2015 Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report

2015 Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report
 INTRODUCTION
The Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report is provided to students, faculty, staff, and the public as
part of Utah State University Eastern commitment to safety and security on campus, and in compliance with the
Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). This report
is prepared in cooperation with various Utah State University departments, which provide annual updated
information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the law. Campus crime, arrests, and
referral statistics include those reported to the Utah State University Eastern Police Department (USUEPD),
other local law enforcement and fire agencies, and designated campus security authorities. The information
contained in this report is intended to educate students and their families about the policies, procedures, and
programs that exist to assist in protecting the safety and wellbeing of campus constituents.
The Act was recently amended by the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) to
include reporting incidents of dating violence, domestic violence and stalking. VAWA requires certain policies
and procedures to be in place to reduce these crimes and meet the needs of victims. This information is
included in this report.
The Clery Act
The Clery Act is named for Jeanne Clery, a nineteen-year-Old Lehigh University
student who was raped and killed in her dorm room in 1986. The law was
originally enacted in 1990 as the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act
(Title II of Public Law 101–542), which amended the Higher Education Act of
1965 (HEA). The Clery Act requires all postsecondary educational institutions
participating in Title IV student financial aid programs to disclose campus crime
statistics and security information. Specifically, higher education institutions
subject to the law must do the following:
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Collect, report, and disseminate crime data
Develop policies, policy statements and procedures regarding campus safety
Prepare and distribute an annual security report
Issue timely warnings and emergency notifications to the campus community
Submit crime statistics to the Department of Education
Preparing the Annual Security Report
This document is designed to provide students and employees with information concerning personal safety and
university policies, and to comply with federal law. The report is prepared on an annual basis by the USU Clery
Compliance Committee. For additional information or to submit changes and corrections, please contact Steve
Mecham at 435-797-1935 or at [email protected]
CAMPUS LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY
Utah State University Eastern Police Department (USUEPD). The officers in the USUEPD have full peace
officer status under state statute, including the authority to make arrests (53B-3-105). Part-time security
officers help keep the campus safe. They do not have authority to make arrests.
University Police has jurisdiction over and investigates all law enforcement related issues occurring on the Utah
State University Eastern campus. Crimes in progress, suspicious circumstances, medical emergencies, and
other campus emergencies should be immediately reported to the University Police. A University officer will
respond to investigate and will initiate an incident report. Follow-up investigation will be conducted as needed.
Page | 2 When dialing 911, campus phones and cell phones connect directly with the Price Public Safety Dispatch.
Dispatchers then forward the call to the University Police Department.
USU Eastern Police Department
Price, UT 84501
435-613-5612
435-613-5677
Emergency: 911
Dispatch Non-Emergency: 435-637-0890
The primary objective of the USUEPD is to provide a campus environment where students, faculty and staff
feel safe to pursue the academic mission of the University without the fear of crime.
Some of the steps to ensure safety objectives taken by Utah State University include:
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USUEPD is staffed 24 hours every day. The department provides 24-hour police coverage with its 7
state certified police officers. A USUE police officer provides safety patrols, responds to all reports of
crime or suspicious activity and conducts follow-up investigations on all leads. The Price City Fire
Department and USUEPD respond to reports of fire and medical emergencies on campus.
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All officers receive ongoing training under regulatory guidelines established by the Utah Department of
Public Safety. This training includes such areas as crime prevention, domestic violence, active shooter,
criminal investigation, first aid, firearms, defensive tactics, crowd control, traffic accident investigation,
constitutional and statutory law, etc.
REPORTING CRIMES AND EMERGENCIES
Utah State University Eastern encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes, suspicious activity, and
emergency situations. University police is the preferred contact for reporting campus crimes and emergencies.
For non-emergencies call 435-613-5612 or Price Public Safety Dispatch 435-637-0890. For emergencies call
911.
Students and others can report Clery crimes that occurred in Clery geographic locations to the Police
Department and Campus Security Authorities for the purpose of making timely warning reports and inclusion in
the annual statistical report.
Campus Security Authorities
Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) are University officials whose functions involve relationships with
students that could result in them receiving reports of crime. They have significant responsibility for student
and campus activities. Utah State University Eastern will identify and notify CSAs of their duties and
responsibilities. On-line training will be provided when they are hired and annually thereafter. They are given
a crime survey annually and are required to report Clery Crimes to the USUPD that occurred in Clery
geographic locations and were reported to them during the previous year for inclusion in the Annual Campus
Security Report.
Individuals who do not want to contact police may confidentially report a crime to a CSA for inclusion in the
annual crime statistics disclosure.
Page | 3 Professional and Pastoral Counselors
University professional counselors are encouraged to make individuals aware that they may report crimes
anonymously to a Campus Security Authority for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. Utah
State University Eastern does not employ pastoral counselors.
A professional counselor is a person whose official responsibilities include providing mental health counseling
to members of the campus community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or
certification. This definition applies even to professional counselors who are not employees of the university
but are under contract to provide counseling to the campus community.
The professional counselor exemption is intended to ensure that these individuals can provide appropriate
counseling services without an obligation to report crimes they may have learned about. This is similar to the
privilege provided under certain circumstances to doctors and attorneys when they may learn of crimes from
patients or clients. This exemption is intended to protect the counselor-client role. However, even these legally
recognized privileges acknowledge some exemptions, such as certain situations in which counselors are in fact
under a legal obligation to report a crime.
To be exempt from disclosing reported offenses, professional counselors must be acting in the role of
professional counselor. An individual who is not yet licensed or certified as a counselor, but is acting in that
role under the supervision of an individual who meets the definition of a professional counselor, is considered
to be one for the purposes of the Clery Act. An example is a USUE Ph.D. counselor-trainee acting under the
supervision of a professional counselor. However, a professional staff member in Student Services who has a
professional counselor’s license, but who is employed by the university only as a staff member and not as a
counselor, is not exempt from reporting. If that same staff member is employed by USUE as both a
professional counselor and an academic counselor, and he or she learns of a criminal incident while he or she is
engaged in academic counseling, he or she is not exempt from reporting that incident. If an individual has dual
roles, one as a professional counselor and the other as an official who qualifies as a campus security authority,
and the roles cannot be separated, that individual is considered a campus security authority and is obligated to
report Clery crimes of which they are aware.
An individual who is counseling students and/or employees, but who does not meet the Clery definition of a
professional counselor, is not exempt from being a campus security authority if they otherwise have significant
responsibility for student and campus activities. This includes positions such as the director of the Student
Health and Wellness Center or the director of the Center for Women and Gender, etc.
LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES
The USUEPD has a close working relationship with the Price City Police Department, the Carbon County
Sheriff’s Office, the Helper City Police Department, the Wellington City Police Department, East Carbon City
Police Department and other law enforcement agencies throughout the State of Utah. University Police
personnel brief with local law enforcement agencies to exchange ideas and discuss problems which may be of
concern to the University community. Because the USUEPD has full police authority by state statute there is
no memorandum of understanding with local police departments regarding the investigation of alleged criminal
offenses.
Price City Police Department
Page | 4 Students may report crimes that occur off campus to the Price City Police Department, whose jurisdiction
includes all off-campus student housing facilities within the Price City limits. Because housing facilities of
non-campus student organizations are not university property, the Price City Police Department provides
services for these locations. The Price City Police Department is located at the following location:
910 N 7th E
Price, UT 84501
435-636-3190
Emergency: 911
Dispatch: 435-637-0890
Carbon County Sheriff’s Office
Students living in the county and unincorporated areas of the county may report crimes that occur off campus to
the Carbon County Sheriff’s Office. Because housing facilities of non-campus student organizations are not
university property, the Carbon County Sheriff’s Office provides services for these locations. The Carbon
County Sheriff’s Office is located at:
240 West Main Street
Price, UT 84501
435-636-3251
Emergency: 911
Dispatch: 435-637-0890
Helper City Police Department
Students may report crimes that occur off campus to the Helper City Police Department, whose jurisdiction
includes all off-campus student housing facilities within the Helper City limits. Because housing facilities of
non campus student organizations are not university property, the Helper City Police Department provides
services for these locations. The Helper City Police Department is located at the following location:
97 South Main Street
Helper, UT 84526
435-472-3719
Emergency: 911
Dispatch: 435-637-0890
Page | 5 Wellington City Police Department
Students may report crimes that occur off campus to the Wellington City Police Department, whose jurisdiction
includes all off-campus student housing facilities within the Wellington City limits. Because housing facilities
of non-campus student organizations are not university property, the Wellington City Police Department
provides services for these locations. The Wellington City Police Department is located at the following
location:
150 West Main Street
Wellington, UT 84526
435-637-4830
Emergency: 911
Dispatch: 435-637-0890
East Carbon Police Department
Students may report crimes that occur off campus to the East Carbon Police Department, whose jurisdiction
includes all off-campus student housing facilities within the East Carbon, Sunnyside, Columbia City limits.
Because housing facilities of non-campus student organizations are not university property, the East Carbon
Police Department provides services for these locations. The East Carbon Police Department is located at the
following location:
101 West Geneva Drive
East Carbon, UT 84520
435-888-2081
Emergency: 911
Dispatch: 435-637-0890
CRIME AWARENESS AND PREVENTION PROGRAMS
Several crime prevention programs available to campus groups teach people ways to protect themselves and
their property and encourage the immediate reporting of all crimes or suspicious incidents. These programs
include the following:
1. USUEPD participates in the freshman orientation each fall semester. They also participate in the
International Student Orientation program during the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Additionally,
they participate in the SOAR (Student Orientation and Advising and Registration) program during the
summer for incoming freshman or transfer students and their parents.
2. USUE security or police officers provide a 24-hour walking escort to students or employees to and
from campus destinations.
Page | 6 3. Other presentations that include:
