Systems, methods, and computer program products for instant

Systems, methods, and computer program products for instant
US008332689B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent No.:
Timashev et a].
US 8,332,689 B2
(45) Date of Patent:
(54) SYSTEMS, METHODS, AND COMPUTER
2
PROGRAM PRODUCTS FOR INSTANT
537133024 A
RECOVERY OF IMAGE LEVEL BACKUPS
5,758,165 A
5,835,953 A
(75) Inventors: Ratmir Timashev, Baar (CH); Anton
Dec. 11, 2012
Eemis
1/1998 Hg?gjgy
5/1998 Shuff
11/1998 Ohran
(Continued)
Gostev, Saint-Petersburg (RU)
(73)
A _
V
ssignee:
s f
eeam
I
o tware nternationa
lL d
Pembroke (BM)
(*)
Nome:
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
t .,
EP
0 899 662 A1
3/1999
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
SHbJeCt, to any dISCIalmeri the term Ofthls
Noti?cation of Transmittal of the International Search Report and the
Patent 15 eXtended or adJuSted under 35
Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority, or the
U'S'C' 15403) by 0 days'
Declaration, for International Application No. PCT/US2011/04435,
mailed Feb. 9, 2012.
(21) Appl.N0.: 13/540,178
(Continued)
(22) Filed:
Jul. 2, 2012
Primary Examiner * Dieu-Minh Le
(65)
Prior PUblication Data
us 2012/0284236 A1
Nov. 8, 2012
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm * Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein
& FOX P-L-L-C
Related US. Application Data
(57)
(63) Continuation of application No. 13/185,036, ?led on
Jul' 18, 2001'
(60)
ABSTRACT
SyStems’ methOds’ and computer program Predums are pro
V1ded for instant recovery of a Virtual machine (VM) ~from a
compressed image level backup W1thout fully extractlng the
Provisional application No. 61/365,721, ?led on Jul.
image level backup ?le’s contents to production storage. The
19, 2010.
method receives restore parameters, initializes a virtual stor
(51)
Int- Cl-
ured to launch a recovered VM. The method stores virtual
(52)
(58)
US. Cl. ............................................ .. 714/15; 718/1
Field of Classi?cation Search .................. .. 714/ 15,
(OS), applications, and users in a changes storage. The
method provides the ability to migrate the actual VM disk
714/16, 20, 2, 6.1, 6.12, 6.13; 718/1, 100;
707/ 602, 679; 711/161, 182
See application ?le for complete search history.
state (taking into account changed disk data blocks accumu
lated in changes storage) so as to prevent data loss resulting
age, and attaches the virtual storage to a hypervisor con?g
G06F 11/00
(2006-01)
disk data changes in?icted by a running operating system
from the VM running during the recovery and accessing
References Cited
virtual storage, to production storage Without downtime. In
embodiments, the method displays received restore param
US. PATENT DOCUMENTS
eters in an interactive interface and delivers the recovery
results via an automated message.
(56)
4,912,628 A
3/1990 Briggs
5,133,065 A
7/1992 Cheffetz et a1.
28 Claims, 11 Drawing Sheets
Attach Virtual
sways to
Hypalviwr
YES
US 8,332,689 B2
Page 2
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
5,907,672 A
5,974,547 A
6,038,570 A
6,047,294
6,061,770
6,076,148
6,081,875
6,205,527
6,421,777
6,434,681
6,604,118
A
A
A
A
B1
B1
B1
B2
6,691,245 B1
6,735,692
6,795,966
6,799,258
6,823,376
6,917,963
6,931,558
7,024,527
7,043,485
7,093,086
7,191,299
7,240,239
7,254,682
7,480,822
B1
B1
B1
B1
B1
B1
B1
B2
B1
B1
B2
B1
B1
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5/2000
6/2000
6/2000
3/2001
7/2002
8/2002
8/2003
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Gosheyet al.
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1
2
Finally, the VM is registered with a virtual environment
SYSTEMS, METHODS, AND COMPUTER
PROGRAM PRODUCTS FOR INSTANT
RECOVERY OF IMAGE LEVEL BACKUPS
and started. If the VM or applications inside it do not start due
to an image level backup being unrecoverable, the process of
recovery needs to be repeated using different backup ?les,
until a viable, working backup ?le is found and the restored
VM is running as expectediwhich concludes the traditional
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
recovery process.
in order to verify the functionality of data restored from
image level backups, some traditional recovery techniques
The present application is a continuation of US. patent
application Ser. No. 13/185,036, ?led on Jul. 18, 201 1, which
claims the bene?t of US. Provisional Patent Application No.
61/365,721, ?led on Jul. 19, 2010, both of which are incor
stage restored data on isolated, test networks and servers. This
results in the need for additional time to ?rst stage recovered
data objects in a test environment before it is made available
in a production environment.
Thus, traditional image-level recovery processes are
resource intensive, inef?cient, and as a result, may take hours
to completeiprimarily due to having to copy very large
amounts of data from an image level backup ?le to a produc
tion environment. This can prevent users from using produc
tion data and applications during the restore process. This can
porated by reference herein in its entirety.
