Digital subscriber line/home phoneline network router

Digital subscriber line/home phoneline network router
US006711138B1
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
(45) Date of Patent:
Pai et al.
(54) DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE/HOME
US 6,711,138 B1
Mar. 23, 2004
Cisco 675 SOHO/Telecommuter ADSL Router, Cisco Sys
PHONELINE NETWORK ROUTER
tems Datasheet, @ 1999.
WebRamp 500i, @ 1999 Ramp Networks, Inc.
(75) Inventors: Prasan Pai, Mission Viejo, CA (US);
Nick C. Burd, Irvine, CA (US); Kevin
V. Strong, Irvine, CA (US); P. Michael
Henderson, Tustin, CA (US)
Cisco 605 Personal PCI ADSL Modem, Cisco Systems,
Datasheet, @ 1998.
(73) Assignee: Conexant Systems, Inc., Newport
Beach, CA (US)
ture.html.
WebRamp Network Architecture, Ramp Networks, ©
1997—1999,
http://www.rampnet.com/products/architec
82559 Fast Ethernet Multifunction PCI Controller, Intel
(*)
Notice:
Corporation © 1999, http://developer.intel.com/design/net
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
work/82559.htm.
21145 Phoneline/Ethernet LAN Controller, Intel Corpora
tion @ 1999, http://developer.intel.com/design/network/
U.S.C. 154(b) by 0 days.
(21) Appl. No.: 09/408,639
(22) Filed:
Sep. 30, 1999
(51)
21145.htm.
Cisco 600 DSL CPEs, Cisco Systems, @ 1992—1999, http:
//cisco.com/warp/public/cc/cisco/mkt/access/cpe600/indeX.
Int. Cl.7 ....................... .. H04L 12/28; H04L 12/66;
shtml.
H04] 3/22
(52)
Simple, High—Speea' Ethernet Technology For The Home,
White Paper, Home Phoneline Networking Alliance, Jun.,
US. Cl. ..................... .. 370/257; 370/352; 370/401;
370/466; 370/469; 710/313; 375/222
(58)
1998, pp. 1—11.
Field of Search ............................... .. 370/401, 402,
370/466, 467, 469, 355, 484, 445, 465,
257, 236, 463, 493, 356; 455/560; 375/221,
* cited by examiner
222; 710/313
(56)
Primary Examiner—Duc Ho
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm—Akin Gump Strauss Hauer
& Feld, LLP
References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
5,654,962 A
5,910,970 A
*
*
8/1997
6/1999
Rostoker et al. .......... .. 370/232
Lu .................... ..
375/377
6,061,357 A
*
5/2000 Olshansky et al. ..
6,075,784 A
6,094,441 A
*
*
6/2000 Frankel et al. ............ .. 370/356
7/2000 Jung et a1. ................ .. 370/466
6,101,216 A
*
8/2000 Henderson et al. ..
6,130,879 A
* 10/2000
ABSTRACT
(57)
370/401
A digital subscriber line (DSL)/home phoneline network
router provides DSL connectivity and home networking
support. The router provides a single phoneline connection
375/222
(RJ-11 jack) to access either the Internet or a home phone
line network. In terms of hardware, the router may include
a central processing unit, a DSL modem, and a home
Liu .......................... .. 370/230
6,137,839 A * 10/2000 Mannering et al. ....... .. 375/260
6,137,865 A * 10/2000 Ripy et al. ............. .. 379/9305
6,563,816 B1 * 5/2003 Nodoushani et al. ..... .. 370/352
phoneline networking device (media access controller and
home phoneline networking physical interface). In terms of
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
software, the router may include a DSL driver, a local area
network (LAN) driver, a media access controller driver,
network routing stacks and a real time operating system.
3COM® O?ciceConnect®, Remote 810 ADSL Router
Datasheet, @ 1999.
Remote 810ADSL Router; 3COM®, http://www.3com.com/
products/dsheets/400499.html.