 Alcohol awareness – effects, impairment, laws and USUE’s rules
 Theft – identify and document belongings, how to secure belongings, etc.
 Workplace violence/Active shooter – warning signs, what to do, how to protect yourself
 Crime prevention – overall crime prevention practices and tips
 Personal Safety-practices and tips
 Resident Hall Assistan safety and awareness orientation-assist resident hall assistant (RA’s) to
educate students living in the residence halls (personal safety, emergencies, housing policies)
TIMELY WARNING NOTIFICATION POLICY
In the event of that a serious incident is reported to the USUEPD which may pose a serious or ongoing threat to
members of the USUE community, a timely warning will be sent to all students and employees on campus via
blast email through the USUE Code Blue Emergency Alert System. The alerts are written by the USU Logan
Police Chief, the Assistant Police Chief, or a designee and are approved by the Vice President for Student
Services and/or the Vice President for Business and Finance or designees. The USUE Emergency Manager or a
trained designee will distribute the crime alert. Crime alerts may also be distributed through the student
newspaper, The Eagle, posting fliers in affected areas, or local radio stations.
Crime Alerts will be provided to students and employees in a manner that is timely, that withholds the
names of victims as confidential, and that provides information to assist with potentially preventing
similar occurrences. Crime Alerts are usually distributed for the following Uniform Crime Reporting
Program (UCR)/National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) classifications:
 major incidents of arson
 murder/non-negligent manslaughter
 burglary
 robbery
The following UCR/NIBRS cases are considered on a case-by-case basis depending on the facts of the
case and the information known by University Police:
 aggravated assault
 sex offenses
For example, if an aggravated assault occurs between two students who have a disagreement, there may be no
ongoing threat to other USUE community members and a Crime Alert would not be distributed.
Cases involving sexual assault are often reported long after the incident occurred, thus there is no opportunity to
distribute a “timely” warning notice to the community. Sex offenses will be considered on a case by case basis
depending on when and where the incident occurred, when it was reported, and the amount of information
known by the USUE Police Department.
Timely warnings may be issued for other Clery Act crimes when the USUE Police Department determines such
crimes pose a serious or on-going threat to students and employees. The Chief of Police, the Assistant Chief of
Police or a designee reviews all reports to determine if there is an on-going threat to the community and
whether the distribution of a Crime Alert is warranted.
Page | 7 Anyone with information warranting a “timely warning” should report the circumstances to the USUE Police
Department by phone at 435-613-5612 or contact Price Public Safety by phone at 435-637-0890.
MISSING PERSON POLICY
The Clery Act requires institutions that maintain on-campus housing facilities to establish a missing student
notification policy and related procedures. The term “missing student” for this policy refers to any Utah State
Eastern University student who is residing in on-campus student housing who is reported missing from a
residence.
Every student who resides in on-campus housing may confidentially register one or more individuals to be a
contact strictly for missing persons purposes. The contact person can be anyone. Only authorized campus
officials and law enforcement officers in furtherance of a missing person investigation may have access to this
information. This information will not be disclosed outside of a missing person investigation. Even if a
resident does not register a contact person, law enforcement will be notified if the resident is reported missing.
If anyone has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, he or she should
immediately notify USUE Housing and Residence Life staff at 435-???-???? or contact the Resident Director
(RD) or Resident Assistant (RA) in the affected residence hall (click here for a directory of the residence halls).
The Utah State University Eastern Police Department can also be contacted at 435-637-5612, 435-613-5677 or
by contacting Price Public Safety Dispatch who will contact the USUE Police Department. If the report of a
missing resident of on-campus housing is received by any Housing and Residence Life staff member, the report
shall immediately be referred to the University Police Department.
The University Police Department will immediately initiate an investigation of any missing person report.
Should the investigation result in the conclusion that the student is missing, and has been missing for 24 hours,
the Price City Police Department or the local law enforcement agency which would have jurisdiction for the
reported incident.
The student’s missing person contact shall be notified within 24 hours of that determination. If the missing
student is under the age of 18, and not an emancipated individual, the student’s parent or legal guardian will be
notified within 24 hours of a determination that the student is missing, in addition to notifying any additional
contact person designated by the student.
DATING VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING POLICIES
AND PROCEDURES
Utah State University Eastern prohibits the crimes of sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and
stalking (as defined by the Clery Act) and reaffirms its commitment to maintaining a campus environment that
emphasizes the dignity and worth of all members of the university community. Toward that end, Utah State
University Eastern issues this statement of policy to inform the campus community of our programs to address
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as well as the procedures for institutional
disciplinary action in cases of alleged dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, which will
be followed regardless of whether the incident occurs on or off campus when it is reported to a University
official.
University employees, including faculty, staff, and administrative employees, who become aware of or
reasonably suspect any sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking incidents should report
the information to the University Police (435-613-5612, 435-613-5677) or the Title IX Coordinator in
Page | 8 Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity office. The Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity office is located in
Reeves Building 451 E 400 N inside the Human Resource Office (435-613-5678).
A dean, department chair, manager, supervisor, professor, or any other university employee, who receives a
report of sexual misconduct, including sexual harassment or sexual violence, must promptly refer the reporting
individual to the Title IX Coordinator in the Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity office. If a report of sexual
misconduct involves potentially criminal acts (i.e., rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence,
sexual assault, or stalking), the alleged victim should be informed that she or he also has the option of reporting
the incident to the University Police at 435-613-5612, 435-613-5677 or the Price City Police at 435-636-3190,
and the option to be assisted by campus personnel in notifying such authorities.
The University Police will notify the Title IX Coordinator of all such reports received. Persons who have
reason to believe that a child (anyone under 18 years old) has been subjected to sexual violence or other forms
of abuse or neglect, or who observe a child being subjected to conditions or circumstances which would
reasonably result in such abuse or neglect, must report the situation to the nearest peace officer, law
enforcement agency, or applicable office of the state Division of Child and Family Services, as required by state
law.
Procedures to Follow if a Sex Offense, Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, or Stalking Occurs
Incidents of on-campus dating violence, domestic violence, sex offenses, or stalking should be reported to the
University Police at 435-613-5612, 435-613-5677 or by calling 911 in emergencies. Off-campus incidents
should be reported to appropriate local law enforcement officials. If desired, personnel from Student Services
or the SAAVI office will assist a victim in notifying the appropriate law enforcement authorities when any of
these offenses occur. A victim of these offenses has the option to decline to notify law enforcement but may
still report the incident to the Title IX Coordinator (435-613-5678). Prompt reporting helps the victim receive
medical assistance, counseling, or other support services (e.g. housing relocation, change in classes, etc.) and
allows for the collection and preservation of crucial evidence. It is important to preserve evidence that may
assist in proving that the alleged criminal offense occurred.
Victims have a right to seek a protective order against an aggressor from the courts. The Carbon County Victim
Advocate (435-636-3250) can assist in obtaining protective orders. Preserved evidence may be helpful in
obtaining a protective order. If a victim obtains a protective order, a copy of that order should be brought to the
USU Eastern Police Department so they are aware of it. Protective order violations will be enforced when they
occur on the USU Eastern campus.
In appropriate cases Utah State University Eastern will issue no contact orders as part of the campus judicial
process.
Procedures to Follow if You Become a Victim of a Sex Offense
Victims of sexual assault should do the following:
 Escape and go to a safe place as soon as possible
 Preserve all physical evidence (do not bathe, douche, brush teeth, wash hands, or change clothing)
 Use a clean jar to collect any urine
 Find a trusted individual to provide moral support and company
 Use the campus and community resources listed in this publication to aid in recovery
 Do not change clothes or shower.
 Seek medical attention if needed.
 Save all text messages and emails that you receive from the suspect.
 Save all text messages and emails you send or those you receive from friends in reference to the
incident.
 Report the offense immediately to the police. If you live in a campus residence hall, your resident
director or resident assistant can help you contact the proper authorities.
Page | 9 
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Seek medical attention.
If you do not want to contact the police, you may contact the SAAVI Office or CAPSA (Community
Abuse Prevention Services Agency), the USU Eastern Counseling Center, the Office of Student
Services, or Four Corners Mental Health. These agencies can help you deal with the assault. Their
phone numbers are listed at the end of this brochure.
Sexual assault is a criminal offense of varying degrees. Depending upon circumstances, a perpetrator of a
sexual assault may be charged with crimes ranging from a class B misdemeanor to a first degree felony. The
USU Eastern Police Department will vigorously work to prosecute anyone who commits a sexual assault.
Risk Reduction
With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following
are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest
National Network, www.rainn.org)
1. Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you
to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
2. Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
3. Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
4. Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t
the best place to be.
5. Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more
vulnerable.
6. Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
7. Don't allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
8. Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your
surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
9. When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in
with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who
is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
10. Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see
something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached
by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.).
11. Don't leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a
phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
12. Don't accept drinks from people you don't know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink,
go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties,
don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
13. Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated
for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe
place immediately.
14. If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately
(local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with
doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).
15. If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can
try:
a. Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything
wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
b. Be true to yourself. Don't feel obligated to do anything you don't want to do. "I don't
want to" is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are
comfortable with.
c. Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable
you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with
knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for
you to leave.
Page | 10 d. Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a
reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you
could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well,
having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
16. Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the
doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an
emergency phone nearby?
17. If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait
until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.
How to Be an Active Bystander
Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are “individuals who
observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the
choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.”1 We want to promote a culture of community
accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further
harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list2 of some ways to be an
active bystander. Further information regarding bystander intervention may be found. If you or someone else
is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards
another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.
1. Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they
could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.
2. Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with anyone who is impaired.
3. Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
4. Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
5. Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or
with legal assistance.
UNIVERSITY DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS AGAINST THOSE WHO COMMIT DATING VIOLENCE,
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING
If a person is accused of sexual assault dating violence, domestic violence or stalking and the accusation
appears to be valid, the accused person will be called into a conference with an employee in the office of the
Vice President for Student Services. If the accused admits to the allegations appropriate disciplinary actions
will be imposed. If the accused denies the allegations a University Judicial Board (must receive annual
training) will be convened. The accuser and the accused are entitled to the same opportunities to have others
present during a disciplinary proceeding. It is the responsibility of the University Judicial Board to hear the
facts of the case and determine the validity of the accusation. If it is determined that the accusation is valid the
Board will determine the penalty. Both the accuser and the accused shall be informed of the outcome of any
institutional disciplinary proceeding brought alleging a sex offense.
The sanctions that may be imposed include probation, suspension, or expulsion.
VICTIM NOTIFICATION
Utah State University Eastern will, upon written request, disclose to an alleged victim of a crime of violence
or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the
institution against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is
1
Burn, S.M. (2009). A situational model of sexual assault prevention through bystander intervention. Sex Roles, 60, 779‐
792. 2
Bystander intervention strategies adapted from Stanford University’s Office of Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse Page | 11 deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall be treated as the alleged victim
for purposes of this paragraph.
SEX OFFENDER REGISTRY
In accordance with the federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act and the Utah Sex Offender Registration Act,
notice must be given of registered sex offenders to institutions of higher education if the offender is employed,
carries on a vocation, or is a student at the institution.
This information is available at the University Police Department. Information regarding registered sex
offenders residing within a specific Utah geographic location can be accessed via the Utah Department of
Corrections’ website: UTAH SEX OFFENDER REGISTRY
(http://www.communitynotification.com/cap_office_disclaimer.php?office=54438)
PROHIBITED CONDUCT
As required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
the university prohibits sex discrimination in its educational programs or activities, admission, and employment.
Under certain circumstances, Sexual Misconduct may constitute sex discrimination.
Sexual Misconduct prohibited under this policy includes a range of unwelcome sexual conduct, including verbal
and physical sexual harassment, sexual assault, and other forms of sexual violence, each of which is a form of
prohibited sex discrimination. Other criminal behavior, such as domestic violence, dating violence, and
stalking, that is generally (though not exclusively) gender-based is also considered Sexual Misconduct under
this policy.
ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES
Utah State University Eastern has a strong commitment to the wellbeing of its faculty, staff, and students. USU
Eastern policy supports a drug-free environment.
University regulations specifically prohibit the possession, use, or sale of alcoholic beverages on campus,
including athletic events. Utah law prohibits the consumption of alcohol in any arena or stadium. Anyone
found in violation of these regulations is subject to arrest.
Utah law prohibits the purchase, possession, or consumption of alcohol by a minor (anyone under the age of
18). It is unlawful for anyone to provide alcohol to a minor. The USUEPD and other local law enforcement
agencies vigorously enforce state underage drinking laws. The USUEPD has a very low tolerance to alcohol
violations. The following enforcement options are used:
 Warning
 Referral to the Student Conduct Officer
 Referral to Housing staff
 Referral to Athletics coaches
 Citation (used most often in these cases)
 Physical arrest
Utah law and University regulations also prohibit possessing, using or selling hallucinatory, narcotic, or other
controlled substance. USUEPD works closely with the Carbon and Emery County Task Force to enforce state
and federal laws regarding these substances. The following enforcement options are used:
 Warning
 Referral to the Student Conduct Officer
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Referral to Housing staff
Referral to Athletics coaches
Citation
Physical arrest
Utah State University Eastern maintains the Wellness Center to assist employees and students. This office has
several programs including:
 An annual student orientation dealing with policies and the legal and health consequences of substance
 A campus referral system provides assessment, education and/or referral for treatment
 A 10-hour alcohol/drug education class
 An annual alcohol and drug awareness week
 Educational workshops and/or presentations on alcohol or other drug-related issues upon request
 A Life Skills Center to teach life skills that prevent substance abuse through enhancing one’s ability to
function personally, socially, emotionally, educationally, and economically
Click here to see the USU Drug and Alcohol-Free Workplace policy (https://hr.usu.edu/files/policies/313.pdf).
SECURITY OF AND ACCESS TO USU FACILITIES
The USUPED is responsible for securing the buildings on campus and on the off campus properties. Each
building has a scheduled time to be secured. The department employees part-time, unarmed student security
officers to assist USUE PD for this purpose. Police Officers and/or Security officers begin locking buildings at
6:30 p.m. each day. The last buildings are scheduled to be secured by 12:30 a.m. Lockup times for some
buildings may vary depending upon class schedules and other reservations.
Some university academic departments arrange for students to stay in buildings after hours. With departmental
approval the student is issued a building pass which allows him or her to stay in the building after the normal
lockup time. When the building is checked by police and/or security officers at night, those students who have
building passes are allowed to remain in the building. Those who do not have passes are required to leave. In
addition, graduate students who have been issued keys to a building are allowed to remain in the building after
hours.
Utah State University Eastern has established a well-defined access control policy. Only selected
administrators are authorized to approve the issuance of keys to individuals within their assigned areas. The
executive director/police of the USUE Department of Public Safety must approve all master key requests.
Periodic surveys and audits of campus departments are conducted to determine the status of keys issued to
department personnel. It is against USU Eastern policy to for individuals to duplicate any USU Eastern key.
The USUEPD provides a service to individuals who need access to an area after hours. Individuals may be
allowed into an area when prior written approval has been given by an appropriate dean, department head, or
instructor. In cases where written approval has not been received, a student may gain access if the responsible
dean or department head calls the University Police Department and gives verbal approval. Under special
circumstances an officer may escort an individual into an area to retrieve his or her personal property.
All resident halls are designated as private residences. Persons not authorized to be in a residence hall are
subject to arrest for trespassing. All Housing maintenance personnel wear name badges identifying them as
Housing workers. Maintenance personnel only enter rooms or apartments to respond to work orders for needed
repairs requested by the residents or for identified emergencies.
Academic and buildings housing on-campus businesses (e.g. Parking, Publication and Design and Production)
are open to the public during business hours. While these are public areas Utah law gives USU Eastern the
Page | 13 right to remove individuals from campus who violate the law, the rules and regulations of the University, or
who disrupt the peaceful conduct of the institution.
All USU Eastern students and employees can be issued USU Eastern identification cards and are encouraged to
carry the cards while on campus.
SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS RELATED TO MAINTENANCE PROGRAMS
Utah State University Eastern Facilities has a regular preventive maintenance program for the outside lighting
system on campus. Periodic light surveys are completed of the entire campus. Lights that are out or in need of
repair are taken care of in a timely manner. In addition, as USUE PD police and/or security officers make their
regular rounds and find lights out or other problems that need attention, they complete a work order to have the
necessary repairs made.
Access points to buildings are well maintained. When a broken lock, door or window is found on-call
locksmiths and other Facilities workers are available 24 hours a day to come in and make repairs to maintain the
security of our buildings.
Each spring trees and shrubbery around campus are trimmed to keep pathways throughout the campus as safe as
possible.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES
When a serious incident occurs that causes an immediate threat to the campus, law enforcement and emergency
medical services will be summoned. The first responders to the scene are usually the Utah State University
Eastern Police Department, Price City Police Department and Price City Fire Department (PCFD). These
agencies typically respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the nature of the incident,
other USU Eastern departments and other local or federal agencies could also be involved in responding to and
managing the incident.
Utah State University Eastern’s Emergency Operations Plan includes information about the university’s
response to any natural or man-made disaster or hazard that affects Utah State University Eastern and poses an
actual or potential threat to public health and safety on the university campus, and the response to a regional or
national crisis that affects the university system. The USU Eastern Department of Public Safety has the
responsibility of responding to and summoning the necessary resources to mitigate, investigate, and document
any situation that may cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. Resources that may be called upon
include:
 USU Eastern Environmental Health and Safety
 USU Eastern Facilities
 Price City Fire and EMS
 Price City Police Department
 Other local police departments
 USU Eastern Risk Management
Upon confirmation that an event poses a threat to the campus community or a segment of the community the
University Police Chief, Assistant Chief, or Police Sergeant Will, taking into accounts the safety of the campus
community; approve the activation of the Code Blue Alert system and what information will be released.
Without delay alert information will be distributed to the campus community or appropriate segment by the
USU Eastern Emergency Manager or a trained designee and/or Director of Public Relations and Marketing or a
designee using one or more of the following methods.
 Code Blue Alert System which includes alerts to the following:
Page | 14 Email (All students and employees are automatically
signed up to receive email alerts on their preferred email
account)
o Text messages
o Cell phone
o Landline
o TTY
USU Eastern home page
Department of Public Safety web page
Fire alarm system
Local radio stations
Bulletins posted at affected areas
o