FIELD OF THE INVENTION
The present invention is related to data backup and recov
ery. In particular, the present invention relates to methods,
systems, and computer program products for instant recovery
of virtual machines stored in an image level backup.
20
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
also often jeopardize achieving RTOs and SLAs resulting in
extended and costly downtime for production systems.
Therefore, there is a need for an ef?cient method of quick
The speed of recovery during disaster has been a concern
throughout the era of the personal computer and distributed
client-server systems. Backup administrators and restore
operators need to ensure they are meeting Recovery Time
recovery of VMs from image-level backups to production
environment. There is also a need for methods and systems
25
which allow users to access data sets while a restoration is
running.
Objectives (RTOs) and Ser vice Level Agreement levels
(SLAs) for all mission-critical applications and servers.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
Traditional methods of recovering image level backups
include the complete restoration of an image-level backup
30
into a production environment. Traditional recovery tech
niques also do not allow users to access and use data sets
being restored while a restoration is ongoing.
For virtual machines, backups and restorations are typi
cally performed at the image level, so the data size that needs
to be restored can be overwhelming. For example, restoring a
?le server virtual machine (VM) with 1 terabyte (TB) disk can
compressed/deduplicated/ encrypted image level backup
35
?led on Oct. 8, 2010 entitled “Item-Level Restoration from
40
example, some commercially available backup tools, such as
VEEAMTM Backup from Veeam Software International Ltd.,
provide mechanisms for de-duplication and compression of
image level backup ?les. Deduplication may be applied when
backing up multiple virtual machines (VMs) that have similar
without prior full VM image extraction are described in US.
Provisional Patent Application No. 61/250,586, ?led on Oct.
12, 2009, and entitled “Item-Level Restoration From Image
Level Backup,” US. patent application Ser. No. 12/ 901,233,
take up to 8 hours on a 1 gigabit (Gb) network.
In order to conserve storage space, backup ?les themselves
are typically highly compressed and/or de-duplicated. For
Embodiments of the invention include methods, systems,
and computer program products for instant recovery of a VM
from an image level backup to a production environment.
Example methods for restoring and verifying a VM from a
Image Level Backups,” and US. Provisional Patent Applica
tion No. 61/302,743, ?led on Feb. 9, 2010 and entitled “Sys
tems, Methods, and Computer Program Products for Veri?
cation of Image Level Backups”, which are incorporated by
reference herein in their entireties.
45
data blocks within them. For example, if VMs were created
The methods, systems, and computer program products
described herein perform image level backup recovery that
based on the same template, or ifVMs with a large amount of
substantially obviate one or several of the disadvantages of
free space on their logical disks are backed up, deduplication
of backups of the VMs can reduce storage space required for
traditional approaches.
the backups of those VMs.
Another means for decreasing the backup size is compres
sion. Again, while compression decreases the size of created
50
backup ?les, it increases the duration for backup creation,
veri?cation, restoration, and recovery procedures.
In order to enhance security, backup ?les are also often
diately start a MICROSOFTTM Exchange server stored in a
compressed and deduplicated image level backup ?le stored
55
encrypted.
Thus, in an initial restoration step, backup ?les may need to
be extracted (i.e., decompressed) and/ or decrypted com
pletely before their contents can be read. The extracted VM
data are then copied to a target production environment.
Embodiments of the invention include a system for instant
recovery of aVM from an image level backup to a production
environment without prior restorations of data from a backup
?le to production storage. For example, the system can imme
60
on arbitrary storage, in a production environment without
having to ?rst extract the entire MICROSOFTTM Exchange
server image from the image level backup and move the
extracted data over to production storage.
Embodiments of the invention additionally use virtual stor
age to provide access to data stored inside of image level
Using traditional techniques, restoration and recovery pro
backup ?les (i.e., disk images and con?guration ?les) during
cess can take hours depending on the size of the VM to be
the recovery process. This allows the system to be fully stor
restored, because large amounts of data need to be extracted
and moved across from the backup storage to the production
storage. The time required to copy the extracted VM image
data over to production storage is the primary factor affecting
overall duration of the traditional recovery process.
age-agno stic, and not require that the image level backup data
is stored on the device with snapshot capabilities and/or in the
65
native (uncompressed) format.
In an embodiment, the instant recovery method does not
require performing a full restore of the backup ?le to the
US 8,332,689 B2
3
4
production storage before the recovered computer can be
Thus, the operational behavior of the present invention will be
described with the understanding that modi?cations and
variations of the embodiments are possible, given the level of
detail presented herein.
started, and therefore, does not require waiting for such
extraction to complete before applications computer and its
applications are made available to users.
Unless speci?cally stated differently, a user, a restore
operator, and an administrator are interchangeably used
Embodiments of the invention additionally provide a num
ber of methods to migrate a running server to production
storage with zero or little downtime, wherein any downtime is
herein to identify a human user, a software agent, or a group
of users and/or software agents. Besides a human user who
limited to a scheduled maintenance window.
