of each SQL clause. Use
all caps to differentiate the reserved words from the rest of the clause. Only the SELECT clause and the
FROM clause are required. WHERE and ORDER BY are optional.
SELECT
FROM
WHERE
ORDER BY
Instead of typing these names, you can select and apply words from the SQL Keywords and Operators list
box.
Query Parameters
The Query window allows you to specify search criteria for your report. If you do not specify any criteria,
the report will contain all information from the selected database table. If you have a large database table,
the report may run out of space requiring you to limit your query by specifying search criteria.
Text fields
You can insert or edit text in these fields by selecting the field and typing the desired text.
Text can contain wild card characters. The asterisk (*) is a wild card indicating 0 or more
characters. The question mark (?) is a wild card indicating a single character.
Example: You could query alarm history for all records with associated badge encode
numbers starting with 123 by typing 123* in the Badge Encode Number field.
Combo Boxes Clicking one of these buttons causes a list box to appear. From this list you can choose an
item or you can enter your own text by editing the text field at the bottom of the window.
Example: If you want to query the history database by micro, click the Micro button and the
list box will list all defined micros for the system. You can select one of these micros from the
items list. Click Ok in the list box to specify which micro the report will cover.
Chapter 14
Reports
Table 114. Reports form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Date Time
Ranges
History contains a date and time stamp of when the transaction occurred. Use the date
and time range boxes to specify date and/or time ranges for the report. You can specify
either a Daily or Continuous date/time query. Daily refers to what happened between a
start and end time each day from start to end date. Continuous refers to what happened
from start date at start time through end date at end time.
Example: Suppose you want to know what happened between 8AM and 5PM during the
month of December 2003. Enter 12/1/03 as the start date, 12/31/03 as the end date, 8:00
as the start time and 17:00 as the end time and click Daily. In contrast, leave the dates and
times as specified for the Daily example, but click Continuous. Now you would get all
information on what happened starting at 8AM on the 1st of December through 5PM on the
31st.
List Boxes
Some query windows contain list boxes that allow multiple selections for valid and invalid
transactions. By selecting any of the items in the list, you will be querying for only those
records that satisfy that condition.
Toggle
Buttons
Toggle buttons allow you to specify values for various conditions. By clicking any of these
buttons, you will be querying only those records that satisfy that condition.
Submit
Accepts your changes and runs the report.
View Results
Click to view a list of the data records included in the report.
Header
Specify text to be used as a header to be printed at the top right of every page.
Footer
Specify text to be used as a footer to be printed to the left of the page number at the bottom of every
page.
New
Click to create a new report.
Save
Saves the current report with the existing title and current changes. Use the Save As command to assign a
new title to a new report.
Save As
Allows you to save the current report under a different name, with the original report still existing under
the previous name. The Save As window will appear. Type a new name for the current report, and then
click Save As to save it and exit the window.
Delete
Select the desired report, and then click Delete. Click OK to exit the window. This option appears only if you
have operator permission to delete.
Note:
If report permissions are enabled, only the reports that the operator has access to will be
displayed.
Clear
Clears the form so you can create a new report.
Run
Click this button to generate the report, which will then appear in the View Results tab.
There is no limit on the amount of data returned by the select statement, and the View Results window
shows how many data records are in the report. When there are more than 1000 rows, it also shows you
the current page and the total number of pages. If there are more than 1000 rows found, the first 1000
can be viewed using the scroll bars; click Next Page to see more. To view the previous 1000 rows, click Prev
Page. Click Go to Page to access a particular page.
Print
Displays the Print Preview window. You can adjust the paper size, format the way the map will appear on
the page, select the number of copies, and preview the page before printing. The Print Report window
allows you to Print to pdf, if you want to create an electronic copy, or to Print to your local printer. There are
also several formats to which you can export, such as Excel, HTML, or CSV.
Note:
The Save as text file option does not function with Picture Perfect.
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Table 114. Reports form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Import Archived
Data
Click the Import Archived Data tab to display the Restore form where you can restore an archived
database to use for reporting purposes.
Related procedures
To create a new report:
1. From the Reports menu, select the Report menu item, and then click the Report tab.
2. Click New
. A Modified Report dialog box displays. Click Yes to continue.
3. From the Select a Report Category list pane, select a category for this report, such as My Reports.
When you select a category, the existing reports in that category display in the Select a Report list
pane. You can create a new category by clicking New Category or rename an existing category by
clicking Rename Category.
4. From the Table Names list pane, select the database table from which the data should be extracted,
such as alarm_color. Once you have selected the table, the Column Names list pane displays the
columns in the database.
5. Enter your SQL statement. Refer to the topic SQL Syntax for more information on how to write an
SQL statement. The only required elements include the type of data to include (SELECT) and what
database table the data is to be extracted from (FROM) in the format:
SELECT <Column Name>, <Column Name> FROM <Table Name>
For example:
•
•
•
•
•
From the Table Names list pane, select alarm.
From the SQL Keywords and Operators list pane, select SELECT and click Apply.
From the Column Names list pane, select the columns that you want to include in the report, such
as Foreground Color (fg_color) and Background Color (bg_color). Separate the columns to be
included with commas. Click Apply.
From the SQL Keywords and Operators list pane, select FROM and click Apply.
From the Table Names list pane, select alarm. Click Apply.
Chapter 14
Reports
Figure 123.Example Report form
•
If desired, click the Header/Footer tab and enter text that you want to appear at the top and
bottom of each page of the report.
•
From the toolbar, click Run
•
From the toolbar, click Save As
•
Click Print to display the Print Preview page. From this window you may Save to pdf or Print
to your local printer.
.
. Select the report category and enter a Title for the report.
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Figure 124.Print Preview: Test Report
•
Click Save . This icon will not be available if all required information is not entered or if you do
not have the required permissions for the form.
To view an existing report:
1. From the Reports menu, select the Report menu item, and then click the Report tab.
2. From the Select a Report Category list pane, select the category for this report, such as My Reports.
When you select a category, the existing reports in that category display in the Select a Report list
pane.
3. To open an existing report, select it from the Select a Report list pane. Then, from the toolbar, click
Run
.
4. Click Print to display the Print Preview page. From this window you may Save to pdf or Print to
your local printer.
5. Click Save . This icon will not be available if all required information is not entered or if you do not
have the required permissions for the form.
Note:
Chapter 14
Reports
Importing archived data
You can restore archived data from backup tapes. This data can then be used to run archived data reports for
Badge, Operator, and Alarm, history.
Example
The following example is a restore of the Badge history archive.
Figure 125.Import Archived Data form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. The list is in the
order that the fields appear on the form. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 115. Archive form fields
Field name
Description
Restore from:
Select the media that contains the data to be restored.
Tape, Disk File
Source file:
If you chose to restore from a Disk File, enter the name of the filesystem where the data is stored.
Click Browse to select from a list.
Delete Imported Data
This button will remove system generated tables containing the restored data.
Related procedures
To perform a restore:
1. From the Reports menu, select the Report menu item, and then click the Import Archived Data tab.
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2. Use the appropriate radio button to specify whether you are restoring from Tape or Disk File.
Note:
When Disk File is selected, clicking Browse displays a list from which you can select the file from which the
data will be restored.
3. Click Execute
to start the restore. When the Media pop-up window appears, insert the tape.
4. Click OK to start the restore.
Note:
Importing an archive can consume a large amount of available database space. It is recommended that you delete
imported data when execution of Archive Reports is completed. This will free up the database space.
Note:
Archive data must be imported prior to running an Archive History report.
Working with SQL
SQL variables
Picture Perfect 4.5 supports an expanded version of SQL variable syntax. The SQL Variables list box contains
a list of pre-defined “template” versions of the four types of variables as described below.
User defined variables may be embedded directly into the SQL syntax by enclosing the variable inside brackets
{}. It is up to the operator to put double quotes outside the variable as needed for character fields. The variable
will be detected when the operator clicks Run, and the Variable window displays. When the operator fills in the
desired value and clicks OK, the report is executed. The value is then substituted in place of the variable. SQL
supports a maximum of ten variables in the SQL select statement. If there are no variables detected, the Report
Variables window will not display.
Notes:
•
•
•
Multiple words with spaces for substitution variables cannot be supported for column descriptions.
SQL leaves it up to the operator to make the decision regarding the choice of variables and their textual
descriptions.
The Report Events feature does not support variables. An audit routine that detects variables in the
Report Events form prevents reports from being scheduled if they contain variables.
If you use informix “today” function, time comparisons with Picture Perfect date format must be done
using “to_date”function.
For example: TODAY - TO_DATE (person.access_date::VARCHAR(8), '%Y%m%d')
{$text|label}
UI Control:
Text field with a label
Output:
Replaces tag with user-supplied text.
Example Query:
SELECT * FROM badge_history WHERE last_name=”{$text|Last Name:}”
Chapter 14
Reports
{$facility_set}
UI Control:
None
Output:
Replaces tag with comma-delimited list of active facility ids for the current operator.
Example Query:
SELECT * FROM badge_history WHERE facility IN ({$facility_set})
{$single_choice|label|query}
UI Control:
Drop-down list with the given label, and entries generated by the given query. The query should select only
two columns: the first one is the value for the option, the second is the label for the option to be displayed
in the dropdown.
Output:
Replaces tag with value (not label) of choice selected by operator.
Example Query:
SELECT * FROM badge_history WHERE dept=”{$single_choice|Department:|SELECT id, description
FROM department}”
{$multiple_choice|label|query}
UI Control:
Group of check boxes with the given label, and check boxes generated by the given query. The query
should select only two columns: the first one is the value for the check box, the second is the label for the
check box to be displayed in the drop-down.
Output:
Replaces tag with comma-delimited values (not label) of check boxes selected by operator.
Example Query:
SELECT * FROM badge_history WHERE dept=”{$multiple_choice|Department:|SELECT id, description
FROM department}”
{$host_date}
{$host_date|n}
{$host_time|}
{$host_time|n}
{$operator_date|}
{$operator_date|n}
{$operator_time|}
{$operator_time|n}
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{$utc_date|}
{$utc_date|n}
UI Control:
None
Output:
Current date minus “n” days
Current time minus “n” hours
Example Query:
SELECT * FROM badge_history WHERE dept=”{$multiple_choice|Department:|SELECT id, description
FROM department}”
{$translate_lookup_exclusive|<tablename>}
UI Control:
Translates the view results lookup values for the specified table
Output:
None
{$column_selection_exclusive|<all possible columns>|<columns selected by default>}
UI Control:
“Column Manager” provides a control to select the columns to be included in the report results.
Output:
Comma-delimited list of column names
{$union_exclusive|<table1>|<table2>}
UI Control:
Expands the SQL query into two queries; one against table1 and one against table2
Output:
None
{$number_exclusive|<label>|<field>}
UI Control:
Text field with a label
Output:
Replaces tag with user-supplied number
{$time_range_exclusive|report.DateAndTime|report.Device|report.Host|report.UTC|dev_xac
t|host_xact|utc_xact}
UI Control:
Date and time control
Output:
Replaces tag with SQL clauses that correspond to Date and Time criteria selected in the control
Chapter 14
Reports
{$label_exclusive|<text>}
UI Control:
Displays a text heading only
Output:
Replaces tag with 1=1
{$yes_no_checkbox_exclusive|<text>|<checked value>|<unchecked value>|field}
UI Control:
Displays a check box with the text label
Output:
Replaces tag with either checked value or unchecked value
SQL keywords
In an SQL select statement, only the SELECT clause and the FROM clause are required. The other clauses are
optional.
SQL is case sensitive. For example, if you specify %Door%, the query finds anything with the word Door in
initial caps, but does not find the word DOOR in all caps. To include both, type:
WHERE description = "%Door%" OR "%DOOR%"
The SQL database stores information in tables. A table is a collection of information organized into columns
and rows. Each table contains one or more columns. A column contains one specific type of information, such
as last_name. Each row contains all the data about one of the records the table describes. A row contains one or
more columns. In your SQL select statement, the SELECT clause limits the columns and the WHERE clause
limits the rows.
You can create direct relationships between tables when you query a database to generate a report. The report
displays data from several different tables as if the data belongs to a single table.
See Logical operators on page 305 and Relational operators on page 305 for information on describing
relations between two values.
SELECT
Use the SELECT clause to find data from selected columns in a table. The report retrieves columns of data
and lists the data under each column heading in the report. The sequence of column names in the SELECT
clause determines the sequence of column headings on the report title bar.
FROM
Use the FROM clause to name the tables where the selected data is located. You can include (join) multiple
database tables.
For example, the following (unfinished) SQL select statement retrieves data from the category, badge, and
department tables. Notice that each column name in the SELECT clause has a table indicator. If there is
more than one table, identify each column name with the table name, since identical column names that
belong to different tables cause an ambiguous error.
SELECT badge.last_name, category.description, department.description FROM badge, department,
category
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The above SQL statement is unfinished because it requires a WHERE clause. The WHERE clause is
discussed next.
Note:
When selecting columns with the same name from multiple tables, make sure to specify the display table. For example:
SELECT reader.description reader, area.description area FROM reader, area
WHERE
Use the WHERE clause to set conditions on the select statement so that the query finds only selected (not
all) rows in a table. The WHERE clause describes acceptable values for one or more columns. Use
relational operators after the WHERE keyword, followed by search conditions or descriptions of the rows
you want to find. See Relational operators on page 305.
When your search conditions include a column name, a relational operator, and a value, enclose character
values in quotation marks.
For example, the following SQL select statement retrieves reader descriptions from the reader table that
matches only the Cafeteria Reader description:
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description = "Cafeteria Reader"
ORDER BY
Use the ORDER BY clause to sort the ROWS FOUND (data records returned). The report can sort by any
column name; however, it is faster to order by columns that are indexed, such as last_name and
description.
If the SQL statement does not specify the sorting order, Informix-SQL creates an index in ascending order:
that is: A to Z for character fields, low to high for number and money fields, from earlier to later in time
and date fields, and from smallest time span to largest time span for interval fields.
For example, the following SQL select statement retrieves data from the reader table that matches all
reader descriptions, which appear in ascending alphabetical order.
SELECT description FROM reader ORDER BY description
LIKE
Use LIKE after a column name to specify a value or pattern that data must match in order to be found.
Characters typically used in a LIKE string are:
%
A percent character matches zero or more characters.
_
An underscore character matches any single character.
The following SQL select statement retrieves a list of reader descriptions from the reader table where the
reader description starts with the characters Lob and ends with zero or more unspecified characters.
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description LIKE "Lob%"
The following SQL select statement retrieves a list of reader descriptions from the reader table where the
reader description contains the word Door or DOOR anywhere in the description.
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description LIKE "%Door%" OR "%DOOR%"
Chapter 14
Reports
Logical operators
Use AND, OR, and NOT to connect one or more search conditions that create a comparison condition.
AND
Use AND to retrieve data that matches both of the values connected by AND.
The following SQL comparison statement retrieves each reader described as Engineering Reader and also
has a set interval time of less than 5 seconds.
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description = "Engineering Reader" AND Interval_Time < 5
OR
Use OR to retrieve data that matches either one of the values connected by OR.
The following SQL comparison statement retrieves reader descriptions that match either Lobby Reader or
Cafeteria Reader:
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description = "Lobby Reader" OR description = "Cafeteria
Reader"
NOT IN
Use NOT IN to screen out data that you do not want in the report.
For example, the following SQL comparison statement retrieves all reader descriptions except those
described as Engineering or Antipassback.
SELECT description FROM reader WHERE description NOT IN ("Engineering", "Antipassback Reader")
Relational operators
Relational operators describe a relationship between two values. Use the following characters as relational
operators in a WHERE clause:
=
Equal to
<>
Not equal to
!=
Not equal to
>
Greater than
<
Less than
>=
Greater than or equal to
<=
Less than or equal to
For example, the following SQL select statement retrieves data for employees with last names that start with
the letter A or above and also start with letters below G; in other words, last names that start with the letters A
through F:
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SELECT last_name, employee, FROM badge WHERE last_name >= "A" AND last_name < "G"
Table 116. Data type relational operators
Data type
Greater than (>) means
Less than (<) means
DATE
Later in date
Earlier in date
TIME
Later in time
Earlier in time
INTERVAL
Longer span of time
Shorter span of time
CHAR
Later in the alphabet
Earlier in the alphabet
Scheduling reports
If there are certain history reports that you want to run at specific times, you can use this scheduling feature to
run these automatically. The scheduled report will follow the day and time settings specified on the Report
Events form.
All error messages and completion messages generated as a result of the scheduled report process are written to
a log file in the /cas/log directory called log.mmdd where mmdd = system date (For example: 0302
= March 2nd). You must check the log file for messages after the scheduled report process has executed, since
there are no pop-up window messages associated with this feature.
This scheduling feature can be used for both History and SQL reports, and they can be run together or
separately. Each report type will have a prefix in the log file to indicate its execution. History reports will have
a prefix of hist, and SQL reports will have a prefix of ppsql.
Note:
This feature will not support variables. An audit routine that detects variables in the Report Events form prevents reports
from being scheduled.
Example
Define a report event that schedules a history report of the Badge database tables to occur at 8 PM every
Friday.
Figure 126.Report Event form
Chapter 14
Reports
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 117. Report Event form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type a report event description up to 30 alphanumeric characters long.
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned.
For more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Report Type
Select the report you want to schedule from the PPSQL Report drop-down list.
Note:
If Enforcement of Report Permissions is enabled through the System Parameters form, only
those reports that the operator has permission to access will be displayed.
HHmmss
Enter the time of day that this report is to run.
Days of the Week
Select the days of the week that the report is to run.
Printer
From the drop-down list, select a printer. (Remember to consider the width specifications of the report
when choosing a printer.)
Related procedures
To schedule an SQL report:
1. From the Reports menu, select Report, and then click the Reports tab.
2. Define your query and report format through the Reports form, and save it under the desired name.
3. From the Reports menu, select Report Events, and then click New
.
4. Type the Description of this report event.
5. Enter the time this report is to run, and select the days on which it is to run.
6. Click the PPSQL Report button to display a list box of SQL reports. Select the desired report.
7. Click the Printer button to display a list box of printers. Select the printer where this report should
print. (Remember to consider the width specifications of the report when choosing a printer.)
8. Click Save
.
Wide carriage printing of report events
Picture Perfect provides support for printing reports from report events to a wide carriage printer on the
host. However, in order to do this, a few changes must be manually made on the host.
Keep the following items in mind if you intend to use wide carriage printing:
1. Prior to PP4.5 SP3, if you had a report wider than 80 columns, it would print in landscape mode
regardless of what type of paper was being used.
2. Report events use a program called enscript to facilitate printing. This command only supports
postscript printers. If your printer does not support postscript, it will not work.
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3. Reports printed from Report Events use the full length of each field. For example, last_name and
first_name in the person table are each 60 columns wide. It may be necessary to use the truncate
statement in your reports in order to setup a predetermined size. If you only want to report the first 20
characters of the last_name, you use the syntax "last_name[1,20]" instead of "last_name" when
selecting the last_name column. If this field is to be used in an ORDER BY clause, then you must refer
to it by its order number. For example: "SELECT last_name[1,20], employee[1,15]
FROM person ORDER BY 1". This will order the results by the last_name field.
Follow these steps after you have added a printer to your OS and to Picture Perfect:
1. Configure report width. After a report is created, a SQL command must be run to setup the width of the
report manually. This is not a configurable field within the UI. Please follow the table below to
configure the page_width field for each report_event record.
Table 118. Wide Carriage Printing Configuration
Report width
Printer paper size
Orientation
Page width
<80 columns
Letter
landscape
No action
<80 columns
Letter
portrait
81
>80 and <132
Letter
landscape
132
any
Wide paper
portrait
132
2. Type the following using the Page width from the above table:
# sqlstmt "update report_setup set page_width=132 where title='<title of your
report>'"
3. You can verify the change took place by doing the following:
# selectrpt "select title, page_width from report_setup where title='<title of your
report>'"
4. Optional procedure if using wide paper: Configure enscript to use wide paper when printing. Enscript,
by default, uses Letter size paper. In order to use a different paper size, a configuration file must first
be edited. All dimensions of paper size are measured in points. A printer's point is approximately 1/72
of an inch. The following is an example using a wide carriage printer with wide track paper (14in x
11in):
On Linux, edit the file called /etc/enscript.cfg. Find the Letter line in "Media definitions"
section, it will look as follows:
#
name
Media: Letter
width
612
height
792
llx
24
lly
24
urx
588
ury
768
984
768
Change the width of this type of paper as follows:
Media: Letter
1008
792
24
24
On AIX, edit the file called /usr/lib/ps/MediaSizes. Find the Letter line, it will look as
follows:
# Name
Letter
Width
612
Depth
792
llx lly urx ury PageRegionName PaperTrayName
18 17 597 776 letter
Chapter 15 Backup and restore
This chapter shows you how to perform an archive, back up the database, restore
the database, and recover the entire system.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Backing up your database. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Archiving your database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
Restoring your database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
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Overview
We recommend that during initial system setup, you perform a daily backup. Every day during initial setup,
new inputs, outputs, and alarms are configured and new badge data is entered. Regular backups will protect
this setup process.
The system stores badge transactions, alarm events, and operator activity in online history tables. When the
online history table for an activity is almost full, the system displays an Archive Alert pop-up window with a
message to archive the records of that particular table. If you prefer to archive data on a regular schedule, a
Force-Rollover option can be used instead. This lets you archive a table even if it hasn’t reached its threshold
point.
Backing up your database
A backup of your access-control database should be performed periodically. The system allows you to back up
the database to tape, or disk file. If your system has optional packages installed, use separate tapes to back up
each database, because each backup initializes the tape.
Example
The following example is a backup of the Badge table to a Disk file.
Figure 122.Backup form
Chapter 15
Backup and restore
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow
Table 114. Backup form fields
Field name
Description
Include:
Select the database whose files you want to back up. It is strongly recommended that you only
back up one database at a time. If the Badge database is not large, then you can combine Base
and Badge.
Badge, Base, History,
Optional Packages
Each package should be backed up to a separate tape or disk file.
Save to:
Select the media to use for the backup.
Tape, Disk File
Note:
If Disk File is selected, any file or path selected is appended to the system configured
backup directory.
Destination File
If you chose to save to a Disk File, enter the name of the file system to store the backup. Click
Browse to select from a list. If your backup file is expected to exceed 2 GB, ensure that the
location where the file is to be stored is defined as a Large File System. Otherwise, the backup file
will be incomplete.
Generate Verification
Report
Click to generate an on-screen verification report.
Base Tables
This is an advanced option that allows you to select only certain tables in the Base database for
backup or you can click Check All to select all the tables.
Other Tables
This is an advanced option that allows you to select only certain tables in the various databases
on your system for backup. You can click Check All to select all the tables.
Related procedures
To perform a backup:
1. From the Control menu, select the Backup Restore menu item, and then click the Backup tab.
2. From the Include: section, select one or more of the options: Badge, Base, History, or an optional
package, corresponding to the tables you want to back up.
3. If you want to see exactly which tables are included in your selection, you may click the Base Tables
(Advanced) or Other Tables (Advanced) tabs. These tabs display a listing of all the tables in the
database. The tables included in your selection will be toggled on.
Note:
Do not toggle any of the individual table buttons unless instructed to do so by your support representative.
4. If you want to generate an on-screen verification report, click Generate Verification Report.
5. Use the appropriate radio button to specify whether you are backing up to Tape or Disk File.
Note:
When Disk File is selected, clicking Browse displays a list from which you can select the destination file for the
backup/archive.
6. Click Execute
to start the backup.
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Perform a backup using the command line option cba
The command line version of backup uses a configuration file, backup.cfg, located in /cas/db/text.
This file contains the flat files to be backed up. You can edit this file if you want to add or delete files to be
backed up.
You must precede each file or directory name with a package name followed by a colon and a space (or tab).
This will cause the specified files to be backed up only when the associated package is backed up. The syntax
of the contents of the backup.cfg file is:
package name
directory or file to back up
base:
/etc/passwd
base:
/etc/group
base:
/etc/security
The following table describes the cba command line options.
Table 115. CBA Command Line Option
Command
Description
-o (htable)
Rollover, then archive the selected history table
-b
Backup specified table or group of tables
-a (htable)
Archive the specified history table
-r
Force rollover on history (archive only)
-rt (#)
Retry rollover (#) of times (default is 100)
-d (file)
Write to the specified disk file
-t
Tape - write to /dev/pptape
-v
Verify that data was written successfully
-np
Do not prompt for tapes if specified with -c
-nb
Run from netback
-e (table)
Backup specified tables
-l (file)
Backup tables specified in file
The following tables can be backed up (b) or archived (a):
Table 116. Tables that can be backed up or archived
Table
(b) or (a)
Description
-badge
ba
badge table / badge history
-base
b
basic database
-hist
ba
all three history tables
-image
b
badge photos and related files
-graph
b
alarm graphics (if installed)
-tour
b
guard tours (if installed)
Chapter 15
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Table 116. Tables that can be backed up or archived (continued)
Table
(b) or (a)
Description
-thist
ba
tour history (if installed)
-visitor
b
visitor tables (if installed)
-vhist
ba
visitor history (if installed)
-alarm
a
alarm history
-oper
a
operator history
To launch the cba backup option:
1. Open a terminal window.
2. Type a command, including options. For example: to backup and verify the base Picture Perfect
package to a disk file, type:
cba -c -b -v -d /tmp/basebackup -base -badge
Enter
The cba backup option will back up the files contained in the backup.cfg file.
Archiving your database
The system prompts you (by way of an alarm) to perform a specific archiving function for Badge History,
Alarm History, or Operator History when the primary table for that history reaches 95 percent capacity. At that
time, the system takes the records stored in that primary history table and moves them to a temporary history
table. When an archive is performed for a particular history, it uses the information in its temporary table; that
way, the primary table is free to start collecting new information right away.
If an archive is not performed before the primary table 95 percent capacity again, the data in the temporary
table will be overwritten, and the original archive data lost. It is therefore important to perform the indicated
archive when the system notifies you through an alarm.
Since the time needed to reach a history threshold varies with activity levels, it’s hard to predict when a
particular threshold will be reached. A Force-Rollover option exists, therefore, which allows you to archive
data on a regular schedule, such as once a week. This task can then be incorporated into your normal backup
procedure. The Force-Rollover option takes data in the primary table and transfers it to the temporary table
even if the primary table is not full. The Force-Rollover option will only be displayed on the Backup window if
the data currently in the temporary table has already been archived. This prevents un-archived data from being
erased when new data overwrites it. (This data will, however, be overwritten when the primary table becomes
full.)
Note:
In Picture Perfect 4.1, in addition to the Archive Notice pop-up, an alarm is triggered to notify that it is time to perform an
archive.
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Example
The following example is an archive of the Alarm table to a Disk file.
Figure 123.Archive Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 117. Archive form fields
Field name
Description
Include:
Select the type of history files you want to archive. It is strongly recommended that you only
archive one database at a time.
Badge, Alarm, Operator, Event,
Optional Packages
Force Rollover
Each package should be archived to a separate tape or disk file. Since the time needed to
reach a history threshold varies with activity levels, it's hard to predict when a particular
threshold will be reached. A Force-Rollover option exists, therefore, which allows you to
archive data on a regular schedule, such as once a week. This task can then be incorporated
into your normal backup procedure. The Force-Rollover option takes data in the primary
table and transfers it to the temporary table even if the primary table is not full.
Picture Perfect uses two history tables for each type of history: primary and temporary.
When the primary fills up, it is renamed: history_tmp and an archive notification window for
that table displays.
Since the time needed to reach a history threshold varies with activity levels, it’s hard to
predict when a particular threshold will be reached. A Force-Rollover option exists, therefore,
which allows you to archive data on a regular schedule, such as once a week. This task can
then be incorporated into your normal backup procedure. The Force-Rollover option takes
data in the primary table and transfers it to the temporary table even if the primary table is
not full.
Save to:
Tape or Disk File
Select the media to use for the archive.
Note:
If Disk File is selected, any file or path selected is appended to the system
configured backup directory.
Chapter 15
Backup and restore
Table 117. Archive form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Destination File
If you chose to save to a Disk File, enter the name of the file system to store the archive. Click
Browse to select from a list. If your archive file is expected to exceed 2 GB, ensure that the
location where the file is to be stored is defined as a Large File System. Otherwise, the
archive file will be incomplete.
Generate Verification Report
Click to generate an on-screen verification report.
Related procedures
To archive data:
1. From the Control menu, select the Backup Restore menu item, and then click the Archive tab.
2. From the Include: section, select one or more of the tables: Badge, Alarm, Operator, Event, or an
optional package, corresponding to the tables you want to archive.
3. The Force Rollover option is displayed beside each history option. Toggle this button On if you want
to force a rollover of information and archive that data.
4. If you want to generate an on-screen verification report, click Generate Verification Report.
5. Use the appropriate radio button to specify whether you are backing up to Tape or Disk File.
Note:
When Disk File is selected, clicking Browse displays a list from which you can select the destination file for the
backup/archive.
6. Click Execute
to begin archiving.
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Restoring your database
Use the Restore function to restore a database from disk files or tapes. Keep the following in mind before you
restore your database:
CAUTION:
•
•
•
•
Note:
Do not restore non-history data on a running system.
The Restore function does not overwrite existing data. To clear your tables, contact your support
representative.
Before you restore a database, you should perform a database initialization. For instructions on how to
perform this task, contact your support representative.
The Restore function restores database files only, not regular files. To restore non-database files, use
the command line database restore option, cbr, or the database restore utility, restore.sh.
When a database is restored, please note that data is not downloaded to the controllers until the
controllers are reset.
Archives are restored to tmp tables.
Example
The following example is a restore of the Badge table to a disk file.
Figure 124.Restore form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow
Table 118. Restore form fields
Field name
Description
Restore from:
Select the media that contains the data to be restored.
Tape or Disk File
Note:
If Disk File is selected, any file or path selected is appended to the system configured
backup directory.
Chapter 15
Backup and restore
Table 118. Restore form fields
Field name
Description
Source file:
If you chose to restore from a Disk File, enter the name of the file system where the data is stored.
Select Backup Directory or Archive Directory, and then click Browse to select from a list.
Related procedures
To perform a restore:
1. From the Control menu, select the Backup Restore menu item, and then click the Restore tab.
2. Use the appropriate radio button to specify whether you are restoring from Tape or Disk File.
Note:
When Disk File is selected, clicking Browse displays a list from which you can select the file from which the
data will be restored. See the User Manual for detailed information on configuring this option.
3. Click Execute
to start the restore. When the Media pop-up window appears, insert the tape.
4. Click OK to start the restore.
Perform a restore using the command line option cbr
The command line version of restore uses a configuration file, restore.cfg, located in /cas/db/text.
This file contains the flat files to be restored. You can edit this file if you want to add or delete files to be
restored.
The syntax of the contents of the restore.cfg file is:
/etc/passwd
/etc/group
/etc/security
The following table describes the cba command line options.
Table 119. CBA Command Line Option
Command
Description
-o (htable)
Rollover, then archive the selected history table
-b
Backup specified table or group of tables
-a (htable)
Archive the specified history table
-r
Force rollover on history (archive only)
-rt (#)
Retry rollover (#) of times (default is 100)
-d (file)
Write to the specified disk file
-t
Tape - write to /dev/pptape
-v
Verify that data was written successfully
-np
Do not prompt for tapes if specified with -c
-nb
Run from netback
-e (table)
Backup specified tables
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Table 119. CBA Command Line Option
Command
Description
-l (file)
Backup tables specified in file
To launch the cbr restore option:
1. Open a terminal window.
2. Type a command, including options. For example: to restore and verify the base Picture Perfect
package from a disk file, type:
cbr -c -a -v -d /tmp/basebackup
Enter
The cbr restore option will restore the files contained in the restore.cfg file. After the database
records are restored and if your backup included “flat” files, messages similar to the following display:
This program edits the configuration file, /cas/d/text/restore.cfg before running
the backup or restore programs.
For backups, you must also precede each file or directory name with a package name followed by a
colon and a space (or tab). This will cause the specified files to be backed up only when the associated
package is backed up.
For restores, do not precede each file or directory name with a package name, colon, or space. Simply
supply the file or directory you want to be restored from the media.
P - Print Current List
A - Add Item to List
E - Edit Item on List
D - Delete Item from List
Q - Quit and Save File
Enter Function (P/A/E/D/Q): p
3. Type the letter p to print the list of files to be restored. A list, similar to the following, of the files
contained in the restore.cfg files displays:
Current File List
1. /cas/forms/*
2. /cas/lists/*
3. /photo/photo/*
4. /photo/designs/*
4. If these are the files you want to restore, press Q to quit and save the file. If you want to edit the list,
press A, E, or D, as appropriate. When you have completed your edits, press Q to quit and save the file.
To restore the entire system:
1. To recover the entire system, perform the installation procedures. For the complete installation
procedures for Picture Perfect and the operating system, refer to the Picture Perfect Installation
Manual.
When you reach the Database Restore utility during installation, select option 2 (Restore customer’s
Database from Tape), or option 3 (Restore Customer’s Database from Disk File), depending on your
media type, and reload your database backup rather than the minimum or sample database.
Chapter 16 Data Generator and templates
This chapter shows you how to use templates and template groups to create
records.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Running templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Data Generator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
Managing templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
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Overview
The ability to run Data Generator is governed by your system permission profile. The ability to run templates is
governed by your facility permission profile. The action permission Run Templates must be enabled on the
Facility Permissions Profile form. This function allows you to generate new records based on a template.
There are two ways to use templates:
•
•
Generate new records of the same type using the Run Template option on the form toolbar. When a
template is run, a Wizard guides you through the necessary steps to create a new record for the form.
Generate and link all records required to set up a particular device using the Run Template Group
option on the toolbar of the Data Generator form. The Data Generator guides you through the
necessary templates required for all the associated records.
Running templates
All Picture Perfect forms, with the exception of the system forms such as Facilities and the various monitors,
allow you to run a wizard to create new records based on a template. Your system is installed with some default
templates that you may use or you can create your own. See Managing templates on page 324.
Related procedures
To run a template:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab to access the form for which you are creating a new record. For
example: Access, People, Personnel.
2. Click
.
A screen similar to the following will display.
Figure 125.Personnel Template
3. From the Select a Template pane, highlight a template. A description of what this templates creates
displays in the Template Description pane.
4. Click Run.
A Wizard similar to the following displays.
Chapter 16
Data Generator and templates
Figure 126.Template Wizard: Step 1
5. In our example, under Status/Navigation, notice that you are on Step 1 and the Wizard displays the
Personal tab. Fill in the required fields that appear in red and then click Next Step.
6. Continue to fill in the remaining tabs until all required fields are compete.When you have finished,
click Save and Close.
Data Generator
The Data Generator form allows you to run a template group which contains templates for all the associated
records required to set up a device. Default template groups are provided for you.
Data Generator form
The following example reflects a template group designed to generate a new reader.
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Figure 127.Data Generator form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete.
Table 120. Data Generator form fields
Field name
Description
Description
A description (up to 60 characters) to identify this template group, for example: GENERATE READER WITH DOOR
CONTROL.
Details
A synopsis of the kind of records that are created by this template group, for example: Used for generating a
new reader and all the associated records required for that reader to be operational with door control
functionality.
Assigned
Templates
The templates that make up this template group.
Available
Templates
A list of all defined templates not included in the template group.
Related procedures
To run a template group:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Data Generator.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
The record list window, or data grid, displays a list of template groups defined in the system.
3. Select a template group from the list. For example the default GENERATE READER WITH DOOR
CONTROL template group as shown below.
Chapter 16
Data Generator and templates
Figure 128.Data Generator: Template group example
4. Click
.
A screen similar to the following will display.
Figure 129.Template group Wizard
5. In our example, under Status/Navigation, notice that you are on Step 1 of 32 and there are 8 templates
included in this template group. The first step allows you to assign a global name to be applied to the
related records but this is not required. Click Next Step.
6. Continue to fill in the remaining tabs until all required fields are compete.When you have finished,
click Save and Close.
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Managing templates
The ability to manage templates for operators and system administrators is governed by their Facility
Permission Profile. The action permission Manage Templates must be enabled on the Facility Permissions
Profile form. This function allows users to create a new template from a blank form or use an existing record as
the basis for a new template. Existing templates may be modified, deleted, or duplicated.
Example
The following example reflects the Manage Templates dialog for the Categories form.
Figure 130.Manage Template
Fields and controls
Table 121. Manage template form fields
Field name
Description
Create a New Template
New Template from Blank Form: Click to create a new template from a blank form with all fields
initially empty.
New Template from Record: Click to create a new template based on an existing record. The fields
in the new template are populated with the information from the existing record.
Modify, Duplicate, or
Delete an Existing
Template
• Select a Template: From the list of existing templates, select the template you want to modify,
duplicate, or delete.
• Template Description: This field is view only and reflects the description of the selected
template.
• Modify, Duplicate, Delete, Cancel: Click the appropriate button based on the action you want to
perform.
Related procedures
To add a template:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab for the form that you are creating a template. For example:
Configuration, Elevators, Elevators.
Chapter 16
Data Generator and templates
2. To create a template from a blank record, click
. The example that follows is based on a blank
record.
Note:
If you want to create a template from an existing record, first perform a search and select the record that you
want to base the template on.
A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 131.New Template
3. Click New Template from Blank Form.
A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 132.New Template from blank form
4. Under Template Name: enter a name for this template record, for example Marketing Elevator form.
5. Under Template Description: enter text that describes the purpose for which this template is used.
6. Under Template Facility: select the facility to which this record is assigned.
7. Under Field Locks select any fields that you do not want the user to edit when the template is run. Be
sure to populate those fields with the information that you want locked.
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8. When you have completed the template, click Save
.
To edit a template:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab for the form whose template you are going to edit. For
example: Configuration, Elevators, Elevators.
2. Click
. A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 133.Manage Template
3. Select the template you want to edit and click Modify.
A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 134.Modify Template
4. Make the desired changes.
5. When you have completed your changes, click Save
.
To delete a template:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab for the form whose template you are going to edit. For
example: Configuration, Elevators, Elevators.
2. Click
.
Chapter 16
Data Generator and templates
A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 135.Manage Template
3. Select the template you want to edit and click Delete.
To duplicate a template:
1. From the Primary menu, such as Access, Configuration, Control, or Setup, select a Secondary menu
item, and then click the appropriate tab for the form whose template you are going to edit. For
example: Configuration, Elevators, Elevators.
2. Click
.
A screen similar to the following displays.
Figure 136.Manage Template
3. Select the template you want to copy and click Duplicate.
A screen similar to the following displays.
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Figure 137.Duplicate Template
4. If you want to save it under a different name or edit any fields, select it and click Modify to make the
necessary changes.
Chapter 17 User interface customization
This chapter shows you how to customize your system to your particular needs
using custom forms and custom lists.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Creating and editing custom forms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Creating and editing custom lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
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Overview
All Picture Perfect forms support custom forms and templates that can be created based on an existing record
or by modifying a blank record. The templates can then be used to generate new records with the necessary
links already set up, saving the operator time. Custom lists can be created to appear in the user fields on your
Personnel forms to satisfy specific requirements
Creating and editing custom forms
In addition to required fields, Picture Perfect forms can be customized to include the fields and tabs of your
choice. For example, if your facility does not use expiration dates/times on badges, you could exclude those
fields. You can use names that are more meaningful to your particular business. Once you have designed your
form in the Workspace, you can preview the results by clicking the Preview tab. A custom form may be set as
the default.
Note:
In an Enterprise system, the following restrictions apply:
•
•
Note:
The default Custom Form may be set for the network host and each subhost. However, functions, such as
editing and creating, must be performed from the network host.
Custom Forms cannot be deleted from any host in an Enterprise system.
In a Redundant system, the default Custom Form can only be set from the primary host. This will set the default Custom
Form to be used by both the primary and backup hosts. All other functions, such as editing and creating, must be
performed from the primary host.
Figure 138.Custom Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete.
Table 122. Custom form fields
Field name
Description
Description
The name used to describe the custom form.
Facility
This is a required field. Assigning a facility to a custom form record allows the administrator to
filter the records that can be viewed.
Chapter 17
User interface customization
Table 122. Custom form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Tabs
The labels of the tabs that you create are displayed in this box.
Tab Sequence
The order in which the tabs display can be manipulated by using the Tab Sequence arrows.
New Tab
Click to create a new tab. The label New Tab will display in the Tabs window.
Rename
Click to rename a selected tab. Example: Rename New Tab, to a descriptive label, such as Personal
Info.
Select the current text, rename as desired, and then press <Enter>.
Delete
Click to delete a selected tab.
Tab Layout Preview
Once fields have been added to a tab, the layout is displayed in this window.
Width
To adjust the width of a field, select the field label in the Form Fields on Tab window. The selected
field layout will be highlighted and you can make adjustments using the Width spin box.
Height
To adjust the height of a field, select the field label in the Form Fields on Tab window. The selected
field layout will be highlighted and you can make adjustments using the Height spin box.
Available Form Fields
The fields that you can choose to place on a tab.
Form Fields on Tab
The fields that you have chosen to place on a tab.
Field Sequence
The order in which the fields display can be manipulated by using the Field Sequence arrows.
Field Settings
The field attributes are listed in this window, such as maximum length.
Related procedures
To create a custom form:
1. From the Setup menu, select Custom Form.
2. From the data grid, navigate to the type of custom form you want to create, for example, Department.
Figure 139.Data Grid
Note:
default_dept_form is shown in the bottom portion of the grid. If you select it, the preview pane displays the
current default Department form.
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Figure 140.Blank Preview pane
3. From the toolbar, click New
to display a blank preview pane.
4. Click the Workspace tab to begin creating your custom form.
5. In the Description field, highlight New Custom Form and type a name for the custom form, such as:
Accounting Department Form.
6. Click the Facility drop-down list to assign the custom form record to a facility.
7. Click New Tab and then Rename to assign a meaningful name to the tab.
Figure 141.Tabs
8. From the Available Form Fields list box, select a field that you want to appear on the tab and click the
arrow to display it in the Form Fields on Tab list box.
Figure 142.Form fields
9. Continue to add or remove fields from the form. You can rearrange the order of the fields using the
arrows.
Chapter 17
User interface customization
10. As fields are added to the Form Fields on Tab list box, corresponding boxes are displayed in the Tab
Layout Preview window. To adjust the width or height of a field box, highlight the field in the Form
Fields on Tab list box. The corresponding field box in the Tab Layout Preview window will be
highlighted and can be manipulated using the Width or Height spin boxes.
Figure 143.Tab layout
11. Under Field Settings:
•
•
To make a field mandatory, change the required attribute to Yes.
To change the name of a field, type the new name in the fieldname box.
Figure 144.Field settings
12. Click Save
to save your custom form.
Creating and editing custom lists
You can create custom lists to appear in the user fields of the Personnel form to satisfy specific requirements.
For example, you can create a custom Personnel form that contains a drop-down list of company or division
names.
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Figure 145.Custom List form
Fields and controls
Table 123. Custom List form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination (1 to 60 characters). Example: Eye Color
Custom List
The items that will appear in the custom list are displayed in this box.
Item
Type the name of the item to be included in the custom list.
Add
Click Add to insert the text entered in the Item: box to the Custom List box.
Remove
Select one or more items in the Custom List box and click Remove to delete them from the list.
Update
Select an item in the Custom List box. It will be displayed and available for editing in the Item box. When you
have completed your edits, click Update.
Set Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Related procedures
To create a custom list:
1. From the Setup menu, select Custom Lists, and then click the Custom List tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Enter a meaningful description to represent the list, such as Eye Color.
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User interface customization
4. Assign the record a facility from the Facility drop-down list. Click Manage to display the Facilities
form, where you may add or delete facilities from this drop-down list. You must have Manage
permission to perform this function.
5. In the Element field, type an item to be added to the list.
6. Click Add to add the item to the Custom List box.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 as necessary to complete the list.
8. Click Save
to save your custom list.
To delete a custom list:
1. From the Setup menu, select Custom Lists, and then click the Custom List tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
.
The record list window, or data grid, shows the results of search operations and allows you to quickly
navigate through the records found by a search. When an application is started, the record list window
is initially empty.
3. Select a record from the list in the data grid.
4. Click Delete
.
The selected record appears in the data grid with the deleted icon
next to it.
5. Click Save
. This icon will not be available if all required information is not entered or if you do
not have the required permissions for the form.
Note:
If you delete a custom list that is being used on a custom form, the custom list will not be deleted from the
form.
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Chapter 18 Advanced access control features
This chapter describes how to control specific areas of access in your system
according to your specific requirements.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Occupancy control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Seed counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Double-badge function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Elevator control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Pre-alarm notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381
Controlling alarms using a keypad code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384
Tracing badge holder activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 388
Escort required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390
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Overview
Your access control system is a group of devices working together, including a host, micros, readers, doors,
inputs, and outputs. To accommodate high security areas, elevators, and varying stages of security alerts, these
devices can be configured to operate in different manners, based on your particular needs.
Occupancy control
Picture Perfect allows the number of persons in a controlled space to be monitored by enabling Occupancy
Control through the Area form. This option is used when the number of people in an area must be controlled,
such as fire code enforcement regulations or when Two Man Rule is enforced. The occupancy count is set to
zero and Picture Perfect updates the occupancy count when a valid entry or exit to/from the area occurs.
Note:
Areas with Occupancy Counting enabled cannot span micros. All readers and doors must be physically connected to
the same micro.
How to set up occupancy control
You need to complete the following forms to set up occupancy control for an area:
•
•
•
•
Reader form: To configure the area readers.
Door form: To configure the doors in the area.
Facility Profile form: To enable Occupancy Control.
Area form: To enable Occupancy Counting for the area.
To set up the area readers:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Readers tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the reader record you want to set up.
3. On the Function tab, under Logical Reader Function, enable the appropriate radio button: APB In,
APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
Note:
•
•
•
In an area with Occupancy Control enabled:
All readers in the area must be assigned one of these logical functions: APB In, APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
APB readers must be set to Global. Timed APB is not allowed.
The logical reader function T&A In/Out is not allowed for any reader.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 146.Reader form: Reader Function
4. On the Reader Description tab, under Micro, verify that all readers in the area are assigned to the
same micro.
5. On the Options tab, under Number of Badges, verify that all readers are set to Single.
Figure 147.Reader form: Options
6. Save and exit the Readers form.
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To set up the area doors:
Note:
The door sensor input and the door output must be physically connected to the same micro.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the door record you want to set up.
3. On the Inputs and Outputs tab, click Door Sensor Input.
Figure 148.Doors form: Inputs and Outputs
4. Select the appropriate input from the list displayed.
5. Save and exit the Doors form.
To enable Occupancy Control:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the Facility Permissions Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the Facility Permission profile record you want to modify.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, click on Areas and make sure the level of permission is set to
Update.
4. Under Control Level Permissions, click on Occupancy Control and make sure the level of
permission is set to Update.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 149.Facility Permissions Profile form
5. Save and exit the Facility Permissions Profile form.
To enable Occupancy Counting for the area:
Note:
In order to perform this function, you must have Occupancy Control permission. See To enable Occupancy Control: on
page 340.
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Areas tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the area record you want to set up.
3. On the Area tab, under Occupancy Control, enable the Occupancy Counting radio button.
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Figure 150.Areas form: Occupancy Control
4. Save and exit the Areas form.
Two man rule (2MR)
Some high security areas, such as banks, may require that a minimum of two people occupy an area. Picture
Perfect has the ability to control occupancy in an area by placing the area in Two Man Rule (2MR) or Modified
Two Man Rule (M2MR) mode and then monitoring the count of badge holders that enter and exit the area. This
type of area control can be set up through the Areas form or an area event can be scheduled for a specific time
through the Area Events form.
The standard Two Man Rule (2MR), when enabled, requires that at least two authorized badge holders occupy
a controlled space at the same time. The Modified Two Man Rule (M2MR), when enabled, further restricts
access to controlled areas based on specific M2MR category types. See Table 124, Badge transactions for
Occupancy Counting and Two Man Rule features on page 363.
When using Occupancy Control with the Two Man Rule feature, the following restrictions apply:
•
•
Occupancy Count must be enabled and the count must be zero in order to enable Two Man Rule.
If Two Man Rule is enabled, Occupancy Count cannot be disabled. An error message will display and
you will not be allowed to save the record.
If Standard Two Man Rule or Modified Two Man Rule is enabled and the occupancy count is greater than zero,
Two Man Rule can be disabled, but you cannot switch to another Two Man Rule state. For example, if the area
is set up as 2MR and the occupancy count is 2, you cannot change the area to M2MR with Door Control.
Instead you must disable 2MR, reset the occupancy count to zero, and then enable M2MR with Door Control.
If desired, a digital output (DO) such as a blinking light can be activated on the reader following the first badge
swipe, to alert the badge holder that a second badge swipe is required before access will be granted. This is an
optional feature available by selecting 2MR Output from the Readers form.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Modified two man rule (M2MR)
The modified two man rule further restricts access to a controlled area based on the badge holders M2MR
category type. Additionally, a Door Control option can be enforced which, after access has been granted to the
first two badge holders, requires a door release button to be pressed before access is granted to any subsequent
badge holders.
M2MR category type
There are three M2MR category types assigned through the Categories form:
•
•
•
Note:
None
Access to an M2MR controlled area will not be permitted while M2MR control is enabled. By default,
any existing or new categories are assigned this category type.
Guest
A Guest is not allowed entry to an M2MR controlled area unless two (2) Team Members are already
present in the area.
Team Member
If the M2MR controlled area is empty, a Team Member is allowed entry only with a second Team
Member. Additional Team Members can enter individually after the initial two (2) Team Members are
present in the M2MR controlled area. Furthermore, at least two (2) Team Members must be present
until all Guests have exited.
If the micro controlling an M2MR area resets, it will automatically reset the occupancy count to zero. Therefore, in the
unlikely event that this occurs while the area is occupied, the system administrator must disable Two Man Rule,
evacuate the area, and then reinstate M2MR.
Modified two man rule without door control
The first two badge holders to enter a controlled space must be Team Members and at least two Team Members
must be present in the controlled space until all Guests have exited.
Modified two man rule with door control
The first two badge holders to enter a controlled space must be Team Members and at least two Team Members
must be present in the controlled space until all Guests have exited. Additionally, before any subsequent badge
holders are allowed entry, a Team Member within the controlled space must press a door release button. The
door release button must be pressed within the time specified in the Door Release Timeout field on the Areas
form or the door will not be unlocked.
A warning device, such as a horn or a strobe light, can be activated to notify the team members in an area that
a person desiring access has presented a valid badge at the reader and is awaiting entry. A digital output (DO)
point is configured to control the warning device through the Doors form, by selecting an M2MR output. When
the warning device is triggered, team members in the area press the door release button before the door timeout
has elapsed to cause the door to unlock and allow entry to the area.
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How to set up a two man rule (2MR) controlled space
You need to complete the following forms to set up standard 2MR for an area:
•
•
•
•
Reader form: To configure the area readers.
Door form: To configure the doors in the area.
Facility Profile form: To enable Occupancy Control.
Area form: To enable Occupancy Counting and 2MR for the area.
To set up the area readers:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Readers tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the reader record you want to set up.
3. On the Function tab, under Logical Reader Function, enable the appropriate radio button: APB In,
APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
Note:
•
•
•
In an area with Occupancy Control enabled:
All readers in the area must be assigned one of these logical functions: APB In, APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
APB readers must be set to Global. Timed APB is not allowed.
The logical reader function T&A In/Out is not allowed for any reader.
Figure 151.Readers form: Reader Function
4. On the Reader Description tab, under Micro, verify that all readers in the area are assigned to the
same micro.
5. On the Options tab, under Number of Badges, verify that all readers are set to Single.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 152.Readers form: Options
6. Optional: If you want to activate a DO (such as a blinking light) between the first and second required
badge swipes, click Two Man Rule Output and select the output to be triggered.
7. Save and exit the Readers form.
To set up the area doors:
Note:
The door sensor input and the door output must be physically connected to the same micro.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the door record you want to set up.
3. On the Inputs and Outputs tab, click Door Sensor Input.
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Figure 153.Doors form: Inputs and Outputs
4. Select the appropriate input from the list displayed.
5. Save and exit the Door form.
To enable Occupancy Control:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the Facility Permissions Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the Facility Permission profile record you want to modify.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, click on Areas and make sure the level of permission is set to
Update.
4. Under Control Level Permissions, click on Occupancy Control and make sure the level of
permission is set to Update.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 154.Facility Permissions Profile form
5. Save and exit the Facility Permissions Profile form.
To enable Occupancy Counting for the area:
Note:
In order to perform this function, you must have Occupancy Control permission.
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Area tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the area record you want to set up.
3. On the Area tab, under Occupancy Control, enable the Occupancy Counting radio button.
4. Under Two Man Rule, enable the Standard radio button.
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Figure 155.Area form: 2MR
5. Save and exit the Area form.
How to set up a modified two man rule (M2MR) controlled space with door
control
You need to complete the following forms to set up M2MR with Door Control for an area:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reader form: To configure the area readers.
Door form: To configure the doors in the area.
Facility Profile form: To enable Occupancy Control.
Area form: To enable Occupancy Counting, M2MR, and to assign M2MR Categories to the area.
Category form: To define Categories for M2MR Category Types
Personnel form: To assign M2MR Categories to Badge holders
To set up the area readers:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Readers tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the reader record you want to set up.
3. On the Function tab, under Logical Reader Function, enable the appropriate radio button: APB In,
APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
Note:
•
•
•
In an area with Occupancy Control enabled:
All readers in the area must be assigned one of these logical functions: APB In, APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
APB readers must be set to Global. Timed APB is not allowed.
The logical reader function T&A In/Out is not allowed for any reader.
Chapter 18
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Figure 156.Readers form: Reader Function
4. On the Reader Description tab, under Micro, verify that all readers in the area are assigned to the
same micro.
5. On the Options tab, under Number of Badges, verify that all readers are set to Single.
Figure 157.Readers form: Reader Control
6. Optional: If you want to activate a DO (such as a blinking light) between the first and second required
badge swipes, click Two Man Rule Output and select the output to be triggered.
7. Save and exit the Readers form.
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To set up the area doors:
Note:
The door sensor input and the door output must be physically connected to the same micro.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the door record you want to set up.
3. On the Inputs and Outputs tab, click Door Sensor Input.
4. Select the appropriate input from the list displayed.
5. Define an M2MR output on each door to the area that will be used for entry (APB IN or T&A IN).
Click M2MR Output and select an output to associate with a warning device, such as a horn or strobe
light.
6. Define an input as the exit button. Click Exit Button Input and select an input to associate with the
exit button.
Figure 158.Doors form: M2MR
7. The input selected as the exit button input must be set to the following: On the Inputs form, under
Input Control Setup, the Input Enabled button must be de-selected (the default).
8. Set Exit Button Asserts Strike to enabled.
Chapter 18
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Figure 159.Doors form: M2MR
9. Save and exit the Door form.
To allow an operator to view Occupancy Control:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the Facility Permissions Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the Facility Permission profile record you want to modify.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, click on Areas and make sure the level of permission is set to View.
4. Under Control Level Permissions, click on Occupancy Control and make sure the level of
permission is set to View.
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Figure 160.Facility Permissions Profile form
5. Save and exit the Facility Permissions Profile form.
To allow an operator to enable Occupancy Control:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the Facility Permissions Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the Facility Permission profile record you want to modify.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, click on Areas and make sure the level of permission is set to
Update.
4. Under Control Level Permissions, click on Occupancy Control and make sure the level of
permission is set to Update.
Chapter 18
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Figure 161.Facility Permissions Profile form
5. Save and exit the Facility Permissions Profile form.
To enable Occupancy Counting for the area:
Note:
In order to perform this function, you must have Occupancy Control permission.
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Area tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the area record you want to set up.
3. On the Area tab, under Occupancy Control, enable the Occupancy Counting radio button.
4. Under Two Man Rule, enable the Modified Door Control radio button.
5. Enter a value in the Door Release Timeout field.
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Figure 162.Area form: M2MR
6. Save and exit the Area form.
To define categories for M2MR category types:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Categories tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Define one or more categories (groups of people) who will access the controlled area and, under Type,
enable the appropriate radio button, None, Guest, or Team Member.
Figure 163.Categories form: M2MR
4. Save and exit the Category form.
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To assign M2MR categories to areas and badge holders:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Areas tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the area record to be controlled.
3. Click the Category Manager tab and select an M2MR category from Available Categories and move
it to Assigned Categories.
Figure 164.Area Form: M2MR Category
4. Save and exit the Area form.
5. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab.
6. From the toolbar, click Find
the controlled area.
to locate the Personnel records of the badge holders requiring access to
7. Click the Category Manager tab and select an M2MR category from Available Categories and move
it to Assigned Categories.
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Figure 165.Personnel form: M2MR Category
8. Save and exit the Personnel form.
How to set up a modified two man rule (M2MR) controlled space without door
control
You need to complete the following forms to set up M2MR with Door Control for an area:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reader form: To configure the area readers.
Door form: To configure the doors in the area.
Facility Profile form: To enable Occupancy Control.
Area form: To enable Occupancy Counting and to assign M2MR Categories to the area.
Category form: To define Categories for M2MR Category Types.
Personnel form: To assign M2MR Categories to badge holders.
To set up the area readers:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Readers tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the reader record you want to set up.
3. On the Function tab, under Logical Reader Function, enable the appropriate radio button: APB In,
APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
Note:
•
•
•
In an area with Occupancy Control enabled:
All readers in the area must be assigned one of these logical functions: APB In, APB Out, T&A In, or T&A Out.
APB readers must be set to Global. Timed APB is not allowed.
The logical reader function T&A In/Out is not allowed for any reader.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 166.Readers form: Reader Function
4. On the Reader Description tab, under Micro, verify that all readers in the area are assigned to the
same micro.
5. On the Options tab, under Number of Badges, verify that all readers are set to Single.
Figure 167.Readers form: Options
6. Optional: If you want to activate a DO (such as a blinking light) between the first and second required
badge swipes, click Two Man Rule Output and select the output to be triggered.
7. Save and exit the Readers form.
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To set up the area doors:
Note:
The door sensor input and the door output must be physically connected to the same micro.
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the door record you want to set up.
3. On the Inputs and Outputs tab, click Door Sensor Input.
4. Select the appropriate input from the list displayed.
5. Define an M2MR output on each door to the area that will be used for entry (APB IN or T&A IN).
Click M2MR Output and select an output to associate with a warning device, such as a horn or strobe
light.
6. Define an input as the exit button. Click Exit Button Input and select an input to associate with the
exit button.
Figure 168.Doors form: M2MR
7. The input selected as the exit button input must be set to the following: On the Inputs form, under
Input Control Setup, the Input Enabled button must be de-selected (the default).
8. Set Exit Button Asserts Strike to enabled.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 169.Doors form: M2MR
9. Save and exit the Door form.
To enable Occupancy Control:
1. From the Control menu, select Operators, and then click the Facility Permissions Profile tab.
2. From the toolbar, click on Find
to locate the Facility Permission profile record you want to modify.
3. Under Page Level Permissions, click on Areas and make sure the level of permission is set to
Update.
4. Under Control Level Permissions, click on Occupancy Control and make sure the level of
permission is set to Update.
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Figure 170.Facility Permissions Profile form
5. Save and exit the Facility Permissions Profile form.
To enable Occupancy Counting for the Area:
Note:
In order to perform this function, you must have Occupancy Control permission.
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Areas tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the area record you want to set up.
3. On the Area tab, under Occupancy Control, enable the Occupancy Counting radio button.
4. Under Two Man Rule, enable the Modified radio button.
Chapter 18
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Figure 171.Area form: M2MR without door control
5. Save and exit the Area form.
To define categories for M2MR category types:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Categories tab.
2. Click New
.
3. Define one or more categories (groups of people) who will access the controlled area and, under Type,
enable the appropriate radio button: Guest, or Team Member.
Figure 172.Categories form: M2MR
4. Save and exit the Category form.
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To assign M2MR categories to areas and badge holders:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Areas tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the area record to be controlled.
3. Click the Category Manager tab and select an M2MR category from Available Categories and move
it to Assigned Categories.
Figure 173.Area form: M2MR Category
4. Save and exit the Area form.
5. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab
6. From the toolbar, click Find
the controlled area.
to locate the Personnel records of the badge holders requiring access to
7. Click the Category Manager tab and select an M2MR category from Available Categories and move
it to Assigned Categories.
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Figure 174.Personnel form: M2MR Category
8. Save and exit the Personnel form.
Badge transactions for occupancy counting and 2MR
Table 124. Badge transactions for Occupancy Counting and Two Man Rule features
2MR mode
Badge event description
Badge transaction generated
DISABLED
Invalid badge swipe
Invalid badge
Unknown badge swipe
Badge Unknown
Valid badge swipe on IN reader; door is not opened
Valid no passage
Valid badge swipe on IN reader; door is opened
APB/T&A IN, occupancy count incremented by one
Valid badge swipe on OUT reader; door is not opened
Valid no passage
Valid badge swipe on OUT reader; door is opened
APB/T&A OUT, occupancy count decremented by
one
Invalid badge swipe
Invalid badge
Unknown badge swipe
Badge Unknown
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, within specified reader interval time; door is
not opened
Valid no passage
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, within specified reader interval time; door IS
opened
Two APB/T&A IN, occupancy count incremented
by two (to two)
(Occupancy
Counting is
enabled)
STANDARD 2MR
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Table 124. Badge transactions for Occupancy Counting and Two Man Rule features (continued)
2MR mode
MODIFIED 2MR
NOTE: Door not
opened case
includes door
release not pressed
within specified
time interval.
Badge event description
Badge transaction generated
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
but second swipe is not within specified reader
interval time
NO Transaction
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
but second badge is invalid
Valid door locked
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
but second badge does not have a valid category
Valid Door Locked and No Categ Match
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
but first badge does not have a valid category and
second badge is valid
No Categ Match and Not Validated
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, door is not opened
Valid no passage
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, door IS opened
One APB/T&A IN, occupancy count incremented
by one
One valid badge swipe on OUT reader when
occupancy count is at least three; door is not opened
Valid no passage
One valid badge swipe on OUT reader when
occupancy count is at least three; door IS opened
One APB/T&A OUT, occupancy count decremented
by one
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, within specified reader
interval time; door is not opened
Valid no passage
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, within specified reader
interval time; door IS opened
Two APB/T&A OUT, occupancy count decremented
by two (to zero)
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, but second swipe is not
within specified reader interval time
NO Transaction
Invalid badge swipe
Invalid badge
Unknown badge swipe
Badge Unknown
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, within specified reader interval time, M2MR
category type not Team Member and is Valid GUEST
Two Valid door locked
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
within specified reader interval time, but second
badge category type id not valid (not on area)
Valid door locked and No Categ Match
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Table 124. Badge transactions for Occupancy Counting and Two Man Rule features (continued)
2MR mode
Badge event description
Badge transaction generated
Two badge swipes on IN reader when room is empty,
within specified reader interval time, but first badge
category type id is not valid (not on area)
No Categ Match and Not Validated
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, within specified reader interval time, M2MR
category type IS Team Member; door is not opened
Valid no passage
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, within specified reader interval time, M2MR
category type IS Team Member; door is opened
Two APB/T&A IN, occupancy count incremented
by two (to two)
Two valid badge swipes on IN reader when room is
empty, but second swipe is not within specified
interval time, M2MR category type is Team Member
NO Transaction
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, M2MR category type NOT None;
door is not opened
Valid no passage
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, M2MR category type NOT None;
door is opened
One APB/T&A IN, occupancy count incremented
by one
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, M2MR category type is None but
valid (on area)
Valid door locked
One valid badge swipe on IN reader when occupancy
count is at least two, M2MR category type is None
and category not on area
No Categ Match
One valid badge swipe on OUT reader when
occupancy count is at least three and there would
not be two Team Members left in the room
Valid door locked
One valid badge swipe on OUT reader when
occupancy count is at least three and there would be
two Team Members left in the room; door is not
opened
Valid no passage
One valid badge swipe on OUT reader when
occupancy count is at least three and there would be
two Team Members left in the room; door is opened
One APB/T&A OUT, occupancy count decremented
by one
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, within specified reader
interval time; door is not opened
Valid no passage
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, within specified reader
interval time; door is opened
Two APB/T&A OUT, occupancy count decremented
by two (to zero)
Two valid badge swipes on OUT reader when
occupancy count is two, but second swipe is not
within specified reader interval time
NO Transaction
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Seed counter
The seed counter option provides a way to:
•
•
•
•
Automatically generate a unique Id number for each badge.
Automatically generate the badge Id (BID) number for each badge (optional).
Keep count of the number of badges a person has been issued.
Keep count of the number of times a person’s badge has been printed.
In order to use this feature, the seed counter feature must be selected at the time of base installation. The base
installation will ask you a series of questions to help you set up the seed counter options. The setup can only be
done at installation. For more information, refer to the Picture Perfect 4.5 Installation Manual. Changing the
option settings later can cause difficulties.
If enabled, three new fields will appear on the Badges form: Reissue Count, Reprint Count, and Unique Id.
Reissue count
Every time a badge is issued to a person this incremental number is stored to the badge. This field shows
the issue number of this badge and the total number of badge issues for the badgeholder to whom this
badge is assigned, for example 3 of 5. If a badge has not been assigned to a person, the Reissue Count is 00.
The maximum number of badge issues allowed is 99. This field is view only - you can perform a search,
but it cannot be edited.
Reprint count
This is the number of times the badge has been printed. A new badge will set the Reprint Count to 00.
Anytime the badge is printed or previewed, the badge will increment the number, storing it to the badge.
The Reprint Count is tracked a maximum of 99 times. This field is view only - you can perform a search,
but it cannot be edited.
Unique Id
The seed counter assigns a unique number to each badge. It is a global counter that is incremented each
time a new badge is created. The range is determined by the number of digits allocated to the counter. This
field is view only - you can perform a search, but it cannot be edited.
Double-badge function
This feature provides double-badge control for access to high security areas. Operator-defined readers will
require two badges or two badges with PINs to be presented before a door strike is activated.
Access through double-transaction readers is granted only when two complete, valid, and distinct transactions
are presented to the reader. “Complete” means that both transactions have all necessary information. “Valid”
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means that both transactions are recognized by the reader. “Distinct” means that both transactions are
individually distinguishable (a single badge cannot be used twice to complete a double-badge transaction).
•
•
•
Badge-only readers need two distinct badges.
Keypad-only readers need two distinct badge-encode numbers.
Badge-and-keypad readers need two complete badge-and-keypad transactions. The first reader activity
may be a shunt code or an alarm response code entered on the keypad. This first activity is optional.
Next must come the presentation of a badge to the reader. Following that, a PIN or duress code must be
entered on the keypad. The two transactions must have different badges, but they may use the same
PIN or duress code. The required order for a badge-and-keypad reader transaction is outlined below:
a. Shunt or Alarm Response code
b. Badge swipe
c. PIN or Duress code
Note:
On badge-and-keypad readers, shunt codes, duress codes, and alarm responses may be entered by either or
both transactions. For example, the first transaction may shunt the reader’s door while the second
transaction responds to an alarm on that door.
The separate transactions comprising a double transaction may use the same or different categories while
gaining access through the reader.
Each double-badge reader must have an Interval Time defined on the Devices/Doors/Reader form. This
specifies the number of seconds allowed between stages of the transaction. If, during the processing of a
transaction, there is no reader activity for the specified interval-time period, the transaction “times out” and is
considered at an end. The next reader activity will be considered the start of a new transaction. “Time outs” are
not reported to users.
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Double-badge reporting
All reader transactions are tracked by two separate reports, one for each component transaction. These reports
are presented in the Badge Monitor and/or Badge History.
Each transaction reports whether it is the first or second activity on a single- or double-transaction reader.
When both transactions are valid, each transaction reports that access was granted. When both transactions fail,
each transaction reports its individual reason for failure. When only one transaction fails, it reports its reason
for failure while the other reports that it was valid but did not gain access. It is possible to detect the one
component transaction’s failure before the other component transaction has been completely validated. In this
case, the other component transaction will report that it was not completely validated.
All transaction reports include a time stamp. It shows the time at which the access decision was made, not
when the transaction started. Since a double-transaction’s access decision is made when both component
transactions are complete, both transactions will report the same time stamp.
Double-badge configuration
To configure a reader for double-badge function, set the Number Of Badges field on the Readers form to
Double. All readers can be configured to require one or two transactions for granting access. In addition, the
Interval Time field on this form must be completed. The interval time specifies the number of seconds
allowed between stages of the transaction. (See Chapter 9 Area management for details on the Readers form.)
The double-badge configuration can also be changed by scheduling. This is done by setting the Number Of
Badges field on the Reader Events form. (See Chapter 10 Schedules and modes for details on the Reader
Events form.)
A change to the definition will be reflected in a micro’s local database. The only micro affected by any change
to a reader’s Number-of-Badges definition is the one which is physically connected to the reader.
A change in the micro’s local database does not affect any on-going reader activity. In other words, changing a
reader from double-transaction to single-transaction while the micro is processing the reader’s activity does not
affect that process; two complete valid transactions are still needed before access may be granted. After the two
transactions are processed, the micro will grant or deny access based on a single transaction.
A reader’s Number-of-Badges definition is not limited by the reader’s physical or logical type. For example, it
is possible to define a double-transaction, badge-and-keypad, anti-passback-in reader.
Reader status requests will display the reader’s current Number-of-Badges definition.
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Elevator control
Elevator Control allows you to control access to floors serviced by an elevator. This feature works only with
the Micro/5, M/PX-2000, and M/PXN-2000 micro controllers. It allows the micro to control multiple elevator
readers, DI’s and DO’s. This section shows how to implement the Elevator Control feature using any one of the
following methods:
•
•
•
Elevator Micro/DO Configuration
Elevator Reader/DO Configuration
Elevator Reader/DI/DO Configuration
System configuration standards
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Elevator Control is a part of the base Picture Perfect software package.
Elevator Control is implemented on Micro/5, M/PX-2000, or M/PXN-2000 configurations only.
A maximum of 64 floors can be serviced by one elevator.
128 separate, user-configurable elevator categories are supported per elevator.
The elevator buttons are enabled for a length of time (duration) defined on the Outputs form. All the
buttons (outputs) should be set to the same duration.
Badges must be authorized for an elevator reader in order to gain access to an assigned floor.
Picture Perfect can address up to 4096 micros with each micro having up to a maximum of 16 elevator
readers. The recommended limit is based on memory and disk capacity of the Picture Perfect host
system.
Elevator access
There are two ways to grant access to an elevator floor. Both require a valid badge swipe to an elevator
configured reader and a valid category match between the badge and a floor or floors. Depending on the
elevator control configuration, one of the following methods will then activate the elevator floors.
Method 1
This is the default and is available on all configurations.
Following a valid badge swipe, the badge is checked for category floors for this elevator. For each badge
category that matches the elevator’s categories, access is granted to the set of floors denoted by the matched
category. Therefore, the set of accessible floors will be the combined set of matched category floors.
For example, a badge holder has General Access and Computer Department as categories on their badge. The
elevator allows floors 1, 2, and 5 for General Access, and floors 3 and 4 for Computer Department. Therefore,
when this badge holder enters the elevator, floors 1 through 5 will be activated. Refer to Figure 175.
For a double-badge transaction configuration, each badge must first have access to the reader, then the same
access validation as above takes place. The difference is that the final set of accessible floors will be denoted
by the union of the two badges’ matched categories (which correspond to floors). In other words, if the elevator
category matches a category found on either badge, access is granted. See Double-badge function on page 366.
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Figure 175.Example of Elevator Control - Method 1
Method 2
When enabled, this method is available on the following elevator configurations:
•
Reader/DI/DO - See To set up Example 2 in a Reader/DI/DO configuration: on page 377.
Following a valid badge swipe, a floor button (DI) is used to enter a floor number. A category match
must exist between the floor selected and the badge before the DO (digital output) is fired to activate
the elevator. This method will generate a floor transaction, valid or invalid, which is stored, along with
the floor selected, and can be used for history and reporting purposes.
For example, a badge holder has General Access as the sole category on their badge. The elevator
allows floors 1, 2, and 5 for General Access, and floors 3 and 4 for Computer Department. Therefore,
when this badge holder enters the elevator and pushes floor buttons 1, 2 or 5, the elevator will be
activated and a Valid floor transaction will be generated. Entering numbers 3 or 4 would return an
Invalid floor transaction and no access would be granted. Refer to Figure 176.
For a double-badge transaction configuration, each badge must first have access to the reader, then the
same access validation as above takes place. The difference is that the final set of accessible floors will
be denoted by the union of the two badges’ matched categories (which correspond to floors). In other
words, if the elevator category matches a category found on either badge, access is granted. See
Double-badge function on page 366.
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Figure 176.Example of Elevator Control - Method 2
Method 1
During the period of time when the elevator’s digital outputs are active (buttons are lit), any number of those
buttons may be selected. The amount of time that the elevator buttons are active, after a valid badge swipe, is
set using the Outputs form. The same duration time should be used for all digital outputs assigned to floors.
Method 2
During a set period of time, a button may be selected. This amount of time in which the entry is accepted, after
a valid badge swipe, is set using the Outputs form. The same duration time should be used for all digital
outputs.
Elevator access for all categories
A badge that has the All Categories category assigned to it will be allowed access to all floors defined for the
elevator, regardless of whether the All Categories category is present on the area.
Free access floors
There are two methods of allowing free access to particular elevator floors. One method requires a badge
swipe; the other does not need a badge at all.
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Free access for all badges
Free access for all badges allows any badge that has access to the elevator reader to have free access to
designated floors. The “wild-card” category is used as an elevator category on the Category Floors form to
designate which floors are free access.
To set up a wild-card category, you must select All Categories from the Category list box, and assign the freeaccess floors to it. This allows a badge holder to gain access to the free-access floors, as long as the badge is
authorized for the elevator reader.
Free access without a badge
The free access without a badge method allows anyone to walk onto an elevator and have free access to
designated floors (without using a badge in any way). For this method to work, you must configure a Door
State of “unlocked” for the door to each floor you want included, then associate a digital output to the door.
When this is in place, the free-access floor buttons will always be lit, regardless of a badge swipe. When a
badge is swiped, access is given to all floors for which the badge is valid, along with the free-access floors.
Free access without a badge can be scheduled as described in Scheduling elevator free access on page 379.
How to set up elevator control
To implement elevator control, follow these steps for each access-controlled elevator in the system:
1. Define the maximum number of floors you want to control using the System Parameters form.
Depending on the configuration, this number is based either on a per elevator micro basis or is divided
between all elevator readers on a micro.
2. Depending on the configuration, define a Micro/5 as an elevator micro on the Micros form, or define a
Micro/5 as a normal micro and a reader on that micro as an elevator reader on the Readers form.
3. Define an output for each floor on the Output form.
4. For a Reader/DI/DO configuration, define an input for each floor on the Input form.
5. Define the type of elevator configuration, the number of floors for the elevator and assign an output
(and an input in the case of a Reader/DI/DO configuration) to each floor on the Elevator form.
6. Define sets of floors for categories on the Category Floors form.
Defining the number of floors
Use the System Parameters form to specify the maximum number of elevator floors on a micro. This number
could be per elevator (Micro/DO configuration) or it could be distributed between up to 16 elevators (Reader/
DO or Reader/DI/DO configurations). The maximum number of floors serviced by a micro (elevator) is 64.
See Assigning system parameters on page 40.
Defining micros
Required for: Micro/DO Configuration Only
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Use the Micros form to define the micro type as an Elevator for each micro used with an elevator in the Picture
Perfect system. See Defining micros on page 132.
Defining readers
Required for:
•
•
Reader/DO Configuration
Reader/DI/DO Configuration
Use the Reader form to define the reader type as Elevator for each reader used with an elevator in the Picture
Perfect system. See Defining readers on page 182.
Defining outputs
Use the Output form to define a digital output for each elevator floor button. This output will light and activate
the button for a floor to which access is allowed. For more information, see Defining outputs on page 158.
Keep the following in mind when defining elevator floor outputs:
•
•
•
•
At least one 16-digital-output (16 DO/DOR) board must be configured with an elevator micro.
The elevator digital-output addresses must be in the 16 to 31 range for each 16 DO/DOR board used.
For a maximum configuration (64 floors), four 16 DO/DOR boards must be installed in a Micro/5.
The duration time should be the same for all elevator digital outputs.
Note:
•
In a Reader/DI/DO configuration, make sure the Reader Interval Time does not exceed the Output (DO)
Duration.
Elevator digital outputs do not require output groups to be associated with them.
Defining inputs
Required for: Reader/DI/DO Configuration
Use the Input form to define a digital input for each elevator floor button. When this input is received by the
micro, it performs a category match and if successful, activates the associated output for a floor to which
access is allowed. For more information, see Defining inputs on page 161.
Keep the following in mind when defining elevator floor inputs:
•
•
•
•
Toggle the Elevator Point button to On to make this input an elevator input.
At least one 20DI board must be configured with an elevator configured to have the Reader/DI/DO
configuration.
For a maximum configuration (39 floors), an 8RP reader configured to be an elevator reader, two 20DI
boards and two 16DO boards must be installed in a Micro/5.
Elevator DI’s do not require an input group to be associated with them.
The Elevators form
Use the Elevators form to select the type of elevator configuration, define the number of floors, assign the
elevator to a previously defined elevator micro or reader and then tie previously defined outputs (and inputs in
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the case of Reader/DI/DO configurations) to the corresponding floors. Perform this setup for each of the
access-controlled elevators in your facility.
Figure 177.Elevator Form
Fields and controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 125. Elevators form fields
Field name
Description
Description
Type any alphanumeric combination to describe the elevator (up to 60 alphanumeric characters).
Example: Lobby, East Wing 1, West Wing 3
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Configuration
Type
Select one of the following types:
• Micro/DO - See To set up Example 2 in a Micro/DO configuration: on page 377.
• Reader/DO - See To set up Example 2 Reader/DO configuration: on page 377.
• Reader/DI/DO - See To set up Example 2 in a Reader/DI/DO configuration: on page 377.
Micro
When using the Micro/DO configuration type, click to select a micro from the list box. If multiple readers are
configured on an elevator micro, the first reader controls the elevator.
Reader
When using the Reader/DO or the Reader/DI/DO configuration type, click to select a reader from the list box.
Fire DO after
When using the Reader/DI/DO configuration type, select the Fire DO after Floor Selection to enable Elevator
Floor Selection Access Method 2 in which, after a valid badge read, a floor has to be selected and if it is an accessible floor,
the DO will be activated. Otherwise, the default Method 1 in which, after a valid badge read, the DOs for all
accessible floors are activated, will be employed.
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Table 125. Elevators form fields (continued)
Field name
Description
Define Floors
Click Define Floors to specify the number of floors, which in turn will determine how many floor buttons will
display for that elevator on the screen.
Number of
Floors
An entry is required in this field for the Floor label, input and output controls to be displayed. If no entry is
made an error message will display when the record is saved.
Valid entries are based on the type of elevator configuration chosen and the number of floors on other
elevators on the same micro.
Micro/DO: Maximum 64 floors, only one elevator per micro.
Reader/DO: Maximum 64 floors, distributed among the elevators defined for that micro.
Reader/DI/DO: Maximum 39 floors, distributed among the elevators defined for that micro.
Note:
Floor Labels
The “real” maximum number of floors allowed is defined on the System Parameters form.
The default floor labels are Floor 1 through Floor x, where x=the maximum number of floors. There are two
ways to edit the floor labels. See How to edit floor labels on page 376.
Figure 178.Define Floors Window
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How to edit floor labels
The default floor labels are Floor 1 through Floor x, where x=the maximum number of floors. There are two
ways to edit the floor labels:
1. Type directly in the text box.
2. Specify a starting floor number and an Increment/Decrement value. The default is 0. Click the
Increment or Decrement buttons to set default floor labels.
Example 1: Set up an elevator that will only access floors 20 through 40, and the name of floor 20 is
Lobby 2:
Figure 179.Example of Increment Floors
1. Type in description:
Lobby 2 in Floor 1.
2. Enter Start Floor
Number: 2
3. Enter Increment
Value: 19
4. Click Increment.
This will result in Floor
2 displaying a
description of Floor 21
(19 + 2), Floor 3 will
display as Floor 22,
and so on.
To reset the default floor labels (Floor 1....Floor n, corresponding to floors 1...n):
1. Enter “1” as the Starting Floor Number.
2. Enter “0” or blank as the Increment or Decrement value.
3. Click Increment.
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Example 2: Set up an elevator that will access 64 floors described as Basement, Parking, Lobby and Floor 2
through Floor 62:
Figure 180.Example of Decrement Floors
1.Type in descriptions:
Basement, Parking,
Lobby
2. Enter Starting Floor
number as “4”.
3. Enter Decrement
Value as “2”.
4. Click Decrement.
This will result in Floor 4
displaying a
description of Floor 2
(4-2), Floor 5 will
display as Floor 3, and
so on.
To set up Example 2 in a Micro/DO configuration:
1. In Configuration Type, select Micro/DO.
2. Click the Micro button and select a micro from the list box. If multiple readers are configured on an
elevator micro, the first reader controls the elevator.
3. For each floor, click the appropriate button and select an output from the list box. Make sure you select
a different output for each floor. This type of configuration supports up to 64 floors per micro.
4. For each floor, define floor names. See How to edit floor labels on page 376.
To set up Example 2 Reader/DO configuration:
1. In Configuration Type, select Reader/DO.
2. Click the Reader/DO Config button.
3. Click the Reader button and select a reader from the list box. The reader should be defined as an
elevator reader.
4. For each floor, click the appropriate button and select an output from the list box. Make sure you select
a different output for each floor. This type of configuration supports up to 64 floors per micro.
5. For each floor, define floor names. See How to edit floor labels on page 376.
To set up Example 2 in a Reader/DI/DO configuration:
1. In Configuration Type, select Reader/DI/DO.
2. Click the Reader/DI/DO Config button.
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3. Select the Fire DO after Floor Selection button to enable Elevator Access Method 2 in which, after a
valid badge read, a floor has to be selected and if it is an accessible floor, the DO will be activated. See
page 370 for more information on this method of elevator access. Otherwise the default Method 1 in
which, after a valid badge read, the DOs for all accessible floors are activated, will be employed. See
page 369 for more information on this method of elevator access.
4. Click the Reader button and select a reader from the list box. The reader should be defined as an
elevator reader.
5. For each floor, click the appropriate button and select an input and output from the list boxes. To
appear in the list box, the input must be defined as an elevator input. Every input chosen must have a
corresponding output chosen. This type of configuration supports up to 39 floors per micro. Click the
Refresh Floor Defs button to update the floor labels if changes have been made since the Config
window was displayed.
6. For each floor, define floor names. See How to edit floor labels on page 376.
The Category Floors form
Use the Category Floors form to assign a category to certain floors of each elevator. This category is used to
establish a match between the badge and the floor when granting access. The number of categories assigned to
each elevator must not be greater than 128. The number of floors displayed on this form is determined by the
Number Of Floors field defined on the Elevator form.
Figure 181.Category Floors form
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Fields and Controls
The following is a list of fields that may require additional information for you to complete. Because forms are
user customizable some of these fields may not appear, or may appear in a different order than that shown in
the following table. There is no required sequence to follow.
Table 126. Category Floors form fields
Field name
Description
Facility
Click Facility to display the facilities list box. This field reflects the facility to which this record is assigned. For
more information, see Creating facilities on page 53.
Category
Click the Category button to display a list box of categories. Select the category to which you want to assign
floors for this elevator.
Elevator
Click the Elevator button to display a list box of elevators. Select the elevator to which you want to assign
Category Floors, and then click Close.
Select Floors
These toggle buttons are available only after an elevator is selected. Toggle the buttons on for each floor that
is to be assigned this category.
Scheduling elevator free access
In order to schedule elevator free access, a door must be defined on the Doors form and a digital output
corresponding to a floor number must be assigned to the Door Strike Output field. By using this setup, a door
can be scheduled to Lock or Unlock through the Schedule, Door Events form. When the door is scheduled to
unlock, the digital output is triggered and the associated floor’s button is activated.
See Defining doors on page 187 and Scheduling door events on page 209.
If a door is unlocked by a Door Event, a badge is not required to activate the digital output corresponding to
that floor. This button may be selected by anyone, not necessarily an authorized badge holder.
The digital output can be deactivated in the same manner by scheduling a door to lock using the Door Events
form. The button will not be lit, and a valid badge will be required to access the elevator’s floors.
For each floor requiring a scheduled free access, its digital output must be associated with a door, and each
door must then be scheduled for a specific action.
Floor tracking
When Method 2 is employed for Elevator Access, floor transactions are generated and stored along with the
floor selected. This data can then be used for history and reporting purposes.
To generate a Floor Tracking report:
1. From the Reports menu, select the Report menu item, and then click the Report tab.
2. Click New
. A Modified Report dialog box displays. Click Yes to continue.
3. From the Select a Report Category list pane, select History Reports, Badge History.
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4. From the Table Names list pane, select badge_history. Once you have selected the table, the Column
Names list pane displays the columns in the database.
5. From the SQL Keywords and Operators, select SELECT and click Apply.
6. From the Column Names list pane, select floor accessed. Other fields, such as transaction type
(xact_type), date (xact_date), or time (xact_time) can be selected.
7. Click Apply.
8. From the SQL Keywords and Operators, select FROM and click Apply.
9. From the Table Names list pane, select badge_history. Click Apply.
Figure 182.Floor Tracking report setup
10. Click Print to display the Print Preview page. From this window you may Save to pdf or Print to
your local printer.
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Pre-alarm notification
Pre-alarm Notification informs users that a sensing violation is about to occur. The warning notification
method can vary. It can be set to trigger an output, such as a horn or a light, and/or send a signal to the Alarm
Monitor.
Pre-alarm function
Pre-alarm is activated at a specified interval before a sensing violation occurs on an open door, and will not
function if the Allowable Open Time for that door is less than the specified interval. The length of the Prealarm interval is user configurable.
Pre-alarm can be reset by a valid reader transaction or by closing the door. Otherwise, it resets when the
sensing violation occurs.
Activating the Pre-alarm means activating the Pre-alarm input group. Resetting the Pre-alarm means resetting
the Pre-alarm input group.
When a valid reader transaction occurs while waiting for the Pre-alarm to activate, its timing is restarted.
During the interval between the Pre-alarm and the sensing violation, a valid reader transaction will restart the
timing and reset the Pre-alarm. When the Pre-alarm interval expires, the Pre-alarm resets and the sensing
violation activates. Typically, the sensing violation is reset by closing the door.
Pre-alarm notification methods
There are three methods of Pre-alarm notification:
•
•
•
An alarm can be sent to the host which, if routed, will be displayed on the Alarm Monitor.
An audible warning signal can be activated.
A combination of the above (an alarm and an audible warning signal).
Disabling pre-alarm
Pre-alarm can be disabled in the following ways:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Do not configure a Pre-alarm input group for a door.
Disable Pre-alarm on the Doors form.
Configure the door with an Allowable Open Time less than or equal to the Pre-alarm interval.
Disable the Pre-alarm input group. This entirely disables the Pre-alarm by preventing the Pre-alarm
input group and its associated alarm and outputs from changing state.
Disable the Pre-alarm input group’s alarm. This only disables Pre-alarm notification. It does not affect
the outputs associated with the Pre-alarm input group.
Disable the Pre-alarm input group’s associated output groups and/or outputs. This only disables the
Pre-alarm outputs; it does not affect Pre-alarm notification. When a Pre-alarm is associated with more
than one output, they can be individually disabled using the separate outputs and output groups.
Note:
•
Disabling a door’s ability to detect a sensing violation will not cancel the door’s current timer.
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•
•
•
Enabling or disabling Pre-alarm using the radio button has no effect on an on-going timing process. If Prealarm is disabled when the door opens, it stays disabled until the door closes. If Pre-alarm is enabled when the
door opens, it stays enabled until the door closes.
Creating a Pre-alarm input group during a timing process will not affect the Pre-alarm; it continues to behave
as if it were enabled. Removing a Pre-alarm input group during the timing process will have different effects
based on when it is removed. Removing it before Pre-alarm activates will prevent activation. Removing it after
activation will prevent Pre-alarm from resetting. By removing the input group, the door loses its pointer to the
input group and its associated alarm and outputs.
Changing the door’s Allowable Open Time also has different effects, based on when it is changed and the
value to which it is changed. The rules below are listed in priority order. In other words, the second rule has no
effect when the first rule overrides it.
Changing the Allowable Open Time after Pre-alarm activates has no effect.
When the old Allowable Open Time prevents Pre-alarm from activating and it is changed after the door is
opened, the change has no effect.
Pre-alarm will not activate when the new Allowable Open Time prevents it from doing so.
When Pre-alarm can activate and the Allowable Open Time is changed to a value which means Pre-alarm
should already have activated, it immediately does so.
When Pre-alarm can activate and the Allowable Open Time is extended, the timing continues
uninterrupted. Pre-alarm activates when the door has been opened for the new Allowable Open Time
minus the Pre-alarm interval.
Pre-alarm configuration
Use the Doors form to configure Pre-Alarm for an individual door.
Enable this feature using the Pre-alarm radio button. In order for Pre-alarm to generate a warning signal, an
input group must be defined. The associated outputs operate any type of physical device that can be connected
to a micro, including devices that produce audible warning signals.
The Pre-alarm feature is not designed to associate inputs with the Pre-alarm input group. Pre-alarm uses the
Alarm routing defined on the Alarms form, and the Door Status will display the door’s Pre-alarm input group
and whether the door is disabled or enabled for Pre-alarm.
The Allowable Open Time on the Doors form must be greater than the Pre-alarm interval in order to use Prealarm, as the Pre-alarm input group will be triggered at the specified interval before a sensing violation is
detected and reported. Keypad Shunt Time can be used to extend the allowable open time on a door. In this
case, the Pre-alarm warning signal will be triggered at the specified interval before the Held Open Too Long
violation is issued.
To set up pre-alarm notification:
1. From the Configuration menu, select Doors and Readers, and then click the Doors tab.
2. From the toolbar, click Find
to locate the door record you want to set up.
3. On the Inputs and Outputs tab, enable Pre-alarm.
4. Click the Pre-alarm button to display a list box of input groups. Select the desired input group.
•
•
If a warning signal is required at the host, an alarm must be associated with that input group.
If an audible warning signal is required, an output group containing at least one digital output must
be associated with that input group.
See Defining doors on page 187.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 183.Door form: Pre-Alarm
5. Click Save
to save your changes.
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Controlling alarms using a keypad code
Keypad Alarm Response allows alarms to be cleared only after an input has been physically reset (such as
closing a door that has been forced open), and an authorized badge has been swiped, and a keypad code
entered. The use of this feature is intended for strict controlled resets by authorized card holders only.
This feature requires a response to access violations at both the host and reader levels. The alarm response
consists of two actions: a response at the host or sub-host and a response badge swipe and keypad code at the
reader. The badge must be specially authorized for Keypad Alarm Response.
This section shows how to configure a Picture Perfect system to implement the Keypad Alarm Response
feature.
Keypad alarm response function
The Keypad Alarm Response function starts with an access violation: the door is forced open or is held open
too long. The violation activates one of the door’s input groups, which then triggers the alarm and outputs
associated with that input group. Forcing the door open activates the door’s forced-open input group, and
holding the door open for too long activates the door’s open-too-long input group. The input group and its
associated outputs are not reset until the door is closed and a valid keypad response and badge swipe are made
on the reader associated with the door.
Without the Keypad Alarm Response feature, the access violation would end when the door closes. With
Keypad Alarm Response, the violation ends when a valid keypad response is entered after the door closes.
When the violation ends, the violation’s input group along with the associated alarm and outputs are reset.
Note:
Ending the violation is not the same as completely responding to the violation’s alarm. The alarm response is not
complete until the violation is ended by a keypad response and the operator has fully responded to the alarm on the
Alarm Monitor.
Violation notification
When a violation starts, the host displays an alarm on the Alarm Monitor. The Condition field on the Alarm
Monitor indicates “alarm”. When the violation ends, the alarm changes to “reset” state. The access violation
alarms must be routed to the Alarm Monitor for Keypad Alarm Response to function properly.
Keypad response
Alarm response at the Badge-and-Keypad reader requires an alarm-response code, a badge swipe, and a PIN or
duress code. The alarm-response code is entered on the keypad as the first activity. The required order of
activity is outlined below:
1. Press * or + , enter the Alarm-Response Code, and then press # .
2. Swipe the badge.
3. Press * or, + enter the PIN or Duress Code, and then press # .
When the reader is configured for double-transaction, the first and/or second component transaction may enter
an alarm-response code. See Double-badge function on page 366.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Keypad response only affects an active access violation on a door to which the reader is associated. It cannot
affect any other door. The following situations must exist for the keypad response to be valid:
•
•
•
The door must be closed before the keypad response.
The badge must be authorized for keypad response.
The entire reader transaction must be granted access. For example, an invalid PIN or a category
mismatch will invalidate the keypad response.
Valid keypad alarm response does not unlock the door. Keypad alarm response is essentially an
acknowledgment that the door is secure, so it makes no sense to unlock the door for the keypad response. Since
the door does not open, keypad response is independent from anti-passback. This means that keypad response
cannot fail due to the badge’s anti-passback status. It also means that keypad response cannot change the
badge’s anti-passback status.
As with all other reader activity, keypad response is reported in the host’s badge monitor and/or badge history.
The transaction explicitly reports that it is keypad response. When keypad response is valid, a report is made
that the transaction was valid but did not gain access. Invalid keypad responses report the reason for failure. In
addition to usual failure reports, the keypad response feature also reports the following:
•
•
•
Invalid alarm-response code.
Badge is not authorized for keypad response.
Door is not secured (the door is physically open).
Operator response
Operators respond to alarms requiring keypad alarm response in the same manner as any alarm associated with
a physical input. The only difference is that the keypad alarm response resets the alarm rather than a physical
change in an input.
The vehicle for operator response is the Alarm Monitor. Its operation is not changed by keypad alarm response.
The Alarm Monitor presents information to the operator on each alarm that is routed to it. The information
includes the alarm’s Condition and Process State.
Condition
•
•
Alarm - Alarm is logically on.
Reset - Alarm is logically off.
When the violation first occurs, its Condition is “alarm” and its Process State is “active”. When a valid keypad
response occurs, the violation’s Condition goes to “reset”.
Process state
•
•
•
Active - No alarm response has been made.
Pending - Partial alarm response has been made.
Complete - Final alarm response has been made.
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Selecting the alarm on the Alarm Monitor pops up a window which displays the alarm’s instructions and
allows the operator to enter a response. The instructions are the only means of notifying the operator that
keypad alarm response is required. The ways in which the operator can exit the pop-up are listed below:
•
•
•
Cancel - Response is ignored and the Process State stays the same.
OK - Response is saved and the Process State goes to “pending”. The alarm remains on the Alarm
Monitor.
Remove - Response is saved and the Process State goes to “complete”. When the alarm’s Condition is
“reset”, the alarm is removed from the Alarm Monitor. When the alarm’s Condition is “alarm”, the
alarm remains on the Alarm Monitor.
Multiple access violations
It is possible for the same access violation to occur more than once during a keypad alarm response. For
instance, a door can be forced open, then closed, and then forced open again all before the keypad alarm
response is completed for the first violation. In this situation, only one alarm appears in the Alarm Monitor.
The alarm first appears with a count of one, and is incremented by each subsequent violation.
A single valid keypad response resets all occurrences of the violation and the operator responds to all
occurrences using the single alarm.
It is also possible for a door to be forced open and open too long during a single keypad alarm response. For
instance, the door can be held open for too long, then closed, and then forced open all before a valid keypad
response is made for the sensing violation. In this situation, the violations appear as separate alarms on the
Alarm Monitor.
A single valid keypad response resets both alarms. Each alarm is separately removed from the Alarm Monitor
when the response is completed.
Door operation while violation is active
The door will continue to operate normally while the keypad alarm response is active. This makes it possible
for someone to gain access through the door even though the response to the violation has not been completed.
Keypad alarm response configuration
To set up a Keypad Alarm Response (details on each step are given below):
1. Define the Alarm-Response Code (maximum of 10 digits) on the Micros form.
2. Define a reader as a Badge-and-Keypad reader on the Readers form.
3. Enable the Keypad Alarm Response on the Door form.
4. Enable a badge to be used as the Keypad Alarm Response badge on the Badge form.
Defining the alarm-response code
Use the Micros form to define an alarm-response code (up to 10 digits) for each micro on which Keypad Alarm
Response will be implemented. When an authorized badge holder responds to an access violation on a door
using this feature, he will enter this code (for reader keypads on this micro).
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
The same code can be used on any number of the system’s micros, or you can configure different codes for
different micros. The alarm-response code must be different from the shunt code assigned to that micro. Failure
to define an alarm-response code prevents Keypad Alarm Response from working on any of the micro’s doors.
See Defining micros on page 132.
Defining a reader
Use the Readers form to define a reader as a Badge-and-Keypad reader. Keypad Alarm Response only works
with doors associated with Badge-and-Keypad readers. Once the reader is defined, you then associate it with a
door that has Keypad Alarm Response enabled.
See Defining readers on page 182.
Enabling keypad alarm response
Use the Doors form to enable Keypad Alarm Response. This feature can be enabled or disabled for individual
doors, and status requests on doors will show this. The door must be associated with a Badge-and-Keypad
reader. You will be warned if the door is not associated with at least one Badge-and-Keypad reader connected
to a micro with an alarm-response code. You may save the door information anyway, or make the necessary
associations before saving the door again, but Keypad Alarm Response does not function correctly unless those
associations are made.
While it is possible to configure a Picture Perfect system to have more than one reader associated with one
door, and for one reader to be connected to more than one doorstrike output, Keypad Alarm Response does not
support this configuration.
Keypad Alarm Response can be incorporated into scheduling. For instance, if a reader is scheduled to change
between being a Badge-Only reader and a Badge-and-Keypad reader for a door with Keypad Alarm Response
enabled, alarms occurring during the badge-only state will not require a keypad alarm response, while those
occurring during the badge-and-keypad state will require it. If an alarm occurs during the badge-and-keypad
state, but has not yet been responded to when the schedule change goes into effect, the reader will remain in the
Keypad Alarm Response mode until proper response is made, then the reader will change to the badge-only
mode.
See Defining doors on page 187.
To enable Keypad Alarm Response:
Use the Badges form to enable a badge for Keypad Alarm Response. Status requests on badges show whether
or not a badge is authorized for keypad response. Keypad response authorization is independent of badge type
(such as permanent, contractor, etc.), but it must be an active badge.
See Defining badges on page 224.
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Disabling keypad alarm response
Keypad Alarm Response can be disabled in the following ways:
•
•
Disable Keypad Alarm Response on the Doors form. This prevents Keypad Alarm Response for both
types of access violations on that door.
The following situations inhibit an access violation completely. The violation is not reported to the
host and Keypad Alarm Response does not function.
• Access Violation input group not configured.
• Access Violation input group disabled.
• Access Violation input group not associated with an alarm.
• Disabled alarm associated with the Access Violation input group.
Disabling or enabling Keypad Alarm Response does not affect an active access violation. Therefore, enabling
Keypad Alarm Response while a door is forced open does not change the fact that the violation resets as soon
as the door closes. The change has no effect until the current violation ends.
Tracing badge holder activity
This feature allows an operator to trace an individual badge holder and route activity to a specific routing
location--regardless of the routing definition for each of the area’s input groups. When the traced badge holder
swipes a badge through a reader, a record of the transaction is sent to the Person Trace routing destination
(usually to the Badge Monitor and the History Log). The routing for Person Trace transactions is set up on the
System Parameters form. Specific badge holders that are to be traced are identified on the Personnel form.
If Person Trace is routed to the Badge Monitor, a T is displayed in front of the activity record to indicate that
the badge holder is being traced.
If the Person Trace is routed to the History Log, the data is identified as a normal badge transaction.
To configure the Person Trace feature, select a routing for traced badge holders using the Person Trace Routing
field of the Parameters form. (See Assigning system parameters on page 40 for details on completing this
form.)
When you want to trace a particular person (badge holder), you must enable Person Trace on the Personnel
form. When you no longer want to trace them, you must disable Person Trace.
If you want an alarm to be generated every time the badge is read, enable the Person Trace Alarm option.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
To enable or disable Person Trace:
1. From the Access menu, select People, and then click the Personnel tab.
2. Click Find
to display the desired Personnel (badge holder) record.
3. Click the Properties tab.
4. Enable the Person Trace button to begin tracing or disable it to discontinue the Person Trace.
Additionally, if you want an alarm to be generated every time the badge is read, enable the Person
Trace Alarm button.
Figure 184.Personnel form: Person Trace
5. Click Save
.
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Escort required
Escort Required is a feature that can be used when a person or group must be escorted into an area by a person
with valid access.
Escort categories are assigned, as other categories, to Area records and Badge Records. A maximum of 10
Escort categories per Area record will be permitted. The Escort category does not change access to areas where
a badge holder already has access; however, attempted access to an area where the Escort category is the only
match will start an Escort Transaction.
Note:
For PXN+ controllers, you will see two additional valid normal transactions at the end of the escort sequence.
An Escort Transaction causes an LED on the door reader to blink, indicating that it is waiting for an additional
badge read. The door remains locked until a badge read with a non-Escort category match occurs. If a valid
non-Escort access badge read does not occur within the Interval Time set on the Reader form, the Escort
Transaction will time out. An Escort Transaction is “time extended” by the presentation of another badge with
a matching Escort category, even if the Escort category is different between consecutive visitors. Example: If
visitor A gets a match on Escort Cat 1 and is followed by Visitor B who gets a match on Escort Cat 2, then the
time is extended.
An Escort Transaction can be terminated by one of three circumstances:
•
•
•
A badge with a non-Escort category match to the area is presented after the transaction begins and
before the transaction timeout value is reached (valid termination case)
The transaction timeout condition is reached
A badge without a category match is presented before either one of the conditions above are met
(intervening badge case).
A group of visitors can be accompanied by a single escort. There is no limit to the number of Escorted badge
holders (visitors) that can be processed, as long as they all occur within 20 seconds of each other. Badge
History will be sent to the host as each badge is processed.
An Escort category match will generate a Badge History message sent to the host with “Escort Requested”
status and the matching category ID. The transaction will be displayed on the host’s Badge Monitor.
A terminating badge read (non-Escort category match) will generate a Badge History message with “Escort
Provided” status and the matching category. The transaction will be displayed on the host’s Badge Monitor.
Timeout or any other termination condition will cancel the LED indication and post an “Invalid Escort” alarm,
which will be recorded in Alarm History on the Host.
Chapter 18
Advanced access control features
Figure 185.Categories form: Escort Required
To enable or disable Escort Required:
1. From the Access menu, select Places, and then click the Categories tab.
2. Click Find
to display the desired Category record.
3. Enable the Escort Required button.
4. Click Save
.
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Chapter 19 Troubleshooting, maintenance,
support
This chapter provides information to help you troubleshoot problems as well as
technical support contact information in case you need assistance with your GE
equipment.
In this chapter:
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Troubleshooting your Picture Perfect 4.5 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Imaging troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Contacting Technical Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406
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Overview
This section provides information to help you diagnose and solve various problems that may arise while
configuring or using your GE product and offers technical support contacts in case you need assistance. (See
Contacting Technical Support on page 406.)
Troubleshooting your Picture Perfect 4.5 system
Troubleshooting tools:
Note:
•
•
If you receive a syntax error popup when logging onto the Picture Perfect webtop from your browser, make sure that
you are using the following supported Web Browsers and Java Plug-in.
Java Plug-in: Java Runtime Environment (JRE) 6.0 update 13
Web Browsers:
• Internet Explorer 6.0 with Service Pack 1 or later
• Internet Explorer 7.0
• Firefox: 3.0
The client log file and the Java console contain useful information that can be used for troubleshooting client
issues. To access these tools:
•
•
The client log file is located in: c:\avatar\logs\avatar.log
There are two ways to open the Java console:
• From the Internet Explorer window titled "Picture Perfect Webtop", navigate to Tools->Sun Java
Console.
• From the coffee cup icon that appears at the right side within the Windows taskbar, right click it
and select "Open Console" from the context menu.
Log on troubleshooting
If you get one of the following error messages during the login process, please follow the steps below to
troubleshoot and help resolve the issue:
•
•
An error occurred during login. Please try again later.
Unable to transmit login message to host.
1. Verify that the client workstation (WS) OS is Windows XP professional SP3 or Windows Vista SP2
and that the WS has a minimum of 2 GB of RAM.
2. Verify that you are using Internet Explorer (IE) Internet Explorer 6.0 with Service Pack 1 or later,
Internet Explorer 7.0, or Firefox: 3.0
3. Verify that the Java plug-in used by your Web Browser is ava Runtime Environment (JRE) 6.0 update
13. Turn off Automatic Updates in the Java Control Panel under the Update tab.
4. Verify that the client “Java Runtime Parameters Specification” for the JVM is using the recommended
memory, typically -Xms256m –Xmx512m for a system with 512 MB of RAM and not the default
setting of 100 MB.
Chapter 19
Troubleshooting, maintenance, support
Open and check the Java Console Panel / Advanced tab / Java Runtime Parameters Specification
settings:
•
•
Right click the Java icon (coffee mug) on the Windows taskbar, and then select Open Console
Panel.
The JVM memory settings can also be checked from the Picture Perfect client under Help/About
Picture Perfect/About tab - Max Memory field.
5. If you receive the error message: Unable to transmit login message to host:
a. Verify that the hostname in the URL on the browser’s address field. http://<hostname>/
Picture/ is either the host IP such as, http://192.9.200.1/Picture/, or the fully
qualified hostname.
b. Verify that you have a valid Picture Perfect license. Run skver on the server.
c. Try removing the cache folders for both Picture Perfect and Java. If the Picture Perfect cache data
is stale, the client requires a new Avatar jar file. This will force the Picture Perfect client and Java
to download and build new cache files from the server.
d. On the Client workstation, remove all folders under c:/avatar/
e. Clear the Java cache from the Java Control Panel under the Cache tab by pressing Clear.
f.
Close all browser windows and retry logging on.
6. Verify that the user logged into the client workstation has read/write privileges to the local drive
c:\Avatar folder. If it is an Imaging workstation, then also check the read/write privileges on
c:\Documents and Settings\<user>\Local Settings\Temp\GE_SECURITY
7. Verify that the following inbound/outbound TCPIP ports are not blocked between the client
workstation and the Picture Perfect server. See Figure 186.
Note:
The default ports used can be over written by user defined port entries.
Figure 186.Troubleshooting ports
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8. Verify that personnel firewall and PC protection applications are turned off on the client workstation or
have exception lists to allow inbound/outbound TCPIP ports, used by the Picture Perfect client, to pass
messages to and from the Picture Perfect server. The following are some of the common personnel
firewall and PC protection applications that are known to cause problems:
•
•
•
•
Cisco security agent
BlackICE
XP Personnel Firewall
OfficescanNT firewall.
9. Check the Java Console output on the client workstation for any error messages or any indication of
the problem with the login process.
•
•
Right click on the Java icon (coffee mug) on the Windows taskbar.
Select Open Console to open the Java console, and then check the messages for any errors.
10. Verify that the Apache Tomcat server on the Picture Perfect server is running properly:
•
•
Enter the following URL in the Internet Explorer address field:
http://<hostname>:8075/PPServer/ppservlet
Click Go. If you get the following message in the body of the web page This is a test
response, then the Tomcat server is running properly.
In the event that the Tomcat server is not running properly:
•
Stop and restart the Tomcat server.
To shut down the server, type:
Linux
/var/www/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/bin/shutdown.sh
AIX
/usr/HTTPServer/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/bin/shutdown.sh
To start up the server, type:
Linux
/var/www/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/bin/startup.sh
AIX
/usr/HTTPServer/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/bin/startup.sh
•
Check the catalina.out log file for any Java exceptions during startup.
Linux
/var/www/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/logs/catalina.out
AIX
/usr/HTTPServer/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/logs/catalina.out
Listed below is a sample printout of a proper startup:
...
...
...
Chapter 19
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2006-05-16 09:50:30,301 INFO - Executing... size=[2277],
query=[DropDownForeignControlPanel.category] [main] db.QueryUtil
(QueryUtil.java:255)
2006-05-16 09:50:30,563 INFO - Executing... size=[2277],
query=[DropDownForeignControlPanel.category2] [main] db.QueryUtil
(QueryUtil.java:255)
2006-05-16 09:50:32,578 INFO - initializeStaticDatacache() semi-static10 number
queries run:2 [main] server.ServerCache (ServerCache.java:158)
May 16, 2006 9:50:35 AM org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11BaseProtocol start
INFO: Starting Coyote HTTP/1.1 on http-8075
May 16, 2006 9:50:35 AM org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11BaseProtocol start
INFO: Starting Coyote HTTP/1.1 on http-8443
May 16, 2006 9:50:36 AM org.apache.jk.common.ChannelSocket init
INFO: JK: ajp13 listening on /0.0.0.0:8009
May 16, 2006 9:50:36 AM org.apache.jk.server.JkMain start
INFO: Jk running ID=0 time=0/345 config=null
May 16, 2006 9:50:36 AM org.apache.catalina.storeconfig.StoreLoader load
INFO: Find registry server-registry.xml at classpath resource
May 16, 2006 9:50:37 AM org.apache.catalina.startup.Catalina start
INFO: Server startup in 122212 ms
11. Verify the client.html file on the Picture Perfect server is configured properly with the proper
settings.
Linux
/var/www/html/Picture/client.html
AIX
/usr/HTTPServer/htdocs/en_US/Picture/client.html
See default sample file below for proper port and other settings (in blue):
<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">
<!-- Hide script from old browsers
function openHelp(path, page, title)
{
var file = path + page;
var HelpWindow = window.open(file,title,
"scrollbars=yes,resizable=yes,width=800,height=650");
}
// End hiding Script -->
</script>
<title>Picture Perfect</title>
<head>
<body leftmargin=0 marginheight=0 marginwidth=0 topmargin=0>
<!--"CONVERTED_APPLET"-->
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<!-- HTML CONVERTER -->
<center><object name="PicturePerfectApplet"
classid="clsid:8AD9C840-044E-11D1-B3E9-00805F499D93"
codebase="http://java.sun.com/products/plugin/autodl/jinstall-1_4_2-windowsi586.cab#Version=1,4,2,0"
width=100%
height=100% mayscript="mayscript">
<param name="DriverClass" value="com.informix.jdbc.IfxDriver">
<param name="Hostname" value="redmoon">
<param name="Database" value="proteus">
<param name="Environment"
value="INFORMIXSERVER=redmoon;INFORMIXDIR=/cas/db;JDBCTEMP=c:\avatar;">
<param name="Username" value="informix">
<param name="Language" value="English">
<param name="Protocol" value="jdbc:informix-sqli:">
<param name="Proto" value="HTTP">
<param name="HTTP_Port" value="8075">
<param name="EIFPort" value="8085-8100">
<param name="EIFIncomingPort" value="8088">
<param name="NUM_RETRIES" value="3">
<param name="PING_INTERVAL" value="3">
<param name="code" value="com.ge.security.avatar.Avatar.class">
<param name="archive" value="lib/xmlrpc-1.2-b1-applet.jar,lib/jhall.jar,lib/
PPHelp.jar,Avatar.jar,lib/log4j-1.2.8.jar,lib/geSecurityNlsProject.jar,lib/
kunststoff.jar">
<param name="type" value="application/x-java-applet;version=1.4.2">
<comment><embed
type="application/x-java-applet;version=1.4.2" \
code="com.ge.security.avatar.Avatar.class" \
archive="lib/xmlrpc-1.2-b1-applet.jar,lib/jhall.jar,lib/
PPHelp.jar,Avatar.jar,AvatarLocales.jar,lib/log4j-1.2.8.jar,lib/
geSecurityNlsProject.jar,lib/kunststoff.jar" \
width=100% \
height=100% \
mayscript="mayscript" \
DriverClass="com.informix.jdbc.IfxDriver" \
Hostname="redmoon" \
Database="proteus" \
Environment="INFORMIXSERVER=redmoon;INFORMIXDIR=/cas/
db;JDBCTEMP=c:\avatar;" \
Username="informix" \
Language="English" \
Protocol="jdbc:informix-sqli:" \
Proto="HTTP" \
HTTP_Port="8075" \
EIFPort="8085-8100" \
EIFIncomingPort="8088" \
pluginspage="http://java.sun.com/products/plugin/index.html#download">
<noembed>
Chapter 19
Troubleshooting, maintenance, support
alt="Your browser understands the &lt;APPLET&gt; tag but isn't running
the applet, for some reason."
Your browser is completely ignoring the &lt;APPLET&gt; tag!
</noembed></embed></comment>
</object></center>
<!-<applet code="com.ge.security.avatar.Avatar.class" width=1 height=1>
</applet>
-->
<!--"END_CONVERTED_APPLET"-->
</body>
</html>
12. Verify that the Apache Tomcat server configuration file server.xml is configured properly.
Linux
/var/www/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/conf/server.xml
AIX
/usr/HTTPServer/apache-tomcat-5.5.12/conf/server.xml
For standard connections the section (in green) port 8075 needs to be uncommented (no XML tags
<!-- --> around the block of code) listed below, and the SSL connections section (in blue)
commented out (XML tags <!-- --> around the block of code) listed in the next section:
<Connector port="8075" maxHttpHeaderSize="8192"
maxThreads="150" minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
enableLookups="false" redirectPort="8443" acceptCount="100"
connectionTimeout="20000" disableUploadTimeout="true" />
<!-<Connector port="8443" maxHttpHeaderSize="8192" maxThreads="150"
minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75" enableLookups="false"
disableUploadTimeout="true" acceptCount="100" scheme="https" secure="true"
clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" keystoreFile="/cas/db/text/tomcat.key"
keystorePass="install" keystoreType="PKCS12" />
-->
For SSL connections the section (in blue) port 8443 needs to be uncommented (no XML tags <!-- -> around the block of code) listed below, and the standard connections section (in green) commented
out (XML tags <!-- --> around the block of code) listed in the next section:
<Connector port="8443" maxHttpHeaderSize="8192" maxThreads="150"
minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75" enableLookups="false"
disableUploadTimeout="true" acceptCount="100" scheme="https" secure="true"
clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" keystoreFile="/cas/db/text/tomcat.key"
keystorePass="install" keystoreType="PKCS12" />
<!-<Connector port="8075" maxHttpHeaderSize="8192"
maxThreads="150" minSpareThreads="25" maxSpareThreads="75"
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enableLookups="false" redirectPort="8443" acceptCount="100"
connectionTimeout="20000" disableUploadTimeout="true" />
-->
13. If there is a problem connecting to the server via SSL connection:
•
Verify that the URL on the browser’s address field is:
https://<hostname>/Picture/ and not
http://<hostname>/Picture/
•
Also verify that the SSL certificate used on the server has not expired. Use the following command
on the server to check the certificate:
/usr/bin/openssl x509 -in /cas/db/text/<hostname>.crt –text
Chapter 19
Troubleshooting, maintenance, support
Imaging troubleshooting
• Problem
Exception output is shown in the Java Console and Imaging functionality is disabled in the client.
There is a known limitation whereby a client PC that is an imaging workstation (the ImageWare software
has been installed) can only run one client at a time to a host where the image package is installed. Only
one imaging client can be run at a time on a PC.
• Problem
The Print and/or Preview buttons on the Badge or Personnel form are not active (dimmed). See Printing
badges on page 242 for more information.
1. Verify the following:
1a. Verify that the operator has permission to print badges in the facility in which the particular badges
they are working with reside. If the operator had been logged on previously to an account that did
not grant imaging permissions, the operator should log out, close all browser windows and open a
new browser window to log on again.
Note:
The operator must always log on for imaging operations from a newly opened top level browser window.
Possible causes include:
•
•
Permission profiles were changed by an administrator.
A known problem in the EPIBuilder software allows it to be initialized only one time. As long
as the top level browser window is open, subsequent initializations will fail causing imaging
functionality to not be available.
1b. Verify that the operator workstation is correctly identified as an imaging workstation. On the
Workstation record (see Setting up workstations (optional) on page 56), verify that:
•
•
The Imaging Workstation check box is enabled.
The IP address entered in the /etc/hosts file matches the IP Address or Hostname
value in the Workstation record and it is the true IP address of the workstation.
Possible causes include:
•
•
•
•
The flag was disabled by an administrator.
The host name or IP addresses of the workstation was changed.
The IP address and host name entry for the imaging workstation is missing from the
/etc/hosts file.
The host name of the workstation was changed after it was configured as an imaging
workstation.
1c. Verify that the EPIBuilder imaging installation kit is installed and working correctly on the
operator's workstation. The correct installation sequence is specified in Chapter 4 of the Picture
Perfect 4.5 Imaging User Manual and is briefly stated below. Ensure that the operating system
installed on the workstation meets the requirements specified in the Picture Perfect 4.5 Imaging
User Manual.
•
Examine the c:\avatar\logs\avatar.log log file on the workstation to see if
EPIBuilder initialization errors are written to the log.
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•
•
Verify that all Java versions were removed prior to installation of the EPIBuilder package on
the workstation. If in doubt, reinstall.
Verify that the operating system is at the correct service pack level: Windows XP professional
SP3 or Windows Vista SP2
1d. If the problem still persists, remove and reinstall the EPIBuilder Imaging installation kit.
2. EPIBuilder Imaging Kit Installation and Verification Sequence
2a. Verify workstation meets minimum software standards:
•
•
Note:
Windows XP professional SP3
Windows Vista SP2
Windows 2003 Server or Advanced Server have not been certified for EPIBuilder Imaging software.
2b. Remove all currently installed Access Vision packages:
•
•
•
•
•
•
From the windows taskbar, select Start, Settings, Control Panel, Add/Remove Programs.
Select any installed Language or Service Packs; click Remove.
Select Imaging Option 2.0; click Remove
Select Access Vision 2.0; click Remove
Select EPIBUILDER 5.3 Redistribution; click Remove.
Select EPI Builder Runtime files for Picture Perfect; click Remove.
2c. Remove any existing versions of EPIBuilder 6.3 from the workstation.
2d. Remove all currently installed versions of Java from the workstation.
2e. Open the web browser and navigate to the Picture Perfect web page. Do not launch the client at
this time. If you do so, repeat step 2d.
2f. Click the link to install the Java Runtime environment.
2g. Click the link to install the EPIBuilder Imaging installation kit.
2h. Reboot the workstation. Verify that you have the correct host name and IP address for the
workstation.
2i. Open the web browser and navigate to the Picture Perfect web page. Click on the client button to
launch the client and log on as the administrator. Create a workstation record for the imaging
workstation. Be sure to enter the correct host name and to enable the Imaging Workstation check
box. Save the record. Log out completely and close all browser windows.
2j. On the Picture Perfect server edit the /etc/hosts file and add the IP address and host name
entry for the imaging workstation.
2k. Create the operator account or update an existing operator account and grant Badge Print and other
imaging permissions as appropriate.
2l. On the imaging workstation, open the web browser and then navigate to the Picture Perfect web
page. Click on the client button to launch the client and log on. Verify that the permissions granted
to the operator are reflected in the client software. The operator should be able to perform badge
capture and print functions if they were granted to the operator.
Chapter 19
Troubleshooting, maintenance, support
• Problem
When using the Reselect profile button to select the image device to use in capturing an image, the first
attempt at setting the device fails. After clicking OK on the Select Image Source window, the change is not
accepted.
This is a known problem that can occur the first time the Select Image Source window is used after the
client application is started. Perform the following workaround:
1. After selecting the device, click Reselect profile a second time to confirm that the desired capture
device is highlighted. If not, highlight the desired capture device.
2. Click OK.
• Problem
When clicking the Print and/or Preview buttons on the Badge or Personnel form, the application appears
to hang.
This problem can occur if there is a hidden window requiring input, that is obscured by another window. If
the Show print setup dialog button is enabled on the Print Options screen, the printer options window can
be hidden behind another window. Perform the following workaround to bring the hidden window to the
top of the screen:
1. Hold down the keyboard Alt key.
2. Click the Tab key until the Java coffee mug icon is selected
3. Release the Alt key.
The hidden window should now appear on top and can be dispatched to allow the print or preview
operation to continue.
• Problem
Application appears to hang.
The first time that an operator logs in on an imaging workstation, the client applet will perform a one-time
analysis of the badge designs to determine their use of fields in the person and badge tables. Please be
patient as this process may take a few minutes if you have a large number of badge designs.
• Problem
Badge designs do not display as expected.
Picture Perfect 4.5 imaging provides enhancements to the badge designer, some of which have defaults
that may produce undesired results when printing badges. After the upgrade to Picture Perfect 4.5 we
recommend you examine all of your badge designs. For each badge design perform the following checks:
•
Examine the dynamic text field objects to verify that there are no undesired duplicates. Remove any
duplicates you may find.
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•
Right click on each dynamic text field object and select Properties from the menu. On the Dynamic
Text Properties dialog, click on the Conditional Display tab. The Always show object radio button
must be selected. Enable it if necessary and then click OK to save the change.
• Problem
Objects on the badge appear to be missing.
This is usually caused by old conditional expression data that was enabled at some time in the past and
then disabled. The object can be restored to proper functionality by editing the badge design as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Select the area where the missing object would be. (It is actually there but not rendered) Right click on
each dynamic text field object and select Properties from the menu.
On the Dynamic Text Properties dialog, click on the Conditional Display tab.
If the text boxes under the radio buttons contain data that should not be there, click the Show object
only when field/expression radio button to enable the text boxes.
Clear the contents of the text boxes.
The Always show object radio button must be selected. Enable it if necessary and then click OK to
save the change.
• Problem
Objects on the badge are doubled, that is, two copies, one slightly offset from the other.
This is caused by a problem with the badge design conversion. If two copies of one or more objects are
displayed, edit the badge design by deleting the extra copy of each object as follows:
•
•
•
Select the extra copy. The extra copy of the object is usually the one that is slightly to the right and
lower than the original.
Click Delete.
Click OK to save the change.
• Problem
Unable to log on.
When logging out of the client applet on an imaging workstation, it is necessary to close all of the browser
windows before trying to log on again.
• Problem
Badge printing functionality is disabled on the Badge Manager tab of the Personnel form.
If this occurs, try closing the Personnel form and then reopening it.
• Problem
After capturing a new image for an existing personnel record, you undo the change but the newly captured
image still appears in the image panel.
Chapter 19
Troubleshooting, maintenance, support
If this occurs, close the Personnel form and then reopen it to see the original image stored in the database.
• Problem
Badge design does not preview or print correctly.
When previewing or printing badges with Picture Perfect 4.5 imaging for badge designs created with
Picture Perfect 4.0 some badge designs with a very large background static image may not preview or print
correctly. The problem is due to an internal library incompatibility in third party vendor software. The
badge design can be repaired to work correctly with Picture Perfect 4.5 imaging by following these steps:
1. Locate the original image file for the background. If it is a true color image, reduce its color depth to
32,768 (16 bit) colors.
2. Edit the badge design and remove the background static image object. Save the badge design.
3. Edit the badge design again and replace the background static image object using the new image. Save
the badge design.
4. Preview or print a badge using the updated design. It should now work correctly.
Please note that you must save the badge design after removing the original image and before adding the
new image. If you try to remove and replace within the same editing session the update will not work
correctly.
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Contacting Technical Support
For assistance installing, operating, maintaining, and troubleshooting this product, refer to this document and
any other documentation provided. If you still have questions, you may contact technical support during
normal business hours (Monday through Friday, excluding holidays, between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Eastern Time).
GE Security
United States: 1-888-GE SECURITY (1-888-437-3287)
Asia: 852-2907-8108
Australia: 61-3-9259-4700
Europe: 48-58-326-22-40
Latin America: 503-885-5700
407
Glossary
This section explains some terms as they apply to Picture Perfect 4.5.
Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained
Term
Definition
Access
The ability to enter or pass through, such as to enter a building by going through a door. See Access
Control.
Access Control
A security system that controls an individual’s ability to enter an area (building, parking lot, room).
Typically, readers protect doors or gates. Badges used in the readers permit or deny access based on a
person’s authorization.
ACK
Acknowledgment. See ACK Packet.
ACK Packet
A message sent between computers to acknowledge that the preceding message was received
correctly.
Active Window
The window with the input focus, in which what you type appears. Only one window is active at a time.
AIX
Advanced Interactive Executive; the UNIX-based operating system developed by IBM; used for Picture
Perfect.
Alarm Notification
Message
An alarm alert message that displays on the Alarm Notification Window on Picture Perfect X Terminals
when an alarm occurs.
Alarm State
When an alarm sensor detects an alarm condition (such as an open door), its contacts open or close
(depending on the type of sensor and how it is wired to the system), and the sensor is said to be in
alarm state.
Allowable Open
The length of time a door can remain open before an alarm occurs.
Antipassback
Normal: A badge with an APB status of In will not be granted access through an APB In reader; a badge
with an APB status of Out will not be granted access through an APB Out reader; a violation message is
generated.
Passive: A badge with an APB status of In will be granted access through an APB In reader; a badge
with an APB status of Out will be granted access through an APB Out reader; a violation message is
generated.
Archive
To copy history transactions from the database to magnetic tape. Some fields are expanded
from IDs to descriptions. Archives are used for later examination of transactions; archives
cannot be restored.
Area
A logical grouping of readers and doors; used to control access.
Array
A collection of independent disks which allow you to spread your data among two or more hard disks.
See RAID.
Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM)
A fixed-route network protocol in which transmission packets have direct paths and destinations. ATM
is an alternative to TCP/IP, which tags each packet with destination information in the header and can
be routed through arbitrary paths on a carrier network such as the Internet.
Available Language
A language that can be used by Picture Perfect operators. A language must be supported by Picture
Perfect and translated before it can be made available.
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Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
BID
The hidden number that uniquely identifies each badge.
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System. The BIOS is a set of system instructions on a chip built in the computer.
Backup
To copy tables from the database to magnetic tape. A backup can be used to restore the system to a
previous state or to recover from a failure.
Badge
A plastic card issued to each person who uses the facility. The system reads the information on the
badge to determine whether or not to grant access to a person.
Badge Encode
Number
The hidden number that uniquely identifies each badge.
Badge-Issue Reader
A reader assigned to a workstation used to issue a badge.
Badge Learn
Occurs when a micro checks with the host on an unknown badge and stores that badge information in
its database. The next time the badge is presented to a reader connected to that micro, it will have the
needed badge information.
Badge Reader
A device, usually located near a door, used to read badges. When a badge is presented to a badge
reader, the system reads it and determines whether or not to unlock the door.
Badge Status
Indicates either the intended use of a badge (such as permanent or temporary) or its current condition
(such as active or lost).
BAUD
A unit that measures the speed of transmission, such as for data through a modem.
Category
A “lock” and “key” that controls access. Each area and badge has one or more assigned categories. If a
category on a badge matches any of the categories on an area, the badge works as a “key” in readers
assigned to that area. A category assigned to an area functions as a lock; a category assigned to a
badge functions as a key.
CMENU
A diagnostic program that runs on the console in order to monitor and control microcontrollers and X
Terminals; can also be used to monitor database activity and configuration in the host or micro.
Code Set
A collection of character codes that express one or more languages. Picture Perfect only supports code
sets defined by the International Standards Organization (ISO). Western European languages use the
ISO8859-1 code set; Hebrew uses the ISO8859-8 code set.
Console
The host computer used for administrative functions (also called host console).
Coordinated
Universal Time (UTC)
The mean solar time of the meridian of Greenwich, England, used as the basis for calculating standard
time throughout the world.
Daemon
A continually running background process that is not controlled by a terminal. See Process.
Database
Picture Perfect configuration, transaction, and historical data stored on the hard disk of the host
computer or the resident memory of a microcontroller. See Distributed Database and Relational
Database.
Date Format
The order that the system requires for month, day, and year.
Devices
Physical peripherals such as disks, tapes, printers, networks, and serial port adapters for modems and
lines of microcontrollers.
409
Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is network protocol for automatically assigning TCP/IP
information to client machines. Each DHCP client connects to the centrally-located DHCP server that
returns the client’s network configuration including IP address, gateway, and DNS servers. DHCP is
useful for fast delivery of client network configuration.
Digital Input
A physical sensing device used to monitor an electronic contact connected to a microcontroller. Also
called a DI.
Digital Output
A physical control device used to turn on/off an electronic contact connected to a microcontroller. Also
called a DO.
Disk Array
See Array.
Disk Partition
A division of storage disks into physical or logical segments such that each segment acts as an
independent component.
Distributed Database
Resident database downloaded to a microcontroller that allows independent decision-making and
faster response time.
DNS
A service database that translates an IP address into a domain name.
Domain Name
The site's name that an organization uses. Example: GE has a domain name of ge.com.
Door
A database record that links the logical functions of a door with the door strike output, exit button, and
door sensor inputs.
Door Forced Open
A logical alarm caused when the door opens without a valid badge read and the door contact reports
the door-open state.
Door Open Too Long
A logical alarm caused when a door (unlocked by a valid badge read) remains open longer than the
Allowable Open Time (a shunt time that starts when the door contact reports the door-open state).
Downstream
A relative position on a communication line originating at a host computer. Example, the second micro
on a line is “downstream” from the first micro. See Microcontroller (micro).
Duress Code
A special PIN number used (on a keypad reader) to signal emergency situations.
Enabled Reader
A condition in which a reader is enabled to read badges. An enabled reader can be online or offline. See
Online Reader and Offline Reader.
Encryption
The encoding of data for security purposes by converting standard data code into a proprietary code.
ENQ
An inquiry message to poll a micro to see if it is responding.
Facility
A facility is a partitioning of the records of the database of the security system.
Facility Profile
A facility profile is a permission set that an operator can access. The operator’s facility profile can be
different based on the facility to which it is assigned.
Firewall
A firewall is a set of related programs, located at a network gateway server, that protects the resources
of a private network from users from other networks.
Form
An electronic data-entry worksheet used to enter, find, view, or update data. A form may have input
fields, pop-up lists, and pushbuttons for various functions.
Gateway
A network device or machine that connects a local private network to another network or the Internet.
Graphical Terminal
A terminal using a graphical interface for logging on to a desktop environment, such as Windows,
GNOME Desktop Manager (GDM), XDM and KDM.
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Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
Host
A host is generally a device or program that provides services to some smaller or less capable device or
program.
Host Console
The host computer terminal used for AIX functions.
Informix
The relational database management system (RDBMS) used by the Picture Perfect system. See
Relational Database.
Input
A digital input (DI) or a logical condition detected by the microcontroller. An input is assigned to an
inputgroup.
Input Field
An area of the screen where an operator can type in information.
Input Group
A group of one or more digital inputs (or logical inputs) that can cause an alarm (and/or trigger output
groups) when any (or all) inputs in the group are detected as true.
Insertion Point
A point (marked by a cursor) where the text that you enter will appear.
IP Address
A numeric address used by computer hosts to transmit and receive information over the Internet.
ISA
A type of bus conforming to the Industry Standard Architecture.
Keypad Override
Code
See Shunt.
LAN
A Local Area Network. X Terminals are connected to the host computer using an Ethernet LAN.
Linux
Linux (often pronounced LIH-nuhks with a short “i”) is a UNIX-like operating system that was designed
to provide personal computer users a free or very low-cost operating system comparable to traditional
and usually more expensive UNIX systems. Linux has a reputation as a very efficient and fastperforming system. Linux is a remarkably complete operating system, including a graphical user
interface, an X Window System, TCP/IP, the Emacs editor, and other components usually found in a
comprehensive UNIX system. Linux is publicly open and extendible by contributors. Because it
conforms to the Portable Operating System Interface standard user and programming interfaces,
developers can write programs that can be ported to other operating systems.
Locale
A language and the location in which it is used. All languages in Picture Perfect are defined in terms of
locale. Each language has a unique locale identifier. Picture Perfect uses the locale identifiers defined
by AIX. Refer to the Operator’s form for a list of locale identifiers.
Log on
The procedure used by operators to identify themselves to the system. To use the system, an operator
must “log on” with a Login ID and Password. The Login ID is associated with a Permissions level that
defines the functions an operator can perform. A Password provides secondary validation for that
operator.
Log off
A security procedure that protects the system from unauthorized use. When an operator logs off, the
system displays the Login screen and requires the next operator to log on.
LVM
Logical Volume Management. A kernel-level subsystem for managing multiple storage devices.
Physical drive partitions are collected into logical volumes and provide dynamic resizing of logical
volumes with the addition (or removal) of physical drives.
Message
Transaction information that the system displays.
Micro
See Microcontroller (micro).
411
Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
Microcontroller
(micro)
The metal box containing the circuitry that controls the opening and closing of doors. Badge readers,
alarm points, and digital output points are wired to micros, and micros are connected to the host
computer. See Upstream and Downstream.
Mode
A set of schedules that defines how the system operates and specifies the characteristics of readers,
areas, doors, and other system components. See Operating Mode.
Modem
Hardware device used to communicate between computer systems over telephone or other
communications lines.
Monitoring
See Door Forced Open and Shunt.
Offline
A condition in which the micro is not communicating with the host computer.
Offline Reader
A condition in which a reader is not enabled to release the doorstrike when a valid badge read occurs.
Access attempts at an offline reader can be routed to monitors, printers and online history.
Online
A micro is communicating with the host.
Online Reader
A reader is enabled to release the doorstrike when a valid badge read occurs. Access attempts at an
online reader can be routed to monitors, printers and online history.
Open Too Long
See Door Open Too Long.
Operating Mode
The mode associated with a set of schedules that defines system operating specifications.
Output
A physical digital output (DO) that actuates devices such as a siren, a doorstrike, or lights, which can be
triggered by an output group.
Output Group
A group of one or more outputs that can be triggered when activated by an associated input group.
Packet
See ACK Packet.
Password
A special code, used during login, that determines if an operator is authorized to log on to the system.
PCMCIA
A standard for PC cards. Adding a modem, network card, and removable disk drives (especially on
portable computers) sometime requires the use of PCMCIA cards and compatible slots on computer
systems.
Permissions
A level of operator permission to perform system functions. Each group of operators functions is a
“permission group” that can be assigned to an operator authorized to perform those functions. See Log
on and Password.
Physical Volume
A partition or segment of a storage disk that can be integrated into a one logical volume and controlled
by logical volume management (LVM).
PIN #
A Personal Identification Number that identifies a person. If a facility uses both a keypad and badge
reader, employees present their badge to the reader, then enter their PIN on the reader keypad.
Port Group
A single line of microcontrollers connected to a port.
Port Group Leader
The first microcontroller in the port group. See Port Group.
Primary Language
Language used by Picture Perfect for alarm notification, archive notification, describing alarms in the
Alarm Monitor, and describing badge, input, and status activity in the Activity Monitor. These are always
described in the primary language, even when viewed by operators working in a different language.
Priority
A number used to indicate the response priority of an alarm. The lower the priority number, the more
serious the alarm.
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Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
Process
One of many independent programs running at the same time in the computer.
Provided Language
A language whose translations are provided by GE. All provided languages are available at installation.
RAID
The use of two or more disk drives in a single computer system, which can provide better disk
performance, error recovery, and fault tolerance.
RAN
Remote Alarm Notification. An optional package which, when installed, routes alarms from the Picture
Perfect system to a remote (non Picture Perfect) system. The alarms can then be processed by and
responded to, from the remote system.
Readers
Badge readers are devices connected to the system that read the encoded badge numbers. They are
usually located near doors or gates, or in elevators that the system controls.
Redundant System
A Picture Perfect redundant system detects faults and automatically transfers the workload to the
backup host. The transfer of control from the primary host to the backup host occurs rapidly to ensure
that there is almost no loss of data or alarms.
Relational Database
A database that uses a table structure to store data. Relationships among tables are logically specified
at the time of user access into the database; they are not built into the data structures themselves.
Response
Text that the operator selects or types when answering an alarm.
RS-232
A standard method of transmitting data across serial cables, used by modems, printers, and other
serial devices.
Schedule Event
A time-dependent change to a mode, area, reader, door, alarm, input group, or output group. See
Operating Mode.
SCSI
A high-speed interface that can connect to computer devices such as hard drives, CD-ROM drives, and
tape drives. SCSI is pronounced as "Scuzzy."
Semaphore
In programming, especially in UNIX-based systems, semaphores are a technique for coordinating or
synchronizing activities in which multiple process compete for the same operating system resources. A
semaphore is a value in a designated place in operating system (or kernel) storage that each process
can check and then change.
Server
Generally, a server is a computer program that provides services to other computer programs in the
same or other computers. In the client/server programming model, a server is a program that awaits
and fulfills requests from client programs in the same or other computers.
Shunt
Override an alarm on a door contact that detects an open state on the door.
A digital input device monitors the door state. If the door opens with a valid read (or exit device), the
input device (a door contact) detects a state change but does not report the change until a shunt time
elapses. The shunt time allows the badgeholder enough time to get through the door. See Door Forced
Open and Door Open Too Long.
To override a door sensor for a longer time, enter a keypad override code (a microcontroller-dependent
code set on the Micros screen).
Shutdown
To stop running the application and the operating system.
SSL
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a commonly-used protocol for managing the security of a message
transmission on the Internet. SSL uses a program layer located between the Internet's Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and Transport Control Protocol (TCP) layers.
413
Table 127. Picture Perfect 4.5 terms explained (continued)
Term
Definition
Subnet
Network nodes that are related by the same IP address range. Example: computers with an address
beginning with 192.168.1.x are in the same subnet.
Subnet mask
A 32-bit address used in conjunction with an IP address to segment network traffic; used to restrict
transmissions to certain subnets.
Status
The current condition of something, such as a badge or a micro. The Status monitor is used for viewing
a micro’s current database to verify configuration and scheduling.
Supported Language
A language that can be used in Picture Perfect. All languages other than English and French must be
translated and made available before they can be used.
SYN
A message from the host that synchronizes the micro’s clock.
System Administrator A full-function operator; an operator permission without any function restrictions.
TCP/IP
Communications protocol used to connect to a variety of different types of hosts on both private
networks and carrier networks such as the Internet.
TPS
Transaction Processing System; the program that communicates with microcontrollers.
Transaction
Microcontroller activity.
TTY
In UNIX-based operating systems, any terminal at all; sometimes used to refer to the particular
terminal controlling a given job. Also the name of a UNIX command which outputs the name of the
current controlling terminal.
UDP
A communications protocol for the Internet network layer, transport layer, and session layer, which
makes it possible to send a datagram transmissions from one computer to a recipient computer.
UNIX
A multi-user, multitasking network operating system developed at Bell Labs in the early 1970s. Linux is
based on, and is highly compatible with, UNIX.
Unlock Time
The length of time a door latch is to remain unlocked after a valid badge read (or after an exit button
activates). This time allows the badgeholder to open and pass through the door.
Upstream
A relative position on a communication line originating at a host computer. Example: the second micro
on a line is “upstream” from the third micro, because the second micro is relatively closer to the host.
Workstation
An X Terminal that displays the forms that the operator uses to interact with the system; connected to
the host computer using an Ethernet LAN (Local Area Network). See LAN.
xdm
The login utility used to allow an operator to log on to an X Terminal. The operator uses an xdm window
to enter a Login ID and a Password. The X Window Display Manager (xdm) is the program that controls
workstation windows.
X Terminal
The computer monitor that displays the screens that the operator uses to interact with the system. Also
called a workstation.
X Window System
A portable network-transparent window system that handles graphics and multiple fonts in a hierarchy
of windows on a wide variety of bit-mapped display devices.
414
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
415
Index
A
Antipassback Violation.........................................................................128
About Picture Perfect..............................................................................21
APB Control .........................................................................................234
Access ...................................................................................227, 235, 407
APB Duration ...............................................................................204, 208
Access Control ......................................................................................407
APB IN .................................................................................................271
Access Secure Operations.....................................................................166
APB OUT .............................................................................................271
ACK ......................................................................................................407
APB Type .....................................................................................204, 208
ACK Packet ..........................................................................................407
Application Window...............................................................................23
Action....................................................................................................279
Archive....................................................20, 299, 310, 312, 314, 315, 317
Actions ..............................................................................................83, 87
Archiving ..............................................................................................407
Activity Monitoring ..................................................................................4
Area....16, 47, 80, 91, 92, 93, 94, 106, 110, 128, 130, 135, 174, 178, 179,
181, .....183, 184, 189, 194, 200, 201, 202, 203,
224, .....234, 235, 244, 249, 274, 280, 292, 338,
341, .....343, 344, 347, 348, 351, 352, 353, 354,
355, ......................................356, 360, 362, 407
Address .................................................................................................183
AIX ...................................................................................................3, 407
Alarm .18, 33, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 105, 106, 113, 114, 115, 117, 118, 120,
121, .....123, 126, 130, 141, 190, 212, 263, 264,
268, ..............................269, 299, 314, 367, 385
Alarm Alert ...........................................................................................267
Alarm and Badge Threshold .................................................................142
Alarm Colors...............................................................18, 32, 86, 120, 123
Alarm Delay............................................................................................45
Alarm Events ..........................................................18, 118, 200, 211, 213
Alarm History .......................................................................................287
Alarm History Overflow .......................................................................127
Alarm History Threshold ......................................................................135
Alarm Instructions ........................................................................114, 119
Alarm Messages........................................................................................4
Alarm Monitor ..................16, 18, 32, 42, 44, 45, 106, 113, 116, 119, 120
Alarm monitor.........................................................................................87
Alarm Notification Message .................................................................407
Alarm Priority .........................................................................................45
Alarm Response ..............................43, 116, 184, 263, 264, 267, 269, 270
Alarm Response Code ..........................................................................135
Alarm Routing ......................................................................................118
Alarm Shunting.....................................................................................186
Alarm State ...........................................................................................407
Alarm States............................................................................................47
Alarms...4, 31, 32, 113, 115, 116, 117, 119, 120, 121, 123, 213, 266, 384
alarms....................................................................................................117
All Groups Allowed................................................................................91
Allowable Open ....................................................................................407
Allowable Open Time...................................................................188, 382
almmgr ..................................................................................................288
ALM/s ...................................................................................................288
Antipassback .............................................................................5, 180, 407
Antipassback Enforcement ...................................................................178
Anti-Passback In ...................................................................................185
Anti-Passback Out ................................................................................185
APB.......................................................................................................185
Area Events.............................................33, 172, 200, 205, 244, 249, 342
Area Offline ..........................................................................................271
Area Permission Group...........................................................................94
Area Permission group............................................................................91
Areas ...............................................................................................32, 244
Array .....................................................................................................407
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM ...................................................407
Attention Command................................................................................65
Attention Response .................................................................................65
Authorization Not Required..................................................................275
Authorization Required.................................................185, 204, 208, 275
Autodialer Prefix.....................................................................................65
Available Language ..............................................................................407
B
Backup ..............................20, 33, 287, 311, 312, 313, 315, 317, 318, 408
Backup Events ..........................................................20, 33, 200, 219, 220
Badge ....................................................................................................408
Badge and Keypad ................................................................................184
Badge Deleted.......................................................................................271
Badge Designs ..........................................................20, 34, 256, 257, 259
Badge Encode Number .................................................................225, 408
Badge Expired.......................................................................................271
Badge Form...........................................................................................235
Badge Format................................................................16, 30, 74, 75, 225
Badge History .......................................................................................287
Badge History Overflow.......................................................................127
Badge History Threshold ......................................................................135
Badge Id Format .....................................................................................75
Badge Learn..........................................................................................408
Badge Lost ............................................................................................271
416
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Badge Manager .............................................................................235, 242
Code Set................................................................................................408
Badge Monitor ..............................................................................385, 388
Color Picker ..................................................................................119, 122
Badge Only ...........................................................................................184
Color Sample ........................................................................................119
Badge or Keypad ..................................................................................184
Column Names .....................................................................................294
Badge Reader ........................................................................................408
Comm Serial .........................................................................................287
Badge Status .........................................................................................408
Comm XOFF ........................................................................................287
Badge Suspended ..................................................................................272
Comm XON..........................................................................................287
Badge Table Request ............................................................................142
Condition ..............................................................................................264
Badge Transactions...............................................................................363
Configured Devices ................................................................................47
Badge Unknown ...................................................................................272
Console .................................................................................................408
Badge-Issue Reader ..............................................................................408
Continuous schedule type .....................................................................248
Badges..16, 34, 45, 47, 74, 75, 77, 99, 135, 172, 180, 186, 224, 225, 229,
230, .....232, 235, 242, 243, 245, 251, 252, 256,
274, ......339, 349, 366, 368, 369, 372, 387, 407
Control Level Permission .................................................................84, 88
badges .............................................................................................46, 135
Badges Processed..................................................................................287
Base Tables ...........................................................................................311
BAUD ...................................................................................................408
Baud Rate................................................................................................68
bdgmgr ..................................................................................................288
BDG/s ...................................................................................................288
BID........................................................................................225, 274, 408
BIOS .....................................................................................................408
Board.....................................................................................159, 162, 183
Broadcast State Changes.......................................................................130
Bump Time ...........................................................................................113
Bump to Email ......................................................................................112
Bump to Operators................................................................................111
Bump to Permission..............................................................................112
Busy Msg ................................................................................................66
C
Calendar ................................................................................................245
Callback ................................................................................................138
Capture..................................................................................................238
Capture Photo .......................................................................................238
Capture Signatue...................................................................................238
Cascade ...................................................................................................21
Categories Form
Escort Required................................................................................391
Category......................16, 91, 92, 173, 179, 203, 235, 245, 246, 247, 408
category.................................................................................................224
Category Floors...............................................................18, 372, 378, 379
Category Manager.........................................................................355, 362
Category Permission Group..............................................................91, 94
Category Scheduler...............................................................................247
cfgmgr ...................................................................................................288
Change Colors.......................................................................................119
Change Mode ..................................................................19, 194, 196, 197
Change Password ....................................................................................97
Check Boxes ...........................................................................................28
CMENU ................................................................................................408
Control Level Permissions....................................340, 346, 351, 352, 359
Control Output Group Window ............................................................164
Control Outputs.....................................................................................164
Control Outputs Window......................................................................164
conventions .............................................................................................xv
Coordinated Universal Time.................................................................408
Count.....................................................................................................265
CPU Idle % ...........................................................................................288
CPU Sys %............................................................................................288
CPU User %..........................................................................................288
CPU Wait %..........................................................................................288
Creating Records.....................................................................................36
crop .......................................................................................................241
Crop and Enhance.................................................................................241
Custom Form ....................................................20, 90, 232, 330, 331, 332
Custom Lists .............................................................20, 34, 333, 334, 335
D
Daemon.................................................................................................408
Daily schedule type...............................................................................248
Data Bits .................................................................................................68
Data Grid.........................................................................................25, 331
Database................................................................................................408
Database Protection ..................................................................................4
Database Updates..................................................................................142
Date Format ....................................................................................42, 408
Debug Levels ..........................................................................................16
Decrement Floors..................................................................................377
Default Badge Design.....................................................................45, 260
Default Badge Encode Format................................................................45
Default Routing.......................................................................................46
Define Floors ........................................................................................375
Degraded Open .....................................................................................271
Deinitialization Command......................................................................65
Deinitialization Response .......................................................................65
Delete Imported Data............................................................................299
Deleting Records.....................................................................................37
Department............................................................16, 31, 76, 77, 232, 303
DES.......................................................................................................150
417
Design Mappings ............................................................................20, 258
Edit Daylight Savings Time..................................................................170
Devices..................................................................................................408
Editing Records.......................................................................................36
Diagnostic Buffer Size............................................................................42
eFlash ............................................................................................139, 151
Diagnostic Monitors ...............................................................................42
eflash.....................................................................................................288
Dial Host on Schedule Update..............................................................138
Elevator...18, 134, 163, 187, 325, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 378, 379
Dial on Startup ......................................................................................138
Elevator Configuration, Micro/DO.......................................................374
Dial on Updates ....................................................................................138
Elevator Configuration, Reader/DI/DO................................................374
Dial Stored Prefix ...................................................................................65
Elevator Configuration, Reader/DO .....................................................374
Digital Clock Settings .............................................................................22
Email Address.........................................................................................70
Digital Input ..........................................................................................409
Email Recipients ...................................................................19, 30, 70, 71
Digital Output .......................................................................................409
Emergency Modes ................................................................................195
Digital Outputs..........................................................................................4
Emergency modes.................................................................................220
Disk Array.............................................................................................409
Enable DST...........................................................................................169
Disk File........................................220, 299, 300, 311, 314, 315, 316, 318
Enable Output .......................................................................................159
Disk Partition ........................................................................................409
Enabled Reader .....................................................................................409
Distributed Database.............................................................................409
Encryption.............................................................................................409
DNS ......................................................................................................409
Encryption Key Type............................................................................150
Do Not Care ............27, 202, 203, 204, 205, 207, 208, 210, 213, 215, 218
Encryption Keys ...................................................................................149
Domain Name .......................................................................................409
Encryption Mode ..................................................................................150
Door ......................................................................................................409
Enforce Report Permissions..............................................................43, 91
Door Area .............................................................................................189
Enforce UL Specification .......................................................................43
Door Events ......................................................18, 33, 200, 209, 211, 379
ENQ ......................................................................................................409
Door Forced Open ........................................................................128, 409
Enter SQL Statement ............................................................................294
Door Held Open....................................................................................128
Enterprise Consulting ...............................................................................6
Door Open Too Long............................................................................409
EOL ASCII Value...................................................................................65
Door Pre-alarm .....................................................................................128
Error Message .........................................................................................66
Door Release Timeout ..........................................................................179
Escort ....................................................................................................173
Door Sensor ..........................................................................................189
Escort Required.....................................................................................390
Door Sensor Input .................................................................................358
Escort Routing ......................................................................................181
Door State .....................................................................................190, 210
Event History ........................................................................................287
Unlocked/Locked ..............................................................................205
Event Monitors .......................................................................................42
Door Strike Relock ...............................................................................190
evtmgr ...................................................................................................288
Doors..18, 33, 94, 130, 135, 162, 172, 181, 187, 188, 209, 210, 211, 338,
340, .....344, 345, 346, 348, 350, 358, 359, 379,
381, ..............................................382, 387, 388
EVT/s ....................................................................................................288
Double Door Locked ............................................................................272
Double-Badge Function ........................................................................366
Double-Badge Reporting ......................................................................368
Download Upon Save ...........................................................................232
Downstream ..........................................................................................409
Downstream Communication Failure ...................................................127
Downstream Micro ...............................................................................134
Downstream Retries..............................................................................135
Downstream Retry Interval...................................................................135
Drop-Down Lists ....................................................................................28
DST Bias...............................................................................................169
Duress ...........................................................................................128, 180
Duress Code ....................................................................44, 184, 384, 409
Dynamic Configuration ........................................................................139
E
Edit Badge Design ................................................................................256
Execute SQL Statements ........................................................................87
Exit Button............................................................................................189
Exit Button Asserts Strike.....................................................190, 350, 358
Exit Button Input ..................................................................................358
Export....................................................................................................238
F
Facilities........................................................14, 17, 30, 53, 54, 80, 86, 98
Facility ..................................................................................................409
Facility Permission Profile............19, 31, 80, 81, 83, 85, 93, 99, 100, 324
Facility Permissions................................................................................94
Facility Profile ......................................................................................409
Facility Set ..............................................................................................16
Facility Set Manager...............................................................................14
Field Sequence......................................................................................331
Field Settings ........................................................................................331
Filter..................................................................................................23, 26
Fire DO after Floor Selection ...............................................................374
418
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Firewall ...........................................................................................69, 409
Imaging Terminals..................................................................................30
Firmware Version .................................................................................135
Immediate Dial Required......................................................................118
Floor Labels ..........................................................................................375
Immediate Reset Input ..........................................................................118
Force Rollover ..............................................................................314, 315
Import Archived Data ...........................................................................296
Forced Open In Group ..........................................................................189
Import/Export............................................................................................5
Forced Open Monitoring ......................................................190, 205, 210
Increment Floors ...................................................................................376
Forced Open Shunt Time ......................................................................188
Informix ................................................................................................410
Forced Relock .......................................................................................190
Inhibit Schedule Changes .....................................................................118
Form......................................................................................................409
Initialization Command ..........................................................................65
Form Fields ...........................................................................................332
Initialization Response............................................................................65
Form Permission Profile .........................................................................19
Input ..............................................................................................163, 410
Form Profile ............................................................................................94
input ......................................................................................................200
Form Set..................................................................................................90
Input Enabled........................................................................................163
Free Access Floors................................................................................371
Input Field.............................................................................................410
Input Group...........................................................................130, 162, 410
G
Input Group Events...................................................17, 33, 200, 213, 216
Gateway ................................................................................................409
Generate Verification Report........................................................311, 315
Input Groups ....17, 32, 109, 117, 126, 127, 129, 131, 132, 136, 162, 180,
183, ..............................................189, 191, 264
Global APB...........................................................................185, 204, 208
input groups ..........................................................................................200
Graphical Terminal ...............................................................................409
Input Monitor..................................................................................17, 278
Guard ........................................................................................................5
Input State .............................................................................................265
Guest .....................................................................................173, 343, 354
Inputs .17, 32, 33, 106, 109, 110, 126, 127, 132, 134, 160, 161, 163, 189,
190, .....191, 192, 216, 218, 262, 264, 292, 340,
345, ..............................346, 350, 358, 373, 382
H
Hangup Command ..................................................................................65
Has Photograph.....................................................................................237
Has Signature ........................................................................................238
Held Open In Group .............................................................................189
Held Open Sensing ...............................................................190, 205, 210
Help...........................................................................................................4
High Speed Baud ....................................................................................66
Hi-speed Connect Msg............................................................................66
History Counts ........................................................................................48
History Flags...........................................................................................48
Holiday Modes......................................................................................195
Host .......................................................................................................410
Host Console.........................................................................................410
Host Name ..............................................................................................69
Host-Micro Polling Retries ...................................................................135
Host-Micro Polling Retry Interval ........................................................135
Hosts .......................................................................................................20
I
Idle Time...............................................................................................137
image
crop and enhance .............................................................................241
Image Types............................................................................................45
Images ...................................................................................................235
Input Group State..................................................................................130
inputs.....................................................................................................125
Insertion Point.......................................................................................410
Interval Time.........................................................................................183
Invalid APB In ......................................................................................272
Invalid APB Out ...................................................................................272
Invalid Badge........................................................................................128
Invalid Code..........................................................................................272
Invalid Floor .........................................................................................272
Invalid In Group....................................................................................183
Invalid KR BDG ...................................................................................272
Invalid PIN............................................................................................272
Invalid Shunt.........................................................................................272
Invalid T&A In .....................................................................................272
Invalid T&A Out...................................................................................272
IP Address.....................................................................................282, 410
ISA ........................................................................................................410
K
Keypad Alarm Response ......................................................190, 384, 386
Keypad Code.........................................................................................384
Keypad Only .........................................................................................184
Keypad Override Code .........................................................................410
Keypad Response..................................................................................233
Keypad Shunt Time ..............................................................................189
KR INVLD Open DR ...........................................................................272
KR Not Enabled....................................................................................272
419
L
Micro, Dial-up ......................................................................................133
LAN ......................................................................................................410
Micro, Downstream dial-up..................................................................133
Learn Timeout.......................................................................................272
Micro, Network.....................................................................................133
Linux .........................................................................................2, 410, 413
Micro, Network dial-up ........................................................................133
List Window ...........................................................................................28
Micro, Non-existent ..............................................................................133
Load ......................................................................................................238
Micro, Type ..........................................................................................134
Locale..............................................................................................96, 410
Mifare....................................................................................................257
Location ................................................................................................264
Minimize All...........................................................................................21
Location ID ...........................................................................................169
moddrv ..................................................................................................288
Lock on Duress .....................................................................................136
Mode .............................................................................113, 215, 218, 411
Log Monitor ........................................................................17, 86, 87, 289
Mode Event...................................................................................194, 198
Logging off .............................................................................................12
Modem ..................................................................................................411
Logging on ..............................................................................................10
Modem Type...................................................................................68, 137
logging on ...............................................................................................12
Modems ........................................................................17, 30, 64, 66, 412
Logical Reader Function...............................................................185, 208
Modes................................................19, 33, 193, 194, 195, 196, 198, 199
Logical Reader Type.............................................................................204
Modified Door Control .........................................................................179
Logical State .........................................................................122, 178, 184
Modified No Door Control ...................................................................179
Login .....................................................................................................410
Modified Two Man Rule ......................................................................343
Login ID....................................................4, 10, 11, 12, 96, 279, 410, 413
Modified Two Man Rule with Door Control........................................343
Login Id...................................................................................................96
Modified Two Man Rule without Door Control...................................343
Logout ...................................................................................................410
Modified with Door Control .................................................................202
Lo-speed Connect Msg ...........................................................................65
Modified without Door Control............................................................202
Lost Badge ............................................................................................128
Monitoring ............................................................................................411
Lost Routing .........................................................................................181
mrtmgr ..................................................................................................288
Low Speed Baud .....................................................................................65
Multiple Access Violations...................................................................386
LVM......................................................................................................410
M2MR Category Type..........................................................................343
Micro, Direct connect ...........................................................................133
M2MR Output...............................................................................189, 358
M
M2MR, Type ........................................................................................173
Manage..........................................................................23, 25, 26, 34, 335
N
Manage Template ...........................................................................82, 324
Manage Templates ..........................................................................83, 324
netalm....................................................................................................288
Map Values ...........................................................................................258
Network Port...........................................................................................69
Max View Recs.......................................................................................46
Network Ports ...................................................................................17, 30
Maximum Connect Time ......................................................................137
Networking option ....................................................................................5
Media Type ...........................................................................................220
Neutral ..................................................................................................234
Memory Management...........................................................................287
No Answer Message ...............................................................................66
Menu Bar ................................................................................................16
No Carrier Msg .......................................................................................66
Message ..................................................................................18, 115, 410
No Categ Match ....................................................................................272
Message Count......................................................................................287
Node Name .............................................................................................42
Messages Processed ..............................................................................287
Normal Mode........................................................................................194
Micro.........................................................................................5, 183, 410
Normally Closed ...................................................................................163
Micro Address.......................................................................................134
Normally Open .....................................................................................159
Micro Dialout Prefix .............................................................................137
Not Validated........................................................................................272
Micro ID ...............................................................................................162
Number of Badges ................................................................184, 203, 207
Micro Parameter Block Configuration .................................................156
Number of Floors....................................................................47, 372, 375
Micro Phone Number............................................................................137
Number of Person Categories .................................................................47
Micro Poll .............................................................................................142
Micro Reset Request Command ...........................................................142
Microcontroller .....................................................................................411
Micros ..17, 30, 32, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 126, 130, 132, 134, 139, 140, 143,
146, ..............147, 148, 150, 151, 372, 386, 411
O
Occupancy Control ...............................................................................178
420
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Occupancy Control with the Two Man Rule feature ............................342
Permit scheduled mode changes ...........................................................197
Off to On Delay Time ...........................................................................162
Person Trace .........................................................................233, 388, 389
Offline ...................................................................................................411
Person Trace Alarm ..............................................................................388
Offline Reader.......................................................................................411
Person Trace Routing......................................................................46, 388
On to Off Delay Time ...........................................................................162
Personnel16, 34, 36, 37, 76, 178, 224, 225, 227, 231, 232, 235, 236, 238,
.....240, 242, 243, 251, 252, 255, 257, 258, 260,
348, ..............355, 356, 362, 363, 388, 389, 390
Online............................................................................................118, 411
Online Reader .......................................................................................411
Open......................................................................................................271
Open Condition.....................................................................................130
Open Duress..........................................................................................271
Open Shunt ...........................................................................................271
Open Too Long .....................................................................................411
Open windows ........................................................................................21
Operating Features ................................................................................3, 4
Operating Mode ....................................................................................411
Operating System......................................................................................4
Operator .19, 46, 95, 97, 98, 211, 213, 216, 218, 220, 248, 252, 265, 269,
274, .....278, 279, 280, 282, 287, 288, 340, 346,
351, ......................................................352, 385
personnel.........................................................31, 233, 237, 247, 251, 252
Personnel Type ...................................................................16, 77, 78, 257
personnel type .........................................................................................31
Phone ......................................................................................................68
Photograph ............................................................................................237
Photo-Imaging option ...............................................................................5
Physical Reader Function .....................................................................184
Physical Reader Type ...................................................................203, 207
Physical State................................................................................178, 184
Physical Volume ...................................................................................411
PIN ........................................................................................................232
PIN Entry ..................................................................................................5
Operator History ...................................................................................287
PIN # .....................................................................................................407
Operator Interface .....................................................................................4
Places ................16, 32, 173, 182, 205, 341, 353, 354, 355, 360, 361, 362
Operator Monitor ....................................................................17, 279, 280
Polling Interval .....................................................................................136
Operator-generated Commands ............................................................142
Port........................................................................................................282
Operators...........................................................................................31, 95
Port Group.............................................................................................411
oprmgr...................................................................................................288
Port Group Leader ................................................................................411
OPR/s ....................................................................................................288
Ports ..............................................................17, 64, 65, 66, 132, 135, 147
Output ...................................................................................................411
Power-on Reset .....................................................................................141
Output Group ................126, 127, 130, 132, 142, 159, 200, 216, 218, 411
Pre-Alarm..............................................................................................190
Output Group Events ........................................................17, 33, 217, 218
Pre-Alarm In Group ..............................................................................190
Output Groups.................................................................................17, 268
preface.....................................................................................................xv
Outputs17, 32, 33, 119, 125, 126, 127, 132, 134, 142, 158, 159, 160, 163,
.....216, 218, 262, 263, 268, 340, 345, 346, 350,
358, ......................................................369, 373
Preview Pane.........................................................................................332
outputs...................................................................................................187
P
Packet....................................................................................................411
Page Level Permission......................................................................84, 88
Page Level Permissions ........................................340, 346, 351, 352, 359
Parent Input Group................................................................130, 131, 132
Parity .......................................................................................................68
Passive Apb In ......................................................................................271
Passive Apb Out....................................................................................271
Passive Time & Attendance..................................................................136
Password ...............................................................................................411
People..16, 31, 34, 36, 37, 77, 78, 236, 238, 240, 243, 252, 355, 362, 389
Performance Monitor ..................................................17, 86, 87, 287, 289
Performance monitor ............................................................................286
Permission.......................19, 31, 80, 83, 93, 94, 95, 96, 98, 102, 103, 282
Permission Group ...................................19, 31, 81, 91, 92, 173, 178, 411
Permissions ...............................................................................81, 93, 411
Permissions Form .............................................................................94, 96
Primary Language.................................................................................411
Primary Port..........................................................................................134
Print Badge ...........................................................................................226
Printers ..................................................................................20, 30, 54, 55
Priority ..................................................................................118, 264, 411
Privileged ..............................................................................................234
Process ..................................................................................................412
Process State .................................................................................265, 385
Processing State ....................................................................................122
Progress Bar............................................................................................26
Provided Language ...............................................................................412
Q
Query ........................................................................................................4
Query Parameters..................................................................................294
Queue Name ...........................................................................................55
R
Radio Buttons .........................................................................................27
RAID.....................................................................................................412
421
RAN ......................................................................................................412
Schedules ..................................................................................................4
rcvmgr ...................................................................................................288
Scheduling ............................................................................................178
Reader Communication Failure ............................................................127
SCSI ......................................................................................................412
Reader Events .................................................................18, 200, 206, 209
Search Criteria ........................................................................................27
Reader Issue ............................................................................56, 225, 229
Secondary Port......................................................................................135
Reader Offline.......................................................................................272
Seed Counter.................................................................225, 227, 228, 366
Reader Online/Offline...................................................................203, 207
Select Image Source..............................................................................239
Readers18, 33, 94, 130, 134, 172, 174, 181, 182, 209, 211, 338, 339, 342,
.....344, 345, 348, 349, 356, 357, 368, 373, 382,
387, ..............................................................412
Semaphore ............................................................................................412
readers ...................................................................................................366
Real-Time Monitoring ..............................................................................4
Record Remove Interval .................................................................47, 230
Record Remove Maximum .............................................................47, 230
Redundant-System option.........................................................................5
Reissue Count ...............................................................................227, 366
Relational Database ..............................................................................412
Relational Operators .............................................................................306
Remove Alarm Only if Reset................................................................263
Report Event .........................................................................................307
Report Events....................................................21, 33, 200, 300, 306, 307
Report Permission Group..................................................................91, 94
Reports ....5, 16, 21, 33, 80, 91, 92, 93, 293, 296, 298, 299, 306, 307, 379
Reprint Count................................................................................227, 366
Requires badge to print .........................................................................256
Reset on Duration .................................................................................159
Reset Outputs ........................................................................................119
Reset Timed APB .................................................................................234
Reset Timed APB Immediately ............................................185, 204, 208
Response .........................................................................................18, 412
Restore ....................................20, 220, 296, 309, 311, 315, 316, 317, 318
Restore All ..............................................................................................21
Rollback ................................................................................................197
Rollback on Input Reset........................................................................221
Route Definition .............................................31, 109, 111, 118, 162, 181
Route definition ..............................................................................19, 106
Route Point ...........................................................................................113
Route Points ..................................................................................110, 114
Route points ............................................................................................19
Route to Email ......................................................................................112
Route To Operators...............................................................................111
Route to Permission ..............................................................................112
Routing....................................................................................46, 162, 181
Routings ..........................19, 30, 71, 72, 73, 107, 108, 110, 181, 203, 292
RSVP ....................................................................................................269
RS-232 ..................................................................................................412
S
safety terms and symbols ........................................................................xv
Schedule Control.....................................................................................28
Schedule Event .....................................................................................412
Schedule Type.......................................................................................248
Server ....................................................................................................412
Session ..................................................................................................282
Shared Memory.....................................................................................287
Shared Memory Free ............................................................................287
Shared Memory Size...............................................................................42
Shared Memory Total ...........................................................................287
Shared Memory Used ...........................................................................287
Short Condition.....................................................................................130
Shunt .....................................................................................................412
Shunt Code............................................................................................135
Shunting ........................................................................................178, 186
Shutdown ..............................................................................................412
Signature ...............................................................................................238
snddrv....................................................................................................288
SQL Keywords .....................................................................................303
SQL Keywords and Operators..............................................................293
SQL Variables...............................................................................293, 300
SSL........................................................................................................412
Status.............................................................................................232, 413
Status Bar................................................................................................26
Status Monitor.................................................................17, 263, 280, 413
Std. Bias ................................................................................................169
Stop Bits..................................................................................................68
Strike Output.........................................................................................189
stsmgr....................................................................................................288
Support Services .......................................................................................6
Supported Language .............................................................................413
Suspend Badge......................................................................................252
Suspended Badge..................................................................................128
Suspended Routing ...............................................................................181
Swipe And Show ..................................................................................271
Swipe and Show....................................................................................274
Swipe and Show Control ......................................................185, 204, 208
SYN ......................................................................................................413
System Administrator ...........................................................................413
System Diagnostics.................................................................................48
System History......................................................................................287
System Parameters20, 30, 40, 50, 53, 85, 91, 233, 249, 260, 263, 264, 265,
..............268, 279, 280, 292, 307, 372, 375, 388
System Permission Profile ....................19, 80, 81, 85, 87, 88, 93, 99, 104
System Permissions Profile ..............................................................85, 94
T
Tab Layout Preview..............................................................................331
422
Picture Perfect 4.5
User Manual
Tab Sequence ........................................................................................331
T&A In..................................................................................................271
Table Names .........................................................................................294
T&A Out ...............................................................................................271
Taped Badge Count ..............................................................................136
Taped Badge Suspend...........................................................................136
Team Member.......................................................................173, 343, 354
U
technical support ...................................................................................406
UCS.......................................................................................................288
Temp Issue ....................................................................................251, 252
UDP ......................................................................................................413
Templates....................................................5, 83, 319, 320, 324, 330, 335
Unique Id ......................................................................................228, 366
templates .................................................................................................34
UNIX ........................................................................................................4
Text Boxes ..............................................................................................27
Unix ......................................................................................................413
Tile Horizontally.....................................................................................21
unix .......................................................139, 151, 292, 407, 410, 412, 413
Tile Vertically .........................................................................................21
UnixWare..................................................................................................3
Time and Attendance In/Out.................................................................185
Unknown Badge ...................................................................................128
Time Format ...........................................................................................43
Unknown Routing.................................................................................181
Time Zone..14, 18, 96, 112, 126, 134, 168, 169, 170, 199, 203, 207, 211,
213, ......................216, 218, 220, 226, 227, 235
Unlock Time .................................................................................188, 413
time zone.......................................................................................233, 262
Upstream Communication Failure........................................................127
Time Zone Support ...................................................................................5
Upstream Micro ....................................................................................134
Timed APB ...................................................................................204, 208
Upstream Retries...................................................................................135
Timed APB Duration ............................................................................186
Upstream Retry Interval........................................................................135
Timed reader .........................................................................................185
Usage Count..........................................................................................227
timer ......................................................................................................288
Usage Exhausted...................................................................................272
timerd ....................................................................................................288
User Monitor.......................................................................17, 86, 87, 283
Upstream...............................................................................................413
Title Bar ..................................................................................................24
Tool Bar ..................................................................................................24
Toolbars, Monitor .................................................................................262
V
Tour Badge ...........................................................................................227
Valid Door Locked ...............................................................................271
Tour History..........................................................................................287
Valid Floor............................................................................................271
Tour Monitor...........................................................................................17
Valid In Group ......................................................................................183
tourmgr..................................................................................................288
Valid No Passage ..................................................................................271
Tours .............................................................................5, 16, 21, 163, 227
Valid Routing........................................................................................181
TOUR/s .................................................................................................288
Valid Toggle .........................................................................................271
TPS........................................................................................................413
TPS Mode .............................................................................................287
TPS Network Mode ..............................................................................287
W
Tracing Badge Holder Activity.............................................................388
Wizard.......................................................................................5, 320, 321
Training.....................................................................................................6
Workstation...........................................................................................413
Transaction............................................................................................413
Transaction History Processing ................................................................4
TTY.......................................................................................................413
X
tty ............................................................................................................69
X Terminal............................................................................................413
Two Man Rule ..............................................................................202, 342
X Window System ................................................................................413
Two Man Rule Control .........................................................................179
xdm .......................................................................................................413
Two man rule output.............................................................................184
Xoff Threshold........................................................................................42
Type ......................................................................................................232
Xon Threshold ........................................................................................42
TZ Context ............................................................................................233
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