Tecra S1 User`s Manual
TOSHIBA TECRA S1 Series
Portable Personal Computer
User’s Manual
Copyright
© 2003 by TOSHIBA Corporation. All rights reserved. Under the copyright laws,
this manual cannot be reproduced in any form without the prior written permission
of TOSHIBA. No patent liability is assumed, with respect to the use of the information
contained herein.
TOSHIBA TECRA S1series Portable Personal Computer User’s Manual
First edition March 2003
Copyright authority for music, movies, computer programs, data bases and other
intellectual property covered by copyright laws belongs to the author or to the
copyright owner. Copyrighted material can be reproduced only for personal use or
use within the home. Any other use beyond that stipulated above (including
conversion to digital format, alteration, transfer of copied material and distribution
on a network) without the permission of the copyright owner is a violation of
copyright or author’s rights and is subject to civil damages or criminal action. Please
comply with copyright laws in making any reproduction from this manual.
Disclaimer
This manual has been validated and reviewed for accuracy. The instructions and
descriptions it contains are accurate for the TOSHIBA TECRA S1series Portable
Personal Computer at the time of this manual’s production. However, succeeding
computers and manuals are subject to change without notice. TOSHIBA assumes
no liability for damages incurred directly or indirectly from errors, omissions or
discrepancies between the computer and the manual.
Trademarks
IBM is a registered trademark, and IBM PC and PS/2 are trademarks of International
Business Machines Corporation.
Intel, Intel SpeedStep and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel
Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries/regions.
Windows and Microsoft are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Photo CD is a trademark of Eastman Kodak.
Bluetooth is a trademark owned by its proprietor and used by TOSHIBA under
license.
Memory Stick is a registered trademark and i.LINK is a trademark of Sony
Corporation.
CompactFlash is a trademark of SunDisk Corporation.
FCC information
Product Name : TECRA S1
Model number : PT831X
FCC notice “Declaration of Conformity Information”
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy
and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause
harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
❑
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
❑
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
❑
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which
the receiver is connected.
❑
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
WARNING: Only peripherals complying with the FCC class B limits may
be attached to this equipment. Operation with non-compliant peripherals or peripherals not recommended by TOSHIBA is likely to result in
interference to radio and TV reception. Shielded cables must be used
between the external devices and the computer’s external monitor port,
USB port, serial port, parallel port, PS/2 mouse/keyboard port and
microphone jack. Changes or modifications made to this equipment, not
expressly approved by TOSHIBA or parties authorized by TOSHIBA
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
FCC conditions
This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
1. This device may not cause harmful interference.
2. This device must accept any interference received, including interference that
may cause undesired operation.
Contact
Address:
TOSHIBA America Information Systems, Inc.
9740 Irvine Boulevard
Irvine,California92618-1697
Telephone: (949)583-3000
EU Declaration of Conformity
TOSHIBA declares, that the product: PT831* conforms to the following Standards:
Supplementary Information:
“The product complies with the requirements
of the Low Voltage Directive 73/23/EEC, the
EMC Directive 89/336/EEC and/or the R&TTE
Directive1999/05/EEC.”
This product is carrying the CE-Mark in accordance with the related European
Directives. Responsible for CE-Marking is TOSHIBA Europe, Hammfelddamm 8,
41460 Neuss, Germany.
VCCI Class B Information
Modem warning notice
Conformity Statement
The equipment has been approved to [Commission Decision “CTR21”] for panEuropean single terminal connection to the Public Switched Telephone Network
(PSTN).
However, due to differences between the individual PSTNs provided in different
countries/regions the approval does not, of itself, give an unconditional assurance
of successful operation on every PSTN network termination point.
In the event of problems, you should contact your equipment supplier in the first
instance.
Network Compatibility Statement
This product is designed to work with, and is compatible with the following
networks. It has been tested to and found to conform with the additional requirements conditional in EG 201 121.
Germany
ATAABAN005,AN006,AN007,AN009,AN010and
DE03,04,05,08,09,12,14,17
Greece
ATAABAN005,AN006andGR01,02,03,04
Portugal
ATAABAN001,005,006,007,011andP03,04,08,10
Spain
ATAAB AN005,007,012, and ES01
Switzerland
ATAAB AN002
All other countries/regions ATAABAN003,004
Specific switch settings or software setup are required for each network, please refer
to the relevant sections of the user guide for more details.
The hookflash (timed break register recall) function is subject to separate national
type approvals. It has not been tested for conformity to national type regulations,
and no guarantee of successful operation of that specific function on specific
national networks can be given.
Japan regulations
Region selection
If you are using the computer in Japan, technical regulations described in the
Telecommunications Business Law require that you select the Japan region mode. It
is illegal to use the modem in Japan with any other selection.
Redial
Up to two redial attempts can be made. If more than two redial attempts are made,
the modem will return Black Listed. If you are experiencing problems with the
Black Listed code, set the interval between redials at one minute or longer.
Japan’s Telecommunications Business Law permits up to two redials on analogue
telephones, but the redials must be made within a total of three minutes.
The internal modem is approved by Japan Approvals Institute for Telecommunications
Equipment.
A02-0604JP
Pursuant to FCC CFR 47, Part 68:
When you are ready to install or use the modem, call your local telephone company
and give them the following information:
❑
The telephone number of the line to which you will connect the modem
❑
The registration number that is located on the device
The FCC registration number of the modem will be found on either the device
which is to be installed, or, if already installed, on the bottom of the computer
outside of the main system label.
❑
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of the modem, which can vary. For the
REN of your modem, refer to your modem’s label.
The modem connects to the telephone line by means of a standard jack called the
USOC RJ11C.
Type of service
Your modem is designed to be used on standard-device telephone lines. Connection to telephone company-provided coin service (central office implemented
systems) is prohibited. Connection to party lines service is subject to state tariffs. If
you have any questions about your telephone line, such as how many pieces of
equipment you can connect to it, the telephone company will provide this information upon request.
Telephone company procedures
The goal of the telephone company is to provide you with the best service it can. In
order to do this, it may occasionally be necessary for them to make changes in their
equipment, operations, or procedures. If these changes might affect your service or
the operation of your equipment, the telephone company will give you notice in
writing to allow you to make any changes necessary to maintain uninterrupted
service.
If problems arise
If any of your telephone equipment is not operating properly, you should immediately remove it from your telephone line, as it may cause harm to the telephone
network. If the telephone company notes a problem, they may temporarily discontinue service. When practical, they will notify you in advance of this disconnection.
If advance notice is not feasible, you will be notified as soon as possible. When you
are notified, you will be given the opportunity to correct the problem and informed
of your right to file a complaint with the FCC. In the event repairs are ever needed
on your modem, they should be performed by TOSHIBA Corporation or an
authorized representative of TOSHIBA Corporation.
Disconnection
If you should ever decide to permanently disconnect your modem from its present
line, please call the telephone company and let them know of this change.
Fax branding
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for any person
to use a computer or other electronic device to send any message via a telephone
fax machine unless such message clearly contains in a margin at the top or bottom
of each transmitted page or on the first page of the transmission, the date and time it
is sent and an identification of the business, other entity or individual sending the
message and the telephone number of the sending machine or such business, other
entity or individual. In order to program this information into your fax modem, you
should complete the setup of your fax software before sending messages.
Instructions for IC CS-03 certified equipment
1 The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This certification
means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective,
operational and safety requirements as prescribed in the appropriate Terminal
Equipment Technical Requirements document(s). The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to be
connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The
equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection.
The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may
not prevent degradation of service in some situations. Repairs to certified
equipment should be coordinated by a representative designated by the
supplier. Any repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to
request the user to disconnect the equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water pipe system,
if present, are connected together. This precaution may be particularly important
in rural areas.
CAUTION: Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection
authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
2 The user manual of analog equipment must contain the equipment’s Ringer
Equivalence Number (REN) and an explanation notice similar to the following:
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) of the modem, which can vary. For the
REN of your modem, refer to your modem’s label.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each
terminal device provides an indication of the maximum number of
terminals allowed to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may consist of any combination of devices subject
only to the requirement that the sum of the Ringer Equivalence Numbers
of all the devices does not exceed 5.
3 The standard connecting arrangement (telephone jack type) for this equipment is
jack type(s): USOC RJ11C.
The IC registration number of the modem is shown below.
Canada: 1353 11026A
Notes for Users in Australia and New Zealand
Modem warning notice for Australia
Modems connected to the Australian telecoms network must have a valid Austel
permit. This modem has been designed to specifically configure to ensure compliance with Austel standards when the country/region selection is set to Australia.
The use of other country/region setting while the modem is attached to the
Australian PSTN would result in you modem being operated in a non-compliant
manner. To verify that the country/region is correctly set, enter the command ATI
which displays the currently active setting.
To set the country/region permanently to Australia, enter the following command
sequence:
AT%TE=1
ATS133=1
AT&F
AT&W
AT%TE=0
ATZ
Failure to set the modem to the Australia country/region setting as shown above
will result in the modem being operated in a non-compliant manner. Consequently,
there would be no permit in force for this equipment and the Telecoms Act 1991
prescribes a penalty of $12,000 for the connection of non-permitted equipment.
Notes for use of this device in New Zealand
❑
The grant of a Telepermit for a device in no way indicates Telecom acceptance
of responsibility for the correct operation of that device under all operating
conditions. In particular the higher speeds at which this modem is capable of
operating depend on a specific network implementation which is only one of
many ways of delivering high quality voice telephony to customers. Failure to
operate should not be reported as a fault to Telecom.
❑
In addition to satisfactory line conditions a modem can only work properly if:
❑
a/
it is compatible with the modem at the other end of the call and
b/
the application using the modem is compatible with the application at the
other end of the call - e.g., accessing the Internet requires suitable software
in addition to a modem.
This equipment shall not be used in any manner which could constitute a
nuisance to other Telecom customers.
❑
Some parameters required for compliance with Telecom’s PTC Specifications
are dependent on the equipment (PC) associated with this modem. The
associated equipment shall be set to operate within the following limits for
compliance with Telecom Specifications:
a/
There shall be no more than 10 call attempts to the same number within
any 30 minute period for any single manual call initiation, and
b/
The equipment shall go on-hook for a period of not less than 30 seconds
between the end of one attempt and the beginning of the next.
c/
Automatic calls to different numbers shall be not less than 5 seconds
apart.
❑
Immediately disconnect this equipment should it become physically damaged,
and arrange for its disposal or repair.
❑
The correct settings for use with this modem in New Zealand are as follows:
ATB0 (CCITT operation)
AT&G2 (1800 Hz guard tone)
AT&P1 (Decadic dialing make-break ratio =33%/67%)
ATS0=0 (not auto answer)
ATS10=less than 150 (loss of carrier to hangup delay, factory default of 15
recommended)
ATS11=90 (DTMF dialing on/off duration=90 ms)
ATX2 (Dial tone detect, but not (U.S.A.) call progress detect)
❑
When used in the Auto Answer mode, the S0 register must be set with a value
of 3 or 4. This ensures:
(a) a person calling your modem will hear a short burst of ringing before the
modem answers. This confirms that the call has been successfully
switched through the network.
(b) caller identification information (which occurs between the first and
second ring cadences) is not destroyed.
❑
The preferred method of dialing is to use DTMF tones (ATDT...) as this is
faster and more reliable than pulse (decadic) dialing. If for some reason you
must use decadic dialing, your communications program must be set up to
record numbers using the following translation table as this modem does not
implement the New Zealand “Reverse Dialing” standard.
Number to be dialed: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Number to program into computer: 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Note that where DTMF dialing is used, the numbers should be entered
normally.
❑
The transmit level from this device is set at a fixed level and because of this
there may be circumstances where the performance is less than optimal. Before
reporting such occurrences as faults, please check the line with a standard
Telepermitted telephone, and only report a fault if the phone performance is
impaired.
❑
It is recommended that this equipment be disconnected from the Telecom line
during electrical storms.
❑
When relocating the equipment, always disconnect the Telecom line connection before the power connection, and reconnect the power first.
❑
This equipment may not be compatible with Telecom Distinctive Alert cadences and services such as FaxAbility.
NOTETHATFAULTCALLOUTSCAUSEDBYANYOFTHEABOVE
CAUSESMAYINCURACHARGEFROMTELECOM
General conditions
As required by PTC 100, please ensure that this office is advised of any changes to
the specifications of these products which might affect compliance with the relevant
PTC Specifications.
The grant of this Telepermit is specific to the above products with the marketing
description as stated on the Telepermit label artwork. The Telepermit may not be
assigned to other parties or other products without Telecom approval.
A Telepermit artwork for each device is included from which you may prepare any
number of Telepermit labels subject to the general instructions on format, size and
colour on the attached sheet.
The Telepermit label must be displayed on the product at all times as proof to
purchasers and service personnel that the product is able to be legitimately
connected to the Telecom network.
The Telepermit label may also be shown on the packaging of the product and in the
sales literature, as required in PTC 100.
The charge for a Telepermit assessment is $337.50. An additional charge of $337.50
is payable where an assessment is based on reports against non-Telecom New
Zealand Specifications. $112.50 is charged for each variation when submitted at the
same time as the original.
An invoice for $NZ1237.50 will be sent under separate cover.
Optical disk drive standards
TOSHIBA TECRA S1 series computer is shipped with one of the following drives
preinstalled:CD-ROM,DVD-ROM,CD-R/RW,CD-RW/DVD-ROM,DVD-R/RW
or DVD Multi drive.
The drive has one of the following labels :
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
LASER KLASSE 1
LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE
APPAREIL A LASER DE CLASSE1
KLASS 1 LASER APPARAT
Before it is shipped, the Class 1 Laser is certified to meet the United States
Chapter 21 Standards of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS 21
CFR).
For any other country, the drive is certified to meet the Class 1 Laser standards of IEC825 and EN60825.
Table of Contents
Preface
Manual contents .................................................................................. xx
Conventions ........................................................................................ xxi
Abbreviations ...................................................................................... xxi
Icons ................................................................................................... xxi
Keys ................................................................................................... xxi
Key operation ..................................................................................... xxii
Display ............................................................................................... xxii
Messages .......................................................................................... xxii
General Precautions
Stress injury ...................................................................................... xxiv
Heat injury ......................................................................................... xxiv
Pressure or impact damage ............................................................ xxiv
PC card overheating ......................................................................... xxv
Mobil phone ....................................................................................... xxv
Central Processing Unit("CPU") Performance Disclaimer .............. xxv
Chapter 1 Introduction
Equipment checklist ........................................................................... 1-1
Features .............................................................................................. 1-3
Special features .................................................................................. 1-9
Utilities ............................................................................................... 1-11
Options .............................................................................................. 1-12
Chapter 2 The Grand Tour
Front with the display closed ............................................................ 2-1
Left side ............................................................................................... 2-2
Right side ............................................................................................ 2-3
Back side ............................................................................................. 2-4
Underside ............................................................................................ 2-6
Front with the display open ............................................................... 2-8
xiv
System indicators ............................................................................. 2-10
USB diskette drive ............................................................................ 2-12
Selim Select Bay modules .............................................................. 2-13
DVD-ROM drive(Black) ..................................................................... 2-13
CD-ROM drive(Black) ........................................................................ 2-15
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive(Black) ........................................................ 2-15
DVD Multi drive(Black) ...................................................................... 2-17
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor(Black) ............................................... 2-18
Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack(Black) ......................................... 2-18
AC adaptor ........................................................................................ 2-19
Chapter 3 Getting Started
Setting up your work space ............................................................... 3-2
General conditions .............................................................................. 3-2
Placement of computer ....................................................................... 3-2
Seating and posture ............................................................................ 3-3
Lighting ............................................................................................... 3-4
Work habits ........................................................................................ 3-4
Connecting the AC adaptor ............................................................... 3-5
Opening the display ........................................................................... 3-6
Turning on the power ........................................................................ 3-6
Starting up for the first time ............................................................... 3-7
Turning off the power ........................................................................ 3-7
Shut Down mode (Boot mode) ............................................................ 3-7
Hibernation mode ................................................................................ 3-8
Standby mode .................................................................................. 3-10
Restarting the computer .................................................................. 3-12
Restoring the preinstalled software from the
Product Recovery CD-ROM .............................................................. 3-13
Chapter 4 Operating Basics
TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device ......................................................... 4-1
Using the Touch Pad ........................................................................... 4-2
Using the AccuPoint ........................................................................... 4-2
AccuPoint precautions ........................................................................ 4-2
Replacing the cap ............................................................................... 4-3
Using the USB diskette drive ............................................................. 4-3
Connecting 3 1/2" diskette drive .......................................................... 4-4
Disconnecting 3 1/2" diskette drive ..................................................... 4-4
xv
Changing Slim Select Bay modules ................................................. 4-5
Removing a module ............................................................................. 4-5
Installing a module .............................................................................. 4-6
Using optical media drives ................................................................ 4-7
Loading discs ...................................................................................... 4-7
Removing discs ................................................................................. 4-10
Writing CDs on CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive .......................................... 4-11
Before writing or rewiting ................................................................... 4-12
When writing or rewiting .................................................................... 4-13
Writing CDs on DVD Multi drive ....................................................... 4-13
Important message ........................................................................... 4-13
Disclaimer ......................................................................................... 4-14
Before writing or rewiting ................................................................... 4-17
When writing or rewiting .................................................................... 4-18
Drag'n Drop CD ................................................................................. 4-18
Data Verification ................................................................................ 4-19
Media care ........................................................................................ 4-20
CD/DVDs .......................................................................................... 4-20
Diskettes .......................................................................................... 4-20
Using the microphone ...................................................................... 4-21
Modem ............................................................................................... 4-21
Region selection ............................................................................... 4-22
Properties menu ................................................................................ 4-23
Connecting ........................................................................................ 4-25
Disconnecting ................................................................................... 4-25
Wireless communications ................................................................ 4-26
Wireless LAN .................................................................................... 4-26
Bluetooth wireless technology ........................................................... 4-26
Wireless communication switch ........................................................ 4-27
Wireless communication Indicator .................................................... 4-27
LAN .................................................................................................... 4-28
Connecting LAN cable ...................................................................... 4-28
Disconnecting LAN cable .................................................................. 4-29
Cleaning the computer .................................................................... 4-29
Moving the computer ....................................................................... 4-30
Heat dispersal ................................................................................... 4-30
Chapter 5 The Keyboard
Typewriter keys .................................................................................. 5-1
F1 … F12 function keys ...................................................................... 5-2
xvi
Soft keys: Fn key combinations ......................................................... 5-2
Emulating keys on enhanced keyboard ............................................... 5-2
Hotkeys .............................................................................................. 5-4
Emulating Fn key on external keyboard .............................................. 5-7
Fn Sticky key ..................................................................................... 5-7
Windows special keys ........................................................................ 5-8
Keypad overlay ................................................................................... 5-8
Turning on the overlays ....................................................................... 5-8
Temporarily using normal keyboard (overlay on) .................................. 5-9
Temporarily using overlay (overlay off) ............................................... 5-10
Temporarily changing modes ............................................................. 5-10
Generating ASCII characters ........................................................... 5-10
Chapter 6 Power and Power-Up Modes
Power conditions ................................................................................ 6-1
Power indicators ................................................................................ 6-4
Battery indicators ................................................................................ 6-4
DC IN indicator .................................................................................... 6-4
Power indicator ................................................................................... 6-5
Battery types ....................................................................................... 6-5
Main battery ........................................................................................ 6-5
Secondary battery (option) .................................................................. 6-6
Real time clock battery ....................................................................... 6-6
Care and use of the battery pack ...................................................... 6-7
Safety precautions .............................................................................. 6-7
Charging the batteries ....................................................................... 6-10
Monitoring battery capacity ............................................................... 6-11
Maximizing battery operating time .................................................... 6-12
Retaining data with power off ............................................................. 6-13
Extending battery life ........................................................................ 6-13
Replacing the battery pack .............................................................. 6-14
Removing the battery pack ................................................................ 6-14
Installing the battery pack ................................................................. 6-15
Starting the computer by password ................................................ 6-16
Chapter 7 HW Setup and Passwords
HW Setup ............................................................................................ 7-1
Accessing HW Setup .......................................................................... 7-1
HW Setup window ............................................................................... 7-2
xvii
Chapter 8 Optional Devices
PC cards .............................................................................................. 8-2
Installing a PC card ............................................................................. 8-2
Removing a PC card ........................................................................... 8-3
SD cards .............................................................................................. 8-4
Installing an SD card ........................................................................... 8-4
Removing an SD card .......................................................................... 8-5
Memory expansion ............................................................................. 8-6
Installing memory module ................................................................... 8-6
Removing memory module .................................................................. 8-8
Additional battery pack(9Cell and 6 Cell) ......................................... 8-9
Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack ..................................................... 8-9
Additional AC adaptor ........................................................................ 8-9
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor(Black) ................................................ 8-9
USB FDD Kit ...................................................................................... 8-11
Advanced Port Replicator II ............................................................. 8-11
Parallel printer ................................................................................. 8-12
External monitor ............................................................................... 8-12
Television .......................................................................................... 8-13
PS/2 mouse ....................................................................................... 8-14
PS/2 keyboard .................................................................................. 8-14
Security lock ..................................................................................... 8-15
Chapter 9 Troubleshooting
Problem solving process .................................................................... 9-1
Preliminary checklist ........................................................................... 9-1
Analyzing the problem ........................................................................ 9-2
Hardware and system checklist ......................................................... 9-3
System start-up .................................................................................. 9-3
Self test .............................................................................................. 9-4
Power ................................................................................................. 9-4
Overheating power down ..................................................................... 9-5
AC power ............................................................................................ 9-5
Battery ................................................................................................ 9-6
Password ............................................................................................ 9-7
Keyboard ............................................................................................ 9-7
LCD panel ........................................................................................... 9-8
Hard disk drive .................................................................................... 9-9
CD-ROM drive(Black) .......................................................................... 9-9
DVD-ROM drive(Black) ...................................................................... 9-10
xviii
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive(Black) ......................................................... 9-12
Diskette drive .................................................................................... 9-13
Infrared port ....................................................................................... 9-14
Printer ............................................................................................... 9-14
Pointing device .................................................................................. 9-15
Touch Pad/AccuPoint ....................................................................... 9-15
PS/2 mouse ...................................................................................... 9-16
Serial mouse ..................................................................................... 9-17
USB mouse ...................................................................................... 9-17
PC card ............................................................................................ 9-18
SD card ............................................................................................ 9-19
Monitor ............................................................................................. 9-19
Sound system .................................................................................. 9-20
TV output signal ................................................................................ 9-20
USB .................................................................................................. 9-21
Modem ............................................................................................. 9-22
Standby/Hibernation .......................................................................... 9-23
LAN .................................................................................................. 9-24
Wireless LAN .................................................................................... 9-24
Bluetooth .......................................................................................... 9-25
TOSHIBA support .............................................................................. 9-26
Before you call .................................................................................. 9-26
Where to write .................................................................................. 9-26
Appendixes
Appendix A
Specifications ..................................................................................... A-1
Appendix B
Display Controller and Modes ...........................................................B-1
Appendix C
AT Commands ....................................................................................C-1
Appendix D
S-registers ........................................................................................... D-1
Appendix E
V.90 ...................................................................................................... E-1
Appendix F
Internal Modem Guide ....................................................................... F-1
xix
Appendix G
Wireless LAN ...................................................................................... G-1
Appendix H
AC Power Cord and Connectors ........................................................H-1
Appendix I
Parts Numbers ..................................................................................... I-1
Glossary
Index
xx
Preface
Congratulations on your purchase of the TOSHIBA TECRA S1series computer.
This powerful, lightweight notebook computer is designed to provide years of
reliable, high-performance computing.
This manual tells how to set up and begin using your TECRA S1series computer. It
also provides detailed information on configuring your computer, basic operations
and care, using optional devices and troubleshooting.
If you are a new user of computers or if you’re new to portable computing, first read
over the Introduction and The Grand Tour chapters to familiarize yourself with the
computer’s features, components and accessory devices. Then read Getting
Started for step-by-step instructions on setting up your computer.
If you are an experienced computer user, please continue reading the preface to
learn how this manual is organized, then become acquainted with this manual by
browsing through its pages. Be sure to look over the Special features section of the
Introduction, to learn about features that are uncommon or unique to the computers
and carefully read HW Setup and Passwords. If you are going to install PC cards or
connect external devices such as a printer, be sure to read Chapter 8, Optional
Devices.
Manual contents
This manual is composed of nine chapters, nine appendixes, a glossary, and an
index.
Chapter 1, Introduction, is an overview of the computer’s features, capabilities, and
options.
Chapter 2, The Grand Tour, identifies the components of the computer and briefly
explains how they function.
Chapter 3, Getting Started, provides a quick overview of how to begin operating
your computer and gives tips on safety and designing your work area.
Chapter 4, Operating Basics, includes tips on care of the computer and on using the
AccuPoint , Slim Select Bay modules, optical media drive, external diskette drive,
Wireless LAN, LANs, microphone and internal modem.
Chapter 5, The Keyboard, describes special keyboard functions including the
keypad overlay and hotkeys.
xxi
User's Manual
Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes, gives details on the computer’s power
resources and battery save modes.
Chapter 7, HW Setup and Passwords, explains how to configure the computer using
the HW Setup program. It also tells how to set a password.
Chapter 8, Optional Devices, describes the optional hardware available.
Chapter 9, Troubleshooting, provides helpful information on how to perform some
diagnostic tests, and suggests courses of action if the computer doesn’t seem to be
working properly.
The Appendixes provide technical information about your computer.
The Glossary defines general computer terminology and includes a list of acronyms
used in the text.
The Index quickly directs you to the information contained in this manual.
Conventions
This manual uses the following formats to describe, identify, and highlight terms
and operating procedures.
Abbreviations
On first appearance, and whenever necessary for clarity, abbreviations are enclosed
in parentheses following their definition. For example: Read Only Memory (ROM).
Acronyms are also defined in the Glossary.
Icons
Icons identify ports, dials, and other parts of your computer. The indicator panel
also uses icons to identify the components it is providing information on.
Keys
The keyboard keys are used in the text to describe many computer operations. A
distinctive typeface identifies the kejy top symbols as they appear on the keyboard.
For example, Enter identifies the Enter key.
xxii
Conventions
Key operation
Some operations require you to simultaneously use two or more keys. We identify
such operations by the key top symbols separated by a plus sign (+). For example,
Ctrl + C means you must hold down Ctrl and at the same time press C. If three
keys are used, hold down the first two and at the same time press the third.
ABC
When procedures require an action such as clicking an icon or entering
text, the icon’s name or the text you are to type in is represented in the
type face you see to the left.
Display
ABC
Names of Windows or icons or text generated by the computer that
appears on its display screen is presented in the type face you see to the
left.
Messages
Messages are used in this manual to bring important information to your attention.
Each type of message is identified as shown below.
CAUTION: Pay attention! A caution informs you that improper use of
equipment or failure to follow instructions may cause data loss or
damage your equipment.
NOTE: Please read. A note is a hint or advice that helps you make best
use of your equipment.
xxiii
User's Manual
General Precautions
TOSHIBA computers are designed to optimize safety, minimize strain and withstand
the rigors of portability. However, certain precautions should be observed to
further reduce the risk of personal injury, damage to the computer or impared
performance.
Be certain to read the general precautions below and to note the cautions included
in the text of the manual.
Stress injury
Carefully read the Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort. It contains information
on prevention of stress injuries to your hands and wrists than can be caused by
extensive keyboard use. Chapter 3, Getting Started, also includes information on
work space design, posture and lighting that can help reduce physical stress.
Heat injury
◆ Avoid prolonged physical contact with the computer. If the computer is used
for long periods, its surface can become very warm. While the temperature will
not feel hot to the touch, if you maintain physical contact with the computer
for a long time (if you rest the computer on your lap, or if you keep your
hands on the palm rest, for example) your skin might suffer low-heat injury.
◆ If the computer has been used for a long time, avoid direct contact with the
metal plate supporting the I/O ports. It can become hot.
◆ The surface of the AC adaptor can become hot when in use. This condition
does not indicate a malfunction. If you need to transport the AC adaptor,
disconnect it and let it cool before moving it.
◆ Do not lay the AC adaptor on a material that is sensitive to heat. The material
could be damaged.
Pressure or impact damage
Do not apply heavy pressure to the computer or subject it to strong impact.
Excessive pressure or impact can cause damage to computer components or
otherwise cause malfunctions.
xxiv
PC card overheating
Some PC cards can become hot with prolonged use. Overheating of a PC card
can result in errors or instability in the PC card operation. Also be careful when
you remove a PC card that has been used for a long time.
Mobile phone
Use of mobile phones can interfere with the audio system. Computer opreation is
not impaired but it is recommended that a distance of 30 cm be maintained
between the computer and a mo-bile phone in use.
Central Processing Unit (“CPU”) Performance
Disclaimer
CPU performance in your computer product may vary from specifications under
the following conditions:
◆ Use of certain peripheral products
◆ Use of battery power instead of AC power
◆ Use of certain multimedia games or videos with special effects
◆ Use of standard telephone lines or low speed network connections
◆ Use of complex modeling software, such as high end computer aided design
applications
◆ Use of the computer in areas with low air pressure (high altitude > 1,000
meters or > 3,280 feet above sea level)
◆ Use of the computer at temperatures outside the range of 5°C to 35°C (41°F
to 95°F) or > 25°C (77°F) at high altitude (all temperature references are
approximate).
CPU performance may also vary from specifications due to design configuration.
Under some conditions, your computer product may automatically shut-down.
This is a normal protective feature designed to reduce the risk of lost data or
damage to the product when used outside recommended conditions. To avoid
risk of lost data, always make back-up copies of data by periodically storing it on
an external storage medium. For optimum performance, use your computer
product only under recommended conditions. Read additional restrictions in
bundled documents. Contact TOSHIBA Service and Support for more
information.
xxv
Introduction
This chapter provides an equipment checklist, and it identifies the computer’s
features, options and accessories.
CAUTION: Some of the features described in this manual may not
function properly if you use an operating system that was not
preinstalled by TOSHIBA.
Equipment checklist
Carefully unpack your computer. Save the box and packing materials for future use.
Hardware
Check to make sure you have all the following items:
❑
TECRA S1 series Portable Personal Computer
❑
Universal AC adaptor and power cord
❑
USB diskette drive (Provided with some models)
❑
Modular cable
1-1
INTRODUCTION
Chapter 1
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
Software
Windows XP Professional Service Pack 1
◆ The following software is preinstalled:
• Microsoft® Windows XP Professional
• Microsoft Internet Explorer
• Modem driver
• Display Drivers for Windows
• TOSHIBA Utilities
• Wireless LAN driver
• Bluetooth driver
• Sound Driver for Windows
• DVD Video Player
• LAN Drivers
• Infrared Device Driver
• TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device utility
• TOSHIBA Power Saver
• TOSHIBA Console
• Online manual
◆ Documentation:
• TECRA S1 Resorce Guide
• Microsoft Windows XP manual package
• Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort
• End User License Agreement
◆ Product Recovery CD-ROM
Windows 2000 Service Pack 3
◆ The following software is preinstalled:
• Microsoft® Windows 2000
• Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0
• Modem driver
1-2
Features
INTRODUCTION
• Display Driver
• TOSHIBA Utilities
• Wireless LAN driver
• Bluetooth driver
• Sound Driver
• DVD Video Player
• LAN Drivers
• Infrared Device Driver
• TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device utility
• TOSHIBA Power Saver
• TOSHIBA Console
• Online manual
◆ Documentation:
• Microsoft Windows 2000 manual package
• The same documentation that is supplied with Windows XP Professional.
◆ Product Recovery CD-ROM
If any of the items are missing or damaged, contact your dealer immediately.
Features
The computer uses TOSHIBA’s advanced Large Scale Integration (LSI), Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology extensively to provide
compact size, minimum weight, low power usage, and high reliability. This computer
incorporates the following features and benefits:
Processor
Built-in
The computer is equipped with an Intel®processor, on-die
32KB instruction L1 cache and 1MB L2 cache memory.
1.3GHz
Mobile Intel® Pentium® M Processor 1.3 GHz
Support Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep™ technology
1.4GHz
Mobile Intel® Pentium® M Processor 1.4 GHz
Support Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep™ technology
1-3
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
1.5GHz
Mobile Intel® Pentium® M Processor 1.5 GHz
Support Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep™ technology
1.6GHz
Mobile Intel® Pentium® M Processor 1.6 GHz
Support Enhanced Intel® SpeedStep™ technology
Memory
Slots
PC2100 128 or 256 MB or 512MB memory modules can be
installed in the two memory slots for a maximum of 1GB
system memory.
Level 2 cache
A 1MB level 2 cache is provided to maximize performance.
Video RAM
32 MB of RAM is provided for video display.
Disks
Hard disk drive
The computer has an integrated, 2 1/2" hard disk drive
(HDD) for nonvolatile storage of data and software. It
comes in the following sizes.
• 20.0GB(18.63 billion bytes)
• 30.0GB(27.94 billion bytes)
• 40.0GB(37.26 billion bytes)
• 60.0GB(55.89 billion bytes)
Diskette drive
3 1/2" 1.44-megabyte or 720-kilobyte connects to the USB
port. (Windows® XP does not support 720-kilobyte
diskettes.)