Embodiments of the invention additionally include a com
needs to restore data objects from image level backups, a
puter-readable medium having computer-executable instruc
software application or agent sometimes needs to recover
tions stored thereon that, in response to execution by a com
VMs from image level backups. Accordingly, unless speci?
cally stated, the terms “operator,” “administrator,” and “user”
puting device, cause the computing device to perform
as used herein do not necessarily pertain to a human being.
As used herein, in an embodiment, the term “server”
encompasses computing devices that are designed to function
operations for instant VM recovery from an image level
backup.
Further features and advantages of the invention, as well as
the structure and operation of various embodiments of the
invention, are described in detail below with reference to the
accompanying drawings. It is noted that the invention is not
limited to the speci?c embodiments described herein. Such
embodiments are presented herein for illustrative purposes
only. Additional embodiments will be apparent to persons
skilled in the relevant art(s) based on the teachings contained
herein.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE
DRAWINGS/FIGURES
as one or more of email servers, Domain Name System
(DNS) servers, Domain Controller (DC) servers, application
servers; database servers, web servers, ?rewall servers, and
20
other enterprise servers, ?le servers, back end servers, and
regular desktops. A server may be comprised of one or more
server machines. A server may be implemented as collection
of servers such as a server farm or server cluster. For example,
web servers may be commercially available server machines
with one or more central processing units (CPUs). Altema
25
tively, these web servers may comprise multiple computing
devices and/or computing functionality hosted on multiple
server machines (i.e., a server farm).
The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated
herein and form a part of the speci?cation, illustrate the
present invention and, together with the description, further
30
Instant Recovery System Architectures
FIG. 1 depicts system architecture 100 for instant recovery,
serve to explain the principles of the invention and to enable
a person skilled in the relevant art to make and use the inven
tion.
FIGS. 1-3 illustrate modular views of instant recovery
system architectures, in accordance with embodiments of the
present invention.
FIG. 4 is a ?owchart illustrating steps by which instant
in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. A restore
operator console 110 includes a user interface (UI) 115 for
35
backup recovery operators. In an embodiment, the UI 115
may be displayed on computer display 1130 shown in FIG.
11. UI 115 can be used to select a backup to be restored, a
recovery is performed, in accordance with an embodiment of
the present invention.
FIGS. 5-10 illustrate an exemplary graphical user interface
(GUI), wherein the instant recovery process can be con?g
ured, in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.
FIG. 11 depicts an example computer system in which the
The present invention relates to improved systems, meth
ods, and computer program products for instant recovery of
servers from image level backups.
40
restoration point, hypervisor to restore the server to, and
additional restore parameters. Restore operator console 110
is also used to con?gure and manage components of instant
recovery system architecture 100.
In embodiments of the invention, a virtual storage 120 can
be implemented in the form of a process, a software agent, an
application, a virtual machine (VM), hardware, a software
present invention may be implemented.
to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, generally,
appliance, or a combination of hardware and software that
allows representing either the entire or partial raw data con
like reference numbers indicate identical or functionally
tent of a requested image level backup. In an embodiment,
similar elements. Additionally, generally, the left-most digit
virtual storage 120 includes an application or process 125
The present invention will now be described with reference
(s) of a reference number identi?es the drawing in which the
reference number ?rst appears.
45
50
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
The following detailed description of the present invention
refers to the accompanying drawings that illustrate exemplary
55
embodiments consistent with this invention. Other embodi
(also referred to herein as “data conversion engine” 120) that
enables representation of either the entire (or partial) raw data
content of the required virtual disk or con?guration ?le from
image level backup ?le located in backup ?les storage 130.
As used herein, “virtual storage” refers to logical storage
that has been abstracted and separated from physical storage,
such as network attached storage (NAS), ?le servers, disks,
and other physical storage devices. In an embodiment “virtual
ments are possible, and modi?cations can be made to the
storage” is logical storage implemented via virtual storage
embodiments within the spirit and scope of the invention.
Therefore, the detailed description is not meant to limit the
invention. Rather, the scope of the invention is de?ned by the
logic and is viewable within a virtual infrastructure as a
appended claims.
storage device containing VM con?guration ?les and one or
more virtual disk ?les, which are separated from physical
storage disks. As used herein, a “virtual machine” (VM) is a
It wouldbe apparent to one of skill in the art that the present
invention, as described below, can be implemented in many
puter, or other computing device that supports the execution
60
software implementation of a machine such as a server, com
of a complete operating system (OS) and executes application
different embodiments of software, hardware, ?rmware, and/
or the entities illustrated in the ?gures. Any actual software
code with the specialized control of hardware to implement
the present invention is not limiting of the present invention.
65
programs like a physical machine.
A VM is a software implementation that duplicates the
functionality of a physical machine implemented in hardware
US 8,332,689 B2
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and software. Software applications and the OS running on a
VM are limited to the resources and abstractions provided by
the VM. In an embodiment, virtual machines (VMs) are view
able within an overall virtual infrastructure. According to an
VMotion to seamlessly migrate the published VM ?les to
another datastore available to hypervisor.
