Cisco 7000 and 7507 Chassis MAS-7K Specifications

Cisco 7000 and  7507 Chassis MAS-7K Specifications
Customer Order Number:
Documentation Part Number:
DOC-782881=
78-2881-01
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Product Number VIP-4R/4T(=)
This configuration note is a standalone publication that provides instructions for installing,
configuring, and maintaining the Versatile Interface Processor (VIP) in your Cisco 7000 series and
Cisco 7500 series routers.
The VIP operates with the CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series and CyBus in the Cisco 7500 series, and
requires that the host Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series router is running Cisco Internetwork
Operating System (Cisco IOS) Release 11.1(1) or later, or a Cisco-approved beta version of
Cisco IOS Release 11.1.
Note The entire VIP card, with port adapters installed, is a field-replaceable unit (FRU). Individual
port adapters are not available as spare parts.
Included are steps for VIP hardware installation and basic VIP configuration steps and examples for
configuring the individual interfaces on a new VIP. Also included are maintenance procedures for
upgrading user-configurable VIP components.
This publication has two main sections:
•
Versatile Interface Processor Functions, page 3—this section discusses general VIP features,
maintenance considerations, and overall functions
•
VIP Port Adapter Functions, page 29—this section contains subsections that discuss each port
adapter and its specific features, configuration and connection requirements, and functions
You need only refer to the information that is specific to your VIP port adapter configuration or that
applies to specific VIP functionality. A table of contents is included on page 2 so you can more easily
find what you need.
Note For complete descriptions of interface subcommands and the configuration options available
for VIP-related interfaces, and which support VIP functionality, refer to the section “If You Need
More Configuration Information.”
Copyright © 1995
Cisco Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved.
1
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
This configuration note includes the following sections:
•
•
If You Need More Configuration Information
Versatile Interface Processor Functions, page 3
— What is the VIP?, page 3
Note The following section contains important information about the latest Cisco IOS release.
— VIP Software Prerequisites, page 5
— VIP Hardware Prerequisites, page 5
— What is the Cisco 7000 Family?, page 5
— VIP Port Adapter Hardware Configuration Overview, page 10
— VIP Microcode Overview, page 11
— VIP Installation Prerequisites, page 11
— VIP Installation, page 16
— Checking the Installation and Verifying VIP Status, page 19
— Upgrading VIP Microcode, page 23
— Upgrading and Replacing DRAM SIMMs, page 26
•
VIP Port Adapter Functions, page 29
— 4R Port Adapter, page 29
— 4T Port Adapter, page 45
•
Cisco Information Online, page 74
If You Need More Configuration Information
The Cisco Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) software running the router contains
extensive features and functionality. The effective use of many of many of these features is easier if
you have more information at hand.
To obtain general information about documentation, call Customer Service at 800 553-6387 or
408 526-7208. Customer Service hours are 5:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Pacific time, Monday through
Friday (excluding company holidays). You can also send e-mail to [email protected] You can also
refer to the Cisco Information Packet that shipped with your router.
2 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
For additional information on configuring the Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series router, the
following documentation resources are available to you:
•
UniverCD
This publication and all other Cisco Systems publications are available on UniverCD, which is
Cisco’s online library of product information. UniverCD is updated and shipped monthly, so it
might be more up to date than printed documentation. To order UniverCD, contact a Cisco Sales
or Customer Service representative.
•
For systems with Cisco IOS Release 11.1(1), a Cisco-approved 11.1 beta software version, or a
later Cisco IOS release, refer to the following modular configuration and modular command
reference publications, as appropriate for your configuration:
— Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide
— Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference
— Wide-Area Networking Configuration Guide
— Wide-Area Networking Command Reference
— Network Protocols Configuration Guide
— Network Protocols Command Reference
— Network Protocols Configuration Guide
— Network Protocols Command Reference
— Bridging and IBM Networking Configuration Guide
— Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference
— Configuration Builder Getting Started Guide
— Troubleshooting Internetworking Systems
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The following sections describe the Versatile Interface Processor (VIP) and discuss VIP-specific
features and functions, such as installing and removing the VIP, installing and removing port
adapters, using and configuring common VIP interface functions.
What is the VIP?
The VIP is a new interface processor for use with the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers, and it installs in the interface processor slots in your Cisco 7000 series or 7500 series router.
The VIP uses a single motherboard with up to two port adapters. The VIP port adapters provide the
individual LAN, WAN, or LAN/WAN interface ports. The VIP can be removed from a chassis while
power is on and the system is operating.
Caution The VIP supports online insertion and removal (OIR), which allows you to remove and
replace a VIP without first shutting down the system. Online insertion and removal maximizes router
availability by letting you add or remove VIPs during system operation; however, the system may
indicate a hardware failure if you fail to follow proper procedures. To help avoid problems with the
installation, review the functional description in the section “Online Insertion and Removal—An
Overview” on page 13, and follow the VIP installation steps carefully.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
3
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Note The VIP port adapters themselves do not support OIR, nor are they FRUs.
The VIP uses a Reduced Instructions Set Computing (RISC), Mips 4600 processor for high
performance, and has an internal operating frequency of 100 megahertz (MHz) and a 50-MHz
system bus interface. The VIP has 8 megabytes (MB) of dynamic random access memory (DRAM)
as the default DRAM configuration.
Figure 1 shows a VIP-4R/4T. The VIP firmware (microcode), which contains card-specific software
instructions, resides in a Flash memory device in socket location U17. Single in-line memory
modules contain the DRAM. For connector pinouts, refer to the section “4R Port Adapter
Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts” on page 34, or to the section “4T Port Adapter Receptacles,
Cables, and Pinouts” on page 51. You can install VIPs in any available interface processor slots.
Figure 1
VIP with One 4R and One 4T Port Adapter (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Bus connector
Microcode
ROM U1 7
Port adapter
handles not shown
DRAM
SIMMs
4T in port
adapter
slot 1
4R in port
adapter
slot 0
H5985
CD
LB
RC
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
TC
RD
CD
LB
RC
RD
TC
TD
EN
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
Note In the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513 chassis, the VIP is installed vertically. In the
Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 chassis, the VIP is installed horizontally. Port adapters have a handle
attached, but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of detail on each port adapter’s faceplate.
4 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Software Prerequisites
The VIP requires that the host Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series router is running Cisco
Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) Release 11.1(1) or later, or a Cisco-approved beta
version of Cisco IOS Release 11.1.
Note The latest Cisco IOS release is available via anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) from
ftp/[email protected]
Detailed information about the latest Cisco IOS release can be
found in the ASCII file vip1-readme, which is also available via FTP from ftp.cisco.com in the
directory /ftp/beta111_dir. This ASCII file includes information and instructions on how to get
the current Cisco IOS software images and VIP microcode. To access information located in Cisco
Information Online (CIO), refer to the section “Cisco Information Online” at the end of this
publication.
VIP Hardware Prerequisites
The VIP operates with the CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series and CyBus in the Cisco 7500 series, and
operates with the optional RSP7000 and RSP7000CI RSP-based processor modules in the Cisco
7000 series routers: Cisco 7000 and Cisco 7010. The VIP will also operate with the Route Processor
(RP) and Switch Processor (SP) in the Cisco 7000 series routers. The VIP operates with all
RSP-based processor modules currently shipping in the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers: Cisco 7505, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513.
What is the Cisco 7000 Family?
For the Cisco 7000 family of routers, which includes the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series
routers, network interfaces reside on modular interface processors, including the VIP, which provide
a direct connection between external networks and the high-speed CxBus in the Cisco 7000 series
and the high-speed CyBus in the Cisco 7500 series.
In all systems, the remaining slots support any combination of network interface types: Ethernet
attachment unit interface (AUI), Ethernet 10BASE-T, Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX, Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (ATM), Token Ring, multichannel applications, Fiber Distributed Data Interface
(FDDI), channel attachment, serial, or High-Speed Serial Interface (HSSI), and all VIP–based
interfaces.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
5
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Cisco 7000 Series
Figure 2 and Figure 3 show the rear of the Cisco 7000 series routers: the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and
the five-slot Cisco 7010, respectively. In the Cisco 7000 series, two slots are reserved for the SP (or
SSP) and RP, or for the 7000 Series Route Switch Processor (RSP7000) and the 7000 Series Chassis
Interface (RSP7000CI). The remaining slots are for interface processors: slots 0 through 4 in the
Cisco 7000, and slots 0 through 2 in the Cisco 7010.
Figure 2
Cisco 7000, Interface Processor End
Captive
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Interface processor slots
6 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
0
1
2
3
4
RSP RSP
7000 7000CI
slot 5 slot 6
H5288
X.
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 3
Cisco 7010, Interface Processor End
RSP7000CI slot 4
RSP7000 slot 3
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Interface processor slot 1
Interface processor slot 0
Power switch
H5874
DC OK LED
Chassis ground
screw
Power receptacle
AC-input power supply
Cisco 7500 Series
Figure 4, Figure 5, and Figure 6 show the rear of the Cisco 7500 series routers: the five-slot
Cisco 7505, the seven-slot Cisco 7507, and the thirteen-slot Cisco 7513, respectively.
In the Cisco 7505, one slot (4) is reserved for the Route Switch Processor (RSP1), which contains
the system processor and performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 through 3 are for interface
processors.
Cisco 7505, Interface Processor End
T
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Figure 4
Interface processor slot 2
Interface processor slot 1
Interface processor slot 0
H2761
ower switch
Chassis
grounding
receptacles
Power receptacle
DC OK LED
AC-input power supply
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
7
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 5 shows the rear of the seven-slot Cisco 7507 router. In the Cisco 7507, up to two slots (2 and
3) are reserved for the Route Switch Processor (RSP2), which contains the system processor and
performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 and 1 and 4 through 6 are for interface processors.
Figure 5
Cisco 7507, Interface Processor End
aptive
stallation screw
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Slot 0
1
2
3
RSP slots
8 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
4
5
6
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 6 shows the rear of the Cisco 7513 with two AC-input power supplies installed. Two slots (6
and 7) are reserved for the second generation Route Switch Processor (RSP2), which contains the
system processor and performs packet switching functions. Slots 0 through 5 and 8 through 12 are
for interface processors.
Figure 6
Cisco 7513, Interface Processor End
Blower module
Cable-management
bracket
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VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
9
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Port Adapter Hardware Configuration Overview
The port adapters attach to the VIP motherboard. (See Figure 7.) Each port adapter contains the
physical connections for the VIP interface types to connect to your network.
Figure 7
VIP with One 4R and One 4T Port Adapter (Product Number VIP-4R/4T[=])
Bus connector
Microcode
ROM U1 7
Port adapter
handles not shown
DRAM
SIMMs
4T in port
adapter
slot 1
4R in port
adapter
slot 0
H5985
CD
LB
RC
CD
RD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
TC
RD
LB
CD
RD
RC
TC
TD
EN
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
Following are the VIP port adapters by interface type:
•
•
•
•
Ethernet 10BASE-T—4E
Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX—FE-TX
Synchronous serial—4T
Token Ring—4R
Following are the supported electrical interfaces:
•
•
4E port adapter—10BASE-T Ethernet, using RJ-45
•
4T port adapter—synchronous serial (EIA/TIA-232, EIA-TIA-449, EIA-530, V.35, and X.21;
determined by the cable), using DB-60, 60-pin mini-D-sub connectors
•
4R port adapter—IEEE 802.5 Token Ring, using DB-9, 9-pin D-sub connectors
FE-TX port adapter—IEEE 802.3u Fast Ethernet 100BASE-TX, using Media Independent
Interface (MII) or RJ-45
Note The VIP-4R/4T is a fixed configuration. The entire VIP-4R/4T assembly is a FRU. Port
adapters have a handle attached, but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of detail on each
port adapter’s faceplate.
10 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Caution To prevent system problems, do not remove port adapters from the VIP motherboard or
attempt to install other port adapters on the VIP motherboard.
VIP Microcode Overview
The VIP microcode (firmware) is an image that provides card-specific software instructions. A Flash
memory device in socket U17 of the VIP contains the default microcode boot image. The router
supports downloadable microcode, which enables you to upgrade microcode versions by
downloading new microcode images, storing them in system Flash memory, and instructing the
system to load its image from Flash instead of the default VIP image. (The RP in the Cisco 7000 and
7010 loads software from ROM or Flash memory; the RSP loads software from Flash only.) You can
store multiple images for an interface type and, with a configuration command, instruct the system
to load any one of them or the default ROM image. All interfaces of the same type (VIP, and so on)
will load the same microcode image, either from the default ROM image or from a single image
stored in system Flash. Although multiple microcode versions for a specific interface type can be
stored concurrently in Flash, only one image can load at startup. The show controllers cbus
command displays the currently loaded and running microcode version for the SP or SSP (in the
Cisco 7000 series routers), each interface processor, and VIP. The show startup-config EXEC
command shows the current system instructions for loading microcode at startup.
Software and interface processor microcode images are carefully optimized and bundled to work
together. Overriding the bundle can result in system incompatibilities. We recommend that you use
the microcode included in the software bundle. For a complete description of microcode and
downloading procedures, refer to the section “Upgrading VIP Microcode” on page 23.
VIP Installation Prerequisites
This section provides a list of parts and tools you will need to perform the VIP installation, and it
also includes safety and ESD-prevention guidelines to help you avoid injury and damage to the
equipment. This section also provides a detailed description of the OIR function to help you perform
online installation successfully and avoid error message and system restarts. If you are installing a
new VIP, be sure to review the equipment descriptions and distance limitations in the port adapter
sections “Serial Distance Limitations” and “Token Ring Distance Limitations” when preparing your
site and planning network connections.
List of Parts and Tools
You need the following tools and parts to install or upgrade a VIP. If you need additional equipment,
contact a service representative for ordering information.
•
•
•
Cables appropriate for the port adapter interfaces on your VIP
Number 1 Phillips and a 3/16-inch, flat-blade screwdriver
Your own ESD-prevention equipment or the disposable grounding wrist strap included with all
upgrade kits, FRUs, and spares
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
11
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Safety Guidelines
Following are safety guidelines that you should follow when working with any equipment that
connects to electrical power or telephone wiring.
Electrical Equipment Guidelines
Follow these basic guidelines when working with any electrical equipment:
•
Before beginning any procedures requiring access to the chassis interior, locate the emergency
power-off switch for the room in which you are working.
•
•
•
•
Disconnect all power and external cables before moving a chassis.
•
Carefully examine your work area for possible hazards such as moist floors, ungrounded power
extension cables, and missing safety grounds; correct all hazardous conditions.
Do not work alone when potentially hazardous conditions exist.
Never assume that power has been disconnected from a circuit; always check.
Do not perform any action that creates a potential hazard to people or makes the equipment
unsafe.
Telephone Wiring Guidelines
Use the following guidelines when working with any equipment that is connected to telephone
wiring or to other network cabling:
•
•
Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
•
Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals unless the telephone line has been
disconnected at the network interface.
•
Use caution when installing or modifying telephone lines.
Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the jack is specifically designed for wet
locations.