If it is determined that issuing a notification of a confirmed emergency or
dangerous situation would compromise the efforts to assist a victim,
contain the emergency, respond to the emergency or otherwise mitigate the
emergency, the notification will not be sent.
How do I sign up to receive Code Blue Alert notifications? 



Log into USU Access and select Personal Information o (https://ssb.banner.usu.e
du/zprod/twbkwbis.P_W
WWLogin) Select View/Update USU Emergency Alert Phone Numbers Enter up to 5 voice and text message contact numbers Be sure to keep your preferred email up to date. If only a segment of the campus community is notified of a threat the
situation will be continually monitored and additional segments of the
campus community will be notified if the situation warrants such action.
Depending on the threat those already on campus may be given different instructions than those who may be
planning to come to campus. Pay attention to the full message of the campus alert.
If a serious threat is confirmed on the USU Eastern campus you will be advised to shelter in place, lock down,
or evacuate.
Shelter-in-Place
In certain emergency situations, the campus community may be advised to shelter-in-place to avoid or minimize
exposure to outside risks. Risks could include chemical, biological or radioactive releases and some weatherrelated emergencies. Once shelter-in-place instructions have been communicated, students, faculty and staff
should either stay in the building they are in when they get the message or if outside, go to the nearest building
and await further instructions.
Shelter-in-Place is a precaution aimed to keep you safe while remaining indoors. It refers to taking refuge in a
designated area of safety within a building such as a small, interior room with no or few windows. It does not
mean sealing off your entire residence or building. If you are told to shelter-in-place, follow these instructions:
 Stop classes, work or close business operations.
 Share the notification with others in the building if possible, but do not leave the area where you were
instructed to shelter-in-place.
 Close all windows, exterior doors, and any other openings to the outside.
 Select interior room(s) above the ground floor with the fewest windows or vents.
 Gather essential disaster supplies if possible.
 Under certain circumstances (criminal activity) it may be necessary to lock the door to the area where
you are located
 Keep listening to local radio, television, and check your cell phone for Code Blue messages and alerts
until you are told it is safe or you are told to evacuate.
 University and local officials are the best source of information for your particular situation.
 During an emergency, go to USU Eastern home page at www.usu.edu for more information. Follow
instructions during and after emergencies regarding sheltering, food, water, and clean-up methods.
Page | 15 Lockdown
Lockdown is appropriate for threats posed from outside or inside the building. These threats could include a
violent person attempting to enter the building, a perpetrator already inside, or nearby criminal or terrorist
activity.
Lockdown Procedures:
 Get to a position out of the line-of-sight of doors and windows.
 Check outside of the room or office for nearby individuals and move them into a room.
 Close and lock all doors and windows.
 Cover any door windows and close window blinds if available.
 Turn off room/office lights and remain quiet.
 Silence cell phones
 If there is a group spread out throughout the room.
 Make a plan to protect yourselves in the event that the perpetrator enters the room.
 Anyone in the outdoors should move away from the danger to an appropriate, safe location.
 Anyone in common areas should proceed immediately to the nearest room and follow the lockdown
procedures.
 Let roommates or family members know where you are.
 Remain in your location until an all-clear message is received.
Evacuation
In the event of a serious threat evacuations may be ordered from a building, a group of building or the entire
campus. Though fire is the most common reason to initiate an evacuation, it is not the only reason. Some of
the more prevalent reasons are:
 Bio hazards (release of biologically hazardous materials)
 Chemical hazards (dangerous chemical spill, dangerous gas releases)
 Radiation hazards (spill of radioactive material, release of a radioactive gas)
 Fire hazards (smell or sight of smoke or flames)
 Terrorist Threat
 Natural Disaster
Building Evacuation
If you come upon a situation that calls for an evacuation of the building you are occupying, either from a fire
alarm or an emergency notification, proceed as follows:
 Exit the building via the nearest exit.
 Follow the direction of evacuation team leaders if present.
 Do not use elevators.
 Instructors are to ensure the evacuation of their classes.
 Do not re-enter the building until USU Eastern Police, Price City Fire Department, or other University
official (e.g. someone from Environmental Health and Safety) gives an all-clear.
 The silencing of the alarm bells is not an all-clear to re-enter the building.
 If you suspect someone was not evacuated or you have any information on the incident that
prompted the alarm, report to an emergency responder in the area.
 Let roommates or family members know where you are.
Campus-wide Evacuation
Page | 16 If a serious threat to the entire campus is determined by the USU Eastern Police Department to be legitimate, a
campus-wide evacuation will be ordered. If such an order is given, follow the following procedures:
 Stop classes, work or close business operations
 Secure offices and workplaces
 Immediately go to your vehicle, the nearest bus stop, or if riding or walking take the nearest route off of
campus away from the threat.
 Follow the directions of public safety officials regarding direction of travel when coming out of parking
lots. They may not let you take the quickest route to your destination, but they will provide a more
orderly flow of traffic.
If an on-campus emergency is determined to be a threat to the entire community the local police department or
fire department will determine what information will be distributed. Information can be distributed through one
or more of the following methods:
 Carbon County’s Code Red (sign up at this link: https://public.coderedweb.com/CNE/E86621C92CA4)
 Local radio stations
At least one follow-up message will be distributed through the Code Blue Alert system, a blast email, and/or on
the USU Eastern home web page.
All members of the USU Eastern Community are encouraged to notify the USUEPD of any situation or incident
on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that may involve an immediate or
ongoing threat to the health and safety of students and/or employees on campus. You can use any of the
following methods to make the notification:
 Call 911 – If you are using a campus phone you will be connected to the USUEPD Dispatch Center
(Price Public Safety Dispatch). If you are using a cell phone you will connected with the Price Public
Safety Dispatch Center which will transfer you to the USUEPD.
 Call 435-637-0890 – you will be connected to the USUEPD Dispatch Center (Price Public Safety
Dispatch)
Emergency Evacuation Exercises
Utah State University Eastern conducts at least one test of our emergency response and evacuation procedures
each year. In conjunction with that drill we will publicize our emergency response and evacuation procedures.
In addition, other emergency response tests are conducted each year, such as table top exercises, field exercises,
or tests of the emergency notification system. These tests are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency
plans and capabilities of the institution.
The University conducts two evacuation drills each year in each of the on-campus housing facilities that have
central fire alarm systems. These drills are unannounced. The residents in these facilities are required to
evacuate and go to their designated location to be accounted for.
Page | 17 Fire Drill Tests
Spring 2012 Sessions Date 1/12/2012 Time 1:00pm Aaron Jones Tucker 1/12/2012 1:15pm 1/12/2012 1:30pm Burtenshaw 1/12/2012 1:45pm Fall 2012 Sessions Date 8/30/2012 Time 4:00pm Aaron Jones 4:15pm Spring 2013 Date Time Sessions 1/9/2013 4:00pm Aaron Jones 1/9/2013 4:30pm Burtenshaw 1/9/2013 5:00pm Sessions Sessions Date 1/10/2013 Time 3:30pm Aaron Jones 3:45pm Date Time 8/29/2013 3:30pm 1/10/2013 4:00pm Burtenshaw 1/10/2013 4:15pm Sessions Date 8/27/2013 Time 4:00pm Spring 2015 Sessions Date 1/14/2015 Time 4:45pm Aaron Jones 1/14/2015 4:30pm Sessions Date 1/14/2016 Time 3:30pm Aaron Jones 1/14/2016 3:45pm Tucker 8/29/2013 3:45pm 4:45pm Burtenshaw 8/29/2013 4:00pm Aaron Jones Tucker 8/27/2013 4:15pm 8/29/2013 4:15pm Burtenshaw 8/27/2013 4:30pm 8/27/2013 4:45pm Fall 2015 (Tentative) Tucker 1/14/2015 4:15pm Burtenshaw 1/14/2015 Sessions Date 4:00pm Time Burtenshaw Aaron Jones 9/3/2015 4:00pm Tucker 1/14/2016 4:00pm Tucker 9/3/2015 4:15pm Spring 2016 (Tentative) 8/30/2012 Fall 2014 Tucker 1/10/2013 4:30pm Aaron Jones Spring 2014 Burtenshaw 8/30/2012 Fall 2013 Tucker 1/9/2013 4:15pm Tucker 8/30/2012 Burtenshaw 9/3/2015 4:30pm 9/3/2015 4:45pm Fall 2016 1/14/2016 4:15pm Sessions Aaron Jones Tucker Date Time Burtenshaw General information about the emergency response and evacuation procedures for USU Eastern is publicized
each year as part of the institution’s Clery Act compliance efforts. More information regarding the emergency
response plan is available on the USU Eastern Department of Public Safety web site at:
(http://dps.usu.edu/emergency/htm/emergency-operations-plan)
DEFINITIONS
The Crime Statistics table reflects specific crimes and arrests reported to the sources identified in the Collecting
Crime Reports and Statistics Procedures Section. Per the Clery Act, these crimes are classified based on the
Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI’s) Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook (UCR). For sex offenses only,
the definitions are from the FBI’s National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) edition of the UCR.
Hate crimes are defined according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Hate Crime Data Collection
Guidelines and Training Guide for Hate Crime Data Collection.
Although the law states that institutions must use the UCR for defining and classifying crimes, it does not
require Clery Act crime reporting to meet all UCR standards.
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by
another.
Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
Prior to 2014 the following definitions were used for the Clery Report regarding sex offenses:
Page | 18 Sex Offenses, Forcible (these definitions were replaced in 2014 by the definitions under Sexual Assault
below.): Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not
forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