Hypervisor 150 is used to start up the restored VM 170
using VM image and data ?les from the image level backup.
In accordance with embodiments of the invention, hypervisor
embodiment of the invention, the requested backup ?le to be
veri?ed can be located in local storage (not shown) or backup
?les storage 130. In the exemplary embodiment depicted in
FIG. 1, backup ?les storage 130 is used to store full computer
image ?les corresponding to a full image level backup of a
computer or server. These backup ?les are typically highly
compressed and de-duplicated to reduce the amount of stor
150 can be, but is not limited to VMMs such as VMWARETM
Player, MICROSOFTTM VirtualPC, SUNTM VirtualBox,
VMWARETM ESX/ESXi, MICROSOFTTM Hyper-V, CIT
RIXTM XENServer, PARALLELSTM and other hypervisors
150. As would be apparent to one of skill in the art, other
hypervisors 150 and virtualization solutions can be used as
well.
age required; in some cases, they are also encrypted for secu
rity reasons. Virtual storage 120 can be made available to
At this point, the restored VM 170 and all applications
hypervisor 150 via public or proprietary storage access pro
tocols such as, but not limited to the Network File System
running inside it become available to users. As restored VM
170 runs, any VM disk changes in?icted by the running
operating system (OS), applications, and user activity are
being accumulated in changes storage 140.
(NFS), Common Internet File System (CIFS), Internet Small
Computer System Interface (iSCSI).
Restore operator console 110 communicates with a virtual
environment implemented on a virtual machine monitor
(VMM) or hypervisor 150. As would be understood by one
In order to complete the recovery, at some point the recov
20
skilled in the relevant art(s), hypervisor 150 may be imple
mented as software or a combination of hardware and soft
ery operator needs to completely move the VM disk images
and data ?les of virtual storage 120 to production storage 260
depicted in FIG. 2. This process migrates actual VM disk state
(taking into account changed disk data blocks accumulated in
ware to implement platform-virtualization software that
changes storage 140) to prevent the loss of data generated
allows multiple operating systems (OSs) to run concurrently
while the VM was running from the virtual storage 120. This
migration process is described below with reference to FIGS.
2 and 3.
FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary system architecture used
for instant VM recovery. FIG. 2 is described with continued
reference to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1. However,
on a single host computer. Virtual storage 120 is accessible by
hypervisor 150 that supports the same storage type and for
mat as virtual storage 120 is con?gured to emulate. Hypervi
sor 150 performs virtual disk image read operations from
virtual storage 120 and writes changed virtual disk data into
virtual storage 120, or directly to the changes storage 140
25
30
using hypervisor’s native I/O redirection techniques.
Changes storage 140 stores virtual disk image data changes
As shown in FIG. 2, restoredVM 170 in virtual storage 120
is migrated to production storage 260 using hypervisor 150.
in?icted by the running OS, applications and users. The writ
In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, the migration may be
performed using VM migration tool 380. According to an
ten data can also be read back by hypervisor 150, in cases
when hypervisor needs to access changed virtual disk image
35
data blocks. Thus, the exposed images residing inside backup
?les remain read only and intact on the backup storage.
Virtual storage 120 handles these operations using appro
priate formats and stores the modi?ed disk image data on
changes storage 140. In accordance with embodiments of the
FIG. 2 is not limited to that embodiment.
40
embodiment, VM migration tool 380 may include an recov
ery ?nalization module 385 that coordinates the instant
recovery of the restored VM 170. In other embodiments,
recovery ?nalization module 385 is implemented separately
from the migration tool 380, and may include the logic to
initiate the launch and operation of restored VM 170. Replica
present invention, changes storage 140 canbe implemented in
VM 375 has the same contents as restored VM 170. FIG. 3
the following different ways. Changes storage 140 can be
also depicts a production hypervisor 355, which is instructed
to con?gure and register with replica VM 375.
FIG. 2 depicts system architecture used to achieve migra
implemented using virtual storage 120 logic by intercepting
and re-directing write input/output (I/O) using ?le system
level drivers or similar I/ O redirection techniques to physical
45
storage available to virtual storage 120 logic. Changes stor
age 140 can also be implemented using ‘snapshot’ disk I/O
redirection capabilities of hypervisor 150 (snapshot, non
persistent disk etc.), when all data changes in?icted by the
running VM are redirected to designated physical storage by
embodiment, to perform such migration to production stor
age 260 with no downtime, technologies similar to VMware
50
hypervisor 150 itself, instead of being committed into a vir
exemplary embodiment depicted in FIG. 2, virtual storage
120 storing restored VM 170 and production storage 260
55
Once virtual storage 120 is fully initialized and running,
restore operator console 110 issues a command to con?gure
pleted, so that there is no downtime.
