User`s Manual
WinCOMM V.92
Internal 56Kbps PCI V/D/F modem
Voice and Caller ID
User’s Manual
VERSION 1.00
Copyright © 2001 Jaton corporation, USA.
UNITED STATES - FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION
CONSUMER INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS
Part 15-Radio Interference
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for
a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of FCC rules. These limits
are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation This equipment generates, uses.
and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions. may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference
will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can he
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged
to try and correct the interference by one or more of the following
measures:
Reorient the receiving antenna
Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
to which the receiver is connected
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for
help.
Notice 1:
The changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate
the equipment
Notice 2:
Shielded interface cables and AC. power cord, if any, must be used in
order to comply with emission limits
Part 68 -Telephone Connection
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC Rules, On the inside of
this equipment is a label that contains, among other things, the FCC
Registration Number and Ringer Equipment Number (REN) for this
equipment. You must, upon request, provide this information to your
telephone company.
The REN is useful to determine the quantity of devices you may
connect to your telephone line and still have all those devices ring
3
when your telephone number is called. In most, but not all areas, the
sum of the REN’s of all devices you may connect to one line should not
exceed five (.5.0). To be certain of the number of devices you may
connect to your line, as determined by the REN. you should contact
your local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for your
calling area.
If your telephone equipment cause harm to the telephone equipment,
the Telephone Company may discontinue your service temporarily. If
possible, they will notify you in advance. But if advance notification is
not possible, you will be notified as soon as possible. You will be
informed of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
Your telephone company may make changes in its facilities, equipment,
operations or procedures that would affect the proper functioning of
your equipment. If they do. you will be notified in advance to give you
an opportunity to maintain uninterrupted telephone service.
If you experience trouble with this telephone equipment, please contact
Technical Support of your OEM supplier. The telephone company may
ask that you disconnect this equipment from the network until the
problem has been corrected or until you are sure that the equipment is
not malfunctioning.
This equipment may not be used on coin service provided by the
telephone company. Connection to party lines is subject to state tariffs.
Statement of Fax Branding
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful for
any person to use a computer or other electronic device to send any
message via a telephone fax machine unless such message clearly
contains a margin at the top or bottom of each transmitted page or on
the first page of the transmission, the date and time it is sent and an
identification of the huskiness or other entity. or other individual
sending the message and the telephone number of the sending machine
or such business. other entity, or individual.
CANADA-DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS NOTICE
Telephone Connection
The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies certified
equipment. This certification means that the equipment meets certain
telecommunications network protective, operational and safety
4
requirements. The department does not guarantee the equipment will
operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is
permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be installed
using an acceptable method of connection. In some cases, the
company’s inside wiring associated with a single line individual service
may be extended by means of a certified connector assembly (telephone
extension cord). The customer should be aware that compliance with the
above conditions may not prevent degradation of service in some
situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized
Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs
or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or equipment
malfunctions, may give the telecommunications company cause to
request the user to disconnect the equipment.
The user should ensure for their own protection that the electrical
ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal
metallic water pipe systems, if present, are connected together This
precaution may be particularly important in rural areas.
CAUTION:
Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves, but
should contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or
electrician, as appropriate.
The Load Number 2 assigned to each terminal device denotes the
percentage of the total load to be connected to a telephone loop which
is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The termination on a loop
may consist of any combination of devices subject only to the
requirement that the total of the Load Numbers of all the devices does
not exceed 100.
NOTICE:
The information in this document is subject to change in order to improve
reliability, design, or function without prior notice and does not represent a
commitment on the part of this company. The information in this manual is
believed to be accurate. However, we assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies
that may be contained in this manual. In no event will we be liable for direct,
indirect, special, incidental, or consequential damages arising out of the use or the
inability to use the product or documentation, even if advised of the possibility of
5
such damages. No part of this reference manual may be reproduced or transmitted
in any form or by any means without the prior written permission.
March. 2001 Rev.B
TRADEMARK ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Microsoft, Microsoft Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corp.
All other product names or trademarks are property of their respective owners.
Copyright protection claimed includes all forms and matters of copyrightable
material and information now allowed by statutory or judicial law or hereinafter
granted, including without limitation, material generated from the software
programs which are displayed on the screen such as icons, screen display looks, etc.
Reproduction or disassembly of embedded computer programs or algorithms
prohibited.
6
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................9
FEATURES ..................................................................................................10
SPECIFICATIONS ......................................................................................11
SYSTEM REQUIREMENT.........................................................................13
MODES OF OPERATION.........................................................................13
MODEM INTERFACE ...............................................................................16
CHECK LIST................................................................................................17
TECHNICAL SUPPORT.............................................................................17
INSTALLATION..............................................................................................18
GETTING STARTED ..................................................................................18
COM PORT AND IRQ................................................................................18
HARDWARE DESCRIPTION...................................................................18
HARDWARE INSTALLATION STEPS..................................................19
MODEM DRIVER INSTALLATION STEPS...............................................20
ÿ
ÿ
ÿ
ÿ
ÿ
ÿ
IDENTIFY YOUR WINDOWS® VERSION...............................20
SETUP WITH WINDOWS®98...................................................22
SETUP WITH WINDOWS®ME.................................................31
SETUP WITH WINDOWS®NT™4.0 ........................................38
WINDOWS® 2000 INSTALLATION.........................................41
WINDOWS® XP INSTALLATION ...........................................47
TESTING COMMAND: .............................................................................57
COMMUNICATION SOFTWARE ..........................................................61
KNOWLEDGE BASIC....................................................................................62
TECHNICAL REFERENCES..........................................................................66
FREQUENTLY ENCOUNTERED PROBLEMS: ......................................70
7
AT COMMANDS............................................................................................75
BASIC DATA MODE AT COMMANDS...............................................75
DATA ERROR CORRECTION & COMPRESSION COMMANDS.....82
FAX CLASS 1 AT COMMANDS ............................................................85
VOICE MODE AT COMMANDS.............................................................86
RADISH VOICEVIEW............................................................................87
S-REGISTER.................................................................................................88
OTHER COMMANDS AND RESPONSE CODES .................................90
LIMITED WARRANTY. ................................................................................91
OTHER LIMITS...........................................................................................91
EXCLUSIVE OBLIGATION.......................................................................92
OTHER STATEMENTS.............................................................................92
TERMS AND CONDITIONS.....................................................................92
SERVICES AGREEMENT:.........................................................................93
ENTIRE OBLIGATION...............................................................................93
REDUCING WARRANTY CLAIM REJECTIONS......................................93
8
INTRODUCTION
WinCOMM v.92 is based on the Intel/Ambient MD5628 D-L-C
chipset with V.34 FastPath™ platform, a host accelerated
modem solution that combines and optimized the best features
from software and hardware modems. The result is a platform
with low power requirements and high performance. The
FastPath platform’s scalability allows the graceful addition of
computer telephony features such as speakerphone, and
telephone emulation. Ambient exceeds Microsoft® PC 00
specifications for Windows®, and it is TAPI-and PCI 2.2
compliant.
WinCOMM v.92supports all requirements for PC-based
communications. With the robust host-based controller
software and powerful DSP, the modem support all industrystandard AT commands for data, IS-101 voice, and Class 1 fax.
WinCOMM v.92with many advanced features already built in,
a versatile platform for future development can leverage the
latest progress in CPU technology. Thus, new features and
unique hybrid products can be deliver superior performance
and less expensively than ever before. And users can easily
upgrade to the newest communication technology by
download and installing software upgrades directly from the
manufacturer’s Internet site.
WinCOMM v.92is expected to support any eventual new ITUT V.92/V.90, ITU-T V.44 standards.
ITU - V.92 Standard increased upstream rate - up to 48K by
using a PCM stream through a conversion. Three new features
offer from V.92 mode are QC (Quick Connect), MOH (Modemon-hold) and 48kbps speed upload; these well-developed
countenances significantly reduce connect times up to 50%
faster and also allow you put your data connection on hold for
your incoming call if you have the Call-Waiting service from
telephone company.
This user’s manual contains all the information you need to
install your modem. You should still retain this manual for
knowledge basic and AT commands reference, even though
you may never need to use the AT commands that are
documented here.
9
FEATURES
Ì Complete PC telephony solution
−
−
−
−
−
−
Up to 56-kbps data rates (FCC is allowed 53.333kbps)
host-based controller
PCI 2.2-compliant
Exceeds Microsoft® PC 00 requirements
Microsoft, Windows, TAPI-compliant
AT command-driven
Ì Data modulation
−
−
−
−
−
−
V.92 (Modem-on-hold, Quick Connect, 48K upload speed)
ITU-T V.44 compression up to 6:1
ITU V.90 up to 56Kbps data rates
ITU-T V.34 (33,600 to 2400 bps) symmetric and asymmetric
operation
ITU-T V.32 bis, V.23, V.22bis, V.21
Bell® 212A and 103
Ì Fax modulation
−
ITU-T V.17, V.29 to 14,400 bps
Ì Voice telephony
−
−
−
IS-101 voice command
Telephone emulation
ITU-V.80 for videophone
Ì Voice mode
−
−
Voice compression: ADPCM, linear, and CL1
4800, 7200, 8000, 9600, and 11025 samples per second
Ì Data link layer protocol
−
−
Error correction: ITU V.42 and MNP® 2-4
Data compression: ITU V.44/V.42bis and MNP® 5
Ì DTE integrated interface alternatives
−
PCI Rev.2.2 - compliant
10
Ì Host-based controller
−
−
−
Fax Class 1 commands
Fax Group 3 mode
Voice IS-101 commands
Ì Minimal-component design
−
−
−
Direct connection to PCI bus
Single crystal
Passive hybrid
Ì Low power requirements
−
−
−
Single +5-V power source; 3.3-V DSP; 1.3 V Core
Automatic sleep and wake-up modes
ACPI (Advanced Configuration Power Interface)
Ì Plug and Play
−
Jumperless configuration
SPECIFICATIONS
Chipset:
Intel / Ambient - MD5628 D-L-C
COMMUNICATION MODES AND DATA RATES
DATA APPLICATION
Mode
Data Rates
V.92
56,000
ITU-T
~
(Receive
only)
24,000
V.92
48,000
Mode
~
(Transmit
only)
24,000
V.90
57,333
Modulation
Baud Rates
Carrier Frequency
PCM
N/A
N/A
TCM
3429
Variable
3200
3000
11
Mode
-,,,,,,,,
(Receive
only)
28,000
V.90
31,200
ITU-T
-,,,,,,,,
(Transmit only)
PCM
8000
Variable
TCM
3200
1920
TCM
Variable
Variable
TCM
2400
1800
2400
1800
-4800
33,600
V.34
-,,,,,,,,
-2400
14,400
V.32 bis
-,,,
-4800
V.32
9600
TCM
9600
QAM
4800
QAM
V.22 bis
2400
QAM
600
1200/2400
V.22
1200
DPSK
600
1200/2400
V.21
300
FSK
300
1180S/1850S
Bell 212A
1200
DPSK
600
1200/2400
Bell 103
300
FSK
300
1070S/2025S
FAX APPLICATION
Mode
V.17
V.29
V.27
ter
Data Rates
Modulation
Baud Rates
Carrier Frequency
14,400
TCM
2400
1800
12,000
TCM
2400
1800
9600
TCM
2400
1800
7200
TCM
2400
1800
9600
QAM
2400
1700
7200
QAM
2400
1700
4800
QAM
2400
1700
4800
DPSK
1600
1800
12
V.21
2400
DPSK
1200
1800
300
FSK
300
1650M/1850S
V.90 ITU-T data receive rates of up to 56,000 bps can be achieved only in
connections with equipment-compatible ISPs (Internet Service Providers).
PHYSICAL/ELECTRICAL/ENVIRONMENTAL
Dimensions:
Cables:
Connectors:
Speaker Interface:
Humidity:
Temperature:
Storage Temp.
Transmit Level:
Receive Level:
2.5” x 4.75”
6.4 cm x 12 cm
Phone cord
1 RJ11 jack, for telephone and PSTN line connections
Maximum load 8 Ω
20-90% (non-condensing)
0° to 70° C (32° to 158° F)
-65° to 150° C
-6 dBm ±1 dB dialup; Programmable.
-9 to -43 dBm. DCD is deactivated at -48dBm or below.
SYSTEM REQUIREMENT
Ì
Ì
Ì
Ì
PC system with a free PCI slot
CD-ROM Drive to load software
Hard Disk Drive with 5 MB free space
Microsoft Windows®98/Me, Windows®NT™4.0,
Windows®2000/XP
Ì Free COM port address: 1, 2, 3, 4, or ……
Ì Free IRQ for the COM port: 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, or 12
MODES OF OPERATION
The Ambient chipset provides the complete modem functions for
the following modes: Group 3 fax, data, voice, V.42/MNP 2-4, and
V.44/V.42 bis/MNP 5 (Microcom Networking Protocol Class 5).
Each mode has its own unique AT command set. Additionally, the
modem provides special modes of operation for VoiceView, and
power management.
13
DATA MODE
In the data mode, the 56K modem operate at up to 48,000 bps
(transmit) and up to 56,000 bps (receive). It implements all data rates
and modulation schemes for ITU-T standards V.92, V.90, V.34,
V.32bis, V.32, V.22bis, V.22, V.21, Bell 212A, and Bell 103. The
chipset implements a standard (TIES) Data mode AT command set.
V.44 / V.42 BIS/MNP  2-5 MODES
Up to 6:1 data compression that will improve the current data
compression anywhere from 230 to 60 percent, up to as much as 200
percent for certain types of highly compression data. For users, it
means that your WEB browsing will be much faster.
V.42/MNP  2-4 AND V.42 BIS/MNP  5 MODES
The FastPath™ modem supports error correction(V.42/MNP 2-4)
and data compression (V.42 bis/MNP 5). Error correction ensures
error-free data transfer. Data compression substantially increases
the modem data throughput over the basic data rate. Depending on
the data stream, MNP 5 may provide up to 2:1 compression.
Alternately, ITU-T V.42 bis can provide up to 4:1 compression.
FAX MODE
In Fax mode, the FastPath™ modem operate at up to 14,400 bps
(transmit and receive) and implement all the data rates and
modulation schemes for ITU-T standards V.17, V.29, V.27ter, and
V.21 channel 2. Ambient chipset implements a standard Fax mode
AT command set compatible with any communication application
software that supports EIA/TIA-578 Fax Class 1 standards.
VOICE MODE
The modem supports Telephone-Emulation mode, IS-101 voice
commands, and record and playback message capabilities.
Telephone-emulation mode allows a handset/microphone-speaker
and modem to be used as a complete telephone. In Telephone
emulation mode, the received data from SAFE (CL-MD1724T) the
microphone interface is looped back to the SAFE analog transmit
pins. In voice mode, the message record and playback abilities are
accessed by the extended AT command set.
14
VIDEOCONFERENCING (V.80) SUPPORT
The Ambient supports the ITU-V.80 recommendation. This feature
ensures compatibility with host-based H.324 videoconferencing
application software. The modem supports both transparent and
framed submodes of the V.80 synchronous access mode.
LOOPBACK TEST MODES
In all modes except V.92, modem-to-DTE and modem-to-modem
communication integrity can be tested with loopback tests. The
AT&T1 command initiates the local analog loopback test.
POWER MANAGEMENT MODES
The Ambient chipset provides both sleep and stop modes to
reduce power consumption when the modem in inactive. Stop mode
turns off all modem power except for the circuitry needed to
maintain the host interface signals at the appropriate highimpedance state.
Power-on mode consists of an Operational mode and a sleep (or
power-down) mode. In Operational mode, the modem chipset is
fully powered and is either communicating with the host and/or
another modem or is performing internal processing.
In Sleep mode, power is turned off to most of the internal circuitry
of the DSP and SAFE. Sleep mode is controlled by S-register S33.
When enabled, the modem enters Sleep or Power-down mode
whenever the modem has been inactive for a user-programmable
time delay.
The modem is considered to be in an inactive state when:
1. No internal processing is being performed;
2.
No activity occurs between the host and the modem
within a specific time period;
3.
The modem is on-hook.
The mode exits sleep mode whenever the host writes the
modem or when a ring signal is detected. The modem does
not wake up after the host reads the UART registers.
15
TRANSMIT LEVELS
The factory defaults transmit level for V.92 and V.34 transmission is
-10 dBm±1 dB at Tip and Ring. Data and Fax use separate
transmission levels.
TRANSMIT TONE LEVELS
The modem generates DTFM, answer, call and guard tones.
Tone
Value
Application
Calling Tone
1100 Hz
Fax originator
1300 Hz
Data originator
2100 Hz
Data/Fax (ITU-T)
2225 Hz
Data (Bell mode)
1800 Hz
Data/Fax
550 Hz
(answer mode)
Answer Tone
Guard Tone
CALLER ID
Caller ID is a service that allows the user to see the caller’s
telephone number. Caller ID also provides information on call date
and time. This service is not available everywhere due to Central
Office telephone equipment limitations and legal prohibition in
some locations.
For more information on how to use this feature, please refer to the
communication software user’s guide.
MODEM INTERFACE
SPEAKER INTERFACE
The SAFE device internally implements both the volume control and
amplifier necessary to drive an external speaker. The output of internal
amplifier can be connected directly to a speaker or to the input of the
host speaker amplifier. The internal amplifier is capable of driving a
maximum load of 8 Ω . The speaker volume is controlled by the ATLn
command.
16
MICROPHONE INTERFACE
The MD 1724 AFE device provides a microphone interface that
connects a microphone to the modem either in Fully Duplex (FD) or in
Half Duplex (HD). This microphone input can then be used for local
voice record mode or for Telephone-Emulation mode.
CHECK LIST
In addition to this Hardware’s Reference Manual, your package
includes the following items:
Ì
Ì
Ì
Ì
WinCOMM v.92 Internal PCI Modem
Software and Document CD-ROM
Quick Start Guide (Printed)
RJ11 Phone Cord
TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Telephone:
(408) 934-9369, 9-5 Mon.-Fri. PST
Fax:
(408) 942-6699
24 hour BBS:
(408) 263-8529, 8-N-1.
URL:
http://www.jaton.com
E-mail:
[email protected]
For modem Firmware upgrade or utilities, please dial-up to Jaton BBS or
access to our Web Site that listed above.
For software upgrade, please refer to the communication software
manual.
If you encounter a problem with your modem, you may consult the
“Trouble Shooting” section in later chapter.
If your modem is purchased from OEM supplier, or as a part of PC from
a system integrator, please call their Technical Support first.
17
INSTALLATION
GETTING STARTED
This section will walk you through of your modem’s installation. Before
you getting started, make sure that you do have the following items:
Internal Voice/Data/Fax Modem
Software and Document CD
RJ11 (Standard) Phone Cord
Telephone Line Jack
Appropriated hardware tools (such as screw driver, etc.)
COM PORT AND IRQ
This modem is Plug-and Play device and no jumper settings needed on
board. However, you may organize the PCI configuration on CMOS
(Motherboard BIOS) setup utility to explicit the IRQ sequence for PCI
slots, or make available IRQ for its purpose. Most communication
software prefer standard COM port and IRQ, e.g. COM1, IRQ4 or
COM2, IRQ3. Your system may have unused Serial (UART) port
occupies one of this port address and IRQ. It is recommended to disable
it and let your internal modem use the COM port address and IRQ. Refer
to your main board or I/O card manual on how to disable the port in
your system.
HARDWARE DESCRIPTION
BOARD LAYOUT
18
Modem's Plate
Jumperless - Plug-n-Play - PCI Bus
Width
J4
SPKR
J6
MIC
SPK1
Height
PHONE
Ambient
LINE
K2
J2
Product / PCB #
WinCOM V.92
62230
DAA
DSP Chipset
AFE Chipset
Discrete DAA
Intel / Ambient MD5628 D-L-C
MD 1724 / HD
HARDWARE INSTALLATION STEPS
STEP 1: INSTALLING THE MODEM
Ì TURN YOUR COMPUTER’S POWER OFF.
Turn off the power to your PC and any attached peripheral devices such
as Printers, Scanner and Monitor.
Ì REMOVE THE COVER FROM YOUR PC.
Remove the computer’s cover, retain the screws if any.
Ì REMOVE THE SILVER BRACKET ON THE BACK OF THE PC.
Find an empty PCI slot inside your computer. Remove the silver bracket
behind the slot where you want to install the modem. Save the screw.
Ì PLACE THE MODEM INTO AN AVAILABLE PCI SLOT.
Before you remove the modem from its static resistant bag, you must
discharge any static electricity on your body by touching a grounded
metal surface. When handling this modem, hold it by its edges, and
avoid touching its circuitry.
19
Ì REPLACE THE COVER ON YOUR PC.
Slide the cover back on your PC, and secure it with the screws.
Reconnect your power cord, and all cables.
STEP 2: CONNECTING EXTERNAL DEVICES
Ì CONNECT THE MODEM WITH TELEPHONE CORD.
Plug one end of the included telephone cord into the LINE jack on the
modem and the other end into wall telephone-outlet.
Ì CONNECT THE MICROPHONE TO MIC PORT.
If you have a microphone, you can plug the microphone jack into the
MIC port on your modem.
Ì SPEAKERS
You can also plug speaker jack to the SPKR port on your modem if you
do not have sound card, or your sound card doesn’t supported by the
communication software.
Ì PLAY VOICE MAIL WITH SOUND CARD
If you already have a sound card installed in your computer, you can
use your sound card to record personalized greeting messages or play
voice mail messages if your communication software support your
sound card.
MODEM DRIVER INSTALLATION STEPS
ÿ IDENTIFY YOUR WINDOWS® VERSION
Microsoft® distributes various versions of their Operating System
(Windows®) product worldwide, such as Windows®98/Me,
Windows®2000/XP
, Windows® NT 4.0, etc. and everyone knows those
words at anywhere in the world. How to identify your Windows®
version inside the operating system? Here is an example.
Open “Control Panel”, double click on “system” icon.
20
Windows® version
Note: You should verify your operating system first, then select
following appropriated procedure or technique to complete this
driver installation.
Add second modem or change the modem to an existing PC system, you
may proceed a few steps before install the new hardware and software
(modem’s driver). The followings are some of the considers:
1. To change a new modem, please remove the existing modem driver,
or disable it from Windows® system before you remove the
existing hardware.
2. To added second modem, make sure the mainboard that has
available IRQ for new devices, and there is no conflict between the
others.
3. The driver installation for upgrade system as same as below, if error
occur when you proceed step 1, or 2, please consult with your
system dealer or the existing hardware manufacturer support.
21
ÿ SETUP WITH WINDOWS®98
WinCOMM v.92 is PnP device that automatically detect by Microsoft
Windows ®98, place the manufacturer’s software CD into your CD ROM
and you can start driver’s installation from there.
A new device driver installation wizard pops up which indicated a new
PCI hardware device. Click on <Next> to start driver installation.
22
Place the mark on “Search the best driver for your device”, then click on
<Next>.
You may type in the source location into the dialog box as above then
click on “Next”. Or, press <Browse…> button, browsing on software
CD and unfold D:\Drivers\Win9x directory, then click on <OK>.
23
A confirmation screen that prompt the source location for driver files, to
continue click on <Next> button again.
24
Install process brings-up the configure screen interface, and you
can perform the configuration now or later, but the install is not
over yet, please click on <OK> button to continue.
This screen is not the final for installation, click on <Finish>
button.
Installation still processing few screens after you click <Finish> on
above.
VERIFYING MODEM INSTALLATION
Open ”system” icon in “Control panel”, switch tab bar on “Device
manager”, then click on the “Modem” item, and you should see the
device with no yellow-exclamation (!) or red-across (X) marks.
25
Highlight Intel[R] 536EP V.92 Modem and click on “Properties”
button. Then, Resource tab screen with “No conflicts” on Device
settings.
MODEM CONFIGURATION SCREEN
Before you start to use this modem, you have to configure it as well as
to ensure this modem has been installed properly without any conflict
errors. This is a very important and advantageous procedure to all of
users.
26
From your desktop, control panel and click on Intel[R] 536EP V.92
Modem that brings-up the configuration screen interface, then you can
setting up this modem as you want to expected. The “Intel[R] 536EP
V.92 Modem” induces you with four tab screens by the side of all
options. To establish your modem’s configuration, or make changes if
it’s necessary for any determination be possible.
27
You may place check mark to those selection to enable or disable
features and function as their described.
28
As a host-base controller modem, the COMports availability’s are by
the software develop robust and whatever not on hardware. But, you
should have an IRQ free for this modem.
Default settings from manufacturer is COMM port = 4.
29
Select on United States America. Otherwise, you may check the local
telephone company for available line services.
30
Do this Uninstall process before you physically removal the modem
from your PC.
ÿ SETUP WITH WINDOWS®ME
As with previous versions of Windows9x, the WindowsMe it also
performs PnP when you added a new hardware, and the <Add New
Hardware Wizard> will pops-up for device driver installation.
1.
PCI Communication Device has been detected, check on “Specify
the location of the driver” selection and click “Next”.
31
2.
You may type in the exactly source location as below then click on
“Next”; or “Browse” into the Software & Document CD from the
modem manufacturer. Unfold “D:\Drivers\WinMe”, then click on
“OK”, the Wizard will back to the screen as below again.
3.
A confirmation leads the modem device to install. Click on “Next”
to continue.
32
4.
Screen prompt you that the source location of modem driver files,
click on “Next” to continue.
5.
Select on United States America then click on “OK”. Otherwise,
you may check local telephone company for available line
services.
33
6.
The install process is not over. Click on “Finish” button.
7.
Again, the wizard ask you to install a modem device. Place check
mark on the selection as below then click on “Next”.
34
8.
Keep the same source location for your driver files, then click on
“Next” button.
9.
Once again, a confirmation screen leads device and driver files
source to install, click on “Next”.
35
10. Click on “Finish”.
11. Unimodem Wave install screen will flash-up.
36
12. Accept all devices and drivers installation, then click on “Next”.
13. This is final screen for installation, click on “Finish”.
37
ÿ SETUP WITH WINDOWS®NT™4.0
INSTALL DRIVER TO THE WINDOWS®NT™4.0
WORKSTATION
Since Windows®NT does not automatically detect this modem, you
need to proceed and perform this driver installation manually. Insert
“Software & Document CD” (from Jaton) into your CD-ROM drive, then
proceed the steps below for your installation :
INSTALLER.EXE
1)
Insert the Modem Driver’s CD into your CD ROM drive, explorer
into the D:\Drivers\Winnt4\, and click on ‘Installer.exe’. (D: is the
letter of your CD ROM drive; Typically, D or E, etc.)
38
2)
A message screen pops-up to ask you a question about install
this modem. Click on “Yes” if you want to install it.
3)
You may wait on little while, then anther message to tells you
that the modem has been installed. Click on “OK”. This is
unusual quick process than others.
VERIFY MODEM INSTALLATION
Open ”Modem” property from your “Control panel”, the new modem
will be list in that content with assigning COMport.
39
Uninstall
------1) Insert the modem’s CD into your CD ROM drive, unfolded
\Drivers\Winnt4.
2) Click on Installer.exe again.
3) Install Wizard that prompts you to choosing for Reinstall /
Uninstall, and then you can selected Uninstall to remove the
driver from the Windows.
4) Click on “Yes”.
40
ÿ WINDOWS 2000 INSTALLATION
®
Your modem is PnP device that automatically detected by Microsoft
Windows ®, and you can start driver’s installation from there.
1.
As Windows 2000 loads, it checks for new plug-and-play devices.
If Windows detects a new card, it displays New Hardware Found
and the Wizard is displayed.
2.
Click on [Next] to starting the driver installation.
41
3.
Select second option that will displayed location for driver’s file.
Click on [Next].
4.
Indicated the type of hardware, and then click on [Next] to
continue.
42
5.
Do not selected any of them from the list. The current modem driver
is folded in the modem’s CD from manufacturer, please click on
[Have Disk…].
6.
Browse into D:\drivers\win2000\ (D is the letter of your CD ROM
drive, typically drive D or E).
43
7.
Unfolded, selected appropriate files and then click on [Next] to
continue.
8.
Click on [OK].
44
9.
The Wizard prompts the device as Intel[R] 536EP V.92 Modem, click
on [Next].
10. A confirmation screen prompt to you that install will setting as
default on hardware and software. Click on [Next].
45
11. Click on [Yes] to continue.
12. Install wizard has copying all files from source media to your local
hard disk, please wait until the process is over.
46
13. Click on [Finish].
14. A few screens will flash-up for all components to install.
15. After the all, your modem driver installation has completed.
ÿ WINDOWS XP INSTALLATION
®
Windows XP is the latest version out from the Microsoft and that has
built-in PnP function to detects any new hardware (included this
modem) on the system but at least your motherboard utility driver
installed correctly.
47
After your XP’s desktop loads-up completely, the new hardware wizard
will be prompt for your modem. If your windows system has trouble to
detect it, or your desktop problem to starts-up after the modem added
physically, please re-start your windows system again, or make sure the
motherboard utility has been setup properly.
Place the manufacturer’s software CD into your CD ROM and render the
following steps to install the modem driver.
Place check mark on the recommended selection then click on “Next” to
beginning the driver installation.
48
Windows system searches resource for the new modem driver files,
please wait until the inspection is over.
Wizard pops-up a list of modem selection, you may scroll the table up
and down, left and right to verify the data of new modem and highlight a
right one then click on “Next”. (Source location is D:\Drivers\Winxp\)
49
Click on “Continue Anyway” to ignore this message.
Windows system starts copying files from CD ROM to your local hard
disk, please wait until the process is over.
50
When the files complete its transmission, click on “Finish” button.
Modem driver installation has been ended.
VERIFY MODEM INSTALLATION
To examine your modem, to ensure your modem and computer is
communicating correctly. This can be accomplished by running the
modem diagnostics in Windows XP.
51
Brings-up the system property interface, tab on “Hardware” then click
on “ OK” button.
52
At device manager section, press on “Device Manager” button.
53
Unfold modems and highlight the modem, right click then select on
“Properties”.
54
This is the modem property interface that you can configure and verify
the modem settings. After modem hardware and software installations,
this tab screen is most important interface for your desktop
communication with outside world.
55
At “Diagnostics” tab screen as above, click on “Query Modem” button.
It may take while for the results.
56
You may write down all repose information for your support needs in
the future, then click on “OK” to close.
TESTING COMMAND:
You may using the HyperTerminal to utilizing some of the command
response before you ready to operating this modem. Click on “Start” at
lower left corner on your windows desktop, select on “run” then input
“hypertrm.exe” into dialog box, click on “OK” button to launching
HyperTerminal in windows.
57
The HyperTerminal command brings-up the dial-up screen for
connection. Actually, you don’t need have a real connection right now,
even plug the phone line into modem, just input an area code then click
on “OK”.
58
Click on “ OK” to continue.
59
Enter “TEST” or any name you like then click “OK”.
Do not enter any number and click on “Cancel” button.
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Type each of those commands to examine their response as quick as
you can.
Commands: (Must be in Upper case)
AT&F&W&W1 (Enter ↵ )
ATZ
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PQC=0
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PSS=0
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PMH=0
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PCW=0
(Enter ↵ )
AT+Vcid=1
(Enter ↵ )
Dial to V.92 server - quick connect mode (Must connect a V.92 BBS)
+++
(Enter ↵ )
AT
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PMHR
(Enter ↵ )
AT+PMHF
(Enter ↵ )
Pick up the phone (modem side)
AT+PMHF
(Enter ↵ )
ATO
(Enter ↵ )
If returns error then you can verify its description in data mode AT
command table in back of this manual.
COMMUNICATION SOFTWARE
Communication software allows you to change settings and issue
commands to your modem.
We have bundled third party communication software with 56 kbps
Data/Fax/Voice internal modem and Documentation CD. Please refer to
their README.TXT files for updated information which is not included
in this user’s manual.
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KNOWLEDGE BASIC
This section will address some basic terminology associated with your
modem and with your communications software.
MODEM
Modem is a compound word of Modulator and DEModulator. It is used
for computer communication. Modem translates computer data to
analog signal (modulation) that can travels through the telephone
network and reaches the other modem. The remote modem translates the
analog signal received back to data (demodulation) and sends to the
receiving end computer.
FAX MODEM
Normal modem can be designed to have the fax transmitting (or and)
receiving function(s).
VOICE MODEM
Modem with digitized voice capability can digitize the incoming voice
message and the computer can store it as a file. The voice modem can
also playback a recorded digital voice message either locally or to the
line as an announcement.
DTE / DCE
DTE stands for Data Terminal Equipment and DCE stands for Data
Communication Equipment. The Computer or terminal is the DTE and
the modem is the DCE.
DSP
Digital Signal Processor. It performs all digital signal processing
functions for the chipset, such as modulation schemes and modem
handshakes.
UART
UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter) is the device
used in DTE or DCE for asynchronous data receiving and transmitting.
The normal UART device used in PC is NS16450. For high-speed serial
data receiving (38400 bps and up), the PC may not be fast enough and
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data may get lost. In this case, a UART with data buffer is needed such
as 16C550A.
NVRAM (THIS MODEM DOESN’T SUPPORTED)
NVRAM(Non-Volatile RAM) is a device to store the DCE configuration.
Upon powering-up, the modem defaults to the configuration specified in
the NVRAM or to the factory default (if the NVRAM is not installed).
DCE configuration can be changed and stored by DTE in the NVRAM
by first setting up the current configuration and then sending an AT
command & Wn. The active profile will be lost if reset commands are
issued or the modem is powered down. For examples:
ATZ
Resets and then configures the modem to
NVRAM user profile 0.
AT&F S0=1 &W1 &Y1 &F configures the modem to factory default
&S0=1 configure the modem to answer after
1ring
&W1 saves the active configuration to
profile 1
&Y1 configures the modem to use NVRAM
user profile 1 as the power-up defaults.
AT COMMAND SET AND S-REGISTER
The modem (DCE) operates in one of two states: command or online. In
each state, both data and commands (including DCE response) are
transferred through the UART. In command state, the host (DTE)
communicates to the modem through AT (stands for attention)
commands and S-registers. AT command set is the industry standard
used to control the modem in command state. S-registers are internal
modem registers that DTE can access. AT command set is extended by
each modem manufacture for the control of more modem functions and
capabilities.
INIT STRINGS
An Initialization string is a series of specific commands that prepares a
modem to operate with communications software.
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XMODEM, YMODEM, ZMODEM
These are file transfer protocols used by the host ( e.g. communication
program in the PC). It does error checking and ensures data integrity of
the file transfer. There are some other protocols. Zmodem is the most
preferred protocol to use.
DATA RATE
The modem recognizes AT commands from the DTE at any valid data
rate from 300 bps to 115,200 bps; however, the DTE should use the data
rate specified for each mode:
Mode
Data
Fax
Voice
data Rate (bps)
300-33,600
300-115,200
19,200
19,200-115,200
Affected Data
Modem-to-modem data rates
DTE-to-modem data rates
AT commends and data transfers
AT commands, playback and record modes
(varies according to compression type)
MNP
Microcom Network Protocol is a data communication protocol that
allows error-free interactive communications with a variety of computers
or terminals over ordinary voice-grade telephone lines.
LAPM
Link Access Procedure for Modems. An HDLC error correction protocol
for use with error-correcting modems. Part of the ITU-T V.42 protocol.
XON/XOFF
A handshaking, flow control mechanism that communicates that the
device is ready to accept more data. The flow control is embedded into
the data stream by using special characters; hence transmit on (XON),
transmit off (XOFF) often referred to as software flow control.
CTS/RTS
CTS stands for Clear To Send. RTS stands for Request To Send, a
handshake line in which the computer tells the modem it can accept new
data.
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DCD
Data Carrier Detect
DSR
Data Set Ready. Supplied by the modem to indicate it has power and is
ready to accept commands.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready. Signal generated by the computer to indicate it
can accept data from the modem.
DUPLEX
A communication system which is capable of communicating in both
directions can be half duplex or full duplex. Half duplex allows
communication in both directions, but only one direction at a time, while
full duplex allows data to be transmitted in two directions
simultaneously.
OFF-HOOK
Picking up a telephone receiver. You take the modem off hook to dial or
answer and it remains off hook while you are connected.
ON-HOOK
Hangs up a telephone receiver. You are not connected to Telephone
Central Office when the modem is on hook.
DTMF
Dual-Tone-Multi-Frequency. The use of two simultaneous audio band
tones for dialing.
CCITT
Acronym for the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative
Committee. An international organization that decides upon
recommended communication protocol standards. Also see ITU-T.
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ITU-T
International Telecommunication Union-Telecom. Formerly CCITT.
TECHNICAL REFERENCES
Make sure the modem card is firmly and evenly inserted in the
expansion slot. Check up and make sure that the phone and line
cables are connected to the correct jacks on the modem’s plate
bracket.
: Tips for high-speed connections using a V.34 or faster
modem.
Very few people can reach a consistent 33,600 or 56K(V.90 modem) bps
connection. Speeds of 28,800 bps or faster, require perfect, almost
ISDN quality, and line conditions along the entire length of the
connection. However, V.34 and 33.6k modems are capable of pushing
the limits of analog phone lines, commonly offering connect speeds of
21600,24000, and even 26400 bps or higher.
Variations in line quality are typically the cause of low connection rate.
At one point or another, everyone will experience “ a bad line”
connection, and have to hang up and call again. However, if you find
that you never or rarely connect at rates above 19200 bps, you will need
to investigate the line quality of your connections.
If you encounter the same low connection rate, the problem may be
resulting from impairments along the lines running to the local
Telephone Company or within your home or office. Your telephone
company or a private consultant may be able to help.
: Modem does not respond to AT commands.
Either the COM port settings mis-match within hardware and software
or the wrong type of your modem configuration.
Verify the hardware jumper settings if there is any for modem IRQs,
COM port with reference manual from product manufacturer, or techsupport from your dealer.
: Verify the PnP modem setup with Windows®95.
66
Check and update the modem’s configuration through the
Windows ®95 Modem Properties windows.
1.
To view this information, you need to enter the
“SYSTEM” information in the Windows ®95 Control
Panel.
2.
Double-click the Control Panel folder.
3.
Next double-click the System icon. A System Properties
screen will be display.
4.
Choose the Device Manager menu. There are now two
different areas where you can look for information about
the modem setup and the computer setup.
5.
First double-click the Modem icon. All modems that have
added to your system will appear.
6.
Find and double-click your modem’s name. If it is not
present, the installation did not work at all. If it appears
then the Device status area display the message which
shows this device is working properly. Otherwise, you
may get an error message.
7.
Click on the Resource Menu. This window shows the
modem’s configuration. The input/output range indicates
the COM port address. Below this is the interrupt Request
(IRQ) number. At the bottom of the screen is a
“Conflicting device list”. If no device conflict, then a “No
conflicts” message should appear.
Additionally, for PCI plug-and-play device, the modem’s COM port
address and IRQ can be changed from the Windows’ 95 Modem
Properties screen.
: Verify the modem with regedit.exe and HyperTerminal.
Verify Installation with REGEDIT.EXE Use Windows® 95’s
REGEDIT.EXE program to access the PCI plug-and-play code.
1)
From the Windows 95 Start Menu, choose Run. Type
“REGEDIT”. The Run function generates the Registry
window on your screen.
2)
Double-click on the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE folder.
3)
Double-click on the Enum folder.
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4)
Double-click on the PCIPNP folder, which shows one or
more modem folders.
The subdirectory names are base on the PCI PnP Unimodem ID. The
name contains a three-character manufacturer ID and a four-digit
product ID. For example, “CIR1000” refers to Cirrus Logic product 1000,
which stands for the CL-MD1414US plug-and-play product.
5)
Double-click the subdirectory containing your modem.
6)
Double-click on the ‘0’ directory. Information about your
modem should appear in the right window of the Registry
Editor screen.
: Test your modem with HyperTerminal.
The fastest way to verify whether the modem was added properly is to
use the HyperTerminal program to send an AT command to the modem.
Alternatively, you can use the software’s autodial feature. Installation
was successful if you get an “OK” back from the modem or if the
modem dials
use the auto-dial feature. If HyperTerminal returns an error message,
then the installation either did not work properly or a COM port or IRQ
conflict exists.
HyperTerminal is located in the Windows ® 95 program Accessories
menu. After loading HyperTerminal, set the modem type to your modem.
If your modem type is not displayed, then the Unimodem ID installation
failed. Correctly entering the modem type, you also need to enter a
telephone number (even though you may not use the dial feature).
Then, press the “OK” button, the HyperTerminal will display Dial
screen.
To make sure the installation was successful, type AT. You should see
an OK message. If HyperTerminal displays an error message, then the
system is not configured properly, and you should check the Windows
95 modem properties.
: Setup Jaton’s modem.
If your modem is not detected by Windows ®95 PnP function, then you
simply need to add this modem from the Windows ®95 modem property:
1)
In the Control Panel, double-click on the “Modems” icon.
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2)
Press the “Add” button in the Modem Properties screen.
3)
Press the” Next ” button in the Install New Modem
screen.
Windows ®95 then generates a Unimodem ID for your modem and
checks whether is already supported by Window’s .INF files. If
supported, then Windows 95 display the detected modem’s name in the
Verify Modem screen.
Alternatively, you may need to install a new .INF file for your modem. If
the verify Modem windows shows that Standard Modem was found,
then Windows 95 detected the modem but either did not recognize the
Unimodem ID and/or the correct .INF file was not previously installed.
To install a new .INF file for modem:
1)
Press the “Change” button.
2)
Press the “Have Disk” button.
3)
Place the floppy disk containing the .INF file into your
floppy drive. You should now see an Install from Disk
window on your screen.
4)
Then press the “ OK” button. If the new .INF file supports
your Unimodem ID, then Windows 95 may autodetect
your modem or list available modems from your disks.
5)
Select the appropriate modes and press the “OK” button.
6)
Press the “Next” button in the Verify Modem window.
7)
Then, press the “Finish” button in the install New Modem
window.
Another way to install a new .INF file is to copy your manufacturer .INF
file to the “\Windows\INF” directory before trying to add a new modem.
In this case, Windows 95 may auto-detect your modem without your
having to manually select the modem.
: PnP setup doesn’t work
The problem most likely is you do not have the right .INF file for your
modem. Additionally, you may have an IRQ conflict problem. If you
have a plug-and-play modem, Windows ®95 will not let you easily
69
share IRQs with other devices. For example, if the serial ports COM1
and Com2 use IRQ4 and IRQ3, then Windows 95 will not let you use
IRQ3 or IRQ4 for your new modem.
Unfortunately, you may manually delete the old .INF file from
\Windows\INF directory . Then replace new OEM*.INF (provide by
Modem manufacturer) to that same directory.
FREQUENTLY ENCOUNTERED PROBLEMS:
Problem:
Modem would not dial
Solution :
Check your phone line and cable connections. Make sure
that
the line from the wall is connected to the LINE jack of the
modem.
Issue command: ATS6=6
Problem:
No dial tone message
Solution :
Make sure no other phone extension has been picked up
on the same line.
Make sure that the telephone line, coming from the wall is
connected to the LINE jack and NOT to the PHONE jack
on your modem.
Check to make sure you are using a standard analog
telephone line and not a digital line.
Problem:
Modem does not dial correctly
Solution A:
Your phone system may require that you obtain an
outside line before dialing. In this case, place the numeric
prefix for the outside line (usually the number 9) before
the phone number in your dialing string.
9 555 3333 To get out of the office
NOTE: Place a comma immediately after the number 9 in
the dialing string to create a 2 second delay at that point
in the dialing. This prevents the modem from dialing the
phone number before the phone system has had time to
connect to an outside line.
9, 555 3333 To get a pause
Solution B: You may be trying to dial into another area code; you must
first
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dial a 1 before the phone number in your dialing string.
1 555 555 3333 To get into another area code
The other end could be busy or not answering.
Make sure the number you dialed is correct.
Test the number by dialing it on your telephone - not
through your modem.
If you are using the modem internationally, your modem
may not recognize the dial tone in the local country. Try
the command ATX3DT and the telephone number.
Problem:
Error message
Solution :
Make sure you selected the correct modem in your
communications software.
If you are typing from the command line in terminal mode,
make sure you typed correctly.
Make sure you are issuing the correct AT command.
Note: Not all modems support the same AT Command set.
Check the AT Command set in this manual to ensure that
you are using a valid AT Command.
Problem:
Modem communication error or modem not
found
Solution :
Problem:
Solution :
Make sure you have selected the correct COM Port in
your communications software setup.
Check all the cable connections and make sure they are
secure.
In fax software, make sure you have selected the correct
fax class.
The Port setting in the Control Panel in Windows may not
be set properly;
Modem would not connect.
If you have no trouble communicating with any modem
except on one particular line, the problem may be with the
modem on the other end of that line.
Problem:
Modem would not fax
Solution :
Make sure you have selected Class 1 fax class.
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Make sure that you do not have another communications
program open.
Be sure you selected the Fax printer in your word
processing program.
Problem:
Solution :
Fax not found
Re-install or re-setup Fax software with the modem
installed.
The Port setting in the Control Panel in Windows may not
be set properly; you may have connected the phone line,
coming from the wall, to the Phone jack on the back of the
modem. The phone line, coming from the wall, must be
connected to the Line jack.
Problem:
Modem does not respond to AT Commands
Solution :
Make sure the COM port settings in the software match
the hardware configuration.
Make sure the board is seated properly (pushed all the
way into the slot).
POSSIBLE INSTALLATION PROBLEMS
Problem:
IRQ Conflict
One of the biggest installation problems occurs when
more than one modem or serial card uses the same COM
ports and IRQs. Additionally, other devices like the
mouse or sound card also may use conflicting IRQs.
Solution :
If you have a COM port conflict, then you can try a different
COM port. Many computer systems come with either one serial
port and a modem or two serial ports that use COM port 1 and
COM port 2; therefore, it is best to try COM port 3 and COM
port 4.
If you believe an IRQ conflict may exist, go into the Windows
95 Computer Properties screen and double click the Systems
icon at the top of the screen. Windows 95 then shows the
IRQs being used by the system. Scroll down the screen and
find an IRQ not being used, then try changing the board IRQ
to this number. If the board does not support this IRQ, then
72
you can change the IRQ number on another device and use
this IRQ for your modem. Alternately, you can free up an IRQ
by removing an existing board from the computer and
removing its name from the Computer Properties screen.
CAUTION: Removing the device name from the Computer
Properties screen may cause problems later when using the
removed board.
.INF FILE NOT LOADED PROPERLY
Determining Whether the .INF was Loaded
Go back to the Modem icon in the Windows 95 Control Panel.
After double-clicking the icon, check whether your modem’s
name is displayed in the Modems Properties screen. If so, then
the .INF file is loaded properly. If your modem is not shown,
then one of the following problems could have occurred: a
wrong .INF file, Windows 95 did not recognize your modem,
the Cancel button was mistakenly pressed during installation,
or the modem type name was removed previously.
What To Do if the .INF Was Not Loaded
Try adding the board again. If that still does not work, try
removing the board and adding a different modem. If this
works, then there may be a hardware problem or a COM port
conflict problem.
WINDOWS 95 IRQ CONFLICTS
Determining If There Is A Conflict
Even if the hardware works perfectly and the .INF file is
installed properly, Windows ®95 may still have problems using
the board. Part of the problem is that even though DOS and
Windows 3.1™ allow you to share IRQs between COM ports
(for example, COM1 and COM3 typically use IRQ4; COM2 and
COM4, IRQ3), Windows ®95 does not appropriately support
devices sharing IRQs. For plug-and-play devices, this may
become a major problem. For non-plug-and-play boards,
Windows ®95 may allow you to share IRQs.
73
What To Do If There Is A Windows 95 IRQ Conflict
On the Computer Properties screen, manually select the
modem’s IRQ. This may or may not work. Alternately, free an
IRQ line by deleting or removing existing devices or boards,
then manually select the modem’s IRQ from the Computer
Properties screen.
USING THE WINDOWS 95 COMPUTER PROPERTIES SCREEN
The computer properties screen displays the hardware and
software drivers used by the computer. Use the following
directions to access the Computer Properties screen:
THE SYSTEMS PROPERTIES SCREEN
Press the Windows ®95 Start icon, then press the Settings
icon. Choose the Control Panel.
Double-click the System icon on the Control Panel. The System
Properties screen appears.
Press the Device Manager tab in the System icon. A screen
displays the devices installed on your computer.
Double click the Modem icon. This screen displays the
installed modems.
Find your modem and double-click on that selection. If your
modem does not appear, then either the modem was not added
through the Modems Icon in the Control Panel or the modem’s
installation process failed.
After double-clicking your modem type, a new screen displays
information about your modem. This screen informs you
whether the device is working properly and if there is a COM
port or device conflict. After you’re finished viewing this
window, press the OK button to return to the System
Properties menu.
To remove or eliminate a modem, select the modem in the
System Properties menu and press the Remove button.
Alternately, access the Modems icon from the Control Panel,
select the modem name, and press the Remove button.
COMPUTER PROPERTIES SCREEN
From the System Properties window, double-click the
“Computer” ‘ icon. This opens up the Computer Properties
74
screen. This screen provides information on which IRQs, I/O
address, Memory Address and DMA channels are used by the
computer.
To see if any IRQs are available, select the Interrupt Request
(IRQ) circle at the top of the Computer Properties screen (the
default selection when first entering this window). Next, scroll
down to see which IRQ numbers are used. If an IRQ number is
not shown, then that IRQ is not being used by the system and
can be used by your modem (if your modem supports that IRQ
number).
To determine which COM ports address are available, select
the Input/ Output (I/O) circle at the top of the Computer
Properties screen. Scroll down the screen to see what COM
ports are being used. The COM port addresses are: COM1
03F8-03FF, COM2 02F8-02FF, COM3 03E8-03EF, and COM4
02E8-02EF. If the address for any of the COM ports is not
shown, then that COM port is available.
AT COMMANDS
BASIC DATA MODE AT COMMANDS
•
An AT command string begins with an AT prefix and ends
with the content of S-register S3 (typically a carriage return
<ENTER>). The A/ and escape sequences are the only
exceptions. AT stands for attention and prompts the modem
to receive a command line from DTE.
•
AT command strings can contain multiple commands in the
same string. These commands are placed after the AT prefix
and before the <ENTER>. Spaces may be used to separate
commands within the string, but no punctuation is needed
except for fax and voice commands. In a multiple-command line,
fax and voice AT commands must be separated from following
command by a semicolon (;).
•
The maximum length of an AT command string is 40
characters. The AT prefix and any spaces are not counted.
•
The AT prefix and commands may be entered in either upper
or lower case.
75
•
For commands that contain numeric options you may omit the
numeric value and the modem will assume that the number 0
was entered.
Table 1. Basic Data Mode AT Commands
Command
Description
A/
Repeat the last AT command string issued.
An “AT” prefix is not used. Do not terminate this command
with <ENTER>.
Answer.
Go off-hook and enter the answer mode. After 3 seconds the
modem will initiate an answer tone.
ITU-T or Bell® (Default=1)
Use ITU-T V.22 at 1200 bps, and ITU-T V.21at 300 bps
Use Bell® 212A at 1200 bps, Bell® 1035 at 300 bps.
Use ITU-T V.23 only. The originating modem transits at 75 bps
(and receives at 1200 bps); the answering modem receives at
75 bps (and transmits at 1200 bps)
Selects ITU-T V.23 only. The originating modem transmits at
1200 bps (and receives at 75 bps); the answering modem
receives at 1200 bps (and transmits at 75 bps)
Carrier control option (Default=1)
Transmit carrier always off
Normal transit carrier
Dial command
Command Echo (Default=l)
Disables command echo from the modem.
Enables command echo from the modem.
Online echo (Default=1)
Enables online echo
Disables online echo
Hook Switch Control (Default=0)
Hangs up the telephone line
Picks up the telephone line
Identification/checksum option (Default=0)
Reports product code
Reports modem chip firmware version
Verifies ROM checksum
Reports device set name
Reserved
Reserved for modem chip hardware configuration
A
Bn
B0
B1
B2
B3
Cn
C0
C1
D
En
E0
E1
Fn
F0
F1
Hn
H0
H1
In
I0
I1
I2
I3
I4
I5
76
I6
I7
I8
I10
I11
I14
I20
I21
I22
I23
Ln
L0,1
L2
L3
Mn
M0
M1
M2
M3
Nn
N0
N1
On
O0
O1
P
Qn
Q0
Q1
Sn
Sn=x
Sn?
T
Vn
V0
V1
Wn
W0
W1
W2
W3
Country code
Version of board manufacturer firmware
Features of modem firmware
Modem board configuration - bit set by board manufacturer
Modem board configuration - bits set by board manufacturer
SAFE device
Speaker Volume control (Default=2)
Low volume.
Medium speaker volume
High speaker volume
Speaker On/Off (Default=1)
Speaker off.
Speaker on until modem detects the carrier signal.
Speaker is always on when modem is off-hook.
Speaker off during dialing, on until modem carrier present
Select data rate handshake (Default=1)
Handshake only at DTE-to-modem data rate
Begins handshake at DTE-to-modem data rate and falls to
highest compatible rate
Go Online (Default=0)
Returns modem to data mode
Retrains equalizer and then returns to data mode
Pulse Dial
Result Codes (Default = 0)
Enables display of result codes
Disables display of result codes
Select an S-register
Write to an S-Register
Read from an S-Register
Tone Dial
Result Codes Format (Default=1)
Enable short-form result codes. (Numeric)
Enable long-form result code. (Text or Verbose)
Response code data rate (Default=0)
Reports DTE speed response codes
Reports DTE speed response codes
Reports DCE speed response codes
Reports DTE speed response codes and information on error
77
Xn
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4
Yn
Y0
Y1
Zn
Z0
Z1
&Cn
&C0
&C1
&Dn
&D0
&D1
&D2
&D3
&F
&Gn
&G0
&G1
&G2
&Jn
&J0
&J1
&Kn
&K0
&K3
&K4
&M0
correction and data compression
Result Code type (Default=4)
Enables result codes 0-4; disables detection of busy and dial
tone
Enables result codes 0-5, 10, and above; disables busy and dial
tone detection
Enables result codes 0-6 and 10 and above; disables busy
detection and enables dial tone detection
Enables result codes 0-5, 7, and 10 and above; enables busy
detection and disables dial tone detection
Enables result codes 0-7 and 10 and above; enables busy and
dial tone detection
Long Space Disconnect (Default=0)
Disable Long Space Disconnect
Enable Long Space Disconnect
Recall stored profile (Default=0)
Resets modem and recalls user profile 0
Resets modem and recalls user profile 1
DCD (data carrier detect) option (Default=1)
Ignores remote modem status; DCD always on
DCD set according to remote modem status
DTR Control, Data Terminal Ready (Default=2)
In async mode, modem ignores DTR
Modem switches to command mode when DTR switches on
When DTR switches off, the modem goes on-hook and
disables auto-answer mode; when DTR switches on, autoanswer is enabled
Turning off DTR re-initializes the modem and resets values
except UART registers
Load factory defaults
Guard tone option (1200 bps and 2400 bps only) (Default=0)
disables guard tone
Enables 550-Hz guard tone
Enables 1800-Hz guard tone
Auxiliary relay control (Default=0)
Auxiliary relay never operated
Activates auxiliary relay when modem is off-hook
Select serial flow control (Default=3)
Disable flow control.
Bidirectional hardware flow control
Xon/Xoff software flow control
Communication mode option-modem supports only async
mode (Default=0)
78
&Pn
&P0
&P1
&Q0
&Sn
&S0
&S1
&Tn
&T0
&T1
&T3
&T4
&T5
&T6
&T7
&T8
&Un
&U0
&U1
&Vn
&V0
&V1
&V3
&Wn
&W0
&W1
&Yn
&Y0
&Y1
&Zn=x
%En
%E0
%E1
%E2
%Gn
%G0
%G1
-Cn
-C0
-C1
dial pulse ratio (Default=0)
Sets 10-pps pules dial with 39% / 61% make-break
Sets 10-pps pules dial with 33 / 67 make-break
Communication mode option-modem supports only async
mode (Default=0)
DSR (data set ready) option (Default=0)
DSR is always active
DSR active only during handshaking and when carrier is lost
Self test commands (Default=0)
Terminate test in progress
Initiate Local Analog Loopback
Initiate Local Digital Loopback
Grants RDL request from remote modem
Denies RDL request from remote modem
Initiates remote digital Loopback
Starts remote digital Loopback with self-test
Initiate Local Analog Loopback with self test.
Disable Trellis coding (Default=0)
Enables Trellis coding with QAM as fallback
QAM modulation only
View active and stored profiles (Default=0)
View stored profile 0
View stored profile 1
View relay and general-purpose input-output status
Store active profile (Default=0)
Store in user profile 0
Store in user profile 1
Select stored profile on power up (Default=0)
Recall stored profile 0 on power-up
Recall stored profile 1 on power-up
Store Telephone Numbers
n=0 to 3 and x=dial string.
Auto-retrain control (V.22 bis and V.32 bis only) (Default=1)
Disables auto-retrain
Enables auto-retrain
enables line quality monitor and fallback/fall forward
Rate renegotiation (Default=0)
Disabled
Enabled
Generate data modem calling tone (Default=1)
Calling tone disabled
1300-Hz calling tone enabled
79
-C2
+GMI?
+GMM?
+GMR?
+MS=m
+PCW=m
V.8 calling tone and 1300-Hz calling tone
Identify modem manufacturer
Identify product model
Identify product revision
Modulation selections (Default=V.34B, 1, 0, 0)
(V.34 asymmetrical connections: 33,600 bps maximum)
Call Waiting Enable: This command controls the action to be
taken upon detection of call waiting in a V.92 DCE.
0
+PIG=m
+PMH=m
+PMHF
+PMHR
Toggle V.24 Circuit 125 and collect Caller ID if enabled by
VCID (Default)
1
Hang up
2
Ignore V.92 call waiting
PCM Upstream Ignore: This command controls the use of PCM
upstream in a V.92 DCE.
0
Enable PCM upstream (Default)
1
Disable PCM upstream
Modem on Hold Enable: this command controls whether or not
modem on hold procedures are enabled during V.92 operation.
0
Enables V.92 modem on hold (Default)
1
Disables V.92 modem on hold
V.92 Modem on Hold Hook Flash: This command causes the
DCE to go on-hook for a specified period of time, and then
return on-hook. The specified period of time is normally onehalf second, but many be governed by national regulations. If
this command is initiated and modem is not On Hold, ERROR
is returned. This command applies only to V.92 Modem on
Hold. Modem on Hold: This command requests the DCE to
Initiate
initiate or to confirm a modem on hold procedure. The DCE
shall return ERROR if Modem on Hold is not enabled or if the
DCE is in an idle condition. The DCE shall return the string
response +PMHR: <value> where <value> is a decimal value
corresponding to the Modem on Hold on Hold timer value
received or the request status during the DCE modem on hold
exchange procedure as defined below. This response may be
delayed depending up or the context under which the +PMHR
command is made, i.e., if the +PMHR is response to an
incoming Modem on Hold or if it is initiating a request.
<value>
Description
0
V.92 Modem on Hold Request Denied or not
available
80
1
MOH with
10 second time-out Granted
2
MOH with 20 second time-out Granted
+PMHT=m
+PQC=m
+PSS=m
3
MOH with 30 second time-out Granted
4
MOH with 40 second time-out Granted
5
MOH with 1 minute time-out Granted
6
MOH with 2 minute time-out Granted
7
MOH with 3 minute time-out Granted
8
MOH with 4 minute time-out Granted
9
MOH with 6 minute time-out Granted
10
MOH with 8 minute time-out Granted
11
MOH with 12 minute time-out Granted
12
MOH with 16 minute time-out Granted
13
MOH with indefinite time-out Granted
Modem on Hold Timer: This command controls whether or not
the modem will grant or deny a Modem-on-Hold (MOH)
request as well as setting the Modem-on-Hold-Time-Out.
0
Deny V.92 Modem-on-Hold Request (Default)
1
Grant MOH with 10 second time-out
2
Grant MOH with 20 second time-out
3
Grant MOH with 30 second time-out
4
Grant MOH with 40 second time-out
5
Grant MOH with 1 minute time-out
6
Grant MOH with 2 minute time-out
7
Grant MOH with 3 minute time-out
8
Grant MOH with 4 minute time-out
9
Grant MOH with 6 minute time-out
10
Grant MOH with 8 minute time-out
11
Grant MOH with 12 minute time-out
12
Grant MOH with 16 minute time-out
13
Grant MOH with indefinite time-out
V.92 Phase 1 and Phase 2 Control: This command controls the
global enabling or disabling of the V.92 shortened Phase 1 and
Phase 2 startup procedures, not the initiation thereof. This
command is used in conjunction with the +PSS command.
0
Enable Short Phase 1 and Phase 2 (Default)
1
Enable Short Phase 1
2
Enable Short Phase 2
3
Disable Short Phase 1 and Short Phase 2
Use Short Sequence: This command causes a calling DCE to
force either a V.92 short or full startup sequence as defined by
the PQC command on the next and subsequent connections.
0
The DCEs decide whether or not to use the short startup
81
1
2
procedures. The short startup procedures shall only be
used if enabled by the +PQC command.
Forces the use of the short startup procedures on next
and subsequent connections if they are enabled by the
+PQC command.
Forces the use of the full startup procedures on the next
and subsequent connections independent of setting of
the +PQC command. (Default)
DATA ERROR CORRECTION & COMPRESSION
COMMANDS
Your modem supports two types of error correction (MNP
2-4 and
V.42) and data compression (MNP5 and V.42 bis). V.42 error correction
uses LAPM as the primary error-control protocol and uses MNP2-4 as
an alternative. V.42 bis data compression requires V.42 (LAPM only).
MNP5 requires MNP2-4. The supported V.42 bis/MNP AT command is
listed below:
Table 2. V.44/V.42/V.42 bis MNP AT Commands
Command
Description
%An
%Cn
Set auto-reliable fallback character (Default=13)
MNP 5 data compression control (Default=1)
No compression
Enables MNP5 data compression
MNP Block Size (Default=3)
64 characters (This improves throughput on noisy phone line)
128 characters
192characters
256 characters
Transmit Break
Set auto-reliable buffer (Default=0)
No data buffering
Four-second buffer until 200 characters in the buffer or
detection of a SYN character
No buffering. Connects non-V.42 modems to V.42 modem
Set modem port flow control (Default=0)
Disable port flow control.
Set port flow control to XON/XOFF
Bps rate adjust control (Default=0)
%C0
%C1
\An
\A0
\Al
\A2
\A3
\Bn
\Cn
\C0
\C1
\C2
\Gn
\G0
\G1
\Jn
82
\J0
\J1
\Kn
Disables rate adjust
Enables rate adjust
Set break control (Default=5)
In connect state, transmits break to remote (if in reliable
mode):
\K0,2,4
\K1
\K3
\K5
Enters command mode, no break sent
Destructive/expedited
Nondestructive/expedited
Nondestructive/non-expedited
In command state, transmits break to remote (if in reliable
mode):
\K0,1
\K2,3
\K4,5
Destructive/expedited
Nondestructive/expedited
Nondestructive/non-expedited
In connect state, receives break at modem port (if in direct
mode):
\K0,2,4
\K1,3,5
Immediately sends break and enters command state
Immediately sends the break through
In connect state, receives break at modem port and sends to
serial port:
\K0,1
\K2,3
\K4,5
\T0
Destructive/expedited
Nondestructive/expedited
Nondestructive/non-expedited
Set operating mode (Default=3)
Selects normal mode with speed buffering
Selects normal mode with speed buffering
Select MNP reliable mode
Select V.42 auto-reliable mode
Select V.42 reliable mode
Originate reliable link
Set serial port flow control (Default=3)
Disables flow control
XON/XOFF software flow control
Unidirectional hardware flow control
Bi-directional hardware flow control
Disables inactivity timer (Default=0)
\U
Accept reliable link
\Nn
\N0
\N1
\N2
\N3
\N4
\O
\Qn
\Q0
\Q1
\Q2
\Q3
\Xn
\X0
\X1
\Y
\Z
Set XON/XOFF pass-through (Default=0)
Processes flow control characters
Processes flow control characters and passes to local or
remote
Switch to reliable mode
Switch to normal mode
83
-Jn
-J0
-J1
“Hn
“H0
“H1
“H2
“H3
“On
+DS44=m
Set V.42 detect phase (Default=1)
Disables the V.42 detect phase
Enables the V.42 detect phase
V.42 bis compression control (Default=3)
Disables V.42 bis
Enables V.42 bis only when transmitting data
Enables V.42 bis only when receiving data
Enables V.42 bis for both transmitting and receiving data
V.42 bis string length (Default=32)
V.44 Data Compression:This command controls the V.44 data
compression function if provided in the DCE. It accepts the
following sub parameters:
m=[<direction>[,<compression_negotiation>[,<capability>[,<m
ax_codewords_tx>[,<max_codewords_rx>[,<max_string_tx>[,<
max_string_rx>[,<max_history_tx>[,<max_history_rx>]]]]]]]]]
<direction> Specified the desired direction(s) of the data
compression function.
0
Negotiated… no compression
1
Transmit only
2
Receive only
3 (Default)
Both directions, accept any direction
<compression_negotiation> specifies whether or not the DCE
should continue to operate if the desired result is not obtained.
0 (Default)
Do not disconnect if Rec.V.44 is not negotiated
by the remote DCE as specified in <direction>.
Always set to 0.
<capability> specifies the use of stream method, packet
method, multi-packet method.
0 (Default)
Stream method
1
Packet method
2
Multi-packet method
<max_codeword_tx> specifies the maximum number of
codewords which should be negotiated in the transmit
direction.
256 to 65536
<max_codewords_rx> dpecifies the maximum number of
codewords which should be negotiated in the receive
direction.
256 to 65536
<max_string_tx> specifies the maximum string length to be
negotiated in transmit direction.
32 to 255
84
<max_string_rx> specifies the maximum number string length
to be negotiated in receive direction.
32 to 255
<max_history_tx> specifies the maximum size of history buffer
to be negotiated in transmit direction.
≥ 512
<max_history_rx> specifies the maximum size of the history
buffer to be negotiated in the receive direction.
≥ 512
FAX CLASS 1 AT COMMANDS
Your modem implements the EIA-578 dada/fax Class 1 AT command set
standard. This AT command set allows a DTE (with Class 1
communication software) and a CL-MD34xx based modem to
communicate with group 3 fax machines. The fax identity and test
commands are listed below.
Table 3. Fax Identity Commands
Command
Function
+FMFR?
+FMDL?
+FMI?
+FMM?
+FMR?
+FREV?
Identifies modem manufacturer
Identifies product model
Identifies modem manufacturer
Identifies product model
Identifies product version number
Identifies product version number
Table 4. Fax Class 1 AT Commands
Command
Function
Range
+FCLASS=1
+FAE=n
+FRH=n
+FRM=n
Mode selection (Default=0)
Fax/data autorecognition (Default=0)
Receive HDLC data
Receive data
+FRS=n
+FTH=n
+FTM=n
Wait for silence
Transmit HDLC data
Transmit data
0, 1, 8, 80
0, 1
3
24, 48, 72, 73, 74, 96,
97, 98, 121, 122, 145,
146
1-255
3
24, 48, 72, 73, 74, 96,
97, 98, 121, 122, 145,
85
+FTS=n
Stop transmission and pause
146
0-255
VOICE MODE AT COMMANDS
Your modem implements a voice AT command set that allows a DTE to
record and play back voice messages. This product is compatible with
EIA/TIA IS-101 voice command set. Supported commands and
descriptions are listed in following tables:
Table 5. Voice AT Commands
Command Function
+FCLASS=8 Voice mode selection
+FLO=n
Flow Control Select
n = 0 disables flow control
n = 1 enables XON/XOFF
n = 2 enables ITU-T V.24 CTS/RTS
+VTS=m
DTMF and Tone generation
+VCID=n
Caller ID selection
n = 0 disables Caller ID
n = 1 Enables Caller ID formatted
n = 2 Enables Caller ID unformatted
+VCSD=n Voice command mode silence detection
n =0 disabled
n = 1 enabled
+VDR=m
Distinctive Ring selection
(can be disabled by +VEM command)
+VIP=n
Initialize parameter
+VLS=n
Relay/playback control
+VGT=n
Volume selection
+VTX
Play mode
+VRA=n
Ringback-goes-away timer
+VRX
Record mode
+VGR=n
Receive gain selection
+VRN=n
Ringback-never-appeared timer
+VSM=m
Compression method selection
+VSD=m
+VTD=n
+VEM=m
Silence detection (quiet and silence)
Beep tone duration timer
Event reporting and masking
86
Default
0
1
Range
0-2, 8, 80
0-2
none
*0
Call
0-2
0
0,1
0,0
0-255, 0-255
none
0
128
none
50
none
128
10
140, 8000
0, 0:
128, 50
100
‘C’
0-16
121-131
Call
0-50
Call
121-131
0-255
Call
0-255,0-255
5-255
Call
BB860980
BFE63883
BB863EE0
+VBT=m
+VIT=n
+VNH=n
+VSP=n
+VGM=n
+VGS=n
Buffer threshold setting
DTE/DCE inactivity timer
Automatic hang-up control
Speakerphone on/off control
Speakerphone microphone gain
Speakerphone speaker gain
192,320
0
0
0
128
128
192,320
0-255
0-255
0,1
121-131
121-131
RADISH
 VOICEVIEW
This modem implements the commands and protocols needed to
support Radish VoiceView. Supported commands and responses are
listed below:
Table 6. VoiceView Commands
Command
+FCLASS=80
+FLO=n
+FPR
-SVV
-SAC
-SIP
-SCD
-SER?
-SIC
-SDS
-SSQ
-SDA
-SFX
-SQR
-SSP
-SSR
+VLS=n
+VSP=n
+VGM=n
+VGS=n
Function
Default
Mode selection
Flow control select
Select DTE/DCE interface rate-turn on/off autobaud
Start VoiceView data mode
Accept data mode request
Initialize VoiceView parameters
Capabilities data
Error status (ready only)
Reset capabilities to default setting
Disable switchhook status monitoring (required if
DCE implements switchhook status monitoring and
is used with handset adapter)
Start capabilities query
Start modem data mode
Start fax data mode
Capabilities query response control
VoiceView transmission speed
Start sequence response control
Analog source/destination selection
Speakerphone on/off control
Speakerphone microphone gain
Speakerphone speaker gain
87
0
1
4
128
128
Table 7. VoiceView Response Codes
Response
-SFA
-SMD
-SSV
-SRA
-SRQ
-SRC:
-STO
Function
Fax data mode start sequence event (mandatory only if fax
data mode is supported)
Modem data mode start sequence event (mandatory only if
modem data mode is supported)
VoiceView data mode start sequence event
Receive ADSI response event
Receive capabilities query event
Receive capabilities information event
Talk-off event
Table 8. VoiceView <DLE> Character Pairs
Command
<CAN>
<EOT>
<ESC>
<ETB>
<ETX>
Function
Abort data transfer in progress
End of message marker, final message of transaction, no
response accepted (ASCII 10h 04h)
End of message marker, DCE shall immediately return to
voice mode (ASCII 10h 1Bh)
End of message marker, final response requested, after
which the transaction terminates (ASCII 10h 17h)
End of message marker, continue transaction, response
requested (ASCII 10h 03h)
S-REGISTER
This modem provides direct access to the internal registers know as Sregisters. The DTE uses S-registers to set up and check modem
configurations. The content of these registers can be changed using the
ATSn=x command, where “Sn” is the register name and “x”’ is the value
to be stored. The contents of the S-registers can be read using the
ATSn? Command. Most S-registers can be read from or written to;
however, some S-registers(such as S14) are read-only. Writing to a readonly register may cause the modem to act improperly. Reserved
registers should never be written to. A list of supported S-registers
follows:
Table 9. S-Register Summary
88
Regist
S0
S1
S2
S3
S4
S5
Function
Rings to auto-answer
Ring counter
Escape character
Carriage return character
Line feed character
Backspace character
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10
S11
S12
S13
S14
S15
S16
S17
S18
S19
S20
S21
S22
S23
Wait time before dialing
Wait time for carrier
Pause time for dial modifier
Carrier recover time
Lost carrier hang up delay
DTMF dialing speed
Guard time
Reserved
Bit Mapped options
Reserved
Modem test options
Reserved
Modem test tier
Reserved
Reserved
Bit Mapped options
Bit Mapped options
Bit Mapped options
S24
S25
S26
S27
Reserved
Detect DTR change
RTC to CTS delay interval
Bit Mapped options
Range
0-255
0-255
0-127
0-127
0-127
032,127
2-255
1-255
0-255
1-255
1-255
50-255
0-255
Units
Rings
Rings
ASCII
ASCII
ASCII
ASCII
Type
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Default
0
0
43
13
10
8
second
second
second
0.1sec
0.1sec
ms
0.02s
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
2
60
2
6
14
70
50
none
170
none
0
none
0
none
none
48
118
none
R
R
0-255 second
R/W
R
R
R
0-255
0.01 s
R
none
5
1
64
R/W
S30 Disconnect inactivity timer
S31 Bit Mapped options
0-255
minute
R/W
R
0
none
S33 XOFF character
0-255
ASCII
R/W
19
89
S37 Maximum Line Speed Attempt (Same
as +MS=m<max rate> parameter. )
0 = DTE Rate
1 = Reserved
2 = Reserved
3 = 300
4 = Reserved
5 = 1200
6 = 2400
7 = 4800
8 = 7200
9 = 9600
10 = 12,200
11 = 14,400
12 = 16,800
13 = 19,200
14 = 21,600
15 = 26,400
16 = 26,400
17 = 28,800
18 = 31,200
19 = 33,600
0-19
R/W
OTHER COMMANDS AND RESPONSE CODES
Table 10. Dial Modifiers
Command
0 to 9
A, B, C, D, *, #
P
R
S=n
T
W
,
!
@
;
-()
Function
Dialing digits
Tone dial characters
Pulse dial
Reverse originate mode
Dial NVRAM telephone number
Tone dial
Wait for dial tone
Pause
Flash hook
Wait for quiet answer
Return to command state
Ignored by modem
90
0
Table 11. DTE-Modem Data Rate Response Codes
V0
Short
Form
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
23
22
10
11
24
12
V1
Long Form
V0
Short
Form
OK
CONNECT
RING
NO CARRIER
ERROR
CONNECT 1200
NO DIAL TONE
BUSY
NO ANSWER
CONNECT 75/1200
CONNECT 1200/75
CONNECT 2400
CONNECT 4800
CONNECT 7200
CONNECT 9600
25
13
59
14
61
62
63
64
28
18
31
33
35
45
+F4
V1
Long Form
CONNECT 12000
CONNECT 14400
CONNECT 16800
CONNECT 19200
CONNECT 21600
CONNECT 24000
CONNECT 26400
CONNECT 28800
CONNECT 38400
CONNECT 57600
CONNECT 115200
FAX
DATA
RINGBACK
+FCERROR
LIMITED WARRANTY.
Manufacturer warrants that the products sold hereunder are free from
defects in material and workmanship for a period of two (2) years from
manufacturing date. This limited warranty applies only to the original
purchaser of Jaton Product and is not transferable. This limited warranty
does not apply if failure to the Product Registration, or over thirty (30)
days from purchase (original invoice date). This Limited Warranty does
not cover any incompatibilities due to the user’s computer, hardware,
software or any related system configuration in which the Jaton
Products interfaces. Proof of purchase will be require before any
consideration by Manufacturer occurs.
OTHER LIMITS.
The forgoing is in lieu of all other warranties, expressed or implied.
Including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability
and fitness for a particular purpose.Manufacturer does not warrant
against damages or defects arising out of improper or abnormal use of
handling of the products; against defects or damages arising from
91
improper installation (where installation is by persons other than
Manufacturer), against defects in products or components not
manufactured or installed by Manufacturer, or against damages result
from non-manufacturer made products or components. This warranty
does not apply if the Product has been damaged by accident, abuse, nor
misuse. This warranty also does not apply to products upon which
repairs have been effected or attempted by persons other than pursuant
to written authorization by Manufacturer.
EXCLUSIVE OBLIGATION.
This warranty is exclusive.The sole and exclusive obligation of
Manufacturer shall repair or replace the defective products in the
manner and for the period provided above. Manufacturer shall not have
any other obligation with respect to the Products or any part thereof,
whether based on contract, tort, strict liability or otherwise. Under no
circumstances, whether based on this Limited Warranty or otherwise,
Manufacturer shall not be liable for incidental, special, or consequential
damage.
OTHER STATEMENTS.
Manufacturer’s employees or representatives’ ORAL OR OTHER
WRITTEN STATEMENTS DO NOT CONSTITUE WARRANTIES
, shall
not be relied upon by Buyer, and are not a part of the contract for sale
or this Limited Warranty.
TERMS AND CONDITIONS.
Direct Jaton Customer:
This warranty applies only for a period of
two (2) years from purchase date of Jaton
original invoice.
Reseller/ Vendor:
This warranty applies only for a period of
two (2) years from manufacturing date.
Registered User:
This warranty applies only for a period of
two (2) years from purchase date and
register within 30 days of purchase date
from legal reseller.
Others:
If the products do not conform to this
Limited Warranty (as herein above
described), Manufacturer should charge
services such as repair, replacement
whether based on its costs. Shipping and
installation of the replacement Products
92
or replacement parts shall be at User’s
expanse.
SERVICES AGREEMENT:
(1) All applicants shall completed service request form from
Manufacturer.
(2) All returned checks will be charged a $20.00 fee by
Manufacturer.
(3) All repair and replacement services allow 4-6 weeks from
the date of receiving by Manufacturer.
(4) All products without warranties required service
processing fee $20 (payment in advance), which is not
refundable.
ENTIRE OBLIGATION.
This Limited Warranty states the entire obligation of Manufacturer with
respect to the Products. If any part of this Limited Warranty is
determined to be void or illegal, the remainder shall remain in force and
effect. Some states do not allow limitation of implied warranties, or
exclusive or limitation on product incidental or consequential damages,
so above limitation may not apply to you. This warranty gives you
specific legal rights. You may have other rights which may vary from
state to state.
This warranty applies only to this product, and is governed by the law
of the State of California.
REDUCING WARRANTY CLAIM
REJECTIONS.
To reduce the potential of incurring damages not covered by
Manufacturers warranties, we strongly recommend the following:
•
•
read your manuals before installing peripherals and/or
before making changes to the machine’s configuration;
ask your dealer if there are any known problems with the
system requirements or installation procedures for any
add-on products that your are purchasing;
93
•
•
buy industry standard products where compatibility issue
are more likely to surface;
If you are unsure about installation for a new product,
contact your dealer’s service department.
We believe it is important for you to know and understand what your
warranty coverage provides and what it does not.
We also want you to be aware that most hardware warranties only relate
to the function of the hardware. In most cases, no assurances are given
by the manufacturer that the hardware item will work in conjunction with
any other hardware item. If a computer product is not working because
it is not compatible with another product, or because it has not been
properly installed and set-up, the manufacturer does not pay for the
service time. To help avoid these inconveniences, contact a
professional consultant that one can help you determine the possibility
of incompatibility issue before you purchase add-on or accessories.
Warranty Service Use Only
Serial Number - ten or eleven digit code, the serial number consists of the following parts:
Packaging Type
Manufactured Date Code
A
00 8
Production Numerical Code
000015
Year Month
XXXXX-XXX-XX
xxxx/xxxx
S/N: A008000015
00.0
XXXX XX XXXXXX
Product Label and Manufactured Date Code
94
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