CD-ROM drive
A maximum 24-speed CD-ROM drive supports the follow-
(Black)
ing formats:
• Photo CD™
• CD-R (read only)
• CD-ROM
• CD-Rewritable (read only)
• CD-DA
• CD-Text
• CD-ROM x A Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
• Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
1-4
Features
A full-size, DVD-ROM drive module lets you run either
digital versatile or compact disks without using an adaptor.
It runs DVD-ROMs at maximum 8 speed and CD-ROMs at
maximum 24 speed. This drive supports the same formats
as the CD-ROM drive plus the following:
• DVD-ROM
• DVD-Video
CD-RW/DVD-ROM Some models are equipped with a full-size, CD-RW/
drive(Black)
DVD Multi drive
(Black)
DVD-ROM drive module that lets you run CD/DVDs
without using an adaptor. It reads DVD-ROMs at maximum
8 speed and CD-ROMs at maximum 24 speed. It writes CDR at up to 24 speed and CD-RW at up to 24 speed. See
Chapter 4, Operating Basics, for details. For reading, this
drive supports the same formats as the DVD-ROM drive.
A full-size DVD Multi drive lets you read/write DVD-R,
DVD-RW, DVD-RAM, CD-R and CD-RW discs. DVD
Multi media can be read, written and erased with random
access like a diskette. Data can be rewritten hundreds of
thousands of times over the life of a disc. For reading, this
drive supports the same formats as the DVD-ROM drive.
Refer to chapter 2, The Grand Tour, for details.
Display
The computer’s LCD panel supports high-resolution video graphics. The screen can
be set at a wide range of viewing angles for maximum comfort and readability.
Built-in
Thin-film transistor color LCD is available in three sizes:
• 14.1" XGA-TFT, 1024 horizontal x 768 vertical pixels
• 15.0" XGA-TFT, 1024 horizontal x 768 vertical pixels
• 15.0" UXGA-TFT, 1600 horizontal x 1200 vertical
pixels
Graphics controller
A 64 bit graphics controller maximizes display performance.
Refer to Appendix B for more information.
1-5
INTRODUCTION
DVD-ROM drive
(Black)
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
Keyboard
Built-in
85 keys or 86 keys, compatible with IBM enhanced
keyboard, embedded numeric overlay, dedicated cursor
control,
and
keys. See Chapter 5.The Keyboard,
for details.
TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device
Built-in
AccuPoint
A Touch Pad and control buttons in the palm rest enable
control of the on-screen pointer and scrolling of
windows.
This pointer control stick, located in the center of the
keyboard, provides convenient control of the cursor.
Power
Battery pack
The computer is powered by one rechargeable lithium-ion
battery pack.
RTC battery
The internal RTC battery backs up the Real Time Clock
(RTC) and calendar.
AC adaptor
The universal AC adaptor provides power to the system
and recharges the batteries when they are low. It comes
with a detachable power cord. Because it is universal, it
can receive a range of AC voltage between 100 and 240
volts.
Headphone
Enables connection of a stereo headphone
Microphone
Enables connection of a monaural microphone
Ports
Parallel
Serial
Infrared
Parallel printer or other parallel device (ECP compatible).
RS-232C compatible port (16550 UART compatible)
This infrared port is compatible with Infrared Data
Association (IrDA 1.1) Fast InfraRed (FIR) standards. It
enables cableless 4 Mbps data transfer with IrDA 1.1
compatible external devices.
External monitor
1-6
A 15-pin, analog VGA port supports VESA DDC2B
compatible functions.
Features
Connects an external PS/2 keyboard or PS/2 mouse.
mouse
Docking
Universal Serial Bus
Special port for connecting an optional Port Replicator.
Three Universal Serial Bus (USB) enables chain connection of a number of USB-equipped devices to one port on
your computer.
Slots
PC card
A PC card slot accommodates:
Two 5 mm Type II
One 10.5 mm Type III
Refer to Chapter 8, Optional Devices, for details
SD card
An SD card slot accommodates :
SD card
Refer to Chapter 8, Optional Devices, for details.
Multimedia
Sound System
Sound Blaster™ Pro™ and Windows Sound System
compatible sound system provides internal speaker as well
as jacks for an external microphone and headphone. It also
has a volume control dial.
Video-out jack
This RCA jack lets you transfer NTSC or PAL data to
external devices.
Communications
Modem
An internal modem provides capability for data and fax
communication. It supports V.92(US/Canda) and V.90
(other countries/regions). Refer to Appendix E for details
on V.90. The speed of data transfer and fax depends on
analog telephone line conditions. It has a modem jack for
connecting to a telephone line.
LAN
The computer is equipped with a LAN card that supports
Ethernet LAN (10 Mbit/s, 10BASE-T) and Fast Ethernet
LAN (100 Mbit/s, 100BASE-Tx). It is preinstalled as a
standard device in some markets.
1-7
INTRODUCTION
PS/2 keyboard/
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
Wireless LAN
Bluetooth
Some computers in this series are equipped with a wireless
LAN mini-PCI card that is compatible with other LAN
systems based on Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum radio
technology that complies with the IEEE 802.11 Standard
(Revision A or B). Revision-A supports data transfer up to
54 Mbit/s. Revision-B supports data transfer up to 11
Mbit/s. Turbo Mode (USA,Canada only) supports data
transfer up to 108 Mbit/s. It has Frequency Channel
Selection (5 GHz or 2.4 GHz) and allows roming
overmultiple channels.
Bluetooth wireless technology eliminates the need for
cables between electronic devices such as computers and
printers. Bluetooth provides fast, reliable, and secure
wireless communication in a small space.
Slim Select Bay
Modules
Slim Select Bay is a single-drive bay that accommodates a
DVD-ROM drive, CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive, CD-ROM
drive, DVD Multi drive, optional CD-R/RW drive, optional
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor, optional Slim Select Bay 2nd
battery pack . The TOSHIBA Mobile Extension enables
hot insertion of modules when you are using a plug and
play operating system.
Security lock slot
Connects an optional security lock to anchor the computer
to a desk or other large object
Security
Software
Operating System
Windows®XP Professional or Windows®2000 is available.
Refer to the preinstalled software section at the front of
this chapter.
TOSHIBA Utilities
A number of utilities and drivers are preinstalled to make
your computer more convenient to use. Refer to the
Utilities section in this chapter.
Plug and Play
1-8
When you connect an external device to the computer or
when you install a component, Plug and Play capability
enables the system to recognize the connection and make
the necessary configurations automatically.
Special features
The following features are either unique to TOSHIBA computers or are advanced
features, which make the computer more convenient to use.
Hotkeys
Key combinations let you quickly modify the system
configuration directly from the keyboard without running a
system configuration program.
Keypad overlay
Keys with gray lettering make up the keypad overlay,
which lets you use the keyboard for ten-key operations or
cursor control.
Display automatic
power off
This feature automatically cuts off power to the internal
display when there is no keyboard input for a time
specified. Power is restored when any key is pressed. You
can specify the time in the Turn off monitor item of the
Power Save Mode window in Power Saver.
HDD automatic
power off
This feature automatically cuts off power to the hard disk
drive when it is not accessed for a time specified. Power is
restored when the hard disk is accessed. You can specify
the time in the Turn off hard disks item of the Power Save
Mode window in Power Saver.
System automatic
power off
This feature automatically turns off power to the system
when there is no input for a time specified. You can specify
the time in the When the system standby time has passed
item of the System Power Mode window in Power Saver.
Battery save mode
This feature lets you save battery power. You can specify
the Power Save Mode in the Running on batteries item of
the Power Save Modes window in Power Saver.
Power on password
Three levels of password security are available: supervisor
and user. This feature prevents unauthorized access to
your computer.
Instant security
Panel power on/off
A hotkey function blanks the screen and disables the
computer providing quick and easy data security.
This feature turns power to the computer off when the
display panel is closed and turns it back on when the panel
is opened. You can specify the setting in the When I close
the lid item of the System Power Mode window in Power
Saver.
1-9
INTRODUCTION
Special features
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
Auto power on
Standby
Hibernation
Heat dispersal
This feature lets you set a time and date for the computer
to turn on automatically. The feature is useful for receiving
remote communications while you are asleep or away. You
can specify the setting in Scheduled Tasks.
If you have to interrupt your work, you can turn off the
power without exiting from your software. Data is maintained in the computer’s main memory. When you turn on
the power again, you can continue working right where
you left off.
This feature lets you turn off the power without exiting
from your software. The contents of main memory is saved
to the hard disk, when you turn on the power again, you
can continue working right where you left off.
To protect from overheating, the CPU has an internal
temperature sensor. If the computer’s internal temperature
rises to a certain level, the cooling fan is turned on or the
processing speed is lowered. Use the Fan item of the
Power Save Modes window in Power Saver.
Maximum
Turns on fan first, then if necessary
Performance
lowers CPU processing speed.
Performance
Uses a combination of fan and
lowering the CPU processing speed.
Battery optimized Lowers the CPU processing speed first,
then if necessary turns on the fan.
Utilities
This section describes preinstalled utilities and tells how to start them. For details
on operations, refer to each utility’s online manual, help files or read.me files.
TOSHIBA Power Saver
To access this power savings management program,
open the Control Panel and select the TOSHIBA Power
Saver icon.
HW Setup
This program lets you customize your hardware
settings according to the way you work with your
computer and the peripherals you use. To start the
utility, click the Windows Start button and click Control
Panel. In the Control Panel, select the TOSHIBA HW
Setup icon.
1-10
Utilities
This utility has four sections to let you do the following:
• Buttons: Assign applications to the Internet button
(default setting is the browser) and to the TOSHIBA
Console button (default setting is the TOSHIBA
Console).
Fn-esse
This Windows program lets you define your own
“shortcut” keys to quickly launch applications and speed
your work in Windows. To start the utility, click the
Windows Start button, point to All Programs, point to
TOSHIBA Utilities and click Fn-esse.
DVD Video Player
The DVD Video Player is used to play DVD-Video. It has
an on-screen interface and functions. Click Start, point to
All Programs, point to InterVideo WinDVD 4, then click
InterVideo WinDVD 4.
Bluetooth TOSHIBA
This software enables communication between remote
Stack Bluetooth devices. Refer to the Quick Start Guide.
Drag’n Drop CD
This easy-to-use software lets you record CDs with just a
few mouse clicks. You can create CDs in several formats
including audio CDs that can be played on a standard
stereo CD player and data CDs to store the files and
folders on your hard drive. This software can be used
only on model with CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive.
TOSHIBA Mobile
Extension
This utility enables hot insertion of Slim Select Bay
modules, that is, you can remove/insert Slim Select Bay
modules while the computer is on. To activate this utility,
select TOSHIBA Mobile Extension from TOSHIBA
Console.
ConfigFree
ConfigFree is a suite of utilities to allow easy control of
communication device and network connections.
ConfigFree also allows you to find communication
probrems and create profiles for easy switching between
location and communication networks.
You can boot ConfigFree from the menu bar as follows.
Windows 2000: [Start] - [Programs] - [TOSHIBA ConfigFree] - [ConfigFree]
Windows XP: [Start] - [All Programs] - [TOSHIBA ConfigFree] - [ConfigFree]
TOSHIBA Dual
Pointing Device utility
This utility has the following functions:
To disable/enable TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device with
Fn + F9 keys.To customize the functions of TOSHIBA
Dual Pointing Device easily.
1-11
INTRODUCTION
TOSHIBA Controls
INTRODUCTION
User's Manual
Options
You can add a number of options to make your computer even more powerful and
convenient to use. The following options are available:
Memory expansion
Two memory expansion slots are available for installing
128 or 256 or 512MB memory modules. The modules are
PC2100, 200-pin, SO Dual In-line (SO-DIMM).
Main battery pack
(Black)
An additional battery pack 9 cells Type(PA3257*), 6 cells
Type(PA3248*) can be purchased from your TOSHIBA
dealer. The battery pack is identical to the one that came
with your computer. Use it as a spare or replacement.
AC adaptor
USB diskette drive
If you use your computer at more than one site, it may be
convenient to purchase an additional AC adaptor for each
site so you will not have to carry the adaptor with you.
A 3 1/2" diskette drive accommodates 1.44-megabyte or
720-kilobyte diskettes. It connects to a USB port.
(Windows®XP does not support 720-kilobyte diskettes.)
Security lock
A slot is available to attach a security cable to the computer to deter theft.
Advanced Port
Replicator II
The Port Replicator provides the ports available on the
computer in addition to separate PS/2 mouse and PS/2
keyboard ports, a digital visual interface (DVI) port, i.
LINK™ (IEEE1394) port, line-in jack and line-out jack.
NOTE: The TECRA S1 does not support the DVI and i.LINK ports on the
Advanced Port ReplicatorII.
Slim Select Bay options
The following modules can be installed in the Slim Select Bay.
DVD-ROM drive (Black) Refer to the Features section for details.
CD-RW/DVD-ROM
drive (Black)
Refer to the Features section for details.
CD-ROM drive (Black)
Refer to the Features section for details.
DVD Multi drive (Black) Refer to the Features section for details.
1-12
Options
A full-size, CD-R/RW drive module lets you record
CDs as well as run either digital versatile or compact
discs without using an adaptor. It runs CDs and CDRs at maximum 24 speed and CD-RWs at maximum
14 speed. It writes CD-Rs at maximum 8 speed and CDRWs at maximum 8 speed.
This drive supports the following formats:
• Photo CD
• CD-R
• CD-ROM
• CD-Rewritable
• CD-DA
• CD-Text
• CD-ROM XA Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
• Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
Slim Select Bay
HDD adaptor (Black)
Hard disk drive
Slim Select Bay 2nd
battery pack
An adaptor lets you insert an optional HDD described in
Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
You can increase your computer’s data storage capacity
with an additional 30 GB (27.94 billion bytes), 40 GB (37.26
billion bytes), and 60 GB (55.89 billion bytes) hard disk
drive in the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor.
The secondary battery increases your computer’s battery
power and operating time when a main battery is also
installed.
1-13
INTRODUCTION
CD-R/RW drive (Black)
Chapter 2
The Grand Tour
Front with the display closed
Figure 2-1 shows the computer’s front with its display panel in the closed position.
DISPLAY LATCH
MICROPHONE
HEADPHONE
WIRELESS
COMMUNICATION
SWITCH
INFRARED PORT
Figure 2-1 Front of the computer with display closed
Display latch
This latch secures the LCD panel in its closed position.
Slide the latch to open the display.
Microphone jack
A standard 3.5 mm mini microphone jack enables connection of a monaural microphone or other device for audio
input.
Headphone jack
A standard 3.5 mm mini headphone jack enables connection of a stereo headphone (16 ohm minimum) or other
device for audio output. When you connect headphones,
the internal speaker is automatically disabled.
2-1
THE GRAND TOUR
This chapter identifies the various components of your computer. Become familiar
with each component before you operate the computer.
User's Manual
THE GRAND TOUR
Infrared port
Wireless
communication
switch
On
This infrared port is compatible with Infrared Data Association (IrDA 1.1) standards. It enables cableless 4 Mbps,
1.152 Mbps, 115.2 Kbps, 57.6 Kbps, 38.4 Kbps, 19.2 Kbps
or 9.6 Kbps data transfer with IrDA 1.1 compatible external
devices.
Slide this switch toward the left of the computer to turn
on Wireless communication. Slide it toward the right of the
computer to turn off the functions.
Off
CAUTION: Set the switch to off in airplanes and hospitals. Check the
Wireless communication indicator. It will stop glowing when the wireless
communication.
Left side
Figure 2-2 shows the computer’s left side.
SD CARD
SLOT
SECURITY LOCK SLOT
FAN VENT
VOLUME CONTROL
VIDEO-OUT
PC CARD
JACK
SLOT
SD CARD
INDICATOR
HARDDISK
Figure 2-2 The left side of the computer
Security lock
slot
Volume control
2-2
A security cable attaches to this slot. The optional security
cable anchors your computer to a desk or other large
object to deter theft.
Use this dial to adjust the volume of the system speaker
and headphones.
Right side
SD card slot
SD card Indicator
This slot lets you transfer data from the device to your
computer.
This LED glows green when the computer is accessing the
SD card Slot.
Fan vent
THE GRAND TOUR
CAUTION: Keep foreign objects out of the SD card slot. A pin or similar
object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
Provides air flow for the fan.
CAUTION: Be careful not to block the fan vent. Also be careful to keep
foreign objects out of the vents. A pin or similar object can damage the
computer’s circuitry.
Video-out jack
PC card slot
CB
1
Plug an RCA video connector into this jack.
A PC card slot can accommodate two 5 mm PC cards (Type
II) or one 10.5 mm PC card (Type III). The slot supports 16bit PC cards and CardBus PC cards.
0
CAUTION: Keep foreign objects out of the PC card slot. A pin or similar
object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
Hard Disk
Provides access to read and write.
Right side
Figure 2-3 shows the computer’s right side.
SLIM SELECT BAY
USB
Figure 2-3 The right side of the computer
2-3
User's Manual
A CD-ROM drive, DVD-ROM drive, CD-R/RW drive, CDRW/DVD-ROM drive, DVD Multi drive, Slim Select Bay
HDD adaptor, secondary battery pack can be installed in the
Slim Select Bay.
Universal
Serial Bus
port
The Universal Serial Bus (USB) port comply with USB2.0
standards,which enables data transfer speeds 40 times faster
than the USB1.1 standards.(The port also support USB1.1.)
THE GRAND TOUR
Slim Select Bay
CAUTION: Keep foreign objects out of the USB connectors. A pin or
similar object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
NOTE: Operation of all functions of all USB devices has not been
confirmed. some functions might not execute properly.
Back side
Figure 2-4 shows the computer’s back side.
PS/2 KEYBOARD/
USB PORTS
MOUSE PORT
DC IN 15V
LINK
INDICATOR
(GREEN)
LAN ACTIVE
INDICATOR
(ORANGE)
EXTERNAL
PARALLEL
MONITOR PORT
PORT
SERIAL PORT
LAN JACK
Figure 2-4 The computer’s back side
2-4
MODEM JACK
Back side
Universal
Serial Bus
Port
The Universal Serial Bus (USB) port comply with USB 2.0
standards, which enables data transfer speeds 40 times
faster than the USB 1.1 standards.(The port also support
USB 1.1)
NOTE: Operation of all functions of all USB devices has not been
confirmed. some functions might not execute properly.
PS/2 keyboard/
mouse port
Use this port to connect an external PS/2 compatible
keyboard or mouse. The computer automatically recognizes which device you have connected when you turn on
the power.
LAN jack
This jack lets you connect to a LAN. The adaptor has
built-in support for Ethernet LAN (10 megabits per second,
10BASE-T) and Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per
second, 100BASE-Tx). The LAN has two indicators. See
Chapter 4, Operating Basics, for detailes.
Ether
LAN active
indicator (orange)
Link indicator
(green)
This indicator glows orange when data is being exchanged
between the computer and the LAN.
This indicator glows green when the computer is connected to a LAN and the LAN is functioning properly.
Modem jack
In areas where an internal modem is installed as standard
equipment, there is a modem jack that lets you use a
modular cable to connect the modem directly to a telephone line. The modem is not supported in some marketing
regions.
CAUTIONS:1.
2.
DC IN 15V
In case of a lightning storm, unplug the modem cable
from the telephone jack.
Do not connect the modem to a digital telephone line.
A digital line will damage the modem.
The AC adaptor connects to this socket. Use only the
model of AC adaptor that comes with the computer. Using
the wrong adaptor can damage your computer.
2-5
THE GRAND TOUR
CAUTION: Keep foreign objects out of the USB connectors. A pin or
similar object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
User's Manual
THE GRAND TOUR
External monitor
port
This 15-pin port lets you connect an external monitor.
Parallel port
This Centronics-compatible, 25-pin parallel port is used to
connect a parallel printer or other parallel device. This port
supports Extended Capabilities Port (ECP) standard.
Serial port
Use this 9-pin port to connect external serial devices such
as an external modem, a serial mouse or printer.
Underside
Figure 2-5 shows the underside of the computer. Make sure the display is closed
before turning over your computer.
SLIM SELECT
BAY LOCK
DOCKING
DOCKING
DOCKING
HOLE
PORT
HOLE
MEMORY MODULE
SLIM SELECT
BAY LATCH
COVER
BATTERY PACK
COVER LATCH
BATTERY
PACK
Figure 2-5 The underside of the computer
Docking holes
Docking port
These holes ensure a proper connection between the
computer and an optional Port Replicator.
Use this port to connect an optional Port Replicator.
CAUTION: Keep foreign objects out of the docking port. A pin or similar
object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
2-6
Underside
The battery pack powers the computer when the AC
adaptor is not connected. The Batteries section in Chapter
6, Power and Power-Up Modes, describes how to access
the battery pack. Additional battery packs can be purchased from your TOSHIBA dealer to extend the
computer’s battery operating time.
Battery pack
cover latch
Slide this latch to release or the battery pack.
This latch moves only when the computer is upside down.
Memory module
cover
This cover protects two memory module sockets. One
or two modules are preinstalled.
Slim Select Bay
lock
There are two screw holes next to the Slim Select Bay
latch. One screw is initially set in the front hole, which is
the unlock position. To lock the Slim Select Bay latch, set
the screw in the back hole.
NOTE: Use a point size 0 Phillips screwdriver.
Slim Select Bay
latch
Slide this latch to free the Slim Select Bay for removal.
2-7
THE GRAND TOUR
Battery pack
User's Manual
Front with the display open
THE GRAND TOUR
Figure 2-6 shows the front of the computer with the display open. To open the
display, slide the display latch on the front of the computer and lift the display up.
Position the display at a comfortable viewing angle.
DISPLAY SCREEN
STEREO SPEAKER
(RIGHT)
ACCUPOINT
POWER
BUTTON
MIC
STEREO SPEAKER
(LEFT)
POWER SOURCE/
SYSTEM INDICATORS
ACCUPOINT
CONTROL BUTTONS
TOUCH PAD
TOUCH PAD
CONTROLBUTTONS
Figure 2-6 The front with the display open
Display screen
The full-color LCD displays high-contrast text and graphics
The computer's LCD consist of one of below:
14" XGA, LCD consists of up to 1024 × 768 pixels or dots.
15" XGA, LCD consists of up to 1024 × 768 pixels or dots.
15"UXGA, LCD consists of up to 1600 × 1200 pixels or dots.
The computer has a Thin-Film Transistor (TFT) display.
Refer to Appendix B.
When the computer operates on power through the AC
adaptor, the display screen’s image will be somewhat
brighter than when it operates on battery power. The lower
brightness level is intended to save battery power.
2-8
Front with the display open
Power button
AccuPoint
Power source/
system indicators
Sensor switch
Stereo Speaker
Touch Pad
A pointer control device located in the center of the
keyboard is used to control the on-screen pointer. Refer to
the AccuPoint section in Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Control buttons below the keyboard let you select menu
items or manipulate text and graphics designated by the
on-screen pointer.
LEDs let you monitor the status of various computer
functions. Details are given in the Indicators section.
This switch shuts down the computer when you close the
cover and the panel power on/off feature is enabled.
The speaker emits sound generated by your software as
well as audio alarms, such as low battery condition,
generated by the system.
Moves the pointer and selects or activates items on the
screen. Can be set to perform other mouse functions, such
as scrolling, selecting, and double-clicking.
Touch Pad
Control Buttons
Function like the left and right buttons on an external
mouse.
Microphone
Input single-channel sound.Can be used whether the
notebook is open or closed.
2-9
THE GRAND TOUR
AccuPoint
control buttons
Press the power button to turn the computer’s power on
and off.
User's Manual
System indicators
THE GRAND TOUR
Figure 2-7 shows the system indicators, which light when various computer
operations are in progress.
DC IN
POWER
MAIN
BATTERY
DISK
SLIM
SELECT
BAY
WIRELESS
COMMUNICATION
Figure 2-7 System indicators
Power source/system indicators
DC IN
Power
The Power indicator glows green when the computer is
on. If you turn off the computer in Resume mode, this
indicator blinks orange (one second on, two seconds off)
while the computer shuts down.
Main battery
The Main battery indicator shows the condition of the
charge. Green means fully charged and orange means
being charged. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up
Modes.
Disk
2-10
The DC IN indicator glows green when DC power is
supplied from the AC power adaptor. If the adaptor’s
output voltage is abnormal or if the power supply
malfunctions, this indicator flashes orange.
The Disk indicator glows green when the computer is
accessing a disk drive.
System indicators
The Slim Select Bay indicator glows green when the
computer is accessing a CD-ROM drive, DVD-ROM drive,
CD-R/RW drive, CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive, DVD multi
drive, Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor or secondary battery
pack in the Slim Select Bay. When the secondary battery is
charging, the indicator glows orange.
Wireless
communication
The Wireless communication indicator glows orange
when the Wireless communication function is turned on.
The figures below show the positions of the keypad overlay indicators and the
CapsLock indicator.
When the F10 key indicator glows the keypad overlay lets you enter numbers.
When the F11 key indicator glows the keypad overlay lets you control the cursor.
NUMERIC MODE
ARROW MODE
Figure 2-8 Keypad overlay indicators
Arrow mode
Numeric mode
When the Arrow mode indicator lights green, you can
use the keypad overlay (white labeled keys) as cursor
keys. Refer to the Keypad overlay section in Chapter 5,
The Keyboard.
You can use the keypad overlay (white labeled keys) for
numeric input when the Numeric mode indicator lights
green. Refer to the Keypad overlay section in Chapter 5,
The Keyboard.
When the CapsLock indicator glows the keyboard is in all-caps mode.
2-11
THE GRAND TOUR
Slim Select Bay
User's Manual
THE GRAND TOUR
CAPS LOCK
Figure 2-9 CapsLock indicator
Keyboard indicator
Caps Lock
This indicator glows green when the alphabet keys are
locked in uppercase.
USB diskette drive
A 3 1/2" diskette drive accommodates 1.44-megabyte or 720-kilobyte diskettes. It
connects to the USB port.
DISK-IN-USE
INDICATOR
DISKETTE SLOT
EJECT BUTTON
Figure 2-10 USB diskette drive
2-12
Slim Select Bay modules
Disk-In-Use
Indicator
This indicator lights when the diskette is being accessed.
Insert diskette in this slot.
Eject button
When a diskette is fully seated in the drive, the eject
button pops out. To remove a diskette, push in the eject
button and the diskette pops out partially for removal.
CAUTION: Check the Disk-In-Use indicator when you use the diskette
drive. Do not press the eject button or turn off the computer while the
light is glowing. Doing so could destroy data and damage the diskette or
the drive.
NOTES: 1. The external diskette drive should be placed on a flat,
horizontal surface when in use. Do not set the drive on an
incline greater than 20o while it is operating.
2. Do not set anything on top of the diskette drive.
Slim Select Bay modules
The Slim Select Bay can accommodate the following modules: DVD-ROM drive,
CD-ROM drive, CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive, DVD multi drive, optional Slim Select Bay
HDD adaptor and optional Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack.
DVD-ROM drive (Black)
An optional full-size DVD-ROM drive module lets you run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8
cm (3.15") CD/DVDs without using an adaptor. It may be selected as a standard
component or as an option.
NOTE: The read speed is slower at the center of a disk and faster at the
outer edge. The maximum (outer edge) speeds for DVDs and CDs are:
DVD 8 speed (maximum)
CD
24 speed (maximum)
This drive supports the following formats:
• DVD-ROM
• DVD-Video
• Photo CD
• CD-R (read only)
• CD-ROM
• CD-Rewritable (read only)
• CD-ROM x A
• CD-DA
• CD-EXTRA
• CD-Text
2-13
THE GRAND TOUR
Diskette slot
User's Manual
DISC-IN-USE
THE GRAND TOUR
INDICATOR
EJECT HOLE
EJECT BUTTON
Figure 2-11 The optical media device
Disc-In-Use
Indicator
Eject button
Eject hole
This indicator lights when the CD/DVD is being accessed.
Press the eject button to open the drawer partially.
Insert a slender object to open the drawer when the power
to the computer is off.
CAUTION: Check the Slim Select Bay indicator when you use the
DVD-ROM drive. Do not press the eject button, disconnect a drive or turn
off the computer while the light is glowing. Doing so could damage the
DVD/CD or the drive.
DVD-ROM drives and media are manufactured according to the specifications of six
marketing regions. When you purchase DVD media, make sure it matches your
drive, otherwise it will not play properly.
Code Region
2-14
1
Canada, United States
2
Japan, Europe, South Africa, Middle East
3
Southeast Asia, East Asia
4
Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America, South
America, Caribbean
5
Russia, Indian Subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, Mongolia
6
China
Slim Select Bay modules
CD-ROM drive (Black)
An optional full-size, maximum 24-speed CD-ROM drive module lets you run either
12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm (3.15") compact discs without using an adaptor. It may be
selected as a standard component or as an option.
This drive supports the following formats:
• CD-R (read only)
• CD-ROM
• CD-Rewritable (read only)
• CD-DA
• CD-Text
THE GRAND TOUR
• Photo CD
• CD-ROM x A Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
• Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
NOTE: The physical features of this drive are similar to those of the
DVD-ROM drive. Refer to the illustration in the DVD-ROM drive section.
CAUTION: Check the Slim Select Bay indicator when you use the
CD-ROM drive. Do not press the eject button, disconnect a drive or turn
off the computer while the light is glowing. Doing so could damage the
CD or the drive.
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive (Black)
The full-size CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive module lets you record data to rewritable
CDs as well as run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm (3.15") CD/DVDs without using an
adaptor. The computer is configured with either a DVD-ROM drive or CD-RW/
DVD-ROMdrive.
NOTE: The read speed is slower at the center of a disc and faster at the
outer edge.
DVD read
8 speed (maximum)
CD read
24 speed (maximum)
CD-R write
24 speed (maximum)
CD-RW write
10 speed (maximum)
2-15
User's Manual
THE GRAND TOUR
This drive supports the following formats:
• DVD-ROM
• DVD-Video
• Photo CD
• CD-R
• CD-ROM
• CD-Rewritable
• CD-DA
• CD-Text
• CD-ROM x A Mode 2 (Form1, Form2)
• Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
CD-R describes compact discs that can be written only once. The recorded data
cannot be erased or changed. Use 24-speed CD-R discs.
CD-RW describes compact discs that can be recorded more than once. Use either 1,
2, or 4 multi speed CD-RW disks or high-speed 4- to 24-speed discs. The write
speed of the high-speed CD-RW discs i s maximum 24-speed.
Use Drag’n Drop CD to write compact discs.
NOTE: The physical features of this drive are similar to those of the
DVD-ROM drive. Refer to the illustration in the DVD-ROM drive section.
CAUTION: Check the Slim Select Bay indicator when you use the
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive. Do not press the eject button, disconnect a
drive or turn off the computer while the light is glowing. Doing so could
damage the CD/DVD or the drive.
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drives and media are manufactured according to the specifications of six marketing regions. When you purchase DVD media, make sure it
matches your drive, otherwise it will not play properly.
Code Region
2-16
1
Canada, United States
2
Japan, Europe, South Africa, Middle East
3
Southeast Asia, East Asia
4
Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America, South
America, Caribbean
5
Russia, Indian Subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, Mongolia
6
China
Slim Select Bay modules
DVD Multi drive (Black)
NOTE: The read speed is slower at the center of a disc and faster at the
outer edge.
DVD read
8 speed (maximum)
DVD-R write
1 speed
DVD-RW write
1 speed
DVD-RAM write
2 speed
CD read
24 speed (maximum)
CD-R write
16 speed (maximum)
CD-RW write
8 speed (maximum)
This drive supports the following formats:
•DVD-ROM
• CD-DA
• Photo CD (single/multi-session)
• CD-ROM XA Mode2 (Form1, Form2)
• CD-G (Audio CD only)
• DVD-Video
• CD-Text
• CD-ROM Mode1, Mode2
• Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA)
• Addressing Method 2
DVD Multi drives and disc are manufactured according to the specifications of
six marketing regions. When you purchase DVD-Video, make sure it matches
your drive, otherwise it will not play properly.
Code
1
2
3
4
5
6
Region
Canada, United States
Japan, Europe, South Africa, Middle East
Southeast Asia, East Asia
Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Central America,South
America, Caribbean
Russia, Indian Subcontinent, Africa, North Korea, Mongolia
China
NOTE: Use the WinDVD 4 application to view DVD-Video discs.
2-17
THE GRAND TOUR
The full-size DVD Multi drive module lets you record data to rewritable CD/DVDs as
well as run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8 cm (3.15") CD/DVDs without using an adaptor.
An ATAPI interface controller is used for CD/DVD-ROM operation. When the
computer is accessing a CD/DVD, an indicator on the drive glows and Slim Select
Bay indicator glows.
User's Manual
THE GRAND TOUR
CD-R and DVD-R discs can be written only once. The recorded data cannot be
erased or changed.
CD-RW discs can be recorded more than once. Use either 1, 2, or 4 multi speed
CDRW discs or high-speed 4- to 10-speed discs. The write speed of the high-speed
CD-RW discs is maximum 10-speed.
DVD-RW/-RAM discs can be recorded more than once.
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor (Black)
You can increase your computer’s data storage capacity by installing an optional,
integrated, 2 1/2" HDD in the Slim Select Bay.