60
150. Once selected one or more VM is published via Virtual
Storage 120, this datastore will show a repository of ?les
representing backed up virtual machine. This approach
enables hypervisor to access all VM ?les (i.e. con?guration,
snapshots, auxiliary ?les), which in turn enables full hyper
where restoredVM 170 is copied to are both connected to and
accessible by hypervisor 150. Restored VM 170 continues to
run normally while the migration to production storage 260
shown in FIG. 2 is taking place, and after it has been com
work (SAN) snapshots.
hypervisor 150 and attach virtual storage 120 to hypervisor
Storage VMotion may be used with the present invention.
Such technologies allow seamless migration of aVM, such as
restored VM 170, from one storage to another, if both storage
devices are connected to the same hypervisor host. In the
tual disk image. In an embodiment, hypervisor 150 can create
a snapshot of a disk image to protect the disk image from data
changes associated with the instant recovery process. Finally,
changes storage 140 can be implemented using capabilities of
backup ?le storage 130, for example, using storage area net
tion of the contents of restored VM 170 in virtual storage 120
to production storage 260 with no downtime. According to an
FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary system architecture used
for another migration method involving short downtime as
part of instant VM recovery. FIG. 3 is described with contin
ued reference to the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.
However, FIG. 3 is not limited to those embodiments.
65
Another way to perform the migration described above
visor capabilities for the VM published in this manner. For
involves a short downtime that is scheduled to occur during a
example, this approach enables using VMWARETM Storage
scheduled maintenance window. For example, if a mainte
US 8,332,689 B2
7
8
nance window has been scheduled for software or hardware
instructed to con?gure and register with virtual environment
restored VM 170 using the VM data ?les located in virtual
installations or upgrades, the architecture depicted in FIG. 3
can be used to migrate restored VM 170 in virtual storage 120
storage 120. In an embodiment, restored VM 170 can be any
enterprise application server, such as, but not limited to, a
MICROSOFTTM Exchange email server.
At stage 3, restored VM 170 is started. Once the operating
to replica VM 375 in production storage 260 during the time
scheduled for the software/hardware maintenance. This
includes leveraging an additional VM migration tool 380
depicted in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 depicts a system architecture cor
system (OS) inside restored VM 170 fully boots up and is
running, users can start accessing applications running in the
VM normally, while the VM is running from the backup ?le.
At stage 4, a restore operator performs migration of
restored VM 170 disk image and data ?les from virtual stor
age 120 to production storage 260, using one of the methods
described above with reference to FIGS. 2 and 3. Depending
on the method and options available to user with given hyper
visors 150 and 355, this process can be initiated immediately
and have no impact on running applications thus resulting in
responding to this exemplary embodiment. For example, VM
migration tool 380 providing replication functionality to rep
licate a VM from virtual storage 120 to production storage on
the same or different hypervisor host can be used as part of an
instant recovery. One example of a migration tool providing
such replica and failover capabilities is the VEEAMTM
Backup and Replication product. In an embodiment of the
invention, after replica VM 375 has been created, a restore
operator shuts down running restored VM 170, and then per
forms a failover to replica VM 375 located on production
no downtime, or can be postponed to the next scheduled
maintenance windows and result in some downtime limited to
storage 260.
According to an embodiment, another way to perform the
migration with longer downtime involves shutting down the
VM during the maintenance window, and using existing tools
a maintenance window.
20
such as VEEAMTM FastSCP or VMware Converter to copy
VM ?les from virtual storage 120 to production storage 260.
Despite the fact that time to complete this copying be similar
to the speed of “traditional” restorations, it will still be com
pleted during a scheduled maintenance window. This enables
recovery to occur during planned downtime off-hours within
a maintenance window as opposed to unplanned down time,
which is detrimental to organizations due to critical system
resources being unavailable during peak usage hours.
boots up and is running, users can start accessing applications
running in the VM, which is now running from normal pro
25
As would be apparent to one of skill in the relevant art(s),
30
more e?icient than manual recovery techniques or systems
which require complete backup extraction in order to restore
data objects from image level backups.
system incorporates the architectures depicted in FIGS. 1-3.
Instant Recovery Methods
For example an instant recovery system including a server
(see computer system 1100 illustrated in FIG. 11) hosting a
35
server is can be used to host a recovery application as part of
a recovery system, it is understood that the recovery applica
tion may reside on a shared application server (not shown).
The operations of system are described with reference
stages 1-5 below. In an embodiment, the stages may corre
spond to steps of ?owchart 400 discussed below with refer
ence to FIG. 4. An image-level backup of production servers
duction storage.
the methods and systems described herein to perform fully
automated instant recovery without requiring complete
backup extraction or repetitive manual operations are much
In an embodiment of the invention, an instant recovery
recovery application may be used. Although a dedicated
At stage 5, in case where “cold” migration was used in
stage 4, replica VM 375 is started in production storage 260.
Once the operating system (OS) inside replica VM 375 fully
FIG. 4 is a ?owchart 400 illustrating steps by which a
method is used to recover data objects from an image level
backup, in accordance with an embodiment of the present
invention.
More particularly, ?owchart 400 illustrates the steps by
40
is performed by a backup application at stage 0 (i.e., at some
point in time in the past), and the produced image level
backup is saved in backup storage. In accordance with an
embodiment of the invention, backup storage can be backup
?les storage 130.