Preventing Electrostatic Discharge Damage
Electrostatic discharge (ESD) damage, which can occur when electronic cards or components are
improperly handled, results in complete or intermittent failures. A processor module comprises a
printed circuit board that is fixed in a metal carrier. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding,
connectors, and a handle are integral components of the carrier. Although the metal carrier helps to
protect the board from ESD, use a preventive antistatic strap whenever handling a processor module.
Following are guidelines for preventing ESD damage:
•
•
Always use an ESD wrist or ankle strap and ensure that it makes good skin contact.
•
When installing a processor module, use the ejector levers to properly seat the bus connectors in
the backplane, then tighten both captive installation screws. (See Figure 8.) These screws prevent
accidental removal, provide proper grounding for the system, and help to ensure that the bus
connectors are seated in the backplane.
•
When removing a processor module, use the ejector levers to release the bus connectors from the
backplane. Use the handle to pull the processor module out slowly while keeping your other hand
underneath the carrier to guide it straight out of the slot.
Connect the equipment end of the strap to a captive installation screw on an installed power
supply.
12 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
•
•
Handle carriers by the handles and carrier edges only; avoid touching the board or connectors.
•
Avoid contact between the processor module and clothing. The wrist strap only protects the board
from ESD voltages on the body; ESD voltages on clothing can still cause damage.
•
Never attempt to remove the printed circuit board from the metal interface processor carrier.
Place a removed processor module board-side-up on an antistatic surface or in a static shielding
bag. If you plan to return the component to the factory, immediately place it in a static shielding
bag.
For safety, periodically check the resistance value of the antistatic strap. The
measurement should be between 1 and 10 megohms.
Caution
Online Insertion and Removal—An Overview
The OIR feature allows you to remove and replace a VIP board while the system is operating; you
do not need to notify the software or shut down the system power.
Note The VIP port adapters themselves do not support OIR, nor are they FRUs.
This section describes mechanical functions of system components, emphasizes the importance of
following correct procedures to avoid unnecessary board failures, and is for background only;
specific VIP procedures follow in the section “VIP Installation” on page 16.
Each interface processor contains a receptacle with which it connects to the system backplane. Each
backplane connector comprises a set of tiered pins, in three lengths. The pins send specific signals
to the system as they make contact with the card. The system assesses the signals it receives and the
order in which it receives them to determine what event is occurring and what task it needs to
perform, such as reinitializing new interfaces or shutting down removed ones.
For example, when inserting an interface processor, the longest pins make contact with the
backplane first, and the shortest pins make contact last. The system recognizes the signals and the
sequence in which it receives them. The system expects to receive signals from the individual pins
in this logical sequence, and the ejector levers help to ensure that the pins mate in this sequence.
When you remove or insert an interface processor, the backplane pins send signals to notify the
system, which then performs as follows:
1 Rapidly scans the backplane for configuration changes and does not reset any interfaces.
2 Initializes all newly inserted interface processors, noting any removed interfaces and placing
them in the administratively shut down state.
3 Brings all previously configured interfaces on the interface processor back to the state they were
in when they were removed. Any newly inserted interfaces are put in the administratively shut
down state, as if they were present (but unconfigured) at boot time. If a similar interface processor
type has been reinserted into a slot, then its ports are configured and brought on line up to the
port count of the original interface processor.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
13
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The system brings on line only interfaces that match the current configuration and were previously
configured as up; all others require that you configure them with the configure command. OIR
functionality enables you to add, remove, or replace interface processors with the system online,
which provides a method that is seamless to end users on the network, maintains all routing
information, and ensures session preservation.
The function of the ejector levers (see Figure 8) is to align and seat the card connectors in the
backplane. Failure to use the ejector levers and insert the interface processor properly can disrupt the
order in which the pins make contact with the card or interface processor. Follow the VIP installation
and removal instructions carefully, and review the following examples of incorrect insertion
practices and their results:
•
Using the handle to force the interface processor all the way into the slot can pop the ejector
levers out of their springs. If you then try to use the ejector levers to seat the interface processor,
the first layer of pins (which are already mated to the card or interface processor) can disconnect
and then remate with the backplane, which the system interprets as a board failure.
•
Using the handle to force or slam the interface processor all the way into the slot can damage the
pins on the board connectors if they are not aligned properly with the backplane.
•
When using the handle (rather than the ejector levers) to seat the interface processor in the
backplane, you might need to pull the interface processor back out and push it in again to align
it properly. Even if the backplane pins are not damaged, the pins mating with and disconnecting
from the card or interface processor will cause the system to interpret a board failure. Using the
ejector levers ensures that the board connector mates with the backplane in one continuous
movement.
•
Using the handle to insert or remove an interface processor, or failing to push the ejector levers
fully against the interface processor, can leave some (not all) of the connector pins mated to the
card or interface processor, a state which will hang the system. Using the ejector levers and
making sure that they are pushed fully into position ensures that all three layers of pins are mated
with (or free from) the backplane.
It is also important to use the ejector levers when removing an interface processor to ensure that the
backplane connector pins disconnect from the card or interface processor in the logical sequence
expected by the system. Any interface processor that is only partially connected to the backplane can
hang the bus. Detailed steps for correctly performing OIR are included with the following
procedures for installing and removing the VIP.
14 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 8
Ejector Levers and Captive Installation Screws on the VIP (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Interface processor
card slot
Ejector
lever
Interface processor card
carrier guide (black)
a
b
Captive
installation
screw
H1984
c
Note The VIP is oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 and vertically in the
Cisco 7000, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
15
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
VIP Installation
The following sections describe the procedures for removing or installing a VIP in the Cisco 7000
series and Cisco 7500 series routers. The functionality is the same for each router model; therefore,
the term the chassis will be used except where specific model issues arise. The OIR function allows
you to install and remove a VIP without first shutting down the system; however, you must follow
the instructions carefully. Failure to insert the VIP properly can cause system error messages
indicating a board failure. For a complete description of OIR, refer to the section “Online Insertion
and Removal—An Overview” on page 13.
Each unused interface processor slot contains an interface processor filler (which is an interface
processor carrier without an interface board) to keep dust out of the chassis and to maintain proper
air flow through the interface processor compartment. If you are installing a new VIP that is not a
replacement, you must first remove the interface processor filler from an unused slot; proceed to the
next section “Removing an Interface Processor Filler.” If you are replacing a VIP or upgrading the
microcode Flash EPROM on a VIP, proceed to the section “Removing a VIP.”
Note If you suspect that a port adapter has failed, you must replace the entire VIP processor
module. Port adapters are not available as FRUs.
Caution If you use the VIP with a single port adapter, the port adapter must be in slot 0 for the VIP
to function properly. A single port adapter in slot 1 will not be recognized by the system.
Removing an Interface Processor Filler
Select an unused interface processor slot for the new VIP and remove the interface processor filler
as follows:
Step 1 Choose an available slot for the VIP and make a note of it.
Step 1 Use a screwdriver to loosen the captive installation screws on the interface processor filler.
(See Figure 8.)
Step 2 Place your thumbs on both ejector levers and simultaneously pull them both outward to
release the VIP from the backplane connector (in the opposite direction from that shown in
Figure 8c).
Step 3 Grasp the handle with one hand and pull the filler straight out of the slot, keeping your other
hand under the carrier to guide it. (See Figure 9.) Keep the carrier parallel to the backplane.
Step 4 Store the interface processor filler for future use.
To help prevent dust and contaminants from entering the chassis, do not leave the interface processor
slot open. Immediately proceed to the section “Installing a VIP” on page 18.
Removing a VIP
Remember, the VIP supports OIR; therefore, you need not shut down the interface or the system
power when removing a VIP. If you are replacing a failed VIP, remove the existing board first, then
replace the new VIP in the same slot.
16 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Figure 9 shows proper handling of an interface processor during installation.
Handling Processor Modules for Installation and Removal (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
H4714
Figure 9
Captive installation
screws
To remove a VIP, follow these steps:
Step 1 If you are replacing a failed VIP, disconnect all cables from the VIP ports; however, if you
are only moving a VIP to another slot, this step is not necessary.
Step 2 Use a screwdriver to loosen the captive installation screws at both ends of the VIP.
(See Figure 8.)
Caution Always use the ejector levers to remove or install the VIP. Failure to do so can cause
erroneous system error messages indicating a board failure.
Step 3 Place your thumbs on the ejector levers and simultaneously pull both of the ejectors
outward (in the opposite direction from that show in Figure 8c) to release the VIP from the
backplane connector.
Step 4 Use the VIP handle to carefully pull the VIP straight out of the slot, keeping your other hand
under the carrier to guide it. (See Figure 9.) Keep the VIP parallel to the backplane.
Step 5 Place the removed VIP on an antistatic mat or foam pad, or place it in an antistatic bag if
you plan to return it to the factory.
Step 6 If the interface processor slot is to remain empty, install a filler (MAS7K-BLANK) to keep
dust out of the chassis and to maintain proper air flow inside the chassis. Do not leave the
interface processor slot open. Immediately proceed to the section “Installing a VIP.”
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
17
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Installing a VIP
The VIP slides into the open interface processor slot and connects directly to the backplane. The
interface processors are keyed to guide pins on the backplane, so the VIP can be installed only in an
interface processor slot. Figure 8 shows the functional details of inserting an interface processor and
using the ejector levers. Figure 9 shows proper handling of an interface processor during installation.
Caution Remove or insert only one interface processor at a time. Allow at least 15 seconds for the
system to complete its discovery and initialization before removing or inserting another interface
processor. Disrupting the sequence before the system has completed verification can cause the
system to interpret hardware failures.
Follow these steps to install a VIP:
Step 1 Ensure that a console terminal is connected to the console port (on the RP or RSP) and that
your console is turned ON.
Step 2 Hold the VIP handle with one hand and place your other hand under the carrier to support
the VIP and guide it into the slot. (See Figure 9.) Avoid touching the card or any connector
pins.
Caution To prevent ESD damage, handle interface processors by the handles and carrier edges
only.
Note The processor modules are oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505, and
vertically in the Cisco 7000, the Cisco 7507, and the Cisco 7513.
Step 3 Place the back of the VIP in the slot and align the notch on the carrier with the groove in
the slot. (See Figure 8.)
Step 4 While keeping the VIP parallel to the backplane, carefully slide it into the slot until the back
of the faceplate makes contact with the ejector levers, then stop. (See Figure 8b.)
Caution Always use the ejector levers when installing or removing processor modules. A module
that is partially seated in the backplane will cause the system to hang and subsequently crash, and
shoving or slamming the interface processor into the slot can damage the backplane pins and board.
Step 5 Using your thumbs, simultaneously push both ejector levers inward until the VIP is pushed
entirely into its slot. (See Figure 8c.)
Step 6 Tighten both of the captive installation screws.
18 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Checking the Installation and Verifying VIP Status
You can use the configure command to configure a VIP interface. To use the configure command,
enter the privileged level of the EXEC command interpreter with the enable command. The system
will prompt you for a password if one has been set.
The system prompt for the privileged level ends with a pound sign (#) instead of an angle bracket
(>). At the console terminal, enter the privileged level as follows:
Step 1 At the user-level EXEC prompt, enter the enable command. The EXEC prompts you for a
privileged-level password, as follows:
Router> enable
Password:
Step 2 Enter the password (the password is case sensitive). For security purposes, the password is
not displayed on your console.
Step 3 When you enter the correct password and press Return, the system displays the
privileged-mode system prompt (#) as follows:
Router#
Checking the VIP Installation
After you install the VIP and connect cables (using connection procedures in the respective port
adapter subsections), verify the installation by observing the LED states and the console display.
When the system has reinitialized all interfaces, the enabled LED on the VIP and on all interface
processors should go on. One or the other of the MII and RJ-45 LEDs should be on, depending on
your connection, and the link LED should be on if the VIP is receiving a carrier signal from the
network.
The console screen will also display a message as the system discovers each interface during its
reinitialization.
When you remove and replace interface processors, the system provides status messages on the
console screen. The messages are for information only.
The following sample display shows the events logged by the system as a serial-equipped VIP was
removed from slot 2; the system then reinitialized the remaining interface processors and marked as
down the serial interfaces on the VIP that was removed from slot 2. When the VIP is reinserted, the
system automatically brings up the interfaces that were up when the VIP was removed.
Router#
%OIR-6-REMCARD: Card removed from slot 2, interfaces disabled
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial2/1/0, changed state to administratively down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial2/1/1, changed state to administratively down
Router#
%OIR-6-INSCARD: Card inserted in slot 2, interfaces administratively shut down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial2/1/0, changed state to up
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial2/1/1, changed state to up
Note When a new VIP is inserted or when a VIP is moved to a new slot, the system recognizes the
new interfaces, but leaves them in a shutdown state until you configure them and change their state
to up with the configure command.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
19
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The following example display shows the events logged by the system as a new VIP is inserted in
slot 3. (Serial interfaces are used in the following examples.)
Router#
%OIR-6-INSCARD: Card inserted in slot 3, interfaces administratively shut down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial3/1/0, changed state to administratively down
%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial3/1/1, changed state to administratively down
Verify that the VIP is installed correctly as follows:
Step 1 While the system reinitializes each interface, observe the console display messages and
verify that the system discovers the VIP as follows:
•
If you installed a new VIP, the system should recognize all new interfaces but leave them
configured as down.
•
If you replaced a VIP, the system should recognize each interface and place it in the
same state (up or down) each was in when you removed the VIP.
Step 2 When the reinitialization is complete, verify that the enabled LED on each port adapter
goes on and remains on. If it does, proceed to step 5. If it does not, proceed to the next step.
Step 3 If the enabled LED on a port adapter fails to go on, suspect that the VIP board connector is
not fully seated in the backplane. Loosen the captive installation screws, then firmly push
both ejector levers into place until they are approximately in the same orientation as the VIP
faceplate. Tighten the captive installation screws. After the system reinitializes the
interfaces, the enabled LED on the port adapter should go on. If it does, proceed to Step 5.
If it does not, proceed to Step 4.
Step 4 If the enabled LED still fails to go on, remove the VIP and try installing it in another
available interface processor slot.
•
If the enabled LED goes on when the VIP is installed in the new slot, suspect a failed
backplane port in the original interface processor slot.
•
If the enabled LED still fails to go on, but other LEDs on the VIP go on to indicate
activity, proceed to Step 5 to resume the installation checkout and suspect that the
enabled LED on the port adapter has failed.
•
•
If no LEDs on the VIP go on, suspect that the VIP is faulty.
If the enabled LED still does not go on, do not proceed with the installation. Contact a
service representative to report the problem and obtain further instructions.
Step 5 If the VIP is new and not a replacement, you have to configure the new interfaces. Proceed
to the appropriate configuration section for your port adapter. (This does not have to be
done immediately, but new interfaces will not be available until you configure them.)
Step 6 If the VIP is a replacement, use the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port or show
controllers cbus command to verify the status of the interfaces. (Refer to the section
“Verifying VIP Status Using show Commands” on page 21.)
If you replaced a VIP with a new VIP with a greater number of ports (for example, if you
replaced a one-port VIP with a two-port VIP), the system will recognize the first interface,
but will not recognize the additional interface. The new interface will remain in the
shutdown state until you configure it.
Step 7 When the interfaces are up, check the activity of each interface by observing the status
LEDs, which are described in the appropriate LED section for your port adapter type.
Step 8 In general, if an interface’s LED fails to go on and a cable is connected to the port, check
the cable connection and make certain it is properly seated in the connector.
20 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
If an error message is displayed on the console terminal, refer to the System Error Messages
publication for error message definitions. If you experience other problems that you are unable to
solve, contact a service representative for assistance.
This completes the VIP installation. If you installed a new VIP or if you installed a replacement VIP
with an additional port, you must now configure the new interface as described in the following
section.
Verifying VIP Status Using show Commands
The following procedure describes how to use the show commands to verify that the new interfaces
are configured correctly:
Step 1 Use the show version or show hardware commands to display the system hardware
configuration. Ensure that the list includes the new interfaces.
Step 2 Display all of the current interface processors and their interfaces with the show
controllers cbus command. Verify that the new VIP appears in the correct slot.
Step 3 Specify one of the new VIP interfaces with the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port
command and verify that the first line of the display specifies the interface with the correct
slot number. Also verify that the interface and line protocol are in the correct state: up or
down.
Step 4 Display the protocols configured for the entire system and specific interfaces with the
command show protocols. If necessary, return to Configuration mode to add or remove
protocol routing on the system or specific interfaces.
Step 5 Display the running configuration file with the write terminal (or show running-config)
command. Display the configuration stored in NVRAM using the show config (or show
startup-config) command. Verify that the configuration is accurate for the system and each
interface.
If the interface is down and you configured it as up, or if the displays indicate that the hardware is
not functioning properly, ensure that the network interface is properly connected and terminated. If
you still have problems bringing the interface up, contact a service representative for assistance.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
21
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
The show controllers cbus command displays the internal status of each interface processor,
including the slot location, the card hardware version, and the currently-running microcode version.
It also lists each interface (port) on each interface processor including the logical interface number,
interface type, physical (slot/port adapter/port) address, and hardware (station address) of each
interface. The following example shows a VIP, with serial interfaces, installed in interface processor
slot 3:
Router# show controller cbus
(display text omitted)
slot3: VIP, hw 2.1, sw 200.09, ccb 5800FF70, cmdq 480000A0, vps 8192
software loaded from system
FLASH ROM version 255.255, VPLD version 20.0
4T HW Revision 121, SW Revision 216, Unresponsive 0
Serial3/1/0, addr 0000.0ca5.2380 (bia 0000.0ca5.2380)
gfreeq 48000140, lfreeq 48000238 (1536 bytes), throttled 0
rxlo 4, rxhi 123, rxcurr 16, maxrxcurr 16
txq 48000240, txacc 480000EA (value 77), txlimit 77
Serial3/1/1, addr 0000.0ca5.238e (bia 0000.0ca5.238e)
gfreeq 48000140, lfreeq 48000238 (1536 bytes), throttled 0
rxlo 4, rxhi 123, rxcurr 16, maxrxcurr 16
txq 48000240, txacc 480000EA (value 77), txlimit 77
(display text omitted)
The show startup-config command displays the contents of the system configuration file stored in
NVRAM. This file should reflect all new configuration changes you made and wrote to memory
with the show running-config command. (A serial interface is used in this example.)
Router# show startup-config
Using 1652 out of 130048 bytes
version 11.1(1)
!
hostname Router
!
enable-password hello
!
microcode VIP flash VIP11-0
microcode reload
!
(display text omitted)
!
interface serial 3/1/0
ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.248
ip route-cache cbus
!
(display text omitted)
The show protocols command displays the global (system-wide) and interface-specific status of any
configured Level 3 protocol.
Router# show protocols
Global values:
Internet Protocol routing is enabled
Serial3/1/0 is up, line protocol is up
22 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Upgrading VIP Microcode
The Cisco 7000 series and the Cisco 7500 series support downloadable microcode, which enables
you to upgrade microcode versions without having to physically replace the microcode Flash
memory device on the board. You can download new microcode versions and store multiple versions
in Flash memory, and you can boot from them just as you can with the system software images.
System software upgrades may also contain upgraded microcode images, which will load
automatically when the new software image is loaded (unless the configuration states otherwise).
Note Software and interface processor microcode images are carefully optimized and bundled to
work together. Overriding the bundle can result in system incompatibilities. We recommend that you
use the microcode included in the software bundle.
You can download microcode to Flash memory by copying the TFTP image of a microcode version
to Flash memory. When the microcode image is stored in Flash memory you can use the
microcode reload command to manually load the new microcode file, and the configure command
to instruct the system to load the new image automatically at each system boot.
To compare the size of the microcode image and the amount of Flash memory available, you must
know the size of the new microcode image. The image size is specified in the README file that is
included on the floppy disk with the new image.
Note Note the size of the new image before proceeding to ensure that you have sufficient available
Flash memory for the new image.
Caution Before you copy a file to system Flash memory, be sure there is ample space available in
Flash memory. Compare the size of the file you want to copy to the amount of available Flash
memory shown. If the space available is less than the space required by the file you want to copy,
the copy process will continue, but the entire file will not be copied into Flash memory.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
23
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Follow these steps to download (copy) a microcode version from a TFTP server to Flash memory.
Step 1 To display the total amount of Flash memory present, its location, any files that currently
exist in Flash memory and their size, and the amount of Flash memory remaining, use the
show flash command. Following is an example of the output that is displayed:
Router# show flash
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1
.. FFFFFFFF B4A18E0B 3F6494 30
4023316 Jun 26 1994 19:44:29 image/file/1
2
.. FFFFFFFF 8075AA5D 4118B4 23
111518
Jun 29 1994 11:05:57 image/file/2
12044568 bytes available (8533736 bytes used)
Step 2 Compare the amount of available Flash memory (last line in the preceding example) to the
size of the new microcode image on the floppy disk. If you attempt to copy in a new image,
and the size of the new image exceeds the available space in Flash, only part of the new
image will be copied, and the following error message will be displayed:
buffer overflow - xxxx/xxxx
where xxxx/xxxx is the number of bytes read in/number of bytes available.
Step 3 After you verify that there is sufficient space available in Flash memory for the new image,
use the command copy tftp:filename [ flash | slot0 | slot1 ]:filename to copy an image to
Flash memory. (tftp:filename is the file’s source, and [ flash | slot0 | slot1 ]:filename is the
destination in onboard Flash memory or on either of the Flash memory cards.)
An example of the copy tftp:filename command follows:
Router# copy tftp:vip11-1 slot0:vip11-1
20575008 bytes available on device slot0, proceed? [confirm]
Address or name of remote host [1.1.1.1]?
Loading new.image from 1.1.1.1 (via Ethernet1/0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!![OK - 7799951/15599616 bytes]
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
Router#
Step 4 Use the show flash command to verify that the microcode has been copied to Flash. The
output should display the filename of the image you copied to Flash (vip11-1 in the
following example):
Router# show flash
-#1
2
3
ED
..
..
..
--type-FFFFFFFF
FFFFFFFF
FFFFFFFF
--crc--B4A18E0B
8075AA5D
EEA1FEEB
-seek-3F6494
4118B4
8436E8
nlen
30
23
22
-length- -----date/time------ name
4023316 Jun 26 1994 19:44:29 image/file/1
111518
Jun 29 1994 11:05:57 image/file/2
4398516 Oct 10 1995 19:35:25 vip11-1
7646052 bytes available (16179788 bytes used)
24 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Step 5 To ensure that the new microcode is used when you reboot the system, add the appropriate
commands to the configuration file. To modify the configuration file, enter the configure
terminal command, as follows:
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)#
End with CNTL/Z.
Step 6 Specify that you are changing the microcode for the VIP (microcode vip), and that it will
load from Flash memory (flash). Then add the filename of the new microcode image to be
loaded from Flash:
Router(config)# microcode vip flash slot0:vip11-1
Step 7 To save the configuration file, press Ctrl-Z.
Step 8 Copy the new configuration to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM):
Router# copy running-config startup-config
The microcode reload command is automatically added to your running configuration.
The new VIP microcode image will load automatically the next time the system boots or
reinitializes.
Step 9 To load the new microcode immediately, you can issue the microcode reload configuration
command (you must be in Configuration mode to enter this command):
Router# config t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# microcode reload
End with CNTL/Z.
Immediately after you enter the microcode reload command and press Return, the system
reloads all microcode. Configuration mode remains enabled; after the reload is complete,
press Ctrl-Z to exit from Configuration mode and return to the system prompt.
Step 10 To verify that the VIP is using the correct microcode, issue the show startup-config or
show controllers cbus command, which indicates the currently loaded and running
microcode version for each interface processor and the SP or SSP in the Cisco 7000 series
routers.
Router# show controllers cbus
This completes the procedure for downloading microcode to Flash memory.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
25
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Upgrading and Replacing DRAM SIMMs
VIPs are shipped with 8 megabytes (MB) of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) as the
default DRAM configuration. Depending on memory requirements, you might need to upgrade the
amount of DRAM by replacing the DRAM SIMMs on the VIP. You also might need to replace a
single SIMM in the case of a diagnosed DRAM SIMM failure.
Note DRAM SIMMs should be upgraded or replaced in the field by a Cisco-certified maintenance
provider. Both DRAM SIMMs are replaced for all upgrades.
Caution SIMMs are sensitive components that are susceptible to ESD damage. Handle SIMMs by
the edges only; avoid touching the memory modules, pins, or traces (the metal fingers along the
connector edge of the SIMM). (See Figure 10.)
Handling a DRAM SIMM—Example Only
H2326
Figure 10
26 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Following is the procedure for replacing or upgrading DRAM SIMMs.
Step 1 Attach an ESD-preventive wrist strap between you and an unpainted chassis or VIP surface.
Step 2 Disconnect all cables from the VIP and remove it from the chassis using the procedure in
the section “Removing a VIP” on page 16.
Step 3 Place the VIP on a flat surface (preferably an antistatic mat or foam), and turn it so the face
plate is away from you and the connector edge is toward you. (approximately opposite of
the orientation shown in Figure 11).
Step 4 Locate the DRAM SIMMs in U1 and U2. (See Figure 11.)
Figure 11
Orientation of DRAM SIMMs (U1 and U2) on VIP Motherboard
Bus connector
Microcode
ROM U1 7
Port adapter
handles not shown
DRAM
SIMMs
4T in port
adapter
slot 1
4R in port
adapter
slot 0
H5985
CD
LB
RC
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
RD
TC
TD
LB
CD
RC
TC
RD
TD
EN
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
27
Versatile Interface Processor Functions
Step 5 Remove a SIMM by pulling outward on the connectors to unlatch it, as shown in the
enlargement in Figure 12. Be careful not to break the holders on the SIMM connector.
Figure 12
Removing and Replacing DRAM SIMMs
Faceplate edge of
the system card
Pull the tabs away with
your thumbs, bracing your
forefingers against the
posts. Raise the SIMM
to a vertical position.
Polarization notch
H2017
DRAM SIMM
Step 6 Using the SIMM orientation shown in Figure 12, position the new SIMM so that the
polarization notch is located at the right end of the SIMM socket.
Step 7 Insert the new SIMM by sliding the end with the metal fingers into the SIMM connector
socket at approximately a 45-degree angle to the system card. Gently rock the SIMM back
into place until the latch on either side snaps into place. (See Figure 12.)
Caution Do not use excessive force, or the connector could break. To prevent damage, do not push
on the center of the SIMMs. Handle each SIMM with care.
Step 8 As required, repeat Steps 5 through 7 for the second SIMM.
Step 9 Reinstall the VIP in the chassis using the procedure in the section “Installing a VIP” on
page 18.
If error messages relating to memory are displayed once power to the chassis is turned back on, or
the VIP card is installed in a chassis that is already on, repeat Steps 1 through 8, taking care to firmly
reseat each SIMM in its socket.
This completes the procedure for upgrading or replacing DRAM SIMMs on your VIP.
28 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
VIP Port Adapter Functions
The following sections discuss the port adapters used with the VIP:
•
•
4R Port Adapter
4T Port Adapter, page 45
4R Port Adapter
The following sections discuss the 4R port adapter, which is shown in Figure 13.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Token Ring Overview, page 30
Token Ring Specifications and Physical Connections, page 30
Token Ring Connection Equipment, page 32
Token Ring Distance Limitations, page 33
Token Ring Speed Considerations, page 33
4R Port Adapter LEDs, page 33
4R Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts, page 34
Attaching 4R Port Adapter Interface Cables, page 35
Configuring the 4R Interfaces, page 36
The 4R port adapter (see Figure 13) is currently available on the VIP-4R/4T, which has two port
adapter slots: port adapter slot 0 and port adapter slot 1. The 4R port adapter, which is installed in
port adapter slot 0, provides up to four IBM Token Ring or IEEE 802.5 Token Ring interfaces. Each
Token Ring interface can be set for 4 Mbps or 16 Mbps. All Token Ring ports run at wire speed.
4R Port Adapter, Faceplate View
H4493
3
2
1
TOKEN RING
0
Figure 13
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
29
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Token Ring Overview
The following sections describe Token Ring specifications, physical connections, connection
equipment, and cables and connectors. Figure 14 shows the 4R port adapter installed on the
VIP-4R/4T.
Figure 14
VIP with One 4R and One 4T Port Adapter Installed (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
Bus connector
Microcode
ROM U1 7
Port adapter
handles not shown
DRAM
SIMMs
4T in port
adapter
slot 1
4R in port
adapter
slot 0
H5985
CD
LB
RC
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
RD
TC
TD
CD
LB
RC
TC
RD
TD
EN
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
Note Current VIP configurations support only one 4R port adapter and one 4T port adapter. Single
and dual 4R configurations are not available. Port adapters have a handle attached, but this handle is
not shown to allow a full view of detail on each port adapter’s faceplate.
Token Ring Specifications and Physical Connections
The term Token Ring refers to both IBM’s Token Ring Network, which IBM developed in the 1970s,
and to IEEE 802.5 networks. The IEEE 802.5 specification was modeled after, and still closely
shadows, IBM’s network. The two types are compatible, although the specifications differ slightly.
Token Ring and IEEE 802.5 are token passing networks, which move a small frame, called a token,
around the network. Possession of the token grants the right to transmit; a station with information
to transmit must wait until it detects a free token passing by.
30 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
The IBM Token Ring specifies a star topology, with all end stations connected through a device
called a multistation access unit (MSAU). IEEE 802.5 does not specify any topology, although most
implementations are based on a star configuration with end stations attached to a device called a
media access unit (MAU). Also, IBM Token Ring specifies twisted-pair cabling, whereas IEEE
802.5 does not specify media type. Most Token Ring networks use shielded twisted-pair cabling;
however, some networks that operate at 4 Mbps use unshielded twisted-pair cable. Table 1 shows a
comparison of the two types.
Table 1
IBM Token Ring and IEEE 802.5 Comparison
Network Type
Data Rates
Stations/ Segment
Topology
Media
Signaling
Access Method
Encoding
IBM Token
Ring network
4, 16 Mbps
260 shielded twisted-pair
72 unshielded twisted-pair
Star
Twisted-pair
Baseband
Token passing
Differential
Manchester
IEEE 802.5
network
4, 16 Mbps
250
Not
specified
Not
specified
Baseband
Token passing
Differential
Manchester
All 4R port adapter interfaces support both 4- and 16-Mbps operation and early token release. The
default for all ports is for 4-Mbps operation and early token release disabled. Both states are enabled
with configuration commands in Configuration mode.
To enable 16 Mbps, specify the slot/port address and use the configuration command ring-speed 16;
to return to 4 Mbps operation, use the command ring-speed 4. To enable and disable early token
release, specify the slot/port address and use the configuration command [no] early token release.
For complete descriptions and examples of software commands, refer to the related software
configuration documentation.
In the typical Token Ring network shown in Figure 15, lobe cables connect each Token Ring station
(4R port adapter interface) to the MSAU (or MAU), and patch cables connect adjacent MSAUs (or
MAUs) to form one large ring.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
31
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Figure 15
Token Ring Network Physical Connections
MAU or MSAU
Ring
in 1
2
3
4
5
6
MAU or MSAU
7
8
Ring
out
Ring
in 1
2
3
Stations
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
Ring
out
7
8
Ring
out
Stations
Patch
cables
MAU or MSAU
Ring
in 1
4
6
7
Ring
8 out
MAU or MSAU
Ring
in 1
2
3
4
5
6
Stations
Stations
H2058
Lobe
cables
Token Ring Connection Equipment
You will need an 802.5 MAU or an MSAU to provide the interface between the 4R port adapter
Token Ring interfaces and the external ring, and a Token Ring lobe cable between each 4R port
adapter interface and the MAU or MSAU. Lobe cables connect each Token Ring station (4R port
adapter interface) to the MAU or MSAU, and patch cables can connect adjacent MSAUs to form one
large ring.
4R port adapter interfaces operate at either 4 or 16 Mbps. The default speed for all 4R port adapter
interfaces is 4 Mbps, which you can change to 16 Mbps on any port using the ring-speed n
configuration command, where n is the speed (4 or 16) in Mbps. The speed of each Token Ring port
must match the speed of the ring to which it is connected. Before you enable the Token Ring
interfaces, ensure that each is set for the correct speed, or it can bring down the ring.
Caution Each 4R port adapter interface must be configured for the same ring speed as the ring to
which it is connected, either 4 or 16 Mbps. If the port is set for a different speed, it will cause the
ring to beacon, which effectively brings the ring down and makes it inoperable.
32 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Token Ring Distance Limitations
The maximum transmission distance is not defined for IEEE 802.5 (Token Ring) networks. Shielded
twisted-pair (STP) cabling is most commonly used for rates of 4 and 16 Mbps. Twisted-pair cabling
is more susceptible to interference than other types of cabling; therefore, the network length and
repeater spacing should be planned accordingly.
Token Ring Speed Considerations
Before you install the 4R port adapter, determine the ring speed (4 or 16 Mbps) of each ring to be
connected to the server. There is no factory default for the interface speed; you must set the speed of
each interface (within the setup command facility or with the ring-speed command) before you
bring the interface up and insert it into the ring with the no shutdown command.
Note If an interface has an undefined or incorrect ring speed and is not shut down, the ring will
beacon. This effectively takes the ring down and makes it inoperable.
4R Port Adapter LEDs
The 4R port adapter’s enabled LED (shown in Figure 16) goes on to indicate the following status of
the 4R port adapter:
•
•
•
•
Enabled for operation
Correctly connected to the VIP card
Receiving power from the VIP card
Contains a valid microcode version
If any of these conditions is not met, or if the initialization fails for other reasons, the port adapter’s
enabled LED does not go on.
4R Port Adapter LEDs
RIN
G
H4489
3
2
1
0
4/1
6M
bp
IN-
AB
L
EN
TOKEN RING
s
ED
Figure 16
When a Token Ring interface is configured by using software commands, two additional LEDs for
each port indicate the following:
•
In ring—Goes on when the interface is currently active and inserted into the ring; off when the
interface is not active and is not inserted into a ring.
•
4/16 Mbps—Goes on if the interface is operating at 16 Mbps; off when the interface is operation
at 4 Mbps.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
33
VIP Port Adapter Functions
4R Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts
A network interface cable provides the connection between the 9-pin Token Ring receptacles on the
4R port adapter and a media access unit (MAU). The 9-pin connector at the 4R port adapter end, and
the MAU connector at the network end, are described in the section “Token Ring Connection
Equipment” on page 32.
4R Port Adapter Receptacles and Cables
The Token Ring ports on the 4R port adapter are DB-9 (PC type) receptacles that require Type 1 or
Type 3 lobe cables. Token Ring interface cables are not available from Cisco Systems, but are
commercially available through outside cable vendors. Type 1 lobe cables use shielded twisted-pair
(STP) cable and terminate at the network end with a large MAU plug. (See Figure 17.) The 4R port
adapter end of the cable is a DB-9 plug.
Figure 17
Token Ring Type 1 Lobe Cable Connectors, DB-9 and MAU Types
4R port adapter end
H5761
MSAU or
MAU end
Type 3 lobe cables use either shielded or unshielded twisted-pair (UTP) cable and terminate at the
network end with an RJ-11 plug. (See Figure 18.) The 4R port adapter end of the cable is a DB-9
plug.
Figure 18
Token Ring Type 3 Lobe Cable Connectors, DB-9 and RJ-11 Types
MAU end
34 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
H5762
4R port adapter end
VIP Port Adapter Functions
4R Port Adapter Receptacle Pinout
Table 2 lists the pinout for the DB-9 receptacle used on the 4R port adapter.
Table 2
Token Ring Signals
Pin
Signal
1
Ring-In B
5
Ring-Out A
6
Ring-In A
9
Ring-Out B
10 and 11
Ground
Attaching 4R Port Adapter Interface Cables
The Token Ring ports on the 4R port adapter run at either 4- or 16 Mbps. You need one Token Ring
interface cable for each 4R port adapter interface you want to use. Token Ring interface cables are
not available from Cisco Systems, but are commercially available through outside cable vendors.
Following is the procedure for attaching Token Ring cables to the 4R port adapter:
Step 1 Determine which 4R port adapter ports you want to use.
Note The IBM Token Ring specifies a star topology, with all end stations connected through a
device called an MSAU. IEEE 802.5 does not specify any topology, although most implementations
are based on a star configuration with end stations attached to a device called an MAU. Also, IBM
Token Ring specifies twisted-pair cabling, whereas IEEE 802.5 does not specify media type. Most
Token Ring networks use shielded twisted-pair (STP) cabling; however, some networks that operate
at 4 Mbps use UTP cable.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
35
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Step 2 Attach the port adapter end of a Token Ring interface cable, or other connection equipment,
to the interface port. (See Figure 19).
Note Port adapters have a handle attached, but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of detail
on each port adapter’s faceplate.
Token Ring Interface Cable Connections
H5986
LB
RC
RD
CD
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
TC
TD
TC
FAST SERIAL
EN
Figure 19
To MAU or MSAU
Caution Each 4R port adapter interface must be configured for the same ring speed as the ring to
which it is connected; either 4 or 16 Mbps. If the 4R port adapter interface is set for a different speed,
it will cause the ring to beacon, which effectively brings the ring down and makes it inoperable.
Step 3 Attach the network end of the Token Ring interface cable to the appropriate Token Ring
equipment at your site: a MAU or MSAU.
Configuring the 4R Interfaces
You can modify the startup configuration for Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series routers
through the software command interpreter called EXEC. To configure the interfaces for interface
processors, you can use either one of the setup or configure EXEC commands:
setup
configure
The setup command facility can be used after first time startup to make basic changes at any time.
The changes you make will affect only the changed elements’ current memory values that are stored
in nonvolatile memory.
The configure privileged EXEC command enables you to perform advanced configurations such as
specifying interfaces. The EXEC interprets the commands you enter and carries out the
corresponding operations. You can list available EXEC commands by entering a question mark (?).
You also can enter a question mark to obtain more information about commands. For example, enter
terminal ? to obtain a list of terminal commands or show ? to obtain a list of show commands.
36 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Using the EXEC Command Interpreter
Before you use the setup or the configure command, you must have privileged access to the EXEC
command interpreter. The system prompt for the privileged level ends with a pound sign (#) instead
of an angle bracket (>).
The EXEC enable command allows access to the privileged level, prompting for a password if one
has been set with the enable-password configuration command.
Follow these steps to enter the privileged level of the EXEC.
Step 1 At the EXEC prompt for a router, enter the enable command:
Router> enable
The EXEC prompts you for a privileged level password:
Password:
Step 2 Enter the password.
For security purposes, the password is not displayed. (Also note that the password is case
sensitive). When you enter the correct password, the system displays the privileged mode
system prompt:
Router#
To configure Token Ring interfaces using the setup EXEC command facility, follow the instructions
in the section “Using the Setup Command.” To configure the Token Ring interfaces by using the
configure EXEC command, follow the instructions in the section “Using the Configure EXEC
Command” on page 39.
Using the Setup Command
The setup command facility identifies all interfaces (including the Token Ring interfaces for the
ports on the 4R port adapter) that are installed and prompts you for configuration information for
each installed interface. When you finish configuring one interface, the setup command facility
prompts you for the next, continuing until each interface has been configured.
When you enter the setup command facility after first time startup, you must run through the entire
dialog until you come to the interface you want to change. Note that when you use the setup
command after first time startup, the default values indicated within the brackets in the System
Configuration Dialog are the values last set using the setup command facility or left as defaults.
After you choose to continue with the setup command (by answering yes to the system configuration
dialog prompt), the remainder of the script is the actual configuration process. The dialog prompts
you first for global system parameters, then for configuration information for each interface. The
existing configuration is displayed as the default, in brackets ([ ]), at the end of each prompt. Press
Return to accept the default settings.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
37
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Note After you start the setup command facility, the system runs through the entire configuration
process; you cannot quit out of it. To make a change or correct a mistake, press the Return key at
each prompt, answer no when asked if you want to save the configuration, and restart the setup
facility.
Following is the procedure for using the setup facility to configure the 4R Token Ring interfaces:
Step 1 After you access the privileged level of the EXEC, as described in the section “Using the
EXEC Command Interpreter” on page 37, enter the setup command to begin the setup
facility:
Router# setup
Step 1 The following script is displayed on the screen, with the name of your router as the default
in the brackets.
-System Configuration DialogAt any point you may enter a question mark ‘?’ for help.
Refer to the ‘Getting Started’ Guide for additional help.
Default settings are in square brackets ‘[]’.
Continue with configuration dialog? [yes]:
(Use Ctrl-c to abort configuration at any prompt)
Configuring global parameters:
Enter host name [Router]: sandbox
Step 2 To accept the default and keep the router name, press Return. (If you do want to change
the name of the router, enter the new name before pressing Return.)
Step 3 Proceed through the remainder of the global parameter prompts, using the Return key to
accept the defaults.
After the global parameters are configured, the system prompts you for interface
configuration information, one interface at a time. Following is a partial display of the
script for a previously configured interface:
Configuring interface parameters:
Configuring interface Token Ring0:
Is this interface in use [yes]:
Tokenring ring speed (4 or 16) [16]
Configure IP on this interface? [yes]:
IP address for this interface: 1.1.1.30
(remainder of display text omitted)
Caution Each 4R port adapter interface must be configured for the same ring speed as the ring to
which it is connected; either 4 or 16 Mbps. If the 4R port adapter interface is set for a different speed,
it will cause the ring to beacon, which effectively brings the ring down and makes it inoperable.
Step 4 To accept the default at each prompt and retain the existing configuration information, press
the Return key. When you reach the scripts for configuring new interfaces, enter the new
configuration information at each prompt.
When all interfaces are configured, the system displays the entire configuration script
followed by a prompt for which there is no default (you must enter yes or no):
Use this configuration [yes/no]:
38 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Step 5 To use the configuration you created, enter yes. To discard the configuration file and begin
the configuration process again, enter no.
If you entered yes at the prompt, the following message is displayed:
Press RETURN to get started!
The configuration process is complete. Proceed to the section “Checking the Configuration” on
page 44. It provides show commands you can use to display and verify the configuration
information.
Using the Configure EXEC Command
The configure EXEC command allows you to configure the interfaces for interface processors in the
Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series. At the privileged command level, enter the ? command to
display a list of privileged level EXEC commands.
To display information about the interface, including the software and hardware versions and the
controller status, use the show controller cbus command. To display statistics about the interfaces,
use the show interfaces command.
Selecting Chassis Slot, Port Adapter, and Serial Interface Port Numbers
The following section describes how to identify chassis slot, port adapter, and serial interface port
numbers.
Note Although the processor slots in the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and 13-slot Cisco 7513 are
vertically oriented and those in the five-slot Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 are horizontally oriented, all
models use the same method for slot and port numbering. (For interface processor slot orientation in
your chassis, refer to Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5, or Figure 6.)
In the router, physical port addresses specify the actual physical location of each interface port on
the router interface processor end. (See Figure 20.) This address is composed of a three-part number
in the format chassis slot number/port adapter number/interface port number.
The first number identifies the chassis slot in which the VIP is installed (as shown in the example
system in Figure 20). The second number identifies the physical port adapter number on the VIP, and
is either 0 or 1. The interface ports on each 4R port adapter are always numbered in sequence as
interface 0 through 3.
Interface ports on the 4R port adapter maintain the same address regardless of whether other
interface processors are installed or removed. However, when you move a VIP to a different slot, the
first number in the address changes to reflect the new slot number.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
39
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Figure 20 shows some of the slot port adapter and interface ports of a sample Cisco 7505 system.
For example, the addresses for the 4R interface ports on the first port adapter are 3/0/0 through 3/0/3
(chassis slot 3, port adapter slot 0, and interface ports 0 through 3).
The first port adapter slot number is always 0. The second port adapter slot number is always 1. The
individual interface port numbers always begin with 0. The number of additional ports depends on
the number of ports on a port adapter.
Note If you remove the 4R-equipped VIP from slot 3 and install it in slot 2, the addresses of those
same ports become 2/0/0 through 2/0/3.
Figure 20
4R Token Ring Interface Port Number Example (Cisco 7505 Shown)
4R port adapter
(port numbers 3/0/0, 3/0/1,
3/0/2, 3/0/3, from left to right)
T
SE
E
CO
NS
OL
U
RE
CP
EC
EJ
AL
RM
NO
SL SLO
OT T
0 1
T
HA
LT
ROUTE SWITCH PROCESSOR
D
C
C
LB
R
D
R
TC
C
D
TD
LB
C
D
R
R
C
TC
D
TD
LB
C
D
D
R
R
TC
TD
C
LB
C
D
R
R
TC
TD
3
2
B
1
U
M
6
Slot 3
2
4/1
IN
AB
EN
2
0
SE
TD
FAST SERIAL
Slot 2
Slot 1
Interface
processor
slots
H5987
Slot 0
Note Current VIP configurations support only one 4R port adapter and one 4T port adapter. Single
and dual 4R configurations are currently not available.
You can identify interface ports by physically checking the slot/port adapter/interface port location
on the back of the router or by using software commands to display information about a specific
interface or all interfaces in the router.
To display information about a specific interface, use the show interfaces command with the
interface type and port address in the format show interfaces [type slot/port adapter/port].
40 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Following is an example of how the show interfaces [type slot/port adapter/port] command displays
status information (including the physical slot and port address) for the interfaces you specify. In
these examples, most of the status information for each interface is omitted, and the four Token Ring
interfaces (0–3) are in chassis slot 3, in port adapter slot 1. (Interfaces are administratively shut down
until you enable them.)
Router# sh int tokenring 3/0/0
TokenRing3/0/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus TokenRing, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.2389)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int tokenring 3/0/1
TokenRing3/0/1 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus TokenRing, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238a)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int tokenring 3/0/2
TokenRing3/0/2 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus TokenRing, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238b)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int tokenring 3/0/3
TokenRing3/0/3 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus TokenRing, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238b)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Token Ring interface port adapters are always numbered as port adapter 0 because VIPs currently
support only one 4R port adapter with the VIP-4R/4T configuration, and the 4T port adapter is
always in the second port adapter slot location (port adapter slot 1). With this VIP configuration, a
4R port adapter is always in port adapter slot 0.
Refer to Table 3, Table 4, Table 5, Table 6, and Table 7 for the 4R port numbers associated with the
interface processor slots in your chassis.
Note Table 3, Table 4, Table 5, Table 6, and Table 7 indicate 4R interface port numbers based on
the slots in which they can be installed; they do not represent examples of maximum 4R
configurations.
Table 3
4R Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7000
Slot 0/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter 0/
Port n
0/0/0
1/0/0
2/0/0
3/0/0
4/0/0
0/0/1
1/0/1
2/0/1
3/0/1
4/0/1
0/0/2
1/0/2
2/0/2
3/0/2
4/0/2
0/0/3
1/0/3
2/0/3
3/0/3
4/0/3
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
41
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 4
4R Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7010
Slot 0/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 0/
Port n
0/0/0
1/0/0
2/0/0
0/0/1
1/0/1
2/0/1
0/0/2
1/0/2
2/0/2
0/0/3
1/0/3
2/0/3
Table 5
4R Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7505
Slot 0/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter 0/
Port n
0/0/0
1/0/0
2/0/0
3/0/0
0/0/1
1/0/1
2/0/1
3/0/1
0/0/2
1/0/2
2/0/2
3/0/2
0/0/3
1/0/3
2/0/3
3/0/3
Table 6
4R Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7507
Slot 0/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 5/
Adapter 0/
Port n
Slot 6/
Adapter 0/
Port n
0/0/0
1/0/0
4/0/0
5/0/0
6/0/0
0/0/1
1/0/1
4/0/1
5/0/1
6/0/1
0/0/2
1/0/2
4/0/2
5/0/2
6/0/2
0/0/3
1/0/3
4/0/3
5/0/3
6/0/3
Table 7
4R Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7513
Slot 0 /
Adapter1/
Port
Slot 1 /
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 5/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 8/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 9/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 10/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 11/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 12/
Adapter/
Port n
0/0/0
1/0/0
2/0/0
3/0/0
4/0/0
5/0/0
8/0/0
9/0/0
10/0/0
11/0/0
12/0/0
0/0/1
1/0/1
2/0/1
3/0/1
4/0/1
5/0/1
8/0/1
9/0/1
10/0/1
11/0/1
12/0/1
0/0/2
1/0/2
2/0/2
3/0/2
4/0/2
5/0/2
8/0/2
9/0/2
10/0/2
11/0/2
12/0/2
0/0/3
1/0/3
2/0/3
3/0/3
4/0/3
5/0/3
8/0/3
9/0/3
10/0/3
11/0/3
12/0/3
1. The 4R port adapter is always installed in port adapter slot 0 on the VIP-4R/4T.
42 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
With the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port command, use arguments such as the interface
type (Token Ring, and so forth) and the slot, port adapter, and port numbers (slot/port adapter/port)
to display information about a specific serial interface only.
The following example of the show interfaces tokenring slot/port adapter/port command shows all
of the information specific to the first 4R interface port (interface port 0) in chassis slot 3, port
adapter slot 0:
Router# sh int tokenring 3/0/0
TokenRing3/0/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus TokenRing, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.2388)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
Last input never, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 2:56:26
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
Basic Configuration Guidelines
Following are instructions for a basic configuration: enabling an interface and specifying IP routing.
You might also need to enter other configuration subcommands depending upon the requirements
for your system configuration.
Step 1 After you access the privileged level of the EXEC as described in the section “Using the
EXEC Command Interpreter” on page 37, enter the configure command:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
End with CNTL/Z.
Step 2 Specify the first Token Ring interface to configure by entering the subcommand
interface type slot/port. For example, if you are configuring the Token Ring interface 0 for
a 4R port adapter installed in slot 3, enter the following command:
Router(config)# interface tokenring 3/0/0
Step 3 If IP routing is enabled on the system, you can assign an IP address and subnet mask to the
interface with the ip address configuration subcommand as follows:
Router(config-int)# ip address ip address subnet mask
Step 4 Change the default shutdown state and enable the interface:
Router(config-int)# no shutdown
When you enable the interface by using the no shutdown command, the LED for 4 Mbps
or 16 Mbps is turned on after about 5 seconds. The IN RING LED for that interface is
turned on about 5 to 18 seconds later, when the port is initialized and is connected to the
ring.
Step 5 Enter any additional configuration subcommands required.
Step 6 Repeat Steps 2 through 5 for each new interface.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
43
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Step 7 When all new interfaces are configured, press Ctrl-Z (hold the Control key down and press
the Z key).
Step 8 Write the new configuration to memory by entering the following:
Router# copy running-config startup-config
[OK]
Router#
Step 9 Enter quit to exit Configuration mode:
Router# quit
You have now completed configuring the Token Ring interfaces. Check the configuration as
described in the section “Checking the Configuration.”
Checking the Configuration
After configuring the new interface(s) using either the setup command or the configure command,
use the EXEC show commands to display status information.
Step 1 To display the current system configuration file, enter the show configuration command:
Router# show configuration
The configuration file for the router is displayed. Check the Token Ring configuration
information in the display.
Step 2 To display and check all interfaces, enter the following command:
Router# show interfaces
Each interface is listed along with its assigned IP address. Verify that each new Token Ring
interface appears.
Step 3 To obtain detailed status information about a specific Token Ring interface, specify the
interface with the following command:
Router# show interface tokenring slot/port adapter/port
Detailed information about the interface is displayed. The first line of display specifies the
interface along with its slot and port number. It indicates whether the hardware is functional
and if the line protocol is up or down. If the line protocol is down (and you did not
administratively shut it down), or if the hardware is not functioning properly, ensure that
the network interface is properly connected and terminated. For explanations of the
displayed information, refer to the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference and
the Configuration Fundamentals Command Summary publications, which are available
UniverCD or as printed copies.
Step 4 To display the current internal status of the processors, use the show controller command:
Router# show controllers token
The display lists the interfaces connected to each processor and indicates whether the
system has identified your new interface. It does not indicate the state of the line or the
protocol.
This completes the installation and configuration procedure for the 4R port adapter and associated
equipment.
44 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
4T Port Adapter
The following sections discuss the 4T port adapter, which is shown in Figure 21.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Synchronous Serial Overview
4T Port Adapter Specifications, page 47
Serial Distance Limitations, page 48
4T Serial Connection Equipment, page 48
4T Port Adapter LEDs, page 50
4T Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts, page 51
Attaching 4T Port Adapter Interface Cables, page 59
Configuring the 4T Interfaces, page 60
The 4T port adapter (see Figure 21) is currently available on the VIP-4R/4T, which has two port
adapter slots: port adapter slot 0 and port adapter slot 1. The 4T port adapter, installed in port adapter
slot 1, provides up to four synchronous serial interfaces. Each serial interface allows a maximum
bandwidth of 2.048 Mbps.
Figure 21
4T Port Adapter, Faceplate View
H4496
CD
LB
RC
RD
TC
TD
CD
RC
LB
RD
TC
TD
CD
RC
LB
RD
TC
TD
CD
RC
LB
RD
TC
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
Synchronous Serial Overview
The 4T port adapter provides four channel-independent, synchronous serial ports that support
full-duplex operation at T1 (1.544 Mbps) and E1 (2.048 Mbps) speeds. Each port supports any of
the available interface types: Electronics Industries Association/Telecommunications Industries
Association (EIA/TIA)-232, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, X.21, and EIA-530.
Note Prior to the acceptance of the EIA/TIA standards by the ANSI committee, they were referred
to as recommended standards called RS-232 and RS-449.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
45
VIP Port Adapter Functions
EIA/TIA-232, which is by far the most common interface standard in the U.S., supports unbalanced
circuits at signal speeds up to 64 kbps. EIA/TIA-449, which supports balanced (EIA/TIA-422) and
unbalanced (EIA/TIA-423) transmissions, is a faster (up to 2 Mbps) version of EIA/TIA-232 that
provides more functions and supports transmissions over greater distances. The EIA/TIA-449
standard was intended to replace EIA/TIA-232, but it was not widely adopted. The resistance to
convert to EIA/TIA-449 was due primarily to the large installed base of DB-25 hardware and to the
larger size of the 37-pin EIA/TIA-449 connectors, which limited the number of connections possible
(fewer than is possible with the smaller, 25-pin EIA/TIA-232 connector).
EIA-530, which supports balanced transmission, provides the increased functionality, speed, and
distance of EIA/TIA-449 on the smaller, DB-25 connector used for EIA/TIA-232. The EIA-530
standard was created to support the more sophisticated circuitry of EIA/TIA-449 on the large
number of existing EIA/TIA-232 (DB-25) hardware instead of the larger, 37-pin connectors used for
EIA/TIA-449. Like EIA/TIA-449, EIA-530 refers to the electrical specifications of EIA/TIA-422
and EIA/TIA-423. The specification recommends a maximum speed of 2 Mbps for EIA-530.
EIA-530 is used primarily in the United States.
The V.35 interface is most commonly used in the United States and throughout Europe, and is
recommended for speeds up to 48 kbps.
The X.21 interface uses a 15-pin connection for balanced circuits and is commonly used in the
United Kingdom to connect public data networks. X.21 relocates some of the logic functions to the
data terminal equipment (DTE) and data communications equipment (DCE) interfaces and, as a
result, requires fewer circuits and a smaller connector than EIA/TIA-232.
You can install 4T-configured VIPs in any available interface processor slot in the Cisco 7000 series
and Cisco 7500 series routers; there are no restrictions on slot locations or sequence. All interface
types except EIA-530 can be individually configured for operation with either external (DTE mode)
or internal (DCE mode) timing signals; EIA-530 operates with external timing only. In addition, all
VIP serial interface types support nonreturn to zero (NRZ) and nonreturn to zero inverted (NRZI)
format, and both 16-bit and 32-bit cyclic redundancy checks (CRCs). The default configuration is
for NRZ format and 16-bit CRC. You can change the default settings with software commands. (See
the section “Configuring the 4T Interfaces” on page 60.)
There is no default mode or clock rate set on the VIP serial ports, although an internal clock signal
is present on all ports for DCE support. The internal clock also allows you to perform local loopback
tests without having to terminate the port or connect a cable. (All interface types except X.21 DTE
support loopback.) To use the port as a DCE interface, you must set the clock rate and connect a DCE
adapter cable. To use the port as a DTE interface, you need only connect a DTE adapter cable to the
port. Because the serial adapter cables determine the mode and interface type, the 4T port adapter
interface becomes a DTE when a DTE cable is connected to it.
If a DTE cable is connected to a port with a clock rate set, the DTE ignores the clock rate and uses
the external clock signal that is sent from the remote DCE. For a brief description of the clockrate
command, refer to “Configuring Timing (Clock) Signals” on page 65. For complete command
descriptions and instructions, refer to the publications listed in the section “If You Need More
Configuration Information” on page 2.
46 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
4T Port Adapter Specifications
The following sections discuss specifications related to the 4T synchronous serial port adapter.
Figure 22 shows the 4T port adapter installed on the VIP-4R/4T.
Figure 22
VIP with One 4R and One 4T Port Adapter Installed, Horizontal Orientation Shown
Bus connector
Microcode
ROM U1 7
Port adapter
handles not shown
DRAM
SIMMs
4T in port
adapter
slot 1
4R in port
adapter
slot 0
H5985
CD
LB
RC
RD
CD
LB
TC
RC
TD
RD
CD
LB
TC
TD
RC
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
RD
TC
TD
LB
CD
RC
TC
RD
TD
EN
TD
EN
FAST SERIAL
Note Current VIP configurations support only one 4R port adapter and one 4T port adapter on a
VIP motherboard. Single and dual 4T configurations are not available. Port adapters have a handle
attached, but this handle is not shown to allow a full view of detail on each port adapter’s faceplate.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
47
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Serial Distance Limitations
Serial signals can travel a limited distance at any given bit rate; generally, the slower the baud rate,
the greater the distance. All serial signals are subject to distance limits beyond which a signal
degrades significantly or is completely lost. Table 8 lists the IEEE-recommended maximum speeds
and distances for each 4T port adapter serial interface type. The recommended maximum rate for
V.35 is 2.048 Mbps.
Table 8
IEEE Standard EIA/TIA-449 Transmission Speed Versus Distance
EIA/TIA-232
Distances
EIA/TIA-449, X.21, V.35, EIA-530
Distances
Rate (bps)
Feet
Meters
Feet
Meters
2400
200
60
4,100
1,250
4800
100
30
2,050
625
9600
50
15
1,025
312
19200
25
7.6
513
156
38400
12
3.7
256
78
56000
8.6
2.6
102
31
1544000 (T1)
–
–
50
15
Balanced drivers allow EIA/TIA-449 signals to travel greater distances than EIA/TIA-232. The
recommended distance limits for EIA/TIA-449 shown in Table 8 are also valid for V.35, X.21, and
EIA-530. EIA/TIA-449 and EIA-530 support 2.048-Mbps rates, and V.35 supports 2.048-Mbps
rates without any problems; we do not recommend exceeding published specifications for
transmission speed versus distance. Do so at your own risk.
4T Serial Connection Equipment
The 4T port adapter supports synchronous serial connections at speeds of up to 2 Mbps per
interface; the speed depends on the type of electrical interface used. Use EIA/TIA-232 for speeds of
64 kilobits per second (kbps) and below, and use X.21, EIA/TIA-449, V.35, or EIA-530 for higher
speeds.
EIA/TIA-232 Connections
The router (VIP) end of all EIA/TIA-232 adapter cables is a high-density 60-pin plug. The opposite
(network) end of the adapter cable is a standard 25-pin D-shell connector (known as a DB-25) that
is commonly used for EIA/TIA-232 connections. Figure 23 shows the connectors at the network end
of the adapter cable. The system console and auxiliary ports on the RP in the Cisco 7000 series (or
the RSP in the Cisco 7500 series) also use EIA/TIA-232 connections; however, the 4T port adapter
interfaces support synchronous serial connections, and the console and auxiliary ports only support
asynchronous connections. Use caution when connecting EIA/TIA-232 cables to the 4T receptacles.
48 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Figure 23
EIA/TIA-232 Adapter Cable Connectors, Network End
DCE
H1343a
DTE
EIA/TIA-449 Connections
The router (VIP) end of all EIA/TIA-449 adapter cables is a high-density 60-pin plug. The opposite
(network) end of the adapter cable provides a standard 37-pin D-shell connector, which is commonly
used for EIA/TIA-449 connections. Figure 24 shows the connectors at the network end of the
adapter cable. EIA/TIA-449 cables are available as either DTE (DB-37 plug) or DCE (DB-37
receptacle).
Figure 24
EIA/TIA-449 Adapter Cable Connectors, Network End
DCE
H1344a
DTE
V.35 Connections
The router (VIP) end of all V.35 adapter cables is a high-density 60-pin plug. The opposite (network)
end of the adapter cable provides a standard 34-pin Winchester-type connector commonly used for
V.35 connections. Figure 25 shows the connectors at the network end of the V.35 adapter cable. V.35
cables are available with a standard V.35 plug for DTE mode (CAB-V35MT=) or a V.35 receptacle
for DCE mode (CAB-V35FC=).
Figure 25
V.35 Adapter Cable Connectors, Network End
DCE
H1616a
DTE
Note Also available, but not shown in Figure 25, are CAB-V35MC=, a V.35 cable with a plug on
the network end for DCE mode, and CAB-V35FT=, a V.35 cable with a receptacle on the network
end for DTE mode. These cables are used for connecting V.35-equipped systems back to back.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
49
VIP Port Adapter Functions
X.21 Connections
The router (VIP) end of all X.21 adapter cables is a high-density 60-pin plug. The opposite (network)
end of the adapter cable is a standard DB-15 connector. Figure 26 shows the connectors at the
network end of the X.21 adapter cable. X.21 cables are available as either DTE (DB-15 plug) or DCE
(DB-15 receptacle).
Figure 26
X.21 Adapter Cable Connectors, Network End
1
8
DCE
9
15
H1346a
DTE
EIA-530 Connections
The EIA-530 adapter cable is available in DTE mode only. The router (VIP) end of the EIA-530
adapter cable is a high-density 60-pin plug. The opposite (network) end of the adapter cable is a
standard DB-25 plug commonly used for EIA/TIA-232 connections. Figure 27 shows the DB-25
connector at the network end of the adapter cable.
EIA-530 Adapter Cable Connector, Network End (Available in DTE Only)
DTE
H1615a
Figure 27
4T Port Adapter LEDs
The 4T port adapter contains the enabled LED, standard on all port adapters, and a one status LED
for each port. After system initialization, the enabled LED goes on to indicate that the 4T port
adapter has been enabled for operation. (The LEDs are shown in Figure 28.)
LEDs on the 4T Port Adapter (Horizontal Orientation Shown)
H4491
LB
CD
RC
RD
TC
TD
EN
Figure 28
50 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Note The VIP is oriented horizontally in the Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505, and vertically in the Cisco
7000, the Cisco 7507, and the Cisco 7513.
The following conditions must be met before the enabled LED goes on:
•
•
•
The 4T interface is correctly connected to the backplane and receiving power.
The 4T-equipped VIP contains a valid microcode version that has been downloaded successfully.
The bus recognizes the 4T-equipped VIP.
If any of these conditions is not met, or if the initialization fails for other reasons, the enabled LED
does not go on.
Table 9 lists the 4T port adapter LEDs and their indications.
Table 9
LED Indications
LED Label
DTE Function
DCE Function
Color and Function
TD
Transmit data out
Transmit data in
Green
TC
Transmit clock in
Transmit clock in
(TXCE)
Green
RD
Receive data in
Receive data out
Green
RC
Receive clock in
Receive clock out
Green
LB/CD
–
–
Green: DTR, DSR, RTS, CTS, or DCD active
Yellow: local loop or internal loop active
EN (enable)
–
–
Green: port adapter enabled
4T Port Adapter Receptacles, Cables, and Pinouts
The following sections describe the serial receptacles on the 4T port adapter, and the cables and
pinouts for the various serial interface cables.
Serial Port Adapter Receptacles and Cables
The 4T port adapter and adapter cables allow a high density of interface ports, regardless of the size
of the connectors typically used with each electrical interface type.
All ports use an identical 60-pin, D-shell receptacle that supports all interface types: EIA/TIA-232,
V.35, EIA/TIA-449, X.21, and EIA-530. Each port requires a serial adapter cable, which provides
the interface between the high-density serial port and the standard connectors that are commonly
used for each electrical interface type.
Note The adapter cable determines the electrical interface type and mode of the port (DTE or DCE)
to which it is connected.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
51
VIP Port Adapter Functions
The network end of the cable is an industry-standard connector for the type of electrical interface
that the cable supports. For most interface types, the adapter cable for DTE mode uses a plug at the
network end, and the cable for DCE mode uses a receptacle at the network end. Exceptions are V.35
adapter cables, which are available with either a V.35 plug or a receptacle for either mode, and the
EIA-530 adapter cable, which is available only in DTE mode with a DB-25 plug at the network end.
The mode is labeled on the molded plastic connector shell at the ends of all cables except V.35
(which uses the standard Winchester block-type connector instead of a molded plastic D-shell).
Following are the available interface cable options for the mode and network-end connectors for
each cable:
•
•
EIA/TIA-232: DTE mode with a DB-25 plug; DCE mode with a DB-25 receptacle
•
V.35: DTE mode or DCE mode with a 34-pin Winchester-type V.35 plug; DTE mode or DCE
mode with a 34-pin Winchester-type V.35 receptacle
•
•
X.21: DTE mode with a DB-15 plug; DCE mode with a DB-25 receptacle
EIA/TIA-449: DTE mode with a 37-pin D-shell plug; DCE mode with a 37-pin D-shell
receptacle
EIA-530: DTE mode with a DB-25 plug
For cable pinouts, refer to the section “Serial Port Adapter Cable Pinouts.”
52 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Figure 29 shows the serial port adapter cables for connection from the 4T port adapters to your
network.
Figure 29
Serial Port Adapter Cables
H5763
(PA-4T port adapter)
Router connections
EIA/TIA-232
EIA/TIA-449
V.35
X.21
EIA-530
Network connections at the modem or CSU/DSU
Metric (M3) thumbscrews are included with each port adapter cable to allow connections to devices
that use metric hardware. Because the 4T port adapter uses a special, high-density port that requires
special adapter cables for each electrical interface type, we recommend that you obtain serial
interface cables from the factory.
Serial Port Adapter Cable Pinouts
The 4T port adapter supports EIA/TIA-232, EIA/TIA-449, X.21, V.35, and EIA-530 serial
interfaces.
All 4T ports use a a 60-pin receptacle that supports all available interface types. A special serial
adapter cable, which is required for each port, determines the electrical interface type and mode of
the interface. The router (VIP) end of all of the adapter cables is a 60-pin plug; the connectors at the
network end are the standard connectors used for the respective interfaces.
All interface types except EIA-530 are available in DTE or DCE format: DTE with a plug connector
at the network end and DCE with a receptacle at the network end. V.35 is available in either mode
with either gender at the network end. EIA-530 is available in DTE only.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
53
VIP Port Adapter Functions
The tables that follow list the signal pinouts for both the DTE and DCE mode serial port adapter
cables, for each of the following 4T port adapter interface types:
•
•
•
•
•
EIA/TIA-232 pinout, Table 10
EIA/TIA-449 pinout, Table 11
X.21 pinout, Table 12
V.35 pinout, Table 13
EIA-530 pinout, Table 14
Table 10
EIA/TIA-232 Adapter Cable Signals
DTE Cable
DCE Cable
VIP End, HD1
60-Position
Plug
Network
End,
DB-25 Plug
VIP End, HD
60-Position
Plug
Network End,
DB-25
Receptacle
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
TxD/RxD
41
—>
2
TxD
RxD/TxD
36
<—
2
TxD
RxD/TxD
36
<—
3
RxD
TxD/RxD
41
—>
3
RxD
RTS/CTS
42
—>
4
RTS
CTS/RTS
35
<—
4
RTS
CTS/RTS
35
<—
5
CTS
RTS/CTS
42
—>
5
CTS
DSR/DTR
34
<—
6
DSR
DTR/DSR
43
—>
6
DSR
Circuit ground
45
7
Circuit ground
Circuit ground
45
7
Circuit ground
DCD/LL
33
<—
8
DCD
LL/DCD
44
—>
8
DCD
TxC/NIL
37
<—
15
TxC
TxCE/TxC
39
—>
15
TxC
RxC/TxCE
38
<—
17
RxC
NIL/RxC
40
—>
17
RxC
LL/DCD
44
—>
18
LTST
DCD/LL
33
<—
18
LTST
DTR/DSR
43
—>
20
DTR
DSR/DTR
34
<—
20
DTR
TxCE/TxC
39
—>
24
TxCE
RxC/TxCE
38
<—
24
TxCE
Mode 0
Ground
Mode_DCE
50
51
52
Mode 0
Ground
50
51
1. HD = high density.
54 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Shorting
group
Shorting group
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 11
EIA/TIA-449 Adapter Cable Signals
DTE Cable
DCE Cable
HD1
VIP End,
60-Position Plug
Network End,
DB-37 Plug
VIP End, HD
60-Position Plug
Network End,
DB-37 Receptacle
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
TxD/RxD+
11
—>
4
SD+
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
4
SD+
TxD/RxD–
12
—>
22
SD–
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
22
SD–
TxC/RxC+
24
<—
5
ST+
TxCE/TxC+
13
—>
5
ST+
TxC/RxC–
23
<—
23
ST–
TxCE/TxC–
14
—>
23
ST–
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
6
RD+
TxD/RxD+
11
—>
6
RD+
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
24
RD–
TxD/RxD–
12
—>
24
RD–
RTS/CTS+
9
—>
7
RS+
CTS/RTS+
1
<—
7
RS+
RTS/CTS–
10
—>
25
RS–
CTS/RTS–
2
<—
25
RS–
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
8
RT+
TxC/RxC+
24
—>
8
RT+
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
26
RT–
TxC/RxC–
23
—>
26
RT–
CTS/RTS+
1
<—
9
CS+
RTS/CTS+
9
—>
9
CS+
CTS/RTS–
2
<—
27
CS–
RTS/CTS–
10
—>
27
CS–
LL/DCD
44
—>
10
LL
NIL/LL
29
—>
10
LL
Circuit ground
45
37
SC
Circuit ground
30
37
SC
DSR/DTR+
3
<—
11
ON+
DTR/DSR+
7
—>
11
ON+
DSR/DTR–
4
<—
29
ON–
DTR/DSR–
8
—>
29
ON–
DTR/DSR+
7
—>
12
TR+
DSR/DTR+
3
<—
12
TR+
DTR/DSR–
8
—>
30
TR–
DSR/DTR–
4
<—
30
TR–
DCD/DCD+
5
<—
13
RR+
DCD/DCD+
5
—>
13
RR+
DCD/DCD–
6
<—
31
RR–
DCD/DCD–
6
—>
31
RR–
TxCE/TxC+
13
—>
17
TT+
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
17
TT+
TxCE/TxC–
14
—>
35
TT–
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
35
TT–
Circuit ground
15
19
SG
Circuit ground
15
19
SG
Circuit ground
16
20
RC
Circuit ground
16
20
RC
Mode 1
Ground
49
48
Shorting group
Mode 1
Ground
49
48
Ground
Mode_DCE
51
52
Shorting group
Shorting group
1. HD = high density.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
55
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 12
X.21 Adapter Cable Signals
DTE Cable
DCE Cable
VIP End, HD1
6-Position Plug
Network End,
DB-15 Plug
VIP End, HD
60Position Plug
Network End,
DB-15
Receptacle
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
TxD/RxD+
11
—>
2
Transmit+
RxD/TxD+
11
—>
2
Transmit+
TxD/RxD–
12
—>
9
Transmit–
RxD/TxD–
12
—>
9
Transmit–
RTS/CTS+
9
—>
3
Control+
CTS/RTS+
9
—>
3
Control+
RTS/CTS –
10
—>
10
Control–
CTS/RTS –
10
—>
10
Control–
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
4
Receive+
TxD/RxD+
28
<—
4
Receive+
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
11
Receive–
TxD/RxD–
27
<—
11
Receive–
CTS/RTS+
1
<—
5
Indication+
RTS/CTS+
1
<—
5
Indication+
CTS/RTS –
2
<—
12
Indication–
RTS/CTS–
2
<—
12
Indication–
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
6
Timing+
TxC/RxC+
26
<—
6
Timing+
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
13
Timing–
TxC/RxC –
25
<—
13
Timing–
Circuit ground
15
8
Circuit ground
Circuit ground
15
8
Circuit ground
Ground
Mode_2
48
47
Shorting group
Ground
Mode_2
48
47
Ground
Mode_DCE
51
52
Shorting group
Ground
Mode_DCE
51
52
1. HD = high density.
56 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Shorting
group
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 13
V.35 Adapter Cable Signals
DTE Cable
DCE Cable
VIP End, HD1
60-Position Plug
Network End,
34-Position
Plug
VIP End, HD
60-Position Plug
Network End,
34-Position
Receptacle
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Shield ground
46
A
Frame ground
Shield ground
46
A
Frame ground
Circuit ground
45
B
Circuit ground
Circuit ground
45
B
Circuit ground
RTS/CTS
42
—>
C
RTS
CTS/RTS
35
<—
C
RTS
CTS/RTS
35
<—
D
CTS
RTS/CTS
42
—>
D
CTS
DSR/DTR
34
<—
E
DSR
DTR/DSR
43
—>
E
DSR
DCD/LL
33
<—
F
RLSD
LL/DCD
44
—>
F
RLSD
DTR/DSR
43
—>
H
DTR
DSR/DTR
34
<—
H
DTR
LL/DCD
44
—>
K
LT
DCD/LL
33
<—
K
LT
TxD/RxD+
18
—>
P
SD+
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
P
SD+
TxD/RxD–
17
—>
S
SD–
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
S
SD–
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
R
RD+
TxD/RxD+
18
—>
R
RD+
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
T
RD–
TxD/RxD–
17
—>
T
RD–
TxCE/TxC+
20
—>
U
SCTE+
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
U
SCTE+
TxCE/TxC–
19
—>
W
SCTE–
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
W
SCTE–
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
V
SCR+
NIL/RxC+
22
—>
V
SCR+
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
X
SCR–
NIL/RxC–
21
—>
x
SCR–
TxC/RxC+
24
<—
Y
SCT+
TxCE/TxC+
20
—>
Y
SCT+
TxC/RxC–
23
<—
AA
SCT–
TxCE/TxC–
19
—>
AA
SCT–
Mode 1
Ground
49
48
Shorting group
Mode 1
Ground
49
48
Shorting group
Mode 0
Ground
Mode_DCE
50
51
52
Shorting group
Mode 0
Ground
50
51
Shorting group
TxC/NIL
RxC/TxCE
RxC/TxD
Ground
53
54
55
56
Shorting group
TxC/NIL
RxC/TxCE
RxC/TxD
Ground
53
54
55
56
Shorting group
1. HD = high density.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
57
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 14
EIA-530 DTE Adapter Cable Signals
VIP End, HD1
60-Position Plug
Network End,
DB-25 Plug
Signal
Pin
Pin
Signal
Shield ground
46
1
Shield ground
TxD/RxD+
11
—>
2
TxD+
TxD/RxD–
12
—>
14
TxD–
RxD/TxD+
28
<—
3
RxD+
RxD/TxD–
27
<—
16
RxC–
RTS/CTS+
9
—>
4
RTS+
RTS/CTS–
10
—>
19
RTS–
CTS/RTS+
1
<—
5
CTS+
CTS/RTS–
2
<—
13
CTS–
DSR/DTR+
3
<—
6
DSR+
DSR/DTR–
4
<—
22
DSR–
DCD/DCD+
5
<—
8
DCD+
DCD/DCD–
6
<—
10
DCD–
TxC/RxC+
24
<—
15
TxC+
TxC/RxC–
23
<—
12
TxC–
RxC/TxCE+
26
<—
17
RxC+
RxC/TxCE–
25
<—
9
RxC–
LL/DCD
44
—>
18
LL
Circuit ground
45
7
Circuit ground
DTR/DSR+
7
—>
20
DTR+
DTR/DSR–
8
—>
23
DTR–
TxCE/TxC+
13
—>
24
TxCE+
TxCE/TxC–
14
—>
11
TxCE–
Mode_1
Ground
Mode_2
49
48
47
Ground
Mode_DCE
51
52
1. HD = high density.
58 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
Shorting group
Shorting group
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Attaching 4T Port Adapter Interface Cables
On a single 4T port adapter, you can use up to four synchronous-serial connections.
Connect serial cables to the 4T port adapter as follows:
Step 1 Attach the appropriate serial cable directly to the receptacle on the 4T port adapter and
tighten the strain-relief screws. (See Figure 30.)
Connecting 4T Serial Cables (Horizontal Orientation—Shown without Handles)
H5988
LB
RC
RD
CD
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
TD
RD
CD
TC
LB
RC
TD
RD
TC
TD
TC
FAST SERIAL
EN
Figure 30
To DTE, DCE, or other
external synchronus serial
equipment
Caution Serial interface cables must be attached correctly or damage to the cable plug will result.
Attempting to force a cable plug on the 60-pin receptacle can damage the plug. (See Figure 31.)
Figure 31
Connecting Serial Port Adapter Cables
Correct
4T port adapter
interface cable
Router port
4T port adapter
interface cable
Router port
H5764
Incorrect, cable upside down
Step 2 Attach the network end of your serial cable to your DSU, CSU, DTE, or other external
synchronous-serial equipment and tighten the strain-relief screws.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
59
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Configuring the 4T Interfaces
If you installed a new VIP or if you want to change the configuration of an existing interface, you
must enter Configuration mode to configure the new interfaces. If you replaced a VIP that was
previously configured, the system will recognize the new 4T port adapter interfaces and bring each
of them up in their existing configuration.
After you verify that the new 4T port adapter is installed correctly (the enabled LED goes on), use
the privileged-level configure command to configure the new interfaces. Be prepared with the
information you will need, such as the following:
•
•
•
•
Protocols you plan to route on each new interface
Internet protocol (IP) addresses if you will configure the interfaces for IP routing
Whether or not the new interfaces will use bridging
Timing source for each new interface and clock speeds for external timing
Refer to the appropriate software documentation for descriptions of the configuration options
available and instructions for configuring a serial interface.
The following sections describe the commands for configuring an external clock signal for a DCE
interface and for configuring a port for NRZI encoding or 32-bit CRC. Configuration commands are
executed from the privileged level of the EXEC command interpreter, which usually requires
password access. (See the section “Using the EXEC Command Interpreter” on page 69.) Refer to
the description that follows and contact your system administrator, if necessary, to obtain access.
Selecting Chassis Slot, Port Adapter, and Serial Interface Port Numbers
The following section describes how to identify chassis slot, port adapter, and serial interface port
numbers.
Note Although the processor slots in the seven-slot Cisco 7000 and 13-slot Cisco 7513 are
vertically oriented and those in the five-slot Cisco 7010 and Cisco 7505 are horizontally oriented, all
models use the same method for slot and port numbering. (For interface processor slot orientation in
your chassis, refer to Figure 2, Figure 3, Figure 4, Figure 5, or Figure 6.)
In the router, physical port addresses specify the actual physical location of each interface port on
the router interface processor end. (See Figure 32.) This address is composed of a three-part number
in the format chassis slot number/port adapter number/interface port number.
The first number identifies the chassis slot in which the VIP is installed (as shown in the example
system in Figure 32). The second number identifies the physical port adapter number on the VIP, and
is either 0 or 1. The interface ports on each 4T port adapter are always numbered in sequence as
interface 0 through 3.
60 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Interface ports on the 4T port adapter maintain the same address regardless of whether other
interface processors are installed or removed. However, when you move a VIP to a different slot, the
first number in the address changes to reflect the new slot number.
Figure 32 shows some of the slot port adapter and interface ports of a sample Cisco 7505 system.
For example, on a VIP-4R/4T VIP in slot 3, the addresses of the 4T port adapter are 3/1/0 through
3/1/3 (chassis slot 3, port adapter slot 1, and interface ports 0 through 3). The first port adapter slot
number is always 0. The individual interface port numbers always begin with 0. The number of
additional ports depends on the number of ports on a port adapter.
Note If you remove the 4T-equipped VIP from slot 3 and install it in slot 2, the addresses of those
same ports become 2/1/0 through 2/1/3.
Figure 32
4T Serial Interface Port Number Example (Cisco 7505 Shown)
4/T port adapter
(port numbers 3/1/0, 3/1/1, 3/1/2,
3/1/3, from left to right)
T
SE
E
CO
NS
OL
U
RE
CP
EC
EJ
AL
RM
NO
SL SLO
OT T
0 1
T
HA
LT
ROUTE SWITCH PROCESSOR
D
C
C
LB
R
D
R
TC
C
TD
D
LB
C
D
R
R
C
TC
D
TD
LB
C
D
R
R
TC
TD
LB
C
D
C
D
R
R
TC
TD
3
2
1
0
Slot 3
2
2
EN
AB
IN
U
4/1 SE
6
M
B
TD
FAST SERIAL
Slot 2
Slot 1
Interface
processor
slots
H5989
Slot 0
Note Current VIP configurations support only one 4R port adapter and one 4T port adapter on a
VIP motherboard. Single and dual 4T configurations are not available.
You can identify interface ports by physically checking the slot/port adapter/interface port location
on the back of the router or by using software commands to display information about a specific
interface or all interfaces in the router.
To display information about a specific interface, use the show interfaces command with the
interface type and port address in the format show interfaces [type slot/port adapter/port].
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
61
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Following is an example of how the show interfaces [type slot/port adapter/port] command displays
status information (including the physical slot and port address) for the interfaces you specify. In
these examples, most of the status information for each interface is omitted, and the four serial
interfaces (0–3) are in chassis slot 3, in port adapter slot 1. (Interfaces are administratively shut down
until you enable them.)
Router# sh int serial 3/1/0
Serial3/1/1 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus Serial, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.2389)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int serial 3/1/1
Serial3/1/2 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus Serial, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238a)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int serial 3/1/2
Serial3/1/3 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus Serial, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238b)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Router# sh int serial 3/1/3
Serial3/1/3 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus Serial, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.238b)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
Serial interface port adapters are always numbered as port adapter 1 because VIPs currently support
only one 4T port adapter with the VIP-4R/4T configuration, and the 4T port adapter is always in the
second port adapter slot location (port adapter slot 1). With this VIP configuration, a 4T port adapter
is always in port adapter slot 0. Refer to Table 15, Table 16, Table 17, Table 18, and Table 19 for the
4T port numbers associated with the interface processor slots in your chassis.
Note Table 15, Table 16, Table 17, Table 18, and Table 19 indicate 4T interface port numbers
based on the slots in which they can be installed; they do not represent examples of maximum 4T
configurations.
Table 15
4T Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7000
Slot 0/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter 1/
Port n
0/1/0
1/1/0
2/1/0
3/1/0
4/1/0
0/1/1
1/1/1
2/1/1
3/1/1
4/1/1
0/1/2
1/1/2
2/1/2
3/1/2
4/1/2
0/1/3
1/1/3
2/1/3
3/1/3
4/1/3
62 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Table 16
4T Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7010
Slot 0/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 1/
Port n
0/1/0
1/1/0
2/1/0
0/1/1
1/1/1
2/1/1
0/1/2
1/1/2
2/1/2
0/1/3
1/1/3
2/1/3
Table 17
4T Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7505
Slot 0/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter 1/
Port n
0/1/0
1/1/0
2/1/0
3/1/0
0/1/1
1/1/1
2/1/1
3/1/1
0/1/2
1/1/2
2/1/2
3/1/2
0/1/3
1/1/3
2/1/3
3/1/3
Table 18
4T Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7507
Slot 0/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 1/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 5/
Adapter 1/
Port n
Slot 6/
Adapter 1/
Port n
0/1/0
1/1/0
4/1/0
5/1/0
6/1/0
0/1/1
1/1/1
4/1/1
5/1/1
6/1/1
0/1/2
1/1/2
4/1/2
5/1/2
6/1/2
0/1/3
1/1/3
4/1/3
5/1/3
6/1/3
Table 19
4T Slot, Port Adapter, and Port Numbers in a Cisco 7513
Slot 0 /
Adapter1/
Port
Slot 1 /
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 2/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 3/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 4/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 5/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 8/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 9/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 10/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 11/
Adapter/
Port n
Slot 12/
Adapter/
Port n
0/1/0
1/1/0
2/1/0
3/1/0
4/1/0
5/1/0
8/1/0
9/1/0
10/1/0
11/1/0
12/1/0
0/1/1
1/1/1
2/1/1
3/1/1
4/1/1
5/1/1
8/1/1
9/1/1
10/1/1
11/1/1
12/1/1
0/1/2
1/1/2
2/1/2
3/1/2
4/1/2
5/1/2
8/1/2
9/1/2
10/1/2
11/1/2
12/1/2
0/1/3
1/1/3
2/1/3
3/1/3
4/1/3
5/1/3
8/1/3
9/1/3
10/1/3
11/1/3
12/1/3
1. The 4T port adapter is always installed in port adapter slot 1 on the VIP-4R/4T.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
63
VIP Port Adapter Functions
With the show interfaces type slot/port adapter/port command, use arguments such as the interface
type (serial, and so forth) and the slot, port adapter, and port numbers (slot/port adapter/port) to
display information about a specific serial interface only.
The following example of the show interfaces serial slot/port adapter/port command shows all of
the information specific to the first 4T interface port (interface port 0) in chassis slot 3, port adapter
slot 1:
Router# sh int serial 3/1/0
Serial3/1/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cyBus Serial, address is 0000.0ca5.2300 (bia 0000.0ca5.2388)
MTU 1500 bytes, BW 10000 Kbit, DLY 1000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255
Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec)
ARP type: ARPA, ARP Timeout 4:00:00
Last input never, output never, output hang never
Last clearing of "show interface" counters 2:56:26
Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops
5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer
Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants
0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
0 input packets with dribble condition detected
0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns
0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets, 0 restarts
0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
For complete VIP command descriptions and examples, refer to the publications listed in the section
“If You Need More Configuration Information” on page 2.
64 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
The show version (or show hardware) command displays the configuration of the system hardware
(the number of each interface processor type installed), the software version, the names and sources
of configuration files, and the boot images. Following is an example of the show version command
used with a Cisco 7500 series system:
Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-A), Version 11.1(1) [mpo 105]
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Fri 06-Oct-95 12:22 by mpo
Image text-base: 0x600088A0, data-base: 0x605A4000
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(16645) [biff 571], INTERIM SOFTWARE
ROM: GS Bootstrap Software (RSP-BOOT-M), Version 11.0(1.2), MAINTENANCE INTERIME
honda uptime is 4 hours, 22 minutes
System restarted by reload
System image file is "slot0:rsp-a111-1", booted via slot0
cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor with 32768K bytes of memory.
R4600 processor, Implementation 32, Revision 2.0
Last reset from power-on
G.703/E1 software, Version 1.0.
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
Chassis Interface.
1 VIP controllers (4 Serial)(4 Token Ring).
4 Network Serial interfaces.
4 Token Ring/IEEE 802.5 interfaces.
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
20480K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
No slave installed in slot 6.
Configuration register is 0x2
Configuring Timing (Clock) Signals
All interfaces support both DTE and DCE mode, depending on the mode of the interface cable
attached to the port. To use a port as a DTE interface, you need only connect a DTE adapter cable to
the port. When the system detects the DTE mode cable, it automatically uses the external timing
signal. To use a port in DCE mode, you must connect a DCE interface cable and set the clock speed
with the clockrate configuration command. You must also set the clock rate to perform a loopback
test. This section describes how to set the clock rate on a DCE port and, if necessary, how to invert
the clock to correct a phase shift between the data and clock signals.
Setting the Clock Rate
All DCE interfaces require a noninverted internal transmit clock signal, which is generated by the
4T port adapter. The default operation on an 4T port adapter DCE interface is for the DCE device
(4T port adapter) to generate its own clock signal (TxC) and send it to the remote DTE. The remote
DTE device returns the clock signal to the DCE (4T port adapter interface). The clockrate command
specifies the rate as a bits-per-second value. In the following example, the clock rate for the serial
interface on a 4T port adapter on a VIP in interface processor slot 3 (3/1/0) is defined as 72 kbps:
Router(config)# interface serial 3/1/0
Router(config-int)# clockrate 72000
Use the no clockrate command to remove the clock rate.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
65
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Following are the acceptable clockrate settings:
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200
38400, 56000, 64000, 72000, 125000
148000, 500000, 800000, 1000000, 1300000, 2000000
Speeds above 64 kbps (64000) are not appropriate for EIA/TIA-232. On all interface types, faster
speeds might not work if your cable is too long.
Inverting the Clock Signal
Systems that use long cables may experience high error rates when operating at the higher
transmission speeds. Slight variances in cable construction, temperature, and other factors can cause
the clock and data signals to shift out of phase. If an 4T port adapter DCE port is reporting a high
number of error packets, a phase shift might be the problem. Inverting the clock can often correct
this shift.
When the 4T port adapter interface is a DTE, the invert-transmit-clock command inverts the TxC
signal it receives from the remote DCE. When the 4T port adapter interface is a DCE, this command
inverts the clock signal to the remote DTE port. Use the no invert-transmit-clock command to
change the clock signal back to its original phase.
Configuring NRZI Format
All interfaces support both NRZ and NRZI formats. Both formats use two different voltage levels
for transmission. NRZ signals maintain constant voltage levels with no signal transitions (no return
to a zero voltage level) during a bit interval and are decoded using absolute values (0 and 1). NRZI
uses the same constant signal levels but interprets the presence of data at the beginning of a bit
interval as a signal transition and the absence of data as no transition. NRZI uses differential
encoding to decode signals rather than determining absolute values.
NRZ format, the factory default on all interfaces, is most common. NRZI format, which is
configured with a software command, is commonly used with EIA/TIA-232 connections in IBM
environments.
To enable NRZI encoding on any interface, specify the slot and port address of the interface followed
by the command nrzi-encoding. Enter Ctrl-Z when you have finished with the configuration
change. In the example that follows, the first serial port on a 4T port adapter in interface processor
slot 3 is configured for NRZI encoding:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# interface serial 3/1/0
Router(config-int)# nrzi-encoding
Router(config-int)# ^Z
End with CNTL/Z.
To disable NRZI encoding on a port, specify the slot and port address and use the no nrzi-encoding
command. For complete command descriptions and instructions, refer to the related software
documentation.
66 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Configuring CRCs
CRC is an error-checking technique that uses a calculated numeric value to detect errors in
transmitted data. All interfaces use a 16-bit CRC by default, but also support a 32-bit CRC. The
sender of a data frame divides the bits in the frame message by a predetermined number to calculate
a remainder or frame check sequence (FCS). Before it sends the frame, the sender appends the FCS
value to the message so that the frame contents are exactly divisible by the predetermined number.
The receiver divides the frame contents by the same predetermined number that the sender used to
calculate the FCS. If the result is not 0, the receiver assumes that a transmission error occurred and
sends a request to the sender to resend the frame.
The designators 16 and 32 indicate the number of check digits per frame that are used to calculate
the FCS. CRC-16, which transmits streams of 8-bit characters, generates a 16-bit FCS. CRC-32,
which transmits streams of 16-bit characters, generates a 32-bit FCS. CRC-32 transmits longer
streams at faster rates and, therefore, provides better ongoing error correction with fewer
retransmissions. Both the sender and the receiver must use the same setting.
The default for all serial interfaces is for 16-bit CRC. To enable 32-bit CRC on an interface, specify
the slot and port address of the interface followed by the command crc32. In the example that
follows, the first serial port on an 4T port adapter on a VIP in interface processor slot 3 is configured
for 32-bit CRC:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# interface serial 3/1/0
Router(config-int)# crc32
Router(config-int)# ^Z
End with CNTL/Z.
To disable CRC-32 and return to the default CRC-16 setting, specify the slot and port address and
use the no crc32 command. For command descriptions, refer to the related software documentation.
Replacing Port Adapter Cables
The port adapter cable connected to each port determines the electrical interface type and mode of
the port. The default mode of the ports is DCE, which allows you to perform a loopback test on any
port without having to attach a port adapter cable. Although DCE is the default, there is no default
clock rate set on the interfaces. When there is no cable attached to a port, the software actually
identifies the port as Universal, Cable Unattached rather than either a DTE or DCE interface.
Following is an example of the show controller cbus command that shows an interface port (2/1/0)
that has an EIA/TIA-232 DTE cable attached, and a second port (2/1/1) that does not have a cable
attached:
Router# show controller cbus
slot2: VIP, hw 2.1, sw 200.03, ccb 5800FF50, cmdq 48000090, vps 8192
software loaded from system
FLASH ROM version 255.255, VPLD version 20.1
4T HW Revision 121, SW Revision 216, Unresponsive 0
Interface 24- Serial2/1/0, electrical interface is RS-232 DTE
31 buffer RX queue threshold, 101 buffer TX queue limit, buffer size 1520
Transmitter delay is 0 microseconds
Interface 24- Serial2/1/1, electrical interface is Universal (cable unattached)
31 buffer RX queue threshold, 101 buffer TX queue limit, buffer size 1520
To change the electrical interface type or mode of a port online, you replace the serial adapter cable
and use software commands to restart the interface and, if necessary, reconfigure the port for the new
interface. At system startup or restart, the VIP polls the interfaces and determines the electrical
interface type of each port (according to the type of port adapter cable attached).
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
67
VIP Port Adapter Functions
However, it does not necessarily repoll an interface when you change the adapter cable online. To
ensure that the system recognizes the new interface type, shut down and reenable the interface after
changing the cable.
Perform the following steps to change the mode or interface type of a port by replacing the adapter
cable. First replace the cable, then shut down and bring up the interface with the new cable attached
so that the system recognizes the new interface. If you are replacing a cable with one of the same
interface type and mode, these steps are not necessary (simply replace the cable without interrupting
operation).
Step 1 Locate and remove the adapter cable to be replaced.
Step 2 Connect the new cable between the 4T port adapter and the network connection. Tighten
the thumbscrews at both ends of the cable to secure it in the ports.
Step 3 At the privileged level of the EXEC, specify the port address, shut down the interface, and
write the configuration to nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM). Add additional
configuration commands, if any, before you exit from Configuration mode (before you
enter Ctrl-Z).
Router> enable
Password:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# int serial 3/1/0
Router(config-int)# shutdown
Router(config-int)# ^Z
End with CNTL/Z.
Router# write memory
Step 4 Enter Configuration mode again and bring the port back up.
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)# int serial 3/1/0
Router(config-int)# no shutdown
Router(config-int)# ^Z
End with CNTL/Z.
These steps will prompt the system to poll the interface and recognize new interface immediately.
When you configure a port for a DCE interface for the first time, or when you set up a loopback test,
you must set the clock rate for the port. When you connect a DCE cable to a port, the interface will
remain down, the clock LEDs will remain off, and the interface will not function until you set a clock
rate (regardless of the DCE mode default).
If you are changing the mode of the interface from DCE to DTE, you do not need to change the clock
rate for the port. After you replace the DCE cable with a DTE cable and the system recognizes the
interface as a DTE, it will use the external clock signal from the remote DCE device and ignore the
internal clock signal that the DCE interface normally uses. Therefore, once you configure the clock
rate on a port for either a DCE interface or loopback, you can leave the clock rate configured and
still use that port as a DTE interface.
68 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Using the EXEC Command Interpreter
Before you use the configure command, you must enter the privileged level of the EXEC command
interpreter with the enable command. The system will prompt you for a password if one has been
set.
The system prompt for the privileged level ends with a pound sign (#) instead of an angle bracket
(>). At the console terminal, enter the privileged level as follows:
Step 1 At the user-level EXEC prompt, enter the enable command. The EXEC prompts you for a
privileged-level password, as follows:
Router> enable
Password:
Step 2 Enter the password (the password is case-sensitive). For security purposes, the password is
not displayed.
Step 3 When you enter the correct password, the system displays the privileged-mode system
prompt (#) as follows:
Router#
Proceed to the following section to configure the new interfaces.
Shutting Down an Interface
Before you remove an interface that you will not replace, or replace port adapters, shut down
(disable) the interfaces to prevent anomalies when you reinstall the new or reconfigured interface
processor. When you shut down an interface, it is designated administratively down in the show
command displays.
Follow these steps to shut down an interface:
Step 1 Enter the privileged level of the EXEC command interpreter. (Refer to the previous section
for instructions.)
Step 2 At the privileged-level prompt, enter Configuration mode and specify that the console
terminal will be the source of the configuration subcommands, as follows:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)#
End with CNTL/Z.
Step 3 Specify the slot/port address of the first interface that you want shut down by entering the
subcommand interface, followed by the type (serial) and slot/port (interface processor slot
number/1). The example that follows is for a VIP in interface processor slot 1:
Router(config)# interface serial 1/1/0
Step 4 Enter the shutdown command, as follows:
Router(config-int)# shutdown
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69
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Step 5 To shut down additional interfaces, enter the slot/port address of each additional interface
followed by the shutdown command. When you have entered all the interfaces to be shut
down, press Ctrl-Z (hold down the Control key while you press Z) to exit Configuration
mode and return to the EXEC command interpreter prompt, as follows:
Router(config-int)#
Router(config-int)#
Router(config-int)#
Router(config-int)#
Router(config-int)#
Router#
int serial 1/1/0
shutdown
int serial 1/1/1
shutdown
^Z
Step 6 Write the new configuration to memory, as follows:
Router# copy running-config startup-config
[OK]
Router#
The system displays an OK message when the configuration has been stored.
Step 7 To verify that new interfaces are now in the correct state (shutdown), use the show
interface serial slot/port command to display the specific interface, or use the show
interfaces command, without variables, to display the status of all interfaces in the system.
Router# show int serial 1/1/0
Serial 1/1/0 is administratively down, line protocol is down
Hardware is cxBus VIP
[display text omitted]
Step 8 To reenable the interfaces, repeat the previous steps, but use the no shutdown command in
Step 4, then write the new configuration to memory, as follows:
Router(config)# int serial 1/1/0
Router(config-int)# no shutdown
Router(config-int)# ^Z
Router# copy running-config startup-config
[OK]
Router# show int serial 1/1/0
Serial 1/1/0 is up, line protocol is up
Hardware is cxBus VIP
[display text omitted]
For complete descriptions of software configuration commands, refer to the publications listed in the
section “If You Need More Configuration Information” on page 2.
Configuring Interfaces
Following are instructions for a basic configuration: enabling an interface, specifying IP routing, and
setting up external timing on a DCE interface. You might also need to enter other configuration
subcommands, depending on the requirements for your system configuration and the protocols you
plan to route on the interface. For complete descriptions of configuration subcommands and the
configuration options available for serial interfaces, refer to the appropriate software documentation.
Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7500 series routers identify an interface address by its slot number and
port number (port numbers 0 through 7, depending on the interface processor type) in the format
slot/port. Each 4T port adapter contains four serial interfaces.
70 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Ports are numbered sequentially beginning with either the top port (in the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7507,
and Cisco 7513) or the left-most port (in the Cisco 7010, and the Cisco 7505), which is always port
(interface) 0. For example, the slot/port adapter/port address of the first interface on a VIP installed
in interface processor slot 1 is 1/1/0, and the adjacent port on the same VIP is 1/1/1.
The following steps describe a basic configuration. Press the Return key after each step unless
otherwise noted.
Step 1 At the privileged-level prompt, enter Configuration mode and specify that the console
terminal will be the source of the configuration subcommands, as follows:
Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.
Router(config)#
End with CNTL/Z.
Step 2 At the prompt, specify the first interface to configure by entering the subcommand
interface, followed by the type (serial) and slot/port (interface processor slot number/0).
The example that follows is for the first port on a VIP in interface processor slot 1:
Router(config)# interface serial 1/1/0
Step 3 If IP routing is enabled on the system, you can assign an IP address and subnet mask to the
interface with the ip address configuration subcommand, as in the following example:
Router(config-int)# ip address 145.22.4.67 255.255.255.0
Step 4 Add any additional configuration subcommands required to enable routing protocols and
adjust the interface characteristics.
Step 5 If you are configuring a DTE interface, proceed to Step 7. If you are configuring a DCE
interface, you also need to configure the external clock signal, as described in the next step.
Step 6 Set the clock rate with the clockrate command (see the section “Configuring Timing
(Clock) Signals” on page 65).
Router(config-int)# clockrate 72000
Step 7 Change the shutdown state to up and enable the interface as follows:
Router(config-int)# no shutdown
Step 8 When you have included all of the configuration subcommands to complete the
configuration, press Ctrl-Z to exit Configuration mode.
Router(config-int)# ^z
Step 9 Write the new configuration to memory as follows:
Router# copy running-config startup-config
[OK]
Router#
Step 10 Exit the privileged level and return to the user level by entering disable at the prompt as
follows:
Router# disable
Router>
To check the interface configuration using show commands, proceed to the section “Checking the
Configuration” on page 72.
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71
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Checking the Configuration
After configuring the new interface, use the show commands to display the status of the new
interface or all interfaces.
Using Show Commands to Verify the VIP Status
The following steps use show commands to verify that the new interfaces are configured and
operating correctly.
Step 1 Use the show version command to display the system hardware configuration. Ensure that
the list includes the new serial interfaces.
Step 2 Display all the current interface processors and their interfaces with the show controllers
cbus command. Verify that the new VIP appears in the correct slot.
Step 3 Specify one of the new serial interfaces with the show interfaces serial slot/port command
and verify that the first line of the display specifies the interface with the correct slot
number. Also verify that the interface and line protocol are in the correct state: up or down.
Step 4 Display the protocols configured for the entire system and specific interfaces with the show
protocols command. If necessary, return to Configuration mode to add or remove protocol
routing on the system or specific interfaces.
Step 5 Display the running configuration file with the write terminal (or show running-config)
command. Display the configuration stored in NVRAM using the show config (or show
startup-config) command. Verify that the configuration is accurate for the system and each
interface.
If the interface is down and you configured it as up, or if the displays indicate that the hardware is
not functioning properly, ensure that the network interface is properly connected and terminated. If
you still have problems bringing the interface up, contact a customer service representative for
assistance.
Using the ping and loopback Commands
The packet internet groper (ping) and loopback commands allow you to verify that an interface port
is functioning properly and to check the path between a specific port and connected devices at
various locations on the network. This section provides brief descriptions of these commands. After
you verify that the system and VIP have booted successfully and are operational, you can use these
commands to verify the status of interface ports. Refer to the publications listed in the section “If
You Need More Configuration Information” on page 2, for detailed command descriptions and
examples.
The ping command sends an echo request out to a remote device at an IP address that you specify.
After sending a series of signals, the command waits a specified time for the remote device to echo
the signals. Each returned signal is displayed as an exclamation point (!) on the console terminal;
each signal that is not returned before the specified time-out is displayed as a period (.). A series of
exclamation points (!!!!!) indicates a good connection; a series of periods (.....) or the messages
[timed out] or [failed] indicate that the connection failed.
72 VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
VIP Port Adapter Functions
Following is an example of a successful ping command to a remote server with the address 1.1.1.10:
Router# ping 1.1.1.10 <Return>
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echoes to 1.1.1.10, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/15/64 ms
Router#
If the connection fails, verify that you have the correct IP address for the server and that the server
is active (powered on), and repeat the ping command.
The loopback test allows you to detect and isolate equipment malfunctions by testing the connection
between the 4T port adapter interface and a remote device such as modems or CSU/DSUs. The
loopback subcommand sends a series of packets out to and through the device (or cable), and back
to the 4T port adapter interface. If the packets complete the loop, the connection is good. If not, you
can isolate a fault to the remote device or interface cable in the path of the loopback test.
Note You must configure a clock rate on the port before performing a loopback test.
Depending on the mode of the port, issuing the loopback command checks the following path:
•
When no interface cable is attached to the 4T port adapter interface, or if a DCE cable is attached
to the port, the loopback command tests the path between the VIP and the interface port only
(without leaving the VIP and port adapter).
•
When a DTE cable is attached to the port, the loopback command tests the path between the VIP
and the near (VIP) side of the DSU or modem to test the 4T port adapter interface and interface
cable. (The X.21 DTE interface cable does not support this loopback test; see the following
Note.)
Refer to the appropriate software configuration document for command descriptions and examples.
Note The X.21 interface definition does not include a loopback definition. On the 4T port adapter,
the X.21 DTE interface does not support the loopback function. Because of the internal clock signal
present on the 4T port adapter interfaces, loopback will function on an X.21 DCE interface.
This completes the configuration procedure for the new 4T port adapter serial interfaces.
VIP-4R/4T Installation and Configuration
73
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