RELEASE LATCH
Figure 2-12 The Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor
Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack (Black)
An optional battery pack can be installed in the Slim Select Bay to increase the
computer’s battery power and operating time. For details, refer to the documentation accompanying the secondary battery pack. Refer to Chapter 8, Optional
Devices, for details on installing a Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack.
2-18
AC adaptor
THE GRAND TOUR
Figure 2-13 The Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack
AC adaptor
The AC adaptor converts AC power to DC power and reduces the voltage supplied
to the computer. It can automatically adjust to any voltage from 100 to 240 volts and
to a frequency of either 50 or 60 hertz, enabling you to use the computer in almost
any region.
To recharge the battery, simply connect the AC adaptor to a power source and the
computer. See Chapter 6 Power and Power-Up Modes for details.
Figure 2-14 The AC adaptor
CAUTION: Use of the wrong adaptor could damage your computer.
TOSHIBA assumes no liability for any damage in such case. The current
rating for the computer is 5.0 amperes.
2-19
Chapter 3
Getting Started
This chapter provides basic information to get you started using your computer. It
covers the following topics:
❑
Setting up your work space — for your health and safety
NOTE: Be sure also to read Instruction Manual for Safety & Comfort.
This guide, which is included with the computer, explains product
liability.
Opening the display
❑
Connecting the AC adaptor
❑
Turning on the power
❑
Windows®XP Professional/2000 setup
❑
Turning off the power
❑
Restarting the computer
❑
Restoring the Windows system
GETTING STARTED
❑
If you are a new user, follow the steps in each section of this chapter as you prepare
to operate your computer.
NOTE: All users should be sure to carefully read the sections
Windows®XP Professional/2000 setup , which describe actions to take
when you turn on the power for the first time.
3-1
User's Manual
Setting up your work space
GETTING STARTED
Establishing a comfortable work site is important for you and your computer. A
poor work environment or stressful work habits can result in discomfort or serious
injury from repetitive strain to your hands, wrists or other joints. Proper ambient
conditions should also be maintained for the computer’s operation. This section
discusses the following topics:
❑
General conditions
❑
Placement of the computer and peripheral devices
❑
Seating and posture
❑
Lighting
❑
Work habits
General conditions
In general, if you are comfortable, so is your computer, but read the following to
make sure your work site provides a proper environment.
❑
Make sure there is adequate space around the computer for proper ventilation.
❑
Make sure the AC power cord connects to an outlet that is close to the
computer and easily accessible.
❑
The temperature should be 5 to 35 degrees Centigrade (41 to 95 degrees
Fahrenheit) and the relative humidity should be 20 to 80 percent.
❑
Avoid areas where rapid or extreme changes in temperature or humidity may
occur.
❑
Keep the computer free of dust, moisture, and exposure to direct sunlight.
❑
Keep the computer away from heat sources, such as electric heaters.
❑
Do not use the computer near liquids or corrosive chemicals.
❑
Do not place the computer near objects that create strong magnetic fields (e.g.,
stereo speakers).
❑
Do not operate the computer in close proximity to a mobile phone.
❑
Leave ample ventilation room for the fan. Do not block the vents.
Placement of computer
Position the computer and peripheral devices to provide comfort and safety.
3-2
Setting up your work space
❑
Set the computer on a flat surface at a comfortable height and distance. The
display should be no higher than eye level to avoid eye strain.
❑
Place the computer so that it is directly in front of you when you work and
make sure you have adequate space to easily operate other devices.
❑
Allow adequate space behind the computer to let you freely adjust the display.
The display should be angled to reduce glare and maximize visibility.
❑
If you use a paper holder, set it at about the same height and distance as the
computer.
Seating and posture
The height of your chair in relation to the computer and keyboard as well as the
support it gives your body are primary factors in reducing work strain. Refer to the
following tips and to figure 3-1.
GETTING STARTED
BELOW EYE LEVEL
FOOT REST
90O ANGLES
Figure 3-1 Posture and positioning of the computer
❑
Place your chair so that the keyboard is at or slightly below the level of your
elbow. You should be able to type comfortably with your shoulders relaxed.
❑
Your knees should be slightly higher than your hips. If necessary, use a foot
rest to raise the level of your knees to ease pressure on the back of your thighs.
❑
Adjust the back of your chair so it supports the lower curve of your spine.
❑
Sit straight so that your knees, hips and elbows form approximately 90 degree
angles when you work. Do not slump forward or lean back too far.
3-3
User's Manual
Lighting
Proper lighting can improve legibility of the display and reduce eye strain.
❑
Position the computer so that sunlight or bright indoor lighting does not reflect
off the screen. Use tinted windows, shades or other screen to eliminate sun
glare.
❑
Avoid placing the computer in front of bright light that could shine directly in
your eyes.
❑
If possible, use soft, indirect lighting in your computer work area. Use a lamp to
illuminate your documents or desk, but be sure to position the lamp so that it
does not reflect off the display or shine in your eyes.
GETTING STARTED
Work habits
A key to avoiding discomfort or injury from repetitive strain is to vary your
activities. If possible, schedule a variety of tasks into your work day. If you must
spend long periods at the computer, finding ways to break up the routine can
reduce stress and improve your efficiency.
❑
Sit in a relaxed posture. Good positioning of your chair and equipment as
described earlier can reduce tension in your shoulders or neck and ease back
strain.
❑
Vary your posture frequently.
❑
Occasionally stand up and stretch or exercise briefly.
❑
Exercise and stretch your wrists and hands a number of times during the day.
❑
Frequently, look away from the computer and focus your eyes on a distant
object for several seconds, for example 30 seconds every 15 minutes.
❑
Take frequent short breaks instead of one or two long breaks, for example, two
or three minutes every half hour.
❑
Have your eyes examined regularly and visit a doctor promptly, if you suspect
you might be suffering from a repetitive strain injury.
A number of books are available on ergonomics and repetitive strain injury or
repetitive stress syndrome. For more information on these topics or for pointers on
exercises for such stress points as hands and wrists, please check with your library
or book vendor. Also refer to the computer’s Instruction Manual for Safety &
Comfort.
3-4
Connecting the AC adaptor
Connecting the AC adaptor
Attach the AC adaptor when you need to charge the battery or you want to operate
from AC power. It is also the fastest way to get started, because the battery pack
will need to be charged before you can operate from battery power.
The AC adaptor can be connected to any power source supplying from 100 to 240
volts and 50 or 60 hertz. For details on using the AC adaptor to charge the battery
pack, refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
CAUTION: Use of the wrong adaptor could damage your computer.
TOSHIBA assumes no liability for any damage in such case. The current
rating for the computer is 5.0 amperes.
1. Connect the power cord to the AC adaptor.
GETTING STARTED
Figure 3-2 Connecting the power cord to the AC adaptor
2. Connect the AC adaptor’s DC output plug to the DC IN port on the back side
of the computer.
Figure 3-3 Connecting the adaptor to the computer
3-5
User's Manual
3. Plug the power cord into a live wall outlet. The Battery and DC IN indicator on
the front of the computer should glow.
Opening the display
The display panel can be rotated in a wide range of angles for optimal viewing.
1. Slide the display latch on the front of the computer to the right to unlatch the
display panel.
2. Lift the panel up and adjust it to the best viewing angle for you.
NOTE: When you open the display, hold it with both hands and lift up
slowly.
GETTING STARTED
DISPLAY LATCH
Figure 3-4 Opening the display panel
Turning on the power
This section describes how to turn on the power.
NOTE: After you turn on the power for the first time, do not turn it off
until you have set up the operating system (OS) and the OS has started
up.
1. If the external diskette drive is connected, make sure it is empty. If a diskette is
in the drive, press the eject button and remove the diskette.
2. Open the display panel.
3. Press and hold the button for two or three seconds.
3-6
Turning off the power
Figure 3-5 Turning on the power
GETTING STARTED
Starting up for the first time
When you first turn on the power, the computer’s initial screen is the Microsoft
Windows®XP Professional or Windows®2000 Startup Screen Logo.
Follow the on-screen directions.
Turning off the power
The power can be turned off in one of the following modes: Shut down (Boot),
Hibernation or Standby mode.
Shut Down mode (Boot mode)
When you turn off the power in Shut Down mode, no data is saved and the
computer will boot to the operating system’s main screen.
1. If you have entered data, save it to the hard disk or to a diskette.
2. Make sure all disk(disc)activity has stopped, then remove any CD/DVDs or
diskette.
CAUTION: Make sure the Disk, Slim Select Bay and Slim Select Bay’s
module indicators are off. If you turn off the power while a disk(disc) is
being accessed, you can lose data or damage the disk(disc).
3-7
User's Manual
3. a.If you are using Windows®XP, click start then click Turn off computer. From
the Turn off computer menu select Turn off.
b.If you are using Windows®2000, click Start and click Shut Down. From the
Shut Down menu select Shut Down.
4. Turn off the power to any peripheral devices.
Caution: Do not turn the computer or devices back on immediately. Wait
a moment to let all capacitors fully discharge.
Hibernation mode
GETTING STARTED
The hibernation feature saves the contents of memory to the hard disk when the
computer is turned off. The next time the computer is turned on, the previous state
is restored. The hibernation feature does not save the status of peripheral devices.
CAUTIONS: 1. While entering hibernation mode, the computer saves
the contents of memory to the HDD. Data will be lost if
you remove the battery or disconnect the AC adaptor
before the save is completed. Wait for the Disk
indicator to go out.
2. Do not install or remove a memory module while the
computer is in hibernation mode. Data will be lost.
Benefits of hibernation
The hibernation feature provides the following benefits:
❑
Saves data to the hard disk when the computer automatically shuts down
because of a low battery.
NOTE: For the computer to shut down in hibernation mode, the hibernation feature must be enabled in two places in TOSHIBA Power Saver: the
Hibernate window and the Battery Alarm item of the Alarm window.
Otherwise, the computer will shut down in Standby mode. If battery
power becomes depleted, data saved in Standby will be lost.
❑
3-8
You can return to your previous working environment immediately when you
turn on the computer.
Turning off the power
❑
Saves power by shutting down the system when the computer receives no
input or hardware access for the duration set by the System hibernate feature.
❑
You can use the panel power off feature.
Starting Hibernation
To enter Hibernation mode, follow the steps below.
Windows ®XP
1. Click Start.
2. Select Turn Off Computer.
3. Open the Turn Off Computer dialog box. Hibernate is not displayed.
4. Press the Shift key. The Standby item will change to Hibernate.
GETTING STARTED
5. Select Hibernate.
Windows ®2000
1. Click Start and click Shut Down.
2. In Shut Down Windows select Hibernate and click the OK button.
Automatic Hibernation
The computer will enter Hibernate mode automatically when you press the power
button or close the lid. First, however, make the appropriate settings according to
the steps below.
1. Open the Control Panel.
2. a. In Windows®XP, open Performance and Maintenance and open
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
b. In Windows®2000, double-click the TOSHIBA Power Saver icon.
3. Select the Hibernate window, select the Enable Hibernate support check
box and click the Apply button.
4. Select the Power Save Modes window.
5. Double-click Power Mode (Full Power, Normal, etc.) and open the
System Power Mode window.
6. Enable the desired Hibernation settings for When I press the power
button and When I close the lid.
7. Click the OK button.
3-9
User's Manual
Data save in hibernation mode
When you turn off the power in hibernation mode, the computer takes a moment to
save current memory data to the hard disk. During this time, the Built-in HDD
indicator will light.
After you turn off the computer and memory is saved to the hard disk, turn off the
power to any peripheral devices.
CAUTION: Do not turn the computer or devices back on immediately.
Wait a moment to let all capacitors fully discharge.
Standby mode
GETTING STARTED
In standby mode the power remains on, but the CPU and all other devices are in
sleep mode.
CAUTIONS: 1. Before entering Standby mode, be sure to save your data.
2. Do not install or remove a memory module while the
computer is in standby mode. The computer or the
module could be damaged.
3. Do not remove the battery pack while the computer is in
standby mode (unless the computer is connected to an
AC power source). Data in memory will be lost.
4. If you carry the computer on board an aircraft or into a
hospital, be sure to shut down the computer in hibernation mode or in shutdown mode to avoid radio signal
interference.
Benefits of standby
The standby feature provides the following benefits:
❑
Restores the previous working environment more rapidly than does
hibernation.
❑
Saves power by shutting down the system when the computer receives no
input or hardware access for the duration set by the System Standby feature.
❑
You can use the panel power off feature.
3-10
Turning off the power
Executing standby
NOTE: You can also enable Standby by pressing Fn + F3. See Chapter
5, Keyboard, for details.
You can enter standby mode in one of three ways:
1. In Windows®XP, click Start, click Turn Off Computer and click Stand by.
In Windows®2000, click Start, click Shut Down, select Stand by and click
OK.
2. Close the display panel. This feature must be enabled. Refer to the System
Power Mode item in Power Saver Utility described in the Control Panel.
a.In Windows®XP,open Performance and Maintenance and open
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
b.In Windows®2000, double-click the TOSHIBA Power Saver icon.
a.In Windows®XP, open Performance and Maintenance and open
TOSHIBA Power Saver.
b.In Windows®2000, double-click the TOSHIBA Power Saver icon.
When you turn the power back on, you can continue where you left when you shut
down the computer.
NOTES: 1. When the computer is shut down in standby mode, the
power indicator glows orange.
2. If you are operating the computer on battery power, you
can lengthen the operating time by shutting down in
hibernation mode. Standby mode consumes more power.
Standby limitations
Standby will not function under the following conditions:
❑
Power is turned back on immediately after shutting down.
❑
Memory circuits are exposed to static electricity or electrical noise.
3-11
GETTING STARTED
3. Press the power button. This feature must be enabled. Refer to the System
Power Mode item in Power Saver Utility described in the Control Panel.
User's Manual
Restarting the computer
Certain conditions require that you restart the computer system. For example, if:
❑
You change certain computer settings.
❑
An error occurs and the computer does not respond to your keyboard
commands.
There are three ways to restart the computer system:
1. If you are using Windows®XP, click start then click Turn off computer.
From the Turn off computer menu select Restart.
If you are using Windows®2000, click Start and click Shut Down. From the
Shut Down menu select Restart.
GETTING STARTED
2. Press the power button and hold it down for five seconds. Wait 10 to 15
seconds, then turn the power on again by pressing the power button.
Restoring the preinstalled software
from the Product Recovery CD-ROM
If preinstalled files are damaged, use the Product Recovery CD-ROM to restore
them. To restore the operating system and all preinstalled software, follow the steps
below.
CAUTION: When you reinstall the Windows operating system, the hard
disk will be reformatted and all data will be lost.
1. Load the Product Recovery CD-ROM in the drive and turn off the computer’s
power.
2. Hold down the F12 key and turn on the power. When In Touch with
Tomorrow TOSHIBA appears, release the F12 key.
3. Use the up or down cursor key to select the CD-ROM drive in the display
menu. For details, refer to the Boot priority section in Chapter 7, HW Setup.
4. Follow the on-screen instructions.
3-12
Chapter 4
Operating Basics
This chapter gives information on basic operations including using the TOSHIBA
Dual Pointing Device, USB diskette drive, optical media drives, the microphone, the
internal modem, wireless communication, LAN and changing Slim Select Bay
modules. It also provides tips on caring for your computer, diskettes and CD/DVDs.
TOSHIBA Dual Pointing Device
The computer is equipped with a dual point system: a Touch Pad and an AccuPoint
pointing stick.
TOUCH PAD
ACCUPOINT
CONTROL
BUTTONS
OPERATING BASICS
ACCUPOINT
TOUCH PAD
CONTROL
BUTTONS
Figure 4-1 Touch Pad, AccuPoint and control buttons
4-1
User's Manual
Using the Touch Pad
To use the Touch Pad, simply touch and move your finger tip across it in the
direction you want the on-screen pointer to go.
Two buttons below the Touch Pad are used like the buttons on a mouse pointer.
Press the left button to select a menu item or to manipulate text or graphics designated by the pointer. Press the right button to display a menu or other function
depending on the software you are using.
NOTE: You can also tap the Touch Pad to perform functions similar to
those of the left button.
Click: Tap the Touch Pad once
Double click: Tap twice
Drag and drop: Tap to select the material you want to move. Leave your
finger on the Touch Pad after the second tap and move the material.
Using the AccuPoint
OPERATING BASICS
To use the AccuPoint, simply push it with your finger tip in the direction you want
to move the on-screen pointer.
Two buttons above the Touch Pad work in the same way with the AccuPoint as
they do with the Touch Pad. Refer to the Using the Touch Pad section for details.
AccuPoint precautions
Certain conditions can affect the on-screen pointer when using AccuPoint . For
example, the pointer may travel contrary to AccuPoint operation or an error
message may appear, if
◆ You touch the AccuPoint during power-up.
◆ You apply constant, soft pressure during power-up.
◆ There is a sudden temperature change.
◆ Strong stress is applied to the AccuPoint.
If an error message appears, reboot the computer. If an error message does not
appear, wait a moment for the pointer to stop, then continue operation.
4-2
Using the USB diskette drive
Replacing the cap
The AccuPoint cap is an expendable item that should be replaced after prolonged
use.
1. To remove the AccuPoint cap, firmly grasp the cap and pull it straight up.
ACCUPOINT
CAP
PEG
Figure 4-2 Removing the AccuPoint cap
2. Position a new cap on the peg and press it into place.
OPERATING BASICS
NOTE: The peg is square, so be careful to align the cap’s square hole
with the peg.
Using the USB diskette drive
A 3 1/2" diskette drive connects to the computer’s USB port. It accommodates 1.44megabyte or 720-kilobyte diskettes. Refer to Chapter 2, The Grand Tour, for more
information.
4-3
User's Manual
Connecting 3 1/2" diskette drive
To connect the drive, plug the diskette drive connector into a USB port. Refer to
Figure 4-3.
NOTE: Make sure the connector is right side up and properly aligned
with the socket. Do not try to force the connection, doing so can damage
the connecting pins.
OPERATING BASICS
Figure 4-3 Connecting the USB diskette drive
NOTE: If you connect the diskette drive after turning on the computer, it
will take about 10 seconds for the computer to recognize the drive. Do
not disconnect and reconnect before 10 seconds has elapsed.
Disconnecting 3 1/2" diskette drive
When you have finished using the diskette drive, follow the procedures below to
disconnect it:
1. Wait for the indicator light to go out to make sure all diskette activity has
stopped.
CAUTION: If you disconnect the diskette drive or turn off the power while
the computer is accessing the drive you may lose data or damage the diskette
or the drive.
2. a. In Windows XP, open the Safety Remove Hardware icon on the
system tray.
b. In Windows 2000, open the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon on the
system tray.
4-4
Changing Slim Select Bay modules
3.
Click Diskette drive.
4.
Pull the diskette drive connector out of the USB port.
Changing Slim Select Bay modules
This section explains how to change modules in the Slim Select Bay. The illustrations show replacement of the DVD-ROM drive with the Slim Select Bay HDD
adaptor. Therefore, the text refers to those modules. However, the procedures are
the same for any of the modules: CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive, CD-ROM drive, DVD
Multi drive, CD-R/RW drive, Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack.
CAUTION: 1. To avoid injury, do not put your hand into the Slim
Select Bay slot.
2. Before removing or inserting a second battery pack,
turn off the computer’s power.
NOTE: The TOSHIBA Mobile Extension is preinstalled to support hot
swapping under Windows. Refer to Chapter 1, Introduction, for information on using this utility to change modules while the computer’s power
is on.
Remove the DVD-ROM drive as described below.
1. Check all disk indicators to make sure no disks are operating.
2. Turn the computer upside down.
CAUTION: Wait for all disc indicators to go out before you turn over the
computer and be careful to lay the computer down gently. Shock can
damage the HDD or other components.
3. Be sure the screw near the icon securing the Slim Select Bay.
4. Make sure the screw in the Slim Select Bay lock is set in the hole for the unlock
position.
5. Slide the Slim Select Bay latch to the unlock position.
4-5
OPERATING BASICS
Removing a module
User's Manual
6. Graps the DVD-ROM drive and Slide it out.
CAUTION: The DVD-ROM drive and other Slim Select Bay modules can
become hot with use. Be careful when removing the module.
SLIM SELECT BAY
LATCH
SLIM SELECT BAY
MODULE
Figure 4-4 Removing the DVD-ROM drive
OPERATING BASICS
Installing a module
Install the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor as described below.
1. Insert the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor in the computer as shown below and
press until the ejector clicks.
2. If you want to lock the Slim Select Bay module, set the screw of the Slim Select
Bay lock in the back hole.
SCREW
4-6
SLIM SELECT BAY
SLIM SELECT BAY
LATCH
MODULE
Figure 4-5 Installing the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor
Using optical media drives
Using optical media drives
The text and illustrations in this section refer primarily to the DVD-ROM drive.
However, operation is the same for the CD-RW/DVD-ROM,CD-ROM,DVD Multi
and optional CD-R/RW drives. The full-size drive provides high-performance
execution of CD/DVD-ROM-based programs. You can run either 12 cm (4.72") or 8
cm (3.15") CD/DVDs without an adaptor. An ATAPI interface controller is used for
CD/DVD-ROM operation. When the computer is accessing a CD/DVD-ROM, an
indicator on the drive glows and the Slim Select Bay indicator glows.
NOTE: Use the WinDVD 4 application to view DVD-Video discs.
If you have a CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive, refer also to the Writing CDs section for
precautions on writing to CDs.
Loading discs
To load CD/DVDs, follow the steps below and refer to figures 4-6 to 4-10.
1. a. When the power is on, press the DVD-ROM eject button to open the
drawer slightly.
OPERATING BASICS
EJECT BUTTON
Figure 4-6 Pressing the DVD-ROM eject button
4-7
User's Manual
b. Pressing the eject button will not open the drawer when the DVD-ROM
drive’s power is off. If the power is off, you can open the drawer by
inserting a slender object (about 1.5 mm) such as a straightened paper clip
into the eject hole just to the right of the eject button.
Figure 4-7 Manual release with the eject hole
OPERATING BASICS
2. Grasp the drawer gently and pull until it is fully opened.
Figure 4-8 Pulling the drawer open
4-8
Using optical media drives
3. Lay the CD/DVD, label side up, in the drawer.
Figure 4-9 Inserting a CD/DVD
NOTE: When the drawer is fully opened, the edge of the computer will
extend slightly over the CD/DVD tray. Therefore, you will need to turn
the CD/DVD at an angle when you place it in the tray. After seating the
CD/DVD, however, make sure it lies flat, as shown in figure 4-9.
CAUTIONS: 1. Do not touch the laser lens. Doing so could cause
misalignment.
4. Press gently at the center of the CD/DVD until you feel it click into place. The
CD/DVD should lie below the top of the spindle, flush with the spindle base.
4-9
OPERATING BASICS
2. Be careful to keep foreign matter from entering the
drive. Check the back edge of the tray to make sure it
carries no debris before closing the drive.
User's Manual
5. Push the center of the drawer to closd it. Press gently until it locks into place.
CAUTION: If the CD/DVD is not seated properly when the drawer is
closed, the CD/DVD might be damaged. Also, the drawer might not open
fully when you press the eject button.
Figure 4-10 Closing the DVD-ROM drawer
Removing discs
OPERATING BASICS
To remove the CD/DVD, follow the steps below and refer to figure 4-11.
CAUTION: Do not press the eject button while the computer is accessing
the DVD-ROM drive. Wait for the DVD-In-Use indicator to go out before
you open the drawer. Also, if the CD/DVD is spinning when you open the
drawer, wait for it to stop before you remove it.
1. To pop the drawer partially open, press the eject button. Gently pull the
drawer out until it is fully opened.
CAUTIONS: 1. When the drawer pops open slightly, wait a moment to
make sure the CD/DVD has stopped spinning before
pulling the drawer fully open.
2. Turn off the power before you use the eject hole. If the
CD/DVD is spinning when you open the drawer, the
CD/DVD could fly off the spindle and cause injury.
4-10
Writing CDs on CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive
2. The CD/DVD extends slightly over the sides of the drawer so you can grasp
it. Hold the CD/DVD gently and lift it out.
Figure 4-11 Removing a CD/DVD
3. Push the center of the drawer to close it. Press gently until it locks into
place.
Writing CDs on CD-RW/DVD-ROM
drive
NOTE: CD-R discs can be written to only once. CD-RW discs can be
rewritten many times.
4-11
OPERATING BASICS
Depending on the type of drive installed, you may be able to write CDs. The
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive lets you write as well as read CD-ROMs. Observe the
precautions in this section to ensure the best performance for writing CDs. For
information on loading and unloading CDs refer to the Using optical media drive
section.
User's Manual
Before writing or rewriting
Please observe the following points when you write or rewrite the data.
◆
We recommend the following manufacturers of CD-R and CD-RW media.
Media quality can affect write or rewrite success rates.
CD-R:
TAIYOYUDENCO.,LTD.
Mitsui Chemicals Inc.
MITSUBISHICHEMICALCORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
Hitachi Maxell Ltd.
CD-RW:
MITSUBISHI CHEMICAL CORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
TOSHIBA has confirmed the operation of CD-R and CD-RW media of the manufacturers above. Operation of other media cannot be guaranteed.
◆ CD-RW can generally be rewritten about 1,000 times. However, the actual
number of rewrites is affected by the quality of the media and the way it is
used.
◆ Be sure to connect the AC adaptor when you write or rewrite.
OPERATING BASICS
◆ Be sure to close all other software programs except the writing software.
◆ Do not run software such as a screen saver which can put a heavy load on the
CPU.
◆ Operate the computer at full power. Do not use power-saving features.
◆ Do not write while virus check software is running. Wait for it to finish, then
disable virus detection programs including any software that checks files
automatically in the background.
◆ Do not use hard disk utilities, including those intended to enhance HDD
access speed. They may cause unstable operation and damage data.
◆ Write from the computer’s HDD to the CD. Do not try to write from shared
devices such as a LAN server or any other network device.
◆ Writing with software other than Drag’n Drop CD has not been confirmed.
Therefore, operation with other software cannot be guaranteed.
4-12
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Multi drive
When writing or rewriting
Note the following when you write or rewrite a CD-R or CD-RW.
◆ Always copy data from the HDD to the CD. Do not use cut-and-paste. The
original data will be lost if there is a write error.
◆ Do not perform any of the following actions:
•
Operate the computer for any other function, including use of a mouse or
Touch Pad, closing/opening the LCD panel.
•
Start a communication application such as a modem.
•
Apply impact or vibration to the PC.
•
Install, remove or connect external devices, including the following:
PC card, SD card, USB devices, external display, i.LINK devices, optical
digital devices.
•
Use the CD/MP3 control buttons to reproduce music and voice.
•
Open the optical media drive.
◆ If the media is poor in quality, dirty or damaged, writing or rewriting errors may
occur.
Set the computer on a level surface and avoid places subject to vibration such
as airplanes trains, or cars. Do not use an unstable surface such as a stand.
◆
Keep mobile phones and other wireless communication devices away from the
computer.
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Multi drive
You can use the DVD Multi drive to write data to either CD-R/-RW or DVD-R/-RW/RAM discs. The following application for writing are supplied on CD-ROM:
Drag’n Drop CD, licensed by Easy Systems Japan Ltd., and DigiOn Inc..
Important message
Before you write or rewrite to CD-R/-RW or DVD-R/-RW/-RAM disc, read and
follow all set-up and operating instructions in this section. If you fail to do so, the
DVD Multi drive may not function properly, and you may fail to write or rewrite,
lose data or incur other damage.
4-13
OPERATING BASICS
◆
User's Manual
Disclaimer
TOSHIBA does not bear responsibility for the following:
◆
OPERATING BASICS
Damage to any CD-R/-RW or DVD-R/-RW/-RAM disc that may be caused by
writing or rewriting with this product.
◆ Any change or loss of the recorded contents of CD-R/-RW or DVD-R/-RW/RAM disc that may be caused by writing or rewriting with this product, or for
any business profit loss or business interruption that may be caused by the
change or loss of the recorded contents.
◆ Damage that may be caused by using third party equipment or software.
Given the technological limitations of current optical disc writing drives, you may
experience unexpected writing or rewriting errors due to disc quality or problems
with hardware devices. Also, it is a good idea to make two or more copies of
important data, in case of undesired change or loss of the recorded contents.
4-14
O
O
Write
Drag’n Drop CD*1
O
O
O
CD-RW
´ : No
O
O
O
DVD-R
OPERATING BASICS
O
O
O
DVD-RW
*1 Software supplied with the product can be used for writing to a disc.
O
CD-R
Read
Disc type
O : Yes
Read/write function chart
´
O
O
´
´
´
DVD-RAM DVD+R
´
´
´
DVD+RW
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Multi drive
4-15
User's Manual
◆
Based on TOSHIBA’s limited compatibility testing, we suggest the following
manufacturers of CD-R/-RW and DVD-R/-RW/-RAM disc. However, in no
event does TOSHIBA guarantee the operation, quality or performance of any
disc. Disc quality can affect write or rewrite success rates.
CD-R: TAIYOYUDENCO.,LTD.
Mitsui Chemicals Inc.
MITSUBISHICHEMICALCORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
Hitachi Maxell Ltd.
CD-RW: MITSUBISHICHEMICALCORPORATION
RICOH Co., Ltd.
DVD-R: DVD Specifications for Recordable Disc for General
Version 2.0
TAIYOYUDENCO.,LTD.
PIONEERVIDEOCORPORATION
MITSUBISHICHEMICALCORPORATION
OPERATING BASICS
DVD-RW: DVD Specifications for Re-recordable Disc for Version 1.1
VICTOR COMPANY OF JAPAN.LIMITED
TDK Corporation
DVD-RAM: DVD Specifications for DVD-RAM Disc for Version 2.0 or
Version 2.1
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.
◆
If the disc is poor in quality, dirty or damaged, writing or rewriting errors may
occur. Be careful to check the disc for dirt or damage before you use it.
◆
The actual number of rewrites to CD-RW or DVD-RW/-RAM is affected by the
quality of the disc and the way it is used.
◆
There are two types of DVD discs: authoring and general use discs. Do not use
authoring discs. Only general use discs can be written to by a computer drive.
◆
You can use DVD-RAM discs that can be removed from a cartridge and
DVDRAM discs designed without a cartridge. You cannot use a disc with a 2.6
GH single-sided capacity or 5.2 GB double-sided capacity.
◆
Other DVD-ROM drives for computers or other DVD players may not be able
to read DVD-R/-RW discs.
4-16
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Multi drive
◆
You cannot partially delete any data written to a DVD-RW disc.
◆
Data written to a CD-R/DVD-R disc cannot be deleted either in whole or in part.
◆
Data deleted (Erase) from a CD-RW and DVD-RW/-RAM disc cannot be
recovered. Check the content of the disc carefully before you delete it. If
multiple drives that can be written to are connected, be careful not to delete
data from the wrong drive.
◆
In writing to a DVD-R/-RW disc, some disc space is required for file
management, so you may not be able to write the full capacity of the disc.
◆
Since the disc is based on the DVD standard, it will be filled with dummy data if
the written data is less than about 1 GB. Even if you write only a small amount
of data, it might take time to fill in the dummy data.
◆
DVD-RAM formatted by FAT32 cannot be read in Windows 2000 without
DVD-RAM Driver Software.
Before writing or rewriting
Please observe the following points when you write or rewrite data.
When multiple drives that can be written are connected, be careful not to write
to the wrong drive.
◆
Be sure to connect the AC adaptor before you write or rewrite.
◆
Before you enter standby/hibernation mode, be sure to finish DVD-RAM
writing. Writing is finished if you can eject DVD-RAM media.
◆
Be sure to close all other software programs except the writing software.
◆
Do not run software such as a screen saver, which can put a heavy load on the
CPU.
◆
Operate the computer in the full-power mode. Do not use power-saving
features.
◆
Do not write while virus check software is running. Wait for it to finish, then
disable virus detection programs including any software that checks files
automatically in the background.
◆ Do not use hard disk utilities, including those intended to enhance HDD
access speed. They may cause unstable operation and data damage.
4-17
OPERATING BASICS
◆
User's Manual
◆ Write from the computer’s HDD to the CD/DVD. Do not try to write from
shared devices such as a LAN server or any other network device.
◆ Writing with software other than Drag’n Drop CD is not recommended.
When writing or rewriting
Please observe/consider the following when you write or rewrite to a CD-R/-RW or
DVD-R/-RW/-RAM disc.
◆
Do not perform any of the following actions when writing or rewriting:
OPERATING BASICS
• Operate the computer for any other function, including using a mouse or
TouchPad/cPad or closing/opening the LCD panel.
• Start a communication application such as a modem.
• Apply impact or vibration to the computer.
• Install, remove or connect external devices, including the following:
PC card, SD card, USB devices, external display, i.LINK devices, optical
digital devices.
• Use the Audio/Video control button to reproduce music or voice.
• Open the DVD Multi drive
◆
Do not use standby/hibernation while you write or rewrite.
◆
Make sure writing or rewriting is completed before going into standby/
hibernation. Writing is completed if you can open the DVD Multi drive tray.
◆
Set the computer on a level surface and avoid places subject to vibration such
as airplanes, trains, or cars. Do not use an unstable surface such as a stand.
◆
Keep mobile phones and other wireless communication devices away from the
computer.
◆
Always copy data from the HDD to the DVD-RAM. Do not use cut-and-paste.
The original data will be lost if there is a write error.