Forcible Sodomy: Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that
person's will; or not forcibly against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent
because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

Sexual Assault with an Object: The use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however
slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person's
will; or not forcibly or against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because
of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

Forcible fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual
gratification, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly or against the person's will where
the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or
permanent mental incapacity
Sex Offenses, Non-forcible (these definitions were replaced in 2014 by the definitions under Sexual
Assault below.): Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse. Only two types of offenses are included in this
definition:

Incest: Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the
degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

Statutory Rape: Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of
consent.
Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control, of a person or
persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
Aggravated Assault: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or
aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means
likely to produce death or great bodily harm. (It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault
when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if
the crime were successfully completed.)
Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes, this
definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or felony; breaking and entering with intent
to commit a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. For reporting purposes, this definition
includes all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access—even if the vehicles are
later abandoned (including joyriding).
Arson: Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house,
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, the personal property of another, etc.
Hate Crimes: A criminal offense committed against a person or property, which is motivated, in whole or in
part, by the offender’s bias. Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based
on one or more of the following actual or perceived characteristics: race, gender, religion, sexual orientation,
ethnicity, disability, gender identity, and national origin. For reporting purposes, hate crimes include any of the
following offenses that are motivated by bias: murder and non-negligent manslaughter, sexual offenses (rape,
Page | 19 fondling, incest, statutory rape), robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, theft, simple
assault, intimidation, destruction/damage/vandalism of property.
Illegal Weapons Possession: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale, purchase,
transportation, possession, concealment, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices,
or other deadly weapons. This classification encompasses weapons offenses that are regulatory in nature.
Included in this classification are the following: the manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons;
carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; using, manufacturing, etc., silencers; furnishing deadly weapons
to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and attempts to commit any of the above.
Drug Law Violations: The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution and/or use of certain
controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use. This includes the
unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation of
any controlled drug or narcotic substance, as well as any arrests for violations of state and local laws,
specifically those relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and making of narcotic
drugs. Included in this classification are the following: all drugs, without exception, that are illegal under local
or state law; and all illegally obtained prescription drugs.
Liquor Law Violations: The violation of state or local laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, sale,
purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages—not including driving under the influence
and drunkenness. The following are included in this classification: the manufacture, sale, transporting,
furnishing, possessing, etc., of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating
a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; underage possession; using a vehicle for illegal
transportation of liquor; and drinking on a public conveyance.
Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to
fear for his/her safety or the safety of others, or to suffer substantial emotional distress.
Attempted Crimes: This report does not differentiate between attempted and completed crimes. For example,
an incident involving an attempted forcible rape is counted as a forcible sex offense. The only exception to this
rule applies to attempts or assaults to murder when the victim does not die. These incidents are classified as
aggravated assaults rather than murders.
Federal Clery Act Definitions of Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking
The Clery Act defines the crimes of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking as follows:

Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a
romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
i. The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with
consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of
interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
ii. For the purposes of this definition—
A) Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of
such abuse.
B) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic
violence.
iii. For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and §668.41, any incident
meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic Violence:
i.
A Felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed—
A) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
B) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
Page | 20 ii.


C) By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or
intimate partner;
D) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family
violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
E) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that
person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which
the crime of violence occurred.
For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and §668.41, any incident
meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used
in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. Per the National Incident-Based Reporting
System User Manual from the FBI UCR Program, a sex offense is “any sexual act directed against
another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of
giving consent.”
o Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or
object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
o Fondling: The touching of the private parts of another person for the purposes of sexual
gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is
incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or
permanent mental incapacity.
o Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees
wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
o Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Stalking:
i. Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable
person to—
A) Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
B) Suffer substantial emotional distress.
ii. For the purposes of this definition—
A) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts which the
stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or
means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a
person, or interferes with a person’s property.
B) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with
similar identities to the victim.
C) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may,
but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
iii. For the purposes of complying with the requirements of this section and section 668.41, any
incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purposes of Clery Act reporting.
Utah Definitions of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking

Dating Violence – 78B-7-402(4):
“Dating violence” means:
(a) any criminal offense involving violence or physical harm, or threat of violence or physical
harm, when committed by a person against a dating partner of the person; or
(b) any attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation by a person to commit a criminal offense involving
violence or physical harm against a dating partner of the person.

Domestic Violence – 77-36-1(4):
Page | 21 (4) "Domestic violence" means any criminal offense involving violence or physical harm or threat of
violence or physical harm, or any attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit a criminal offense
involving violence or physical harm, when committed by one cohabitant against another. "Domestic
violence" also means commission or attempt to commit, any of the following offenses by one
cohabitant against another:
(a) aggravated assault, as described in Section 76-5-103;
(b) assault, as described in Section 76-5-102;
(c) criminal homicide, as described in Section 76-5-201;
(d) harassment, as described in Section 76-5-106;
(e) electronic communication harassment, as described in Section 76-9-201;
(f) kidnapping, child kidnapping, or aggravated kidnapping, as described in Sections 76-5-301,
76-5-301.1, and 76-5-302;
(g) mayhem, as described in Section 76-5-105;
(h) sexual offenses, as described in Title 76, Chapter 5, Part 4, Sexual Offenses, and Section
76-5b-201, Sexual Exploitation of a Minor;
(i) stalking, as described in Section 76-5-106.5;
(j) unlawful detention or unlawful detention of a minor, as described in Section 76-5-304;
(k) violation of a protective order or ex parte protective order, as described in Section 76-5-108;
(l) any offense against property described in Title 76, Chapter 6, Part 1, Property Destruction,
Part 2, Burglary and Criminal Trespass, or Part 3, Robbery;
(m) possession of a deadly weapon with intent to assault, as described in Section 76-10-507;
(n) discharge of a firearm from a vehicle, near a highway, or in the direction of any person,
building, or vehicle, as described in Section 76-10-508;
(o) disorderly conduct, as defined in Section 76-9-102, if a conviction of disorderly conduct is
the result of a plea agreement in which the defendant was originally charged with any of the
domestic violence offenses otherwise described in this Subsection (4). Conviction of disorderly
conduct as a domestic violence offense, in the manner described in this Subsection (4)(o), does
not constitute a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence under 18 U.S.C. Section 921, and is
exempt from the provisions of the federal Firearms Act, 18 U.S.C. Section 921 et seq.; or
(p) child abuse as described in Section 76-5-109.1.

Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used
by the State of Utah.
o Rape – 76-5-402
(1) A person commits rape when the actor has sexual intercourse with another person without
the victim's consent.
Object rape - 76-5-402.2
(1) A person [commits object rape] who, without the victim's consent, causes the penetration,
however slight, of the genital or anal opening of another person who is 14 years of age or older,
by any foreign object, substance, instrument, or device, including a part of the human body
other than the mouth or genitals, with intent to cause substantial emotional or bodily pain to the
victim or with the intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person.
o Fondling - 76-5-404. (Forcible sexual abuse in Utah)
(1) A person commits forcible sexual abuse (Fondling) if the victim is 14 years of age or older
and, under circumstances not amounting to rape, object rape, sodomy, or attempted rape or
sodomy, the actor touches the anus, buttocks, or any part of the genitals of another, or touches
the breast of a female, or otherwise takes indecent liberties with another, or causes another to
take indecent liberties with the actor or another, with intent to cause substantial emotional or
bodily pain to any person or with the intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person,
without the consent of the other, regardless of the sex of any participant.
o Incest - 76-7-102. Incest
(2) (a) An actor is guilty of incest when, under circumstances not amounting to rape, rape of a
child, or aggravated sexual assault, the actor knowingly and intentionally:
(i) engages in conduct under Subsection (2)(b)(i), (ii), (iii), or (iv); or
(ii) provides a human egg or seminal fluid under Subsection (2)(b)(v).
Page | 22 (b) Conduct referred to under Subsection (2)(a) is:
(i) sexual intercourse between the actor and a person the actor knows has
kinship to the actor as a related person;
(ii) the insertion or placement of the provider's seminal fluid into the vagina,
cervix, or uterus of a related person by means other than sexual intercourse;
(iii) providing or making available his seminal fluid for the purpose of insertion
or placement of the fluid into the vagina, cervix, or uterus of a related person by means
other than sexual intercourse;
(iv) a woman 18 years of age or older who:
(A) knowingly allows the insertion of the seminal fluid of a provider into
her vagina, cervix, or uterus by means other than sexual intercourse; and
(B) knows that the seminal fluid is that of a person with whom she has
kinship as a related person; or
(v) providing the actor's sperm or human egg that is used to conduct in vitro
fertilization, or any other means of fertilization, with the human egg or sperm of a
person who is a related person.
o

Statutory Rape – 76-5-401 ( Unlawful sexual activity with a minor in Utah)
(1) For purposes of this section "minor" is a person who is 14 years of age or older, but
younger than 16 years of age, at the time the sexual activity described in this section occurred.
(2) A person commits unlawful sexual activity with a minor if, under circumstances not
amounting to rape, in violation of Section 76-5-402, object rape, in violation of Section 76-5402.2, forcible sodomy, in violation of Section 76-5-403, or aggravated sexual assault, in
violation of Section 76-5-405, the actor:
(a) has sexual intercourse with the minor;
(b) engages in any sexual act with the minor involving the genitals of one person and
the mouth or anus of another person, regardless of the sex of either participant; or
(c) causes the penetration, however slight, of the genital or anal opening of the minor
by any foreign object, substance, instrument, or device, including a part of the human
body, with the intent to cause substantial emotional or bodily pain to any person or
with the intent to arouse or gratify the sexual desire of any person, regardless of the sex
of any participant.
Stalking – 76-5-106.5 (2) and (3)
(2) A person is guilty of stalking who intentionally or knowingly engages in a course of conduct
directed at a specific person and knows or should know that the course of conduct would cause a
reasonable person:
(a) to fear for the person's own safety or the safety of a third person; or
(b) to suffer other emotional distress.
(3) A person is guilty of stalking who intentionally or knowingly violates:
(a) a stalking injunction issued pursuant to Title 77, Chapter 3a, Stalking Injunctions; or
(b) a permanent criminal stalking injunction issued pursuant to this section.
CONSENT
State of Utah Definition
In Utah consent is defined by statute 76-5-406. Sexual offenses against the victim without consent of victim
– Circumstances, as follows:
An act of sexual intercourse, rape, attempted rape, rape of a child, attempted rape of a
child, object rape, attempted object rape, object rape of a child, attempted object rape of a
child, sodomy, attempted sodomy, forcible sodomy, attempted forcible sodomy, sodomy on a
child, attempted sodomy on a child, forcible sexual abuse, attempted forcible sexual abuse,
Page | 23 sexual abuse of a child, attempted sexual abuse of a child, aggravated sexual abuse of a child,
attempted aggravated sexual abuse of a child, or simple sexual abuse is without consent of the
victim under any of the following circumstances:
(1) the victim expresses lack of consent through words or conduct;
(2) the actor overcomes the victim through the actual application of physical force or
violence;
(3) the actor is able to overcome the victim through concealment or by the element of
surprise;
(4) (a) (i) the actor coerces the victim to submit by threatening to retaliate in the
immediate future against the victim or any other person, and the victim perceives at the time
that the actor has the ability to execute this threat; or
(ii) the actor coerces the victim to submit by threatening to retaliate in the future
against the victim or any other person, and the victim believes at the time that the actor has the
ability to execute this threat;
(b) as used in this Subsection (4), "to retaliate" includes threats of physical force,
kidnapping, or extortion;
(5) the actor knows the victim is unconscious,
unaware that the act is occurring, or physically unable to resist;
(6) the actor knows that as a result of mental disease or defect, or for any other reason
the victim is at the time of the act incapable either of appraising the nature of the act or of
resisting it;
(7) the actor knows that the victim submits or participates because the victim
erroneously believes that the actor is the victim's spouse;
(8) the actor intentionally impaired the power of the victim to appraise or control his or
her conduct by administering any substance without the victim's knowledge;
(9) the victim is younger than 14 years of age;
(10) the victim is younger than 18 years of age and at the time of the offense the actor
was the victim's parent, stepparent, adoptive parent, or legal guardian or occupied a position of
special trust in relation to the victim as defined in Section 76-5-404.1;
(11) the victim is 14 years of age or older, but younger than 18 years of age, and the
actor is more than three years older than the victim and entices or coerces the victim to submit
or participate, under circumstances not amounting to the force or threat required under
Subsection (2) or (4); or
(12) the actor is a health professional or religious counselor, as those terms are defined
in this Subsection (12), the act is committed under the guise of providing professional
diagnosis, counseling, or treatment, and at the time of the act the victim reasonably believed
that the act was for medically or professionally appropriate diagnosis, counseling, or treatment
to the extent that resistance by the victim could not reasonably be expected to have been
manifested; for purposes of this Subsection (12):
(a) "health professional" means an individual who is licensed or who holds himself or
herself out to be licensed, or who otherwise provides professional physical or mental health
services, diagnosis, treatment, or counseling including, but not limited to, a physician,
osteopathic physician, nurse, dentist, physical therapist, chiropractor, mental health therapist,
social service worker, clinical social worker, certified social worker, marriage and family
therapist, professional counselor, psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric mental health nurse
specialist, or substance abuse counselor; and
(b) "religious counselor" means a minister, priest, rabbi, bishop, or other recognized
member of the clergy.
Utah State University Eastern Definition
Consent to engage in sexual activity must be informed, freely given and mutual. Consent must be ongoing,
throughout each instance of sexual activity, and for each form of sexual contact. Consent to one form of sexual
contact does not constitute consent to all forms of sexual contact. For example, an individual may agree to kiss
but choose not to engage in touching of the intimate parts or sexual intercourse. An individual should obtain
Page | 24 consent before moving from one act to another. In the state of Utah, a 16 or 17 year old cannot consent to
sexual activity if the other person is ten (10) or more years older than the minor.




