PICkit Serial Analyzer USER`S GUIDE

PICkit Serial Analyzer USER`S GUIDE
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
USER’S GUIDE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B
Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices:
•
Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet.
•
Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the
intended manner and under normal conditions.
•
There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our
knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data
Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property.
•
Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code.
•
Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not
mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.”
Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our
products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts
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Information contained in this publication regarding device
applications and the like is provided only for your convenience
and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your application meets with your specifications.
MICROCHIP MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR
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OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION,
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Trademarks
The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, Accuron,
dsPIC, KEELOQ, KEELOQ logo, microID, MPLAB, PIC,
PICmicro, PICSTART, PRO MATE, PowerSmart, rfPIC, and
SmartShunt are registered trademarks of Microchip
Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other countries.
AmpLab, FilterLab, Linear Active Thermistor, Migratable
Memory, MXDEV, MXLAB, PS logo, SEEVAL, SmartSensor
and The Embedded Control Solutions Company are
registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, CodeGuard,
dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net, dsPICworks, ECAN,
ECONOMONITOR, FanSense, FlexROM, fuzzyLAB,
In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP, ICEPIC, Mindi, MiWi,
MPASM, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB, MPLINK, PICkit,
PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICLAB, PICtail, PowerCal,
PowerInfo, PowerMate, PowerTool, REAL ICE, rfLAB,
rfPICDEM, Select Mode, Smart Serial, SmartTel, Total
Endurance, UNI/O, WiperLock and ZENA are trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2007, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in the
U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
Printed on recycled paper.
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2002 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona, Gresham, Oregon and Mountain View, California. The
Company’s quality system processes and procedures are for its PIC®
MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping devices, Serial
EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and analog
products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design and
manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
DS51647B-page ii
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Table of Contents
Preface ........................................................................................................1
Chapter 1. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Overview
1.1
Introduction ..................................................................................... 5
1.2
Highlights ........................................................................................ 5
1.3
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Contents .................................................. 5
1.4
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Development System .............................. 5
1.5
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Hardware ................................................. 6
1.6
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Software .................................................. 8
Chapter 2. Getting Started
2.1
Introduction ..................................................................................... 9
2.2
Highlights ........................................................................................ 9
2.3
Installing the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Software ............................. 9
2.4
Connecting the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer to the PC ........................ 9
2.5
Connecting the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer to the 28-Pin Demo Board
10
2.6
Starting the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Program ............................. 10
2.7
Running the 28-Pin Demo I2C™ Demonstration Program ........... 11
2.8
I2C™ Communications – Basic Operations .................................. 14
2.9
28-Pin Demo I2C™ Source Code and Firmware .......................... 15
Chapter 3. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
3.1
Introduction ................................................................................... 17
3.2
Highlights ...................................................................................... 17
3.3
Installing the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Software ........................... 17
3.4
Starting the Program ..................................................................... 17
3.5
Configuration Wizard .................................................................... 18
3.6
Main Window ................................................................................ 21
3.7
Serial Communications Modes ..................................................... 25
Chapter 4. I2C™ Master Communications
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page iii
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
4.1
Introduction ...................................................................................27
4.2
Highlights ......................................................................................27
4.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments .......................................................27
4.4
Selecting Communications Mode ..................................................27
4.5
Configuring I2C Communications Mode ........................................28
4.6
Communications: Basic Operations ..............................................30
4.7
Script Builder .................................................................................31
4.8
Script Execute ...............................................................................35
Chapter 5. I2C™ Slave Communications
5.1
Introduction ...................................................................................37
5.2
Highlights ......................................................................................37
5.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments .......................................................37
5.4
Selecting Communications Mode ..................................................38
5.5
Configuring I2C Slave Communications Mode .............................38
5.6
Communications: Basic Operations ..............................................41
5.7
Communications: Profile Generator ..............................................42
Chapter 6. Lin Communications
6.1
Introduction ...................................................................................44
6.2
Highlights ......................................................................................44
6.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments .......................................................44
6.4
Selecting Communications Mode ..................................................44
6.5
Configuring Lin Slave Communications Mode ..............................45
6.6
Communications: Basic Operations ..............................................47
Chapter 7. SPI and Microwire Master Communications
DS51647B-page iv
7.1
Introduction ...................................................................................49
7.2
Highlights ......................................................................................49
7.3
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Pin Assignments ....................................49
7.4
Selecting Communications Mode ..................................................49
7.5
Configurating SPI Communications Mode ....................................50
7.6
Communications: Basic Operations ..............................................52
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Table of Contents
7.7
Script Builder ................................................................................ 54
7.8
Script Execute ............................................................................... 59
Chapter 8. USART Asynchronous Communications
8.1
Introduction ................................................................................... 63
8.2
Highlights ...................................................................................... 63
8.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments ...................................................... 63
8.4
Selecting Communications Mode ................................................. 64
8.5
Configuring USART Asynchronous Communications Mode ......... 64
8.6
Communications: Basic Operations .............................................. 66
8.7
Script Builder ................................................................................ 66
8.8
Script Execute ............................................................................... 71
Chapter 9. USART Master Synchronous Communications
9.1
Introduction ................................................................................... 73
9.2
Highlights ...................................................................................... 73
9.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments ...................................................... 73
9.4
Selecting Communications Mode ................................................. 73
9.5
Configuring USART Synchronous Master Communications Mode ..
74
9.6
Communications: Basic Operations .............................................. 76
9.7
Script Builder ................................................................................ 76
9.8
Script Execute ............................................................................... 81
Chapter 10. User Defined Templates
10.1 Introduction ................................................................................... 83
10.2 Highlights ...................................................................................... 83
10.3 Creating and Using Templates ..................................................... 84
10.4 My Templates ............................................................................... 85
10.5 GRAPHING DATA ........................................................................ 86
Chapter 11. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page v
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.1 Introduction ...................................................................................87
11.2 Highlights ......................................................................................87
11.3 Overview .......................................................................................87
11.4 EXEC ............................................................................................89
11.5 COMM ...........................................................................................92
11.6 I2CM Communications ..................................................................96
11.7 I2CS Communications ................................................................102
11.8 SPI Communications ...................................................................112
11.9 USART Communications ............................................................115
11.10 LIN Communications ...................................................................119
Chapter 12. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer DLL
12.1 Introduction .................................................................................127
12.2 Overview .....................................................................................127
Chapter 13. Troubleshooting
13.1 Introduction .................................................................................129
13.2 Frequently Asked Questions .......................................................129
Appendix A. PICkit Serial Analyzer Schematics ............................... 131
A.1
Introduction .................................................................................131
Appendix B. 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware ... 135
B.1
Introduction .................................................................................135
B.2
Highlights ....................................................................................135
B.3
Hardware .....................................................................................135
B.4
Firmware .....................................................................................135
B.5
I2C Communications ...................................................................136
B.6
Slave Devices .............................................................................137
B.7
Functions .....................................................................................140
Worldwide Sales and Service ............................................................... 143
DS51647B-page vi
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Preface
NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS
All documentation becomes dated, and this manual is no exception. Microchip tools and
documentation are constantly evolving to meet customer needs, so some actual dialogs
and/or tool descriptions may differ from those in this document. Please refer to our web site
(www.microchip.com) to obtain the latest documentation available.
Documents are identified with a “DS” number. This number is located on the bottom of each
page, in front of the page number. The numbering convention for the DS number is
“DSXXXXXA”, where “XXXXX” is the document number and “A” is the revision level of the
document.
For the most up-to-date information on development tools, see the MPLAB® IDE on-line help.
Select the Help menu, and then Topics to open a list of available on-line help files.
INTRODUCTION
This chapter contains general information that will be useful to know before using the
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide. Items discussed in this chapter include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Document Layout
Conventions Used in this Guide
Warranty Registration
Recommended Reading
The Microchip Web Site
Development Systems Customer Change Notification Service
Customer Support
Document Revision History
DOCUMENT LAYOUT
This document describes how to use the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer as a development
tool to communicate with embedded development systems via serial protocols. The
manual layout is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chapter 1: PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Overview
Chapter 2: Getting Started
Chapter 3: PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
Chapter 4: I2C™ Master Communications
Chapter 5: SPI Master Communications
Chapter 6: USART Asynchronous Communications
Chapter 7: USART Master Synchronous Communications
Chapter 8: User Defined Templates
Chapter 9: PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
Chapter 10: PICkit™ Serial Analyzer DLL
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 1
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
• Chapter 11: Troubleshooting
• Appendix A: Hardware Schematics
• Appendix B: 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demo Firmware
CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS GUIDE
This manual uses the following documentation conventions:
DOCUMENTATION CONVENTIONS
Description
Arial font:
Italic characters
Represents
Referenced books
Emphasized text
A window
A dialog
A menu selection
A field name in a window or
dialog
A menu path
MPLAB® IDE User’s Guide
...is the only compiler...
the Output window
the Settings dialog
select Enable Programmer
“Save project before build”
A dialog button
A tab
A number in verilog format,
where N is the total number of
digits, R is the radix and n is a
digit.
A key on the keyboard
Click OK
Click the Power tab
4‘b0010, 2‘hF1
Italic Courier New
Sample source code
Filenames
File paths
Keywords
Command-line options
Bit values
Constants
A variable argument
Square brackets [ ]
Optional arguments
Curly brackets and pipe
character: { | }
Ellipses...
Choice of mutually exclusive
arguments; an OR selection
Replaces repeated text
#define START
autoexec.bat
c:\mcc18\h
_asm, _endasm, static
-Opa+, -Opa0, 1
0xFF, ‘A’
file.o, where file can be
any valid filename
mcc18 [options] file
[options]
errorlevel {0|1}
Initial caps
Quotes
Underlined, italic text with
right angle bracket
Bold characters
N‘Rnnnn
Text in angle brackets < >
Courier New font:
Plain Courier New
Represents code supplied by
user
DS51647B-page 2
Examples
File>Save
Press <Enter>, <F1>
var_name [,
var_name...]
void main (void)
{ ...
}
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Preface
WARRANTY REGISTRATION
Please complete the enclosed Warranty Registration Card and mail it promptly.
Sending in the Warranty Registration Card entitles users to receive new product
updates. Interim software releases are available at the Microchip web site.
RECOMMENDED READING
This user’s guide describes how to use the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer. Other useful
documents are listed below. The following Microchip documents are available and
recommended as supplemental reference resources.
Readme Files
For the latest information on using other tools, read the tool-specific Readme files in
the Readmes subdirectory of the MPLAB IDE installation directory. The Readme files
contain update information and known issues that may not be included in this user’s
guide.
THE MICROCHIP WEB SITE
Microchip provides online support via our web site at www.microchip.com. This web
site is used as a means to make files and information easily available to customers.
Accessible by using your favorite Internet browser, the web site contains the following
information:
• Product Support – Data sheets and errata, application notes and sample
programs, design resources, user’s guides and hardware support documents,
latest software releases and archived software
• General Technical Support – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), technical
support requests, online discussion groups, Microchip consultant program
member listing
• Business of Microchip – Product selector and ordering guides, latest Microchip
press releases, listing of seminars and events, listings of Microchip sales offices,
distributors and factory representatives
DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS CUSTOMER CHANGE NOTIFICATION SERVICE
Microchip’s customer notification service helps keep customers current on Microchip
products. Subscribers will receive e-mail notification whenever there are changes,
updates, revisions or errata related to a specified product family or development tool of
interest.
To register, access the Microchip web site at www.microchip.com, click on Customer
Change Notification and follow the registration instructions.
The Development Systems product group categories are:
• Compilers – The latest information on Microchip C compilers and other language
tools. These include the MPLAB® C18 and MPLAB C30 C compilers; MPASM™
and MPLAB ASM30 assemblers; MPLINK™ and MPLAB LINK30 object linkers;
and MPLIB™ and MPLAB LIB30 object librarians.
• Emulators – The latest information on Microchip in-circuit emulators.This
includes the MPLAB ICE 2000 and MPLAB ICE 4000.
• In-Circuit Debuggers – The latest information on the Microchip in-circuit
debugger, MPLAB ICD 2.
• MPLAB® IDE – The latest information on Microchip MPLAB IDE, the Windows®
Integrated Development Environment for development systems tools. This list is
focused on the MPLAB IDE, MPLAB SIM simulator, MPLAB IDE Project Manager
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 3
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
and general editing and debugging features.
• Programmers – The latest information on Microchip programmers. These include
the MPLAB PM3 and PRO MATE® II device programmers and the PICSTART®
Plus and PICkit™ 2 development programmers.
CUSTOMER SUPPORT
Users of Microchip products can receive assistance through several channels:
•
•
•
•
Distributor or Representative
Local Sales Office
Field Application Engineer (FAE)
Technical Support
Customers should contact their distributor, representative or field application engineer
(FAE) for support. Local sales offices are also available to help customers. A listing of
sales offices and locations is included in the back of this document.
Technical support is available through the web site at: http://support.microchip.com
DOCUMENT REVISION HISTORY
Revision A (January 2007)
• Initial release of this document.
DS51647B-page 4
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 1. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Overview
1.1
INTRODUCTION
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer development system enables a personal computer (PC)
to communicate with embedded development systems via serial protocols such as
I2C™, SPI, asynchronous and synchronous USART. The PC program uses a graphical
interface to enter data and commands to communicate to the target device. Data and
commands can be entered using basic or scripting commands. The PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer connects to the embedded development system using a 6-pin header.
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer is a sophisticated and highly configurable device. Please
take a few moments to familiarize yourself with the hardware interface and PC program
by reading this user’s guide. Chapter 2. “Getting Started” will guide you through
installing the PC program and running a simple demonstration program on the 28-Pin
Demo Board (DM164120-3) using the I2C serial protocol.
1.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
1.3
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Contents
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Development System
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Hardware
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Software
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER CONTENTS
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer serial communications development system contains the
following items:
1. The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
2. USB cable
3. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer CD-ROM
1.4
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer consists of several components that together make an
embedded serial communications development system. The PC program runs on
Microsoft® Windows® compatible computers with a USB port. The PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer connects to the PC using a USB cable. Finally, the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
interfaces to the target device using a 6-pin header. Figure 1-1 illustrates the PICkit™
Serial Analyzer embedded serial communications development system.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 5
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 1-1:
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM
PC
Target
Device
USB
I2C™
SPI
USART
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
1.5
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER HARDWARE
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer connects to a Microsoft® Windows® compatible computer
using a USB port. It interfaces to the target device using a 6-pin header. Figure 1-2
shows an overview of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer.
FIGURE 1-2:
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
3
2
1
4
6
5
Legend:
DS51647B-page 6
1 – Status LEDs
3 – Lanyard Connection
5 – Pin 1 Marker
2 – Push Button
4 – USB Port Connection 6 – Communications Connector
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Overview
1.5.1
Status LEDs
The Status LEDs indicate the status of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer.
1. Power (green) – Power is applied to the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer by the USB
port.
2. Target (yellow) – The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer is communicating with the target
device.
3. Busy (red) – The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer is communicating with the target
device.
1.5.2
Push Button
The push button is available for future implementation.
1.5.3
Lanyard Connection
To help prevent possible loss of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer, a convenient lanyard
connection is available.
1.5.4
USB Port Connection
The USB Port Connection is a USB mini-B connector. Connect the PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer to the PC using the supplied cable.
1.5.5
Pin 1 Marker
The Pin 1 marker assists in aligning the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer with the target device.
Pin assignments are shown in Figure 1-3.
1.5.6
Communication Connector
The communication connector connects to the target device using an inexpensive
6-pin, 0.100" pitch spacing, 0.025” square pin header. Pin assignments are shown in
Figure 1-3.
FIGURE 1-3:
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin 1 Indicator
Pin Description
I
1
2
3
4
5
6
Note:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
2C™
SPI
USART Microwire LIN
1
—
CS
TX
CS
TX
2
+V
+V
+V
+V
—
3
GND
GND GND
GND
GND
4
SDA
SDI
SDI
CS/Wake
5
SCL
SCK —
SCK
Fault/TXE
6
—
SDO RX
SDO
RX
—
The 6-pin header (0.100" spacing) accepts 0.025" square pins.
DS51647B-page 7
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
1.6
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER SOFTWARE
1.6.1
PC Program
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC program uses a graphical interface to enter data
and commands to communicate to the target device. Data and commands can be
entered using basic or scripting commands. Chapter 3. “PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
PC Program” explains the installation and operation of the program. Following
Chapter 3 there are individual chapters that explain the specific serial
communications modes and their operation.
1.6.2
Dynamically Linked Library (DLL)
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer DLL is explained in Chapter 12. “PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer DLL”.
1.6.3
Firmware
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer firmware is explained in Chapter 11. “PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer Firmware”.
The latest version of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer firmware can be downloaded from the
Microchip Technology web site. The firmware is updated by selecting PICkit Serial
Analyzer > Download PICkit Serial Analyzer Firmware from the menu bar. An open file
window will open. Select the *.hex file to be uploaded to the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer
and click on the Open button. The Firmware Download window will open as shown in
Figure 1-4 to indicate the status of the firmware update.
FIGURE 1-4:
DS51647B-page 8
FIRMWARE DOWNLOAD WINDOW
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 2. Getting Started
2.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter will get you started using the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer with the 28-Pin
Demo Board. In this demo, the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer will communicate with the
28-Pin Demo Board using the I2C serial protocol. The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer will be
the I2C Master and the 28-Pin Demo Board will be the I2C Slave device. The 28-Pin
Demo board is programmed to emulate an I2C real-time clock and Serial EEPROM.
For more information about the 28-Pin Demo Board hardware, see the 28-Pin Demo
Board User’s Guide (DS41301).
For more information about the 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ demo firmware, see
Appendix B. “28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware”.
The demo program source code and *.hex file can be found on the PICkit™ Serial
CD-ROM at D:\28-pin Demo Board\Firmware\.
2.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2.3
Installing the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Software
Connecting the PICkit Serial Analyzer to the PC
Connecting the PICkit Serial Analyzer to the 28-Pin Demo Board
Starting the PICkit Serial Analyzer Program
Running The 28-Pin Demo I2C™ Demonstration Program
I2C Communications – Basic Operations
28-Pin Demo I2C™ Source Code and Firmware
INSTALLING THE PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER SOFTWARE
Insert the PICKit™ Serial Analyzer CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive. In a few moments
the introductory screen should be displayed. Follow the directions on the screen to
install the PICkit Serial Analyzer software.
If the introductory screen does not appear, browse to the CD-ROM directory and select
the AutorunPro.exe program.
Note:
2.4
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer program requires the Microsoft® .NET
Framework Version 2.0. If the .NET Framework is not installed on your
computer (or if in doubt), select the application plus Microsoft® .NET
Framework installation.
CONNECTING THE PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER TO THE PC
Connect the PICkit Serial Analyzer to the PC using the supplied USB cable. There are
no USB drivers to install. The green Power indicator should light indicating that the
PICkit Serial Analyzer is powered.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 9
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
2.5
CONNECTING THE PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER TO THE 28-PIN DEMO
BOARD
Connect the PICkit Serial Analyzer to P3 on the 28-Pin Demo Board as shown in Figure
2-1. The PICkit Serial Analyzer will supply power to the 28-Pin Demo Board and
perform a power on routine:
•
•
•
•
•
•
LEDs will flash in sequence DS1, DS2, DS3, DS4, DS3, DS2, and DS1 twice
All LEDs will turn off
All LEDs will turn on
All LEDs will turn off
LEDs will display in hexadecimal: A, D, C
LEDs will display the top 4 bits of the ADC value read from potentiometer RP1
FIGURE 2-1:
2.6
CONNECTING PICkit™ SERIAL TO THE 28-PIN DEMO
BOARD
STARTING THE PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER PROGRAM
You can start the program by:
• Clicking on the desktop icon, or
• Navigating to Start>All Programs>Microchip>PICkit Serial Analyzer
After a few moments, the program will start and display the main window as shown in
Figure 2-2.
If this is the first time you are running the program, the Configuration Wizard will automatically run. Click on the Next button and accept the default settings for I2C Master
mode. For more information about using the I2C Master mode, see Chapter 4. “I2C™
Master Communications.”
DS51647B-page 10
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Getting Started
FIGURE 2-2:
2.7
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER MAIN WINDOW
RUNNING THE 28-PIN DEMO I2C™ DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM
Select the 28-Pin Demo I2C demonstration by clicking on Demo Boards > 28 Pin Demo
I2C from the menu bar. The 28-Pin Demo I2C demonstration window will be displayed
as shown in Figure 2-3.
The Real-Time Clock (RTC) will be displayed first. Note the tabs to select between the
RTC, EEPROM and ADC demonstrations. The demonstration program will constantly
poll the 28-Pin Demo Board and display the contents of the real-time clock and the
ADC.
2.7.1
Real-Time Clock (RTC)
Clicking on the Real-Time Clock tab will display calendar and clock contents of the
real-time clock function running on the 28-Pin Demo Board. The 28-Pin Demo Board
has been programmed to emulate a stand-alone serial I2C clock-calendar device. The
I2C commands are very similar to the commands used in these devices. The demonstration program will constantly poll the 28-Pin Demo Board and display the contents
of the real-time clock.
The Real-Time Clock window displays calendar and clock controls. Notice the date and
time when the 28-Pin Demo Board has first been powered on. The date and time start
at January 1, 2000 at midnight (12:00 AM).
The user can manually enter calendar and clock values and send the values to the
real-time clock by clicking on the Update RTC button. Or the user can click on the Set
RTC to System Time button to set the real-time clock to the date and time of the
computer.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 11
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 2-3:
2.7.2
28-PIN DEMO I2C™ – RTC
Serial EEPROM (EEPROM)
Clicking on the EEPROM tab will display the 256 byte array of EEPROM memory as
shown in Figure 2-4. The 28-Pin Demo Board has been programmed to emulate a
stand-alone serial I2C EEPROM device such as a 24LC02. The I2C commands are
very similar to the commands used in these devices.
The Serial EEPROM tab displays the contents of a serial EEPROM implemented on
the 28-Pin Demo Board. When this tab is first displayed, the values are grayed out. This
means that the display does not match the contents of the emulated serial EEPROM.
Click on Read EE button and the program will read and display the contents of the
28-Pin Demo Board. Notice that the displayed values are now black.
Individual memory locations can be changed by clicking on the value and typing in a
new value in hexadecimal. Notice that the changed values will be displayed in red. This
means the value has changed but has not been written to the emulated serial
EEPROM. Click on the Write EE button and the values will be written. The color of the
value will turn to black indicating that the value has been written and the display
matches the contents of the emulated serial EEPROM.
DS51647B-page 12
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Getting Started
FIGURE 2-4:
2.7.3
28-PIN DEMO I2C™ – EEPROM
Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
Clicking on the ADC tab will show a meter gauge displaying the value of the ADC as
read from potentiometer RP1 as shown in Figure 2-5.
The meter gauge displays the Most Significant 8 bits of the 10-bit ADC internal to the
PIC® microcontroller. Rotate potentiometer RP1 and the display changes almost
instantaneously. The demonstration program will constantly poll the 28-Pin Demo
Board and display the contents of the ADC.
FIGURE 2-5:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
28-PIN DEMO I2C™ – ADC
DS51647B-page 13
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
2.8
I2C™ COMMUNICATIONS – BASIC OPERATIONS
Individual I2C commands and data can be read and written to the 28-Pin Demo Board
from the Basic Operations window as shown in Figure 2-6. Ensure that the PICkit Serial
Analyzer program is in I2C Master mode by selecting PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard from the menu bar and selecting I2C Master.
Note:
The 28-Pin Demo I2C window and the Basic Operations window cannot be
opened at the same time. When the 28-Pin Demo I2C window is opened,
the Basic Operations window will automatically close.
FIGURE 2-6:
2.8.1
I2C™ BASIC OPERATIONS
Real-Time Clock (RTC)
The Slave address for the emulated real-time clock on the 28-Pin Demo Board is
hexadecimal A2 (0xA2). The Word Address selects the following memory locations:
TABLE 2-1:
DS51647B-page 14
MEMORY LOCATIONS
Word Address
Contents
0x00
Configuration 1
0x01
Configuration 2
0x02
Seconds
0x03
Minutes
0x04
Hours
0x05
Days
0x06
Weekdays
0x07
Months
0x08
Years
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Getting Started
For example, to read seconds from the real-time clock:
Step 1 – Enter 0xA2 into the Slave Address[W] block in the Read section of the Basic
Operations window (lower third of window)
Step 2 – Enter 0x02 into the Word Address block
Step 3 – Note that the Slave Address[R] has already been entered for you (the Read
bit is set).
Step 4 – Enter 0x01 into the Byte Count block
Step 5 – Click on the Execute button
The I2C combination command (Write then Read) will be sent to the 28-Pin Demo
Board. The command and the contents of Word Address 0x02 (seconds) will be
displayed in the transaction window as shown in Figure 2-7.
FIGURE 2-7:
2.8.2
RTC TRANSACTIONS DEMO
EEPROM
The Slave address for the emulated Serial EEPROM on the 28-Pin Demo Board is
hexadecimal A8 (0xA8). The Word Address selects one of 256 8-bit memory locations:
TABLE 2-2:
WORD ADDRESS CONTENTS
Word Address
Contents
0x00
Memory Contents
…
…
0xFF
Memory Contents
2.8.3
ADC
The Slave address for the ADC on the 28-Pin Demo Board is hexadecimal AA (0xAA).
The Word Address 0x01 selects the memory location containing the Most Significant 8
bits of the 10-bit ADC of the PIC microcontroller.
2.9
28-PIN DEMO I2C™ SOURCE CODE AND FIRMWARE
The demo program source code and *.hex file can be found on the PICkit Serial
CD-ROM at D:\28-pin Demo Board\Firmware\.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 15
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
NOTES:
DS51647B-page 16
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 3. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
3.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter covers the installation, starting and high level operations of the PICkit
Serial Analyzer program. Detailed information about the entering of data and commands for specific serial communications modes are given in the following chapters.
3.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
3.3
Installing The PICkit Serial Analyzer Software
Starting the Program
Configuration Wizard
Main Window
Specific Communications Modes
INSTALLING THE PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER SOFTWARE
Insert the PICKit Serial Analyzer CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive. In a few moments
the introductory screen should be displayed. Follow the directions on the screen to
install the PICkit Serial Analyzer software.
If the introductory screen does not appear, browse to the CD-ROM directory and select
the AutorunPro.exe program.
Note:
3.4
The PICkit Serial Analyzer program requires the Microsoft® .NET
Framework Version 2.0.
STARTING THE PROGRAM
You can start the program by
• Clicking on the desktop icon, or
• Navigating to Start>All Programs>Microchip>PICkit Serial Analyzer
After a few moments, the program will start and display the main window as shown in
Figure 3-1.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 17
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 3-1:
3.5
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER MAIN WINDOW
CONFIGURATION WIZARD
If it is the first time that the PICkit Serial Analyzer program is run, the Configuration Wizard will run automatically. The Configuration Wizard can be manually invoked by selecting PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard from the menu bar.
The Configuration Wizard will guide you through the basic steps to configure the PICkit
Serial Analyzer program for a specific communications mode (I2C Master, I2C Slave,
SPI, USART, LIN, Microwire).
Advanced configuration can be done from the Configuration Window by selecting PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode from the menu bar.
As an example, Figure 3-2 through Figure 3-7 show how to configure for I2C Master
mode. Refer to the specific communications chapter for detailed information on the
Configuration Wizard for that communications mode.
The Configuration Wizard Welcome window is shown in Figure 3-2. You may choose
to continue by clicking on the Next button or canceling the wizard by clicking on the
Cancel button.
DS51647B-page 18
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
FIGURE 3-2:
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – WELCOME
The Configuration Wizard Page 1 of 4, as shown in Figure 3-3, displays the available
communications modes and allows you to choose one of the modes.
FIGURE 3-3:
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – PAGE 1 OF 4
In this example, I2C Master Communication’s mode is selected. The Configuration
Wizard Page 2 of 4, as shown in Figure 3-4, allows you to select the bus speed. A more
comprehensive list of bus speeds can be chosen from the Configuration Window by
selecting PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode from the menu bar.
FIGURE 3-4:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – PAGE 2 OF 4
DS51647B-page 19
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
The I2C bus requires pull-up resistors. The PICkit Serial Analyzer has the ability to
enable internal 2.2 kΩ pull-up resistors. If the target device does not have pull-up resistors installed, then enable pull-ups by selecting the Yes radio button as shown in
Figure 3-5. If the target device has the pull-up resistors installed, you can disable the
internal pull-ups by selecting the No radio button.
FIGURE 3-5:
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – PAGE 3 OF 4
The PICkit Serial Analyzer can power the target device from 0 to 5 VDC at a combined
total current limit of 100 mA (PICkit Serial Analyzer plus target device). The Configuration Wizard Page 4 of 4, as shown in Figure 3-6, allows you to choose between
powering the target device and selecting the specific target voltage.
CAUTION
Even though the voltage can be set as low as 0 VDC, it is up to the user to verify the
required operating voltage of the target device.
CAUTION
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target plus PICkit Serial Analyzer
exceeds this current limit, the USB port will turn off. The target may be powered
externally if more power is required.
FIGURE 3-6:
DS51647B-page 20
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – PAGE 4 OF 4
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
Once all pages of the Configuration Wizard are completed, you can choose to not
display the wizard at start up by checking the Do not show this wizard on start-up again
check box.
FIGURE 3-7:
3.6
CONFIGURATION WIZARD – YOU’RE DONE!
MAIN WINDOW
3.6.1
Menu Bar
The menu bar selects various functions of the PICkit Serial Analyzer program. A
summary of the functions are:
FIGURE 3-8:
MENU BAR
COMMUNICATIONS
The Communications menu selections display operation windows to enter data and
commands to communicate with the target device.
• Basic Operations – Displays the Basic Operations window for the communications
mode selected (see PICkit Serial Analyzer -> Select Communications Mode)
• Script >
- Script Builder – Displays the Script Builder window
- Script Execute – Displays the Script Execute window
• I2C Slave Profile – Displays the I2C Slave Profile Generator (Enabled only in I2C
Slave mode)
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 21
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
The PICkit Serial Analyzer menu selection commands the PICkit Serial Analyzer
hardware.
• Select Communications Mode >
- I2C Master – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in I2C Master Communications
mode
- SPI Master – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in SPI Master Communications
mode
- USART Asynchronous – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in USART Asynchronous Communications mode
- USART Synchronous Master – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in USART
Synchronous Master Communications mode
- I2C Slave – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in I2C Slave Communications
mode
- LIN – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in LIN Communications mode
- Microwire – Puts the PICkit Serial Analyzer in Microwire Communications
mode
• Configure Communications Mode – Displays the Configuration Communications
Mode window for the communications mode selected (see PICkit Serial Analyzer
-> Select Communications Mode)
• Download PICkit Serial Analyzer Firmware – Displays the Firmware Download
window. Firmware updates are available from the Microchip Technology web site.
• Run Configuration Wizard – Displays the Configuration Wizard
• Perform System Reset – Closes and then reinitializes USB communications to the
PICkit Serial Analyzer
• Reset PICkit Serial Analyzer – Resets the PICkit Serial Analyzer if an error
condition is present
• PICkit Serial Analyzer No. – Up to four PICkit Serial Analyzers can be controlled
from the PC software. The number is assigned to the hardware as it enumerates
on the USB bus.
DEMO BOARDS
The Demo Boards menu selection displays the selected demonstration window. The
PICkit Serial Analyzer program will be automatically configured for the communications
mode of the selected demonstration.
• 28-Pin Demo I2C – Displays the 28-Pin Demo Board I2C demo graphical user
interface. For more information see Appendix B. “28-Pin Demo Board I2C™
Firmware.”
USER DEFINED TEMPLATES
• Display Template – Displays the User Defined Template window
• My Templates – Selects and displays template windows created by the user
VIEW
• Basic – The PICkit Serial Analyzer program will display basic commands and
status view
• Advanced – The PICkit Serial Analyzer program will display advanced commands
and status view
WINDOW
• New Transaction Window – Opens new or additional transaction window. Multiple
DS51647B-page 22
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
•
•
•
•
transaction windows can be opened as needed for logging communications.
Close All – Closes all windows
Cascade – Cascade windows
Tile Horizontally – Tile windows horizontally
Tile Vertically – Tile windows vertically
HELP
• About – Displays program version information
• Show PICkit Serial Analyzer Connections – Displays pinout for current
communications mode
• Show Event Bytes – Displays Event Marker code for current communication mode
• User’s Guide – Displays the PICkit Serial User’s Guide
3.6.2
Tool Bar
FIGURE 3-9:
TOOL BAR
The Tool Bar gives quick access to often used commands. These commands are also
available from the Menu Bar.
•
•
•
•
View: Basic/Advanced – toggles between Basic and Advanced views
Flash LED – Flashes the Red Busy LED to confirm communications
Reset – Resets the PICkit Serial Analyzer if an error condition is present
Basic Operations – Displays the Basic Operations window for the communications
mode selected
• Configure – (Advanced View Only) – Displays the configuration window for the
communications mode selected
3.6.3
Status Column
The Status Column displays status information for the selected serial communications
mode. In Basic View mode, a simplified status is displayed as shown in Figure 3-10. In
Advanced View mode additional status information is displayed for the communications
mode selected as shown in Figure 3-11.
The status information that is displayed depends on the selected communications
mode (I2C, SPI, USART, etc.). The following chapters give more detailed explanation
of the status window for the particular serial communications mode.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 23
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 3-10:
STATUS COLUMN (BASIC VIEW)
FIGURE 3-11:
STATUS COLUMN (ADVANCED VIEW)
3.6.4
Transactions Window
The Transactions window, shown in Figure 3-12, keeps a running log of the commands
and data that are communicated between the PICkit Serial Analyzer program and
target device.
From the menu bar on the Transaction window, the contents can be saved (File>Save)
to a *.txt or *.rtf file. The file can later be retrieved (File>Open) and displayed in the
Transactions window.
DS51647B-page 24
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer PC Program
Additional Transactions windows can be displayed. From the PICkit Serial Analyzer
menu bar, select Window > New Transaction Window. The active Transactions window
will log the current commands and data.
FIGURE 3-12:
TRANSACTIONS WINDOW
FILE
• Open – Opens a *.txt or *.rtf file and displays it in the Transactions window
• Save – Saves the contents of the Transactions window to a *.txt or *.rtf file
• Close – Closes the selected Transactions window
EDIT
• Copy – The selected contents of the Transactions window will be copied to the
clipboard
• Paste – The contents of the clipboard will be pasted into the Transactions window
• Select All – contents of the Transactions window will be selected
• Clear All – The contents of the Transactions window will be cleared
The Transaction window also allows usage of the common keyboard shortcuts Ctrl-X,
Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V to cut, copy and paste from the clipboard.
CLEAR – The contents of the Transactions window will be cleared
RESET TIME – Resets the PICkit Serial clock – applicable only if Time Markers are
enabled on the Configuration page.
3.7
SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS MODES
Detailed information about the entering of data and commands for specific serial
communications modes are given in the following chapters.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 25
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
NOTES:
DS51647B-page 26
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 4. I2C™ Master Communications
4.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the I2C Master Communications mode. I2C data and
commands can be entered using a Basic Communications window or by creating Script
Commands.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the I2C protocol. For more information see:
• The I2C-Bus Specification Version 2.1 January 2000 is available from NXP
Semiconductor (formerly Philips Semiconductor) web site at
http://www.nxp.com/acrobat_download/literature/9398/39340011.pdf
• An I2C Master Communications tutorial is available on the Microchip Technology
web site. Click on the links: Support -> Getting Started -> PIC MCU Tutorials ->
I2C Master Mode
• Several application notes are available on the Microchip Technology web site.
Click on links: Design -> App Notes -> Function: Communicat ions -> I2C
4.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
4.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configuring I2C Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
Script Builder
Script Execute
PICkit SERIAL PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for I2C Master mode are:
TABLE 4-1:
4.4
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
Description
1
AUX1
Input/Output
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 1
2
+V
Power
Target Power
3
GND
Power
Ground
4
SDA
Input/Output
Serial Data
5
SCL
Power
Serial Clock
6
AUX2
Input/Output
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 2
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The I2C Master Communications mode is selected from the Configuration Wizard or
menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 27
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > I2C
Master
4.5
CONFIGURING I2C COMMUNICATIONS MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the View selected, the Basic
View (Figures 4-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. In the
Advanced View (Figures 4-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 4-1:
I2C™ CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
• Enable Pull-ups – Enable internal 2.2 kΩ pull-ups on SDA and SCL communication lines
VOLTAGE
• PICkit Serial will power my device – Select the check box if the PICkit Serial will
power the target device. The target can be powered at 5 VDC or a user selectable
variable voltage.
CAUTION
Even though the voltage can be set as low as 0 VDC, it is up to the user to verify the
required operating voltage of the target device.
CAUTION
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target plus PICkit Serial Analyzer
exceeds this current limit, the USB port will turn off. The target may be powered
externally if more power is required.
DS51647B-page 28
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Master Communications
2
COMM I CM BIT RATE
Select the desired I2C bus bit rate using the drop down box.
FIGURE 4-2:
I2C™ CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – ADVANCED
VIEW
SCRIPT TIMEOUT
When sending scripts, the software will wait a maximum of Script Timeout ms to receive
a script complete tag before issuing an error. If your I2C hardware is slow to respond
or you are transferring a lot of data, you may need to increase the Script Timeout to
avoid errors.
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Start Bit – Enable event marker – Start bit
Stop Bit – Enable event marker – Stop bit
Restart Bit – Enable event marker – Restart bit
Ack/Nack TX – Enable event marker – Ack or Nack byte transmit
Ack/Nack RX – Enable event marker – Ack or Nack byte received
Write Byte – Enable event marker – write byte
Read Byte – Enable event marker – read byte
TX Error – Enable event marker – TX error
Status Error – Enable event marker – change in I2C status byte
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 29
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
•
•
•
•
4.6
- Switch Off (not depressed) – blink LED1, LED2 off
- Switch ON (depressed) – blink LED2, LED1 off
AUX1 Default State – AUX1 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
AUX2 Default State – AUX2 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
AUX1 Direction – AUX1 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
AUX2 Direction – AUX2 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The I2C Basic Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Communications: Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The I2C Basic Operations window is shown in Figures 4-3. There are three basic
communications commands, Read and Write and Receive.
Read performs a combination Write then Read commands to the target device (refer to
the I2C Specification reference in Section 4.1 “Introduction” above). The basic
structure of the command is:
• Start bit (S_)
• Slave Address[W] – Enter the slave address of the device to communicate with.
The write bit should be cleared to indicate a write operation
• Word Address – Enter the word address
• Restart (RS),
• Slave Address[R] – The slave address with the write bit set will be automatically
entered when the Slave Address[W] has been entered
• Byte Count – Enter the number of bytes to be read
• Stop bit (P_)
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
Write performs a write operation to the target device (refer to The I2C Specification
reference in Section 4.1 “Introduction” above). The basic structure of the command
is:
• Start bit (S_)
• Slave Address[W] – Enter the slave address of the device to communicate with.
The write bit should be cleared to indicate a write operation.
• Word Address – Enter the word address
• Data – Enter up to eight bytes of data
• Stop bit (P_)
The command will be logged in the Transactions window. A listing of the command
abbreviations is given in Table 4-2.
Receive issues a simple read command to the target device (refer to The I2C Specification reference in Section 4.1 “Introduction” above). The basic structure of the command is:
• Start bit (S_)
• Slave Address[W] – Enter the slave address of the device to communicate with.
The write bit should be set to indicate a read operation.
• Byte Count – Enter the number of bytes to receive
• Stop bit (P_)
DS51647B-page 30
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Master Communications
FIGURE 4-3:
4.7
I2C™ BASIC OPERATIONS
SCRIPT BUILDER
I2C commands can be combined into scripts, saved, and used over again. The Script
Builder window is opened by selecting Communications > Script > Script Builder from
the menu bar. The Script Builder is shown in Figures 4-4.
The Script Builder window is divided into four columns as shown in Figures 4-4 through
4-8.
FIGURE 4-4:
4.7.1
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER
Script Commands
The left most column contains the Script Commands as shown in Figures 4-5.
• Script Name – Enter the name of the script
• Save Script – Saves the script
• Execute Script – Executes (performs) the script displayed in the Script Detail
column
• Clear Script – Clears the Script Detail column
• Del User Scripts – Deletes scripts from the User Scripts column.
• Show Array – Displays a spreadsheet-like table in which large amounts of data
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 31
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
may be entered. This data can be included in the script by right clicking in a Script
Detail cell and choosing “Insert Array”.
FIGURE 4-5:
4.7.2
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT COMMANDS
Script Commands
Example Scripts
The second column contains Example Scripts as shown in Figures 4-6. These can be
studied to learn how to create or to edit custom scripts. To load the example script into
the Script Detail column, either double click or right click and select from the local
menu.
FIGURE 4-6:
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER – EXAMPLE SCRIPTS
Example Scripts
4.7.3
Script Detail
The third column contains Script Detail as shown in Figures 4-7. This column is used
to create the script or view an existing script. More information about creating a custom
script is discussed in Section 4.7.5 “Creating A Script”.
DS51647B-page 32
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Master Communications
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
FIGURE 4-7:
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT DETAIL
Script Detail
4.7.4
User Scripts
The fourth column contains User Scripts as shown in Figures 4-8. User scripts that are
created, named, and saved are displayed in the User Scripts column.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
User Scripts can be deleted by right clicking and selecting Delete Script from the local
menu.
FIGURE 4-8:
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER – USER SCRIPTS
User Scripts
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 33
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
4.7.5
Creating A Script
Scripts are created by placing the cursor into the Script Detail column and right clicking.
A local menu will be displayed as shown in Figures 4-9. Select from the choice of
commands or script macro commands.
The sequence of macro commands are executed from top to bottom. Macro commands
are entered by right clicking in the box and selecting from the local menu as shown in
Figures 4-9.
Macro commands are entered according to the sequence of events as defined by the
I2C bus protocol. Studying the example scripts is a good way to learn the sequence of
events. The example scripts can also be modified and saved under a different name.
CAUTION
The choice of macro commands is very flexible. Therefore, the correctness of the
script has to be verified by the user. The PICkit Serial Analyzer program does not
verify the correctness of the script.
A complete listing of the available macro commands is given in Table 4-2. The macro
command abbreviation will be displayed in the Transactions Window. The Transactions
window keeps a running log of the commands and data sent to and from the target
device.
I2C™ SCRIPT BUILDER – CREATING A SCRIPT
FIGURE 4-9:
TABLE 4-2:
I2C™ SCRIPT MACRO COMMAND
Macro Command
DS51647B-page 34
Command
Abbreviation
Description
I2CINIT
[I_]
I2C™ Initialization
I2CSTART
[S_]
I2C™ Start
I2CSTOP
[P_]
I2C™ Stop
I2CRESTART
[RS]
I2C™ Restart
I2CWRTBYT
[W_]
I2C™ Write Bytes. Next byte is the byte count,
followed by the data.
I2CRDBYT
[R_]
I2C™ Read Bytes. Next byte is the byte count.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Master Communications
TABLE 4-2:
4.8
I2C™ SCRIPT MACRO COMMAND (CONTINUED)
I2CRDBLK
[RB]
I2C™ Read Block
I2CBITRATE
[BR]
Set I2C™ Bit Rate - min:0 = 35k, max:127 = 100k.
Next byte is the bit rate.
I2CRESET
[RE]
Reset MSSP module
I2CRDBYTNLB
[RN]
Read bytes - NACK last byte. Next byte is the byte
count
I2CRDBLKNLB
[RBN]
Read block - NACK last byte
I2CAUX1RST
[A1RST]
Reset AUX1
I2CAUX1SET
[A1RST]
Set AUX1
I2CAUX1OUT
[A1OUT]
Set AUX1 direction to Output
I2CAUX1IN
[A1IN]
Set AUX1 direction to Input
I2CAUX1W0
[A1W0]
AUX1 Wait 0
I2CAUX1W1
[A1W1]
AUX1 Wait 1
I2CAUX2RST
[A2RST]
Reset AUX2
I2CAUX2SET
[A2RST]
Set AUX2
I2CAUX2OUT
[A2OUT]
Set AUX2 direction to Output
I2CAUX2IN
[A2IN]
Set AUX2 direction to Input
I2CAUX2W0
[A2W0]
AUX2 Wait 0
I2CAUX2W1
[A2W1]
AUX2 Wait 1
SCRIPT EXECUTE
The Script Execute window is shown in Figures 4-10. Once scripts are created using
the Script Builder, they can be assigned to buttons in the Script Execute window. This
makes a convenient window to execute multiple scripts either individually or iteratively.
Script executing will be logged in the Transactions window. The Script Execute window
is opened by selecting Communications > Script > Script Execute from the menu bar.
FIGURE 4-10:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ SCRIPT EXECUTE
DS51647B-page 35
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
4.8.1
Assignable Buttons
User created scripts will be displayed in the central I2C Scripts column. To assign a
script to a button, click on the script name and drag it to the desired Assignable Buttons
in the right column. The script will be executed once each time the button is clicked.
The Assignable Buttons can be cleared by clicking on the Clear Buttons button.
4.8.2
Iteration
Scripts can be executed a user defined number of times at a specified interval of time.
Figures 4-11 shows an example. A script named Read_Memory has been assigned to
the Iteration button in the left column. The number of iterations are entered in the
Iterations box and the delay in millisecond in the Delay box. A summary of the iterations
is displayed in the left column. The macro is executed when the Iteration button is
clicked.
FIGURE 4-11:
DS51647B-page 36
I2C™ SCRIPT EXECUTE – EXAMPLE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 5. I2C™ Slave Communications
5.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes I2C Slave Communications. The I2C Slave mode allows you to
mimic an I2C slave by responding to standard Read, Write, and Receive commands.
You can mimic an I2C slave device from either the PICkit Serial Analyzer PC interface
(Interactive mode), or from the PICkit Serial Analyzer itself (Auto mode).
Additionally, you can run the Interactive mode from either the Basic Communications
page, or from the I2C Slave Profile page.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the I2C protocol. For more information see:
• The I2C-Bus Specification Version 2.1 January 2000 is available from NXP
Semiconductor (formerly Philips Semiconductor) web site at
http://www.nxp.com/acrobat_download/literature/9398/39340011.pdf
• An I2C Master Communications tutorial is available on the Microchip Technology
web site. Click on the links: Support -> Getting Started -> PIC MCU Tutorials ->I2C
Master Mode
• Several application notes are available on the Microchip Technology web site.
Click on links: Design -> App Notes -> Function: Communications -> I2C
5.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
5.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configuring I2C Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
I2C Profile Generator
PICkit SERIAL PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for I2C Slave mode are listed in the
following table:
TABLE 5-1:
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
Description
1
Unused
–
–
2
+V
Power
Target Power
3
GND
Power
Ground
4
SDA
Input/Output
Serial Data
5
SCL
Power
Serial Clock
6
Unused
–
–
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 37
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
5.4
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The I2C Master Communications mode is selected from the Configuration Wizard or
menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > I2C Slave
5.5
CONFIGURING I2C SLAVE COMMUNICATIONS MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the View selected, the Basic
View (Figure 5-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. The
Advanced View (Figure 5-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 5-1:
I2C™ SLAVE CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE –
BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
• Enable Pull-ups – Enable internal 2.2 kΩ pull-ups on SDA and SCL
communication lines
VOLTAGE
• PICkit Serial will power my device – Select the check box if the PICkit Serial will power
the target device. The target can be powered at 5 VDC or a user selectable variable
voltage.
DS51647B-page 38
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Slave Communications
I2C SLAVE MODE
There are three modes of I2C slave operation:
• DEFAULT: Basic/mechanical mode of operation in which the PKSA blindly
accepts any/all ‘write’ data and provides canned/default ‘read’ data in response to
any enabled I2C address and all device addresses.
• INTERACTIVE: This mode allows the host to orchestrate I2C transactions in ‘real
time’. This necessarily requires the host to provide ‘read’ and ‘receive’ data as
needed while the PKSA holds the I2C bus clock line (waiting). ‘Write’ data is
reported to the host via transaction event tags.
• AUTO: In AUTO mode the PKSA operates autonomously as defined by a
dynamic “SLAVE PROFILE” table stored in PKSA RAM. At any time the host can
read and/or update the table as needed.
SCRIPT TIMEOUT
When the slave responds to Read and Receive queries the software will wait a maximum of Script Timeout ms to receive a script complete tag before issuing an error. If
your slave profile is responding with large amounts of data, you may need to increase
the Script Timeout to avoid errors.
FIGURE 5-2:
I2C™ SLAVE CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE –
ADVANCED VIEW
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
Addr RX – Enable event marker – Slave address received
Data RX – Enable event marker – Data received
Data TX – Enable event marker – Data transmitted
Ack RX – Enable event marker – Ack byte received
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 39
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
•
•
•
•
•
•
Nack RX – Enable event marker – Nack byte received
Reg Read – Enable event marker – Register Read
Reg Write – Enable event marker – Register Write
Status Error – Enable event marker – change in I2C status byte
Stop – Enable event marker – I2C Stop
Data RQ – Enable event marker – Data request
Note:
Disabling any of the event markers may cause the software to not respond
correctly, or at all.
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
DEFAULT MODE READ DATA
• Sets byte 0 and following byte response for Default mode
SLAVE ADDRESS / MASK
• Sets the I2C slave address to which the PICkit Serial Analyzer will respond
Note:
DS51647B-page 40
The Address Mask is not currently implemented due to hardware
limitations. It is left in the software for possible future use.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Slave Communications
5.6
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The I2C Slave Basic Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The I2C Slave Basic Operations window is shown in Figures 5-3. There are three basic
communications commands, Receive, Write and Read.
FIGURE 5-3:
I2C™ SLAVE – BASIC OPERATIONS
Receive responds to a basic Receive request from the master. In Return Byte Count,
enter the number of bytes a Receive request will respond with, then enter the data to
be returned in the Data array. The Basic page limits you to eight bytes of returned data.
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
Write simply displays the byte count and data written by the master.
Read responds to a basic Read request by the master. In Return Byte Count, enter the
number of bytes a Read request will respond with, then enter the data to be returned
in the Data array. The Basic page limits you to eight bytes of returned data.
Byte Count will display the number of bytes between the slave read address and the
slave write address. Data will display the data between the slave read address and the
slave write address.
PICkit Serial Slave Address set the slave address here you wish the software to
respond to, then press the Apply button. A confirmation message should appear on
the Transactions window.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 41
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Show Profile Generator. Press this to close the Basic operations page and open the
I2C Slave Profile Generator page.
Note:
5.7
The Basic operations page and the Profile Generator page cannot both be
opened at the same time due to dll conflict issues.
COMMUNICATIONS: PROFILE GENERATOR
The I2C Slave Profile Generator allows you to mimic an I2C slave device from either
the PICkit Serial Analyzer PC interface, or from the PICkit Serial Analyzer itself. The
trade off between the two methods is flexibility vs. response time. Mimicking a device
from the PC allows for a great deal of run time flexibility, while running from the PICkit
Serial Analyzer decreases response time. You can mimic up to eight registers in a
profile.
DISPLAYING THE I2C SLAVE PROFILE GENERATOR
The profile generator may be opened by either pressing the ‘Show Profile Generator’
button on the I2CS Basic Operations page, or by the menu item Communications > I2C
Slave Profile Generator. Figure 5-4 shows the Slave Profile Generator with the first two
registers activated.
FIGURE 5-4:
I2C™ SLAVE PROFILE GENERATOR
CREATING A PROFILE
Create a profile by filling in Inputs for each register:
• Active – Allows you to activate or deactivate a register. This must be active before
you can fill in the rest of the data. The purpose of this checkbox is to allow run
time activation or deactivation of a register.
• Comm – Flashes when the register is activated (read from or written to).
• Slave Address – Hex representation of the register’s slave address.
• Register Name – Enter a register name. This is for reference only and does not
affect operation.
• Word Address – Hex representation of the word address of the register (will be
forced to zero if Memory Block is selected.
• Enable Read – Determines whether or not the register is read accessible.
• Enable Write – Determines whether or not the register is write accessible.
DS51647B-page 42
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
I2C™ Slave Communications
• Memory Block – Check if the register is to be treated as a contiguous block of
memory, such as an EE array.
• Data Size – Number of bytes in the register. If the register is not a Memory Block,
this many bytes will be returned when the register is read. If the register is a
Memory Block, the profile generator will return one byte at a time until it is
Nacked.
• Data – Stores the data belonging to the register (Hex format)
• Use Large Data Array – If the data in the register is larger than 8 bytes, press this
button to display a 256 byte array into which you may enter data.
Once the parameters are entered, they can be saved as an I2C Slave Profile file (*.pfl).
• File->Open – Open an existing profile (*.pfl)
• File->Save – Save or replace a profile (*.pfl)
• Clear All – Resets (clears) all registers
PICkit SERIAL SLAVE ADDRESS
In the groupbox ‘PICkit Serial Analyzer Slave Address’ enter the hex representation of
the slave address you want the PICkit Serial Analyzer to respond to, then press the
‘Apply’ button. This writes the address into the Analyzer firmware.
MODE
If you wish to run the slave profile from the PC (GUI) there is nothing more to do. If you
wish to run it from the PICkit Serial Analyzer, press the appropriate radio button in the
‘Mode’ groupbox.
Note:
If you are running the profile from the PICkit Serial Analyzer and you wish
to change the profile, you must press the ‘Apply Profile’ button to load the
changes into the firmware.
Note:
When running the profile from the PICkit Serial Analyzer instead of the PC,
you are limited to 255 data and configuration bytes (profile length). If you
attempt to write too large of a profile to the PICkit Serial Analyzer, an error
message will be sent to the Transactions window telling you your profile
length.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 43
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 6. Lin Communications
6.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the LIN Communications mode. LIN data and commands can
be entered using a Basic Communications window.
To use LIN communications, you must attach the LIN Adapter to the PICkit Serial
Analyzer and supply it power prior to attempting any communications.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the LIN protocol. For more information see:
LIN bus Specification Ver. 1.2: http://www.lin-subbus.de/
6.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
6.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configuring LIN Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
PICkit SERIAL PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for LIN mode are:
TABLE 6-1:
6.4
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
Description
1
TX
Output
Transmit
2
Unused
–
–
3
GND
Power
Ground
4
CS/Wake
Input
Chip Select / Wake
5
Fault/TXE
Input/Output
Fault / TXE
6
RX
Input
Receive
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The LIN Communications mode is selected from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > LIN
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 44
Lin Communications
6.5
CONFIGURING LIN SLAVE COMMUNICATIONS MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the
Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the View selected, the Basic
View (Figure 6-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. In the
Advanced View (Figure 6-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 6-1:
LIN CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
LIN BAUD
Enter desired baud rate here. You are limited to a range of 1000 to 20000.
SCRIPT TIMEOUT
When transmitting frames, the software will wait a maximum of Script Timeout ms to
receive a script complete tag before issuing an error. If your LIN hardware is slow to
respond, you may need to increase the Script Timeout to avoid errors.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 45
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 6-2:
LIN CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – ADVANCED
VIEW
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
Data RX – Enable event marker – Data received
Data TX – Enable event marker – Data transmitted
Break TX – Enable event marker – Break transmitted
Break RX – Enable event marker – Break Received
Auto Baud – Enable event marker – Automatic Baud Rate Selection
Status Error – Enable event marker – change in LIN status byte
Note:
Disabling any of the event markers may cause the software to not respond
correctly, or at all.
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
• Chip Select Hi – Sets LIN Adapter Chip Select Hi
• Receive Enable – Enables f/w to receive data
• Auto Baud Detect/Set – Enables Auto Baud detections and setting
DS51647B-page 46
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Lin Communications
6.6
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The LIN Basic Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The LIN Basic Operations window is shown in Figure 6-3.
FIGURE 6-3:
LIN BASIC OPERATIONS
Display Mode: Determines when OnReceive data is displayed. Listen will display
when the completed frame is different than the last frame, Transmit will not display
data, and Display All will display all OnReceive data.
Output Window: Toggles between displaying data on the Transactions window and a
specialized LIN display.
BAUD: Allows the user to get and set the baud rate.
Checksum Type: Toggles between Classic, Enhanced or no checksum.
Commands: Reset Frame Buffer forces a manual reset of the working frame in the
DLL. Reset Timestamp forces the next frame to be received to start at time 0.0
seconds.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 47
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Transmit. Allows the user to transmit a frame. Enter the MasterID, and frame data if
any. The checksum is automatically calculated. Press the Execute button to transmit
the frame. The Clear button will clear the contents of the MasterID and the data
textboxes.
Note:
DS51647B-page 48
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 7. SPI and Microwire Master Communications
7.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the SPI and Microwire Master Communications mode. Microwire is a subset of the SPI protocol. Data and commands can be entered using a Basic
Communications window or by creating Script Commands.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the SPI protocol. For more information see:
An SPI tutorial is available on the Microchip Technology web site. Click on the links:
Support -> Getting Started -> PIC MCU Tutorials -> SPI - PICmicro Serial Peripheral
Interface
Several application notes are available on the Microchip Technology web site. Click on
links: Design -> App Notes -> Function: Communications -> SPI
7.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
7.3
PICkit Serial Analyzer Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configurating SPI Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
Script Builder
Script Execute
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for SPI Master mode are:
TABLE 7-1:
7.4
PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
Description
1
CS
Output
Chip Select (Active Low)
2
+V
Power
Target Power
3
GND
Power
Ground
4
SDI
Input
5
SCK
Output
Serial Clock
6
SDO
Output
Serial Data Out (with respect to the
PICkit Serial Analyzer)
Serial Data In (with respect to the
PICkit Serial Analyzer)
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The SPI Master Communications mode is selected from the Configuration Wizard or
menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 49
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > SPI
Master
7.5
CONFIGURATING SPI COMMUNICATIONS MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the View selected, the Basic
View (Figure 7-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. In the
Advanced View (Figure 7-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 7-1:
SPI CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
VOLTAGE
• PICkit Serial will power my device – Select the check box if the PICkit Serial will
power the target device. The target can be powered at 5 VDC or a user selectable
variable voltage.
CAUTION
Even though the voltage can be set as low as 0 VDC, it is up to the user to verify the
required operating voltage of the target device.
CAUTION
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target plus PICkit Serial Analyzer
exceeds this current limit, the USB port will turn off. The target may be powered
externally if more power is required.
DS51647B-page 50
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
SPI BIT RATE
Select the desired SPI bit rate by selecting the radio button for the desired range and
then selecting the bit rate using the slider.
FIGURE 7-2:
SPI CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS MODE – ADVANCED
VIEW
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
Write Byte – Enable event marker – write byte
Read Byte – Enable event marker – read byte
Status Err – Enable event marker – change in SPI status byte
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
- Switch Off (not depressed) – blink LED1, LED2 off
- Switch ON (depressed) – blink LED2, LED1 off
• Sample Phase – SPI transaction configuration: Sample phase
• Clock Edge Select – SPI transaction configuration: Clock Edge
• Clock Polarity – SPI transaction configuration: Clock Polarity
• Auto Output Disable – Disables output during input. Allows the SDI lines and the
SDO lines to be shorted for 3-wire communication.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 51
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
7.6
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The SPI Basic Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Communications: Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The SPI Basic Operations window is shown in Figure 7-3. The Basic Operations window is organized into five columns. Individual columns are enabled by clicking on the
Enable check box.
The Send button indicates that the column boxes are used to enter data bytes that will
be transmitted to the target device. Clicking on the Send button toggles the column
mode to Rcv (Receive) and the number of received bytes is entered as shown in
Figure 7-4.
Clicking on the Execute button will execute the enabled columns in order from left to
right.
The Clear button clears all boxes.
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
The commands will be logged in the Transactions window. A listing of the command
abbreviations is given in Table 7-2.
FIGURE 7-3:
DS51647B-page 52
SPI BASIC OPERATIONS
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
FIGURE 7-4:
7.6.1
SPI BASIC OPERATIONS
Basic Communications – Serial EEPROM Example
Figures 7-5 through 7-7 demonstrates how to communicate with a 25LC020A SPI
serial EEPROM. Refer to the 25LC020A Data Sheet (DS21833) for a detailed
explanation of its SPI communications.
Before data can be written to the 25LC020A, the write enable (WREN) latch must be
set. This requires that CS be enabled, command 0x06 transmitted, and CS disabled.
Figure 7-5 shows only Group 0 enabled. All other groups are disabled. Clicking on the
Execute button will transmit only the WREN command. The command will be logged
in the Transactions window.
FIGURE 7-5:
SEEPROM EXAMPLE – WREN COMMAND
Once the WREN latch has been enabled, data can be written to the 25LC020A.
Figure 7-6 shows that Group 0 has been disabled, and Group 1 enabled. Clicking on
the Execute button will send the Write command (0x02), the memory address (0x00),
followed by three bytes of data: 0xAA, 0xBB, and 0xCC. The command will be logged
in the Transactions window.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 53
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 7-6:
SEEPROM EXAMPLE – WRITE BYTES
Figure 7-7 shows how to read data from the 25LC020A. Groups 0 and 1 are disabled,
and Groups 2 and 3 are enabled. This example shows how data is transmitted and
received in one transaction (Chip Select, CS, active) between Groups. Clicking on the
Execute button will send the Read command (0x03) and memory address (0x00) of
Group 2 followed by a Read Ten Bytes command in Group 3. The commands and
received data are displayed in the transactions window.
FIGURE 7-7:
7.7
SEEPROM EXAMPLE – READ BYTES
SCRIPT BUILDER
SPI commands can be combined into scripts, saved, and used over again. The Script
Builder window is opened by selecting Communications > Script > Script Builder from
the menu bar. The Script Builder is shown in Figure 7-8.
The Script Builder window is divided into four columns as shown in Figures 7-9 through
7-12.
DS51647B-page 54
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
FIGURE 7-8:
7.7.1
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER
Script Commands
The left most column contains the Script Commands as shown in Figure 7-9.
• Script Name – Enter the name of the script
• Save Script – Saves the script
• Execute Script – Executes (performs) the script displayed in the Script Detail
column
• Clear Script – Clears the Script Detail column
• Del User Scripts – Deletes scripts from the User Scripts column.
• Show Array – Displays a spreadsheet-like table in which large amounts of data
may be entered. This data can be included in the script by right clicking in a Script
Detail cell and choosing “Insert Array”.
FIGURE 7-9:
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT COMMANDS
Script Commands
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 55
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
7.7.2
Example Scripts
The second column contains Example Scripts as shown in Figure 7-10. These can be
studied to learn how to create or to edit custom scripts. To load the example script into
the Script Detail column, either double click or right click and select from the local
menu.
FIGURE 7-10:
7.7.3
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER – EXAMPLE SCRIPTS
Example Scripts
Script Detail
The third column contains Script Detail as shown in Figure 7-11. This column is used
to create the script or view an existing script. More information about creating a
customer script is discussed in Section 7.7.5 “Creating A Script”.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
Note:
DS51647B-page 56
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
FIGURE 7-11:
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT DETAIL
Script Detail
7.7.4
User Scripts
The fourth column contains User Scripts as shown in Figure 7-12. User scripts that are
created, named, and saved are displayed in the User Scripts column.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
User Scripts can be deleted by right clicking and selecting Delete Script from the local
menu.
FIGURE 7-12:
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER – USER SCRIPTS
User Scripts
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 57
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
7.7.5
Creating A Script
Scripts are created by placing the cursor into the Script Detail column and right clicking.
A local menu will be displayed as shown in Figure 7-13. Select from the choice of
commands or script macro commands.
The sequence of macro commands are executed from top to bottom. Macro commands
are entered by right clicking in the box and selecting from the local menu as shown in
Figure 7-13.
Macro commands are entered according to the sequence of events as defined by the
SPI bus protocol. Studying the example scripts is a good way to learn the sequence of
events. The example scripts can also be modified and saved under a different name.
CAUTION
The choice of macro commands is very flexible. Therefore, the correctness of the
script has to be verified by the user. The PICkit Serial Analyzer program does not
verify the correctness of the script.
A complete listing of the available macro commands is given in Table 7-2. The macro
command abbreviation will be displayed in the Transactions Window. The Transactions
window keeps a running log of the commands and data sent to and from the target
device.
FIGURE 7-13:
TABLE 7-2:
SPI SCRIPT BUILDER – CREATING A SCRIPT
SPI SCRIPT MACRO COMMAND
Macro Command
DS51647B-page 58
Command
Abbreviation
Description
SPIBITRATE
[BR]
Set Bit Rate. Next byte is the scaler, followed by
the pre-scaler.
SPIDATIN
[DI]
Input data. Next byte is the byte count.
SPIDATOUT
[DO]
Output data. Next byte is the byte count, followed
by the data.
SPIDATIO
[DIO]
Simultaneous data in and out. Next byte is byte
count, followed by the data.
SPISDOIN
[SI]
Set SDO pin to Input (tri-state)
SPISDOOUT
[SO]
Set SDO pin to Output
SPIINIT
[I_]
Initialize SPI controller
SPICSON
[CSON]
Assert CS (active-low)
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
TABLE 7-2:
SPI SCRIPT MACRO COMMAND (CONTINUED)
SPICSOFF
7.8
[CSOF]
De-assert CS (active-low)
SCRIPT EXECUTE
The Script Execute window is shown in Figure 7-14. Once scripts are created using the
Script Builder, they can be assigned to buttons in the Script Execute window. This
makes a convenient window to execute multiple scripts either individually or iteratively.
Script executing will be logged in the Transactions window.
FIGURE 7-14:
7.8.1
SPI SCRIPT EXECUTE
Assignable Buttons
User created scripts will be displayed in the central SPI Scripts column. To assign a
script to a button, click on the script name and drag it to the desired Assignable Buttons
in the right column. The script will be executed once each time the button is clicked.
The Assignable Buttons can be cleared by clicking on the Clear Buttons button.
7.8.2
Iteration
Scripts can be executed a user defined number of times at a specified interval of time.
Figure 7-15 shows an example. A script named Read_Memory has been assigned to
the Iteration button in the left column. The number of iterations are entered in the
Iterations box and the delay in millisecond in the Delay box. A summary of the iterations
is displayed in the left column. The macro is executed when the Iteration button is
clicked.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 59
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 7-15:
DS51647B-page 60
SPI SCRIPT EXECUTE – EXAMPLE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
SPI and Microwire Master Communications
NOTES:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 61
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
DS51647B-page 62
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 8. USART Asynchronous Communications
8.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the USART Asynchronous Communications mode. USART
Asynchronous data and commands can be entered using a Basic Communications
window or by creating Script Commands.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the USART Asynchronous protocol. For more
information see:
• USART, AUSART, or EUSART chapter of the PIC microcontroller data sheet of
interest
• A USART Asynchronous Communications tutorial is available on the Microchip
Technology web site. Click on the links: Support -> Getting Started -> PIC MCU
Tutorials -> USART - Using in Asynchronous Mode
• Several application notes are available on the Microchip Technology web site.
Click on links: Design -> App Notes -> Function: Communication -> USART
8.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
8.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configuring USART Asynchronous Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
Script Builder
Script Execute
PICkit SERIAL PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for USART Asynchronous
Communications mode are:
TABLE 8-1:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
Description
1
TX
Output
Transmit Data (with respect to the
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer)
2
+V
Power
Target Power
Ground
3
GND
Power
4
AUX1
Input/Output
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 1
5
AUX2
Input/Output
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 2
6
RX
Input
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Receive Data (with respect to the
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer)
DS51647B-page 63
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
8.4
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The USART Asynchronous Communications mode is selected from the Configuration
Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > USART
Asynchronous
8.5
CONFIGURING USART ASYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the
Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the view selected, the Basic View
(Figure 8-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. In the Advanced
View (Figure 8-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 8-1:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS CONFIGURE COMMUNICATIONS
MODE – BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
VOLTAGE
• PICkit Serial will power my device – Select the check box if the PICkit Serial will
power the target device. The target can be powered at 5 VDC or a user selectable
variable voltage.
CAUTION
Even though the voltage can be set as low as 0 VDC, it is up to the user to verify the
required operating voltage of the target device.
DS51647B-page 64
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Asynchronous Communications
CAUTION
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target plus PICkit Serial Analyzer
exceeds this current limit, the USB port will turn off. The target may be powered
externally if more power is required.
USART BAUD
Enter the desired USART symbol rate (Baud) in the text box.
FIGURE 8-2:
USART ASYNCHROUNOUS CONFIGURE
COMMUNICATIONS MODE – ADVANCED VIEW
SCRIPT TIMEOUT
When sending scripts, the software will wait a maximum of Script Timeout ms to receive
a script complete tag before issuing an error. If your hardware is slow to respond or
you are transferring a lot of data, you may need to increase the Script Timeout to avoid
errors.
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
Read Byte – Enable event marker – read byte
Write Byte – Enable event marker – write byte
Status Error – Enable event marker – change in USART status byte
Break TX – Enable event marker – A “Break” has been transmitted
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 65
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
•
•
•
•
•
8.6
AUX1 Default State – AUX1 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
AUX2 Default State – AUX2 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
AUX1 Direction – AUX1 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
AUX2 Direction – AUX2 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
Async Receive Disabled – Received Data is disabled
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The USART Asynchronous Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Communications: Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The USART Asynchronous Basic Operations window is shown in Figure 8-3. There are
two basic communications commands, Read and Write.
Data can be transmitted to the target device as 7-bit ASCII or 8-bit byte. 7-bit ASCII
data is entered in the left hand window. 8-bit byte is entered in the right hand column.
Both transmitted and received data is displayed in the Transaction window.
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
The command will be logged in the Transactions window. A listing of the command
abbreviations is given in Table 8-2.
FIGURE 8-3:
8.7
USART ASYNCHRONOUS BASIC OPERATIONS
SCRIPT BUILDER
USART Asynchronous commands can be combined into scripts, saved, and used over
again. The Script Builder window is opened by selecting Communications > Script >
Script Builder from the menu bar. The Script Builder is shown in Figure 8-4.
The Script Builder window is divided into four columns as shown in Figures 8-5 through
8-8.
DS51647B-page 66
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Asynchronous Communications
FIGURE 8-4:
8.7.1
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER
Script Commands
The left most column contains the Script Commands as shown in Figure 8-5.
• Script Name – Enter the name of the script
• Save Script – Saves the script
• Execute Script – Executes (performs) the script displayed in the Script Detail
column
• Clear Script – Clears the Script Detail column
• Del User Scripts – Deletes scripts from the User Scripts column.
• Show Array – Displays a spreadsheet-like table in which large amounts of data
may be entered. This data can be included in the script by right clicking in a Script
Detail cell and choosing “Insert Array”.
FIGURE 8-5:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT
COMMANDS
Script Commands
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 67
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
8.7.2
Example Scripts
The second column contains Example Scripts as shown in Figure 8-6. These can be
studied to learn how to create or to edit custom scripts. To load the example script into
the Script Detail column, either double click or right click and select from the local
menu.
FIGURE 8-6:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER – EXAMPLE
SCRIPTS
Example Scripts
8.7.3
Script Detail
The third column contains Script Detail as shown in Figure 8-7. This column is used to
create the script or view an existing script. More information about creating a customer
script is discussed in Section 8.7.5 “Creating A Script”.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
Note:
DS51647B-page 68
The “x” indicates the value is a hexidecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Asynchronous Communications
FIGURE 8-7:
8.7.4
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER – SCRIPT
DETAIL
Script Detail
User Scripts
The fourth column contains User Scripts as shown in Figure 8-8. User scripts that are
created, named, and saved are displayed in the User Scripts column.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
User Scripts can be deleted by right clicking and selecting Delete Script from the local
menu.
FIGURE 8-8:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER – USER
SCRIPTS
User Scripts
8.7.5
Creating A Script
Scripts are created by placing the cursor into the Script Detail column and right clicking.
A local menu will be displayed as shown in Figure 8-9. Select from the choice of
commands or script macro commands.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 69
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
The sequence of macro commands are executed from top to bottom. Macro commands
are entered by right clicking in the box and selecting from the local menu as shown in
Figure 8-9.
Macro commands are entered according to the sequence of events as defined by the
USART Asynchronous protocol. Studying the example scripts is a good way to learn
the sequence of events. The example scripts can also be modified and saved under a
different name.
CAUTION
The choice of macro commands is very flexible. Therefore, the correctness of the
script has to be verified by the user. The PICkit Serial Analyzer program does not
verify the correctness of the script.
A complete listing of the available macro commands is given in Table 8-2. The macro
command abbreviation will be displayed in the Transactions Window. The Transactions
window keeps a running log of the commands and data sent to and from the target
device.
FIGURE 8-9:
TABLE 8-2:
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT BUILDER – CREATING A
SCRIPT
USART SCRIPT MACRO COMMANDS
Macro Command
DS51647B-page 70
Command
Abbreviation
Description
USDATATX
[TX]
Transmit data. Next byte is the byte count, followed
by the data.
USDATARX
[RX]
Receive data. Next byte is the byte count.
USDATARXEN
[ER]
Enable Receive data monitor
USDATARXDS
[DR]
Disable Receive data monitor
USBREAKTX
[BK]
Send Break
USBRKDATTX
[BKD]
Send Break, then data byte. Next byte is the data
byte.
USBAUD
[BD]
Set BAUD Rate. Next byte is BAUD (LSB) followed
by BAUD (MSB).
US9BITSET
[9S]
Set 9-bit Data mode
US9BITRST
[9R]
Reset 9-bit Data mode (sets 8-bit)
USCLKPOLSET
[CS]
Set CLOCK POLARITY bit
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Asynchronous Communications
TABLE 8-2:
8.8
USART SCRIPT MACRO COMMANDS (CONTINUED)
USCLKPOLRST
[CR]
Reset CLOCK POLARITY bit
USINIT
[I_]
Initialize USART controller
USRESET
[RE]
Reset USART controller.
USAUX1RST
[A1RST]
Reset Aux1
USAUX1SET
[A1RST]
Set Aux1
USAUX1OUT
[A1OUT]
Set Aux1 direction to Output
USAUX1IN
[A1IN]
Set Aux1 direction to Input
USAUX1W0
[A1W0]
Aux1 Wait 0
USAUX1W1
[A1W1]
Aux1 Wait 1
USAUX2RST
[A2RST]
Reset Aux2
USAUX2SET
[A2RST]
Set Aux2
USAUX2OUT
[A2OUT]
Set Aux2 direction to Output
USAUX2IN
[A2IN]
Set Aux2 direction to Input
USAUX2W0
[A2W0]
Aux2 Wait 0
USAUX2W1
[A2W1]
Aux2 Wait 1
SCRIPT EXECUTE
The Script Execute window is shown in Figure 8-10. Once scripts are created using the
Script Builder, they can be assigned to buttons in the Script Execute window. This
makes a convenient window to execute multiple scripts either individually or iteratively.
Script executing will be logged in the Transactions window.
FIGURE 8-10:
8.8.1
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT EXECUTE
Assignable Buttons
User created scripts will be displayed in the central USART Scripts column. To assign
a script to a button, click on the script name and drag it to the desired Assignable
Buttons in the right column. The script will be executed once each time the button is
clicked.
The Assignable Buttons can be cleared by clicking on the Clear Buttons button.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 71
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
8.8.2
Iteration
Scripts can be executed a user defined number of times at a specified interval of time.
Figure 8-11 shows an example. A script named TX_Data has been assigned to the
Iteration button in the left column. The number of iterations is entered in the Iterations
box and the delay in milliseconds in the Delay box. A summary of the iterations is
displayed in the left column. The macro is executed when the Iteration button is
clicked.
FIGURE 8-11:
DS51647B-page 72
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT EXECUTE – EXAMPLE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 9. USART Master Synchronous Communications
9.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes the USART Synchronous Master Communications mode.
USART Synchronous Master data and commands can be entered using a Basic
Communications window or by creating Script Commands.
It is assumed that the user is familiar with the USART Synchronous protocol. For more
information see:
• USART, AUSART, or EUSART chapter of the PIC microcontroller data sheet of
interest
9.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
9.3
PICkit Serial Pin Assignments
Selecting Communications Mode
Configuring USART Synchronous Master Communications Mode
Communications: Basic Operations
Script Builder
Script Execute
PICkit SERIAL PIN ASSIGNMENTS
The PICkit Serial Analyzer pin assignments for USART Synchronous Master
Communications mode are:
TABLE 9-1:
9.4
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER PIN ASSIGNMENTS
Pin
Label
Type
1
CK
Output
Description
2
+V
Power
Target Power
3
GND
Power
Ground
4
AUX1
Input/Output
5
AUX2
Input/Output
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 2
6
DT
Input/Output
Data
Clock
Auxiliary I/O port pin No. 1
SELECTING COMMUNICATIONS MODE
The USART Synchronous Master Communications mode is selected from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Select Communications Mode > USART
Synchronous Master
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 73
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
9.5
CONFIGURING USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER COMMUNICATIONS
MODE
Once the communications mode has been selected, it is configured from the Configuration Wizard or menu bar.
Configuration Wizard – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Run Configuration Wizard
from the menu bar
Menu Bar – Select PICkit Serial Analyzer > Configure Communications Mode
The Configure Mode window will open. Depending on the view selected, the Basic View
(Figure 9-1) displays a minimum choice of configurations commands. In the Advanced
View (Figure 9-2) displays an extended choice of configuration commands.
Save the configuration by clicking on the Save Changes button.
FIGURE 9-1:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER CONFIGURE
COMMUNICATIONS MODE – BASIC VIEW
OPTIONS
• Enable Event Markers – Enable event markers
• Enable Time Markers – Enable ‘time’ stamp to accompany all event markers
VOLTAGE
• PICkit Serial will power my device – Select the check box if the PICkit Serial will
power the target device. The target can be powered at 5 VDC or a user selectable
variable voltage.
CAUTION
Even though the voltage can be set as low as 0 VDC, it is up to the user to verify the
required operating voltage of the target device.
CAUTION
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target plus PICkit Serial Analyzer
exceeds this current limit, the USB port will turn off. The target may be powered
externally if more power is required.
USART BAUD
Enter the desired USART symbol rate (Baud) in the text box.
DS51647B-page 74
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Master Synchronous Communications
FIGURE 9-2:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER CONFIGURE
COMMUNICATIONS MODE – ADVANCED VIEW
SCRIPT TIMEOUT
When sending scripts, the software will wait a maximum of Script Timeout ms to receive
a script complete tag before issuing an error. If your hardware is slow to respond or
you are transferring a lot of data, you may need to increase the Script Timeout to avoid
errors.
EVENT MARKERS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Abrt Mac Exe – Enable event marker: abort ‘macro’ execution
Macro Loop – Enable event marker: top of ‘macro’ loop
Mac Lp 65536 – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop count overflow (i.e., 65536)
Mac Lp Done – Enable event marker: ‘macro’ loop iterations complete
Timeout Timer1 – Enable event marker: Timer1 expired
Timeout Timer2 – Enable event marker: Timer2 expired
Status Error – Enable event marker: change in status byte
Read Byte – Enable event marker – read byte
Write Byte – Enable event marker – write byte
Status Error – Enable event marker – change in USART status byte
Break TX – Enable event marker – A “Break” has been transmitted
ADVANCED OPTIONS
• Disable LED2 Default – Disable default LED2 behavior (LED2 = Yellow ‘Target’
LED)
• Disable LED1 Default – Disable default LED1 behavior (LED1 = Red ‘Busy’ LED)
• Enable Switch Test – Enable low level switch test:
- Switch Off (not depressed) – blink LED1, LED2 off
- Switch ON (depressed) – blink LED2, LED1 off
• AUX1 Default State – AUX1 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
• AUX2 Default State – AUX2 communication line – default state (0 | 1)
• AUX1 Direction – AUX1 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
• AUX2 Direction – AUX2 communication line – direction: 1: input, 0: output
• Clock Polarity – Checked means the polarity is inverted, unchecked means it is
not
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 75
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
9.6
COMMUNICATIONS: BASIC OPERATIONS
The USART Asynchronous Operations window can be opened by selecting:
• Communications: Basic Operations from the tool bar, or
• Communications > Basic Operations from the menu bar
The USART Synchronous Master Basic Operations window is shown in Figure 9-3.
There are two basic communications commands, Read and Write.
Data can be transmitted to the target device as 7-bit ASCII or 8-bit byte. 7-bit ASCII
data is entered in the left hand window. 8-bit byte is entered in the right hand column.
Both transmitted and received data is displayed in the transaction window.
Note:
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
The command will be logged in the Transactions window. A listing of the command
abbreviations is given in Table 9-2.
FIGURE 9-3:
9.7
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER BASIC OPERATIONS
SCRIPT BUILDER
USART Asynchronous commands can be combined into scripts, saved, and used over
again. The Script Builder window is opened by selecting Communications > Script >
Script Builder from the menu bar. The Script Builder is shown in Figure 9-4.
The Script Builder window is divided into four columns as shown in Figures 9-5 through
9-8.
DS51647B-page 76
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Master Synchronous Communications
FIGURE 9-4:
9.7.1
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER
Script Commands
The left most column contains the Script Commands as shown in Figure 9-5.
• Script Name – Enter the name of the script
• Save Script – Saves the script
• Execute Script – Executes (performs) the script displayed in the Script Detail
column
• Clear Script – Clears the Script Detail column
• Del User Scripts – Deletes scripts from the User Scripts column
• Show Array – Displays a spreadsheet-like table in which large amounts of data
may be entered. This data can be included in the script by right clicking in a Script
Detail cell and choosing “Insert Array”.
FIGURE 9-5:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER –
SCRIPT COMMANDS
Script Commands
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 77
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
9.7.2
Example Scripts
The second column contains Example Scripts as shown in Figure 9-6. These can be
studied to learn how to create or to edit custom scripts. To load the example script into
the Script Detail column, either double click or right click and select from the local
menu.
FIGURE 9-6:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER –
EXAMPLE SCRIPTS
Example Scripts
9.7.3
Script Detail
The third column contains Script Detail as shown in Figure 9-7. This column is used to
create the script or view an existing script. More information about creating a customer
script is discussed in Section 9.7.5 “Creating a Script”.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
Note:
DS51647B-page 78
The “x” indicates the value is a hexadecimal number. Clicking on “x” will
toggle it to a “d” indicating that the value is a decimal number.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Master Synchronous Communications
FIGURE 9-7:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER –
SCRIPT DETAIL
Script Detail
9.7.4
User Scripts
The fourth column contains User Scripts Detail as shown in Figure 9-8. User scripts
that are created, named, and saved are displayed in the User Scripts column.
To load a user script from the User Scripts column into the Script Detail column, the
user can double click or right click and select from the local menu.
User Scripts can be deleted by right clicking and selecting Delete Script from the local
menu.
FIGURE 9-8:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER – USER
SCRIPTS
User Scripts
9.7.5
Creating a Script
Scripts are created by placing the cursor into the Script Detail column and right clicking.
A local menu will be displayed as shown in Figure 9-9. Select from the choice of
commands or script macro commands.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 79
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
The sequence of macro commands are executed from top to bottom. Macro commands
are entered by right clicking in the box and selecting from the local menu as shown in
Figure 9-9.
Macro commands are entered according to the sequence of events as defined by the
USART Synchronous Master protocol. Studying the example scripts is a good way to
learn the sequence of events. The example scripts can also be modified and saved
under a different name.
CAUTION
The choice of macro commands is very flexible. Therefore, the correctness of the
script has to be verified by the user. The PICkit Serial Analyzer program does not
verify the correctness of the script.
A complete listing of the available macro commands is given in Table 9-2. The macro
command abbreviation will be displayed in the Transactions Window. The Transactions
window keeps a running log of the commands and data sent to and from the target
device.
FIGURE 9-9:
TABLE 9-2:
USART SYNCHRONOUS MASTER SCRIPT BUILDER –
CREATING A SCRIPT
USART SCRIPT MACRO COMMANDS
Macro Command
USDATATX
DS51647B-page 80
Command
Abbreviation
[TX]
Description
Transmit data. Next byte is the byte count, followed by
the data.
USDATARX
[RX]
Receive data. Next byte is the byte count.
USDATARXEN
[ER]
Enable Receive data monitor
USDATARXDS
[DR]
Disable Receive data monitor
USBREAKTX
[BK]
Send Break
USBRKDATTX
[BKD]
Send Break, then data byte. Next byte is the data byte.
USBAUD
[BD]
Set BAUD Rate. Next byte is BAUD (LSB) followed by
BAUD (MSB).
US9BITSET
[9S]
Set 9-bit Data mode
US9BITRST
[9R]
Reset 9-bit Data mode (sets 8-bit)
USCLKPOLSET
[CS]
Set CLOCK POLARITY bit
USCLKPOLRST
[CR]
Reset CLOCK POLARITY bit
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
USART Master Synchronous Communications
TABLE 9-2:
9.8
USART SCRIPT MACRO COMMANDS (CONTINUED)
USINIT
[I_]
Initialize USART controller
USRESET
[RE]
Reset USART controller.
USAUX1RST
[A1RST]
Reset Aux1
USAUX1SET
[A1RST]
Set Aux1
USAUX1OUT
[A1OUT]
Set Aux1 direction to Output
USAUX1IN
[A1IN]
Set Aux1 direction to Input
USAUX1W0
[A1W0]
Aux1 Wait 0
USAUX1W1
[A1W1]
Aux1 Wait 1
USAUX2RST
[A2RST]
Reset Aux2
USAUX2SET
[A2RST]
Set Aux2
USAUX2OUT
[A2OUT]
Set Aux2 direction to Output
USAUX2IN
[A2IN]
Set Aux2 direction to Input
USAUX2W0
[A2W0]
Aux2 Wait 0
USAUX2W1
[A2W1]
Aux2 Wait 1
SCRIPT EXECUTE
The Script Execute window is shown in Figure 9-10. Once scripts are created using the
Script Builder, they can be assigned to buttons in the Script Execute window. This
makes a convenient window to execute multiple scripts either individually or iteratively.
Script executing will be logged in the Transactions window.
FIGURE 9-10:
9.8.1
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT EXECUTE
Assignable Buttons
User created scripts will be displayed in the central USART Scripts column. To assign
a script to a button, click on the script name and drag it to the desired Assignable
Buttons in the right column. The script will be executed once each time the button is
clicked.
The Assignable Buttons can be cleared by clicking on the Clear Buttons button.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 81
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
9.8.2
Iteration
Scripts can be executed a user defined number of times at a specified interval of time.
Figure 9-11 shows and example. A script named TX_Data has been assigned to the
Iteration button in the left column. The number of iterations is entered in the Iterations
box and the delay in millisecond in the Delay box. A summary of the iterations is displayed in the left column. The macro is executed when the Iteration button is clicked.
FIGURE 9-11:
DS51647B-page 82
USART ASYNCHRONOUS SCRIPT EXECUTE – EXAMPLE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 10. User Defined Templates
10.1
INTRODUCTION
User Defined Templates extend User Scripts by interpreting the data read from the
target device and displaying it in a human readable form. The conversion formula is:
EQUATION 10-1:
CONVERSION FORMULA
Read Value * Slope + Offset = Display Value
For example, an 8-bit ADC value is read, and we desire a displayed value in voltage, 0
to 5 Volts. The 8-bit ADC value (read value) can be 0 to 256 decimal. The ADC reference voltage is 5 VDC. The slope is the constant value used to convert between the
ADC read value and the desired display value. In this example:
EQUATION 10-2:
SLOPE EXAMPLE
Slope = ADC Reference Voltage / 8-bit ADC = 5 / 256 = 0.01953125
Using a User Defined Template, the interpretation of the ADC value can be displayed
in volts DC.
10.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
• Creating and Using Templates
• My Templates
• Graphing Data
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 83
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
10.3
CREATING AND USING TEMPLATES
Create a User Define Template by selecting User Define Templates > Display Template
from the menu bar. The User Defined Template window is displayed as shown in
Figure 10-1, showing three active scripts.
Note:
First, a user define script(s) must be created using the Script Builder window for the selected serial communications mode. Refer to the respective
serial communications chapter under the Script Builder section.
FIGURE 10-1:
THE USER DEFINED TEMPLATE
Create the Parameter Template by filling in each line. Each line is a single parameter,
a value read converted to value displayed. The Inputs below define how a particular
parameter is interpreted.
• Active – Allows you to activate or deactivate a parameter. This must be active
before you can fill in the rest of the data. The purpose of this checkbox is to allow
run time activation or deactivation of a script.
• Run – Press this button to run your script and display data after you have
completed filling out the parameter template line.
• Script – Select a user defined script from the drop down box. This script must first
be created using the Script Builder for the respective communications mode.
• Return Data – Indicate if data is received (Yes) or not (No)
• Parameter Name – Enter a parameter name. This is for reference only and does
not affect the data retrieved or displayed.
• Parameter Byte Count – The number of bytes read (1, 2, or 4)
• Start Byte – Select which byte (of a possible series of bytes) that will be used for
the display
• Byte Order – Select Least Significant to Most Significant or Most Significant to
Least Significant. If the parameter is only one byte long, this option will not be
available.
• Slope – Conversion value (read value * slope + offset = displayed value)
• Offset – Offset of read value (read value * slope + offset = displayed value)
• Signed/Unsigned – Select between Signed or Unsigned read value (this option is
only available if the format is set to Dec)
• Format – Binary, Decimal, Hexadecimal, or BCD (Binary Coded Decimal)
• # of Dec. pts – Select number of decimal points in the displayed value (this option
is only available if the format is set to Dec)
DS51647B-page 84
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
User Defined Templates
• Graph – allows the data to be graphed during run time. The popup graph may be
resized as needed.
Once the parameter(s) are entered, they can be saved as a User Defined Parameter
file (*.udp).
• File->Open – Open an existing User Defined Parameter file (*.udp)
• File->Save – Save or replace a User Defined Parameter file (*.udp)
• Clear All – Resets (clears) all parameter boxes
OPTIONS
•
•
•
•
10.4
Run All – Runs all parameter scripts above that are marked as active.
Iterations – How many times you wish to run the set of active parameters.
Delay – time in between each parameter.
Error Timeout – time the GUI will wait for a completed response to the script. If
you are running long scripts – you may wish to increase this value.
MY TEMPLATES
When the User Defined Parameter file has been saved, it will be displayed under the
User Defined Templates > My Templates on the menu bar, as shown in Figure 10-2.
Note:
The User Defined Parameter file (*.udp) must be stored in the same directory as the PICkit Serial Analyzer executable (by default C:\Program
Files\Microchip\PICkit Serial Analyzer). Otherwise it will not be displayed
under the My Templates menu selection.
FIGURE 10-2:
SELECTING MY TEMPLATES
This implementation of the User Defined Template differs from the one in the prior
release of PICkit Serial Analyzer in that you create and run the template on the same
form. This allows for a great deal of run time flexibility. For example, you can change
any of the Inputs from section 10.3 while you are running the scripts in a loop.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 85
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
10.5
GRAPHING DATA
You may also graph any of the data being displayed in real time; simply press the Graph
button for the corresponding parameter. The graph may be resized as desired. See
Figure 10-3. The style button on the bottom of the graph toggles the view between an
area, line, column, or point plot.
FIGURE 10-3:
DS51647B-page 86
GRAPHING DATA
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 11. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter explains the internal operations of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer firmware.
The source code is available on the PICkit Serial Analyzer CD-ROM at D:\PICkit Serial
Analyzer\Firmware.
11.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
11.3
EXEC
COMM
I2CM Communications
I2CS Communications
SPI/MICROWIRE Communications
USART Communications
LIN Communications
OVERVIEW
Internally, the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer operates two firmware state controllers running
in parallel – EXEC (executive) and COMM (communication). The EXEC controller is
responsible for overall PICkit™ Serial Analyzer configuration, moving data to/from the
host (via USB) and moving data to/from the COMM controller (via RAM buffers). The
COMM controller supervises serial communication with the target device. This includes
both configuring the necessary communication hardware and executing a sequential
‘script’ defining a serial ‘transaction’.
FIGURE 11-1:
ARCHITECTURE
ARCHITECTURE
EXEC
H
O
S
T
USB
STATUS
EP0-OUT
CIRCULAR
BUFFERS
EP0-IN
EP1-OUT
EP1-IN
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
CONTROL
CBUF
(scratch)
CBUF1
(script/data)
CBUF2
(output/data)
COMM
CONTROL
2
I C™
SPI
USART
D
E
V
I
C
E
DS51647B-page 87
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Data streams associated with PICkit™ Serial Analyzer are formatted with markers
called “TAG” bytes. A TAG may be stand-alone or accompanied by data. As seen in
Table 11-1, the data stream for each state controller has a set of associated TAG bytes
defined in detail later in the document.
EXEC manages the interface with the host. The data stream sent to PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer from the host is encoded with ECMD TAGs and the data stream returned to
the host from PICkit™ Serial Analyzer uses EDATA TAGs. Likewise, the COMM controller utilizes another set of predefined TAG(s) - CCMD TAGs (outgoing scripts) and
CDATA TAGs (returning data). EXEC has no knowledge of COMM TAG(s) but simply
transports data blindly between the host and COMM using EXEC TAG(s). RAM buffers
are used as conduits to exchange data with COMM. Data destined for COMM is
queued in RAM buffer 1 (CBUF1). Data returning from COMM is funneled through RAM
buffer 2 (CBUF2).
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer is designed to facilitate continuous ‘spooling’ of data
to/from the external serial device. Separate 255-byte circular buffers are maintained for
both outgoing data (scripts/data) and returning data. The USB interface is not permitted
to be a bottleneck in the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer operation. EXEC processes each
USB packet immediately. If data is destined for a RAM buffer, the host is responsible to
insure adequate room is available in the buffer before the data is sent to avoid a fatal
‘overrun’ error. Returning data is queued in the appropriate circular buffer until retrieved
by EXEC, tagged and sent to the host. It is possible to overrun the return buffer under
some circumstances but should be rare. EXEC can interleave EXEC data with COMM
data as necessary.
The PICkit™ Serial Analyzer maintains fixed-length blocks of data for CONTROL and
STATUS. The CONTROL_BLOCK provides ‘static’ configuration information. The
STATUS_BLOCK is a snapshot of the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer operation. Each block
is divided into three sections corresponding to EXEC, COMM (common to all protocols)
and COMM (specific to the active serial protocol).
TABLE 11-1:
TAG BYTE TYPES
TAG types
Definition
ECMD
EXEC command TAG(s) – interpreted by EXEC
EDATA
EXEC data TAG(s) – generated by EXEC
CCMD
COMM command TAG)(s) – interpreted by COMM
CDATA
COMM data TAG(s) – generated by COMM
The other major blocks are the control memory block and the status memory block. The
control block is used to configure the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer. The control block is
divided into the following three sections:
• EXEC module configuration
• Generic COMM module configuration
• Protocol specific communication configuration
This third section will change depending on the protocol. The Status block keeps the
status of various flags and is similarly divided into three sections.
TABLE 11-2:
CONTROL BLOCK
TAG Bytes
0-7
DS51647B-page 88
Definition
EXEC section
8-15
Generic COMM section
16-23
Protocol specific communication section
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-3:
STATUS BLOCK
TAG Bytes
11.4
Definition
0-3
EXEC section
4-11
Generic COMM section
12-19
Protocol specific communication section
EXEC
The EXEC module will directly decode the data stream from the host. The list of different commands is shown in Table 11-4. Every data stream from the software to the
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer begins with one of the following EXEC command TAG bytes.
TABLE 11-4:
EXEC COMMAND (ECMD) TAG BYTES
TAG/ECMD
LEN
0x00
1
Name
END OF DATA
Description
Marks the end of valid data
0
0x01
0x02
1
25
COMMAND
Executive command
0
TAG
1
Command byte (see
Table 11-5)
CONTROL_BLOCK_WRITE Write control block to PIC® MCU
0
1:24
0x03
N+2
TAG
CBUF1_WRITE
TAG
Control block
Write data to circular buffer 1
0
TAG
1
Byte count (N)
2 : N+1 Data
0x04
N+2
CBUF2_WRITE
Write data to circular buffer 2
0
TAG
1
Byte count (N)
2 : N+1 Data
0x05
N+2
CBUF3_WRITE
Write data to circular buffer 3
0
TAG
1
Byte count (N)
2 : N+1 Data
0x06
0x07
2
2
LED1_CONFIG
LED2_CONFIG
Configure LED 1
0
TAG
1
Configuration Byte
Configure LED 2
0
TAG
1
Configuration byte
TAG byte 0x01 signifies that the following byte is one of the commands listed in
Table 11-5.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 89
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-5:
TAG BYTE 0x01 COMMAND CODES
CMD
Description
0x00
Master Reset: EXEC Reset, COMM Reset (idled)
0x01
COMM initialization: COMM is initialized as defined by CONTROL_BLOCK
0x02
Request EXEC_STATUS_PACKET (Ref. Table 11-6)
0x03
Save CONTROL_BLOCK to EEPROM
0x04
Restore CONTROL_BLOCK from EEPROM
0x05
Flush CBUF2
0x06
COMM Reset: rest buffers, clear status block (COMM hardware is not re-initialized)
TABLE 11-6:
EXEC STATUS PACKET
Byte
0
1
LEN
Type
2
0x88
Description
PACKET ID = 0x01
2
4
3
0x81
FIRMWARE VERSION
5
29
25
0x82
CONTROL BLOCK
30
50
21
0x83
STATUS BLOCK
51
57
7
0x84
CBUF STATUS
TAG byte 0x02 writes the 24-byte CONTROL_BLOCK (the EXEC portion of the control
block appears in Table 11-7).
TABLE 11-7:
EXEC CONTROL BLOCK
Byte
Bit
0
7:0
Description
EXEC control bits
0
1
2
3
1
DS51647B-page 90
4
1 = Disable default behavior – LED2
5
1 = Disable default behavior – LED1
6
1 = Flush CBUF2 on count [e.g. CBUF2 >= N bytes then flush]
7
1 = Flush CBUF2 on time intervals
7:0
0
1 = Enable switch test
1
n/a
2
n/a
3
n/a
4
n/a
5
n/a
6
n/a
7
n/a
2
7:0
3
7:0
CBUF2 flush count threshold [e.g., CBUF2 > N bytes then
flush]
4
7:0
CBUF2 flush interval [res: 409 μs, min: 409 μs, max:
104 msec] a value of ‘0’ defaults to ‘1’, (i.e., the minimum)
5
7:0
6
7:0
7
7:0
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TAG bytes 0x03, 0x04 and 0x05 write data bytes to their respective script buffers. In
the current architecture, Script Buffer 1 (CBUF1) is used to store communication commands that will be fetched and executed by the COMM block. So, TAG byte 0x03 is
used to delineate data that is to be sent to the script buffer including communication
protocols to be sent to the unit under test. TAG bytes 0x04 and 0x05 are typically not
used. TAG bytes 0x06 and 0x07 configure the LEDs as follows:
TABLE 11-8:
LED CONFIGURATION
Description
Mode
M = CFG[7:6]
State
S = CFG[5]
Time
T = CFG[4:0]
Set immediate
00
1 = On, 0 = Off
N/A
Blink once – On or Off
10
1 = On, 0 = Off
T + 1 units
Blink continuous
11
initial state: 1 = On, 0 = Off
T + 1 units
Reserved
01
Legend:
Note:
Time “unit” = 50 ms
Set LED to blink continuously, on/off time = 100 ms.
CFG = 0xC1 (M = b’11’, S = 0, T = 1)
EXEC data TAG bytes identify data streams sent from the EXEC block back to the host
software.
TABLE 11-9:
EXEC TAG (EDATA) BYTES
TAG/EDATA
LEN
Name
Description
0x80
1
END OF DATA
Marks the end of valid data
0x81
1
FIRMWARE_VERSION
Firmware version
0
0x82
25
CONTROL_BLOCK_DATA
0
TAG
1
Data: 20-byte STATUS_BLOCK
2
Date: major version
Control block contents
0
1:24
0x83
21
STATUS_BLOCK_DATA
0
0x85
7
N+2
CBUF_STATUS
CBUF1_DATA
N+2
CBUF2_DATA
TAG
Data: minor version
0
TAG
1
Data: CBUF1: # bytes used
2
Data: CBUF1: # bytes unused
3
Data: CBUF2: # bytes used
4
Data: CBUF2: # bytes unused
5
Data: CBUF3: # bytes used
6
Data: CBUF3: # bytes unused
Data from CBUF1
0
TAG
1
Byte count
Data: from CBUF1
Data from CBUF2
0
TAG
1
Byte count
2 : N+1
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Data: CONTROL_BLOCK
Status block contents
2 : N+1
0x86
TAG
Status block contents
1:20
0x84
TAG
Data: from CBUF2
DS51647B-page 91
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-9:
EXEC TAG (EDATA) BYTES (CONTINUED)
TAG/EDATA
LEN
0x87
N+2
0x88
2
Name
Description
CBUF3_DATA
Data from CBUF3
PACKET_ID
0
TAG
1
Configuration byte
2 : N+1
Data: from CBUF3
Packet number
0
TAG
1
Data: arbitrary packet ID#
TAG byte 0x80 means the transaction is over. TAG byte 0x81 signifies that the following
data is the firmware version. 0x82 signifies that the data following is the control block
(CONTROL_BLOCK). 0x83 signifies that the data following data is the status block
(STATUS_BLOCK). The EXEC portion of STATUS_BLOCK is shown in Table 11-10.
TABLE 11-10: EXEC STATUS BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
EXEC
0
7:0
EXEC status
0
1
CBUF1 overflow
2
CBUF2 overflow
3
CBUF3 overflow
4
Data error (e.g. illegal TAG, missing TAG-dependent data, etc.)
5
Restore control block failed – defaults used
6
7
1
Composite error
7:0
EXEC status flags
0
SWITCH test active
1
SWITCH state i.e. 0: depressed, 1: released
2
3
4
5
6
7
2
7:0
3
7:0
TAG byte 0x84 is the script buffer status which shows availability of memory in each
buffer. TAG bytes 0x85, 0x86 and 0x87 identify data streams coming from RAM buffers
CBUF1, CBUF2 and CBUF3, respectively. RAM buffer 2 (CBUF2) is used in this architecture to queue the data stream from the COMM module to be sent to the host
software, thus TAG byte 0x86 identifies this stream.
TAG bytes 0x85 and 0x87 are typically unused.
11.5
COMM
The COMM module will decode TAG bytes from the data stream in the script buffer. The
TAG bytes may represent commands to internally configure the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer and report status, or the TAG bytes may be protocol specific identification that
DS51647B-page 92
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
needs to be translated into the device under test’s protocol and communicated to the
device. The COMM module performs both of these functions. This section will describe
the COMM TAGs common to all supported serial protocols. Table 11-11 describes the
TAGs (CCMD) used in the data stream to the COMM controller. Table 11-12 describes
TAGs (CDATA) used in the data stream from the COMM controller
.
TABLE 11-11: COMM SCRIPT COMMAND TAG BYTES
TAG/CCMD
LEN
0x00 – 0x0F
16
RESERVED
Reserved
0x10
3
Wait-1
Wait for time interval
0x12
0x13
0x15
2
2
3
Name
LED1
LED2
TIMEOUT_AB0_SET
Description
0
TAG
1
Time (LSB)
2
Time (MSB)
[res: 409.6 μsec, max: 26.843 sec]
Configure LED1
0
TAG
1
LED Configuration byte
Configure LED2
0
TAG
1
LED Configuration byte
Set time-out AB0
0
TAG
1
Time-out value (LSB)
2
Time-out value (MSB)
[res: 409.5 ms, max: 26.843 sec]
0x16
1
TIMEOUT_AB0_KILL
Kill/disable time-out AB0
0x17
3
TIMEOUT_AB1_SET
Set time-out AB1
0
TAG
0
TAG
1
Time-out value (LSB)
2
Time-out value (MSB)
[res: 409.6 ms, max: 26.843 sec]
0x18
1
TIMEOUT_AB1_KILL
Kill/disable timeout AB1
0x19
1
MACRO_CLEAR
Start macro definition
0x1A
N+2
MACRO_DATA_ADD
Add bytes to macro
0
0
0x1B
0x1C
0x1D
3
1
1
1
TAG
1
Byte count (N)
2
Data
N+1
Data
0
TAG
1
Loop count [0 = indefinitely]
2
Loop count [0 = indefinitely]
0
TAG
MACRO_RUN
Run macro
END_OF_SCRIPT
MACRO_DATA_START
Mark end of script
Mark start of “macro” data block
MACRO_DATA_END
TAG
Mark end of “macro” data block
0
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
TAG
0
0
0x1E
TAG
TAG
DS51647B-page 93
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-11: COMM SCRIPT COMMAND TAG BYTES (CONTINUED)
TAG/CCMD
LEN
0x1F
2
0x20
1
Name
MARKER
Description
Script “marker”
EVENT_TIMER_RESET
0
TAG
1
Marker
Event timer Reset
0
TAG
TABLE 11-12: COMM SCRIPT DATA TAG BYTES
TAG/CDATA
LEN
0x00 – 0x0F
16
RESERVED
RESERVED
0x10
2
DATA_BYTE
Data byte follows
0x11
N+2
Name
DATA_BYTES
Description
0
TAG
1
data
Data bytes follow
0
0x12
0x13
2
3
EVENT_MACRO_LOOP
EVENT_TIME
Byte count (N)
2
Data
N+1
Data
Macro loop count milestone message
0
TAG
1
Loop number
Time marker for previous event
0
TAG
1
Time LSB
2
Time MSB
[res: 409 usec, max: 26.8 sec]
0x14
1
EVENT_TIME_ROLLOVER
Event timer rollover
0x15
3
EVENT_MACRO_DONE
Macro loop complete
0
TAG
0
TAG
1
Loop count (LSB)
2
Loop count (MSB)
0x16
1
EVENT_MACRO_ROLLOVER Macro loop count rollover (65536)
(useful with infinite loop count)
0x17
1
EVENT_MACRO_ABORT
Macro execution was aborted by bit in command
block
0x18
1
EVENT_TIMEOUT_AB0
Timer AB0 timeout
0x19
1
EVENT_TIMEOUT_AB1
Timer AB1 timeout
0x1A
2
EVENT_STATUS_ERR
Status error
0
0
0
0
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
0
TAG
1
STATUS_BLOCK[04]
0x1B
1
EVENT_END_OF_SCRIPT
“End-of-Script” TAG encountered
0x1C
2
MARKER
“Marker” tag encountered
0
DS51647B-page 94
TAG
1
TAG
0
TAG
1
MARKER
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-13: COMM SCRIPT CONTROL BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
COMM: GENERAL
8
7:0
9
7:0
COMM mode:
00: IDLE
01: I2CM
02: SPI-M
04: USART-A
05: USART-SM
07: I2CS
0A: LIN
0B: MWIRE-M
COMM control bits
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
1 = Enable event markers – global
1 = Enable event markers – time stamp
n/a
n/a
1 = Enable PULLUPS
1 = VSRC: On
1 = VSRC: variable
1 = Abort macro execution
Bit flags
1 = Event marker enable: macro loop
1 = Event marker enable: macro loop 65536
1 = Event marker enable: macro loop done
1 = Event marker enable: time-out AB0
1 = Event marker enable: time-out AB1
1 = Event marker enable: status error (STATUS_BLOCK[04] ! = 0)
1 = (Unassigned)
1 = (Unassigned)
N/A
VSRC 8-bit setting
VSRC Fault Threshold
N/A
N/A
10
11
12
13
14
15
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 95
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-14: COMM SCRIPT STATUS BLOCK
Byte
Bit
4
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
Description
COMM: GENERAL
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
11.6
COMM status: error
Time-out AB0
Time-out AB1
COMM initialization error
VSRC fault
Data error (e.g., unrecognized TAG, missing data, etc.)
Output buffer overrun (CBUF2)
Output buffer overrun (CBUF3)
Composite error
COMM status: informational
Controller busy
Executing MACRO
Executing MACRO – infinite loop
Executing WAIT instruction
“End-of-Script” TAG encountered
COMM mode
VSRC Measurement (0-255)
I2CM COMMUNICATIONS
I2CM refers to the Master mode of the I2C protocol. See the I2C specification for protocol details. In this mode, the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer will master the I2C bus only. It will
not respond as a slave. The control block of memory dedicated to communication
allows for setting of the bit rate and displaying event markers in the software windows.
TABLE 11-15: CONNECTOR PINOUT IN I2CM MODE
DS51647B-page 96
Pin
Description
1
—
2
+V
3
GND
4
SDA
5
SCL
6
—
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-16: I2CM CONTROL BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
2
COMM: I CM
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
Bit flags
1 = event marker enable: Start bit
1 = event marker enable: Stop bit
1 = event marker enable: Restart bit
1 = event marker enable: ack/nack tx
n/a
1 = event marker enable: ack/nack rx
n/a
1 = event marker enable: write byte
Bit flags
1 = event marker enable: read byte
1 = event marker enable: transaction error
1 = event marker enable: status error (STATUS_BLOCK[12] != 0)
AUX1 – default state (0 | 1)
AUX2 – default state (0 | 1)
AUX1 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
AUX2 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BIT RATE = (FOSC / (4 * (X + 1)) min: 0, max: 127
49 => 100k bps
127 => 39k bps
DS51647B-page 97
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-17: I2CM STATUS BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
2
COMM: I CM
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
Bit flags: error status
WCOL error
SSPOV error
received NACK when ACK was expected
Composite error
Bit flags: info status
AUX1 – state (0 | 1)
AUX2 – state (0 | 1)
AUX1 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
AUX2 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
SDA Line Voltage (255 = 5V)
SCL Line Voltage (255 = 5V)
BIT RATE CODE currently in use
The I2CM TAG/CCMND bytes are used by the host (software) to describe an I2C transaction in ‘script’ form. The script is sent via USB to the script buffer (CBUF1) and interpreted by the COMM controller to execute the transaction on the I2C bus. The return
data stream contains I2C read data as well as ‘event marker’ TAGs that mark the
occurrence of each entity of the I2C transaction (e.g., TAG: 0x81 indicates a “Start” bit)
DS51647B-page 98
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
.
TABLE 11-18: I2CM ‘CMD’ TAG BYTES
TAG/CCMD
0x80
LEN
Name
2
1
I CM_INIT
1
I2
1
2
I CM_STOP
1
I2
N+2
2
Description
Initialize master
0
0x81
CM_START
TAG
2
Issue I C™ Start
0
0x82
TAG
2
Issue I C™ Stop
0
0x83
CM_RESTART
TAG
2
Issue I C™ Restart
0
0x84
0x85
0x86
2
I CM_WRITE_BYTES
I2CM_READ_BYTES
1
I2CM_READ_BLOCK
2
I2CM_BIT_RATE
Write bytes
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
2
data byte
N+1
data byte
Read bytes – ACK all bytes
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
Read block – ACK all bytes
0
0x87
0x88
1
I2CM_RESET
2
I2CM_READ_BYTES_NLB
Set
0x8A
1
I2CM_READ_BLOCK_NLB
1
I2
1
I2CM
1
I2CM
1
I2CM
1
I2CM
CM_AUX1_RST
1
bit rate
Reset MSSP module
_AUX1_SET
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
Read block – NACK last byte
_AUX1_OUT
_AUX1_IN
_AUX1_WAIT_0
TAG
AUX1 direction: INPUT
TAG
wait AUX1 == 0
0
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
TAG
AUX1 direction: OUTPUT
0
0x94
TAG
AUX1: 1
0
0x93
TAG
AUX1: 0
0
0x92
TAG
Read bytes – NACK last byte
0
0x91
bit rate
TAG
0
0x90
TAG
I2C™
0
0
0x89
TAG
TAG
DS51647B-page 99
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-18: I2CM ‘CMD’ TAG BYTES (CONTINUED)
0x95
1
I2CM _AUX1_WAIT_1
wait AUX1 == 1
0
0x96
2
1
I CM _AUX2_RST
1
I2
1
2
I CM _AUX2_OUT
1
I2
1
I2
1
I2CM
AUX2: 0
0
0x97
CM _AUX2_SET
CM _AUX2_IN
CM _AUX2_WAIT_0
_AUX2_WAIT_1
TAG
wait AUX2 == 0
0
0x9B
TAG
AUX2 direction: INPUT
0
0x9A
TAG
AUX2 direction: OUTPUT
0
0x99
TAG
AUX2: 1
0
0x98
TAG
TAG
wait AUX2 == 1
0
TAG
An example of a data stream in the script buffer that would direct the COMM back to
communicate in I2C to the unit.
Under test is as follows:
0x81
I2CM_START
0x84
I2CM_WRITE_BYTES
0x02
Number of bytes
0xA8
I2C™ address for writing
0x01
I2C™ command code
0x83
I2CM_RESTART
0x84
I2CM_WRITE_BYTES
0x01
Number of bytes
0xA9
I2C™ address for reading
0x89
I2CM_READ_BYTES_NLB
0x01
Number of bytes
0x82
I2CM_STOP
The script (above) is interpreted as follows. TAG 0x81 instructs the COMM module to
generate an I2C ‘Start’ bit on the I2C bus. TAG 0x84 indicates 2 bytes will be transmitted
following the start – 0xA8 and 0x01. The first byte is the I2C slave address (with
write/read bit Reset) and a data/command byte of 0x01. The COMM module does not
place any significance on the value of the data bytes but merely transmits them ‘blindly’
– as instructed. The next TAG 0x83 instructs the COMM module to issue a Restart bit
on the I2C bus. TAG and data bytes - 0x84, 0x01, 0xA9 – will cause 1 byte (0xA9) to
be transmitted. Here again, the COMM module does not interpret the data – the I2C
slave will interpret 0xA9 as an address with write/read bit set. TAG 0x89 followed by
data byte 0x01 instructs the COMM module to attempt to read 1 byte from the slave
then issue a NACK on the bus. Finally, an I2C ‘Stop’ bit is issued according to tag 0x82.
The resulting I2C transaction looks like this on the bus:
[START][A8][01][RESTART][A9][data byte received][STOP]
As the script is executed, a data stream will be developed using TAGs/CDATA
(described in Table 11-19) and returned to the host software via CBUF2.
DS51647B-page 100
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-19: I2CM ‘DATA’ TAG BYTES
TAG/
CDATA
LEN
0x80
1
Name
I2CM_EVENT_START_TX
Description
Start bit event
0
0x81
1
2
I CM_EVENT_STOP_TX
Stop bit event
0
0x82
1
2
I CM_EVENT_RESTART_TX
0x83
1
I CM_EVENT_ACK_TX
0x84
1
I CM_EVENT_NACK_TX
1
I
2CM_EVENT_ACK_RX
I
2CM_EVENT_NACK_RX
I
2CM_EVENT_BYTE_TX
1
0x88
0x89
0x8A
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
2
2
2
2
I2CM_EVENT_BYTE_RX
I
I
2CM_EVENT_XACT_ERR
2CM_EVENT_STATUS_ERR
CDATA-TAG
NACK bit event
0
0x87
CDATA-TAG
ACK bit event
0
0x86
CDATA-TAG
NACK bit event
0
0x85
CDATA-TAG
ACK bit event
0
2
CDATA-TAG
Restart bit event
0
2
CDATA-TAG
CDATA-TAG
BYTE transmit
0
CDATA-TAG
1
data
BYTE transmit
0
CDATA-TAG
1
data
transaction error
0
CDATA-TAG
1
error byte
status error
0
CDATA-TAG
1
error byte
DS51647B-page 101
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.7
I2CS COMMUNICATIONS
The I2CS communication mode is a flexible I2C slave that can be configured to respond
to one or more bus addresses. Three operating modes (described below) provide several levels of sophistication and operability. In all modes, transactions can be reported
to the host using optional PKSA event tags. Additionally, mode-dependant data is available as described below.
TABLE 11-20:
MODE
NAME
DESCRIPTION
0
DEFAULT
basic/mechanical mode of operation in which the PKSA
blindly accepts any/all ‘write’ data and provides
canned/default ‘read’ data in response to any enabled
I2C address and all device registers/addresses (data
defined in CONTROL_BLOCK).
1
INTERACTIVE
This mode allows the host to orchestrate I2C transactions
in ‘real time’. This necessarily requires the host to provide
‘read’ data as needed while the PKSA holds the I2C bus
clock line (waiting). ‘Write’ data is reported to the host via
transaction event tags.
2
AUTO
In AUTO mode the PKSA operates autonomously as
defined by a ‘soft’ “SLAVE PROFILE” table stored in
PKSA RAM (described below). At any time the host can
read and/or update the table contents as needed.
Note:
The ability to service multiple slave addresses is hampered by a bug in
silicon - versions A3 and before. Slave address MASK should be set to
zero (“0”).
11.7.1
Modes
11.7.1.1
MODE: DEFAULT
As stated in the introduction, the DEFAULT mode requires little/no configuration and
results in minimal transaction latencies. This mode is of limited use in that it does not
provide for address-dependant (dynamic) read data. The CONTROL_BLOCK is the
source of ‘read’ data for any/all addresses. Of course optional EVENT markers report
I2C transactions to the host.
DS51647B-page 102
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
FIGURE 11-2:
PKSA
EXEC
CONTROL
B
STATUS
H
O
S
T
COMM
I2CS
I2 C
USB
CBUF1
CBUF2
A
D
E
V
I
C
E
CBUF3
A - event data
B - I2C read data
11.7.1.1.1
Operation
The ‘DEFAULT’ mode requires very little configuration/initialization.
1. Issue COLD START
2. Write CONFIGURATION BLOCK (with COMM=I2CS and MODE = 0)
3. Issue WARM START
11.7.1.2
MODE: INTERACTIVE
The INTERACTIVE mode provides the greatest flexibility but at the expense of transaction latencies. The host monitors I2C transactions near real time using EVENT markers. Should a transaction require ‘read’ data (to return to the I2C master), the I2C bus
is suspended (by holding the clock line low) until the host supplies data via the standard
‘script’ buffer.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 103
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE 11-3:
PKSA
EXEC
CONTROL
COMM
I2CS
STATUS
H
O
S
T
I2 C
USB
CBUF1
CBUF2
B
A
D
E
V
I
C
E
CBUF3
A - event data
B - I2C read data
11.7.1.2.1
Operation
Execute the following sequence for initialization:
1. Issue COLD START (Reset)
2. Write CONFIGURATION BLOCK (with COMM=I2CS, MODE=1, EVENT MARKERS enabled)
3. Issue WARM START
The HOST must monitor I2C transactions via the EVENT MARKERS. Should the I2C
MASTER request ‘read’ data, the PKSA will hold the I2C SCK line low and alert the
HOST with SDATA TAG: I2CS_DATA_RQ. The HOST must supply data to the PKSA
to be returned to the I2CS MASTER using SCMND TAG: I2CS_SEND_BYTES. If more
data is supplied than is required for the transaction, the remaining data will be discarded. If an insufficient number of bytes are supplied by the HOST, the PKSA will
return all data supplied then hold SCK line low and re-issue SCMND TAG:
I2CS_DATA_RQ to the HOST.
11.7.1.3
MODE: AUTO
AUTO is the most sophisticated mode allowing the PKSA to operate ‘autonomously’
from a ‘slave profile’ loaded in PKSA RAM (CBUF3). The slave profile defines one or
more I2C slave addresses and a unique set of device registers for each. The device
registers can be defined in two ways – (1) discrete, non-contiguous registers of various
lengths or (2) a block of contiguous addresses with flexible access to 1 or more bytes
within that block in a single transaction. Additionally, each register can be defined as
Read/Write, Read-only or Write-only.
The 2 bytes in the PKSA CONTROL BLOCK, ADDRESS and MASK, defines the set of
SLAVE addresses that the PKSA will ‘ACKNOWLEDGE’. All addresses excluded by
the ADDRESS and MASK will be automatically ‘NOT ACKNOWLEDGED’. For all
acknowledged address the pre-loaded SLAVE PROFILE dictates the
response/behavior.
For I2C transactions involving SLAVE ADDRESSES or REGISTERS not defined in the
SLAVE PROFILE, WRITE data is discarded and a READ data is defaulted (0xFF). Similarly, writing to a ‘READ-ONLY’ register or attempting to write beyond the addressable
DS51647B-page 104
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
limits of the register will cause the write data to be discarded. Reading from a
‘WRITE-ONLY’ register or attempting to read beyond the addressable limits of the register will result in default data (0xFF).
FIGURE 11-4:
PKSA
EXEC
CONTROL
COMM
I2CS
STATUS
H
O
S
T
I2 C
USB
CBUF1
CBUF2
CBUF3
(PROFILE)
A
D
E
V
I
C
E
B
A - event data
B - I2C read data
11.7.1.3.1
Operation:
The HOST configures the AUTO mode as follows:
1. Issue COLD START (Reset)
2. Write CONFIGURATION BLOCK (comm=I2CS, mode=2, appropriate EVENT
MARKERS enabled)
3. Write SLAVE PROFILE to CBUF3
4. Issue WARM START
The AUTO mode allows the PKSA to operate autonomously (i.e. without HOST intervention). Practically speaking, the HOST GUI will most likely want to reflect activity with
the SLAVE registers as it occurs. A couple options can be employed.
Option 1 would call for the HOST to enable I2C transaction EVENT MARKERS detailing
each I2C transaction in which the PKSA participated. This requires that the HOST
decode/interpret the transactions on a byte-by-byte basis.
Option 2 utilizes the ‘register access’ EVENT MARKERS (I2CS_EVENT_REG_READ
& I2CS_EVENT_REG_WRITE) fired to the HOST when a register within the SLAVE
PROFILE is accessed. The fact that a slave register was read is an ‘event’ but does not
represent a change in the data loaded in the SLAVE PROFILE. In the event that a register within the SLAVE PROFILE was written, it may be important for the HOST monitoring the SLAVE PROFILE to fetch the ‘new’ data from that register for
processing/display. Data is retrieved from a register using SCMND TAG:
I2CS_REGDATA_READ. The register contents are returned with SDATA TAG:
I2CS_REGDATA.
The register contents can be written or read by the HOST. To insure data integrity of
multi-byte registers, the contents are accessed only ‘between’ I2C transactions. This
may cause a slight delay in executing the request or in servicing the next/pending I2C
transactions.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 105
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.7.1.3.2
Slave Profile
In AUTO mode the PKSA personality is defined by a “slave profile” downloaded by the
host to PKSA RAM i.e. CBUF3. The profile defines one or more I2C slave addresses
and a set of one or more device REGISTERS for each. The profile must begin with a
SLAVE ADDRESS TAG and be terminated by an ‘END’ TAG.
TABLE 11-21:
TABLE-TAG(1)
DESCRIPTION
0x10
SLAVE ADDRESS
0x2X
REGISTER DEFINITION
0x40
END OF SLAVE PROFILE
Note 1:
The upper nibble defines the TABLE-TAG, the lower nibble is reserved for
option flags
TABLE 11-22: TABLE-TAG: SLAVE ADDRESS (0X20)
TABLE-TAG: SLAVE ADDR: 0x20
DATA: SLAVE ADDRESS
DATA: (RESERVED)
DATA: (RESERVED)
The SLAVE definition is 4 bytes long (including the TAG). Two bytes are reserved for
firmware operation.
TABLE 11-23: TABLE-TAG: REGISTER DEFINITION
TABLE-TAG: REG DEF: 0x4X
DATA: REGISTER ID / # / ADDRESS
DATA: BYTE COUNT = N
DATA: DATA[0]
...
DATA: DATA[N-3]
The length of a REGISTER definition is flexible.
Lower nibble of TABLE-TAG is defined as option bits (refer to table below):
TABLE 11-24:
TABLE-TAG[3]
‘memory block’ of sequential locations beginning with register #
TABLE-TAG[2]
TABLE-TAG[1]
disable READ
TABLE-TAG[0]
disable WRITE
A ‘memory block’ is a set of N contiguous addresses beginning with ‘REGISTER ID’.
An I2C transaction is permitted to access one or more bytes anywhere within the block.
TABLE 11-25: TABLE-TAG: END
TABLE-TAG: END: 0x80
DS51647B-page 106
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
EXAMPLE
The following SLAVE PROFILE defines 2 slave addresses – 2 registers for 1 and 1
register block for the other.
TABLE 11-26:
TABLE TAG SLAVE ADDR
0x20
DATA: SLAVE ADDR
0x16
DATA: (RESERVED)
0x00
DATA: (RESERVED)
0x00
DATA: TABLE-TAG: REGISTER DEF
0x41
DATA: REGISTER #
0x21
DATA: BYTE COUNT
0x02
DATA:
0x34
DATA:
0x12
DATA: TABLE-TAG: REGISTER DEF
0x40
DATA: REGISTER #
0x22
DATA: BYTE COUNT
0x01
DATA:
0x56
TABLE TAG SLAVE ADDR
0X20
DATA: SLAVE ADDR
0x18
DATA: (RESERVED)
0x00
DATA: (RESERVED)
0x00
DATA: TABLE-TAG: REGISTER DEF
0x48
DATA: REGISTER ID
0x00
DATA: BYTE COUNT
0x04
DATA:
0x12
DATA:
0x34
DATA:
0x56
DATA:
0x78
TABLE-TAG: END
0x80
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 107
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.7.2
Configuration / Status
11.7.2.1
CONTROL_BLOCK
TABLE 11-27:
BYTE
BIT
DESCRIPTION
COMM: I2CS
16
7:0
Mode:
0=default
1=interactive
2=automatic (register table)
17
7:0
bit flags – EVENT MARKERS
0
1= event marker enable: ADDR RX
1
1= event marker enable: DATA RX
2
1= event marker enable: DATA TX
3
1= event marker enable: ACK RX
4
1= event marker enable: NACK RX
5
1= event marker enable: REG READ
6
1= event marker enable: REG WRITE
7
1= event marker enable: status error
18
7:0
0
1= event marker enable: START (reserved – not implemented)
1
1= event marker enable: STOP
2
1= event marker enable: DATA RQ
3
4
5
6
7
DS51647B-page 108
19
7:0
20
7:0
MODE 0 read data (bytes 1 thru N)
21
7:0
MODE 0 read data (byte 0)
22
7:0
SLAVE ADDRESS
23
7:0
SLAVE ADDRESS MASK
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.7.2.2
STATUS_BLOCK
TABLE 11-28:
BYTE
BIT
DESCRIPTION
COMM: I2CS
12
7:0
bit flags: error status
0
Slave profile malformed (mode 2)
1
2
3
4
13
5
SSPOV
6
WCOL
7
composite error
7:0
bit flags: info status
0
SCK line state (0 | 1)
1
SDA line state (0 | 1)
2
3
4
5
6
7
14
7:0
15
7:0
16
7:0
17
7:0
18
7:0
19
7:0
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 109
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.7.3
Communication Tags
11.7.3.1
TAG: SCMND:
TABLE 11-29:
TAG /
SCMND
LEN
NAME
DESCRIPTION
0xC0
1
I2CS_INIT
initialize I2C controller
0xC1
N+2
I2CS_SEND_BYTES
(mode 1)
send/provide ‘read’ bytes
0
0xC2
0xC3
DS51647B-page 110
N+3
3
I2
CS_REGDATA_LOAD
(mode 2)
I2CS_REGDATA_RETURN
(mode 2)
TAG
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
2
data
N+1
data
write/load register definition
0
TAG
1
Slave address
2
Register ID
3
Byte count(N)
4
Data
N+3
Data
read/return register definition
0
TAG
1
Slave Address
2
Register ID
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.7.3.2
TAG: SDATA:
TABLE 11-30:
TAG /
SDATA
0xC0
0xC1
0xC2
LEN
2
2
2
NAME
I2CS_EVENT_ADDR
I2CS_EVENT_DATA_RX
I2CS_EVENT_DATA_TX
DESCRIPTION
ADDRESS byte received
0
SDATA-TAG
1
data (address)
DATA byte received (Master write)
0
SDATA-TAG
1
data
DATA byte sent (Master read)
0
SDATA-TAG
1
data
0xC3
1
I2CS_EVENT_ACK_RX
ACK received
0xC4
1
I2CS_EVENT_NACK_RX
NACK received
0xC5
1
I2CS_EVENT_START
0xC6
1
I2CS_EVENT_STOP
0xC7
2
I2CS_EVENT_STATUS_ER Status error
R
0
SDATA-TAG
0
0
1
0xC9
0xCA
0xCB
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
1
1
N+3
SDATA-TAG
STOP bit received
0
1
SDATA-TAG
START bit received
0
0xC8
SDATA-TAG
SDATA-TAG
error status byte
I2CS_DATA_RQ
(mode 1)
DATA request (master read)
I2CS_EVENT_REG_READ
(mode 2)
REG READ
I2CS_EVENT_REG_WRIT
E
(mode 2)
I2CS_REGDATA
(mode 2)
0
SDATA-TAG
0
SDATA-TAG
1
Slave Address
2
Register ID
REG WRITE
0
SDATA-TAG
1
Slave Address
2
Register ID
register data
0
TAG
1
Slave Address
2
Register ID
3
Byte count = N
4
Data
N+3
Data
DS51647B-page 111
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.8
SPI COMMUNICATIONS
SPI is a 4-wire serial protocol that uses data in, data out, clock and Chip Select pins. It
is a very basic protocol using a clock edge to capture data. The CONTROL_BLOCK is
used to enable SPI event markers, set the bit rate and configure transaction/protocol
options.
TABLE 11-31: CONNECTOR PINOUT IN SPI MODE
Pin
Description
1
CS
2
+V
3
GND
4
SDI
5
SCK
6
SDO
TABLE 11-32: SPI CONTROL BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
COMM: SPI
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
Bit flags
1 = Event marker enable: read byte
1 = Event marker enable: write byte
1 = Event marker enable: status error
1=
1=
1=
1=
1=
SPI Configuration bits
1 = SMP (sample phase)
1 = CKE (clock edge select)
1 = CKP (clock polarity)
1 = DAOD (disable auto output disable on data input)
n/a
n/a
n/a
CSPOL (Chip Select Polarity), 0=LO TRUE, 1=HI TRUE (1)
BIT RATE: Pre-scale code
BIT RATE: Scaling code
Note 1: CSPOL determines the ‘active’ state of CS,
if CSPOL=0, CS is active low
if CSPOL=1, CS is active high
upon initialization, CS is set ‘inactive’
DS51647B-page 112
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-33: BIT RATE CODES
FOSC
20 MHz
20 MHz
20 MHz
20 MHz
20 MHz
20 MHz
Pre-Scale
Code
Pre-Scale
Value
Scale
Code
Scale
Value
Total Scale
Value
0x00
0x00
0x01
0x01
0x02
0x02
8
8
32
32
128
128
0x00
0xFF
0x00
0xFF
0x00
0xFF
1
256
1
256
1
256
8
2048
32
8192
128
32768
Bit Rate
2.500 MHz
9.766 kHz
0.625 MHz
2.441 kHz
0.156 MHz
0.610 kHz
TABLE 11-34: SPI STATUS BLOCK
Byte
Bit
Description
COMM: SPI
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
Bit flags: error status
WCOL error
SSPOV error
Composite error
SPI Configuration bits
1 = SMP (sample phase)
1 = CKE (clock edge select)
1 = CKP (clock polarity)
1 = AOD (auto output disable on data input)
1 = SS
1=
1 = SLAVE
1 = MASTER
BIT RATE: Pre-scale (ref: section: x.x.x)
BIT RATE: Scaling (ref: section: x.x.x)
DS51647B-page 113
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-35: SPI ‘CMD’ TAG BYTES
TAG/CCMD
LEN
0x83
3
SPI_BITRATE
0x84
2
SPI_DATAIO_IN
0x85
N+2
SPI_DATAIO_OUT
0x86
N+2
SPI_DATAIO_INOUT
0x87
1
SPI_SDO_IN
0x88
1
SPI_SDO_OUT
0x8A
1
SPI_INIT
0x8B
1
SPI_CS_ON
0x8C
1
SPI_CS_OFF
Note 1:
Name
Description
Set bit rate
0
TAG
1
scaler
2
pre-scaler
(ref section x.x.x)
Input data
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
Output data
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
2
data
N+1 data
Output data
0
TAG
1
byte count (N)
2
data
N+1 data
Set SDO pin to INPUT (tri-state)
0
TAG
Set SDO pin to OUTPUT
0
TAG
Initialize SPI controller per
CONTROL BLOCK
0
TAG
Assert CS(1)
0
TAG
De-assert CS(1)
0
TAG
CS polarity is determined by CONTROL BLOCK configuration bit CSPOL
CSPOL=0, asserting sets CS=0, de-asserting sets CS=1
CSPOL=1, asserting sets CS=1, de-asserting sets CS=0
TABLE 11-36: SPI ‘DATA’ TAG BYTES
DS51647B-page 114
TAG/CDATA
LEN
Name
0x80
2
SPI_EVENT_BYTE_TX
0x81
2
SPI_EVENT_BYTE_RX
0x82
2
SPI_EVENT_STATUS_ERR
Description
BYTE transmit
0 TAG
1 data
BYTE transmit
0 TAG
1 data
Status error
0 TAG
1 error byte
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.9
USART COMMUNICATIONS
Universal Synchronous Asynchronous Receive Transmit (USART) protocol is a standard 2-wire serial communication. In Asynchronous mode, there is a transmit line and
a receive line. In Synchronous mode, the transmit line becomes the clock line and the
receive line becomes the bidirectional data line. In Asynchronous mode, 8 bits are
framed by a Start and Stop bit. A ninth bit can be included to use as a parity bit.
To configure the protocol, set the clock polarity to rising edge or falling edge if using
Synchronous mode. Select the baud rate according to the BRG table.
TABLE 11-37: CONNECTOR PINOUT IN USART ASYNCHRONOUS MODE
Pin
Description
1
TX
2
+V
3
GND
4
—
5
—
6
RX
TABLE 11-38: CONNECTOR PINOUT IN USART SYNCHRONOUS MODE
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
Pin
Description
1
Clock
2
+V
3
GND
4
—
5
—
6
Data
DS51647B-page 115
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-39: USART CONTROL BLOCK
Byte
Bit
16
17
7:0
7:0
0
Description
COMM: USART
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
18
19
20
21
22
23
n/a
1 = clock polarity (dflt) 1 = hi-lo at start bit cell, 0 = lo-hi
(USART-SM only, ignored otherwise)
1 = n/a
1 = Async receive disable
(USART-A only, ignored otherwise)
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = Event marker enable: read byte
1 = Event marker enable: write byte
1 = Event marker enable: status error
1 = Event marker enable: break tx
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
1 = n/a
n/a
n/a
bit flags
AUX1 – default state (0 | 1)
AUX2 – default state (0 | 1)
AUX1 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
AUX2 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BRG (BAUD) default (LSB)
BRG (BAUD) default (MSB)
TABLE 11-40: BRG BAUD RATE TABLE
BAUD = FOSC/(4*(BRG + 1))
DS51647B-page 116
BAUD
BRG
ACTUAL
ERR
300
16666
300.0
0.00%
1200
4166
1199.9
-0.01%
4800
1041
4798.5
-0.03%
9600
520
9596.9
-0.03%
19200
259
19230.8
0.16%
28800
173
28735.6
-0.22%
57600
86
57471.3
-0.22%
115200
42
116279.1
0.94%
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-41: USART STATUS BLOCK
Byte
Bit
12
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
0
Description
COMM: USART
13
14
1
2
15
16
17
18
19
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
7:0
7:0
7:0
Bit flags: error status
FERR – framing error
OERR – overrun error
INIT error (bad “mode”)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Composite error
1= clock polarity (dflt) 1= hi-lo at start bit cell, 0= lo-hi
(USART-SM only, ignored otherwise)
1 = n/a
1 = Async receive disabled
(USART-A only, ignored otherwise)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
AUX1 – state (0 | 1)
AUX2 – state (0 | 1)
AUX1 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
AUX2 – direction (1=IN, 0=OUT)
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
BRG (BAUD) default (LSB)
BRG (BAUD) default (MSB)
DS51647B-page 117
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE 11-42: USART ‘CMD’ TAG BYTES
TAG/
CCMD
LEN
0x80
1
0x82
N+2
Name
Description
USART_INIT
Initialize USART controller
USART_DATA_XMT
Transmit data
0
0
0x83
0x84
0x85
2
1
1
TAG
1
Byte count = N
2
Data
N+1
Data
USART _DATA_SRCV
(USART-SM only)
Receive data
USART_DATA_ARCV_ENABLE
(USART-A only)
Enable receive data monitor
USART_DATA_ARCV_DISABLE
(USART-A only)
Disable receive data monitor
0
TAG
1
Byte count = N
0
0
TAG
TAG
0x86
1
USART_BREAK_XMT
(USART-A only)
send BREAK
0x87
2
USART_BREAK_DATA_XMT
(USART-A only)
send BREAK then DATA byte
USART_BAUD
set BAUD rate
0x88
3
0
TAG
0
TAG
1
DATA byte (TYP: 0x55)
0
TAG
1
BAUD value (LSB)
2
BAUD value (MSB)
(Reference section x x x)
0x89
1
USART_SCKP_SET
(USART-SM only)
set “CLOCK POLARITY” bit
0x8A
1
USART_SCKP_RST
(USART-SM only)
reset “CLOCK POLARITY” bit
0x90
1
USART_AUX1_RST
AUX1: 0
0x91
1
USART_AUX1_SET
AUX1: 1
0x92
1
USART_AUX1_OUT
AUX1 direction: OUTPUT
0x93
1
USART_AUX1_IN
AUX1 direction: INPUT
0x94
1
USART_AUX1_WAIT_0
wait AUX1 == 0
0x95
1
USART_AUX1_WAIT_1
wait AUX1 == 1
0x96
1
USART_AUX2_RST
AUX2: 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
DS51647B-page 118
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
TABLE 11-42: USART ‘CMD’ TAG BYTES (CONTINUED)
0x97
1
USART_AUX2_SET
AUX2: 1
0x98
1
USART_AUX2_OUT
AUX2 direction: OUTPUT
0x99
1
USART_AUX2_IN
AUX2 direction: INPUT
0x9A
1
USART_AUX2_WAIT_0
wait AUX2 == 0
0x9B
1
USART_AUX2_WAIT_1
wait AUX2 == 1
0
0
0
0
0
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TAG
TABLE 11-43: USART ‘DATA’ TAG BYTES
TAG/
CDATA
LEN
0x80
2
0x81
0x82
0x83
2
2
1
Name
USART_EVENT_BYTE_TX
USART_EVENT_BYTE_RX
USART_EVENT_STATUS_ERR
USART_EVENT_BREAK_TX
Description
BYTE transmit
0
TAG
1
data
BYTE received
0
TAG
1
data
Status error
0
TAG
1
error byte
BREAK transmitted
0
TAG
11.10 LIN COMMUNICATIONS
11.10.1 Introduction
The PKSA ‘LIN’ support is confined to MASTER and MONITOR functionality. As a
MASTER, the PKSA accepts instruction from the HOST in the form of script TAG(s).
Execution of the script results in the PKSA transmitting on the LIN bus as a MASTER.
In practice, the transmission would constitute a LIN frame header or an entire LIN
frame i.e. message.
As a LIN bus MONITOR, the PKSA can detect and report all events / transactions on
the bus generated by other devices on the bus or generated by the PKSA MASTER
module. The ‘event marker’ TAG(s) are used to report bus activity in its variety of forms
but must be enabled, individually, using CONTROL_BLOCK configuration bits as seen
below.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 119
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
11.10.2 Configuration / Status
11.10.2.1 CONTROL_BLOCK
TABLE 11-44:
BYTE
BIT
DESCRIPTION
COMM: LIN
16
17
DS51647B-page 120
7:0
bit flags
0
1= n/a
1
1= n/a
2
1= n/a
3
1= set LIN adapter chip select line HI
4
1= n/a
5
1= n/a
6
1= receive enable
7
1= enable auto baud detect / set
7:0
bit flags
0
1= event marker enable: data RX
1
1= event marker enable: data TX
2
1= event marker enable: break TX
3
1= event marker enable: break RX
4
1= event marker enable: auto baud
5
n/a
6
n/a
7
1= event marker enable: status error
18
7:0
n/a
19
7:0
n/a
20
7:0
n/a
21
7:0
n/a
22
7:0
BAUD rate (BRG code) default (LSB)
23
7:0
BAUD rate (BRG code) default (MSB)
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.10.2.2 STATUS_BLOCK
TABLE 11-45:
BYTE
BIT
DESCRIPTION
COMM: LIN
12
13
7:0
bit flags: error
0
FERR – framing error
1
OERR – overrun error
2
FAULT – from LIN bus adapter
3
AUTOBAUD detect error (e.g. overflow)
4
n/a
5
n/a
6
INIT error
7
composite error
7:0
bit flags: status
0
PIN state: FAULT
1
PIN state: CS
2
AUTOBAUD detect in progress
3
n/a
4
n/a
5
n/a
6
n/a
7
n/a
14
7:0
n/a
15
7:0
n/a
16
7:0
n/a
17
7:0
n/a
18
7:0
currently active BAUD rate (BRG code) (LSB)
19
7:0
currently active BAUD rate (BRG code) (MSB)
11.10.2.3 CONFIGURATION CONSIDERATIONS
The PKSA can be configured to operate as LIN bus MASTER, MONITOR or both.
MASTER
To configure the PKSA to perform as LIN bus MASTER, the HOST must write the
CONTROL_BLOCK to specify:
1. default BAUD rate
2. LIN adapter ‘chip select’ line state
Optionally,
1. set ‘receive enable’ configuration bit to allow the PKSA to receive RX data and
report it to the HOST
2. enable desired event markers
MONITOR
To configure the PKSA to perform as LIN bus MONITOR, the HOST must write the
CONTROL_BLOCK to specify:
1. LIN adapter ‘chip select’ line state
2. set ‘receive enable’ configuration bit to allow the PKSA to receive RX data and
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 121
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
report it to the HOST
3. set ‘auto baud enable’ configuration bit to allow PKSA to track baud rate of bus
transactions
Optionally,
1. enable desired combination of event markers
11.10.3 Communication Tags
11.10.3.1 TAG: SCMND:
TAG commands and data sent to the PICkit Serial Analyzer.
TABLE 11-46:
TAG /
SCMND
LEN
NAME
0x80
1
LIN_INIT
0x81
N+2
LIN_XMT_DATA(1)
DESCRIPTION
initialize USART controller
0
0x82
1
LIN_XMT_BRK
0
TAG
1
Byte count = N
2
Data
N+1
Data
transmit BREAK
0
0x83
0x84
0x85
Note 1:
DS51647B-page 122
N+2
N+2
3
LIN_XMT_BRK_DATA(1)
LIN_XMT_FRAME(1)
LIN_BAUD_SET
TAG
transmit DATA byte(s)
TAG
transmit BREAK then DATA bytes
(the data must include SYNC char)
0
TAG
1
Byte count = N
2
Data (SYNC character)
N+1
Data
transmit DATA byte(s)
(implied leading BREAK & SYNC)
0
TAG
1
Byte count = N
2
Data
N+1
Data
set BAUD rate
0
TAG
1
BAUD code (LSB)
2
BAUD code (MSB)
Data bytes (i.e. ‘frame’ to be published) must include the appropriate
CHECKSUM – ‘enhanced’ CHECKSUM if frame is destined for a LIN 2.0
slave. The PKSA has no comprehension of data content or ‘format’ – data
bytes are simply transmitted verbatim.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
11.10.3.2 TAG: SDATA:
TAG commands and data returned from the PICkit Serial Analyzer.
TABLE 11-47:
TAG /
SDATA
0x80
0x81
0x82
0x83
LEN
2
2
2
1
NAME
LIN_EVENT_BYTE_RX
LIN _EVENT_BYTE_TX
LIN _EVENT_STATUS_ERR
LIN _EVENT_BREAK_RX
DESCRIPTION
BYTE received
0
TAG
1
data
BYTE transmitted
0
TAG
1
data
status error
0
TAG
1
error byte
BREAK received
0
0x84
1
LIN _EVENT_BREAK_TX
BREAK transmitted
0
0x85
3
LIN _EVENT_AUTOBAUD
TAG
TAG
AUTOBAUD event
0
TAG
1
BAUD CODE (LSB)
2
BAUD CODE (MSB)
Those TAGs (above) identified as ‘EVENT’, generally mark the occurrence of LIN bus
activity. As with all other supported PKSA serial protocols, the ‘EVENT’ TAGs are generated when/as are detected in real time and queued in a circular buffer for transmission to the HOST. Each TAG can be individually enabled/disabled using the appropriate
configuration bit in the CONTROL BLOCK.
11.10.4 Parameter Detail
11.10.4.1 BAUD
The PKSA BAUD rate is configured by a 2-byte code as detailed in the table(s) below.
Upon initialization, the PKSA is configured with the ‘default’ BAUD specified in the
CONTROL BLOCK (bytes 22 & 23) as documented in the table above. Additionally, the
BAUD rate can be changed in the context of script execution (real time) using the
appropriate script/SCMND TAG. At all times the STATUS BLOCK reflects the currently
active BAUD rate. This BAUD rate applies to all data transmitted by the PKSA.
AUTOBAUD
The PKSA-LIN ‘monitor’ function has the flexibility to auto baud detect and modify the
PKSA hardware configuration to receive ‘messages’ from the LIN bus at the BAUD rate
being transmitted. This ‘flexibility’ must be enabled using the configuration bit in the
CONTROL BLOCK (byte 16 bit 7). The HOST can be apprised of the ‘auto baud’ detect
action through an event marker TAG.
The AUTOBAUD operation depends on receiving a ‘BREAK’ (13 bits of 0s) followed by
a ‘SYNC’ (byte 0x55). Referring to the timing diagram below – the BREAK begins at ‘A’.
At ‘B’ the PKSA expected a STOP bit – the USART interrupts the PKSA (RCIF – receive
interrupt flag) and sets FERR (framing error). The PKSA interprets (1) DATA=0 and (2)
FERR (framing error) as having received a BREAK; therefore, the FERR is automati-
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 123
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
cally reset and not reported to the host. If AUTOBAUD detection is enabled, the PKSA
will wait a maximum of ‘WAIT-BRK’ for the BREAK to complete at ‘C’. The duration of
WAIT-BRK must be set to accommodate the slowest BAUD rate supported (6 msec
was chosen to support 1000 BAUD +/- 50%). If the end of BREAK is not seen in that
time, the AUTOBAUD ERROR bit is set in the STATUS_BLOCK and the operation is
aborted. If the end of BREAK is seen, the AUTOBAUD mechanism is enabled and the
BAUD rate of the SYNC character is measured. At the second interrupt (RCIF (2)) at
‘E’, the operation is complete and the new/measured BAUD rate is used for subsequent
transactions. If the AUTOBAUD measurement experienced an overflow, the AUTOBAUD ERROR bit is set in the STATUS_BLOCK and the default BAUD rate from the
CONTROL_BLOCK is reloaded into the USART. In either case, the resultant BAUD
rate is reflected in the STATUS_BLOCK. After the BREAK, the PKSA will wait
indefinitely for the SYNC character to begin with the USART receiver disabled.
WARNING
The SYNC character is not actually ‘received’ by the PKSA during an AUTOBAUD
operation; therefore, it is not reflected/reported to the HOST. The EVENT MARKER
sequence would be BREAK_RX and AUTOBAUD followed by BAUD_L, BAUD_H. If
AUTOBAUD was not enabled, the EVENT MARKER sequence would be
BREAK_RX then BYTE_RX followed by 0x55.
FIGURE 11-5:
A
B
C
D
E F
S 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 P
RCIF (1)
RCIF (2)
WAIT-BRK
BREAK
DS51647B-page 124
SYNC
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer Firmware
LIN specifications limit the BAUD rate to 20k (Reference the following table for
examples).
BAUD = FOSC / (4 * (BRG_CODE + 1))
where: FOSC = 20 MHz
TABLE 11-48:
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
BAUD
CODE
ACTUAL
ERROR
100
49999
100.0
0.00%
200
24999
200.0
0.00%
300
16666
300.0
0.00%
400
12499
400.0
0.00%
500
9999
500.0
0.00%
600
8332
600.0
0.00%
700
7142
700.0
0.00%
800
6249
800.0
0.00%
900
5555
899.9
-0.01%
1000
4999
1000.0
0.00%
2000
2499
2000.0
0.00%
3000
1666
2999.4
-0.02%
4000
1249
4000.0
0.00%
5000
999
5000.0
0.00%
6000
832
6002.4
0.04%
7000
713
7002.8
0.04%
8000
624
8000.0
0.00%
9000
555
8992.8
-0.08%
10000
499
10000.0
0.00%
11000
454
10989.0
-0.10%
12000
416
11990.4
-0.08%
13000
384
12987.0
-0.10%
14000
356
14005.6
0.04%
15000
332
15015.0
0.10%
16000
312
15974.4
-0.16%
17000
293
17006.8
0.04%
18000
277
17985.6
-0.08%
19000
262
19011.4
0.06%
20000
249
20000.0
0.00%
DS51647B-page 125
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
NOTES:
DS51647B-page 126
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 12. PICkit™ Serial Analyzer DLL
12.1
INTRODUCTION
Custom software programs can be created by accessing the Dynamically Linked
Library (DLL), PICkitS.dll, with the software language of your choice. All of the functionality to create tag byte scripts that will be converted to protocol scripts is built into the
DLL and is very easy to use. Any programming language that can access functions
from a DLL can be used, however, a Microsoft .NET framework language is
recommended.
12.2
OVERVIEW
The name of the DLL is PickitS.dll and is included in the PICkit Serial Analyzer installation. The functions used to create custom GUI apps are Divided into logical classes
inside the DLL. The classes are listed below:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I2C Master (class PICkitS.I2CM)
I2C Slave (class PICkitS.I2CS)
SPI Master (class PICkitS.SPIM)
Microwire Master (class PICkitS.MicrowireM)
USART (class PICkitS.USART)
LIN (class PICkitS.LIN)
Device (class PICkitS.Device)
USBRead (Class PICkitS.USBRead)
Applications call functions from class ‘Device’ for initialization and cleanup, and from a
specific protocol class for input and output.
Example projects (written in Visual Basic .NET Express – a free download from
Microsoft) and detailed documentation for each protocol are available for download
from the PICkit Serial Website.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 127
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
DS51647B-page 128
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER
USER’S GUIDE
Chapter 13. Troubleshooting
13.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter describes questions and answers to common problems associated with
using the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer and how to resolve them.
13.2
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer could not be found
Question
I am receiving the error message, “PICkit™ Serial Analyzer could not be found” in the
Transactions window, but the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer is plugged in. What is wrong?
Answer
Open the Windows® operating system Device Manger by clicking on Control Panel >
System, selecting the Hardware tab and clicking on Device Manger button. Check if
there is an error displayed under Human Interface Devices as shown in Figure 13-1.
If an error is displayed, try unplugging and the re-plugging the USB cable until the error
goes away (this may take 3 or 4 tries).
If the error persists, try another USB port or hub. Try plugging the PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer into another computer to verify that the USB port is working.
FIGURE 13-1:
WINDOWS® DEVICE MANAGER
Current Limit Exceeded
Question
I received the error message “USB Hub Current Limit Exceeded” from the Windows®
operating system. What is wrong?
Answer
The USB port current limit is set to 100 mA. If the target device plus PICkit™ Serial
Analyzer exceeds this current limit, the USB port will shut down. Check for shorts. The
target device can be externally powered if more power is needed.
Microsoft® Windows® 98 SE
Question
After plugging the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer into the USB port, Windows® 98 SE asks
for a driver. Where is the driver?
Answer
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer uses the Human Interface Device (HID) driver included with
the Windows® Operating System. When Windows® 98 SE prompts for a driver, select
“Search for the best driver for your device.” Then select the check box next to “Microsoft
Windows Update” and click Next. Windows will automatically install the appropriate
driver. Do not use Microchip’s MPLAB® ICD 2 USB driver.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 129
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
Microsoft® Windows® 95/98/NT
Question
Can I run on Windows® 95/98/NT?
Answer
No. These operating systems either do not support USB or have drivers that are not
compatible.
DS51647B-page 130
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER USER’S
GUIDE
Appendix A. PICkit Serial Analyzer Schematics
A.1
INTRODUCTION
This appendix contains the PICkit Serial Management hardware diagrams.
FIGURE A-1:
PICkit™ SERIAL ANAYLZER SCHEMATIC (SHEET 1 OF 2)
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 131
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
FIGURE A-2:
DS51647B-page 132
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER SCHEMATIC (SHEET 2 OF 2)
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit Serial Analyzer Schematics
FIGURE A-3:
SILKSCREEN
FIGURE A-4:
TOP COPPER
FIGURE A-5:
BOTTOM COPPER
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 133
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
NOTES:
DS51647B-page 134
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
PICkit™ SERIAL ANALYZER USER’S
GUIDE
Appendix B. 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware
B.1
INTRODUCTION
The 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ demonstration firmware communicates with the
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer using the I2C serial protocol. The PICkit Serial Analyzer will be
the I2C Master and the 28-Pin Demo Board will be the I2C Slave device. The 28-Pin
Demo board is programmed to emulate an I2C Real-Time Clock (RTC) and Serial
EEPROM.
B.2
HIGHLIGHTS
This chapter discusses:
•
•
•
•
•
B.3
Hardware
Firmware
I2C Communications
Slave Devices
Functions
HARDWARE
The 28-Pin Demo Board (DM164120-3) is populated with and configured for:
•
•
•
•
•
PIC16F886 configured using the 8 MHz internal clock
32 kHz Tuning Fork Crystal connected to Timer1 Low-power Oscillator
Four LEDs (DS1 through DS4) connected to RB0 through RB3
Potentiometer (RP1) connected to RA0/AN0
Push button (SW1) connected to RE3/MCLR
For more information about the 28-Pin Demo Board hardware, see the 28-Pin Demo
Board User’s Guide (DS41301).
B.4
FIRMWARE
The demo program source code and *.hex file can be found on the PICkit Serial
CD-ROM at D:\28-pin Demo Board\Firmware\.
The firmware is structured as multiple ‘modules’ representing functional components.
Each module contains, at minimum, an “initialization” routine (MODULE_INIT) and a
“service” routine (MODULE_SVC). Each initialization routine is called from MAIN once
on Reset. Each Interrupt Service Routine is called sequentially and continuously from
the MAIN Idle loop. Interrupt Service Routine is provided for the I2C module only. All
other modules are serviced in turn from the MAIN ‘Idle loop’.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 135
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE B-1:
FIRMWARE MODULES
MODULE
B.5
DESCRIPTION
adc.asm
ADC service – measuring channel AN0, connected to potentiometer
RP1, and post results to register in shared memory
device.asm
Basic device (microcontroller) configuration
ee_util.asm
EEPROM Read/Write routines
exec.asm
“Executive” feature set – provides functionality for test and demonstration of PICkit™ Serial Analyzer and 28-Pin Demo Board
i2c_slave_pksd.asm
I2C™ service for three slave devices:
0xA2: Real-Time Clock (RTC)
0xA8: EEPROM
0xAA: Executive (EXEC)
led.asm
LED management, set/reset LEDs per state register
main.asm
Initialization, Idle loop and Interrupt Service Routine context
management
pksi.asm
Monitor PICkit Serial Analyzer interface I/O pins – post results to state
register
rtc.asm
I2C™ device: real-time clock emulation maintains 16 locations for
register-based I/O
timer0.asm
Utilizes TMR0 as a source for multiple “soft” timers
timer1.asm
Utilizes TMR1 with external 32 kHz crystal for RTC 1-second ‘ticks’
I2C COMMUNICATIONS
B.5.1
Overview
The 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demo responds to three I2C slave addresses:
TABLE B-2:
DEVICE SLAVE ADDRESSES
ADDR
0xA2
NAME
RTC
DESCRIPTION
Device emulation: Real-Time Clock
0xA8
EEPROM
Device emulation: EEPROM
0xAA
EXEC
Supervisory features
All devices (slave addresses) respond to the I2C protocols described below. Each slave
device supports a fixed number of word addresses (see section B.6 Slave Devices
below). The word address is automatically incremented during a transaction for
sequential access of the device registers. If the word address is incremented beyond
the end of the supported address range, the address will “wrap”.
B.5.2
Protocols
Figure B-1 shows the Master and Slave legend used for Figures B-2 through B-4.
FIGURE B-1:
MASTER/SLAVE DEVICE LEGEND
Master
Slave
Write Byte(s) – This transaction is used to write one or more bytes. The maximum
number of bytes is slave-dependant.
DS51647B-page 136
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware
I2C™ WRITE BYTE(S)
FIGURE B-2:
SLAVE-ADR
[W]
S
A
DATA
WORD-ADR
DATA
A
DATA
A
A
P
Read Byte(s) with Word Address – The word address is set to begin at a given value
and incremented sequentially during the transaction.
I2C™ READ BYTE(S) WITH WORD ADDRESS
FIGURE B-3:
S
SLAVE-ADR
[W]
A
DATA
WORD-ADR
A
RS
SLAVE-ADR
A
DATA
DATA N
A
P
[R]
Read Byte(s) without Word Address – The word address will continue in sequence from
the previous transaction to the I2C slave. On Reset the device address for all three
slave devices are reset to zero.
I2C™ READ BYTE(S) WITHOUT WORD ADDRESS
FIGURE B-4:
S
B.6
SLAVE-ADR
[R]
A
DATA
A
DATA
P
N
SLAVE DEVICES
The 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration firmware responds to three I2C slave
devices: RTC, Serial EEPROM, and Executive.
B.6.1
Slave Address: 0xA2 – Real-Time Clock Emulation
The 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration emulates an I2C Real-Time Clock
(RTC). Table B-3 list the word addresses.
TABLE B-3:
REG
REAL-TIME CLOCK (RTC) WORD ADDRESSES
NAME
DESCRIPTION
0x00
RTC_CONFIG_1
7: 0
6: 0
5: STOP – stop time function (0: RUN, 1: STOP)
4: 0
3: 0
2: 0
1: 0
0: 0
0x01
RTC_CONFIG_2
7: 0
6: 0
5: 0
4: 0
3: AF – Alarm flag
2: 0
1: AE – Alarm enable
0: 0
0x02
RTC_SECONDS
00-59 seconds, coding: BCD, bit 7: VL?
0x03
RTC_MINUTES
00-59 minutes, coding: BCD
0x04
RTC_HOURS
00-23 hours, coding: BCD
0x05
RTC_WEEKDAY
00-06 weekday
0x06
RTC_DAYS
01-31 day of the month
0x07
RTC_MONTHS
01-12 month of the year, coding: BCD
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 137
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
TABLE B-3:
REAL-TIME CLOCK (RTC) WORD ADDRESSES (CONTINUED)
0x08
RTC_YEARS
00-99 year, coding: BCD
0x09
RTC_ALARM_MIN
00-59 minute of alarm, coding: BCD
bit 7: enable
0x0A
RTC_ALARM_HOUR 00-23 hour of alarm, coding: BCD
bit 7: enable
0x0B
RTC_ALARM_DAY
0x0C
RTC_ALARM_WEEK 00-06 weekday of alarm
bit 7: enable
0x0D
(not assigned)
0x0E
(not assigned)
0x0F
(not assigned)
B.6.2
01-31 day of alarm, coding BCD
bit 7: enable
Slave Address: 0xA8 – EEProm Emulation
The 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration emulates a serial EEPROM. Device
emulation provides for 256 bytes. A newly-programmed 28-Pin Demo Board defaults
the first 8 bytes to 0x00 to 0x07 sequentially. The value of the remaining bytes is
undefined / unknown.
A Read operation is executed during the transaction.
The Write operation begins after the Stop bit is received. The firmware will not respond
to I2C communications during the Write.
FIGURE B-5:
SERIAL EEPROM OPERATION
Write Operation
Send Start Bit
Send Control Byte
w/Write Bit
NO
ACK
YES
(continue)
B.6.3
Slave Address: 0xAA – Executive (EXEC)
The “Executive” I2C pseudo device provides features convenient for testing and demonstrating the PICkit™ Serial Analyzer and the 28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ firmware.
The I2C word addresses are listed in Table B-4.
DS51647B-page 138
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware
TABLE B-4:
REG
TABLE B-4 EXECUTIVE (EXEC) WORD ADDRESSES
NAME
DESCRIPTION
0x00
EXEC_STATE
State of executive state controller
bit 7 == 1: force state controller to one of eight “entry
points” specified by bits[2:0]
0x01
EXEC_ADC_CH0
ADC results of CHANNEL AN0 (potentiometer RP1)
0x02
EXEC_RTC_SECS
binary value representation of RTC “SECONDS”
0x03
EXEC_STATUS
state of communications connector pins:
bit 0: PIN 1 (AUX1)
bit 1: PIN 4 (SDA)
bit 2: PIN 5 (SCL)
bit 3: PIN 6 (AUX2)
bits[5:4]: undefined
bit 6: operation error
bit 7: operation busy
0x04
EXEC_04
undefined (can be read/written with no operational effect)
0x05
EXEC_05
undefined (can be read/written with no operational effect)
0x06
EXEC_06
undefined (can be read/written with no operational effect)
0x07
EXEC_VERSION
Firmware version number
State Controller – The Executive state controller manages background functions. The
HOST enacts a function by writing to EXEC_STATE with a valid “state entry value” (i.e.,
0x80-0x87). Writing values outside this range will cause unknown results.
TABLE B-5:
EXEC STATE ENTRY VALUES
VALUE
NAME
DESCRIPTION
0x80
EXEC_DISPLAY_PING_PONG
display PING-PONG LED pattern:
DS1,2,3,4,3,2,1,2 ...
0x81
EXEC_TIMER1_TEST
operation: timer1 test
0x82
EXEC_DISPLAY_ADC
display of Most Significant 4 bits of ADC
results measuring variable resistor
0x83
EXEC_DISPLAY_RTC
display of RTC SECONDS (binary) – 0-15
0x84
EXEC_DISPLAY_PKSI
display of state of communications connector
pins:
LED1: PIN 1 (AUX1)
LED2: PIN 4 (SDA)
LED3: PIN 5 (SCA)
LED4: PIN 6 (AUX2)
0x85
EXEC_DISPLAY_RESET
display ‘RESET’ sequence
0x86
EXEC_DISPLAY_1SEC
display – blink all LEDs – 1 sec ON, 1 sec
OFF, ...
0x87
EXEC_0x87
undefined
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 139
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
B.7
FUNCTIONS
B.7.1
Ping-Pong Display
The PING-PONG display is useful in testing the four LEDs which are illuminated
individually and in sequence as seen below. The following pattern is executed at a
100-millisecond step interval.
FIGURE B-6:
PING-PONG LED PATTERN
DS1
B.7.2
DS2
DS3
DS3
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
Off
Timer1 Test
Timer1 Test provides a basic test of the auxiliary clock used for the RTC. The 28-Pin
Demo Board employs a 32 kHz crystal on TIMER1 LP Oscillator to provide a 1-second
interval for the RTC emulated device. The test begins by clearing the one-second flag,
then waits a maximum of 1.1 seconds to see if the flag is reset. Alternatively, the HOST
can test the RTC clock by examining EXEC REGISTER 0x02 at logically timed
intervals.
FIGURE B-7:
TIMER1 TEST
Write 0x81 to
EXEC_REG_00
BUSY?
YES
EXEC_REG_03[bit 7]
NO
ERROR?
YES
EXEC_REG_03[bit 6]
NO
PASSED
DS51647B-page 140
FAILED
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
28-Pin Demo Board I2C™ Demonstration Firmware
B.7.3
ADC Display
The ADC Display begins by displaying hex values 0x0A, 0x0D and 0x0C in sequence
to signify “ADC” test.
After the opening display sequence, the LEDs displays the Most Significant 4 bits of the
ADC result measuring channel AN0 (potentiometer RP1). As RP1 is manually turned
from one extreme to the other, the LED display should range from binary 0000 to 1111.
The firmware must be forced from this mode by command or Reset.
B.7.4
RTC Display
The RTC Display displays the Least Significant 4 bits of EXEC_REG_02 (RTC SECONDS). The LEDs should be seen to increment once per second in a binary progression (0x0-0xF) three times, then (0x0-0xB) once as the RTC SECONDS value
increments from 0x00 to 0x3B (59 decimal). The firmware must be forced from this
mode by command or Reset.
B.7.5
Communications Connector Display
This feature displays the state of the 4 signal pins on the communications connector.
LED1: PIN 1 (AUX1)
LED2: PIN 4 (SDA)
LED3: PIN 5 (SCL)
LED4: PIN 6 (AUX2)
Normally, LED2 and LED3 should be illuminated if the I2C bus has active pull-ups and
the SCK is not held low. The firmware must be forced from this mode by command or
Reset.
B.7.6
RESET Display
The RESET Display is executed on Reset/power-up or by command. The sequence is
a series of individual displays as follows:
1. PING-PONG display: cycles: 2 (i.e., LED1,2,3,4,3,2,1,2,3,4,3,2,1)
2. Blink all LEDs in unison: cycles: 1 (i.e., 1 sec OFF, 1 sec ON, 1 sec OFF)
3. ADC display (described above): cycles: perpetual
B.7.7
1 Second Blink
Blink all LEDs in unison at 1-second intervals (i.e., 1 sec OFF, 1 sec ON, 1 sec
OFF),...This feature uses time based on the Timer1 low-power oscillator and external
32 kHz tuning fork crystal.
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647B-page 141
PICkit™ Serial Analyzer User’s Guide
DS51647B-page 142
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
WORLDWIDE SALES AND SERVICE
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Corporate Office
2355 West Chandler Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85224-6199
Tel: 480-792-7200
Fax: 480-792-7277
Technical Support:
http://support.microchip.com
Web Address:
www.microchip.com
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Suites 3707-14, 37th Floor
Tower 6, The Gateway
Habour City, Kowloon
Hong Kong
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
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Tel: 91-80-4182-8400
Fax: 91-80-4182-8422
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Tel: 678-957-9614
Fax: 678-957-1455
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Tel: 774-760-0087
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Tel: 630-285-0071
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Fax: 82-2-558-5932 or
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Tel: 86-755-8203-2660
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Tel: 86-757-2839-5507
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Tel: 86-29-8833-7250
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12/08/06
DS51647A-page 143
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DSTEMP
EUROPE
Austria - Wels
Tel: 43-7242-2244-39
Fax: 43-7242-2244-393
Denmark - Copenhagen
Tel: 45-4450-2828
Fax: 45-4485-2829
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Tel: 39-0331-742611
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Netherlands - Drunen
Tel: 31-416-690399
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Spain - Madrid
Tel: 34-91-708-08-90
Fax: 34-91-708-08-91
UK - Wokingham
Tel: 44-118-921-5869
Fax: 44-118-921-5820
© 2007 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS51647A-page 144
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