Drag’n Drop CD
Note the following limitations when you use Drag’n Drop CD:
◆
DVD-Video cannot be created using Drag’n Drop CD.
◆
DVD-Audio cannot be created using Drag’n Drop CD.
◆
You cannot use Drag’n Drop CD’s music CD function to record music to a
DVD-R/-RW disc.
4-18
Writing CD/DVDs on DVD Multi drive
◆
Do not use the DISC Backup function of Drag’n Drop CD to copy DVD-Video
and DVD-ROM with copyright protection, because the copy will not play
correctly.
◆
DVD-RAM disc cannot be backed up with the DISC Backup function of
Drag’n Drop CD.
◆
You cannot backup a CD-ROM or CD-R/-RW to DVD-R/-RW using the DISC
Backup function of Drag’n Drop CD.
◆
You cannot back up DVD-ROM, DVD-Video or DVD-R/-RW to CD-R/-RW
using the DISC Backup function of Drag’n Drop CD.
◆
Drag’n Drop CD cannot record in packet format.
◆
You might not be able to use the DISC backup function of Drag’n Drop CD to
back up a DVD-R/-RW disc that was made with other software on a different
DVD-R/-RW recorder.
Data Verification
To verify that data is written or rewritten correctly, follow the steps below before
you write or rewrite a Data CD/DVD.
1. Right-click Data BOX and select Options to display the DATA DISC
Option window.
3. Click the OK button.
The “Record and Verify” function automatically checks whether data has been
correctly recorded onto a CD/DVD. “Byte compare” compares the original data file
with the data recorded on the CD/DVD and checks that the data completely
matches.
4-19
OPERATING BASICS
2. Mark the Record and Verify check box and select Byte compare.
User's Manual
Media care
This section provides tips on protecting data stored on your CD/DVDs and
diskettes.
Handle your media with care. The following simple precautions will increase the
lifetime of your media and protect the data stored on them:
CD/DVDs
1. Store your CD/DVDs in the container they came in to protect them and keep
them clean.
2. Do not bend the CD/DVD.
3. Do not write on, apply a sticker to, or otherwise mar the surface of the
CD/DVD that contains data.
4. Hold the CD/DVD by its outside edge or the edge on the center hole.
Fingerprints on the surface can prevent the drive from properly reading
data.
OPERATING BASICS
5. Do not expose to direct sunlight, extreme heat or cold. Do not place heavy
objects on your CD/DVDs.
6. If your CD/DVDs become dusty or dirty, wipe them with a clean dry cloth.
Wipe from the center out, do not wipe in a circular direction around the CD/
DVD. If necessary, use a cloth dampened in water or a neutral cleaner. Do
not use benzine, thinner or similar cleaner.
Diskettes
1. Store your diskettes in the container they came in to protect them and keep
them clean. If a diskette is dirty, do not use cleaning fluid. Clean it with a soft
damp cloth.
2. Do not slide back the diskette’s protective metal covering or touch the
diskette’s magnetic surface. Fingerprints may prevent the diskette drive from
reading data from the diskette.
3. Data may be lost if the diskette is twisted; bent; or exposed to direct sunlight,
extreme heat or cold.
4. Do not place heavy objects on your diskettes.
5. Do not eat, smoke, or use erasers near your diskettes. Foreign particles inside
the diskette’s jacket can damage the magnetic surface.
4-20
Modem
6. Magnetic energy can destroy the data on your diskettes. Keep your diskettes
away from speakers, radios, television sets and other sources of magnetic
fields.
Using the microphone
Your computer has a built-in microphone that can be used to record monaural
sounds into your applications. It can also be used to issue voice commands to
applications that support such functions.
Since your computer has a built-in microphone and speaker, “feedback” may be
heard under certain conditions. Feedback occurs when sound from the speaker is
picked up in the microphone and amplified back to the speaker, which amplifies it
again to the microphone.
This feedback occurs repeatedly and causes a very loud, high-pitched noise. It is a
common phenomenon that occurs in any sound system when the microphone input
is output to the speaker (throughput) and the speaker volume is too loud or too
close to the microphone. You can control throughput by adjusting the volume of
your speaker or through the Mute function in the Master Volume panel. Refer to
your Windows documentation for details on using the Master Volume panel.
This section describes how to connect and disconnect the internal modem to and
from a telephone jack.
NOTE: The internal modem does not support voice functions. All data
and fax functions are supported.
CAUTIONS: 1. In case of a lightning storm, unplug the modem cable
from the telephone jack.
2. Do not connect the modem to a digital telephone line.
A digital line will damage the modem.
4-21
OPERATING BASICS
Modem
User's Manual
Region selection
Telecommunication regulations vary from one region to another, so you will need to
make sure the internal modem’s settings are correct for the region in which it will be
used.
To select a region, follow the steps below.
1. a. In Windows XP, click start, point to All Programs, point to TOSHIBA
Internal Modem and click Region Select Utility.
NOTE: Do not use the Country/Region Select function in the Modem
setup utility in the Control Panel if the function is available. If you
change the Country/Region in the Control Panel, the change may not
take effect.
b. In Windows 2000, click Start, point to Programs, point to TOSHIBA
Internal Modem and click Region Select Utility.
OPERATING BASICS
2. The Region Selection icon will appear in the Windows Task Bar.
Figure 4-12 The Region Selection icon (Windows XP)
Figure 4-13 The Region Selection icon (Windows 2000)
3. Click the icon with the primary mouse button to display a list of regions that
the modem supports. A sub menu for telephony location information will also
be displayed. A check will appear next to the currently selected region and
telephony location.
4. Select a region from the region menu or a telephony location from the submenu.
• When you click a region it becomes the modem’s region selection, and the
New Location for telephony will be set automatically.
• When you select a telephony location, the corresponding region is auto
matically selected and it becomes the modem’s current region setting.
4-22
Modem
Properties menu
Click the icon with the secondary mouse button to display the following menu.
Figure 4-14 The menu list (Windows XP)
OPERATING BASICS
Figure 4-15 The menu list (Windows 2000)
4-23
User's Manual
Setting
You can enable or disable the following settings:
AutoRun Mode
The Region Select utility starts automatically when you start up the operating
system.
Open the Dialing Properties dialog box after selecting region.
The dialing properties dialog box will be displayed automatically after you
select the region.
Location list for region selection.
A submenu appears displaying location information for telephony.
Open dialog box, if the modem and Telephony Current
Location region code do not match.
A warning dialog box is displayed if current settings for region code and
telephony location are incorrect.
Modem Selection
OPERATING BASICS
If the computer cannot recognize the internal modem, a dialog box is displayed.
Select the COM port for your modem to use.
Dialing Properties
Select this item to display the dialing properties.
CAUTION: If you are using the computer in Japan, the Telecommunications Business Law requires that you select Japan region mode. It is
illegal to use the modem in Japan with any other selection.
4-24
Modem
Connecting
To connect the internal modem cable, follow the steps below.
1. Plug one end of the modular cable into the modem jack.
2. Plug the other end of the modular cable into a telephone jack.
Figure 4-16 Connecting the internal modem
CAUTION: Do not pull on the cable or move the computer while the
cable is connected.
NOTE: If you use a storage device such as a DVD-ROM drive,
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive or HDD connected to a 16-bit PC
card, you might experience the following modem problems:
OPERATING BASICS
1. Modem speed is slow or communication is interrupted.
2. Skips may occur in sound.
Disconnecting
To disconnect the internal modem cable, follow the steps below.
1. Pinch the lever on the connector in the telephone jack and pull out the
connector.
2. Disconnect the cable from the computer in the same manner.
4-25
User's Manual
Wireless communications
The computer’s wireless communication function supports both Wireless LAN and
Bluetooth devices.
Wireless LAN
The Wireless LAN is compatible with other LAN systems based on Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum radio technology that complies with IEEE 802.11 Wireless
LAN standard (Revision A or B) and Turbo Mode. It supports the following
features:
OPERATING BASICS
◆ Automatic Transmit Rate Select mechanism in the transmit range of 54, 48, 36,
24, 18, 12, 9 and 6 Mbit/s. (Revision A)
◆ Automatic Transmit Rate Select mechanism in the transmit range of 11, 5.5, 2
and 1 Mbit/s. (Revision B)
◆ Automatic Transmit Rate Select mechanism in the transmit range of 108, 96,72,
48, 36, 24, 18 and 12 Mbit/s. (Turbo Mode)
◆ Frequency Channel Selection (Revision A/Turbo Mode: 5 GHz, Revision B: 2.4
GHz)
◆ Roaming over multiple channels
◆ Card Power Management
◆ Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) data encryption, based on the 152 bit RC4
encryption algorithm.
◆ Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) data encryption, based on the 256 bit
encryption algorithm.
Wake-up on LAN does not function on a Wireless LAN.
Bluetooth wireless technology
Bluetooth™ wireless technology eliminates the need for cables between electronic
devices such as desktop computers, printers and mobile phones. You cannot use
the built-in Bluetooth functions and an optional Bluetooth PC card simultaneously.
Bluetooth wireless technology has the following features:
Worldwide operation
The Bluetooth radio transmitter and receiver operates in the 2.45 GHz band, which is
license-free and compatible with radio systems in most countries in the world.
4-26
Wireless communcations
Radio links
You can easily establish links between two or more devices. The link is maintained
even if the devices are not within line of sight.
Security
Two advanced security mechanisms ensure a high level of security:
◆ Authentication prevents access to critical data and makes it impossible to
falsify the origin of a message.
◆ Encryption prevents eavesdropping and maintains link privacy.
Wireless communication switch
You can enable or disable Wireless LAN and Bluetooth functions, with the on/off
switch. No transmissions are sent or received when the switch is off. Slide the
switch toward the left of the computer to turn it on and toward the right of the
computer to turn it off.
CAUTION: Set the switch to off in airplanes and hospitals. Check the
indicator. It will stop glowing when the wireless communication function
is off.
The wireless communication indicator indicates the status of the wireless communication functions.
Indicator status
Indication
Indicator off
Wireless communication switch is set to off.
Automatic power down because of overheating.
Power malfunction
Indicator glows
Wireless communication switch is on.
Wireless LAN or Bluetooth is turned on by an
application.
If you used the Task Bar to disable W-LAN, restart the computer or follow the
procedures below to enable the system to recognize W-LAN. Open or click the
following: start, Control Panel, System, Hardware Device Manager,
Network adapters, TOSHIBA Wireless LAN Mini PCI Card and enable.
4-27
OPERATING BASICS
Wireless communication Indicator
User's Manual
LAN
The computer has built-in support for Ethernet LAN (10 megabits per second,
10BASE-T) and Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per second, 100BASE-Tx).
This section describes how to connect/disconnect to a LAN.
CAUTION: Do not install or remove an optional memory module while
Wake-up on LAN is enabled.
NOTE: The Wake-up on LAN function consumes power even when the
system is off. Leave the AC adaptor connected while using this feature.
Connecting LAN cable
OPERATING BASICS
CAUTION: The computer must be configured properly before connecting
to a LAN. Logging onto a LAN using the computer’s default settings
could cause a malfunction in LAN operation. Check with your LAN
administrator regarding set-up procedures.
If you are using Fast Ethernet LAN (100 megabits per second, 100BASE-TX), be
sure to connect with a category 5 cable, CAT5, or higher.
If you are using Ethernet LAN (10 megabits per second, 10BASE-T), connect with a
category 3 cable, CAT3, or higher.
To connect the LAN cable, follow the steps below.
1. Turn off the power to the computer and to all external devices connected to
the computer.
2. Plug one end of the cable into the LAN jack. Press gently until you hear the
latch click into place.
Figure 4-17 Connecting the LAN cable
4-28
Cleaning the computer
3. Plug the other end of the cable into a LAN hub connector. Check with your
LAN administrator before connecting to a hub.
NOTE: When the computer is exchanging data with the LAN, the LAN
active indicator glows orange. When the computer is connected to a
LAN hub but is not exchanging data, the Link indicator glows green.
Disconnecting LAN cable
To disconnect the LAN cable, follow the steps below.
CAUTION: Make sure the LAN active indicator (orange LED) is out
before you disconnect the computer from the LAN.
1. Pinch the lever on the connector in the computer’s LAN jack and pull out
the connector.
2. Disconnect the cable from the LAN hub in the same manner. Check with
your LAN administrator before disconnecting from the hub.
Cleaning the computer
◆ Be careful not to spill liquids into the computer. If the computer does get wet,
turn the power off immediately and let the computer dry completely before you
turn it on again.
◆ Clean the computer using a slightly damp (with water) cloth. You can use glass
cleaner on the display. Spray a small amount of cleaner on a soft, clean cloth
and wipe the screen gently with the cloth.
CAUTION: Never spray cleaner directly onto the computer or let liquid
run into any part of it. Never use harsh or caustic chemical products to
clean the computer.
4-29
OPERATING BASICS
To help ensure long, trouble-free operation, keep the computer free of dust and use
care with liquids around the computer.
User's Manual
Moving the computer
The computer is designed for rugged durability. However, a few simple precautions
taken when moving the computer will help ensure trouble-free operation.
◆ Make sure all disk activity has ended before moving the computer. Check the
Disk and Slim Select Bay indicators on the computer.
◆ If a CD/DVD is in the drive, remove it. Also make sure the drawer is securely
closed.
◆ Turn off the power to the computer.
◆ Disconnect the AC adaptor and all peripherals before moving the computer.
◆ Close the display. Do not pick up the computer by its display panel.
◆ Close all port covers.
◆ Use the carrying case when transporting the computer.
OPERATING BASICS
Heat dispersal
To protect from overheating, the CPU has an internal temperature sensor. If the
computer’s internal temperature rises to a certain level, the cooling fan is turned on
or the processing speed is lowered. You can select whether to control the CPU
temperature by turning on the fan first, then if necessary, lowering the CPU speed.
Or, by lowering the CPU speed first, then if necessary, turning on the fan. Use the
Cooling Method item of the Power Save Mode window in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Maximum
Performance
Performance
Battery optimized
Turn on the fan first, then if necessary, lower the CPU
processing speed.
Use a combination of the fan and lowering the CPU
processing speed.
Lower the CPU processing speed first, then if necessary
turn on the fan.
When the CPU temperature falls to a normal range, the fan is turned off and the CPU
operation returns to standard speed.
NOTE: If the CPU temperature reaches an unacceptably high level with
either setting, the system automatically shuts down to prevent damage.
Data in memory will be lost.
4-30
Heat dispersal
OPERATING BASICS
4-31
Chapter 5
The Keyboard
The computer’s keyboard layouts are compatible with a 101/102-key enhanced
keyboard. By pressing some keys in combination, all the 101/102-key keyboard
functions can be executed on the computer.
The number of keys on your keyboard depends on which country/region’s
keyboard layout your computer is configured with. Keyboards for numerous
languages are available.
There are five types of keys: typewriter keys, keypad overlay, function keys, soft
keys and cursor control keys.
Typewriter keys
The typewriter keys, produce the upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, punctuation marks, and special symbols that appear on the screen.
There are some differences, however, between using a typewriter and using a
computer keyboard:
Letters and numbers produced in computer text vary in width. Spaces, which
are created by a “space character,” may also vary depending on line justification and other factors.
❑
The lowercase l (el) and the number 1 (one) are not interchangeable on
computers as they are on a typewriter.
❑
The uppercase O (oh) and the 0 (zero) are not interchangeable.
❑
The Caps Lock function key locks only the alphabetic characters in uppercase while the shift lock on a typewriter places all keys in the shifted position.
❑
The Shift keys, the Tab key, and the BkSp (backspace) key perform the same
function as their typewriter counterparts but also have special computer
functions.
5-1
THE KEYBOARD
❑
User's Manual
F1 … F12 function keys
The function keys, not to be confused with Fn, are the 12 keys at the top of your
keyboard. These keys are dark gray, but function differently from the other dark
gray keys.
F1 through F12 are called function keys because they execute programmed
functions when pressed. Used in combination with the Fn key, keys marked with
icons execute specific functions on the computer. See the section, Soft keys: Fn key
combinations, in this chapter. The function executed by individual keys depends on
the software you are using.
Soft keys: Fn key combinations
The Fn (function) is unique to Toshiba computers and is used in combination with
other keys to form soft keys. Soft keys are key combinations that enable, disable or
configure specific features.
NOTE: Some software may disable or interfere with soft-key operations.
Soft-key settings are not restored by the Resume feature.
Emulating keys on enhanced keyboard
F1
Esc
~
CapsLock
Shift
W
A
E
S
Z
F4
$
4
#
3
2
Q
Tab
THE KEYBOARD
@
!
1
`
F3
F2
%
5
R
D
X
F5
F
C
Y
G
V
U
I
J
N
F8
(
9
8
H
B
F7
*
&
7
^6
T
F6
O
?
/
F12
Bk Sp
}
]
,,
,
:
;
>
.
F11
+
=
{
[
P
L
<
,
F10
_
-
)
0
K
M
F9
\
PrtSc
SysReg
Scroll
lock
Pause
Break
Ins
Home
PgUp
Del
End
PgDn
Num
Lock
/
*.
7
8
9
Home
PgUp
+
Enter
Shift
4
5
6
1
End
2
3
PgDn
Enter
Ctrl
Alt
Alt
Ctrl
Figure 5-1 A 101-key enhanced keyboard layout
5-2
0
Ins
.
Del
Soft keys: Fn key combinations
The keyboard is designed to provide all the features of the 101-key enhanced
keyboard, shown in figure 5-1. The 101/102-key enhanced keyboard has a numeric
keypad and scroll lock key. It also has additional Enter, Ctrl and Alt keys to the
right of the main keyboard. Since the keyboard is smaller and has fewer keys, some
of the enhanced keyboard functions must be simulated using two keys instead of
one on the larger keyboard.
Your software may require you to use keys that the keyboard does not have.
Pressing the Fn key and one of the following keys simulates the enhanced
keyboard’s functions.
Press Fn + F10 or Fn + F11 to access the integrated keypad. When activated,
the keys with white markings on the bottom edge become numeric keypad keys (Fn
+ F11) or cursor control keys (Fn + F10). Refer to the Keypad overlay section in
this chapter for more information on how to operate these keys. The power on
default for both settings is off.
Press Fn + F12 (ScrLock) to lock the cursor on a specific line. The power on
default is off.
Press Fn + Enter to simulate Enter on the enhanced keyboard’s numeric keypad.
THE KEYBOARD
Press Fn + Ctrl to simulate the enhanced keyboard’s right Ctrl key.
Press Fn + Alt to simulate the enhanced keyboard’s right Alt key.
5-3
User's Manual
Hotkeys
Hotkeys (Fn + a function or Esc key) let you enable or disable certain features of
the computers.
Sound mute: Pressing Fn + Esc in a Windows environment turns sound on or
off. When you press these hotkeys, the current setting will be displayed as an icon.
Instant security: Press Fn + F1 to lock the keyboard and blank the screen to
prevent others from accessing your data. To restore the screen and original
settings, press any key or move the AccuPoint. When a dialog box appears, enter
the screensaver password and click OK. If no password is set, the screen will be
restored when you press any key.
Power save mode: Pressing Fn + F2 changes the power save mode.
THE KEYBOARD
If you press Fn + F2, the Power Save Mode is displayed in a dialog box. Continue
holding down Fn and press F2 again to change the setting. You can also change
this setting through the Plugged in or Running on batteries item of the Power Saver
Properties window in Power Saver.
Standby: When you press Fn + F3, the computer can enter Standby. To avoid
entering Standby unexpectedly, a dialog box appears for verification. However, if
you check the checkbox in the dialog box, it will not appear from the next time.
5-4
Soft keys: Fn key combinations
Hibernation: When you press Fn + F4, the computer can enter Hibernation. To
avoid entering Hibernation unexpectedly, a dialog box appears for verification.
However, if you check the checkbox in the dialog box, it will not appear from the
next time.
Display selection: Press Fn + F5 to change the active display device. When
you press these hot keys a dialog box appears. Only selectable devices will be
displayed. Hold down Fn and press F5 again to change the device. When you
release Fn and F5, the selected device will change. If you hold down the keys for
three seconds the selection will return to LCD.
Display Brightness: Pressing Fn + F6 decreases the display brightness in
increments. When you press these hotkeys, the current setting will be displayed for
two seconds by an icon. You can also change this setting through the Monitor
brightness item of the Power Save Mode window in Power Saver.
5-5
THE KEYBOARD
Display Brightness: Pressing Fn + F7 increases the display brightness in
increments. When you press these hotkeys, the current setting will be displayed for
two seconds by a pop-up icon. You can also change this setting through the
Monitor brightness item of the Power Save Mode window in Power Saver.
User's Manual
Wireless setting: If your computer has both Bluetooth and wireless LAN
functions, you can press Fn + F8 to select which type of wireless communication
you want to use. When you press these hotkeys, a dialog box will appear. Continue
holing down Fn and press F8 to change the setting. If wireless communication is
turned off, Disabled Wireless Communication Switch will be displayed.
NOTE: If you wireless communication device is installed, no dialog box
will not appear.
Toshiba Dual Pointing Device: Pressing Fn + F9 in a windows environment
enables or disables the Toshiba Dual Pointing Device function. When you press
these hotkeys, the current setting will change and be displayed as an icon.
Display resolution selection: Press Fn + space keys to change the display
resolution. Each time when you press these hot keys, the display resolution
changes as follows: From the current resolution (the original resolution) to
1024X768, from 1024X768 to 800X600, from 800X600 to the original resolution.
THE KEYBOARD
Emulating Fn key on external keyboard
The Fn key is only on Toshiba keyboards. If you use an external keyboard attached
to the computer, you can execute Fn key combinations by emulating the Fn key. See
Chapter 7, HW Setup and Passwords, for details on setting the Fn key equivalent.
Fn Sticky key
You can use the Toshiba Accessibility Utility to make the Fn key sticky, that is, you
can press it once, release it, and they press an “F number” key.
To start the Toshiba Accessibity Utility, click start, point to All Programs (Windows
2000 only, point to Programs), point to TOSHIBA Utilities and click Accessibility.
5-6
Keypad overlay
Windows special keys
The keyboard provides two keys that have special functions in Windows : one
activates the Start menu and the other has the same function as the secondary
mouse button.
This key activates the Windows Start menu.
This key has the same function as the secondary mouse button.
Keypad overlay
Your computer’s keyboard does not have an independent numeric keypad, but its
numeric keypad overlay functions like one.
The keys in the center of the keyboard with white letters make up the numeric
keypad overlay. The overlay provides the same functions as the numeric keypad on
the 101/102-key enhanced keyboard in figure 5-2.
Turning on the overlays
The numeric keypad overlay can be used for numeric data input or cursor and page
control.
Arrow mode
THE KEYBOARD
To turn on the Arrow mode, press Fn + F10. The Arrow mode indicator lights.
Now try cursor and page control using the keys shown in figure 5-2. Press Fn +
F10 again to turn off the overlay.
Numeric mode
To turn on the Numeric mode, press Fn + F11. The Numeric mode indicator lights.
Now try numeric data entry using the keys in figure 5-2. Press Fn + F11 again to
turn off the overlay.
5-7
User's Manual
Figure 5-2 The numeric keypad overlay
Temporarily using normal keyboard (overlay
on)
While using the overlay, you can temporarily access the normal keyboard without
turning off the overlay:
THE KEYBOARD
1. Hold Fn and press any other key. All keys will operate as if the overlay were
off.
2. Type uppercase characters by holding Fn + Shift and pressing a character
key.
3. Release Fn to continue using the overlay.
5-8
Generating ASCII characters
Temporarily using overlay (overlay off)
While using the normal keyboard, you can temporarily use the keypad overlay
without turning it on:
1. Press and hold down Fn.
2. Check the keyboard indicators. Pressing Fn turns on the most recently used
overlay. If the Numeric mode indicator lights, you can use the overlay for
numeric entry. If the Arrow mode indicator lights, you can use the overlay for
cursor and page control.
3. Release Fn to return to normal keyboard operation.
Temporarily changing modes
If the computer is in Numeric mode, you can switch temporarily to Arrow
mode by pressing a shift key.
If the computer is in Arrow mode, you can switch temporarily to Numeric
mode by pressing a shift key.
Generating ASCII characters
Not all ASCII characters can be generated using normal keyboard operation. But,
you can generate these characters using their ASCII codes.
With the overlay on:
1. Hold down Alt.
2. Using the overlay keys, type the ASCII code.
3. Release Alt, and the ASCII character appears on the display screen.
With the overlay off:
1. Hold Alt + Fn.
THE KEYBOARD
2. Using the overlay keys, type the ASCII code.
3. Release Alt + Fn, and the ASCII character appears on the display screen.
5-9
Power and Power-Up Modes
The computer’s power resources include the AC adaptor and internal batteries. This
chapter gives details on making the most effective use of these resources including
charging and changing batteries, tips for saving battery power, and power up
modes.
Power conditions
The computer’s operating capability and battery charge status are affected by the
power conditions: whether an AC adaptor is connected, whether a battery is
installed and what the charge level is for the battery.
Table 6-1 Power conditions
Power on
Power off (no operation)
• Operates
• No charge
• LED: Main battery green
AC
Main battery
adaptor
fully
• No charge
connected
charged
• LED: Main battery green
DC IN green
DC IN green
Main battery
• Operates
1
partially
• Charge *
charged
• LED: Main battery orange
or no charge
No
• Quick charge *1
• LED: Main battery orange
DC IN green
DC IN green
• Operates
• No charge
main battery
• No charge
• LED: Main battery off
installed
• LED: Main battery off
DC IN green
DC IN green
6-1
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Chapter 6
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
Table 6-1 Power conditions continued
Power on
AC
2nd battery
adaptor
connected
Power off (no operation)
• Operates
• No charge
fully
• No charge
• LED: 2nd battery green
charged
• LED: 2nd battery green
DC IN green
DC IN green
2nd battery
• Operates
2
partially
• Charge *
charged
• LED: 2nd battery orange
or no charge
DC IN green
No
• Operates
• No charge
2nd battery
• No charge
• LED: 2nd battery off
installed
• LED: 2nd battery off
AC
Main battery
• Operates
adaptor
charge is
• LED: Main battery off
not
above low
DC IN off
battery
trigger point
Main battery
• Operates
charge is
• LED: Main battery
below low
flashes orange
battery
DC IN off
trigger point
Main battery
Computer shuts down *3
charge is
exhausted
6-2
• LED: 2nd battery orange
DC IN green
DC IN green
connected
• Quick charge *2
No main
• No operation *4
battery
• LED: Main battery off
installed
DC IN off
DC IN green
Power conditions
Power on
AC
2nd battery
• Operates
adaptor
charge
• LED: 2nd battery off
not
is above
Power off (no operation)
DC IN off
connected low battery
trigger point
2nd battery
• Operates
charge
• LED: 2nd battery
is below
flash orange
low battery
DC IN off
trigger point
2nd battery
Computer shuts down *3
charge is
exhausted
No
• No operation *5
2nd battery
• LED: 2nd battery off
is installed
DC IN off
NOTE: 2nd battery indicator refers to the Slim Select Bay indicator when a secondary battery is installed.
*1 When the secondary battery is not charging.
*2 When the main battery is not charging
*3 For the computer to shut down in hibernation mode, the hibernation feature
must be enabled in two places in TOSHIBA Power Saver: the Hibernate
window and the Battery Alarm item of the Alarm window. If a main battery
and a secondry battery are installed, the computer does not shut down until
the charge in both batteries is exhausted.
*4 When no secondary battery is installed
*5 When no main battery is installed
NOTE: When batteries are charged, the main battery is charged first.
When it is fully charged, the secondary battery is charged.
6-3
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Table 6-1 Power conditions continued
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
Power indicators
The Main battery, Slim Select Bay, DC IN and Power indicators on the
system indicator panel alert you to the computer’s operating capability and battery
charge status.
Battery indicators
Check the Main battery indicator to determine the status of the main battery and
the Slim Select Bay indicator to determine the status of the secondary battery.
The following indicator lights indicate the battery status:
Flashing orange
The battery charge is low. The AC adaptor must be
connected to recharge the battery.
Orange
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and charging the
battery.
Green
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and the battery is
fully charged.
No light
Under any other conditions, the indicator does not light.
NOTE: If the battery becomes too hot while it is being charged, the
charge will stop and the battery indicator will go out. When the battery’s
temperature falls to a normal range, charge will resume. This event
occurs regardless of whether the power to the computer is on or off.
DC IN indicator
Check the DC IN indicator to determine the power status with the AC adaptor
connected:
Green
6-4
Indicates the AC adaptor is connected and supplying
proper power to the computer.
Flashing orange
Indicates a problem with the power supply. Plug the AC
adaptor into another outlet. If it still does not operate
properly, see your dealer.
No light
Under any other conditions, the indicator does not light.
Battery types
Check the Power indicator to determine the power status.
Green
Blinking orange
No light
Indicates power is being supplied to the computer and the
computer is turned on.
Indicates the power was turned off while the computer was
in Resume mode. The indicator turns on for one second
and turns off for two seconds.
Under any other conditions, the indicator does not light.
Battery types
The computer has three types of batteries:
❑
Main Battery – 9 cell and 6 cell
❑
Slim Select Bay 2nd Battery Pack
❑
Real Time Clock (RTC) battery
Main battery
When the AC power cord is not connected, the computer’s main power source is a
removable lithium ion battery pack, also referred to in this manual as the main
battery. You can purchase additional battery packs for extended use of the computer away from an AC power source.
CAUTION: The battery pack is a lithium ion battery, which can explode
if not properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of. Dispose of the
battery as required by local ordinances or regulations. Use only
batteries recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
The main battery recharges the RTC batteries. The main battery maintains the state
of the computer when you enable Resume.
CAUTION: When the computer is powered off in Resume mode, and the
AC adaptor in not connected, the main battery pack and optional
secondary battery pack supply power to maintain data and programs in
memory. If the battery pack(s) is completely discharged, Resume does not
function and the computer loses all data in memory.
6-5
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Power indicator
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
The following message appears when you turn on the power:
WARNING: RESUME FAILURE.
PRESS ANY KEY TO CONTINUE.
To ensure that the battery pack maintains its maximum capacity, operate the
computer on battery power at least once a month until the battery pack is fully
discharged. Refer to Extending battery life in this chapter for procedures. If the
computer is continuously operated on AC power, either through an AC adaptor or a
docking station for an extended period, more than a month, the battery may fail to
retain a charge. It may not function efficiently over the expected life of the battery
and the Battery LED may not indicate a low-battery condition.
Secondary battery (option)
An optional secondary battery can be installed in the Slim Select Bay to increase
your battery operating time. Note the caution on Resume mode in the previous
section Main battery.
CAUTION: The secondary battery pack is a lithium ion battery, which
can explode if not properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of.
Dispose of the battery as required by local ordinances or regulations.
Use only batteries recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
Real time clock battery
The Real Time Clock (RTC) battery provides power for the internal real time clock
and calendar. It also maintains the system configuration.
If the RTC battery becomes completely discharged, the system loses this data and
the real time clock and calendar stop working. The following message appears when
you turn on the power:
Check system. Then press [F1] key . . . . . .
CAUTION: The computer’s RTC battery is a lithium ion battery and
should be replaced only by your dealer or by a TOSHIBA service
representative. The battery can explode if not properly replaced, used,
handled or disposed of. Dispose of the battery as required by local
ordinances or regulations.
6-6
Care and use of the battery pack
The battery pack is a vital component of portable computing. Taking proper care of it
will help ensure longer operating time on battery power as well as a longer life for
your battery pack. Follow the instructions in this section carefully to ensure safe
operation and maximum performance.
Safety precautions
Mishandling of batteries can cause death, serious injury or property damage.
Carefully observe the following advisories :
Danger : Indicates an imminently hazardous situation, Which could result in death
or serious injury, if you do not follow instructions.
Warning : Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, Which could result in death
or serious injury, if you do not follow instructions.
Caution : Indicates a potentially hazardous situation, Which if not avoided, may
result in moderate or minor injury or property damage.
Note : Provides important information.
Danger
1. Never try to dispose of the battery pack by burning or expose it to a heating
device such as a microwave oven. The battery pack could explode and cause
bodily injury.
2. Never try to disassemble, repair or otherwise tamper with a battery pack. The
battery pack will overheat and ignite. Leakage of caustic alkaline solution or
other electrolytic substances will cause fire or injury, possibly resulting in
death or serious injury.
3. Never short-circuit the battery pack by contacting the terminals with a metal
object. A short-circuit can cause fire or otherwise damage the battery pack and
possibly cause injury. To avoid accidental short-circuit, always wrap the
battery pack in plastic and cover the terminals with electrical tape when storing
or disposing of the battery pack.
4. Never puncture the battery pack with a nail or other sharp object. Never strike
it with a hammer or other object. Never step on it.
5. Never try to change the battery pack in any manner other than that described
in user's manual. Never connect the battery pack to a plug socked or to a
automobile's cigarette lighter socket. It may rupture or ignite.
6-7
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Care and use of the battery pack
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
6. Use only the battery pack supplied with the computer or other device or an
battery pack approved by the computer or device's manufacturer. Battery
packs have different voltages and terminal polarities. Use of an improper
battery could cause smoke, fire or rupture of the battery pack.
7. Never subject a battery pack to heat, such as storage near a heat source.
Exposure to heat can cause the battery pack to ignite, explode or leak caustic
liquid and cause death or serious injury. It could also fail or malfunction
causing data lose.