According to an embodiment, at stage 1, a disaster happens
affecting a mission-critical production server, and recovery
must be performed quickly (i.e., an ‘instant’ recovery is
needed). A restore operator (user), using UI 115 within
restore operator console 110 chooses a backup ?le containing
backup of affected VM, a restoration point to restore, and
hypervisor host to restore VM to (and any additional hyper
45
visor-speci?c parameters). Virtual storage 120 is then con?g
55
which an instant VM recovery from an image level backup
recovery is performed, according to an embodiment of the
present invention. FIG. 4 is described with continued refer
ence to the embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1-3. However,
FIG. 4 is not limited to those embodiments. Note that the steps
in the ?owchart do not necessarily have to occur in the order
shown.
The method begins at step 41 0. When the method begins in
step 410, an image-level backup of production servers or any
other computers/servers has already been performed (i.e., at
some past point in time), and the produced backup ?les have
50
been put on a backup storage. In an embodiment, backup
storage is backup ?les storage 130. In accordance with an
embodiment, the image level backup was run with knowledge
of what VMs are needed for a subsequent restore and recov
ery.
console 110 by mounting (connecting to) the required backup
According to an embodiment, backup storage may be full
image backup ?le storage 130 described with reference to
FIG. 1 above. As would be appreciated by one of skill in the
?les from backup ?les storage 130. Once the required backup
relevant arts, backup storage may be one or more ?le servers,
ured according to the user’s selections in restore operator
?les are mounted, virtual storage 120 can then start to respond
to data requests over the network. At the end of stage 1 , virtual
storage 120 appears on the network and is ready to serve
remote requests.
60
parameters may include one or more of an image level backup
At stage 2, hypervisor 150 is instructed to connect virtual
storage 120 to itself. Virtual storage provides the requested
raw data blocks by extracting the required portions of data
from the backup ?le on the ?y as they are requested by
hypervisor. After the storage is mounted, hypervisor 150 is
Network-attached storage (NAS), a SAN, disk arrays, optical
jukeboxes, or other storage devices.
In step 420, restore parameters are received. The restore
65
?le location, backup ?le entities to be restored in cases when
a backup ?le contains multiple image backups, and a recovery
point to restore. According to an embodiment, the restore
parameters are received from a restore operator console 110
where an operator speci?es restore parameters. In an embodi
US 8,332,689 B2
9
10
ment of the invention, a recovery point can be a speci?c point
in time, such an hour, minute or second of a day the backup
was created. Alternatively, the recovery point can be a range
of times or a date. The selected recovery points received in
example, an operator, using UI 115 within restore operator
console 110 can issue the corresponding hypervisor con?gu
ration commands. Step 450 is performed without making any
changes to the backup ?le accessed in step 440. In this way, all
virtual disk data changes in?icted during the instant recovery
method is performed are stored in changes storage 140. After
virtual storage 120 is attached to hypervisor 150, the method
proceeds to step 460.
In step 460, restored VM 170 is con?gured, registered with
step 420 depend upon the frequency of full and incremental
backups taken. For example, in environments where fall
image level backups are taken daily and incremental backups
are taken hourly, the granularity of recovery points will be
limited to selected hours of the day corresponding to the
incremental backups. An exemplary interactive interface for
receiving restore parameters described below with reference
a virtual environment, and launched. In cases when image
level backup ?le includes VM con?guration ?les, data from
to FIGS. 5-10. According to an embodiment of the present
invention, the interface shown in FIGS. 5-10 to receive recov
these ?les can be used to ensure that VM is registered in the
ery (i.e., restoration) selections can be used to perform step
420. After receipt of the restore parameters, the method pro
infrastructure with the same settings (e.g., virtual network) as
it had at the time of backup. According to an embodiment,
ceeds to step 430.
In step 430, virtual storage 120 is started. In an embodi
restoredVM 170 is con?gured in a way so that the virtual disk
ment, step 430 is performed when restore operator console
110 initializes virtual storage 120 by starting a storage service
or a process, and attaches corresponding image level backup
?le(s) from backup ?les storage 130 or local storage (not
shown). After virtual storage 120 is started, the method pro
the restored VM 170 is con?gured, registered and launched,
the method proceeds to step 470.
?les refer to corresponding ?les in virtual storage 120. Once
20
step, restoredVM 170 continues to run for as long as required,
ceeds to step 440.
In step 440, a data conversion engine 125 starts. This
engine presents the contents of backup ?les on virtual storage
In step 470, a determination is made as to whether restored
VM 170 has been migrated to production storage 260. In this
25
120 (for example, by publishing ?les structure of ?les stored
in backup). It also performs on-the-?y decompression, de
while the recovery operator plans and execute the strategy of
moving VM disk images and other data ?les to production
storage 260. Virtual Storage 120 continues to serve input/
output (I/O) requests for VM disk image data ?les, which
enables successful and seamless migration of the VM. If it is
deduplication, decryption and/ or any other operator or system
determined by an operator or a monitoring program that
speci?ed operation required to translate portions of the
30
restored VM 170 has been migrated to production storage
260, control is passed to step 480. If it determined that migra
tion is not complete, step 470 is repeated.