18 Claims, 4 Drawing Sheets
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U.S. Patent
Mar. 23, 2004
Sheet 2 of4
US 6,711,138 B1
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U.S. Patent
Mar. 23, 2004
Sheet 3 of4
US 6,711,138 B1
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U.S. Patent
Mar. 23, 2004
Sheet 4 of4
US 6,711,138 B1
400
Public Network
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Phoneline Network
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US 6,711,138 B1
1
2
FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the digital subscriber
DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE/HOME
PHONELINE NETWORK ROUTER
line/home phoneline network router of FIGS. 1 and 2; and
FIG. 4 is a block diagram of an exemplary home network
environment including the digital subscriber line/home
BACKGROUND
phoneline network router of FIGS. 1—3.
1. Field of the Invention
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED
EMBODIMENT
The present invention generally relates home networking
technology and more particularly to a digital subscriber
line/home phoneline network router.
2. Description of the Related Art
10
home phoneline network router R. The router or bridge R
includes a reduced instruction set computer (RISC) central
As home networking continues to emerge, there is a
growing need for high-speed connections to rapidly supply
digital data within homes. Businesses typically achieve
high-speed connections by deploying local area networks
(LANs). These networks, however, are not commonly
processing unit (CPU) 112 to handle the overall manage
15
employed in the home due to the cost and complexity of
installing new wiring required by traditional LANs.
The Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (Home PNA)
has proposed high-speed home networks using a consumer’s
existing phoneline. Many products such as personal com
puters (PCs), home gateway computers, cable modems, DSL
20
(Digital Subscriber Line) modems, digital set-top boxes,
digital televisions, digital radios, digital cameras, digital
telephones and other network appliances stand to bene?t
25
be implemented in other ways. For example, the MAC 118
The MAC 118 is coupled to a 1M8 physical layer device
30
phoneline network is an Ethernet-compatible LAN, phone
122. The 1M8 physical layer (PHY) device 122, a home
phoneline networking physical layer device, is described in
the Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (HPNA) 1M8
PHY Speci?cation, Version 1.0. Alternatively, the 1M8 PHY
line networking technology has leveraged existing Ethernet
software and hardware.
122 can conform to the upcoming 10 Mbps Home Phoneline
35
controllers and/or home gateway computers. In contrast,
traditional LANs have typically been managed with network
Networking Alliance 2.0 Speci?cation. The 1M8 PHY 122
generally enables home networking by allowing Ethernet
packets to be transported over standard home telephone
wiring using standard Ethernet CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense
Multiple Access/Collision Detect) Media Access Control
routers. Such network routers include DSL-Ethernet routers
and ISDN-Ethernet routers targeted to businesses. These
routers have been dif?cult to install and use.
communications with a universal serial bus (USB) control
ler. As an alternative to the CPU 112, a digital signal
processor can be used. The CPU 112 is shown coupled to a
Ethernet controller 114 and a DSL modem 120. The Ethernet
controller 114 includes a media access controller (MAC)
118. Both the Ethernet controller 114 and the MAC 118 may
embodiment, the MAC 118 is effectively compliant with the
I.E.E.E. 802.3 standard for 10 Mbps Ethernet networking.
ensure compatibility with other communication services
Translating, addressing and routing control for home
networks has traditionally been managed by home network
ment of the router R. For example, the CPU 112 can handle
DSL modem control, ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode)
segmentation and reassembly (SAR) and other ADSL pro
tocol processing, LAN (Local Area Network) protocol, and
can be integrated with the CPU 112. In a disclosed
from high-speed connections to a home network. Home
phoneline networking technology has been designed to
within the home, such as voice, ISDN (Integrated Services
Digital Network), and DSL data services. Since a home
Turning now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows an exemplary
hardware architecture for a digital subscriber line (DSL)/
40
(MAC) procedures as speci?ed in the I.E.E.E. 802.3 stan
dard. The 1M8 PHY 122 generally serves as a home
phoneline networking physical interface. The 1M8 PHY 122
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
and the MAC 118 together generally serve as a home
Brie?y, a digital subscriber line (DSL)/home phoneline
phoneline networking device. An optional USB interface
network router provides DSL connectivity and home net
may be designed into the router R as well for host connec
working support. The router provides a single phone line
tivity.