8. Never expose the battery pack to abnormal shock, vibration or pressure. The
battery pack's internal protective device will fail, causing it to overheat,
explode, ignite or leak caustic liquids possibly resulting in death or serious
injury.
9. Never let a battery pack become wet. A wet battery pack will overheat, ignite
or rupture possibly resulting in death or serious injury.
Warning
1. Never allow caustic electrolyte fluid leaked from a battery pack to contact your
eyes, skin or clothing. If caustic electrolyte fluid should contact your eyes,
immediately wash your eyes with large amounts of running water and seek
medical attention, to help prevent eye damage. It electrolyte fluid should
contact your skin immediately wash it under running water to prevent rash. If it
contacts your clothes, promptly remove them to prevent the fluid from
contacting your skin or eyes.
2. Immediately turn off the power, disconnect the AC adaptor and remove the
battery if any of the following events are observed in the battery pack :
offensive or unusual odor, excessive heat, discoloration or deformation. Never
use the computer again until it has been checked by a TOSHIBA service
provider. It might generate smoke or fire, or the battery pack might rupture.
3. Make sure the battery is securely installed in the computer before attempting
to charge the battery pack . Improper installation could generate smoke or fire,
or cause the battery pack to rupture.
4. Keep the battery pack out or reach of infants and children. It can cause injury.
Caution
1. Never continue to use a battery pack after its recharging capacity has become
impaired, or after the display of a warning message indicating that the battery
pack's power is exhausted. Continued use of an exhausted or impaired battery
pack could cause the loss of data.
6-8
Care and use of the battery pack
3. Use only battery packs recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
4. Always make sure the battery pack is installed correctly and securely.
Otherwise, a battery pack could fall out and possibly cause injury.
5. Change the battery pack only in an ambient temperature between 5 and 35
degress Celsius. Otherwise, the electrolyte solution might leak, battery pack
performance might deteriorate and the battery life might be shortened.
6. Be sure to monitor the remaining battery power. If the battery pack and real
time clock battery discharge completely. Standby and Suspend will not
function and data in memory will be lose. Also, the computer might register an
incorrect time and date. In this case, connect the AC adaptor to recharge the
batteries.
7. Never install or remove the battery pack without first turning off the power and
disconnecting the AC adaptor. Never remove the battery pack while the
computer in Suspend or Standby mode. Data will be lost.
Note
1. Never remove the battery pack while the Wake-up on LAN function is
enabled. Data will be lost. Before you remove a battery pack, disable the
Wake-up on LAN function.
2. To ensure the battery pack maintains maximum capacity, operate the computer
on battery power once a week until the battery pack is fully discharged. Refer
to the section Extending battery life in this chapter for procedures. If the
computer is continuously operated on AC power for an extended period, more
than a week, the battery might fail to retain a charge. It might not function
efficiently over the expected life of the battery pack and Battery indicator
might not indicate a low-battery condition.
3. After the battery pack is charged, avoid leaving the AC adaptor connected
and the computer turned off for more than a few hours at a time. Continuing to
charge a fully-charged battery pack can damage the battery.
6-9
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
2. Never dispose of battery packs with normal trash. Bring them to your
TOSHIBA dealer or to another recycling center to save resources and prevent
environmental damage. Cover the terminals with electrical tape to prevent
short-circuits, which could cause the battery pack to ignite or rupture.
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
Charging the batteries
When the power in the battery pack becomes low, the Battery indicator flashes
orange indicating that only a few minutes of battery power remain. If you continue
to use the computer while the Battery indicator flashes, the computer enables
Hibernation mode (so you don't lose data) and automatically turns off.
NOTES :The computer enters Hibernate mode only if Hibernation is
enabled in two places in TOSHIBA Power Saver : the Hibernate window
and the battery Alarm item of the Alarm window.
You must recharge a battery pack when it becomes discharged.
Procedures
To recharge a battery pack while it is installed in the computer, connect the AC
adaptor to the DC IN socket and plug the other end into a working outlet.
The Battery indicator glows orange when the battery is being charged.
CAUTION: Use only the computer connected to an AC power source or
the optional TOSHIBA Battery charger to charge the battery pack. Do
not attempt to charge the battery pack with any other charger.
Time
The following table shows the approximate time required to fully charge a discharged battery.
Charging time (hours)
Battery type
Power on
Power off
Main battery pack (9cell)
about 3.5 or longer about 3.5
Main battery pack (6cell)
about 3 or longer
about 3
Secondary battery pack
about 3 or longer
about 3
RTC battery
about 8
Doesn’t charge
NOTE: The charging time when the computer is on is affected by ambient
temperature, the temperature of the computer and how you use the
computer. If you make heavy use of external devices, for example, the
battery might scarcely charge at all during operation. Refer also to the
section Maximizing battery operating time.
6-10
Care and use of the battery pack
The battery may not charge right away under the following conditions:
❑
The battery is extremely hot or cold. If the battery is extremely hot, it might not
charge at all. Also, to ensure the battery charges to its full capacity, charge the
battery at room temperature of 10° to 30°C (50° to 88°F).
❑
The battery is nearly completely discharged. Leave the AC adaptor connected
for a few minutes and the battery should begin charging.
The Battery indicator may show a rapid decrease in battery operating time when
you try to charge a battery under the following conditions:
❑
The battery has not been used for a long time.
❑
The battery has completely discharged and been left in the computer for a long
time.
❑
A cool battery is installed in a warm computer.
In such case, follow the steps below.
1. Fully discharge the battery by leaving it in the computer with the power on
until the power automatically shuts off.
2. Plug in the AC adaptor.
3. Charge the battery until the Battery indicator glows green.
Repeat the steps two or three times until the battery recovers normal capacity.
NOTES : Leaving the AC adaptor connected will shorten battery life. At
least once a month, run the computer on battery power until the battery is
fully discharged, then recharged the battery.
Monitoring battery capacity
Remaining battery power can be monitored in the Power Save Modes window in
Power Saver of Windows.
NOTES: 1. Wait at least 16 seconds after turning on the computer before
trying to monitor the remaining operating time. The computer needs this time to check the battery’s remaining
capacity and to calculate the remaining operating time,
based on the current power consumption rate and remaining
battery capacity. The actual remaining operating time may
differ slightly from the calculated time.
6-11
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Battery charging notice
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
2. With repeated discharges and recharges, the battery’s
capacity will gradually decrease. Therefore, an often
used, older battery will not operate for as long as a new
battery even when both are fully charged. In this case,
Power Saver Utility will indicate a 100% charge for both
the old and new battery, but the displayed estimated time
remaining will be shorter for the older battery.
Maximizing battery operating time
A battery’s usefulness depends on how long it can supply power on a single
charge.
How long the charge lasts in a battery depends on:
❑
How you configure the computer, for example, whether you enable batterypower saving options. The computer provides a battery save mode to conserve
battery power. This mode has the following options:
• Processing speed
• Monitor brightness
• System standby
• System Hibernate
• Turn off monitor
• Turn off hard disks
❑
How often and how long you use the hard disk , CD/DVD-ROM drive and the
diskette drive.
❑
How much charge the battery contained to begin with.
❑
How you use optional devices, such as a PC card, to which the battery
supplies power.
❑
Enabling Resume mode conserves battery power if you are frequently turning
the computer off and on.
❑
Where you store your programs and data.
❑
Closing the display when you are not using the keyboard saves power.
❑
Operating time decreases at low temperatures.
❑
The condition of the battery terminals. Make sure the battery terminals stay
clean by wiping them with a clean dry cloth before installing the battery pack.
6-12
Care and use of the battery pack
When you turn off your computer with fully charged batteries, the batteries retain
data for the following approximate time periods:
Battery pack (6cell)
3 days (Resume mode)
34 days (Boot mode)
Battery pack (9cell)
4 days (Resume mode)
47 days (Boot mode)
RTC battery
1 month
Extending battery life
To maximize the life of your battery pack:
❑
At least once a month, disconnect the computer from a power source and
operate it on battery power until the battery pack fully discharges. Before doing
so, follow the steps below.
1. Turn off the computer’s power.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and turn on the computer’s power. If it does not
turn on go to step 4.
3. Operate the computer on battery power for five minutes. If the battery pack
has at least five minutes of operating time, continue operating until the
battery pack is fully discharged. If the battery LED flashes or there is some
other warning to indicate a low battery, go to step 4.
4. Connect the AC adaptor to the computer and the power cord to a power
outlet. The DC IN LED should glow green, and the Battery LED should glow
orange to indicate that the battery pack is being charged. If the DC IN
indicator does not glow, power is not being supplied. Check the connections
for the AC adaptor and power cord.
5. Charge the battery pack until the Battery LED glows green.
❑
If you have extra battery packs, rotate their use.
❑
If you will not be using the system for an extended period, more than one
month, remove the battery pack.
❑
Disconnect the AC adaptor when the battery is fully charged. Overcharging
makes the battery hot and shortens life.
❑
If you are not going to use the computer for more than eight hours, disconnect
the AC adaptor.
❑
Store spare battery packs in a cool dry place out of direct sunlight.
6-13
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Retaining data with power off
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
Replacing the battery pack
When the battery pack reaches the end of its operating life you will need to install a
new one. The life of the battery pack is generally about 500 recharges. If the
Battery indicator flashes orange shortly after fully recharging the battery, the
battery pack needs to be replaced.
You might also replace a discharged battery pack with a charged spare when you
are operating your computer away from an AC power source. This section explains
how to remove and install battery packs. For the detail about removing/installing the
Slim Secect Bay 2nd battery pack, refer to Chapter 8, Option Devices.
Removing the battery pack
To replace a discharged battery pack, follow the steps below.
CAUTION: 1. When handling battery packs, be careful not to short
circuit the terminals. Also do not drop, hit or otherwise
apply impact; do not scratch or break the casing and
do not twist or bend the battery pack.
2. Do not remove the battery pack while the computer is in
Standby mood. Data is stored in RAM, so if the com
puter loses power it will be lose.
3. In Hibernation mode, data will be lose if you remove
the battery or disconnect the AC adaptor before the
save is completed. Wait for the Fixed HDD/ODD
indicator to go out.
1. Save your work.
2. Turn the computer’s power off. Make sure the Power indicator is off.
3. Remove all cables connected to the computer.
4. Turn the computer upside down with the back of the computer facing you.
5. Slide the battery release latch to free the battery pack for removal, then lift up
the battery pack.
6. Pull the battery pack forward to remove it.
CAUTION: For environmental reasons, do not throw away a spent
battery pack. Please return spent battery packs to your TOSHIBA dealer.
6-14
Replacing the battery pack
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
BATTERY
RELEASE
LATCH
BATTERY
PACK
Figure 6-1 Removing the battery pack
Installing the battery pack
To install a battery pack, follow the steps below.
CAUTION: The battery pack is a lithium ion battery, which can explode
if not properly replaced, used, handled or disposed of. Dispose of the
battery as required by local ordinances or regulations. Use only
batteries recommended by TOSHIBA as replacements.
1. Be sure the computer’s power is off and all cables are disconnected.
2. Insert the battery pack.
BATTERY PACK
Figure 6-2 Installing the battery pack
3. Push down the battery pack until it is firmly seated.
6-15
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
User's Manual
Starting the computer by password
If you registered a password as supervisor or user, you must enter it to start the
computer. For more information about how to set a password, refer to Chapter 7,
HW Setup and Passwords.
To start up the computer with the password, follow these steps:
1. Turn on the power as described in Chapter 3, Getting Started and the
following message appears:
Password =
2. Enter the password.
3. Press Enter. The computer displays the message below while it starts up.
Valid password entered, system is now starting up.
NOTE: If you enter the password incorrectly three times in a row, the
computer shuts off. In this case, you must turn the computer back on to
retry password entry.
Power-up modes
The computer has the following power-up modes:
❑
Boot : Computer shuts down without saving data. Always save your work
before you turn the computer off in boot mode.
❑
Hibernation : Data in memory is saved to the hard disk.
❑
Standby : Data is maintained in the computer's main memory.
NOTE: Refer also to the sections Turning on the power and Turning off
the power in Chapter 3, Getting Started.
Windows utilities
You can specify the setting in TOSHIBA Power Saver.
Hotkeys
You can use hotkeys Fn + F3 to enter Standby mode and Fn + F4 to enter
Hibernation. See Chapter 5, Keyboard for details.
6-16
Starting the computer by password
You can set up your computer so that power turns off automatically when you close
the display panel. When you open the panel, power turns on in Standby or
Hibernation mode but not in boot mode.
NOTE: If the panel power off function is enabled and use Shut down
Windows, do not close the display until the shut down function is
completed.
System Auto Off
This feature turns the system off automatically if it is not used for a set duration.
The system shuts down in Standby mode or Hibernation mode in windows.
6-17
POWER AND
POWER-UP MODES
Panel power off
Chapter 7
HW Setup and Passwords
This chapter explains how to use TOSHIBA HW Setup program to configure your
computer and how to set passwords.
HW Setup
TOSHIBA HW Setup lets you configure settings for pointing devices, display,
CPU, boot priority, keyboard, USB, LAN, general, password, device config and
parallel/printer.
NOTE: If the supervisor password is set, access to the TOSHIBA HW
Setup program can be prevented when the user password is used to log
on to the computer.
Accessing HW Setup
If you are using Windows®XP, click start, click Control Panel , click Printers
and Other Hardware, and select TOSHIBA HW Setup to run HW Setup.
If you are using Windows®2000, click start, point to Settings, click Control
Panel and select TOSHIBA HW Setup to run HW Setup.
User's Manual
HW Setup window
The HW Setup window contains the following tabs: Pointing Devices, Display,
CPU, Boot Priority, Keyboard, USB, LAN, General, Password, Device Config and
Parallel/Printer.
There are also three buttons: OK, Cancel and Apply.
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
OK
Cancel
Apply
Accepts your changes and closes the HW Setup window.
Closes the window without accepting your changes.
Accepts all your changes without closing the HW Setup
window.
General
This window displays the BIOS version and contains two buttons: Default and
About.
Default
About
Return all HW Setup values to the factory settings.
Display the HW Setup version..
Setup
This field displays BIOS Version and date.
Password
User Password
This option allows you to set or reset the user password for power on.
Not Registered
Registered
Change or remove the password. (Default)
Set the password. A dialogue box will appear to let you set
the password.
To enter a user password:
1. Select Registered to display the following prompt:
Enter Password:
7-2
HW Setup
2. Enter a password of up to 10 characters. The character string you enter is
displayed as a string of asterisks. For example, if you enter a password
consisting of four characters, the display is shown as:
Enter Password: ****
NOTE: If you click the OK button before entering the password, Not
registered will appear on the display.
Verify Password:
4. If character strings match, the password is registered click OK button.
If they do not match, the following message appears. You must repeat from
step 1.
Entry Error!!!
To delete a user password:
1. Select Not Registered to display the following prompt:
Enter Password:
2. Enter the currently registered password. The character string you enter is
displayed as a string of asterisks.
Enter Password: ****
NOTE: If you click the OK button before entering the password,
Registered will appear on the display.
3. Click the OK button. If the character string you enter matches the registered
password, the password option is reset and the display changes to:
Not registered
If they do not match, the following message appears. You must repeat step 1.
Incorrect Password!!!
NOTE: If you enter the password incorrectly three times in a row, the
computer need to shut off.
7-3
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
3. Click the OK button. The following message appears, allowing you to verify
the password.
User's Manual
You will not be able to access the password option in the HW Setup. In
this case you must turn the power off and back on to retry the procedure.
4. Follow the same procedures described in the earlier section, How to set the
password, to set a new user password.
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
Device Config
Device Configuration
This option lets you set the device configuration.
All Devices
BIOS sets all devices.
Setup by OS
Operating system sets devices that it can control.
Parallel/Printer
This tab lets you set the Printer Port Type. Use the Windows Device Manager to
make settings for the Parallel port.
Parallel Port Mode
The options in this tab are ECP and Standard Bi-directional.
ECP
Sets the port type to Extended Capabilities Port (ECP). For
most printers, the port should be set to ECP. (Default)
Standard
Bi-directional
This setting should be used with some other parallel
devices.
Pointing Devices
Pointing Devices
This tab lets you select Auto-Selected and Simultaneous.
Auto-Selected
Simultaneous
7-4
If a PS/2 mouse is connected to the computer when you
turn on the power, the PS/2 mouse is enabled and the
AccuPoint is disabled. Otherwise, the AccuPoint is
enabled. (Default)
Enables both the AccuPoint and a PS/2 mouse.
HW Setup
Display
This tab lets you customize your computer’s display settings for either the internal
LCD screen or for an external monitor.
Power On Display
Lets you set the display to be used when the computer is booted.
Selects an external monitor if one is connected.
Otherwise, it selects the internal LCD. (Default)
LCD+AnalogRGB
Selects both the internal LCD and external monitor for
simultaneous display.
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
Auto-Selected
CPU
Dynamic CPU Frequency Mode
This option lets you choose from the following settings:
Dynamically Switchable
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is enabled.
When the computer is in use, CPU operation
is automatically switched when necessary.
(Default)
Always High
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is disabled. The
CPU always runs at its fastest speed.
Always Low
CPU power consumption and clock speed
automatic switching function is disabled. The
CPU always runs at low power consumption
and low speed.
7-5
User's Manual
Boot Priority
Boot Priority Options
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
This option sets the priority for booting the computer. Select from the following
settings:
HDD −> FDD −> CD-ROM(-> LAN)The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: HDD, diskette drive,
CD-ROM* and LAN. (Default)
FDD −> HDD −> CD-ROM(-> LAN)The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: diskette drive, HDD,
CD-ROM* and LAN.
HDD −> CD-ROM(-> LAN)-> FDD The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: HDD, CD-ROM*, LAN
and diskette drive.
FDD −> CD-ROM(-> LAN)-> HDD The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: diskette drive, CDROM*, LAN and HDD.
CD-ROM(-> LAN)->
> HDD −> FDD The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: CD-ROM*, LAN,
HDD, diskette drive.
CD-ROM(-> LAN)-> FDD −> HDD The computer looks for bootable files in
the following order: CD-ROM*, LAN,
diskette drive and HDD.
You can override the settings and manually select a boot device by pressing one of
the following keys while the computer is booting:
U
Selects the USB diskette drive.
N
Selects the Network.
1
Selects the primary HDD.
2
Selects the secondary HDD.
C
Selects the CD-ROM*.
This procedure does not affect the settings.
*
7-6
In this computer, CD refers to the DVD-ROM,CD-R/RW or CD-RW/DVD-ROM
drives.
HW Setup
To change the boot drive, follow the steps below.
1. Hold down F12 and boot the computer.
2. The following manu will be displayed.
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
3. Use the up/down cursor keys to select boot device you want and press Enter.
NOTES: 1. If a supervisor password is set, the menu above does not
appear when you use the user password to start the computer.
2. The selection method above does not change the boot
priority settings in HW Setup.
3. If you press a key other than one of those above or if the
selected device is not installed, the system will boot
according to the current setting in HW Setup.
HDD Priority Options
This option lets you set the boot priority for the HDD if more than one is installed in
the computer. If the first detected HDD has a boot command, the system will boot
from the HDD.
Built-in HDD -> Second HDD
The built-in HDD is checked first for the
boot command, then the HDD installed in
the Slim Select Bay. (Default)
Second HDD -> Built-in HDD
The HDD installed in the Slim Select Bay is
checked first for the boot command, then
the built-in HDD.
7-7
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
User's Manual
Built-in HDD -> Second HDD
The built-in HDD is checked first for the
boot command, then the HDD installed
in the Slim Select Bay. (Default)
Second HDD -> Built-in HDD
The HDD installed in the Slim Select Bay
is checked first for the boot command,
then the built-in HDD.
Keyboard
External Keyboard Fn key
Use this option to set a key combination on an external keyboard to emulate the Fn
key on the computer’s internal keyboard. Setting an Fn key equivalent will let you
use “Hotkeys” by pressing the set combination instead of the Fn key. (PS/2
keyboard only)
Disabled
Fn Equivalent
No Fn key equivalent (Default)
Left Ctrl
+
Left Alt
Right Ctrl
+
Right Alt
Left Alt
+
Left Shift
Right Alt
+
Right Shift
Left Alt
+
Caps Lock
NOTE: If you select Left Ctrl + Left Alt or Right Ctrl + Right Alt for
this option, you cannot use the selected keys to reboot the computer in
combination with the Del key. For example, if you select Left Ctrl +
Left Alt, you must use Right Ctrl, Right Alt and Del to reboot the
computer. Left Ctrl, Left Alt and Del cannot be used.
Wake-up on Keyboard
When this feature is enabled and the computer is in standby mode, you can turn on
the computer by pressing any key. It is effective only for the internal keyboard and
only when the computer is in standby mode.
Enabled
Disabled
7-8
Enables Wake-up on Keyboard.
Disables Wake-up on Keyboard. (Default)
HW Setup
USB
USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation
Use this option to enable or disable USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation. If your
operating system does not support USB, you can still use a USB mouse and
keyboard by setting the USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation item to
Enabled.
Enables the USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation. (Default)
Disables the USB KB/Mouse Legacy Emulation.
USB-FDD Legacy Emulation
Use this option to enable or disable USB-FDD Legacy Emulation.
Enabled
Disabled
Enables the USB-FDD Legacy Emulation. (Default)
Disables the USB-FDD Legacy Emulation.
LAN
Wake-up on LAN
This features lets the computer’s power be turned on when it receives a wake-up
signal from the LAN.
Enabled
Disabled
Enables Wake-up on LAN.
Disables Wake-up on LAN. (Default)
CAUTION: Do not install or remove an optional memory module while
Wake-up on LAN is enabled.
NOTE: Wake-up on LAN does not work without the AC adaptor. Leave it
connected, if you are using this feature.
Built-in LAN
Enabled
Disabled
Enables built-in LAN functions. (Default)
Disables built-in LAN functions.
7-9
HW SETUP AND
PASSWORDS
Enabled
Disabled
Chapter 8
Optional Devices
Optional devices can expand the computer’s capabilities and its versatility. The
following optional devices are available from your TOSHIBA dealer:
Cards/memory
PC cards
❑
SD cards
❑
Memory expansion
OPTIONAL DEVICES
❑
Power devices
❑
Additional battery pack (9 cell and 6 cell)
❑
Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack (Black)
❑
Additional AC adaptor
Peripheral devices
❑
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor (Black)
❑
USB FDD Kit
❑
Advanced Port Replicator II
❑
Parallel printer
❑
External monitor
❑
Television
❑
PS/2 mouse
❑
PS/2 keyboard
Other
❑
Security lock
8-1
User’s Manual
PC cards
The computer is equipped with a PC card expansion slot that can accommodate two
5 mm Type II cards or one 10.5 mm Type III card. Any PC card that meets industry
standards (manufactured by TOSHIBA or other vendor) can be installed. The slots
support 16-bit PC cards, including PC card 16’s multifunction card and CardBus PC
cards.
CardBus supports the new standard of 32-bit PC cards. The bus provides superior
performance for the greater demands of multimedia data transmission.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
Installing a PC card
Two PC card connectors are located one above the other on the left side of the
computer. Both connectors are accessed from the same slot. You can install two
Type II cards, one in each connector, or one Type III card in the bottom connector.
Windows’ hot-install feature lets you install PC cards while the computer’s power is
on.
NOTES: 1. Do not install a PC card while the computer is in standby or
hibernation mode. Some cards might not work properly.
2. An HDD or CD-ROM connected to a 16-bit PC card, might
affect the performance of the computer’s sound system and
data transmission, including slower transmission speeds
and dialing errors.
To install a PC card, follow the steps below.
1. Insert the PC card.
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
PC CARD
Figure 8-1 Inserting the PC card
8-2
PC cards
3. Check the configuration in the HW Setup window to make sure it is appropriate for your card.
Removing a PC card
To remove the PC card, follow the steps below.
1. a.In Windows®XP, open the Safety Remove Hardware icon on the
system tray and disable the PC card.
b.In Windows®2000, open the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon on the
system tray and disable the PC card.
2. Press the eject button of the PC card you want to remove to extend the button.
3. Press the extended eject button to pop the card out slightly.
4. Grasp the PC card and remove it.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
PC CARD
Figure 8-2 Removing the PC card
8-3
User’s Manual
SD cards
The computer is equipped with a SD card slot that can accommodate Secure Digital
flash memory cards with capacities of 8 MB, 16MB, 64MB, 128MB and 512MB. SD
cads let you easily transfer data from devices, such as digital cameras and Personal
Digital Assistants, that use SD cards flash-memory. The cards have a copy
protection features, but it does not support SD security features. The computer
cannot read/write data protected with the security function. The slot cannot
accommodate MultiMedia cards.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
CAUTION : Keep foreign obiects out of the SD cards slot. A pin or
similar object can damage the computer’s circuitry.
Installing an SD card
To install an SD card, follow the steps below.
1. Insert the SD card.
2. Press gently to ensure a firm connection.
SD CARD
Figure 8-3 Inserting the SD card
CAUTION: Make sure the SD card is oriented properly before you insert
it.
8-4
SD cards
Removing an SD card
To remove an SD card, follow the steps below.
1. a.In Windows®XP, open the Safety Remove Hardware icon on the
system tray and disable the SD card.
b.In Windows®2000, open the Unplug or Eject Hardware icon on the
system tray and disable the SD card.
2. Push in card and release it to pop the card out slightly.
3. Grasp the card and remove it.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
SD CARD
Figure 8-4 Removing the SD card
CAUTION: 1. Make sure the SD card indicator is out before you remove
the card or turn off the computer’s power. If you remove
the card or turn off the power while the computer is
accessing the card you may lose data or damage the card.
2. Please do not remove the SD card from the SD card slot
while in Standby or in Hibernation state. If you do, PC
may become unstable or the data in SD card may be lost.
8-5
User’s Manual
Memory expansion
You can install additional memory in the computer’s memory module to increase the
amount of RAM.
CAUTION: Only memory modules with the following parts numbers can
be installed:
PA3126U-1M12:
PA3127U-1M25:
PA3164U-1M51
128 MB
256 MB
512MB
Installing memory module
OPTIONAL DEVICES
To install a memory module, make sure the computer is in boot mode then:
1. Turn the computer off in boot mode. Refer to the Turning off the power
section in Chapter 3.
CAUTIONS: 1. If you use the computer for a long time, the memory
modules will become hot. In this case, let the memory
modules cool to room temperature before you replace
them.
2. Do not try to install a memory module with the
computer turned on or turned off in Standby and
Hibernation mode. You can damage the computer and
the memory module.
3. If you install a memory module that is not compatible
with the computer, a beep will sound when you turn
on the power. If the module is installed in slot A, there
will be a long beep followed by a short beep. If the
module is in slot B, there will be a long beep followed
by two short beeps. In this case shut down the power
and remove the incompatible module.
2. Remove all cables connected to the computer.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack (refer to Chapter
6, Power and Power-Up Modes.)
4. Remove one screw securing the memory module cover.
5. Lift off the cover.
NOTE: Use a point size 0 Phillips screwdriver.
8-6
Memory expansion
Figure 8-5 Removing the cover
7. Push the module down so that it lies flat and is secured by two latches.
CAUTION: Do not touch the connectors on the memory module or on the
computer. Debris on the connectors may cause memory access problems.
Figure 8-6 Inserting the memory module
8. Seat the cover and secure it with one screw.
9. When you turn the computer on, it should automatically recognize the total
memory capacity. Use the HW Setup program to verify that the added memory
is recognized. If it is not recognized, check the module’s connection.
8-7
OPTIONAL DEVICES
6. Insert the memory module into the connector on the computer. Press the
module carefully and firmly to ensure a solid connection.
User’s Manual
Removing memory module
To remove the memory module, make sure the computer is in boot mode then:
1. Turn the computer off and remove all cables connected to the computer.
CAUTIONS: 1. If you use the computer for a long time, the memory
modules will become hot. In this case, let the memory
modules cool to room temperature before you replace
them.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
2. Do not try to remove a memory module with the
computer turned on or turned off in Standby and
Hibernation mode. You can damage the computer and
the memory module.
2. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack (refer to Chapter
6, Power and Power-Up Modes.)
3. Remove one screw securing the memory module cover.
4. Lift off the cover.
5. Use a slender object such as a pen to press two latches on either side of the
memory module to the outside. The memory module will pop up.
6. Grasp the memory module by the sides and pull it out.
CAUTION: Do not touch the connectors on the memory module or on the
computer. Debris on the connectors may cause memory access problems.
Figure 8-7 Removing the memory module
7. Seat the cover and secure it with one screw.
8-8
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor(Black)
Additional battery pack (9 Cell and 6
Cell)
You can increase the portability of the computer with additional battery packs
(9 Cell : PA3257* , 6 Cell : PA3248*). If you’re away from an AC power source, you
can replace a low battery with a fully charged one. See Chapter 6, Power and
Power-Up Modes.
Slim Select Bay 2nd battery pack
You can install a secondary battery pack (PA3249*) in the computer’s Slim Select
Bay. For details on installing modules in the Slim Select Bay, refer to Chapter 4,
Operating Basics.
If you frequently transport the computer between different sites such as your home
and office, purchasing an AC adaptor for each location will reduce the weight and
bulk of your carrying load: PA3215*.
Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor (Black)
A integrated 2 1/2" HDD is available for installation in the Slim Select Bay.
To install an HDD in the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor (PA3134U-1ETC) follow the
steps below.
1. Slide the lock to the unlock position and open the lid.
Figure 8-8 Opening the lid
8-9
OPTIONAL DEVICES
Additional AC adaptor
User’s Manual
OPTIONAL DEVICES
2. Insert the HDD and push forward to ensure a firm connection.
Figure 8-9 Installing the HDD
3. Close the lid and slide the lock to the lock position.
Figure 8-10 Closing the lid
For details on installing the Slim Select Bay HDD adaptor in the Slim Select Bay,
refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
8-10
Advanced Port Replicator II
USB FDD Kit
The 3 1/2" external FDD drive module can be connected to the USB port. For details
on connecting the 3 1/2" external diskette drive module, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Advanced Port Replicator II
In addition to the ports available on the computer, the Port Replicator provides,
audio line-out jack, line-in jack and separate ports for PS/2 mouse and PS/2
keyboard. The Port Replicator connects directly to the docking interface on the
bottom of the computer. The AC adaptor connects the Port Replicator to a power
source.
The following ports and accessories are available on the Port Replicator.
❑
One RJ45 LAN jack
❑
One RJ11 Modem jack
❑
External monitor port
❑
Parallel port
❑
Serial port
❑
PS/2 mouse port
❑
PS/2 keyboard port
❑
DC IN socket
❑
Security lock slot
❑
Audio line-in, line-out jacks
❑
Universal Serial Bus (two) ports
❑
i.LINK (IEEE 1394) port (This port is not supported by the computer.)
❑
DVI port (This port is not supported by the computer.)
NOTES: 1. When a Port Replicator is connected to the computer,
remove all cables connected to the computer.
2. The TECRA S1 does not support the DVI and i.LINK ports
on the Port Replicator.
8-11
OPTIONAL DEVICES
CAUTION: The computer must be configured properly before connecting
to a LAN. Logging onto a LAN using the computer’s default settings
could cause a malfunction in LAN operation. Check with your LAN
administrator regarding set-up procedures.
User’s Manual
Parallel printer
You can connect any standard Centronics-compatible parallel printer to your
computer. All you need is an IBM PC™ parallel printer cable. Your dealer can
supply one or you can purchase one at most computer stores.
The cable’s connectors are designed so that it is impossible for you to connect
them incorrectly. You can also connect a parallel printer to an optional Advanced
Port Replicator. To connect a printer, follow these steps:
1. Turn off the computer.
2. Insert one end of the cable into the computer’s parallel port.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
3. Tighten the screws that fasten the cable connector to the computer’s parallel
port.
4. Insert the other end of the cable into the printer’s parallel connector.
5. Fasten the connector to the printer with the clips on the parallel port.
6. Turn on the printer.
7. Turn on the computer.
8. Start the Hardware Setup program. Refer to Chapter 7 HW Setup and
Passwords.
9. Select the Parallel/Printer tab from the TOSHIBA HW Setup
window.
10. Set the Parallel Port Mode and press OK.
11. Choose Reboot for the change to take effect.
12. Select the printer in Windows Add Print Wizard. To access the Add Print
Wizard utility, click Start, point to Settings, click Printers and double
click the Add Printer icon.
External monitor
An external analog monitor can be connected to the external monitor port on the
computer, Port Replicator. The computer supports VGA and Super VGA video
modes. To connect a monitor, follow the steps below.
CAUTION: If an external monitor is connected to the computer, do not
connect the Port Replicator. First disconnect the external monitor from
the computer then connect the Port Replicator and use its external
monitor port.
8-12
Television
NOTE: The Resume feature can be used with an external monitor. Simply
enable Resume and the computer will maintain the data as it is displayed
on the external monitor.
1. Connect the monitor to the external monitor port.
2. Turn the monitor’s power on.
When you turn on the power, the computer automatically recognizes the monitor
and determines whether it is color or monochrome.
You can use the HW Setup to select between Auto-Selected and Simultaneous displays. Refer to Chapter 7, HW Setup and Passwords.