35
In this step, virtual storage 120 is disconnected from hyper
visor and changes storage 140 data is deleted.
The instant recovery process stops and the method ends in
step 490.
Example Instant Recovery User Interface
backup ?le contents into raw data, as speci?c portions of this
data are requested by external processes which access the
virtual storage 120. Depending on selected restore point,
In step 480, the hypervisor 150 con?guration is cleaned up.
reading data from multiple backup ?les located on backup
storage 130 may be required. For example, content of ?rst
data block can be read from a fall backup ?le, whereas second
data block can be read from an incremental backup ?le.
In an embodiment, in cases when the full image level
backup ?les contain multiple image level backups, the mul
tiple image level backups may be viewed as separate entities
in UI 115 and on virtual storage 120. For example, in UI 115,
40
multiple image level backups may be displayed as multiple
elements, while virtual storage 120 may contain multiple
folders, each corresponding to and containing ?les of the
speci?c VM. In one embodiment, after the data conversion
engine translates the backup ?le contents, it presents the
45
contents to hypervisor as a regular network attached storage
showing all VM ?les located in the backup ?le. Step 440
enables greatly reduced times for VM recovery because
reference to FIG. 4.
Although in the exemplary embodiments depicted in FIGS.
instead of extracting an entire backup ?le, only requested data
blocks are extracted, and only at the time they are requested
FIGS. 5-10 illustrate a graphical user interface (GUI),
according to an embodiment of the present invention. The
instant recovery GUI depicted in FIGS. 5-10 is described with
reference to the embodiments of FIGS. 1-4. However, the
GUI is not limited to those example embodiments. For
example, the GUI may be the UI 115 within restore operator
console 110 used to select recovery parameters, as described
in step 420 above with reference to FIG. 4. The GUI may also
be a UI for hypervisor 150 used to con?gure, register, and
launch restored VMs 170 as described in step 460 above with
50
5-10 the GUI is shown as an interface running on a computer
(i.e., on-the-?y and as-needed). The exposed images residing
terminal, it is understood that the GUI can be readily adapted
in the backup ?les remain read-only during the method illus
trated in ?owchart 400. Thus, in one embodiment, all required
to execute on a display of other platforms such as mobile
virtual disk changes due to disk write operations are redi
another display of a computing device. For example, in an
embodiment of the invention, the GUI illustrated in FIGS.
rected to temporary storage using native hypervisor 150 func
device platforms running various operating systems, or
55
tionality (if such functionality is provided by a speci?c hyper
5-10 can be displayed on a mobile device having an input
device and a display.
visor 150).Alternatively, all required virtual disk changes due
to disk write operations may be redirected to available storage
Throughout FIGS. 5-10, displays are shown with various
using virtual storage 120 (for example, in cases where hyper
visor 150 lacks functionality to redirect virtual disk changes).
After the translation of selected portions of the image level
backup is performed, and the backup ?le content list is avail
able, the method proceeds to step 450.
In step 450, virtual storage 120 is attached to hypervisor
icons, command regions, buttons, and data entry ?elds, which
150. In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, this
step can be performed when hypervisor con?guration com
mands are received via restore operator console 110. For
60
are used to initiate action, invoke routines, launch displays,
enter data, view data, or invoke other functionality. The ini
tiated actions include, but are not limited to, selecting restore
parameters, selecting restored VMs 170, launching restored
VMs 170, and displaying recovery results. For brevity, only
65
the differences occurring within the ?gures, as compared to
previous or subsequent ones of the ?gures, are described
below.
US 8,332,689 B2
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12
FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplaryVM selection interface 500,
wherein, for example, upon choosing a virtual machine
option 510 one or more ?le system data objects from produc
tion storage 260 of a VM to be restored can be displayed and
selected by a restore operator. As described below and illus
trated in FIG. 5, VM selection interface 500 can be used to
tion interface 700 can be used to select a speci?c server
resource 740 to run a restored VM 170 on.
in accordance with an embodiment of the invention, a
restore operator can select a host (e. g., the “esx0.amust.local”
server in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 7) by clicking on
Choose button 720 using an input device (not shown). The
select one or more VMs to restore as part of an instant recov
original name of the VM selected in VM selection interface
ery.