connection (RJ-11 jack) to access either the Internet or a
The DSL modem 120 and the 1M8 PHY 122 may both be
coupled to a plug-in module 124 containing a DSL analog
home phoneline network. In terms of hardware, the router
may include a central processing unit, a DSL modem, and a
home phoneline networking device (media access controller
and home phoneline networking physical interface). In
front end
50
terms of software, the router may include a DSL driver, a
local area network (LAN) driver, a media access controller
the MAC 118 is generally understood in the art. As an
driver, network routing stacks and a real time operating
system.
55
A better understanding of the present invention can be
60
following drawings, in which:
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary hardware
architecture of a digital subscriber line/home phoneline
network router;
FIG. 2 is a diagram of an exemplary software architecture
of the digital subscriber line/home phoneline network router
of FIG. 1;
alternative to a plug-in con?guration, the DSL AFE 126,
1M8 AF E 128 and RJ-11 jack 130 may be directly integrated
into the router R. As an alternative to the RJ-11 jack, other
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
obtained when the following detailed description of the
preferred embodiment is considered in conjunction with the
126, a 1M8 AFE 128 and an RJ-11 jack 130.
More particularly, the DSL modem 120 is coupled to the
DSLAFE 126, and the 1M8 PHY 122 is coupled to the 1M8
AFE 128. Communication between the 1M8 PHY 122 and
types of customer premise equipment/telephone company
interfaces might be used.
By integrating the 1M8 PHY 122, the 1M8 AFE 128, the
MAC 118, the DSL modem 120, and the DSL AFE 126, the
router R provides the appropriate hardware to enable home
networking and DSL connectivity. DSL should be under
stood to refer to any of the technologies in the DSL family,
65
such as symmetric DSL (SDSL), Asymmetric DSL (ADSL),
High-Speed DSL (HDSL), and G. Lite. Those skilled will
appreciate that there can be variations in con?gurations for
the router R depending on the particular DSL technology
US 6,711,138 B1
3
4
implemented. ADSL is currently the preferred standard in
the industry. Further, the router R supports both home
404. The phoneline netWork 404 is further coupled to
multiple client personal computers (PCs) 406. Packets are
networking (PHY) layer functionality and Ethernet (MAC)
transmitted to and from the client PC 406 on the phoneline
The CPU 112 is further coupled to a set of status light
be a 1 Mbps home phoneline netWork or a 10 Mbps home
emitting diodes (LEDs) and a liquid crystal display (LCD)
phoneline netWork effectively compliant With the standards
102, a memory 104, a button interface (I/F) 106, a ?ash read
only memory (ROM) 108, a poWer subsystem 110 and a
compact ?ash slot 100. The LEDs 102 may include a home
phoneline netWork indicator to indicate active home net
Working functionality and a DSL indicator to indicate active
of the Home Phoneline NetWorking Alliance. Internet access
and other services for the client PCs 406 are accomplished
through the router R. The clients PCs 406 may connect to the
layer functionality.
netWork 404. The phoneline netWork 400 may, for example,
10
DSL connectivity.
Referring to FIG. 2, an exemplary real time softWare
architecture for the router R is shoWn. The router R is shoWn
including a real time operating system (RTOS) 226. The
Internet or a remote LAN. In addition, the client PCs 406 can
utiliZe the Web server 204 to properly con?gure the router R.
While only client PCs 406 are shoWn connected to the
phoneline netWork 404, it should be understood that a
variety of netWork devices (e.g., digital telephones, digital
illustrative softWare components: softWare plug-ins 200 for
televisions and laptops) may also be connected to the
phoneline netWork 404. Other con?gurations of a home
phoneline netWork environment supporting the router R are
OEM customiZation, a user interface 202, a host communi
possible.
cations module 204, a statistics and logging module 206,
caching algorithms 208, a Web server component 210, a
management agent module 212 to support SNMP (Simple
Network Management Protocol), a security module 214 to
support a ?reWall and IP (Internet Protocol) source and
It should be understood that the disclosed functionality
and structure may be integrated into high speed access
15
RTOS 226 provides functions and services to a number of
products other than a router or bridge. While DSL services
are mentioned in connection With the disclosed router, it
should be understood that alternatively a router or other high
destination ?ltering, OSI (Open System Interconnection)
layers 5 and 6 (session and presentation) module 216, a TCP
25
(Transmission Control Protocol)/UDP (User Datagram
speed access device might support derivative, compliant or
similar high speed data services available on the Public
SWitched Telephone NetWork.
Protocol)/ICMP module 218, an IRP and ARP (Address
Resolution Protocol) module 220, an SAR, AAL, and DSL
We claim:
1. A digital subscriber line/home phoneline netWork
control module 222, a MAC driver 224, a DSL hardWare
driver 228, a LAN hardWare driver 230 and a USB controller
router, comprising:
CPU 112 may be stored in the memory 104 or the ?ash ROM
a central processing unit;
a digital subscriber line modem coupled to the central
108. Those skilled in the art Will appreciate the techniques
Which might be employed to integrate the illustrated soft
a media access controller coupled to the central process
driver 232. These softWare components Which can run on the
processing unit;
Ware and drivers Within the router R. Use of softWare such 35
as that illustrated enables the router R to handle bridging,
routing, proxy and other related services in a residential
environment. Like a typical router, the router R can support
full-featured bridging and routing capabilities. Other
the home phoneline netWorking physical interface; and
provides netWork routing stacks to implement a typical
a customer premise equipment/telephone company inter
router algorithm such as NetWork Address Translation
home phoneline netWork via the home phoneline net
Working physical interface, and
Wherein the digital subscriber line analog front end, the
home phoneline netWorking analog front end, and the
customer premise equipment telephone company inter
face are provided on a plug-in card.
55
DSL AFE 126 and the 1M8 AFE 128. The router R presents
only a single RJ-11 jack 130 to a user. With the single
jack.
telephone company interface to support digital sub
scriber line connectivity and home phoneline connec
phoneline 300 and the single RJ-11 jack 130, the router R
tivity.
can handle concurrent DSL connectivity and home phone
line connectivity.
4. The router of claim 1, Wherein the home phoneline
netWorking physical interface comprises a home netWorking
1M8 physical layer device.
Referring to FIG. 4, an exemplary home phoneline net
Work environment is shoWn. This netWork environment
400 (such as the Public NetWork) and a phoneline network
2. The router of claim 1, Wherein the customer premise
equipment telephone company interface comprises an RJ-11
3. The router of claim 1 further comprising:
a Wire coupled to the customer premise equipment/
interface. As shoWn in FIG. 1, the RJ-11 jack couples the
router R. The router R is shoWn coupled to a public netWork
interface,
Wherein the media access controller communicates With a
as both a home phoneline netWork interface and a DSL
includes the digital subscriber line/home phoneline netWork
face coupled to the digital subscriber line analog front
end and the home phoneline netWorking physical
45
router R. The phone Wire 300 serves to connect the DSL
AFE 126 to a public netWork and serves to connect the 1M8
AFE 128 to a phoneline netWork. The RJ-11 jack 130 serves
to the media access controller;
a digital subscriber line analog front end coupled to the
digital subscriber line modem;
a home phoneline netWorking analog front end coupled to
arrangements of softWare components or modules to support
the router R are possible. The OSI layers 5 and 6 module 216
(NAT The Web server 204 is used in con?guring the CPU
112, the DSL modem 120 and the MAC 118.
Referring to FIG. 3, an exemplary digital subscriber
line/home phoneline netWork router is shoWn. PoWer is
supplied to the router R through a plug 304. The router R
includes the RJ-11 jack or connector 130 for connection via
a phone Wire 300 to a Wall phone jack 302. The single phone
Wire 300, Which handles both DSL connectivity and home
phoneline connectivity, alloWs for ease of installation for the
ing unit;
a home phoneline netWorking physical interface coupled
65
5. The router of claim 1, further comprising:
a universal serial bus controller coupled to the central
processing unit.
US 6,711,138 B1
6
5
13. The network environment of claim 9, the router
6. The router of claim 5, the memory comprising:
further comprising:
a media access controller driver.
7. The router of claim 5, the memory comprising:
a web server to con?gure the central processing unit,
a universal serial bus controller coupled to the central
processing unit.
14. The network environment of claim 9, the router
digital subscriber line modem and media access con
further comprising:
troller via computer(s) coupled to the home phoneline
networking physical interface.
a memory containing a digital subscriber line driver, a
8. The router of claim 1, further comprising:
local area network driver, and network routing stacks.
15. The network environment of claim 14, the memory
a memory containing a digital subscriber line driver and
comprising:
a local area network driver.
9. A home phoneline network environment, comprising:
a phoneline network;
a plurality of computers coupled to a phoneline network;
a public network; and
a digital subscriber line/home phoneline network router
coupled to the phoneline network and the public
network, the router comprising:
a central processing unit;
a digital subscriber line modem coupled to the central
a media access controller driver.
16. The network environment of claim 14, the memory
comprising:
a web server to con?gure the central processing unit,
digital subscriber line modem and media access con
troller via computer(s) coupled to the home phoneline
networking physical interface.
17. A home phoneline network high-speed access routing
20
a media access controller coupled to the central pro
cessing unit;
a home phoneline networking physical interface
coupled to the media access controller; and
a digital subscriber line analog front end coupled to the
25
communicating with the public network;
interface coupled to the digital subscriber line analog
a home phoneline networking analog front end means for
communicating with the phoneline network; and
35
wherein the digital subscriber line analog front end, the
home phoneline network analog front end, and the
customer premise equipment/telephone company inter
wherein the media access controller communicates with
the phoneline network via the home phoneline net
working physical interface, and
face are provided on a plug-in card.
10. The network environment of claim 9, wherein the
11. The network environment of claim 9, the router further
comprising:
a wire coupled to the customer premise equipment/
telephone company interface to support digital sub
scriber line connectivity and home phoneline connec
tivity.
12. The network environment of claim 9, wherein the
home phoneline networking physical interface comprises a
home networking 1M8 physical layer device.
a customer premise equipment/telephone company inter
face means for coupling the high speed data service
analog front end means and the home phoneline net
working analog front end means,
the phoneline network via the home phoneline net
working physical interface, and
customer premise equipment/telephone company interface
comprises an RJ-11 jack.
a media access controller coupled to the central process
a home phoneline networking physical interface means
for communicating with the media access controller
and a phoneline network;
a high speed data service analog front end means for
a customer premise equipment/telephone company
wherein the media access controller communicates with
central processing unit for establishing high speed data
connectivity with a public network;
ing unit;
digital subscriber line modem;
a home phoneline networking analog front end coupled
to the home phoneline networking physical layer
device; and
front end and the home phoneline networking physi
cal interface,
device, comprising:
a central processing unit;
a high speed data service modem means coupled to the
processing unit;
45
wherein the high speed data service analog front end
means, the home phoneline network analog front end
means, and the customer premise equipment/telephone
company interface means are provided on a plug-in
card.
18. The routing device of claim 17, further comprising:
a telephone physical connection means for connecting the
high speed data service analog front end means to a
public network and the home phoneline networking
analog front end means to a phoneline network.
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