To change the display settings, press Fn + F5. If you disconnect the monitor
before you turn the computer off, be sure to press Fn + F5 to switch to the internal
display. Refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard, for details on using hotkeys to change
the display setting.
NOTE: If you set Simultaneous for the computer’s display, you must
set the computer’s display resolution to the same as that of the external
monitor or other device, such as a projector.
Television
A television can be connected to the video out port on the computer. To connect a
television, follow the steps below.
1. Turn the computer off.
2. Use a video cable (not supplied) to connect the television to the video out
port.
Figure 8-11 Connecting a television
8-13
OPTIONAL DEVICES
If you have selected Simultaneous under the Display options of the HW
Setup, both the external monitor and the internal LCD will be active when you turn
on the computer. If Auto-Selected is selected, only the external monitor will be
active.
User’s Manual
3. Turn the television on.
4. Turn the computer on.
PS/2 mouse
Use the PS/2 keyboard/mouse port on the computer or optional Advanced Port
Replicator to connect a PS/2 mouse.
Make sure the mouse has a cable with a 6-pin connector for the PS/2 mouse port. If
the mouse’s cable is not compatible, see your dealer for an adaptor cable.
OPTIONAL DEVICES
NOTES: 1. How the computer treats the connection to a PS/2 mouse
depends on the setting for Pointing Devices under
the HW Setup program. If Simultaneous is selected, you
can operate both the AccuPoint II and the PS/2 mouse. If
Auto-Selected is chosen, the AccuPoint II is disabled
when a PS/2 mouse is connected.
2. If you connect a PS/2 mouse to the computer while it is in
Standby mode, you will not be able to use the mouse when
you turn the computer on.
To connect a PS/2 mouse:
1. Turn the computer off.
2. Connect the PS/2 mouse to the PS/2 keyboard/mouse port on the computer or
the mouse port on the optional Advanced Port Replicator, pressing gently to
assure a firm connection.
3. Turn on the computer.
To disconnect the mouse, turn off the computer and pull out the mouse connector.
Consult your mouse manual for instructions on how to install necessary software.
PS/2 keyboard
Use the PS/2 keyboard/mouse port on the computer or optional Advanced Port
Replicator to connect a PS/2 keyboard. When an external keyboard is connected,
you can use both the external keyboard and the computer’s internal keyboard. To
connect a PS/2 keyboard:
NOTE: If you connect a PS/2 keyboard to the computer while it is in
Standby mode, you will not be able to use the keyboard when you turn
the computer on.
8-14
Security lock
1. Turn the computer off.
2. Plug the PS/2 keyboard connector into the PS/2 keyboard/mouse port on the
computer or the keyboard port on the optional Advanced Port Replicator,
pressing gently to assure a firm connection.
3. Turn on the computer.
To disconnect the keyboard, turn off the computer and pull out the keyboard
connector.
Security lock
A security lock enables you to anchor your computer to a desk or other heavy
object to help prevent unauthorized removal of the computer.
Figure 8-12 Security lock
8-15
OPTIONAL DEVICES
Attach one end of a cable to the desk and the other end to the security lock slot on
the left side of the computer.
Chapter 9
Troubleshooting
TOSHIBA designed the computer for durability. However, should problems occur,
following the procedures in this chapter can help to determine the cause.
All readers should become familiar with this chapter. Knowing what might go wrong
can help prevent problems from occurring.
Problem solving process
Resolving problems will be much easier if you observe the following guidelines:
❑
Stop immediately when you recognize a problem exists. Further action may
result in data loss or damage. You may destroy valuable problem-related
information that can help solve the problem.
❑
Observe what is happening. Write down what the system is doing and what
actions you performed immediately before the problem occurred. If you have a
printer attached, print a copy of the screen using PrtSc.
Preliminary checklist
Consider the simplest solution first. The items in this checklist are easy to fix and yet
can cause what appears to be a serious problem.
❑
Make sure you turn on all peripheral devices before you turn on the computer.
This includes your printer and any other external device you are using.
❑
Before you attach an external device, turn the computer off. When you turn the
computer back on it recognizes the new device.
❑
Make sure all options are set properly in the setup program.
❑
Check all cables. Are they correctly and firmly attached? Loose cables can
cause signal errors.
❑
Inspect all connecting cables for loose wires and all connectors for loose pins.
9-1
TROUBLESHOOTING
The questions and procedures offered in this chapter are meant as a guide, they are
not definitive problem solving techniques. Many problems can be solved simply,
but a few may require help from your dealer. If you find you need to consult your
dealer or others, be prepared to describe the problem in as much detail as possible.
User's Manual
❑
Check that your diskette is correctly inserted and that the diskette’s write
protect tab is correctly set.
Make notes of your observations and keep them in a permanent error log. This will
help you describe your problems to your dealer. If a problem recurs, the log will help
you identify the problem faster.
Analyzing the problem
TROUBLESHOOTING
Sometimes the system gives clues that can help you identify why it is
malfunctioning. Keep the following questions in mind:
❑
Which part of the system is not operating properly: keyboard, diskette drives,
hard disk drive, printer, display. Each device produces different symptoms.
❑
Is the operating system configuration set properly? Check the configuration
options.
❑
What appears on the display screen? Does it display any messages or random
characters? Print a copy of the screen if you have a printer attached. Look up
the messages in the software and operating system documentation. Check that
all connecting cables are correctly and firmly attached. Loose cables can cause
erroneous or intermittent signals.
❑
Do any icons light? Which ones? What color are they? Do they stay on or
blink? Write down what you see.
❑
Do you hear any beeps? How many? Are they long or short? Are they high
pitched or low? Is the computer making any unusual noises? Write down what
you hear.
Record your observations so you can describe them to your dealer.
Software
The problems may be caused by your software or diskette.
If you cannot load a software package, the media (usually a
diskette) may be damaged or the program might be
corrupted. Try loading another copy of the software.
If an error message appears while you are using a software
package, check the software documentation. These
documents usually include a problem solving section or a
summary of error messages.
Next, check any error messages in the OS documentation.
Hardware
9-2
If you cannot find a software problem, check your
hardware. First run through the items in the preliminary
checklist above. If you still cannot correct the problem, try
to identify the source. The next section provides checklists
for individual components and peripherals.
Hardware and system checklist
Hardware and system checklist
This section discusses problems caused by your computer’s hardware or attached
peripherals. Basic problems may occur in the following areas:
❑ Pointing device
❑ Self test
❑ Touch Pad device
❑ Power
❑ PC card
❑ Password
❑ SD card
❑ Keyboard
❑ Monitor
❑ LCD panel
❑ Sound system
❑ Hard disk drive
❑ TV output signal
❑ CD-ROM drive
❑ USB
❑ CD-R/RW drive
❑ Modem
❑ DVD-ROM drive
❑ Standby/Hibernation
❑ CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive
❑ Memory Expansion
❑ DVD Multi drive
❑ LAN
❑ Diskette drive
❑ Wireless LAN
❑ Infrared port
❑ Bluetooth
TROUBLESHOOTING
❑ System start-up
❑ Printer
System start-up
When the computer does not start properly, check the following items:
❑
Self Test
❑
Power Sources
❑
Power-on Password
9-3
User's Manual
Self test
When the computer starts up, the self-test will be run automatically, and the
following will be displayed:
In Touch with Tomorrow
TOSHIBA
This message remains on the screen for a few seconds.
If the self test is successful, the computer tries to load the operating system.
Depending on how the Boot Priority is set in the Hardware Setup, the computer tries
to load first from drive A then from drive C, or first from drive C then from drive A.
If any of the following conditions are present, the self test failed:
❑
The computer stops and does not proceed to display information or messages.
❑
A beep sounds, and after a few seconds no new messages appear.
❑
Random characters appear on the screen, and the system does not function
normally.
❑
The screen displays an error message.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Turn off the computer and check all cable connections. If the test fails again, contact
your dealer.
Power
When the computer is not plugged into an AC adaptor, the battery pack is the
primary power source. However, your computer has a number of other power
resources, including intelligent power supply and Real Time Clock battery. These
resources are interrelated and any one could affect apparent power problems. This
section provides check lists for AC adaptor and the main battery. If you cannot
resolve a problem after following them, the cause could lie with another power
resource. In such case, contact your dealer.
9-4
Hardware and system checklist
Overheating power down
If the computer’s internal temperature becomes too high, the computer will automatically enter Hibernation or Resume mode and shut down.
Problem
Procedure
Computer shuts down
and DC IN indicator
blinks orange
Leave the computer off until the DC IN indicator
stops blinking.
NOTE: It is recommended to leave the computer
off until the its interior reaches room temperature
even though the DC IN indicator stops blinking.
If the computer has reached room temperature
and still does not start, or if it starts but shuts
down quickly contact your dealer.
Computer shuts down Indicates a problem with the heat dispersal
and its DC IN indicator system. Please contact your dealer.
is flashing green
If you have trouble turning on the computer with the AC adaptor connected, check
the DC IN indicator. Refer to Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes for more
information.
Problem
Procedure
AC adaptor doesn’t
power the computer
(DC IN indicator does
not glow green)
Check the connections. Make sure the cord is
firmly connected to the computer and a power
outlet.
9-5
TROUBLESHOOTING
AC power
User's Manual
Check the condition of the cord and terminals. If
the cord is frayed or damaged, replace it. If the
terminals are soiled, wipe them with cotton or a
clean cloth.
If the AC adaptor still does not power the
computer, contact your dealer.
Battery
TROUBLESHOOTING
If you suspect a problem with the battery, check the DC IN indicator as well as the
Main battery and Slim Select Bay indicators. For information on indicators and
battery operation see Chapter 6, Power and Power-Up Modes.
Problem
Procedure
Battery doesn’t
power the computer
The battery may be discharged. Connect the AC
adaptor to charge the battery.
Battery doesn’t
charge when the AC
adaptor is attached
(Main battery or Slim
Select Bay indicator
does not glow orange.)
If the battery is completely discharged, it will not
begin charging immediately. Wait a few minutes.
If the battery still does not charge, make sure
the outlet is supplying power. Test it by plugging
in an appliance. If it doesn't work, try another
power source.
Check whether the battery is hot or cold to the
touch. If the battery is too hot or too cold, it will
not charge properly. Let it reach room
temperature.
Unplug the AC adaptor and remove the battery to
make sure the terminals are clean. If necessary
wipe them with a soft dry cloth dipped in alcohol.
Connect the AC adaptor and replace the battery.
Make sure it is securely seated.
9-6
Hardware and system checklist
Check the Battery indicator. If it does not glow,
let the computer charge the battery for at least 20
minutes. If the Battery indicator glows after 20
minutes, let the battery continue to charge at least
another 20 minutes before turning on the
computer.
If the indicator still does not glow, the battery may
be at the end of its operating life. Replace it.
If you do not think the battery is at the end of its
operating life, see your dealer.
Battery doesn’t
power the computer
as long as expected
If you frequently recharge a partially charged
battery, the battery might not charge to its full
potential. Fully discharge the battery, then try to
charge it again.
Check the power consumption settings in Power
Saver utility. Consider using a power saving mode.
Problem
Procedure
Cannot enter
password
Refer to the Password section in Chapter 7,
HW Setup and Passwords.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Password
Keyboard
Keyboard problems can be caused by your setup configuration. For more information
refer to Chapter 5, The Keyboard and Chapter 7, HW Setup and Passwords.
Problem
Procedure
Some letter keys
produce numbers
Check that the numeric keypad overlay is not
selected. Press Fn + F10 and try typing again.
9-7
User's Manual
Output to screen
is garbled
Make sure the software you are using is not
remapping the keyboard. Remapping involves
reassigning the meaning of each key. See
your software’s documentation.
If you are still unable to use the keyboard,
consult your dealer.
LCD panel
TROUBLESHOOTING
Apparent LCD problems may be related to the computer’s setup. Refer to Chapter 7,
HW Setup and Passwords, for more information.
Problem
Procedure
No display
Press hotkeys Fn + F5 to change the display
priority, to make sure it is not set for an
external monitor.
Markings appear on
the LCD
They might have come from contact with the
keyboard, TouchPad or cPad. Try wiping the
LCD gently with a clean dry cloth. If markings
remain, use LCD cleaner. Be sureto let the
LCD dry before closing it.
Problems above
remain unresolved
or other problems
occur
Refer to your software’s documentation to
determine if the software is causing the
difficulty.
Contact your dealer if the problems continue.
9-8
Hardware and system checklist
Hard disk drive
Problem
Procedure
Computer does not
boot from hard disk
drive
Check if a diskette is in the diskette drive or a
CD-ROM is in the optical media drive. Remove
any diskette and/or CD-ROM and check Boot
priority. Refer to Chapter 7. Boot Priority.
There may be a problem with your operating
system files. Refer to your OS documentation.
Slow performance
Your files may be fragmented. Run SCANDISK
and defragmenter to check the condition of your
files and disk. Refer to your OS documentation
or online HELP for information on running
SCANDISK and the defragmenter.
TROUBLESHOOTING
As a last resort, reformat the hard disk. Then,
reload the operating system and other files.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
CD-ROM drive (Black)
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
You cannot access
a CD in the drive
Make sure the drive's drawer is securely
closed. Press gently until it clicks into place.
Open the drawer and make sure the CD is
properly seated. It should lie flat with the label
facing up.
9-9
User's Manual
A foreign object in the drawer could block laser light
from reading the CD. Make sure there is no
obstruction. Remove any foreign object.
Check whether the CD is dirty. If necessary, wipe
it with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral
cleaner. See the CD/DVDs care section in
Chapter 4 for details on cleaning.
Some CDs
run correctly, but
others do not
The software or hardware configuration may
be causing a problem. Make sure the
hardware configuration match’s your software’s
needs. Check the CD’s documentation.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Check the type of CD you are using. The drive
supports:
CD-DA,CD-Text, Photo CD-R (single/multisession), CD-ROM Mode 1, Mode 2 CD-ROMXA
Mode 2(Form1,Form2), Enhanced CD (CD-EXTRA),
CD-G(Audio CD only),Addressing Method 2.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
DVD-ROM drive (Black)
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
You cannot access
a DVD in the drive
Make sure the drive’s drawer is securely
closed. Press gently until it clicks into place.
Open the drawer and make sure the DVD is
properly seated. It should lie flat with the label
facing up.
9-10
Hardware and system checklist
A foreign object in the drawer could block laser
light from reading the DVD. Make sure there is no
obstruction. Remove any foreign object.
Check whether the DVD is dirty. If it is, wipe it
with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral
cleaner. See the CD/DVDs care section in
Chapter 4, Operating Basics,for details on
cleaning.
Some DVD/CDs
run correctly, but
others do not
The software or hardware configuration may
be causing a problem. Make sure the
hardware configuration matches your software’s
needs. Check the DVD/CD’s documentation.
Check the type of DVD/CD you are using. The drive
supports:
DVD-ROM, DVD-Video
CD-ROM:
CD-DA, CD-Text, Photo CD (single/
multi-session), CD-ROM Mode 1,
Mode 2, CD-ROMXA Mode 2
(Form1,Form2), Enhanced CD(CDEXTRA),CD-G(Audio CD only),
Addressing Method 2
Check the region code on the DVD. It must
match that on the DVD drive. Region codes are
listed in the DVD-ROM drive section in Chapter 2,
The Grand Tour.
DVD does not play
correctly in an
optional Expansion
Station
Some video discs might not play properly in a
Expansion Station. Play the disc in the
DVD-ROM drive installed in the computer.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-11
TROUBLESHOOTING
DVD-ROM:
User's Manual
CD-RW/DVD-ROM drive (Black)
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
You cannot access
a CD or DVD in the
drive
Make sure the drive’s drawer is securely
closed. Press gently until it clicks into place.
Open the drawer and make sure the CD or DVD
is properly seated. It should lie flat with the label
facing up.
TROUBLESHOOTING
A foreign object in the drawer could block laser
light from reading the CD or DVD. Make sure there
is no obstruction. Remove any foreign object.
Check whether the DVD is dirty. If it is, wipe it
with a clean cloth dipped in water or a neutral
cleaner. See the CD/DVDs care section in
Chapter 4, Operating Basics, for details on
cleaning.
Some DVD/CDs
run correctly, but
others do not
The software or hardware configuration may
be causing a problem. Make sure the
hardware configuration matches your software’s
needs. Check the DVD/CD’s documentation.
Check the type of DVD/CD you are using. The drive
supports:
9-12
DVD-ROM:
DVD-ROM, DVD-Video
CD-ROM:
CD-DA, CD-Text, Photo CD (single/
multi-session), CD-ROM Mode 1,
Mode 2, CD-ROMXA Mode 2
(Form1,Form2), Enhanced CD(CDEXTRA),CD-G(Audio CD only),
Addressing Method 2
Hardware and system checklist
Check the region code on the DVD. It must match
that on the DVD drive. Region codes are listed in
the DVD-ROM drive section in Chapter 2, The
Grand Tour.
Cannot write correctly
If you have trouble writing, make sure you are
observing the following precautions :
• Use only media recommended by TOSHIBA
• Do not use the mouse or keyboard during
writing.
• Use only the software supplied with the com
puter for recording.
• Do not run or start other software during writing.
• Do not jar the computer during writing.
• Do not connect/ disconnect external devices or
install/ remove internal cards during writing.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Diskette drive
Problem
Procedure
Drive does not
operate
There may be a faulty cable connection. Check
the connection to the computer and to the drive.
Some programs run
correctly but others
do not
The software or hardware configuration may be
causing a problem. Make sure the hardware
configuration matches your software needs.
You cannot access
the external
3 1/2" diskette drive
Try another diskette. If you can access the
diskette, the original diskette (not the drive) is
probably causing the problem.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-13
TROUBLESHOOTING
For more information, refer to Chapter 4, Operating Basics.
User's Manual
Infrared port
Refer also to the documentation for your IrDA compatible device and related
software.
Problem
Procedure
Infrared devices do
not work as expected
Check that the device is connected to an
electric outlet. Make sure the outlet is supplying
power by plugging in an appliance.
Make sure there is no obstruction blocking
communication between the computer and the
target device.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Printer
TROUBLESHOOTING
Refer to the troubleshooting and other relevant sections in your printer and
software documentation.
Problem
Procedure
Printer does not
turn on.
Check that the printer is connected to an electric
outlet. Make sure the outlet is supplying power by
plugging in an appliance.
Computer/printer
do not communicate
Make sure the printer is turned on and is
online (ready to use).
Inspect the cable connecting the printer to the
computer for damage. Make sure it is securely
connected.
A parallel printer connects to the parallel port and
a serial printer to the serial port. Make sure the
ports are configured correctly.
9-14
Hardware and system checklist
Make sure your software is configured to recognize the printer. Check your printer and software
documentation.
Printer error
Check your printer documentation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Pointing device
If you are using a PS/2 or serial mouse, also refer to Chapter 8, Optional Devices,
and to your mouse documentation. If you are using a USB mouse, also refer to the
USB section in this chapter and to your mouse documentation.
Touch Pad/AccuPoint
Problem
Check the Device Select settings. Open the
Mouse properties icon and click the Dual Point
tab. Then click the Detail Setting button and
click the Device Select tab.
Check that the Touch Pad is not selected.
Pressing Fn + F9 to enables TOSHIBA Dual
Pointing Device.
On-screen pointer
does not respond to
Pad/AccuPoint
operation
The system might be busy. If the pointer is
shaped as an hourglass, waitfor it to resum its
normal shape and try again to move it.
If a PS/2 or serial mouse is connected, check
the HW Setup window. The Pointing Device
option should be set to Simultaneous to use
both the AccuPoint and an external PS/2 mouse.
9-15
TROUBLESHOOTING
Either the Touch Pad
or the AccuPoint
does not work.
Procedure
User's Manual
Double-tapping
does not work
Try changing the double-click speed setting in the
mouse control utility.
1. Open the Control Panel, select the Mouse
icon and press Enter.
2. Click the Buttons tab.
3. Set the double-click speed as instructed and
click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves too fast or
too slow
Try changing the speed setting in the mouse
control utility.
1. Open the Control Panel,select the Mouse
icon and press Enter.
2. Click the Pointer Option tab.
3. Set the speed as instructed and click OK.
TROUBLESHOOTING
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
PS/2 mouse
Problem
Procedure
On-screen pointer
Check that the PS/2 mouse cable’s 6-pin
does not respond to
connector is firmly connected to the PS/2 mouse/
PS/2 mouse operation keyboard port.
You may have connected the mouse after turning
the computer on. Turn off the computer, make
sure the mouse is firmly connected and turn the
computer back on.
Is your software configured to recognize the
mouse? Check the software documentation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-16
Hardware and system checklist
Serial mouse
This section applies only with Windows®XP operating systems. You cannot use a
serial mouse with Windows®2000.
Problem
Procedure
On-screen pointer
Check for a firm connection between the
does not respond to
computer’s serial port and the cable’s 9-pin
serial mouse operation connector.
Did you connect the mouse before turning on the
computer?
Is your software configured to recognize the
mouse? Check the software documentation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
USB mouse
Problem
Procedure
On-screen pointer
does not respond to
mouse operation
The system might be busy. If the pointer is
shaped as an hourglass, wait for it to resume
its normal shape and try again to move it.
Make sure the mouse is properly connected to
the USB port.
Double-clicking
does not work
Try changing the double-click speed setting in
the mouse control utility.
9-17
TROUBLESHOOTING
This section applies only with Windows®XP operating systems. You cannot use a
serial mouse with Windows®2000.
User's Manual
1. Open the Control Panel, select the Mouse
icon and press Enter.
2. Click the Buttons tab.
3. Set the double-click speed as instructed and
click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves too fast or
too slow
Try changing the speed setting in the mouse
control utility.
1. Open the Control Panel, select the Mouse
icon and press Enter.
2. Click the Pointer Options tab.
3. Set the speed as instructed and click OK.
The mouse pointer
moves erratically
The mouse might be dirty. Refer to your mouse
documentations for instructions on cleaning.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
TROUBLESHOOTING
PC card
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices.
Problem
Procedure
PC card
error occurs
Reseat the PC card to make sure it is firmly
connected.
Make sure the connection between the external
device and the card is firm.
Check the card’s documentation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-18
Hardware and system checklist
SD card
Refer also to Chapter 4, Optional Devices.
Problem
Procedure
SD card
error occurs
Reseat the SD card to make sure it is firmly
connected.
Check the card’s documentation.
You cannot write
to an SD card
Make sure the card is not write protected.
You cannot read
a file
Make sure the target file is on the SD card
inserted in the slot.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Refer also to Chapter 8, Optional Devices, and to your monitor’s documentation.
Problem
Procedure
Monitor does not
turn on
Make sure that the external monitor’s power
switch is on. Confirm that the external monitor’s
power cable is plugged into a working power
outlet.
No display
Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls on the external monitor.
Press hotkeys Fn + F5 to change the display
priority and make sure it is not set for the internal
display.
9-19
TROUBLESHOOTING
Monitor
User's Manual
Display error occurs
Check that the cable connecting the external
monitor to the computer is attached firmly.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Sound system
Problem
Procedure
No sound is heard
Adjust the volume control dial.
Check the software volume settings.
TROUBLESHOOTING
Make sure the headphone connection is secure.
Check Windows Device Manager. Make sure the
sound function is enabled and that settings for I/
O address, Interrupt level and DMA are correct
for your software and do not conflict with other
hardware devices that you may have connected
to the computer.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
TV output signal
Refer also to your Personal Conferencing Kit’s documentation.
Problem
Procedure
Display on TV is poor
Make sure the TV type is correct for your area:
NTSC (US, JAPAN), PAL (Europe).
No display
Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls
on the external monitor.
9-20
Hardware and system checklist
Press hotkeys Fn + F5 to change the display.
Refer to Chapter 5, Keyboard.
NOTE: If you turn the computer off in Resume
mode while the display is on TV, the computer will
select either the internal LCD or an external
computer CRT as the display device.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
USB
Refer also to your USB device’s documentation.
Problem
Procedure
USB device does
not work
Check for a firm cable connection between the
USB ports on the computer and the USB device.
If you are using an operating system that does
not support USB, you can still use a USB mouse
and/or USB keyboard. If these devices do not
work, make sure the USB KB/Mouse Legacy
Emulation item in HW Setup is set to Enabled.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-21
TROUBLESHOOTING
Make sure the USB device drivers are properly
installed. Refer to your Windows documentation
for information on checking the drivers.
User's Manual
Modem
Refer to the online help files for Appendix C and D.
Problem
Procedure
Communication
software can't
initialize modem
Make sure the computer’s internal modem
settings are correct. Refer to Phone and Modem
Options in the Control Panel.
You can hear a dial
tone but can't make
a call
If the call is going through a PBX machine, make
sure the communication application’s tone dial
detection feature is disabled.
TROUBLESHOOTING
You can also use the ATX command. Refer to the
chapter on AT commands in online help files for
Appendix C, AT Commands.
You place a call,
but a connection
can't be made
Make sure the settings are correct in your
communications application.
After making a call
you can’t hear a ring
Make sure the tone or pulse selection in your
communications application is set correctly.
You can also use the ATD command. Refer to
the chapter on AT commands in online help files
for Appendix C, AT Commands.
Communication is
cut off unexpectedly
9-22
The computer will automatically cut off
communication when connection with the carrier
is not successful for a set time interval. Try
lengthening this time interval.
Hardware and system checklist
A CONNECT display
is quickly replaced by
NO CARRIER
Check the error control setting in your
communications application.
You can also use the AT\N command. Refer to
the chapter on AT commands in online help files
for Appendix C, AT Commands.
Character display
becomes garbled
during a
communication
In data transmission, make sure the parity bit
and stop bit settings correspond with those
of the remote computer.
Check the flow control and communication
protocol.
You cannot receive
an incoming call
Check the rings before auto answer setting in
your communications application.
You can also use the ATS0 command. Refer to
the chapter on S-registers in online help files for
Appendix D, S-registers.
TROUBLESHOOTING
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
Standby/Hibernation
Problem
Procedure
The system will
not enter
Standby/Hibernation
Is Windows Media™ Player open? The system
might not enter Standby/Hibernation, if Windows
Media Player is either playing a selection or
finished playing a selection. Close Windows
Media Player before you select Standby/
Hibernation.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
9-23
User's Manual
LAN
Problem
Procedure
Cannot access LAN
Check for a firm cable connection between the
LAN jackk and the LAN HUB.
Wake-up on LAN
does not work
Make sure the AC adaptor is connected. The
Wake-up on LAN function consumes power even
when the system is off.
If problems persist, consult your LAN
administrator.
Wireless LAN
TROUBLESHOOTING
If the following procedures do not restore LAN access, consult your LAN
administrator. For more information on wireless communication, refer to Chapter 4,
Operating Basics.
Problem
Procedure
Cannot access
Wireless LAN
Make sure the computer’s wireless
communication switch is set to on.
If problems persist, consult your LAN
administrator.
Bluetooth
For more information on wireless communication, refer to Chapter 4, Operating
Basics.
Problem
9-24
Procedure
TOSHIBA support
Cannot access
Bluetooth device
Make sure the computer’s wireless communication switch is set to on.
Make sure the Bluetooth Manager is running and
the power to the Bluetooth device is turned on.
Make sure no optional Bluetooth PC card is
installed in the computer. The built-in Bluetooth
function and an optional Bluetooth PC card
cannot operate simultaneously.
If problems persist, contact your dealer.
TOSHIBA support
If you require any additional help using your computer or if you are having problems operating the computer, you may need to contact TOSHIBA for additional
technical assistance.
Before you call
❑
Review troubleshooting sections in the documentation for software and
peripheral devices.
❑
If a problem occurs when you are running software applications, consult the
software documentation for troubleshooting suggestions. Call the software
company’s technical support for assistance.
❑
Consult the dealer you purchased your computer and/or software from. They
are your best sources for current information and support.
Where to write
If you are still unable to solve the problem and suspect that it is hardware related,
write to TOSHIBA at the nearest location listed on the below.
9-25
TROUBLESHOOTING
Some problems you experience may be related to software or the operating system,
it is important to investigate other sources of assistance first. Before contacting
TOSHIBA, try the following:
TROUBLESHOOTING
User's Manual
Outside of Europe
InEurope
Australia
TOSHIBA Australia Pty. Ltd.
Information Systems Division
84-92 Talavera Road
North Ryde N.S.W. 2113
Sydney
Canada
TOSHIBA of Canada Ltd.
191 McNabb Street,
Markham, Ontario
L3R8H2
China
TOSHIBA Computer Systems
(Shanghai)Co. Ltd.
Bldg.33,No.351,Jinzang Road, Pudong
New Area,
Shanghai,
P .R. China 201206
Singapore
TOSHIBA Singapore Pte. Ltd.
438B Alexandra Road #06-01
Alexandra Technopark
Singapore 119968
Germany & Austria
United States of America
TOSHIBA America Information
Systems, Inc.
9740 Irvine Boulevard
Irvine, California 92618
USA
9-26
TOSHIBA Europe (I.E.) GmbH
Geschäftsbereich,
Deutschland-Österreich
Hammfelddamm8,
D-41460 Neuss, Germany
France
TOSHIBA Systèms France S.A.
7, Rue Ampère B.P. 131,
92804 Puteaux Cedex
Netherlands
TOSHIBA Information Systems,
BeneluxB.V.
Rivium Boulevard
41 2909 LK Capelle a/d IJssel
Spain
TOSHIBA Information Systems,
ESPAÑA
Parque Empresarial San Fernando
Edificio Europa, la Planta,
Escalera A 28830 Madrid
UnitedKingdom
TOSHIBA Information Systems (U.K.)
Ltd.
TOSHIBA Court
Weybridge Business Park
Addlestone Road
Weybridge, Surrey KT15 2UL
The Rest of Europe
TOSHIBA Europe (I.E.) GmbH
Geschäftsbereich,
Deutschland-Österreich
Hammfelddamm8,
D-41460 Neuss, Germany
TOSHIBA support
TROUBLESHOOTING
9-27
Appendix A
Specifications ..................................................................................... A-1
Appendix B
Display Controller and Modes ...........................................................B-1
Appendix C
AT Commands ....................................................................................C-1
Appendix D
S-registers ........................................................................................... D-1
Appendix E
V.90 ...................................................................................................... E-1
Appendix F
nternal Modem Guide ........................................................................ F-1
Appendix G
Wireless LAN ...................................................................................... G-1
Appendix H
AC Power Cord and Connectors ........................................................H-1
Appendix I
Parts Numbers ..................................................................................... I-1
APPENDIXES
Appendixes
APPENDIXES
Specifications
This appendix summarizes the computer’s technical specifications.
Physical Dimensions
Size
With TFT display
327 (w) x 287.1(d) x 33.1(front) /34.1 (rear) millimeters (does
not include the thicker part of the bottom of the computer)
Weight(typical*)
2.8kilograms(Approximate), configured with :14"XGA display, fixed DVD-ROM drive,
256MB memory, 40GB(4200rpm) HDD, and 6 cells battery.
3.0kilograms(Approximate), configured with :15"UXGA display, CD-RW/DVD-ROM
drive, 512MB memory, 40GB(5400rpm) HDD, and 9 cells battery.
* Weight will vary depending on whether or not and what kind of options are
adopted.
Environmental Requirements
Conditions
Operating
Nonoperating
Thermal Gradient
Wet-bulb temperature
Conditions
Operating
Nonoperating
Ambient
temperature
Relative
humidity
5°C (41°F) to 35°C (95°F)
20% to 80%
-20°C (-4°F) to 65°C (149°F)
10% to 90%
20°C per hour maximum
26°Cmaximum
Altitude (from sea level)
-60 to 3,000 meters
-60 to 10,000 meters maximum
Power Requirements
AC adaptor
100- 240 volts AC
A-1
APPENDIX A
Appendix A
User's Manual
APPENDIX A
50 or 60 hertz (cycles per second)
Computer
15VDC
5.0 amperes
Built-in Modem
Network control unit (NCU)
Type of NCU
Type of line
Type of dialing
AA
Telephone line (analog only)
Pulse
Tone
Control command
AT commands
EIA-578 commands
Monitor function
Computer’s speaker
Communication specifications
Communication
system
Data:
Fax:
Communication
protocol
Data
ITU-T-Rec
V.21/V.22/V.22bis/V.32
(FormerCCITT)
/V.32bis/V.34/V.90
Bell
103/212A
Fax
ITU-T-Rec
V.17/V.29/V.27ter
(Former CCITT) /V.21 ch2
Communication
speed
Data transmission and reception
300/1200/2400/4800/7200/9600/12000/14400/
16800/19200/21600/24000/26400/28800/31200/
33600 bps
Data reception only with V.90
28000/29333/30666/32000/33333/34666/36000/37333/
38666/40000/41333/42666/44000/45333/46666/48000/
49333/50666/52000/53333/54666/56000bps
Fax
2400/4800/7200/9600/12000/14400bps
Error correcting
MNP class 4 and ITU-T V.42
Data compression
A-2
Full duplex
Half duplex
MNP class 5 and ITU-T V.42bis
Appendix B
Display Controller and
Modes
APPENDIX B
Display controller
The display controller interprets software commands into hardware commands that
turn particular pels on or off.
The controller is an advanced Video Graphics Array (VGA) that provides Super
VGA (SVGA) and Extended Graphics Array (XGA) support for the internal LCD and
external monitors.