Consent consists of an outward demonstration indicating that an individual has freely chosen to engage
in sexual activity. Consent is demonstrated through mutually understandable words and/or actions that
clearly indicate a willingness to engage freely in sexual activity. Relying on non-verbal communication
can lead to misunderstandings. Consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, lack of resistance
or lack of active response alone. In the absence of an outward demonstration, consent does not exist. If
at any time it is reasonably apparent that either party is hesitant, confused or uncertain, both parties
should stop and obtain mutual verbal consent before continuing sexual activity.
A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent.
Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutually understandable communication that clearly
indicates willingness to engage in sexual activity each time such activity occurs.
Consent does not exist if it results from the use or threat of physical force, intimidation, or coercion, or
any other factor that would eliminate an individual's ability to exercise their own free will to choose
whether or not to have sexual contact.
A person who is incapacitated is not able to make informed decisions or be aware of their consequences
and therefore is incapable of giving consent. Incapacitation is the inability, temporarily or permanently,
to give consent because the individual is mentally and/or physically helpless due to drug or alcohol
consumption, either voluntarily or involuntarily, or the individual is unconscious, asleep or otherwise
unaware that the sexual activity is occurring. In addition, individuals are incapacitated if they
demonstrate that they are unaware of where they are, how they got there, or why or how they became
engaged in a sexual interaction. Some indicators of incapacitation may include, but are not limited to,
lack of control over physical movements, lack of awareness of circumstances or surroundings, or the
inability to communicate for any reason. An individual may experience a blackout state in which they
appear to be giving consent, but do not actually have conscious awareness or the ability to consent. It is
especially important, therefore, that anyone engaging in sexual activity be aware of the other person's
level of intoxication or impairment. Being intoxicated or impaired by drugs or alcohol is never an
excuse for sexual misconduct and does not excuse one from the responsibility to obtain consent. It is
not an excuse that the party initiating sexual contact was intoxicated and therefore did not realize the
incapacity of the other.
CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS
The following statistics are compiled in accordance with definitions used in the Uniform Crime Reporting
System of the Department of Justice and the FBI as modified by the Hate Crime Statistics Act. These statistics
report the occurrence of crime on campus during the most recent year and the two preceding years.
The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (“VAWA”), which President Obama signed into law on
March 7, imposes new obligations on colleges and universities under its Campus Sexual Violence Act (“SaVE
Act”) provision, Section 304. Those obligations—which to some extent refine and clarify, and to some extent
change, existing legal requirements and government agency enforcement statements—likely will require
revision of institutional policy and practice. Counsel should be consulted on this complex, sensitive area of
institutional law compliance.
Under VAWA, effective March 7, 2014, colleges and universities are required to report domestic violence,
dating violence, and stalking, beyond crime categories the Clery Act already mandates.
Statistics Table
Page | 25 This Crime Statistics Report may or may not reflect the actual number of crimes committed on campus;
however, it does accurately represent the number of the following defined crimes reported to the
aforementioned entities.
It should be noted that prior to 2014 sex offense reports were divided between Forcible Sex Offenses and Nonforcible sex offenses. Beginning in 2014 the definition of Sex Offenses includes Rape, Fondling, Incest, and
Statutory Rape. The table below shows statistics for Sex Offenses – Forcible and Sex Offenses – Non-forcible
for 2012 and 2013. Statistics for Sex Offenses are reported using the new definition for 2014.
TOTALS BY CRIME TYPE AND LOCATION CATEGORY
ON-CAMPUS
OFFENSE
STUDENT
PUBLIC
TYPE
ON CAMPUS
HOUSING *
NONCAMPUS
PROPERTY
2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014
Murder/Nonnegligent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
manslaughter
Negligent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
manslaughter
Sex offenses –
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Forcible
Sex offenses –
Non-forcible
(Include only
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
incest and
statutory rape)
Sex Offenses:
Rape
0
0
0
0
Fondling
0
0
0
0
Incest
0
0
0
0
Statutory
0
0
0
0
Rape
Domestic
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Violence
Dating
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Violence
Stalking
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Robbery
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Aggravated
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
assault
Burglary
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Motor vehicle
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
theft
Arson
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
HATE CRIMES
Hate crimes are those crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the
perpetrator’s bias against race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, disability, national origin or
gender identity. . Hate crimes are reported for the following crimes: Murder; Non-negligent Manslaughter;
Negligent Manslaughter; Forcible Sex Offenses (prior to 2014); Non-forcible Sex Offenses (prior to 2014); Sex
Offenses, including Rape, Fondling, Incest and Statutory Rape (beginning in 2014), Robbery, Aggravated
Assault, Burglary, Motor Vehicle Theft, Arson, Larceny-Theft, Simple Assault, Intimidation,
Destruction/damage/vandalism of property, and any other crime involving bodily injury.
Page | 26 No hate crimes using any of the categories listed above were reported for 2012, 2013, or 2014.
ARRESTS FOR DRUG, WEAPON AND LIQUOR LAW VIOLATIONS
ON-CAMPUS
OFFENSE
STUDENT
PUBLIC
TYPE
ON CAMPUS
HOUSING *
NONCAMPUS
PROPERTY
2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014
Illegal
weapons
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
possession
Drug law
6
3
2
6
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
violations
Liquor law
0
4
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
violations
DISCIPLINARY REFERRALS THAT DID NOT RESULT IN AN ARREST
ON-CAMPUS
OFFENSE
STUDENT
PUBLIC
TYPE
ON CAMPUS
HOUSING *
NONCAMPUS
PROPERTY
2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014 2012 2013 2014
Illegal
weapons
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
possession
Drug law
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
violations
Liquor law
0
0
13
0
0
13
0
0
0
0
0
0
violations
* “On-campus Student Housing” numbers are included in the total “On Campus” numbers.
REGIONAL CAMPUSES
Utah State University maintains several regional campuses and distant education centers throughout the state.
These campuses are located in the locations noted below. With the exception of the USU Eastern Campus,
none of these locations reported any of the criminal offenses, arrests, disciplinary actions, or fires
required to be reported under the Clery Act. Please click on USU Eastern below to see the Annual Campus
Security and Fire Safety Report for the USU Eastern campus.
Beaver
Heber
Milford
Nephi
Tooele
Brigham City
Junction-Piute
Moab
Orem
San Juan
Castle Dale
Kanab
Montezuma Creek
Richfield
USU Eastern
Delta
Kaysville
Monticello
Roosevelt
Vernal
Ephraim
Loa
Monument Valley
Salt Lake
Wendover
______________________________________________________________________________
IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Campus Resources
Utah State University Department of Public Safety – Police, Fire, Medical Emergencies…..………………...911
USU Eastern Police business line..…………………………………………………435-613-5612, 435-613-5677
Page | 27 USU Eastern Fire Marshal...………………………………………………………………………...435-797-1979
USU Eastern Emergency Manager…...……………………………………………………………..435-613-5282
Vice Chancellor for Student Services………………………….……………..……………………..435-613-5229
Carbon County Victim Advocate……………………………………………………………………435-636-3250
USU Eastern Counseling and Psychological Services...…………………...………………………..435-613-5670
Student Wellness Center (Help with alcohol and substance abuse)..……………………………….435-613-5670
Affirmative Action Office…………………………………………………………………………...435-613-5678
Disability Resource Center………………….………………………………………………………435-613-5337
USU Eastern Human Resources Office………………………………………………………….... 435-613-5678
Off-Campus Resources
Carbon County (Community Abuse Prevention Services Agency)…………………….………….. 435-636-3250
Alcohol and Drug Counseling……………………………………………………………………… 435-637-2358
Alcohol Information and Referral Help Line………………………………………………………. 800-252-6465
DCFS Social Services Child Abuse and Family Services……...………………………………….. 435-636-2360
Four Corners Mental Health……………………………………………………………………….. 435-637-2358
Women’s Shelter……………………………………………………………………435-637-6589, 435-636-2360
UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY Eastern 2015 FIRE SAFETY REPORT
The Higher Education Act requires disclosure of fire safety standards and measures for on-campus student
housing facilities by October first of each year. This report includes statistics for the three most recent
completed years, a description of each on-campus student housing facility fire safety system, the number of fire
drills held during the previous calendar year, the institution's policies or rules on portable electrical appliances,
smoking and open flames in a student housing facility, the institution's procedures for student housing
evacuation in the case of a fire and policies regarding fire safety education and training programs provided to
the students and employees.
DAILY FIRE LOG
A daily fire log for the most recent 60-day period is available for review 24 hours a day at the USU Eastern
Police Department. Logs older than 60 days will be made available within two business days of a request for
public inspections. This log can also be found by clicking here at http://dps.usu.edu/fire/htm/daily-fire-log.
2014 STATISTICS AND INFORMATION REGARDING FIRES IN USU RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES
HOUSING
FIRES, CAUSE, INJURIES, DEATHS and $$ LOSS
2012
2013
2014
Page | 28 Fires
Cause
Injuries
Deaths
$$ Loss
0
0
0
0
$$ Loss
0
0
0
0
Deaths
Deaths
0
0
0
0
Injuries
Injuries
0
0
0
0
Cause
Cause
0
0
0
0
Fires
Fires
Aaron Jones
Burtenshaw
Sessions
Tucker
$$ Loss
FACILITIES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014 FIRE SAFETY SYSTEMS IN STUDENT HOUSING FACILITIES AND FIRE DRILLS
Building
Automatic
Sprinkler
System
24 – Hour
Monitored
Fire Alarm
System
Aaron Jones
Fire
Extinguishers
Manual Pull
Stations
✔
Smoke
Detectors
in Room
Number
of Fire
Drills
✔
2
Burtenshaw
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
2
Sessions
Tucker
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
✔
2
2
DEPARTMENTS OR ORGANIZATION TO WHOM STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES SHOULD
REPORT THAT A FIRE OCCURRED
Per federal law, Utah State University Eastern is required to annually disclose statistical data on all fires that
occur in on-campus student housing facilities. Listed below are the non-emergency numbers to call to report
fires that have already been extinguished in on-campus student housing. These are fires for which you are
unsure whether the Utah State University Eastern Public Safety Department may already be aware. If you find
evidence of such a fire or if you hear about such a fire, please contact one of the following:
Utah State University Eastern Public Safety: 435-613-5612; 435-613-5677
Utah State University Housing Office: 435-613-5289
When calling, please provide as much information as possible about the location, date, time and cause of the
fire.
USU EASTERN POLICY ON PORTABLE ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES, SMOKING AND OPEN
FLAMES IN STUDENT HOUSING FACILITIES
The following items or actions can represent a potential fire hazard and are therefore prohibited. A minimum
$25 fine may result for each prohibited item discovered by staff, with fines escalating for repeat offenses.
1. Incense and incense burners
Page | 29 2. Candles and other open flame items are expressly prohibited campus-wide unless authorized by the
University Fire Marshall. Decorative candles may be displayed but are strongly discouraged. Wicks
must remain white and unburned. Candle warmers are prohibited as per the State Fire Marshall.
a. Candle usage may be requested to the University Fire Marshall for:
i. Theatrical or other entertaining arts performances
ii. Dining Services areas
iii. Special religious ceremonies
iv. Other purposes as may appear necessary
3. All coiled resistance units (such as hot-plates)
4. Halogen bulbs are prohibited
5. Space heaters or other portable-heating units, unless provided by Housing
6. Inappropriate indoor storage of flammable liquid
7. Installing plastic or paper liners in and around apartment stoves.
8. Taping or hanging material from smoke detectors or fire extinguishers.
9. All electrical appliances and cords must meet UL (Underwriters Laboratory) safety standards. ULapproved power strips must be used when more than two electrical items share an outlet. The Utah
State University Fire Marshal highly recommends purchasing extension cords manufactured by Fire
Shield (available at Wal-Mart for under $10) which senses damage caused by overload,
overheating, pinching or aging and shuts off the power in 25/1000 of a second if a dangerous
condition is detected.
10. Grilling on BBQs within 25 feet of any Housing building. If your grill uses propane the tank cannot
be stored on your porch or in your room/apartment.
11. Smoking is prohibited in all USU academic building and residence halls.
FIRE SAFETY
Each resident must be alert to the danger of fires. The following items or actions can represent a potential fire
hazard and are therefore prohibited. A minimum $25 fine may result for each prohibited item discovered by
staff, with fines escalating for repeat offenses.
Prohibited Items
 Incense and incense burners
 Candles and other open flame items are expressly prohibited campus-wide unless authorized by the
University Fire Marshall. Decorative candles may be displayed but are strongly discouraged. Wicks
must remain white and unburned. Candle warmers (including Scentsy-type warmers) are prohibited as
per State Risk Management requirements. Candle usage may be requested in writing and sent to the
University Fire Marshall for: theatrical or other entertaining arts performances dining and food services
areas special religious ceremonies other purposes as may appear necessary.
 All coiled resistance units (such as hot-plates)
 Halogen bulbs are prohibited
 Inappropriate indoor storage of flammable liquids Residents may store up to 1 pint of lighter fluid
 Installing plastic, aluminum, or paper liners in and around apartment stoves.
 Taping or hanging material from smoke detectors or fire extinguishers.
Page | 30 

All electrical appliances and cords must meet UL (Underwriters Laboratory) safety standards. ULapproved power strips must be used when more than two electrical items share an outlet. The Utah
State University Fire Marshal highly recommends purchasing extension cords manufactured by Fire
Shield which senses damage caused by overload, overheating, pinching or aging and shuts off the
power in 25/1000 of a second if a dangerous condition is detected.
Grilling on BBQs within feet of any housing building. Residents may not store propane tanks larger
than 5 lbs. in their apartments.
Mini-refrigerator, freezers and air conditioners that require 1500 watts of power usage or less are allowed and
must be plugged directly into a wall. All appliances, including microwaves, must be plugged directly into a
wall outlet, not a surge protector or extension cord as required by state fire code. This policy will be enforced
by Housing staff.
Space Heaters
Approved space heaters are ceramic and oil filled heaters and MUST have the following:
 UL listing 1,500 watts or under
 Self-limiting element temperature setting
 Automatic tip over protection
 Built in timer that does not exceed an 8 hour time limit
 Built in programmable thermostat
 Thermal limiter to protect against overheating
General Rules to follow:
 Allow a 3 foot clearance between the heater and anything that burns
 Always plug the heater directly into an outlet to avoid overheating of cords
 Use the heater only as long as required
 Shut off the heater whenever it is not in use
 Place the heater on a level surface
 Always shut the heater off when no one is home to watch it!
 No open element or metallic element heaters are allowed (anything that glows red when on)
 No fuel fired heaters are allowed (kerosene, propane, etc.)
Fire drills or fire safety programs are conducted by the University Fire Marshal and Residence Life staff to
ensure that residents are familiar with emergency evacuation procedures and general fire safety. When
requested or mandated, all occupants must immediately evacuate a residence hall. Interfering with or
noncompliance will result in disciplinary action, including a $100 fine. Residents are also required by the Fire
Marshal to keep hallways, stairwells, and balconies clear of obstructions at all times, to facilitate proper access
and egress.
Fire Extinguishers
A fire extinguisher is located in all apartments on the kitchen wall. In traditional housing the extinguisher is
located in the hallways on each floor. If the extinguisher is discharged while putting out a fire, promptly notify
the Housing Facilities Office. If it occurs after-hours or on weekends, immediately notify the Utah State
University Eastern Police by calling dispatch 435-637-0890 or by calling 911. The extinguisher will be
replaced immediately at no cost. The extinguisher must not be re-hung or relocated after discharge.
Fire extinguishers or other equipment can only be discharged in an actual fire emergency. Starting fires,
tampering with or misuse of fire safety equipment, or falsely reporting a fire may result in criminal prosecution.
Page | 31 Fire extinguishers are checked by the University Fire Marshal at least annually. If an extinguisher is found to
be empty, tampered with, relocated, or missing, the student apartment will be charged $75 for recharging and/or
replacement. Periodically inspect the fire extinguisher gauge to be certain it is properly charged. If the needle
indicates that it is undercharged or overcharged, call the Housing Facilities Office immediately for replacement.
Smoke Detectors
Smoke detectors are located in all Housing facilities. When the detector is activated, it will make a loud,
piercing sound. When the detector beeps intermittently, the batteries need to be replaced. It is the resident's
responsibility to report to Housing Facilities whenever the smoke detector is inoperable or batteries need to be
replaced.
Excessive amounts of smoke from cooking, or steam from the bathroom, may activate a smoke detector. If the
smoke detector is overly sensitive notify Housing Facilities.
Any smoke detector problems after 4:30 p.m. or on weekends can be directed to on-call maintenance staff, and
will be handled as quickly as possible. Calls can also be left after-hours on the dispatch voicemail at
Residential Facilities and will be handled the next morning.
Residents should leave their name, apartment number, time of call, and current problem with the detector. If
Housing staff determine that the smoke detector or battery has been removed, tampered with, or is inoperable
and has not been reported, the student will be charged $75. If there is a second violation, the student will be
charged $100 and appropriate restorative measures imposed.
Fire Sprinklers
Many Housing buildings have been retrofitted with fire sprinklers. It is critical that residents not tamper with
the sprinkler systems, especially the sprinkler heads. The water in the sprinkler systems is under tremendous
pressure and a damaged sprinkler head or pipe can lead to significant damage to both the building and resident’s
property.
The resident will be responsible for all damages caused to Housing facilities by breaking/or tampering with a
sprinkler head. Housing is not responsible for any damage or losses that occur because of sprinklers being
activated for any reason. Housing strongly recommends residents seek insurance for their personal property.
In Case of Fire
Before a fire, know the escape route and meeting location your RA has designated for your area. A smoke
detector can wake you, but only an escape plan can save you. All residents should recognize the alarm signal
and how to respond. In the event that you hear a neighbor's smoke detector ringing for an extended period of
time, contact the fire department first and the Housing Facilities Office next, or after hours on-call maintenance.
Before a fire:
 Know the escape route and meeting location your RA has designated for your area. A smoke
detector can wake you, but only an escape plan can save you.
 All residents should recognize the alarm signal and how to respond. In the event that you hear a
neighbor's smoke detector ringing for an extended period of time, contact the fire department first
and the Housing Residential Facilities Office next, or after hours On-Call Maintenance.
If a fire occurs:
 Grab your keys (if possible) and walk to the nearest exit. Most smoke and dangerous gases rise so
keep your body low and move quickly. If necessary, crawl so you do not breathe the smoke.
 If you suspect a fire, touch the door or handle with the back of your hand before opening it, with
your hand covered for protection. Intense heat, deadly smoke, or gas may be on the other side. If it
Page | 32 
is not hot, open it cautiously a few inches to check the other side for heat, smoke, or flames. Keep
your body out of the opening doorway and be ready to slam it shut if any heat or smoke appears.
Do not waste time getting dressed or gathering valuables. Get out of the building immediately. Call
the fire department from OUTSIDE the building. Dial 911 or call the University Police Department
at 435-613-5612 or dispatch 435-637-0890 and report the location of the fire. Stay on the
telephone until instructed to hang up. If possible, alert other room/apartment occupants.
USU EASTERN FIRE SAFETY TRAINING AND SAFETY EDUCATION PROGRAMS
The USU Eastern Police and Price Fire Department conducts an annual fire training class for Resident
Directors, Resident Advisers, and Housing Facilities employees at the beginning of fall semester each year.
The training covers emergency procedures, review of building fire safety systems, evacuation planning and
hands-on fire extinguisher training. This training is also provided to students, faculty and staff upon request.
PLANS FOR FUTURE FIRE SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS
Utah State University Eastern continues to work to upgrade fire panels across the campus.
CAMPUS RESOURCES
USU Eastern Police Department: www.dps.usu.edu
USU Fire Marshall Office: www.dps.usu.edu/fire
USU Eastern Housing Policy: www.rlstaff.housing.usu.edu/files/uploads/handbk0910.pdf
USU Eastern Open Flame Policy: www.usu.edu/riskmgt/
See our web site at www.dps.usu.edu.
Available in Braille, large print and audio format upon request.
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