500 (e.g., “Igor XP SSH”) is displayed inVM dialog 730, and
According to an embodiment, by entering a VM object
name, using an input device (not shown), in search dialog
can be customized if the restored VM 170 needs to have a
different name. Server resources 740 are displayed in desti
nation selection interface 700 to indicate which resources
530, a restore operator can search for or browse a list of VMs
displayed within VM selection interface 500. In the embodi
ment depicted in FIG. 5, VMs are displayed with correspond
ing backup job details such as the backup job name 520, last
backup time 522, a VM count 524 (i.e., the number of VMs
included in the backup), and restore points count 526 (i.e., the
number of restore points included in the backup). In an
embodiment, a restore operator, using an input device (not
shown), selects a displayed VM to be restored based upon the
displayed backup job details. After selecting a VM to restore,
a restore operator, using an input device (not shown), clicks
Next button 550 to proceed with the next step of the instant
within a given resource pool corresponding to the selected
host are available. The displayed resources 740 from a
resource pool may be used by a restore operator to determine
which host to select. A restore operator can cancel a selection
of a destination by clicking on Cancel button 570. As shown
20
button may be de-selected, if the restore operator needs to
adjust VM settings, including, but not limited to network
recovery process. VM selection interface 500 can be used to
select multiple VMs to restore. For example, through moving
a pointer or cursor within VMs displayed in VM selection
interface 500 as result of clicking on a backup job name 520,
25
ing to an embodiment of the present invention, a restore
operator can select one or more VMs (e.g., “Igor XP SSH”
30
Finish button 560 is not selectable in destination selection
interface 700 because it is not the last interface in the instant
recovery process.
FIG. 8 illustrates an exemplary changes storage selection
interface 800, wherein, for example, upon choosing a datas
selecting backup job name(s) 520 corresponding to VM(s). A
restore operator can cancel a selection of a VM by clicking on
Cancel button 570. After selecting a VM to restore, a restore
operator can click on Next button 550 to proceed with select
settings, before the VM is powered on. A restore operator can
return to restore point selection interface 600 by clicking on
Previous button 540. After selecting a host, a restore operator,
using an input device (not shown), clicks Next button 550 to
proceed with the next step of the instant recovery process.
a restore operator selects one or more VMs to restore. Accord
and “Igor 2003 SSH” in the exemplary embodiment of FIG.
5) by either typing in the VM name(s) in search dialog 530 or
in FIG. 7, a restore operator can select a button below the list
of server resources 740 to power on the VM automatically
after it is restored. In an embodiment, the automatic power on
tore option 810 a changes storage 140 data store can be
35
ing a restore point for the selected VM. Previous button 540
displayed and selected by a restore operator. As described
below and illustrated in FIG. 8, changes storage selection
and Finish button 560 are not selectable in VM selection
interface 800 can be used to select a speci?c data store to host
interface 500 because it is the ?rst interface in the instant
recovery process.
FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary restore point selection
virtual disk changes during VM migration to production stor
40
interface 600, wherein, for example, upon choosing a restore
storage data store (e.g., data stores available for “Igor XP
SSH” in the exemplary embodiment of FIG. 8) by clicking on
Choose button 820 using an input device (not shown). The
VM selected in VM selection interface 500 (e.g., “Igor XP
SSH”) is displayed in changes storage selection interface 800.
point option 610 a restore point for a selected VM to be
restored can be displayed and selected by a restore operator.
As described below and illustrated in FIG. 6, restore point
selection interface 600 can be used to select a speci?c point in
time to restore a VM to.
A restore operator can choose to redirect virtual disk changes
In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, a
restore operator can select a restore point for a selected VM
(e.g., February 10 at 1:48 PM for VM “Igor XP SSH” in the
exemplary embodiment of FIG. 6) by clicking on a restore
age 260.
In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, a
restore operator can optionally select a different a changes
during a VM migration to production storage 260 by clicking
on Redirect button 815. If Redirect button 815 is selected and
50
a data store is chosen by clicking Choose button 820, data
point 622 using an input device (not shown). A backup type
store statistics 830 for the chosen data store are displayed in
630 is displayed in restore point selection interface 600 to
changes storage selection interface 800 to indicate the capac
ity and free space of the selected changes storage 140. A
indicate whether a backup is a full or rollback (incremental)
backup. A restore operator can cancel a selection of a restore
point by clicking on Cancel button 570. A restore operator can
return to VM selection interface 500 by clicking on Previous
button 540. After selecting a restore point, a restore operator,
using an input device (not shown), clicks Next button 550 to
proceed with the next step of the instant recovery process.
Finish button 560 is not selectable in restore point selection
interface 600 because it is not the last interface in the instant
55
storage 140, a restore operator, using an input device (not
shown), clicks Next button 550 to proceed with the next step
of the instant recovery process. Finish button 560 is not
selectable in changes storage selection interface 800 because
it is not the last interface in the instant recovery process.
FIG. 9 illustrates an exemplary instant recovery settings
recovery process.
FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary destination selection inter
face 700, wherein, for example, upon choosing a destination
option 510 destination servers capable of running a restored
VM can be displayed and selected by a restore operator. As
described below and illustrated in FIG. 7, destination selec
restore operator can cancel a selection of changes storage 140
by clicking on Cancel button 570. A restore operator can
return to destination selection interface 700 by clicking on
Previous button 540. After choosing a data store for changes
65
interface 900, wherein, for example, upon choosing a ready to
apply option 910 instant recovery settings are displayed for
review by a restore operator. As described below and illus
trated in FIG. 9, instant recovery settings interface 900 can be
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