Three models are available:
‰ 14" XGA, 1024 horizontal x 768 vertical pixels
‰ 15" XGA, 1024 horizontal x 768 vertical pixels
‰ 15"U XGA, 1600 horizontal x 1200 vertical pixels
A high-resolution external monitor connected to the computer can display up to
2048 horizontal and 1536 vertical pixels at up to 16M colors.
The display controller also controls the video mode, which uses industry standard
rules to govern the screen resolution and the maximum number of colors that can be
displayed on screen.
Software written for a given video mode will run on any computer that supports the
mode.
The computer’s display controller supports all VGA , SVGA and UXGA modes, the
most widely used industry standards.
B-1
User's Manual
Display modes
The modes below are based on the 400MHz DAC. Some modes may not be
supported in all production driver releases.
APPENDIX B
2D Display modes
All modes with resolutions to 1280*800, at refresh rates up to 200Hz, and color
depths of 8, 16 and 32 bpp are supported, but not indicated in the table below in
order to reduce the size of the table. Only modes above 1280*800 with color depths
up to 32bpp are shown.
Table 2D Single Display Modes
Resolution
1280*960
1280*1024
1360*768
1400*1050
1536*864
1600*900
B-2
Refresh Rate
60
75
85
100
120
160
60
75
75
85
90
100
120
160
62
60
60
85
100
120
160
60
75
85
100
120
Horizontal Scan (KHz)
60.0
75.0
85.9
101.6
123.8
168.9
64.0
74.7
80.0
91.1
97.2
108.7
131.8
179.4
49.4
64.0
53.8
76.9
91.5
111.2
151.3
56.0
70.5
80.1
95.5
115.6
Appendix B
Table 2D Single Display Modes(Continued)
Resolution
1600*1000
1600*1200
1600*1280
1792*1344
1800*1440
1856*1393
1920*1080
1920*1200
1920*1440
Horizontal Scan (KHz)
62.1
78.1
89.3
105.9
128.4
81.4
75.0
87.5
93.8
106.3
127.2
154.4
116.2
83.8
106.3
119.7
127.5
89.5
104.9
136.7
86.5
112.5
132.1
67.1
78.7
84.5
96.5
114.5
74.7
94.1
100.3
106.9
127.1
90.0
112.5
128.8
APPENDIX B
1600*1024
Refresh Rate
60
75
85
100
120
76
60
70
75
85
100
120
86.52
60
75
85
90
60
70
90
60
75
90
60
70
75
85
100
60
75
80
85
100
60
75
85
B-3
User's Manual
Table 2D Single Display Modes(Continued)
Resolution
Refresh Rate
60
75
85
100
60
70
75
85
90
60
66
70
75
APPENDIX B
2048*1152
2048*1280
2048*1536
Horizontal Scan (KHz)
71.5
90.0
103.1
122.0
79.5
93.2
100.3
114.0
121.6
95.2
105.5
111.9
120.1
3D modes
Table 1-3 3D Modes
Frame
Buffer
MB
Screen
Resolution
Color
depth
Bit/Pixel
Front
Buffer
MB
Back
Buffer
MB
Z buffer
Depth1
Z buffer
MB
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
16
16
32
32
64
640*480
640*480
800*600
800*600
1024*768
1024*768
1280*1024
1280*1024
1600*1200
1600*1200
1920*1200
2048*1536
16
32
16
32
16
32
16
32
16
32
32
32
0.59
1.17
0.92
1.83
1.50
3.00
2.50
5.00
3.66
7.32
8.79
12.0
0.59
1.17
0.92
1.83
1.50
3.00
2.50
5.00
3.66
7.32
8.79
12.0
16
16
16
32
32
16
16
32
32
32
32
32
0.59
0.59
0.92
1.83
3.00
1.50
2.50
5.00
7.32
7.32
8.79
12.0
1
32 bit Z-buffer can optionally be configured as 24 bit Z-Buffer plus 8 bit Stencil Buffer.
2
AGP configurations can use system memory for additional textures.
B-4
Local Texture
Menory2
WZ W/O Z
MB
MB
6.24
6.38
5.07
5.66
5.25
6.17
2.51
4.34
2.00
5.00
0.50
2.00
0.50
3.00
1.00
6.00
1.35
8.68
10.0
17.35
5.63
14.42
28.0
40.0
Primary use of
Configuration
Value systems
Mainstream systems
PC Workstations
Appendix C
AT Commands
In most cases, you will not need to type AT commands manually. However,
there might be some occasions when you will need to do so.
This chapter describes AT commands for data mode. Fax and voice commands
are taken care of by application software.
The format for entering AT commands is:
ATXn
Any command issued is acknowledged with a response in either text or numeric
values known as result codes.
All commands and command-values accepted by the modem are described in
this section; any entry other than those listed results in an error.
+++ Escape sequence
The escape sequence allows the modem to exit data mode and enter
on-line command mode. While in on-line command mode, you can
communicate directly to your modem using AT commands. Once you
finish, you can return to data mode using the ATO command.
A pause, the length of which is set by Escape Guard Time (S12), must
be completed after an escape sequence is entered, This pause prevents
the modem from interpreting the escape sequence as data.
The value of the escape sequence character may be changed using
register S2.
A/
Repeat last command
This command repeats the last command string entered. Do not
precede this command with an AT prefix or conclude it by pressing
Enter.
C-1
APPENDIX C
where X is the AT command, and n is the specific value for that command.
After you type in the command press Enter.
User's Manual
A
Answer command
This command instructs the modem to go off-hook and answer an
incoming call.
Bn Communication standard setting
This command determines the communication standard CCITT or Bell.
B0
Selects CCITT V.22 mode when the modem is at 1200 bps.
B1
Selects Bell 212A when the modem is at 1200 bps (default).
B15
Selects V.21 when the modem is at 300 bps.
B16
Selects Bell 103J when the modem is at 300 bps (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,15,16
APPENDIX C
ERROR Otherwise
Dn Dial
This command instructs the modem to dial a telephone number. Enter
n (the telephone number and any modifiers) after the ATD command.
Any digit or symbol (0-9, *, #, A, B, C, D) may be dialed as touch-tone
digits. Characters such as spaces, hyphens, and parentheses do not
count. They are ignored by the modem, but you may want to include
them to make the number and modifiers easier to read.
The following may be used as phone number modifiers:
C-2
P
Pulse dialing.
T
Touch-tone dialing (default).
,
Pause during dialing. Pause for time specified in Register S8
before processing the next character in the dial string.
W
Wait for dial tone. Modem waits for a second dial tone before
processing the dial string.
@
Wait for quiet answer. Wait for five seconds of silence after
dialing the number. If silence is not detected, the modem
sends a NO ANSWER result code back to the caller.
!
Hook flash. Causes the modem to go on-hook for 0.5 seconds
and then return to off-hook.
Appendix C
;
Return to command mode. Causes the modem to return to
command mode after dialing a number, without disconnecting
the call.
S=n
Dial a telephone number previously stored using the &Zn=X
command (See &Zn=X command for more information). The
range is 0-3.
En Echo command
This command controls whether or not the characters entered from
your computer keyboard are displayed on your monitor (echoed) while
the modem is in command mode.
E0
Disables echo to the computer.
E1
Enables echo to the computer (default).
Result Codes:
n=0,1
APPENDIX C
OK
ERROR Otherwise
Hn Hook control
This command instructs the modem to go on-hook to disconnect a call,
or off-hook to make the phone line busy.
H0
Modem goes on-hook (default).
H1
Modem goes off-hook.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
In
Request ID information
This command displays product information about the modem.
I0
Returns modem identity string and driver version number.
I3
Same as I0.
I9
Returns region ID in English.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,3,9
ERROR Otherwise
C-3
User's Manual
Ln Monitor speaker volume
This command sets speaker volume to low, medium, or high.
L0
Low volume.
L1
Low volume. (Same as L0)
L2
Medium volume (default).
L3
High volume.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR Otherwise
Mn Monitor speaker mode
APPENDIX C
This command turns the speaker on or off.
M0
The speaker is off.
M1
The speaker is on until the modem detects the carrier signal
(default).
M2
The speaker is always on when modem is off-hook.
M3
Speaker is on until the carrier is detected, except when
dialing.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR Otherwise
Nn Modulation handshake
This command controls whether or not the local modem performs a
negotiated handshake at connection time with the remote modem when
the communication speed of the two modems is different.
N0
When originating or answering, this is for handshake only at
the communication standard specified by S37 and the ATB
command.
N1
When originating or answering, begin the handshake at the
communication standard specified by S37 and the ATB
command (default).
During handshake, a lower transmission speed may be
selected.
C-4
Appendix C
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
On Return on-line to data mode
O0
Instructs the modem to exit on-line command mode and return
to data mode (see AT escape sequence, +++).
O1
This command issues a retrain before returning to on-line data
mode.
O3
This command issues a rate renegotiation before returning to
on-line data mode.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,3
P
Select pulse dialing
This command configures the modem for pulse (non touch-tone)
dialing. Dialed digits are pulsed until a T command or dial modifier is
received. Tone dial is the default setting.
Qn Result code control
Result codes are informational messages sent from the modem and
displayed on your monitor. Basic result codes are OK, CONNECT,
RING, NO CARRIER, and ERROR. The ATQ command allows the
user to turn result codes on or off.
Q0
Enables modem to send result codes to the computer
(default).
Q1
Disables modem from sending result codes to the computer.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
C-5
APPENDIX C
ERROR Otherwise
User's Manual
T
Select tone dialing
This command instructs the modem to send DTMF tones while dialing.
Dialed digits are tone dialed until a P command or dial modifier is
received. This is the default setting.
Vn DCE response format
This command controls whether result codes (including call progress
and negotiation progress messages) are displayed as words or their
numeric equivalents.
V0
Displays result codes as digits.
V1
Displays result codes as text (default).
Result Codes:
APPENDIX C
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
Xn Result code selection, call progress monitoring
This command selects which result codes will be used by the modem.
Command
Dial tone
Busy signal
Supported Result
detect
detect
Code
X0
Disable
Disable
OK, CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER,
ERROR
X1
Disable
Disable
OK, RING, NO CARRIER, ERROR,
CONNECT <RATE>
X2
Enable
Disable
OK, RING, NO CARRIER, ERROR,
NODIALTONE, CONNECT <RATE>
X3
Disable
Enable
OK, RING, NO CARRIER, ERROR,
BUSY, CONNECT <RATE>, BLACKLISTED
X4 (default) Enable
Enable
OK, RING, NO CARRIER, ERROR,
NODIALTONE, BUSY, CONNECT
<RATE>, DELAYED, BLACKLISTED,
REORDER, WARBLE, CALL WAITING
DETECTED
C-6
Appendix C
X5
Enable
Enable
OK, RING, NO CARRIER, ERROR,
NODIALTONE, BUSY, CONNECT
<RATE>, RRING, NO BONGTONE,
DELAYED, BLACKLISTED, REORDER,
WARBLE, CALL WAITING DETECTED
Dial tone detect
Disabled: The modem dials a call regardless of whether it detects a
dial tone.
Enabled:
The modem dials only upon detection of a dial tone, and
disconnects the call if the dial tone is not detected within
10 seconds.
Busy tone detect
APPENDIX C
Disabled: The modem ignores any busy tones it receives.
Enabled:
The modem monitors for busy tones.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3,4,5
ERROR Otherwise
Zn
Recall stored profile
The modem performs a soft reset and restores (recalls) the configuration profile according to the parameter supplied. If no parameter is
specified, zero is assumed. Either Z0 or Z1 restores the profile.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
&Cn Data Carrier Detect (DCD) control
Data Carrier Detect is a signal from the modem to the computer
indicating that a carrier signal is being received from a remote modem.
DCD normally turns off when the modem no longer detects the carrier
signal.
C-7
User's Manual
&C0
The state of the carrier from the remote modem is ignored.
DCD circuit is always on.
&C1
DCD turns on when the remote modem’s carrier signal is
detected, and off when the carrier signal is not detected
(default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
&Dn DTR control
APPENDIX C
This command interprets how the modem responds to the state of the
DTR signal and changes to the DTR signal.
&D0
Ignore. The modem ignores the true status of DTR and treats
it as always on. This should only be used if your communication software does not provide DTR to the modem
&D1
If the DTR signal is not detected while in on-line data mode,
the modem enters command mode, issues an OK result code,
and remains connected.
&D2
If the DTR signal is not detected while in on-line data mode,
the modem disconnects (default).
&D3
Reset on the on-to-off DTR transition.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3
ERROR Otherwise
&F Load factory settings
This command loads the configuration stored and programmed at the
factory. This operation replaces all of the command options and the Sregister settings in the active configuration with factory values.
&F
C-8
Recall factory setting as active configuration.
Appendix C
&Gn V.22bis guard tone control
This command determines which guard tone, if any, to transmit while
transmitting in the high band (answer mode). This command is only
used in V.22 and V.22bis mode. This option is not used in North
America and is for international use only.
&G0
Guard tone disabled (default).
&G1
Sets guard tone to 550 Hz.
&G2
Sets guard tone to 1800 Hz.
Result Codes:
n=0,1,2
OK
ERROR Otherwise
&Kn
Local flow control selection
Disable flow control.
&K3
Enable CTS/RTS flow control (default).
&K4
Enable XON/XOFF flow control.
APPENDIX C
&K0
Result Codes:
n=0,3,4
OK
ERROR Otherwise
&Pn
Select Pulse Dial Make/Break Ratio (WW)
&P0
Selects 39% - 61% make/break ratio at 10 pulses per second.
&P1
Selects 33% - 67% make/break ratio at 10 pulses per second.
&P2
Selects 33% - 67% make/break ratio at 20 pulses per second.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2
ERROR Otherwise
&Tn
Self-test commands
These tests can help to isolate problems if you experience periodic
data loss or random errors.
C-9
User's Manual
&T0
Abort. Stops any test in progress.
&T1
Local analog loop. This test verifies modem operation, as
well as the connection between the modem and computer.
Any data entered at the local DTE is modulated, then
demodulated, and returned to the local DTE. To work
properly, the modem must be off-line.
Result Codes:
OK
n=0
CONNECT
n=1
ERROR
Otherwise
APPENDIX C
&V Display Current Configuration
This command displays the current configuration of the modem. If
nonvolatile memory is supported the stored profiles are displayed as
well.
&V
View profiles.
&W Store current configuration
Saves the current (active) configuration (profile), including SRegisters.
The current configuration comprises a list of storable parameters
illustrated in the &V command. These settings are restored to the
active configuration upon receiving a Zn command or at power up.
Refer to the &V command.
&W
Stores the current configuration.
&Zn=x Store telephone number
This command is used to store up to four dialing strings in the
modem’s nonvolatile memory for later dialing. The format for the
command is &Zn=“stored number” where n is the location 0-3 to
which the number should be written. The dial string may contain up to
34 characters. The ATDS=n command dials using the string stored in
location n.
Result codes:
OK
n=0, 1, 2, 3
ERROR Otherwise
C-10
Appendix C
\Nn
Error control mode selection
\
This command determines the type of error control used by the modem
when sending or receiving data.
\N0
Buffer mode. No error control.
\N1
Direct mode.
\N2
MNP or disconnect mode. The modem attempts to connect
using MNP2-4 error control procedures. If this fails, the
modem disconnects.
This is also known as MNP reliable mode.
\N3
V.42, MNP, or buffered (default).
\N4
V.42 or disconnect. The modem attempts to connect in V.42
error control mode. If this fails, the modem disconnects.
\N5
V.42. MNP or buffered (same as \N3).
\N7
V.42. MNP or buffered (same as \N3).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,2,3,4,5,7
ERROR Otherwise
\Qn Local flow control selection
\Q0
Disable flow control.
\Q1
XON/XOFF software flow control.
\Q3
CTS/RTS to DTE (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1,3
ERROR Otherwise
C-11
APPENDIX C
The modem attempts to connect in V.42 error control mode.
If this fails, it attempts to connect in MNP mode. If this fails,
it connects in buffer mode and continues operation. This is
also known as V.42/MNP auto reliable mode (same as &Q5).
User's Manual
\Vn Protocol result code
\V0
Disable protocol result code appended to DCE speed.
\V1
Enable protocol result code appended to DCE speed (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,1
ERROR Otherwise
%B View numbers in blacklist
If blacklisting is in effect, this command displays the numbers for
which the last call attempted in the past two hours failed. The ERROR
result code appears in regions that do not require blacklisting.
APPENDIX C
%Cn
Data compression control
This command determines the operation of V.42bis and MNP class 5
data compression. On-line changes do not take effect until a disconnect
occurs first.
%C0
V.42bis/MNP 5 disabled. No data compression.
%C3
V.42bis/MNP 5 enabled. Data compression enabled (default).
Result Codes:
OK
n=0,3
ERROR Otherwise
C-12
Appendix C
APPENDIX C
C-13
Appendix D
S-registers
S-registers contain the settings that determine how a number of functions of the
internal modem operate. For example, how many times to let the telephone ring
before the modem answers and how long to wait before it hangs up if a connection fails. You can also customize certain AT commands such as the escape
sequence and command line termination.
The contents of the registers are changed automatically when you modify
corresponding settings in your communication software. If you choose,
however, you can display and edit the contents of the registers manually when
the modem is in command mode. If the value is out of the acceptable range, then
an error is generated.
This chapter describes the settings for each S-register.
S-register values
The format for displaying the value of an S-register is:
A PPENDIX D
rATSn?
wherein is the register number. After you type in the register pressrEnter.
The format for modifying the value of an S-register is:
rATSn=
wherein is the register number, and r is the new register value. After you type in
the register and its new value pressrEnter.
NOTE: Some registers vary from one country/region to another.
D-1
User's Manual
S0 Auto answer ring number
This register determines the number of rings the modem will count
before automatically answering a call. Enter 0 (zero) if you do not want
the modem to automatically answer at all. When disabled, the modem
can only answer with an ATA command.
Range: 0-255
Default: 0
Units:
rings
S1 Ring counter
This register is read only. The value of S1 is incremented with each
ring. If no ring occurs over a six-second interval, this register is
cleared.
Range: 0-225
Default: 0
Units:
rings
S2 AT escape character (user defined)
A PPENDIX D
This register determines the ASCII values used for an escape
sequence. The default is the + character. The escape sequence allows
the modem to exit data mode and enter command mode when on-line.
Values greater than 127 disable the escape sequence.
Range: 0-255, ASCII decimal
Default: 43
Units:
ASCII
S3 Command line termination character
(user defined)
This register determines the ASCII values as the carriage return
character. This character is used to end command lines and result
codes.
Range: 0-127, ASCII decimal
Default: 13 (carriage return)
Units:
D-2
ASCII
Appendix D
S4 Response formatting character (user defined)
This register determines the ASCII value used as the line feed
character. The modem uses a line feed character in command mode
when it responds to the computer.
Range: 0-127, ASCII decimal
Default: 10 (line feed)
Units:
ASCII
S5 Command line editing character (user defined)
This register sets the character recognized as a backspace and pertains
to asynchronous only. The modem will not recognize the backspace
character if it is set to a value that is greater than 32 ASCII. This
character can be used to edit a command line. When the echo command is enabled, the modem echoes back to the local DTE the backspace character, an ASCII space character, and a second backspace
character. This means a total of three characters are transmitted each
time the modem processes the backspace character.
Range: 0-127, ASCII decimal
Default: 8 (backspace)
Units:
ASCII
This register sets the length of time, in seconds, that the modem must
wait (pause) after going off-hook before dialing the first digit of the
telephone number. The modem always pauses for a minimum of two
seconds, even if the value of S6 is less that two seconds. The wait for
dial tone call progress feature (W dial modifier in the dial string) will
override the value in register S6. This operation, however, may be
affected by some ATX options according to country/region
restrictions. In some countries/regions, S6 will set dial tone detect time.
Range: 3-255
Default: 3
Units:
seconds
S7 Connection completion time-out
D-3
A PPENDIX D
S6 Wait before dialing
User's Manual
This register sets the time, in seconds, that the modem must wait
before hanging up because carrier is not detected. The timer is started
when the modem finishes dialing (originate), or goes off-hook
(answer). In originate mode, the timer is reset upon detection of an
answer tone if allowed by county restriction. The timer also specifies
the wait for silence time for the @ dial modifier in seconds. S7 is not
associated with the W dial modifier.
Range: 1-255
Default: 50
Units:
seconds
S8 Comma pause time
This register sets the time, in seconds, that the modem must pause
when it encounters a comma (,) in the dial command string. In some
countries/regions, S8 will set both wait before dialing and comma
pause time.
Range: 0-255
Default: 2
Units:
seconds
A PPENDIX D
S11 DTMF dialing speed
This register determines the dialing speed which is prefixed for each
country/region.
Range: 50-255
Default: 95
Units:
.001 seconds
S12 Escape guard time
This register sets the value (in 20 millisecond increments) for the
required pause after the escape sequence.
Range: 0-255
Default: 50
Units:
D-4
.02 seconds
Appendix D
S37 Dial line rate
maximum modem speed
S37 = 1
reserved
S37 = 2
1200/75 bps
S37 = 3
300 bps
S37 = 4
reserved
S37 = 5
1200 bps
S37 = 6
2400 bps
S37 = 7
4800 bps
S37 = 8
7200 bps
S37 = 9
9600 bps
S37 = 10
12000 bps
S37 = 11
14400 bps
S37 = 12
16800 bps
S37 = 13
19200 bps
S37 = 14
21600 bps
S37 = 15
24000 bps
S37 = 16
26400 bps
S37 = 17
28800 bps
S37 = 18
31200 bps
S37 = 19
33600 bps
A PPENDIX D
S37 = 0 (default)
D-5
User's Manual
AT command set result codes
The following table shows the result codes.
rThe result code summary
A PPENDIX D
Result Code
Numeric
Description
OK
0
Command executed
CONNECT
1
Modem connected to line
RING
2
A ring signal has been detected
NOCARRIER
3
Modem lost carrier signal, or does
not detect carrier signal, or does
not detect answer tone
ERROR
4
Invalid command
CONNECT 1200 EC*1
5
Connection at 1200 bps
NO DIAL TONE
6
No dial tone detected
BUSY
7
Busy signal detected
NO ANSWER
8
No quiet answer
CONNECT 2400 EC*1
10
Connection at 2400 bps
CONNECT 4800 EC*1
11
Connection at 4800 bps
CONNECT 9600 EC*1
12
Connection at 9600 bps
CONNECT 14400 EC*1
13
Connection at 14400 bps
CONNECT 19200 EC*1
14
Connection at 19200 bps
CONNECT 7200 EC*1
24
Connection at 7200 bps
CONNECT 12000 EC*1
25
Connection at 12000 bps
CONNECT 16800 EC*1
86
Connection at 16800 bps
CONNECT 300 EC*1
40
Connection at 300 bps
CONNECT 21600 EC*1
55
Connection at 21600 bps
CONNECT 24000 EC*1
56
Connection at 24000 bps
CONNECT 26400 EC*1
57
Connection at 26400 bps
CONNECT 28800 EC*1
58
Connection at 28800 bps
CONNECT 31200 EC*1
59
Connection at 31200 bps
CONNECT 33600 EC*1
60
Connection at 33600 bps
D-6
Appendix D
rResult Code
Numeric
Description
DELAYED*2
88
Delay is in effect for the dialed
number
BLACKLISTED*2
89
Dialed number is blacklisted
BLACKLISTFULL*2
90
Blacklist is full
*1: EC only appears when the Extended Result Codes configuration option is
enabled. EC is replaced by one of the following symbols, depending upon
the error control method used:
V.42bis - V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression.
V.42 - V.42 error control only.
MNP 5 - MNP class 4 error control and MNP class 5 data compression.
MNP 4 - MNP class 4 error control only.
NoEC - No error control protocol.
*2: In some countries/regions, these result codes may not appear.
A PPENDIX D
D-7
Appendix E
V.90
The TOSHIBA internal modem uses V.90 technology. The modem is capable of
downstream speeds of 56Kbps (kilobits per second) when connected to an Internet
service provider that supports V.90. As with any modem, the actual throughput
(speed of data transfer) depends on analog telephone line conditions, which can
vary considerably. Therefore, many users will experience throughput in the range of
32-44Kbps under normal telephone line conditions. Upstream data flows at the V.
34 rate.
NOTE: V.90 rates can be achieved only when one V.90 capable modem
is connected to another. The TOSHIBA Internal modem will select
automatically V.34 if the remote modem lacks V.90 capability or if a
combination of network and/or phone line conditions prevent V.90
connection.
V.90 mode
Function
Transmission speed
Data V.90
From 56K (maximum) to 28Kbps (minimum)
Reception only
APPENDIX E
E-1
User's Manual
APPENDIX E
Table E-1 Result codes for a V.90 connection
No. Result code
Description
70
CONNECT 32000 EC*
Connection at 32000 bits/s
72
CONNECT 36000 EC*
Connection at 36000 bits/s
74
CONNECT 40000 EC*
Connection at 40000 bits/s
76
CONNECT 44000 EC*
Connection at 44000 bits/s
78
CONNECT 48000 EC*
Connection at 48000 bits/s
80
CONNECT 52000 EC*
Connection at 52000 bits/s
82
CONNECT 56000 EC*
Connection at 56000 bits/s
100 CONNECT 28000 EC*
Connection at 28000 bits/s
101 CONNECT 29333 EC*
Connection at 29333 bits/s
102 CONNECT 30666 EC*
Connection at 30666 bits/s
103 CONNECT 33333 EC*
Connection at 33333 bits/s
104 CONNECT 34666 EC*
Connection at 34666 bits/s
105 CONNECT 37333 EC*
Connection at 37333 bits/s
106 CONNECT 38666 EC*
Connection at 38666 bits/s
107 CONNECT 41333 EC*
Connection at 41333 bits/s
108 CONNECT 42666 EC*
Connection at 42666 bits/s
109 CONNECT 45333 EC*
Connection at 45333 bits/s
110 CONNECT 46666 EC*
Connection at 46666 bits/s
111 CONNECT 49333 EC*
Connection at 49333 bits/s
112 CONNECT 50666 EC*
Connection at 50666 bits/s
113 CONNECT 53333 EC*
Connection at 53333 bits/s
114 CONNECT 54666 EC*
Connection at 54666 bits/s
*EC stands for the Error Control method, which appears only when the extended
result codes configuration option is enabled. EC is replaced by one of the following symbols, depending on the error control method used.
V42bis
V42
NoEC
E-2
V.42 error control and V.42bis data compression
V.42 error control only
No error control protocol
Appendix E
AT Command
-V90=* V.90 Dial Line Rate
-V90 sets the maximum V.90 downstream that the modem attempts to
connect.
-V90=0 V.90 disabled
-V90=1 V.90 enabled: automatic speed selection - maximum modem speed
(default)
APPENDIX E
E-3
Appendix F
Internal Modem Guide
This appendix describes how to install and the remove the internal modem.
CAUTION: Do not disassemble the computer beyond the steps described
in this instruction or touch any components not specifically described.
Installing the modem board
To install the modem board, follow the steps below.
1. Save your data, quit Windows and turn off the power.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and any other peripheral devices.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack.
4. Remove two screws securing the modem cover and remove the cover.
5. Remove two screws, which you use later to secure the modem board.
6. Seat the modem board.
7. Connect the modem board cable.
8. Secure the modem board with two screws removed in step 5.
9. Seat the modem board cover and secure it with two screws.
10. Install the battery pack.
F-1
APPENDIX F
NOTE: The internal modem is preinstalled. The following is for information only.
User’s Manual
Removing the modem board
To remove the internal modem.
1. Save your data, quit Windows and turn off the power.
2. Disconnect the AC adaptor and any other peripheral devices.
3. Turn the computer upside down and remove the battery pack.
4. Remove two screws securing the modem cover and remove the cover.
5. Remove two screws securing the modem board.
6. Lift out the modem board.
7. Disconnect the modem board cable.
8. Secure the modem board with two screws removed in step 5.
APPENDIX F
9. Seat the modem board cover and secure it with two screws.
10. Install the battery pack.
The internal modem is approved by Japan Approvals Institute for Telecommunications Equipment.
A02-0604JP
F-2
Wireless LAN
This appendix is intended to help you get your Wireless LAN network up and
running, with a minimum of parameters.
Card specifications
Form Factor
Capability
■
■
■
Network
Operating
System
Media Access
Protocol
Data Rate
■
■
■
■
■
Mini PCI TypeIII
IEEE 802.11 Standard for Wireless LANS (DSSS)
Wi-Fi (Wireless Fidelity) certified by the Wireless
Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA)
Microsoft Windows® Networking
CSMA/CA (Collision Avoidance) with
Acknowledgment (ACK)
54/48/36/24/18/12/ 9/6 Mb/s (Revision A)
11/5.5/2/1 Mb/s (Revision B)
108/96/72/48/36/24/ 18/12 Mb/s (Turbo Mode)
Radio characteristics
Radio characteristics of Wireless LAN cards may vary according to:
◆ Country/region where the product was purchased
◆ Type of product
Wireless communication is often subject to local radio regulations. Although
Wireless LAN wireless networking products have been designed for operation in
the license-free 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz band, local radio regulations may impose a
number of limitations to the use of wireless communication equipment.
NOTE: Refer to the sheet Information to the User for regulatory information
that may apply in your country/region.
G-1
APPENDIX G
Appendix G
APPENDIX G
User’s Manual
■ Band 5 GHz (5150-5850 MHz) (Revision A,
Turbo Mode)
■ Band 2.4 GHz (2400-2483.5 MHz)
(Revision B)
Modulation Technique Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum
■ CCK, DQPSK, DBPSK (Revision B)
■ OFDM-BPSK, OFDM-QPSK, OFDM16QAM, OFDM-64QAM (Revision A, Turbo
Mode)
The range of the wireless signal is related to the transmit rate of the wireless
communication. Communications at lower transmit range may travel larger
distances.
◆ The range of your wireless devices can be affected when the antennas are
placed near metal surfaces and solid high-density materials.
◆ Range is also affected by “obstacles” in the signal path of the radio signals
that may either absorb or reflect the radio signal.
R-F Frequency
Supported frequency sub-bands
Subject to the radio regulations that apply in your country/region, your Wireless
LAN card may support a different set of 5 GHz/2.4 GHz channels.
Consult your Authorized Wireless LAN or TOSHIBA Sales office for
information about the radio regulations that apply in your country/region.
Wireless IEEE 802.11 Channels Sets (Revision B)
Frequency Range Channel ID
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
* Factory-set default channels
G-2
2400-2472 MHz
2412
2417
2422
2427
2432
2437
2442
2447
2452
2457*
2462
Appendix G
Wireless IEEE 802.11 Channels Sets (Revision A)
Frequency Range Channel ID
36
40
44
48
52
56
60
64
149
153
157
161
5150-5850 MHz
5180
5200
5220
5240
5260
5280
5300
5320
5745
5765
5785
5805
Note
US only *
US only *
US only *
US only *
* Available Area: US (USA, CANADA) only
A peer-to-peer mode is available under the following condition:
A Wireless LAN card receives a “US county/region code” beacon of the standard
IEEE 802.11 (Revision D) from a Wireless LAN Access Point.
G-3
APPENDIX G
When installing Wireless LAN cards, the channel configuration is managed as
follows:
◆ For wireless clients that operate in a Wireless LAN Infrastructure, the
Wireless LAN card will automatically start operation at the channel
identified by the Wireless LAN Access Point. When roaming between
different access points the station can dynamically switch to another
channel if required.
◆ For Wireless LAN cards installed in wireless clients operating in a peer-topeer mode, the card will use the default channel 10.
◆ In a Wireless LAN Access Point, the Wireless LAN card will use the
factoryset default channel (printed in bold), unless the LAN Administrator
selected a different channel when configuring the Wireless LAN Access
Point device.
APPENDIX G
User’s Manual
Wireless Channels Sets (Turbo Mode)
Frequency Range Channel ID
42
50
58
152
160
5150-5850 MHz
5210
5250
5290
5760
5800
Note
US only *
US only *
US only *
US only *
US only *
* Available Area: US (USA, CANADA) only
A peer-to-peer mode is available under the following condition:
A Wireless LAN card receives a “US county/region code” beacon of the standard
IEEE 802.11 (Revision D) from a Wireless LAN Access Point.
G-4
Appendix H
AC Power Cord and
Connectors
Length:
Minimum 2 meters
Wire size:
Minimum 0.75 mm2
Current rating:
Minimum 2.5 amperes
Voltage rating:
125 or 250 VAC
(depending on country/region’s power standards)
Certification agencies
U.S. and Canada:
UL listed and CSA certified
No. 18 AWG, Type SVT or SPT-2 two conductor
Europe:
Austria:
OVE
Italy:
IMQ
Belgium:
CEBEC
The Netherlands:
KEMA
Denmark:
DEMKO
Norway:
NEMKO
Finland:
FIMKO
Sweden:
SEMKO
France:
UTE
Switzerland:
SEV
Germany:
VDE
United Kingdom:
BSI
Australia:
AS
Japan:
DENANHO
In Europe, power cords must be VDE type, H05VVH2-F and two conductor.
For the United States and Canada, plug configuration must be a 2-15P (250 V) or 115P (125 V) as designated in the U.S. National Electrical code handbook and the
Canadian Electrical Code Part II.
H-1
APPENDIX H
The power cord’s AC input plug must be compatible with the various international
AC power outlets and the cord must meet the standards for the country/region in
which it is used. All cords must meet the following specifications:
User's Manual
The following illustrations show the plug shapes for the U.S.A. and Canada, the
United Kingdom, Australia and Europe.
United Kingdom
UL approved
CSA approved
BS approved
APPENDIX H
USA and Canada
Australia
AS approved
H-2
Europe
Approved by the
appropriate agency
Appendix I
Parts Numbers
The computer configuration and parts numbers, printed on a label on the bottom of
the computer, indicate the CPU, LCD, memory, HDD, Slim Select Bay modules and
communication devices.
APPENDIX I
I-1
APPENDIX I
The following table shows the computer configuration indicated on a label. Shaded areas indicate abbreviations used on the label.
The explanations are to the left of the shading. Abbreviations are not limited to those in this chart. They may change without
notice.
CPU
Pentium®M
LCD
Memory
HDD
Slim Select Bay
Communication
1.3G PM1.3 14"TFT-XGA
14X
128MB
128M
20G 20
CD-ROM
CD
1.4G PM1.4 15"TFT-XGA
15X 128+128MB
256M
30G 30
DVD-ROM
DVD
802.11b
1.5G PM1.5 15"TFT-UXGA 15U
256MB
1.6G PM1.6
256+128MB
256M
384M
40G 40
60G 60
CD-R/RW
CD-RW/DVD-ROM
CRW
RW/DV
BT(*)
802.11b/BT(*)
256+256MB
512MB
512+128MB
512+256MB
512M
512M
640M
768M
80G 80
DVD Multi
DRM
802.11a/b combo/BT(*) WLab/BT
512+512MB
1024M
802.11a/b combo
WLb
WLab
BT
WLb/BT
* Figures indicate the CPU operating speed in gigahertz. For example, PM1.6 means Mobile Intel® Pentium®M processor
1.6GHz-M .
User's Manual
I-2
Configurations
The terms in this glossary cover the topics discussed in this manual. Alternate
naming is included for reference.
Abbreviations
HDD: hard disk drive
AC: alternating current
IDE: integrated drive electronics
AGP: accelerated graphics port
I/O: input/output
ANSI: American National Standards
Institute
IrDA: Infrared Data Association
APM: advanced power manager
KB: kilobyte
ASCII: American Standard Code for
Information Interchange
LCD: liquid crystal display
BIOS: basic input output system
LSI: large scale integration
CMOS: complementary metal-oxide
semiconductor
MDA: monochrome display adapter
CPU: central processing unit
CRT: cathode ray tube
DC: direct current
IRQ: interrupt request
LED: light emitting diode
MPEG: moving picture coding experts
group
MS-DOS: Microsoft Disk Operating
System
DOS: disk operating system
OCR: optical character recognition
(reader)
DMA: direct memory access
PCB: printed circuit board
DRAM: dynamic random access
memory
PCI: peripheral component interconnect
DSVD: Digital Simultaneous Voice and
Data
PCMCIA: Personal Computer Memory
Card International Association
DVD: Digital Versatile Disc
RAM: random access memory
DVI: Digital Visual Interface
RGB: red, green, and blue
ECP: extended capabilities port
ROM: read only memory
EGA: enhanced graphics adapter
RTC: real time clock.
FDD: floppy disk drive
SCSI: small computer system interface
FIR: fast infrared
SIO: serial input/output
DDC: display data channel
Glossary-1
GLOSSARY
Glossary
GLOSSARY
AccuPoint
(Abbreviationscontinued)
SO-DIMM: small-outline dual in-line
memory module
SVGA: super video graphics adapter
SDRAM: synchronized dynamic
random access memory
TFT: thin-film transistor
UART: universal asynchronous
receiver/transmitter
USB: Universal Serial Bus
VESA: Video Electronic Standards
Association
VGA: video graphics array
VRM: video ready modem
VRT: voltage reduction technology
A
AccuPoint: A pointing device integrated into the TOSHIBA computer
keyboard.
adapter: A device that provides an
interface between two dissimilar
electronic devices. For example, the AC
adapter modifies the power from a wall
outlet for use by the computer. This
term also refers to the add-in circuit
cards that control external devices, such
as video monitors and magnetic tape
devices.
allocate: To assign a space or function
for a specific task.
Glossary-2
alphanumeric: Keyboard characters
including letters, numbers and other
symbols, such as punctuation marks or
mathematical symbols.
alternating current (AC): Electric
current that reverses its direction of flow
at regular intervals.
analog signal: A signal whose characteristics such as amplitude and frequency vary in proportion to (are an
analog of) the value to be transmitted.
Voice communications are analog
signals.
ANSI: American National Standards
Institute. An organization established
to adopt and define standards for a
variety of technical disciplines. For
example, ANSI defined the ASCII
standard and other information processing requirements.
antistatic: A material used to prevent
the buildup of static electricity.
application: A group of programs that
together are used for a specific task
such as accounting, financial planning,
spreadsheets, word processing, and
games, etc.
ASCII: American Standard Code for
Information Interchange. ASCII code is
a set of 256 binary codes that represent
the most commonly used letters,
numbers, and symbols.
async: Short for asynchronous.
Byte
AUTOEXEC.BAT: A batch file that
executes a series of MS-DOS commands
and programs each time you start the
computer.
B
backup: A duplicate copy of files kept
as a spare in case the original is
destroyed.
batch file: A file that can be executed
from the system prompt containing a
sequence of operating system commands or executable files. See also
AUTOEXEC.BAT.
binary: The base two number system
composed of zeros and ones (off or on),
used by most digital computers. The
right most digit of a binary number has a
value of 1, the next a value of 2, then 4, 8,
16, and so on. For example, the binary
number 101 has a value of 5. See also
ASCII.
Bluetooth: A short-range radio
technology designed to simplify
wireless communication among
computers, communication devices and
the Internet.
board: A circuit board. An internal card
containing electronic components,
called chips, which perform a specific
function or increase the capabilities of
the system.
boot: Short for bootstrap. A program
that starts or restarts the computer. The
program reads instructions from a
storage device into the computer’s
memory.
bps: Bits per second. Typically used to
describe the data transmission speed of
a modem.
buffer: The portion of the computer’s
memory where data is temporarily
stored. Buffers often compensate for
differences in the rate of flow from one
device to another.
bus: An interface for transmission of
signals, data or electric power.
byte: The representation of a single
character. A sequence of eight bits
treated as a single unit; also the smallest
addressable unit within the system.
BIOS: Basic Input Output System. The
firmware that controls data flow within
the computer. See also firmware.
bit: Derived from “binary digit,” the
basic unit of information used by the
computer. It is either zero or one. Eight
bits is one byte. See also byte.
Glossary-3
GLOSSARY
asynchronous: Lacking regular time
relationship. As applied to computer
communications, asynchronous refers
to the method of transmitting data that
does not require a steady stream of bits
to be transmitted at regular time
intervals.
GLOSSARY
cache memory
C
cache memory: High speed memory
which stores data that increases
processor speed and data transfer rate.
When the CPU reads data from main
memory, it stores a copy of this data in
cache memory. The next time the CPU
needs that same data, it looks for it in
the cache memory rather than the main
memory, which saves time. The
computer has two cache levels. Level
one is incorporated into the processor
and level two resides in external
memory.
CGA: Color/graphics adapter. A video
display protocol defined by the IBM
Color/Graphics Monitor Adapter and its
associated circuitry. This protocol
supports two-color 640x200 and fourcolor 320x200 graphics, and 16-color
640x200 and 320x200 text modes.
character: Any letter, number,
punctuation mark, or symbol used by
the computer. Also synonymous with
byte.
chassis: The frame containing the
computer.
CardBus: An industry standard bus for
32-bit PC Cards.
chip: A small semiconductor containing computer logic and circuitry for
processing, memory, input/output
functions and controlling other chips.
capacity: The amount of data that can
be stored on a magnetic storage device
such as a diskette (floppy disk) or hard
disk. It is usually described in terms of
kilobytes (KB), where one KB = 1024
bytes and megabytes (MB), where one
MB = 1024 KB.
CMOS: Complementary Metal-Oxide
Semiconductor. An electronic circuit
fabricated on a silicon wafer that
requires very little power. Integrated
circuits implemented in CMOS technology can be tightly packaged and are
highly reliable.
CD-ROM: A Compact Disk-Read
Only Memory is a high capacity disk
that can be read from but not written
to. The CD-ROM drive uses a laser,
rather than magnetic heads, to read
data from the disk.
cold start: Starting a computer that is
currently off (turning on the power).
card: Synonym for board. See board.
Centronics: The printer manufacturer
whose method of data transmission
between a parallel printer and a
computer has become an industry
standard.
Glossary-4
COM1, COM2, COM3 and COM4:
The names assigned to the serial and
communication ports.
commands: Instructions you enter at
the terminal keyboard that direct the
actions of the computer or its peripheral
devices.
communications: The means by which
a computer transmits and receives data
to and from another computer or device.
See parallel interface; serial interface.
delete
components: Elements or parts (of a
system) which make up the whole
(system).
computer program: A set of instructions written for a computer that enable
it to achieve a desired result.
computer system: A combination of
hardware, software, firmware, and
peripheral components assembled to
process data into useful information.
configuration: The specific components in your system (such as the
terminal, printer, and disk drives) and
the settings that define how your
system works. You use the Hardware
Setup, MaxTime or HW Setup program
to control your system configuration.
control keys: A key or sequence of
keys you enter from the keyboard to
initiate a particular function within a
program.
CPS: Characters per second. Typically
used to indicate the transmission speed
of a printer.
CPU: Central processing unit. The
portion of the computer that interprets
and executes instructions.
CRT: Cathode Ray Tube. A vacuum
tube in which beams projected on a
fluorescent screen-producing luminous
spots. An example is the television set.
cursor: A small, blinking rectangle or
line that indicates the current position
on the display screen.
D
data: Information that is factual,
measurable or statistical that a computer can process, store, or retrieve.
data bits: A data communications
parameter controlling the number of
bits (binary digits) used to make up a
byte. If data bits = 7 the computer can
generate 128 unique characters. If data
bits = 8 the computer can generate 256
unique characters.
DC: Direct Current. Electric current
that flows in one direction. This type of
power is usually supplied by batteries.
controller: Built-in hardware and
software that controls the functions of a
specific internal or peripheral device (e.
g. keyboard controller).
default: The parameter value automatically selected by the system when you
or the program do not provide
instructions. Also called a preset value.
co-processor: A circuit built into the
processor that is dedicated to intensive
math calculations.
delete: To remove data from a disk or
other data storage device. Synonymous with erase.
Glossary-5
GLOSSARY
compatibility: 1) The ability of one
computer to accept and process data in
the same manner as another computer
without modifying the data or the media
upon which it is being transferred. 2)
the ability of one device to connect to
or communicate with another system or
component.
GLOSSARY
device driver
device driver: A program that controls
communication between a specific
peripheral device and the computer. The
CONFIG.SYS file contains device drivers
that MS-DOS loads when you turn the
computer on.
driver: A software program, generally
part of the operating system, that
controls a specific piece of hardware
(frequently a peripheral device such as
a printer or mouse).
dialog box: A window that accepts
user input to make system settings or
record other information.
E
disk drive: The device that randomly
accesses information on a disk and
copies it to the computer’s memory. It
also writes data from memory to the
disk. To accomplish these tasks, the unit
physically rotates the disk at high speed
past a read-write head.
disk storage: Storing data on magnetic
disk. Data is arranged on concentric
tracks much like a phonograph record.
diskette: A removable disk that stores
magnetically encoded data used on a
microcomputer. Also called floppy disk.
diskette drive: An electromechanical
device that reads and writes to floppy
disks. See also diskette.
display: A CRT, plasma screen, LCD, or
other image producing device used to
view computer output.
documentation: The set of manual and/
or other instructions written for the
users of a computer system or
application. Computer system documentation typically includes procedural and
tutorial information as well as system
functions.
DOS: Disk operating system. See
operating system.
Glossary-6
echo: To send back a reflection of the
transmitted data to the sending device.
You can display the information on the
screen, or output it to the printer, or
both. When a computer receives back
data it transmitted to a CRT (or other
peripheral device) and then retransmits
the data to the printer, the printer is said
to echo the CRT.
EGA: Enhanced Graphics Adapter. A
video display protocol defined by the
IBM Enhanced Graphics Adapter and
its associated circuitry for direct drive
TTL displays that supports 16-color/
monochrome 640x350 and 16-color
640x200 and 320x200 graphics, and 16color 640x350 and 320x350 text modes.
erase: See delete.
escape: 1) A code ( ASCII code 27),
signaling the computer that what
follows are commands; used with
peripheral devices such as printers and
modems. 2) A means of aborting the
task currently in progress.
escape guard time: A time before and
after an escape code is sent to the
modem which distinguishes between
escapes that are part of the transmitted
data, and escapes that are intended as a
command to the modem.
host computer
Extended Capability Port: An industry
standard that provides a data buffer,
switchable forward and reverse data
transmission, and run length encoding
(RLE) support.
F
fast infrared: An industry standard that
enables cableless infrared serial data
transfer at speeds of up to 4 Mbps.
file: A collection of related information;
a file can contain data, programs, or
both.
firmware: A set of instructions built
into the hardware which controls and
directs a microprocessor’s activities.
fixed disk: See hard disk.
floppy disk: See diskette.
floppy disk drive (FDD): See diskette
drive.
Fn-esse: A TOSHIBA utility that lets
you assign functions to hotkeys.
format: The process of readying a blank
disk for its first use. Formatting establishes the structure of the disk that the
operating system expects before it writes
files or programs onto the disk.
folder: An icon in Windows used to
store documents or other folders.
function keys: The keys labeled F1
through F12 that tell the computer to
perform certain functions.
G
gigabyte (GB): A unit of data storage
equal to 1024 megabytes. See also
megabyte.
GND: Ground. An RS-232C signal used
in the exchange of data between a
computer and serial device.
graphics: The use of drawings,
pictures, or other images, such as charts
or graphs, to present information.
H
hard disk: A non-removable disk
usually referred to as drive C. Also
called fixed disk.
hard disk drive (HDD): An electromechanical device that reads and writes a
hard disk. See also hard disk.
hardware: The physical electronic and
mechanical components of a computer
system: typically, the computer itself,
external disk drives, etc. See also
software and firmware.
hertz: A unit of wave frequency that
equals one cycle per second.
hexadecimal: The base 16 numbering
system composed of the digits 0
through 9 and the letters A, B, C, D, E,
and F.
host computer: The computer that
controls, regulates, and transmits
information to a device or another
computer.
Glossary-7
GLOSSARY
execute: To interpret and execute an
instruction.
GLOSSARY
hot dock/undock
hot dock/undock: Connecting or
disconnecting a device to or from the
computer while the computer’s power is
turned on.
hotkey: The computer’s feature in
which certain keys in combination with
the extended function key, Fn, can be
used to set system parameters, such as
speaker volume.
HW Setup: A TOSHIBA utility that lets
you set the parameters for various
hardware components.
I
icon: A small graphic image displayed
on the screen or in the indicator panel.
In Windows, an icon represents an
object that the user can manipulate.
iLINK (IEEE1394): This port enables
high-speed data transfer directly from
external devices such as digital video
cameras.
infrared port: A cableless communications capable of using infrared signals
to send serial data.
input: The data or instructions you
provide to a computer, communication
device or other peripheral device from
the keyboard or external or internal
storage devices. The data sent (or
output) by the sending computer is
input for the receiving computer.
instruction: Statements or commands
that specify how to perform a particular
task.
Glossary-8
interface: 1) Hardware and/or software
components of a system used specifically to connect one system or device to
another. 2) To physically connect one
system or device to another to exchange
information. 3) The point of contact
between user, the computer, and the
program, for example, the keyboard or a
menu.
interrupt request: A signal that gives a
component access to the processor.
I/O: Input/output. Refers to acceptance
and transfer of data to and from a
computer.
I/O devices: Equipment used to
communicate with the computer and
transfer data to and from it.
J
jumper: A small clip or wire that allows
you to change the hardware characteristics by electrically connecting two
points of a circuit.
K
K: Taken from the Greek word kilo,
meaning 1000; often used as equivalent
to 1024, or 2 raised to the 10th power.
See also byte and kilobyte.
KB: See kilobyte.
modem
kilobyte (KB): A unit of data storage
equal to 1024 bytes. See also byte and
megabit.
L
M
main board: See motherboard.
MDA: Monochrome Display Adapter.
A video display protocol defined by the
IBM Monochrome Display Adapter and
its associated circuitry for direct drive
TTL displays that supports a monochrome 720x350 text mode.
megabyte (MB): A unit of data storage
equal to 1024 kilobytes. See also
kilobyte.
level 2 cache: See cache.
megahertz: A unit of wave frequency
that equals 1 million cycles per second.
See also hertz.
Light Emitting Diode (LED): A
semiconductor device that emits light
when a current is applied.
menu: A software interface that
displays a list of options on the screen.
Also called a screen.
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD): Liquid
crystal sealed between two sheets of
glass coated with transparent conducting material. The viewing-side coating is
etched into character forming segments
with leads that extend to the edge of the
glass. Applying a voltage between the
glass sheets darkens the liquid crystal to
provide contrast to lighted portions of
the display.
microprocessor: A hardware component contained in a single integrated
circuit that carries out instructions. Also
called the central processing unit (CPU),
one of the main parts of the computer.
LSI: Large Scale Integration. 1) A
technology that allows the inclusion of
up to 100,000 simple logic gates on a
single chip. 2) An integrated circuit that
uses the large scale integration.
MMX: Refers to microprocessors with
additional instructions beyond the x86
standard. The instructions were
developed on the basis of multimedia
code requirements and thus improve the
performance of multimedia applications.
mode: A method of operation, for
example, the boot mode or the resume
mode.
modem: Derived from modulator/
demodulator, a device that converts
(modulates) digital data for transmission
over telephone lines and then converts
modulated data (demodulates) to digital
format where received.
Glossary-9
GLOSSARY
keyboard: An input device containing
switches that are activated by manually
pressing marked keys. Each keystroke
activates a switch that transmits a
specific code to the computer. For each
key, the transmitted code is, in turn,
representative of the (ASCII) character
marked on the key.
GLOSSARY
monitor
monitor: A device that uses rows and
columns of pixels to display alphanumeric characters or graphic images. See
CRT.
motherboard: A name sometimes used
to refer to the main printed circuit board
in processing equipment. It usually
contains integrated circuits that perform
the processor’s basic functions and
provides connectors for adding other
boards that perform special functions.
Sometimes called a main board.
MPEG: Moving picture coding expert
group is an industry standard architecture for compression of video signals.
O
OCR: Optical Character Recognition
(reader). A technique or device that
uses laser or visible light to identify
characters and input them into a storage
device.
OCR wand: A device that reads, using
an optical device, hand written or
machine printed symbols into a
computer. See also OCR.
on-line state: A functional state of a
peripheral device when it is ready to
receive or transmit data.
non-system disk: A formatted diskette
(floppy disk) you can use to store
programs and data but you cannot use
to start the computer. See system disk.
operating system: A group of programs
that controls the basic operation of a
computer. Operating system functions
include interpreting programs, creating
data files, and controlling the transmission and receipt (input/output) of data
to and from memory and peripheral
devices.
nonvolatile memory: Memory, usually
read-only (ROM), that is capable of
permanently storing information.
Turning the computer’s power off does
not alter data stored in nonvolatile
memory.
output: The results of a computer
operation. Output commonly indicates
data 1) printed on paper, 2) displayed at
a terminal, 3) sent through the serial port
of internal modem, or 4) stored on some
magnetic media.
N
numeric keypad overlay: A feature that
allows you to use certain keys on the
keyboard to perform numeric entry, or
to control cursor and page movement.
P
parallel: Refers to two or more processes or events that can occur
simultaneously, and without interfering
with each other. See also serial.
parallel interface: Refers to a type of
information exchange that transmits
information one byte (8 bits) at a time.
See also serial interface.
Glossary-10
RAM
password: A unique string of characters
used to identify a specific user. The
computer provides various levels of
password protection such as user,
supervisor and eject.
pel: The smallest area of the display that
can be addressed by software. Equal in
size to a pixel or group of pixels. See
pixel.
peripheral component interconnect: An
industry standard 32-bit bus.
peripheral device: An I/O device that is
external to the central processor and/or
main memory such as a printer or a
mouse.
plug and play: A capability with
Windows that enables the system to
automatically recognize connections of
external devices and make the necessary
configurations in the computer.
pixel: A picture element. The smallest
dot that can be made on a display or
printer. Also called a pel.
port: The electrical connection through
which the computer sends and receives
data to and from devices or other
computers.
Port Replicator: Devices that enables
one-point connection to a number of
peripheral devices and provides
additional ports and slots.
printed circuit board (PCB): A
hardware component of a processor to
which integrated circuits and other
components are attached. The board
itself is typically flat and rectangular,
and constructed of fiberglass, to form
the attachment surface.
program: A set of instructions a
computer can execute that enables it to
achieve a desired result. See also
application.
prompt: A message the computer
provides indicating it is ready for or
requires information or an action from
you.
R
Radio frequency interference (RFI)
shield: A metal shield enclosing the
printed circuit boards of the printer or
computer to prevent radio and TV
interference. All computer equipment
generates radio frequency signals. The
FCC regulates the amount of signals a
computing device can allow past its
shielding. A Class A device is sufficient
for office use. Class B provides a more
stringent classification for home
equipment use. TOSHIBA portable
computers comply with Class B
computing device regulations.
Random Access Memory (RAM): High
speed memory within the computer
circuitry that can be read or written to.
Glossary-11
GLOSSARY
parity: 1) The symmetrical relationship
between two parameter values (integers)
both of which are either on or off; odd or
even; 0 or 1. 2) In serial communications,
an error detection bit that is added to a
group of data bits making the sum of the
bits even or odd. Parity can be set to
none, odd, or even.
GLOSSARY
restart
restart: Resetting a computer without
turning it off (also called ‘warm boot’ or
‘soft reset’). To restart the computer,
press Ctrl + Alt + Del while the
computer is on. See also boot.
RCA jack: A single-pin connector that
carries composite video signals, which
include both contrast and color
information. See also S-video.
RGB: Red, green, and blue. A device
that uses three input signals, each
activating an electron gun for a primary
additive color (red, green, and blue) or
port for using such a device. See also
CRT.
serial: The handling of data bits one
after the other.
serial communications: A communications technique that uses as few as two
interconnecting wires to send bits one
after another.
serial interface: Refers to a type of
information exchange that transmits
information sequentially, one bit at a
time. Contrast: Parallel interface.
serial port: A communications port to
which you can connect devices, such
as a modem, mouse, or serial printer.
RJ11: A modular telephone jack.
SIO: Serial Input/Output. The electronic methodology used in serial data
transmission.
ROM: Read Only Memory: A nonvolatile memory chip manufactured to
contain information that controls the
computer’s basic operation. You cannot
access or change information stored in
ROM.
soft key: Key combinations that
emulate keys on the IBM keyboard,
change some configuration options,
stop program execution, and access the
numeric keypad overlay.
RS-232C: The Electronic Industries
Association (EIA) interface standard
that describes the 25-pin connector
interface and control, data, and status
signals that allow asynchronous
communications between computers,
printers, communications and other
peripheral devices.
S
SCSI: Small Computer System Interface
is an industry standard interface for
connection of a variety of peripheral
devices.
Glossary-12
software: The set of programs,
procedures and related documentation
associated with a computer system.
Specifically refers to computer programs that direct and control the
computer system’s activities. See also
hardware.
stop bit: One or more bits of a byte that
follow the transmitted character or
group codes in asynchronous serial
communications.
subpixel: Three elements, one red, one
green and blue (RGB), that make up a
pixel on the color LCD. The computer
sets subpixels independently, each may
emit a different degree of brightness.
See also pixel.
write protection
V
synchronous: Having a constant time
interval between successive bits,
characters or events.
volatile memory: Random access
memory (RAM) that stores information
as long as the computer is connected to
a power source.
system disk: A disk that has been
formatted with an operating system. For
MS-DOS the operating system is
contained in two hidden files and the
COMMAND.COM file. You can boot a
computer using a system disk. Also
called an operating system disk.
T
terminal: A typewriter-like keyboard
and CRT display screen connected to
the computer for data input/output.
TFT: A color LCD technology that
applies individual transistors to each
pixel enabling fine display control and
excellent screen legibility.
TTL: Transistor-transistor logic. A
logic circuit design that uses switching
transistors for gates and storage.
U
USB: Enables chain connection of a
number of USB-equipped devices to one
port on your computer. For example, you
might connect a USB-HUB to the
computer, then connect a keyboard to
the USB-HUB and a mouse to the
keyboard.
VGA: Video graphics array is an
industry standard video adapter that
lets you run any popular software.
W
Warm dock/undock: Connecting or
disconnecting a device to or from the
computer while the computer is
suspended.
warm start: Restarting or resetting a
computer without turning it off.
window: A portion of the screen that
can display its own application or
document. Often used to mean a
Microsoft Windows window.
Wireless LAN: A short-range radio
technology designed to simplify
wireless communication with other LAN
systems based on Direct Sequence
Spread Spectrum radio technology that
complies with the IEEE 802.11 Standard
(Revision B) .
write protection: A method for
protecting a diskette (floppy disk) from
accidental erasure.
Glossary-13
GLOSSARY
S-video: This connection provides
separate lines for contrast and color,
which produces a video image superior
to that produced by a composite
connection. See also RCA jack.
Index
C
AC adaptor 1-6, 2-5
DC IN 15V port 2-10
additional 1-12, 8-9
connecting 3-5
AccuPoint 1-6, 2-8
problems 9-15
using 4-2
Advanced Port Replicator 1-12, 8-11
ASCII characters 5-9
Auto power on, See Power
Cache memory
CPU cache 1-3
Level 2 cache 1-4
CD-ROM drive, See also Slim Select
Bay 1-4, 4-5
CD-RW/DVD drive, See also Slim
Select Bay 1-5, 4-5
Cleaning the computer 4-30
COM level, See Ports, serial
D
B
Battery, See also Battery pack
charging 6-10
extending life 6-13
indicator 2-9, 6-4
monitoring capacity 6-11
real time clock 1-6, 6-6
safety precautions 6-7
save mode 1-9
types 6-5
Battery pack 1-6, 6-7
additional 1-12, 8-9
location 2-6
replacing 6-14
2nd, See Slim Select Bay
using 6-7
problems 9-6
Boot priority 7-6
DC IN indicator 2-10, 6-4
Disk indicator 2-10
Diskette care 4-21
Diskette drive 8-10
connecting 4-25
disconnecting 4-25
problems 9-13
using 4-10
Display 1-5, 2-8, See also Video
modes and Monitor external
automatic power off 1-9
controller 1-5, Appendix B
driver 1-11
opening 3-6
selection, See Hot keys
Documentation list 1-2, 1-3,1-5
DVD-ROM drive, See also Slim Select
Bay 1-5
software 1-11
using 4-11
Index-1
INDEX
A
INDEX
User's Manual
E
H
Environment 3-2
Equipment checklist 1-1
Equipment setup
general conditions 3-2
placement 3-2
Ergonomics
lighting 3-4
seating and posture 3-3
work habits 3-4
Expansion memory, See Memory
expansion
Hard disk drive 1-4
automatic power off 1-9
problems 9-9
Hibernation 1-10, 5-5
problems 9-23
Hotkeys 1-9, 5-4
display brightness 5-5
display selection 5-5
hibernation 5-5
instant security 5-4
power save mode 5-4
standby 5-4
sticky key utility 5-6
wireless setting 5-6
HW Setup 1-10
accessing 7-1
Boot Priority 7-6
CPU 7-7
Device Config 7-4
Display 7-5
General 7-2
Keyboard 7-8
LAN 7-9
Parallel/Printer 7-4
Password 7-2
Pointing Devices 7-4
USB 7-9
window 7-2
F
Fn key emulation 5-7
Fn + Alt (enhanced keyboard
simulation) 5-3
Fn + Ctrl (enhanced keyboard
simulation) 5-3
Fn + Enter 5-3
Fn + Esc (sound mute) 5-4
Fn-esse 1-11
Fn + F1 (instant security) 5-4
Fn + F2 (power save mode) 5-4
Fn + F3 (standby) 5-4
Fn + F4 (hibernation) 5-5
Fn + F5 (display selection) 5-5
Fn + F6 (display brightness) 5-5
Fn + F7 (display brightness) 5-5
Fn + F8 (wireless setting) 5-6
Fn + F9 (Touch Pad mode) 5-6
Fn + F10 (arrow mode) 5-3, 5-7
Fn + F11 (numeric mode) 5-3, 5-7
Fn + F12 (ScrLock) 5-3
Fn + Space (UXGA or XGA mode
setting) 5-6
Fn Sticky key 5-6
Function Keys 5-2
Index-2
I
Indicators 2-10, 6-4
Infrared port, See also Ports
problems 9-14
Instant security, See Hot keys
Interfaces, See Ports
Index
K
N
Numeric keypad, See Keypad overlay
O
Operating system 1-8
Overlay, See Keypad overlay
L
P
LAN, See also Wireless LAN 1-8
cable types 4-28
connecting 4-28
disconnecting 4-29
problems 9-23
using 4-28
LCD, See Display, Video modes,
Monitor external
Level 2 cache, See Cache memory
Lock, security, See Security lock
Panel power on/off, See Power
Parallel port, See Ports, parallel
Password
power on 1-10
starting the computer with 6-16
user 7-2
PC card 1-7
installing 8-2
location of slots 2-2
problems 9-18
removing 8-3
Pointing devices, See AccuPoint
Ports
DC IN 15V 2-4
docking 2-6
external monitor 1-6, 2-6
headphone, See Sound system
infrared 1-6, 2-1
LAN 2-4
microphone, See Sound system
modem 2-5
M
Main battery, See Battery pack
Memory 1-4
expansion 1-12, 8-6
installing 8-6
removing 8-8
slots 1-4
Microphone, See sound system,
microphone
Microprocessor, See Processor
Modem 1-7, 4-22
connecting 4-25
Index-3
INDEX
Keyboard 1-5, 5-1
emulating enhanced keyboard 5-2
F1 . . . F12 function keys 5-2
problems 9-7
Typewriter keys 5-1
Keypad overlay 1-9, 5-7
arrow mode 5-7
numeric mode 5-7
temporarily changing modes 5-9
temporarily using normal keyboard
(overlay on) 5-8
temporarily using overlay (overlay
off) 5-9
turning on 5-7
Windows special keys 5-7
disconnecting 4-25
jack location 2-4
problems 9-22
region selection 4-22
using 4-23
Monitor external 8-12, See also Video
modes and Ports
problems 9-19
Moving the computer 4-30
INDEX
User's Manual
parallel 1-6, 2-6
PS/2 keyboard/mouse 1-6, 2-5
serial 1-6, 2-5
USB 1-7, 2-4
Power
auto power on 1-10
button location 2-8
indicator 2-10, 6-5
panel power on/off 1-9
restarting 3-12
turning off 3-7
turning on 3-6
system auto off 1-9
Printer
parallel 7-4, 8-12
problems 9-14
Problems
AccuPoint 9-15
analyzing symptoms 9-2
CD-ROM drive(Black) 9-9
CD-RW/DVD-ROMdrive(Black)
9-12
diskette drive 9-13
DVD-ROM drive(Black) 9-10
hard disk drive 9-9
hardware and system checklist 9-3
infrared port 9-14
keyboard 9-7
LAN 9-24
LCD panel 9-8
modem 9-22
monitor, external 9-19
password 9-7
PC card 9-18
power 9-4
preliminary checklist 9-1
printer 9-14
PS/2 mouse 9-16
self test 9-4
Index-4
serial mouse 9-16
sound system 9-18
standby/hibernation 9-21
support from TOSHIBA 9-24
system start-up 9-3
TV output signal 9-19
USB 9-21
Wireless LAN 9-23
Processor 1-3
R
Real time clock battery, See Battery
Recovery CD-ROM 3-13
S
Screen, See Display
ScrLock (Fn + F12), See Soft keys
Security lock 1-8
attaching 8-14
location 2-2
Self Test, See Problems
Sensor switch 2-9
location 2-8
Serial port, See Ports, serial
Slim Select Bay 2-3
changing modules 4-3
HDD adaptor 1-13, 2-18, 8-9
modules 2-13 to 2-19
options 1-12
2nd battery pack 1-13, 2-19, 8-9
Soft keys 5-2
cursor control mode 5-3
Enter 5-3
numeric mode 5-3
right Alt key 5-3
right Ctrl key 5-3
ScrLock 5-3
Sound system 1-7
drivers 1-11
headphone 1-6, 2-1
microphone 1-6, 2-1
Index
problems 9-20
speaker 2-8
volume control 2-2
Standby 1-10
System auto off 1-9
T
INDEX
TOSHIBA Power Saver 1-10
Troubleshooting, See Problems
TV 8-13
U
Utilities
list 1-10
USB 1-7
location 2-4
problems 9-21
V
Video modes, Appendix B
Video-out jack 1-7, 2-2
Video RAM 1-4
Volume control, See Sound system
W
Windows®XP Professional setup 3-7
Windows®2000 setup 3-7
Wireless LAN 1-8
problems 9-24
using 4-26
Index-5
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising