iQ Console System
iQ Console System
Installation & User’s Guide
Manual Rev 1.2 — March, 2012
for iQ v1.00 and higher
p/n 1490-00067-001
USA Class A Computing Device
Information To User. Warning:
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used
as directed by this manual, it may cause interference
to radio communication. This equipment complies
with the limits for a Class A computing device, as
specified by FCC Rules, Part 15, Subpart J, which
are designed to provide reasonable protection against
such interference when this type of equipment is operated in a commercial environment. Operation of
this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference. If it does, the user will be required to
eliminate the interference at the user’s expense.
NOTE: Objectionable interference to TV or radio reception can occur if other devices are connected to
this device without the use of shielded interconnect
cables. FCC rules require the use of only shielded
cables.
Important Safety Information
To prevent risk of electric shock: Disconnect power
cord before servicing. If fuse replacement is required,
please note: For continued protection against fire, replace fuse only with same type and value.
Caution
The installation and servicing instructions in the
manual are for use by qualified personnel only. To
avoid Electric Shock, do not perform any servicing
other than that contained in the operating instructions unless you are qualified to do so. Refer all servicing to qualified personnel.
Electrical Warning
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, do not expose
this product to rain or moisture. Keep liquids away
from the ventilation openings in the top and rear of
the unit. Do not shower or bathe with the unit.
Canada Warning:
“This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A
limits for radio noise emissions set out in the Radio
Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.” “Le present appareil
numeriQue n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriQues
depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numeriQues (de les Class A) prescrites dans le Reglement sur le brouillage radioelectriQue edicte par le
ministere des Communications du Canada.”
CE Conformance Information:
This device complies with the requirements of the
EEC Council Directives: 93/68/EEC (CE Marking);
73/23/EEC (Safety – low voltage directive); 89/336/
EEC (electromagnetic compatibility). Conformity is
declared to those standards: EN50081-1, EN50082-1.
This equipment is designed to be operated from a
power source that includes a third “grounding” connection in addition to the power leads. Do not defeat
this safety feature. In addition to creating a potentially hazardous situation, defeating this safety ground
will prevent the internal line noise filter from functioning.
Ventilation Warning
The Axia QOR.32 requires the free flow of air for
adequate cooling. Do not block the ventilation openings in the top and rear of the unit. QOR.32 must be
mounted with a blank rack space above or damage
may occur.
Failure to allow proper ventilation could damage the
unit or create a fire hazard. Do not place the units
on a carpet, bedding, or other materials that could
interfere with any panel ventilation openings.
Customer Service
We support you...
By Phone/Fax.
• You may reach our 24/7 Support Team anytime around the clock by calling +1 216-622-0247. For billing
questions or other non-emergency technical questions, call +1 216-241-7225 between 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM
USA Eastern Time, Monday through Friday.
By E-Mail.
• Non-emergency technical support is available at [email protected]
Via World Wide Web.
• The Axia Web site has a variety of information which may be useful for product selection and support. The
URL is http://www.AxiaAudio.com.
Feedback
We welcome feedback on any aspect of the Livewire products or this manual. In the past, many good ideas from
users have made their way into software revisions or new products. Please contact us with your comments.
Updates
The operations of iQ and QOR.32 are determined largely by software. Periodic updates may become available to determine if this is the case, visit our web site periodically, or contact us for advice concerning whether a newer
release is more suitable to your needs.
We recommend joining the Axia Tech mailing list to ensure that you receive immediate updates regarding
new software or documentation releases. You can do so by clicking the “Sign Up Here” links at the top of the
Axia Download and Manuals pages at AxiaAudio.com/manuals/ and AxiaAudio.com/downloads/.
Trademarks
Axia Audio
1241 Superior Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114 USA
+1 (216) 241-7225
[email protected]
Copyright © 2011 by TLS Corporation. Published by Axia Audio. We reserve the right to make improvements or changes in the products described in this manual, which may affect the product specifications, or to revise the manual without notice. All rights reserved.
©2011 Axia Audio
Introduction • iii
Livewire is a trademark of TLS Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Notice
Feedback is welcome
All versions, claims of compatibility, trademarks, etc.
of hardware and software products not made by Axia
mentioned in this manual or accompanying material
are informational only. Axia makes no endorsement
of any particular product for any purpose, nor claims
any responsibility for operation or accuracy.
Warranty
This product is covered by a five year limited warranty, the full text of which is included in the rear
section of this manual.
Service
You must contact Axia before returning any equipment for factory service. Axia will issue a Return
Authorization number, which must be written on the
exterior of your shipping container. Please do not
include cables or accessories unless specifically requested by the Technical Support Engineer at Axia.
Be sure to adequately insure your shipment for its
replacement value. Packages without proper authorization may be refused. US customers please contact
Axia technical support at +1 (216) 241-7225. All other customers should contact their local representative
to arrange for service.
Introduction • iv
We strongly recommend being near the unit when
you call, so our Support Engineers can verify information about your configuration and the conditions
under which the problem occurs. If the unit must
return to Axia, we will need your serial number, located on the rear panel.
Credit Where Credit’s Due
Thanks to the great folks on the Axia team who
produced a great product and helped to compile
this manual - Catfish, Denny, Gints, Maciej, Marc,
Maris, Marty, Milos, Oleg — we are honored to
work with all of you. cn and bw.
At Axia, we love to hear your feedback. If you find
anything in this manual that you feel needs clarification or correction, please let us know by sending an
e-mail to [email protected] .
About This Manual
This manual covers the details of the iQ Frames
and QOR.32. Axia’s iQ is designed to operate as a
standalone console however it also has network capabilities. To learn more about these concepts, you
may wish to read Introduction to Livewire: System
Design Reference and Primer and Audio Over IP:
Building Pro AoIP Systems with Livewire by Steve
Church and Skip Pizzi, available from Elsevier Press.
In these publications we explain the ideas that motivated Livewire and how you can use and benefit
from it, as well as nitty-gritty details about wiring,
connectors, and the like. Since Livewire is built on
standard networks, we also help you to understand
general network engineering so that you have the full
background for Livewire’s fundamentals. After reading this reference material, you will know what’s up
when you are speaking with the network guys that
are often hanging around radio stations these days.
Although we strive for accuracy, some features and
operational characteristics may differ in actual use
from their descriptions herein. We invite feedback
and corrections from our clients.
Axia Audio, a Telos Company
1241 Superior Avenue
Cleveland Ohio 44114 USA
Phone: +1.216.241.7225
Web: www.AxiaAudio.com
E-Mail: [email protected]
©2011 Axia Audio
Table of Contents
Preview Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Preview Switching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Auto-Start Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Logic Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Feed to Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Credit Where Credit’s Due . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Feed to Source Dim Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
A Note From The CEO of Telos . . . . . . . . . . vii
Live Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
iQ Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
V-Mixer and V-Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Adding Backfeeds and GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Chapter One: Setup And Connections . . . . . . . . . 3
Chapter Three: Console Operation . . . . . . . . . . 21
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Assigning an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Show Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Notes on Physical Installation . . . . . . . . . 3
Sources, Channels and Faders . . . . . . . . . 21
QOR.32: Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Mix-Minus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Front Panel Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
QOR.32: Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
iQ Main Frame - Callouts and Operation . . . . . 22
Audio Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
GPIO Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
iQ 8-Fader Expansion Frame . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Ethernet Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
iQ 6-Fader+Telco Expansion Frame . . . . . . . 27
iQ Frame and CANBus Connections . . . . . . . 7
iQ 6-Fader+User Keys Expansion Frame . . . . . 29
IP Address Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Source-Specific Channel Controls . . . . . . . . . . 29
Console Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Control Room Operator Mic Channel . . . . . 29
Producer Microphone Channel . . . . . . . . . 29
Chapter Two: Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Control Room Guest Microphone Channel . . . 29
Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Studio Microphone Channel . . . . . . . . . . 30
What’s a Profile? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
External Microphone Channel . . . . . . . . . 30
Show Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Phone Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Source Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Codec Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Source Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Remote Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Creating a New Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Source Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Chapter Four: Show Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Source Input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Creating A Show Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Primary Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Show Profile Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Signal Phase (Non-Microphone Sources) . . . 14
Chapter Five: Configuring GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Record Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
GPIO Port Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Fader Trim Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
GPIO Operator’s Microphone Logic . . . . . . . 40
Equalizer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
GPIO Control Room Guest Microphone Logic . . 41
Panorama Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
GPIO Studio (Monitor 2) Guest Microphone Logic 42
Source Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
GPIO Producer’s Microphone Logic . . . . . . . 43
Fader Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
GPIO Line Input Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
©2011 Axia Audio
Introduction • v
Signal Mode (Non-Microphone Sources) . . . . 14
GPIO Codec Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
GPIO Telephone Hybrid Logic . . . . . . . . . . 46
GPIO Control Room Monitor Logic . . . . . . . . 47
GPIO Studio Monitor Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
GPIO Computer Playback Device Logic . . . . . 49
GPIO Film Legendable User Button Module / Accessory Panel / Rack Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
GPIO Recording Device Logic . . . . . . . . . . 51
Assigning GPIO to a Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Connections to GPIO Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Output Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Virtual GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Configuring and using iQ User Keys . . . . . . . . . 55
Chapter Six: Advanced Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
iQ Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The iQ Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The Status Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
The Customize Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Log, Log History and Log Setup Menus . . . . 59
Brightness Control Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
User Modules Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
GPIO Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Remote . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Profile Manager Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
IO Manager Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Ethernet Switch settings (Preconfigured) . . . . 61
Chapter Seven: Networking with iQ . . . . . . . . . . 63
Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Introduction • vi
Appendix A: iQ Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Table of Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Appendix B: iQ Block Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Appendix C: Channel / IP Worksheets . . . . . . . . . 81
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
©2011 Axia Audio
A Note From The CEO of Telos
In 2003, Telos launched the Axia Audio divi-
applications to help broadcasters take full advantage
sion based on an idea. That idea sparked a whole
of their networked environment.
new approach to radio consoles, using Ethernet as a
high-speed expressway – the routing infrastructure
For example, we introduced broadcast VoIP tele-
for audio and data inside the radio station.
phone systems that integrate with consoles, merging
telephony into the studio network without adding
Howard Aiken, the scientist responsible for the
infrastructure (and giving broadcasters the world’s
conceptual design of IBM’s groundbreaking Harvard
first consoles with integrated Telos hybrids). Inter-
Mark I computer, once advised “Don’t worry about
com systems that connect via Ethernet, and permit
people stealing your ideas. If your ideas are any good,
users to take broadcast-quality intercom calls to air
you’ll have to ram them down people’s throats.” Sure
instantly. Networked codecs and audio processors
enough, during our first few years, the idea of using
like the Telos Zephyr iPort and Omnia.8X, which
Ethernet to transport audio was so novel that we
concentrate multiple audio devices into a single
spent most of our time simply telling people
network node, significantly changing the
our story, sleeping in hotel beds – and bring-
economics of complex systems.
ing home very few sales.
And along the way, we expanded our
After what seemed like an endless stream
talented staff of engineers, scientists and
of hotel desks and airline food the idea took
broadcast professionals, growing the larg-
hold, thanks to forward-thinking engineers who
est R&D organization in the industry. We’re also the
understood the power of using data networks for
first and only broadcast equipment maker with a 24/7
audio transmission. Our first installations proved that
support team that’s ready to offer assistance any time
the technology was real. Then those engineers began
of the day or night. As they say, radio never sleeps –
sharing stories of their own, telling other folks how
so neither do we.
much they loved what Axia did for them. Word got
around, and we sold thousands of consoles (enough
that Element consoles are now one of the best-selling
that these things have happened — it’s due to yours.
broadcast boards ever).
We owe quite a lot to you, and we will never, ever
forget it. You are, literally, the reason we are here!
As more and more broadcasters embraced IP,
And we will continue to innovate, explore, think and
dozens of companies partnered with us to make in-
invent, for one simple reason: we love to hear you say
novative broadcast products that connect to Axia net-
“Wow!”
works with just the click of an Ethernet cable. And
we conceived of some interesting new devices and
Michael “Catfish” Dosch
©2011 Axia Audio
Introduction • vii
We realize that it’s not due to our efforts alone
CAT.6, small and light
yet sound and data pour forth.
Introduction • viii
What magic is this?.
©2011 Axia Audio
The following chapters of this manual will give you
an in-depth understanding of the capabilities of your
new iQ fader frames and QOR.32, from installation to
advanced functions. This section will help you get everything connected quickly, and point you to the parts
of the manual you’ll need to get up and running with a
minimum of fuss.
The Axia iQ family consists of these components:
• iQ Main Frame: 8-fader frame with master
controls and meters.
• iQ 8-Fader Frame: 8-fader expansion frame
• iQ 6-Fader+User Keys: Optional expansion
frame includes 6 faders and two banks of programmable user keys.
• iQ 6-Fader+Telco: Optional expansion frame
includes 6 faders and a Telos-style dual channel
hybrid controller.
• QOR.32: Rack-mounted CPU chassis with audio I/O and GPIO connectors.
• QOR Backup Power Supply: Optional rackmounted backup power supply.
Making Connections
You’ve probably unpacked your boxes and are sitting
1. Packed with each of your iQ Frames is a cable
with 6-pin Molex™ connectors on each end. This is
the power/communications cable. Connect the end of
the cable without the strain relief to the corresponding port on the iQ Frame connection panel. Connect
the other end of the cable to one of the connectors
labeled CONSOLE on the back of your QOR.32 unit.
You can use a maximum of three iQ Frames with
each QOR.32. One must be an iQ Main Frame.
2. Connect all iQ audio sources (microphones,
CD players, etc) to inputs of your QOR.32.
3. Connect monitor amplifiers, headphone amplifiers, etc to outputs of your QOR.32. Be sure to set all
amplifiers to their minimum volume setting.
4. Follow the instructions found in Chapter 1 to
configure IP address settings for the QOR.32.
5. Refer to the User’s Manuals packed with any
other Axia Audio Nodes for information on how to
configure IP addresses for these units.
What’s Next?
When you’ve completed physically connecting your
Axia hardware, jump to Chapter 2 for a quick tutorial
on configuring audio sources. With that done, you’ll be
a hop, skip, jump away from being on-air! After that,
you’ll likely want to do some in-depth reading about all
The iQ Family: (top L-R) iQ 6-Fader, iQ 8-Fader, iQ Phone, iQ Main Frame, (bottom) QOR.32 and QOR Backup PSU
©2011 Axia Audio
Getting Started • 1
Getting Started
next to a pile of Axia gear, wondering what to do first.
Here’s what you need to know in order to get started:
your new iQ can do. Here’s a brief description of the
contents of the following chapters:
• Chapter 1: iQ Frames and QOR.32 explains connections and basic iQ setup.
• Chapter 2: iQ Inputs and Outputs explains how to
generate Source Profiles and construct backfeeds for
selected sources.
• Chapter 3: iQ Operations takes you behind the
scenes to explore operator controls and options.
• Chapter 4:Show Profiles illustrates how to set and
save unique “snapshots” tailored for specific shows.
These Show Profiles can be instantly recalled whenever needed.
• Chapter 5: GPIO tells how to associate routable
logic commands with any audio source.
• Chapter 6: Advanced iQ Controls discusses advanced features that are configured in the iQ configuration web pages.
• Chapter 7: Livewire Networking and iQ will tell
you how to connect your iQ to a network and reap the
benefits of networked studio systems.
• Appendices provide additional technical specifications and a complete set of block diagrams for your
reference.
Getting Started • 2
Read on. Enjoy your iQ. q
Stay up to date! We recommend joining the
Axia Tech mailing list to ensure that you receive
immediate updates regarding new software or
documentation releases. You can do this by
clicking the “Sign Up Here” link at the top of
AxiaAudio.com/manuals/ & AxiaAudio.com/downloads/.
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter One:
Bus accessory panels. A single cable from each Frame
will be used to connect it to the QOR.32. Each iQ Frame
must have a dedicated Console port. Accessory modules
can be daisy-chained from the CANBus Accessory port.
Setup and Connections
The D-sub combo connector connects ONLY to your
optional QOR Backup power supply. The IEC receptacle
is for your A.C. mains power connection.
If you are reading this manual, you are probably the
proud owner of a new iQ console. You’ve read the Getting Started section, are probably already passing audio,
and are hungry for more knowledge. Here we go!
The Basics
iQ was designed to get you on the air as quickly as
possible with the least amount of effort. It’s the perfect
standalone radio console (and it even networks, too - see
Chapter 7: Livewire Networking and iQ for details on
how to do that).
This chapter covers connecting iQ to your other studio gear, such as microphones, CD players and other audio playback devices. The audio outputs of the QOR.32
connect to control room monitors, preview (cue) speaker, headphones amplifiers and audio recording devices.
These external audio devices may be analog or AES devices.
The GPIO (General Purpose Input Output) ports provide logic control interfaces to devices such as air lights,
recorders and CD players.
The 100 Mbps Ethernet ports may be used to connect PCs running Axia’s IP-Audio driver, to expand your
system by adding other Livewire devices such as Axia
Audio Nodes, or equipment from Axia Partners (see
­AxiaAudio.com/partners/ for the latest list of companies
whose equipment connects directly to Axia networks).
1000 Mbps (Gigabit) Ethernet ports are used to connect to other QOR.32 units or an Ethernet core switch
— another topic covered in Chapter 7.
6-pin Molex connectors are used to connect your iQ
Main, iQ Frames (max of 3 including Main) and CAN-
Assigning an IP Address
Before you can configure your iQ hardware, you’ll
need to assign it an IP address. Press-and-hold the Meter and Clock keys for three seconds. The Studio display
now shows the options and the Studio Monitor control is
used to navigate, select IP Address options and change
parameter values. Consult your network administrator if
you are unsure about what address to use.
Each iQ system requires a single, fixed IP address.
The iQ Frames are controllers for the QOR.32 engine
and they share the same IP addresses. If the iQ is standalone, the default IP address will probably be fine. See
Chapter 7 for more details when multiple iQ’s are used
or when your iQ is a part of a larger network.
Notes on Physical Installation
The QOR.32 is fan-free, so it can be located in any
studio without fear of unwanted noise. Those vents and
heat sinks serve a very important purpose! Be sure to
mount the QOR in an equipment rack with free air flow.
We recommend using a ventilated 1RU rack spacer above
and below the QOR.32 to ensure adequate ventilation.
To install the iQ Frames in your studio, all you need
is a desk — no console cutout required. You may also
rack-mount your iQ Main Frame using the included
rack-mount hardware. This same hardware serves double duty to join your iQ Frames together if you prefer
one, continuous console rather than individual units.
To join iQ console sections:
Remove the adjacent side bezels of the iQ Frames
that you wish to join and attach both rack-mount flanges
to one of the frames as illustrated on the next page.
Flip the iQ frames over and use the rack-mount
©2011 Axia Audio
1: Setup and Connections • 3
Introduction
QOR.32: Front Panel
The indicator panel of the QOR.32, shown on the
following page, is very simple. There are no controls
for you to push or turn. Configuration and setup is performed from the console itself or through the iQ web
browser interface.
Front Panel Indicators
Even though there are no knobs or dials, the front
panel has some very useful indicators that tell you about
the health and status of your QOR.32. In all cases, solid
GREEN indicates normal operating conditions.
screws to securely attach the rack-mount flanges to the
underside of the iQ Frames.
The physical arrangement of the frames is complete-
CHECK
This is a general health indicator for the QOR.32. If
this indicator is RED, immediately check the web pages
for abnormal operating conditions such as excessive
CPU temperature. Do not ignore this indicator. Note that
it is normal for this indicator to flash during boot-up.
1: Setup and Connections • 4
LIVEWIRE
When lit, indicates that Livewire channels are being
taken from the network. If no network sources are being
received, this indicator is not illuminated.
ly arbitrary. The channel assignments are determined by
the iQ Main port to which you connect each iQ frame.
SYNC
If your iQ is part of a larger network, a solid GREEN
indicates the QOR.32 is synchronized as a slave to the
Livewire network and that its internal clock is locked.
Flashing GREEN indicates that sync packets are being
received, but that iQ is not yet locked. It is normal for the
SYNC indicator to flash for several seconds at startup. If
it does not “lock” with a solid, non-flashing LED, this
may indicate an incorrectly configured network switch.
Check your Ethernet switch configuration or call Axia
24/7 Support for assistance.
MASTER
Solid GREEN indicates the QOR.32 is synchronized
as a Master clock to the Livewire network. This indicator will always be green for a standalone console. If
you have any other Livewire devices, they should be reporting Sync or Slave. There should be only one Master
clock device in a Livewire network at any given time.
©2011 Axia Audio
Figure 1-1: QOR.32 - Front Panel
Note: The MASTER and SYNC indicators are not
normally ON at the same time since the QOR.32
will be either a Master or Slave. This principle
applies to all Axia Livewire devices. Any Livewire
network will have only a single Master.
NET 1 and NET 2
These indicators provide the status of the two 1000
Mbsec (Gigabit) NICs in the QOR.32. Note that the unit
can be used with either or both ports connected to properly configured Ethernet switches or other QOR.32 units.
When the Gig1 or Gig2 ports have active connections, the NET1 or NET2 lamps (respectively) will illuminate. If a network cable is connected to a Gig port and
the corresponding NET lamp is unlit, a problem with the
network connection is indicated.
When a disconnected Ethernet link has been re-established, the NET LED will blink with a 50% duty cycle
for about 5 seconds as the network activity is resumed.
Please consult Axia’s Ethernet switch configuration
guides for details when using Core switches in a larger
network. Ethernet Switch guides may be found on our
web site at AxiaAudio.com/manuals/.
PSU
There are two PSU indicators providing assurance
that the QOR.32 power supply rails are normal. Solid
GREEN indicates normal power supply status.
The PSU2 indicator is active only when am QOR
Backup is present and when the iQ console is configured
to incorporate the QOR Backup.
IP
This indicator will illuminate upon detection of an
external Ethernet core switch connected to the QOR.
QOR.32: Rear Panel
Power
• AC Mains: There is one standard IEC receptacle for
your mains power for voltages in the range from 100
to 240 VAC at either 50 or 60 Hz.
• PSU2 (Backup): This is a D-sub combo connector
for use only with the QOR Backup 48 VDC power
supply. Connect your optional backup power supply
with the provided cable.
©2011 Axia Audio
1: Setup and Connections • 5
Figure 1-1 shows both Master and Sync illuminated for
illustration purposes only.
Figure 1-2: QOR.32 - Rear Panel Connections
Audio Connections
1: Setup and Connections • 6
The QOR.32’s rear panel contains all of the connectors used for audio I/O, Ethernet, GPIO, power supply
and the connections to your iQ frames. Note that we use
RJ-45 connectors for three purposes:
• Analog audio inputs and outputs
• AES audio inputs and outputs
•
Ethernet (some with PoE - Power over Ethernet)
It is important to follow the proper conventions for
wiring these connectors and ensure that the connector
functions are not confused as damage may result if you
plug a network cable into an audio input.
Analog and AES Audio
The connector pin functions shown in Figure 1-3 are
the same for both the AES and Analog inputs and outputs.
The nominal audio level for analog line inputs and
outputs is +4 dBm. This audio level will provide you
with 20 dB of headroom.
Note: The well-labelled RJ-45 connectors on
the QOR.32 rear panel are used for different
Figure 1-3: RJ-45 Audio Connector Pinouts
functions. Be sure to use them only for their intended purpose as described in this section.
Microphone Inputs
There are four XLR-F connectors on the rear panel
for connection of microphone inputs. These connectors
use the standard wiring convention for 3-pin XLR audio
connectors. These connectors may have 48-volt Phantom power enabled via the QOR.32’s web page configuration. Please take appropriate precautions if you connect anything other than a microphone to these inputs
when Phantom power is enabled.
©2011 Axia Audio
GPIO Connections
The QOR.32 includes eight GPIO ports, with pinouts
in the same configuration as the GPIO ports on other
Axia products. Please refer to Chapter 5: Configuring
GPIO for the functions of these ports and wiring diagrams for their DB-15 connectors.
tions to other QOR.32 units, or, in larger networks,
for connections to an Ethernet Core switch. Note
that these two ports are used as trunks and are not
intended for connection to Livewire source devices
such as Audio Nodes.
iQ Frame and CANBus Connections
iQ frames need only a single data / power connection
to operate. The QOR.32 includes four power/CANBus
connections for use in conjunction with your iQ control
surface. The accessory CANBus port is an additional
port that is available for future use.
Important: Like any electronic device, iQ can
be affected by static electricity. Use of a personal grounding device is strongly recommended while handling the unit during installation.
Figure 1-4: GPIO Connector Pin-Outs
In most cases, a GPIO port will be associated with
a single source such as a CD player, studio microphone,
profanity delay, et cetera.
Optional PathfinderPC software may also be used to
monitor and control GPIO for advanced applications.
The interconnections to GPIO ports will vary depending on the type external equipment being used and
whether or not voltage is supplied by an external device.
Chapter 5: Configuring GPIO provides these details.
Your iQ surface must be connected to a grounded
metal permanent wiring system or other equipment
grounding conductor using the grounding lug located on
the console chassis. For ground sources, we recommend,
in order of preference:
• “Station Ground,” the heavy copper strap found in the
walls and floors of many radio studios.
• AC Safety Ground — the “3rd prong” of a nearby
outlet.
• A bonded electrical conduit.
Ethernet Connections
The QOR.32 has three types of Ethernet connections
and it is important to use them as intended since the internal Ethernet switch is configured in a specific manner.
The types of connectors available are:
• 100 Mbps PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) ports designed
to be used with future Livewire accessories that will
obtain their power directly from their Ethernet connections. These ports may also be safely used with
standard, non-PoE devices.
• 100 Mbps Ethernet standard ports are used to connect PCs or other Livewire devices to your Livewire
network. These devices might include additional
Livewire nodes or PCs running the Axia IP-Audio
driver.
• Two 1000 Mbps (Gigabit) ports are used for connec-
Important: Grounding reduces the risk of electric shock by providing a “path of least resistance” for electric current. Improper grounding
can result in a risk of electric shock. Check with a qualified electrician if you are in
doubt about how to properly ground this equipment. If your local electrical code prohibits the
use of a Station Ground for this purpose, as described above, use the specific “Safety Ground”
your local regulations mandate.
Console 1, 2, 3
There are three 6-pin Molex connector that are used
to provide DC power (48 vdc) plus CANBus data to your
iQ control surfaces.
©2011 Axia Audio
1: Setup and Connections • 7
#12 AWG GREEN stranded wire is the minimum
wire gauge acceptable for grounding the iQ mixer.
connector used on the Axia Accessory panels. This adaptor will simplify wiring of your CANBus accessories.
What is CANBus? Controller Area Network
(CAN) is a multicast shared serial bus standard,
originally developed in the 1980s by Robert
Bosch GmbH, for connecting electronic control
units (ECUs). Although initially created for automotive purposes, nowadays it is used in many
embedded control applications.
Figure 1-5: Detail of data/communication cable ends.
iQ frames must each be connected to a CONSOLE
port on the QOR.32 using only the supplied 6-conductor cables. Each frame has a discrete connection to the
QOR.32 A maximum of three fader frames (one Main
plus two others of any type) can be connected to a
QOR.32.
1: Setup and Connections • 8
Note: Does it matter what Core port I connect
a console frame to? Fader channel numbers
are dependent on the QOR.32 console port to
which you connect the fader frames. The Console 1 port will assign the lowest channel numbers. Console 2 and Console 3 will assign higher
fader channel numbers. This scheme permits
you to arrange your fader frames in any desired
configuration and automatically assign channel
numbers to your faders.
The CAN data link layer protocol is standardized
in ISO 11898-1 (2003).
IP Address Configuration
To access System Settings from the iQ console,
press-and-hold the Meter and Clock key for three seconds. The Studio display now shows the options and the
Studio Monitor control is used to navigate, select options
and change parameter values. Options available are:
• IP Address
• Subnet Mask
• Gateway
• Save and Reboot
One end of each iQ power/communication cable is
fitted with a strain relief. Connect this end to the Molex
connector on the back of the QOR.32. Connect the other
smaller connector to the ­Molex socket on each iQ Frame.
Each Frame must have a dedicated power/communication cable.
To exit, select EXIT and press the Studio Monitor
control.
Since the CANBus connection cables include power
as well as data, there is a length restriction of approximately 50 feet. If you require longer cables than those
supplied with your iQ Frames, please contact your Axia
representative.
“Gateway” settings on a QOR.32 are not usually required; however, a valid gateway enables access to the
iQ configuration remotely, from outside your network. A
gateway also facilitates the use of an external NTP server.
Enter the IP address of your master router (the one with
external network connections) whenever you’re given
the option to enter a gateway address.
Accessory
The fourth 6-pin Molex connector on the rear panel
of the QOR.32 is labelled ACCESSORY. This is the
CANBus port that can be used to distribute data and 48
VDC to CANBus switch modules and accessory panels.
Several accessory modules can be connected in a daisychain configuration with a termination on the last accessory panel. An Axia CANBus adaptor is available to
convert the Molex CANBus connector to the RJ-45 type
Note: After making changes to any QOR.32 IP
address settings, you must reboot the unit for
these changes to take effect.
Note: If your system employs an Ethernet core
switch, the Ethernet core switch must have an
IP address that is lower than any of your iQ units
or Ethernet edge switches. This function of the
IGMP standard ensures that the multicast querier is handled by the core switch if one exists.
The querier will be passed off transparently to
another switch should the core switch fail or be
disconnected.
©2011 Axia Audio
Console Configuration
Now that your iQ has an IP address and you have
a fader frame or two connected, you will need to tell
the QOR.32 what is plugged to its CANBus slots so that
fader numbers can be assigned. You will need to provide
your computer with a static IP address that is in the same
network as the iQ. For example, if you gave the iQ an
IP address of 192.168.2.40, a good IP address for your
computer could be 192.168.2.45.
through 8 and the faders on the Phone Frame will be
assigned channels 9 through 14.
What’s Next?
Take a break! You’re done with initial set-up. When
you’re ready, continue to Chapter 2: iQ Inputs and Outputs to walk through the software configuration of the
Inputs and Outputs on your iQ. q
Once your computer is configured, enter your iQ’s IP
address into your PC’s browser, and when the iQ Control Center appears, choose Console Config from the
iQ main menu. When you connect to the iQ, you will be
prompted for a user name and password. By default, the
user name is “user” and there is no password.
Figure 1-6: QOR Control Center
©2011 Axia Audio
1: Setup and Connections • 9
In the example shown in Figure 1-6, we have a Main
Frame connected to Console Port 1 and a Phone Frame
connected to Console Port 3. In this configuration, the
faders on the Main Frame will be assigned channels 1
Crimping the spade lugs,
the smell of soldering flux —
1: Setup and Connections • 10
they’ll be missed. (Not much.)
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter Two:
physical connectors. Now, let’s look at the software configuration of these inputs.
Inputs and Outputs
v
In this chapter we’ll discuss how to configure the inputs and outputs for your iQ system by using your computer’s web browser. While browsing this chapter you
may find useful the iQ block diagrams in Appendix B.
iQ has a built-in Ethernet switch and Web server for
options configuration. To access it, all you need is a computer connected to its Ethernet switch. Since Livewire IP
addresses are managed without DHCP, you will need to
ensure that your PC has a manually-assigned IP address
in the same subnet as the QOR.32. Contact your network
administrator if you are not sure how to set up a fixed IP
address for your PC (but if you’re reading this, we think
you’ve probably got it covered yourself).
Note: Axia web interfaces have been tested with
Microsoft(TM) Internet Explorer, version 6 or later, but also work with other browsers.
Once your PC is properly connected to the Axia
Livewire network, direct your web browser to the IP address of your iQ. When you connect to the iQ, you will
be prompted for a user name and password. By default,
the user name is “user” and there is no password.
First, we’ll walk through the Audio IO Manager to
configure your Inputs and Outputs. Then, we will illustrate how Source Profiles and Show Profiles are used
with your iQ system.
Inputs
Figure 2-1 shows the web page configuration for Inputs for your QOR.32. There are three types of inputs.
Microphone Inputs
The four XLR-type connectors on the rear panel are
intended to be used for mono microphone signals. Each
of those inputs has the following parameters:
• Phantom Power (48 vdc) is individually enabled
for each of the four microphone inputs by selecting
this check box.
• PreAmp Gain is adjustable to a maximum of 65 dB.
This setting will adjust the microphone level prior to
all other signal processing.
• Input Gain is adjustable from -64 to +24 dB. If you
are conservative with your PreAmp gain, you may
wish to apply a few dB of additional gain at this stage.
Analog Line Inputs
Your QOR.32 has several connectors on the rear panel that accommodate microphones, analog stereo line
and AES inputs. Chapter 1 discussed the details of these
These sixteen inputs are for line-level stereo signals
connected to the analog line RJ-45 connectors on the
rear panel. They have only one adjustment.
©2011 Axia Audio
2: Inputs and Outputs • 11
Adobe(TM) Flash Player is used for some realtime monitoring features but is not essential for
setup and configuration. If installed, your popup blocker must be disabled. You may download
Adobe Flash Player at http://get.adobe.com/
flashplayer/.
Figure 2-1: Audio IO Manager - Inputs
• Input gain allows you to specify a gain from -64 to
+24 dB.
AES/EBU Inputs
There are two AES/EBU digital inputs on RJ-45 connectors. These digital inputs are equipped with sample
rate converters so a specific incoming sample rate or
AES clock is not required.
• Input gain allows you to specify a gain from -127.5
to 0 dB.
Be sure to click Apply after making changes in each
input section.
Now that the inputs have been tweaked for proper
system audio levels, we can manage that audio and automatically associate logic with the different sources you
have connected to your iQ. We use a concept that we call
Profiles to do this.
What’s a Profile?
2: Inputs and Outputs • 12
A Profile is a group of parameters that are stored in
memory for instant recall. The use of Profiles makes
the operation of your iQ quick and intuitive. In the iQ
console’s design, there are two types of profiles: Source
Profiles and Show Profiles. Show Profiles (discussed
in detail in Chapter 3) contain all of the “snapshot” settings that would be associated with a console scene or
preset. This terminology is commonly used in the sound
reinforcement or recording studio industries.
Show Profiles
Our Show Profiles keep track of monitor bus settings, fader channel assignments, jock preferences, lockouts and many other parameters.
Source Profiles allow you to control access and configurations of the individual sources as they are used on
each iQ console in your facility. Source Profile parameters may include name, source type, backfeed preferences, associated logic and much more.
Source Profiles
One of the most repetitive and tedious parts of studio
building has always been tying “data” to audio sources.
Consider the wiring of analog line selector modules:
you needed a cable for the remote audio source, a set of
wires for a “start” closure, another set for “stop” — even
with TDM routers, an operation as seemingly simple as
logic-follows-audio often turns out to be not so simple.
Mix-minus and IFB generation has also been a problem in the past. Too often it’s a complicated process that
requires air talent to correctly determine source and bus
assignments at a moment’s notice. How many times has
unwanted audio been aired thanks to this error-prone
procedure?
Your iQ eliminates these headaches by automatically merging audio, logic and program data into a single,
routable information stream. Since audio in a Livewire
network is transported as packetized data, it’s easy for
us to “piggyback” other data along with the audio. This
association is accomplished through the use of Source
Profiles.
A Source Profile contains all of the parameters that
are unique to a specific audio input (source) as it applies
to a specific iQ console. Source Profiles can assign modifiers to an audio input. Characteristics like Pan, Trim
and even Mix-Minus source selections can be set in the
Source Profile and automatically loaded whenever that
source is assigned to an iQ fader.
The result of all this is that iQ is always presented
with complete, consistent information about how you
want a given audio input (source) to be handled. Your
board operator will never have to worry about Mix-Minus again!
Source Configuration
The iQ web browser interface is used to configure
Sources. To get started:
• Open the web browser on your computer and point it
to the IP address you previously assigned to your iQ.
• You’ll be prompted to enter a user name and password. The default user name is “user”. Leave the
©2011 Axia Audio
•
•
•
•
Figure 2-2: Source Profiles
•
password field blank.
• Select Sources to proceed to the source setup page.
•
Note that iQ has three different classes of audio
sources. Most originate with the rear panel input connectors and are used locally in the iQ; some audio sources
may be obtained from other devices in your Livewire
network, and some audio sources (PGM1, PGM2, etc)
are generated internally.
With that in mind, let’s discuss configuring your local
sources and making them available for fader assignment.
Creating a New Source
Your first choice defines what type of source you’re
setting up, which is important since GPIO, mix-minus
and other console behaviors are decided based on your
choice. Your choices:
• Operator is the board operator’s mic. It is the source
mic for iQ TALK TO functions. Its logic mutes the
CR monitors and Preview when ON.
• Producer is used for in-studio Producer’s mic positions. It has associated GPIO logic which can operate
TALK TO functions from a remote producer’s panel.
It also mutes CR monitors and Preview when ON.
• CR Guest is used for any other guest mic in the control room. Its associated logic automatically mutes
•
Once you have selected the source type, click the
Create button to proceed to the Source Profile options.
Figure 2-3 shows the setup options screen for a
typical Microphone source. Figure 2-4 shows a Codec
source which has a few different settings, and Figure 2-5
shows a Line source. The following sections describe
these Source configurations in detail.
Source Type
This is a display-only parameter and shows the
source type you selected in the previous step.
About Mics and Headphone Feeds: iQ provides you with several headphone options, all
selectable from iQ monitor control section. The
headphone output provides a feed intended
for the Host (board-op’s) mic position and includes the ability to monitor the Preview bus
in headphones. There are two headphone feeds from the studio
monitor section, one for talent, one for guests.
The Studio headphone output sends audio to all
studio talent positions. Talent positions include
©2011 Axia Audio
2: Inputs and Outputs • 13
You will now see the Sources section as shown in
Figure 2-2. In this example, many of the sources have
already been configured.
the CR monitors and Preview when ON.
Studio Guest is used for any mic located in a separate studio. Its logic mutes the Studio monitors when
ON.
External Mic is used for any mic ­located outside of
a CR or studio. It functions like a Guest microphone
but does not include any muting logic.
Line is used for any line input audio source, analog
or digital. A GPIO logic port can be used to provide
machine start/stop pulses if desired.
Phone defines this source as a hybrid or broadcast
phone system input. A summed mono mix-minus is
automatically provided.
Codec marks this source as a codec. A dual mono
mix-minus is provided; one PA feed (right) + one talent feed with talkback (left).
Computer Player defines this source as originating
from a PC. Associated GPIO logic can be used to
send start/stop signals to a playout system.
Studio Feed defines a source that receives a backfeed, and generates an IFB backfeed in return. This
is intended for an external studio source which you
wish to generate a talkback channel for.
a talkback channel that the board-op can use to
communicate using the Talk To Studio function.
The Guest Headphone does not include talkback.
Source Name
Each Source needs a name for display on the console’s OLED channel displays. Names can be up to 10
characters long and may include spaces or underscore
characters.
Source Input
This setting associates the source with an audio input. It may be a local input in which case you
would choose a local Mic, Analog or AES from the
drop-down menu. This source may also be a Livewire
source which means that it is a network source originating from some other Livewire device. When you
choose Livewire as your Source Input, you will specify a network source. See Chapter 7: Livewire Networking and iQ for details.
2: Inputs and Outputs • 14
Primary Source
This pop-up window is used to select the network
Livewire source ONLY when Livewire has been selected as your Source Input. See Chapter 7: Livewire
Networking and iQ for more on this.
Signal Mode (Non-Microphone Sources)
Determines whether source will be treated as a mono or
stereo source.
• Stereo feeds incoming L/R signal to left and right
channels of assigned bus(es).
• Left feeds incoming left channel to both channels of
assigned bus(es).
• Right feeds incoming right channel to both channels
of assigned bus(es).
• Sum creates L+R mono mix of incoming stereo
source and feeds it to both channels of assigned
bus(es).
Figure 2-3: Operator Microphone Source
PGM 4 that is post-fader but pre ON/OFF. The mix of
the Record bus is controlled by the Record Mode settings of each source. The options are:
• Stereo: delivers this source in stereo to the Record
bus (default).
• Sum to Left : sums L+R of this source and delivers
the sum to the Left channel of the Record bus.
• Sum to Right : sums L+R of this source and delivers
the sum to the Right channel of the Record bus.
The last two options give you the ability to create a
split Record bus which is commonly used for phone recorders. The Operator’s mic can be recorded on one side
of a stereo channel while all other sources are recorded
on the other side.
Signal Phase (Non-Microphone Sources)
Determines whether source will maintain normal or
inverted phase relation.
Fader Trim Gain
This setting allows you to specify an amount of gain
from -25 to +25 dB. Fader Trim Gain is applied in the
signal path just before the fader.
Record Mode
The Record Bus of your iQ is a special variation of
Equalizer
Allows you to enable EQ function for the source as
©2011 Axia Audio
well as predefine the three-band EQ settings for the
source.
Panorama Position
Lets you preset pan settings for this input. Pan is
variable in 49 steps, center being 0, far left -24 and far
right +24. This setting can be adjusted on the fly by
the operator if permitted by show profile settings.
Source Availability
These check boxes determine which faders (or
other inputs) you’ll allow this source to be assigned
to. For example, if your source is a Control Room mic,
and you only want it to appear on the left-most fader,
you would check only the box marked Channel 1. You
might want to make a CD player available on any fader, so you’d check the boxes for all faders.
You might wish to prevent some sources – especially off-air signals – from ever being assigned to a
fader, so you would un-check the boxes for all faders.
To prevent a source from appearing on these inputs’
selection lists, un-check the relevant box. Generally
speaking, you’d want to restrict sources such as computers and CD players to fader assignments while sources
such as off-air receivers would be marked to appear only
on the External monitor selection list.
Fader Mode
Defines fader start actions and start logic:
• Normal conforms to the US method of requiring talent to manually turn the channel on and off.
• Fader Start follows the common European standard of activating the channel and associated machine logic when the fader is raised from - ∞.
• Fader Start with Arm works just like the Normal
setting when the fader is not set to minimum position.
When the fader is set to the minimum position, it can
be in an Armed state. This armed state is entered by
pressing the ON Button when the fader is down. The
armed state means that the channel will go to the ON
state when the fader is moved up. When in Arm state,
the channel OFF lamp will be illuminated. The channel ON lamp will flash in “wink” mode - a long ontime and short off-time. For all fader modes, pressing
the OFF button at any time will place the channel in
the OFF state
Preview Mode
Permits you to choose whether Preview acts in CUE
(pre-fader) or SOLO (post-fader) mode.
Preview Switching
There are two check boxes in this area. None, either
or both may be checked. The options are:
• Channel ON turns Preview OFF
• Preview ON turns Channel OFF
Auto-Start Timer
When this box is checked, the count-up timer will
start when the channel is turned ON.
©2011 Axia Audio
2: Inputs and Outputs • 15
The two final check boxes, External and V-Mixer,
determine whether the board-op will be able to assign
the source directly to the CR and Studio monitor and
headphone buses, or to iQ’s Virtual Mixer.
Figure 2-4: Codec Source
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Figure 2-5: Line Source
2: Inputs and Outputs • 16
Logic Port
Allows you disable GPIO machine logic to this audio source device or enable it in two modes. Exclusive
mode permits GPIO control associated with only a single fader. Shared mode allows more than one user to
send ON/OFF/START signals to the source via GPIO.
A check box can optionally enable GPIO Ready
mode. This allows devices such as CD players or tape
machines to signal their READY state to the operator
through the OFF button LED. If a device is cueing, its
OFF lamp will not be lit. Linking the device’s OFF lamp
to the Ready command means that a machine must be
cued and ready before the OFF lamp illuminates. If enabled, the OFF lamp illuminates when the fader is OFF
and the Ready command is active on the GPIO. If disabled, the OFF lamp illuminates normally whenever the
fader is turned OFF.
Feed to Source (Codec, Phone, Studio Feed only)
If this source is a Phone or Codec type and there is a
backfeed associated with it, this option determines what
audio content is sent back to the source from the console.
- No backfeed.
Auto (Pgm-1/Phone) feeds the Program 1 bus
(minus the source) when this source’s fader is ON,
and feeds the Phone bus (minus the source) when the
fader is OFF. Remember, the Phone bus is actually a
special variant of Program 4. The Phone bus is prefader and pre-on/off to allow speaker-phone style operation thru the Operator’s mic.
Program 1 always feeds the Program 1 bus, minus
the source, regardless of the on/off state of the channel.
Program 2 feeds the Program 2 bus, minus the
source.
Program 3 feeds the Program 3 bus, minus the
source.
Program 4 feeds the Program 4 bus, minus the
source.
Phone feeds the Phone bus, minus the source. Phone
is a pre-fader and pre-on/off variation of Program 4
Talk Only is a “silent backfeed” that operates when
the Talk To function is engaged, creating an IFB to
the source.
Disabled
Feed to Source Dim Gain (Codec, Phone, and Studio
Feed only)
Normally, Talkback is sent over dimmed backfeed
audio. If you want a hard interruption (Talkback interrupts Program audio), un-check the Enable check box,
which mutes the audio. But maybe your jocks would like
to have just their program audio dimmed, with Talkback
heard over it so they can still monitor air while they’re
being talked to. In this case, input a value by which the
program audio will be dimmed. Adjustment range is 0dB
to -30dB.
About the PHONE, RECORD and PROGRAM 4
buses: The iQ PGM-4 mix bus is a special multipurpose bus that does several things at once to
make life easier for the operator. Sources assigned to PGM-4 are also sent to the
RECORD bus, a special post-fader, pre-on/off
output that can be used to feed recording devices.
At the same time, sources assigned to PGM-4
are mixed and sent to the PHONE bus. PHONE is
an internal bus which does not feed a separate
output; instead, it picks up PGM-4 audio pre-
©2011 Axia Audio
Live Controls
This group of radio buttons configures permits “live”
functions for the Options control on each of the console’s fader strips. Available options will vary depending on the source type. One setting may be defined as
the Primary or “live” control, which means that the
­Options control will vary that setting as soon as you adjust the knob. For example, if PANORAMA has been
defined as the Primary function, simply rotating the Options control will pan the source.
The other functions may be enabled or disabled as
desired. Those that are Enabled may be chosen by the
operator “on-the-fly” by depressing the Options control.
When the control is pressed, the OLED display will list
the options that you’ve checked as Enabled in this section of the configuration. Pressing the Options control
selects the highlighted option and turning the Options
control will adjust the parameter for that option. Depending on the enabled options, the operator will be able
to adjust Source, Gain, Mode, Pan and Backfeed.
ilar source — you can save a few clicks this way.
Congratulations — you’ve created a Source Profiles
You can now bring up your new source on an iQ fader.
iQ Outputs
Output Types
Now that we have configured sources, let’s look at
the outputs of the iQ. Since iQ is a network device as
well as a mixing console, you might expect that it has
two kinds of outputs, Local and Livewire (network).
• Local Outputs - These outputs correspond to the
audio connectors on the rear panel of the QOR.32.
These are used to connect Control Room monitors,
Preview speakers, headphone amplifiers, record devices and, of course, your air chain equipment and
processing.
• Livewire Outputs - This is a group of four specified audio streams that can be delivered from your
iQ to other devices in your Livewire network. See
Chapter 7: Livewire Networking and iQ for more
details on how this works.
Local Outputs
Your QOR.32 has eight stereo analog line outputs and two AES outputs. These may be configured to deliver:
»»Local sources (4 microphones, 16 analog, 2
AES/EBU)
»»Backfeeds to any of the above sources that are
configured as Phone or Codec.
»Any
»
of the Program or Monitor feeds that are
created by the QOR.32 (CR Monitor, Studio
Monitor CR Headphones, VMIX, VMODE, etc)
• Output - Using the drop-down menu, select
the desired source that you want to deliver to
your iQ local output.
• Output Gain - The output signal level may be
attenuated to provide an optimal level for outboard devices. The gain range is from -127.5
(off) to 0.0 dB (unity gain).
Remember to save your work! You may also
“Save as Copy” if you intend to set up another, sim-
Figure 2-6: Assigning an Output from the list box
©2011 Axia Audio
2: Inputs and Outputs • 17
fader and pre-On/Off and backfeeds this bus
to callers (minus themselves, of course) when
the channel is OFF and AUTO is selected as the
Feed To Source Mode.
CAUTION - Once you have made a selection
and applied it, audio is immediately delivered
to the QOR output. Be sure to turn down all
amplifier level controls to avoid damaging your
precious equipment — especially your ears.
V-Mixer and V-Mode
The iQ V-Mixer is an “auxiliary” virtual mixer that can be used to mix five stereo sources and,
from this mix, create another new source that may
be used like any regular source.
Figure 2-7: V-Mixer and V-Mode
V-Mode is a signal converter that allows you to
manipulate some mono-mode sources. V-Mode has
one input and one output, thus creating one additional
source.
V-Mixer and V-Mode outputs are assigned in the iQ
Outputs section and delivered to your studio or your
Livewire network. Once V-Mixer and V-Mode signals
are a part of the network, they can be loaded on any local or networked console fader, or routed to any other
network destination.
V-Mixer Controls
2: Inputs and Outputs • 18
The V-Mixer works independently of the iQ console.
Static control of V-Mixer is available through the iQ web
pages.
Even though the “V” in V-Mixer stands for “virtual”,
you can in fact perform a certain amount of “hands-on”
mixing. Although you don’t have physical control of the
virtual faders or virtual ON/OFF switches, adjustments
made to the V-Mixer take effect as soon as you apply
them. While you may not want to operate an entire show
this way, it’s valuable to know that V-Mixer changes
made “on the fly” will take effect immediately.
Figure 2-7 shows the V-Mixer and V-Mode setup
found in the iQ web pages. At the top of that page, you
can see the V-Mixer sub-mixer with its five stereo inputs.
Below that you will see the V-Mode section. Let’s look
at the controls and see what they do.
At the top is the V-Mix Master field. This gives the
option to assign a Livewire GPIO channel for control of
the VMixer. This channel number also gets assigned to
a GPIO port, allowing you to have ON/OFF control of
VMix channels through GPIO. The last option applies a
gain stage to the final mix the five inputs.
Controls for the V-mixer’s input channels include:
Source: From the drop-down menu, you may select
any source previously defined with a Source Profile.
• On: Simply determines the ON/OFF status of the individual V-Mixer channel.
• Gain: This setting allows you to specify a gain setting for the channel that will control its mix level.
The range is from -80 dB (effectively off) to +10dB.
Note that you may also specify a gain setting for the
V-Mix Master, which is the output of the V-Mixer.
•
At the bottom of the V-Mix section is an A
­ pply button. Any changes you make will be saved when this button is pressed. Be sure to save your changes.
What does V-Mode do?
All of the program busses of the iQ are stereo. Sometimes, though, special circumstances require only one
channel of an audio source, or a mono sum. V-Mode lets
you accomplish this easily.
V-Mode Controls
V-Mode allows you to perform special manipulations
on a stream. The controls are as follows:
©2011 Axia Audio
•
contains a drop down menu that allows you to select from a range of sources for each
V-Mode input. You may choose from local Core
sources including PGM-1/2/3/4, and VMIX.
• Audio Mode is the magic box that transforms your
stereo stream into something else. You may choose
from any of the following options:
»» Pass Stereo: Passes the Left and Right channels as is, without modification.
»» Mono sum to L: Creates mono sum and directs
it to the Left channel only.
»» Mono sum to R: Creates mono sum and directs
it to the Right channel only.
»» Combine from left and right: Creates a dual
mono stream by summing the Left and Right
channels.
Input Selector
The output of V-Mix and V-Mode channels can be
assigned to outputs like any normal audio source.
down selector. Click on the drop-down for output #3
and choose to Analog 5 as shown in Figure 2-6. By
simply choosing to Analog 5, iQ knows to deliver a
backfeed that is a mix-minus of Analog Input 5. (The
output chosen to deliver this backfeed is arbitrary we chose Output 5 just for this example.)
4. Click Apply.
5. Now point your browser to the iQ GPIO Configuration screen (Figure 2-8). You may also use a
GPIO Node in lieu of iQ’s built-in GPIO ports; just
point your browser to that Node’s IP address instead.
6. The GPIO setup screen uses the same method
of assigning devices to ports as other Livewire devices. Pick a port to map your Phone channel’s contact closures to, using the list tool, and click Apply.
Figure 2-8 shows the GPIO section of an IQ. (Axia
Element consoles and GPIO nodes are similar, and
also have eight GPIO ports.)
Adding Backfeeds and GPIO
Let’s say you’ve connected a hybrid
to Analog Input 5 of your iQ. You’ve constructed a Source Profile for it, and you now
want to give it a mix-minus backfeed and
set up a GPIO contact closure for the “take”
and “drop” functions. Here’s how:
1.
Make sure that, in your hybrid’s
Source Profile, the Source Type option is set to “Phone” and the Feed to
Source is set to “Auto (Program 1 /
Phone)”.
2. Use your Web browser to connect
to the iQ Outputs screen (Figure 2-6)
and set up the mix-minus for Output #5.
3. Just to the right of each Local
Output name box , you’ll see a drop-
Figure 2-8: GPIO Configuration
©2011 Axia Audio
2: Inputs and Outputs • 19
Since making a mix-minus and mapping
contact closures is often done at the same
time a new Source Profile is constructed,
let’s briefly recap those procedures.
The process is complete: you’ve made a Source Profile for your phone hybrid, created a mix-minus, mapped
it to an audio output, and associated a GPIO port for
contact closures associated with the source.
To confirm, choose the Options key on any of your
iQ’s fader strips and load your new Phone source. Now
press the Talk key just below the fader; you’ll see the
status change appear in the display above the channel
to indicate that the operator’s mic is talking to this telephone hybrid through it’s backfeed channel.
Now look at the GPIO screen on your browser. Note
the green indicators that have appeared on the port representing your hybrid; switch the iQ channel On and Off
and you’ll observe the tally change with the active pins.
What's Next
2: Inputs and Outputs • 20
When you’re ready, join us in Chapter 3: Console
Operation where we’ll show you how to use the various
controls on the iQ mixing surface. q
©2011 Axia Audio
Console Operation
With iQ, our goal is to provide you with the most efficient human-machine interface possible for fast-paced,
complex programs where board operators must multitask without error. As such, iQ brings a whole new level
of control and sophistication to the broadcast studio,
while providing very familiar, intuitive operation.
Overview
iQ was designed to perform equally well in air or
production studios. The clean interface enhances speed
and accuracy without clutter or confusing controls.
In addition to the iQ Main frame, there is an 8-fader
expansion frame, a 6-fader frame with controls for use
with select Telos phone systems, and a 6-fader frame
with ten programmable “User” keys (two groups of five
keys).
In this chapter we’ll first give you a high-level overview of iQ capabilities. Then, we’ll give you detailed explanations of the various controls and functions.
Displays
Like a traditional console, iQ includes built-in meter
displays. The iQ’s OLED meters can be configured to
VU or PPM metering standards.
The iQ Main Frame has dedicated meter displays for
Program buses 1, 2 and 3, plus a multi-function meter. This meter, used in switched mode, toggles between
a preset selection of metering options. The meter tally
tells you what bus the meter is metering.
In addition to the meter displays, iQ, has a time of
day clock and a count-up timer.
Show Profiles are easily toggled by pressing the Profile key located at the top of Monitor section. Construction and administration of Show Profiles is covered in
Chapter 4: Show Profiles.
Sources, Channels and Faders
During the course of this chapter, we’ll refer often to sources and channels. These are not the same!
“Sources” are microphones, CD players, outputs from
the playout system, telephone hybrids, etc.
“Channel” would normally be used when referring to
iQ’s linear faders and associated on/off controls, OLED
displays, bus assignment keys, etc.
Sources are assigned to faders for use on-air or in
production. During initial configuration, the Source
Profiles are programmed by the engineer for appropriate logic and options (as outlined in previous chapters);
afterwards, whenever that source is assigned to a fader,
source logic follows.
Fader settings are instantly reconfigured whenever a
source is selected, to accommodate the unique requirements of the source. For example, a fader controlling a
microphone source also controls appropriate monitor
mutes. A fader controlling a line source may send “start”
and “stop” commands when the channel is turned on
and off.
Sources such as an off-air feed can also be assigned
directly to the monitors for auditioning without being
assigned to a fader.
Mix-Minus
Mix-minus setup, especially for live broadcasts, has
always been one of the most confusing aspects of run-
©2011 Axia Audio
3: Console Operation • 21
Chapter Three:
Show Profiles
iQ can be completely re-configured, instantly, to suit
different types of shows. By recalling any of four previously stored Show Profiles, talent can change board settings from a phone and microphone intensive morning
show to a personality-based music show – or any other
kind – at the touch of a button.
ning a radio console. iQ makes mix-minus easy by automating it. The operator never has to worry about sending a source back to itself and getting feedback— it just
can’t happen!
via the Internet and applied by the station engineer. Axia
Support recommends performing backups or making
printouts of Show Profiles and other configuration data
before applying new software updates.
Several fixed and auto-switching mix-minus choices
are possible, and are configured for each source when
Source Profiles are defined by the engineer (see Chapter 2 for details). Once this setup is done, no further
tweaking is needed; the operator simply uses the source.
A fader’s status display tells operators when a particular source has a mix minus output, and even tells them
which audio mix is being backfed.
iQ Main Frame - Callouts and Operation
iQ will generate as many mix-minus outputs as there
are faders, each with its own automated mix minus feed.
If you have 16 faders, you can have 16 mix-minuses!
3: Console Operation • 22
GPIO
Chapter 2 explained how sources can have associated GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) control associated with them. External GPIO interfaces are connected
to iQ via the Livewire network (more details in Chapter
7) , so you can locate the actual machine connections either physically close to source equipment or in a central
equipment room.
During installation, the engineer configures sources
to accept and provide logic commands by selecting various options. For example, studio mics may be set up to
automatically mute the studio monitor speakers and illuminate an on-air warning light when turned on. The
same sources can be configured to accept GPIO logic
inputs from buttons, so that each studio guest can have
their own On, Off, Talk, and Mute keys.
Line sources can be configured to receive start and
stop commands from the iQ as well. Start/stop messages
can also be passed, via Ethernet, to a computer-based
playout system.
Software
The iQ operating system uses a high-performance
embedded Linux kernel to help ensure bulletproof, 24/7
operation. Software updates can be obtained from Axia
This section provides a “bird’s-eye view” of the iQ,
with full descriptions of its controls and their functions.
Although an iQ console may have a fixed number of
faders, you are not limited to that number of sources.
Just like iQ’s big brother, Element, you may assign any
source to any fader. Unlike Element, iQ’s metering is
built-in.
The iQ Main Frame is laid out in a conventional manner with the monitor and ancillary controls located on
the right side of the frame. Let’s look at each of these
sections in detail.
1. Channel
does.
OFF Switch:
You know what this
2. Channel ON Switch: When the channel is in
fader-normal mode the ON key turns the channel on
and the OFF key turns it off. The channel On and
Off functions also provide logic (start and stop pulses, monitor muting, etc.) specific to the source type.
For example, if a control-room mic is assigned to a
fader, the CR monitors and Preview speakers will
mute when that fader is turned on and when CR microphone sources are Previewed. If a fader is hosting
a microphone source, pressing the On key when the
fader is already on mutes the channel, providing a
“cough” function, until the On key is released.
3. SOFT Key: Each channel has a Soft Key. The
OLED display tells you what function the soft key
is currently controlling. The default action depends
upon the type of input assigned to that fader, which
is defined in the Source Profile. Current functions
of the key are Mute, Talkback and phone hold. This
key is also used to exit Channel Options edit mode.
©2011 Axia Audio
Figure 3-1: iQ Main - Callouts
The Preview key acts like a latching switch.
­ omentarily pressing any channel’s Preview key
M
assigns that channel to the Preview bus; pressing it
again removes the channel from Preview. To enable
an operator to quickly listen to various sources, the
Preview function can be interlocked: pressing Preview on any channel will remove any other channel
from Preview mode.
If you want to preview multiple channels, pressing
and holding any Preview key temporarily disables
the interlock; other sources can be added to the Preview mix by pressing them. Conversely, channels
can be removed from a multiple Preview selection by
pressing and holding any lit Preview key and deselecting the individual channels you wish to remove
from Preview.
A momentary press of any lit Preview key will remove all channels from Preview.
The interlock option for Preview can be disabled in
any Show Profile’s Monitor section so that users can
gang preview sources without the need to press and
hold Preview.
The audio from the Preview bus feeds any speakers
dedicated to Preview, and can also be routed to the
operator’s headphones and CR monitors if desired.
Preview speakers will be muted whenever and CR
microphone is ON, or is assigned to the Preview bus.
5. Channel Information Display: This OLED
display interacts with the Channel Options control
and the Soft key. It is context-sensitive and can display many different parameters relevant to each fader.
©2011 Axia Audio
3: Console Operation • 23
4. PREVIEW Key: allows the operator to listen
to sources before they air. iQ’s Preview bus allows
auditioning in full stereo. Individual source profiles
can change Preview to Solo (post-fader) operation.
Normally the display will show the name of the
source that is applied to the fader (“Zephyr”), and
the function assigned to the SOFT key (“TALK”).
When fader channel parameters are being edited, this
display shows gain and pan settings, mode, backfeed
selection and other parameters that will be dependent on the type of source.
3: Console Operation • 24
When viewing these menus,
the Options control is
pressed to select the function, and rotated to set the
value.
Just below the Source name
is a status line. It shows the
status of a channel. It is displayed in medium font. In
the previous example, it is
“[TALKBACK].” .
talked to, i.e., the talk bus is fed to the backfeed
stream for this fader.
»» Src-label - If the source has an associated label, it will be shown. Source label is normally
used by playout systems to indicate song name
and/or important information. Available only for
Livewire sources.
»» Listen Only - The source was loaded in listenonly mode. No GPIO control is available for this
source’s originating device.
»» Used EW - The source is
currently in use elsewhere and
is in listen only mode. As soon
as source is freed, it will be
automatically reloaded in Full
Control mode.
»» Src Load Err - An error
occurred during source loading.
Re-load the source.
»» No Backfeed - An error occurred during backfeed allocation for the source. For example,
no resources are available to allocate backfeed stream.
»» Src Waiting - means that
a new source is waiting to be
loaded. This state is accompanied by a blinking OFF key.
Turn the channel OFF to load
the new source.
Figure 3-2: iQ Main - Callouts
Here is a list of the different status displays and their
meanings:
»» [TALK TO CR] - means that this channel is talking to Control Room. Used on Guest Microphone
and Codec source types
»» [OP TALKING] - means that this fader is an operator mic and it is currently in use for Talkback
rather than feeding to Program buses
»» [MUTED] - means that this channel is muted
»» [TALKBACK] - means that this channel is being
6. Fader: The fader controls
the volume of the input source.
There are two modes for the
fader: fader-start and fader-nor-
mal:
• When the channel is used in fader-start mode,
pushing the fader all the way to the bottom of its
travel turns the module off, and sends appropriate logic commands to source equipment. Moving the fader up turns the channel on and sends
logic commands. In fader-start mode, the On
and Off keys act more as indicators of channel
status; the On key will not turn the channel on
if the fader is at the bottom of its travel. Pressing
©2011 Axia Audio
7. Program Bus Assignment Keys: Each channel is assigned to any of the three main output buses
by selecting any (or all) of these program bus keys.
Generally, PGM-1 is the main on-air bus and other
buses are used for production or other programming
requirements. All program
outputs are post-fader and
post on-off function.
the value of that parameter (if any). Press the
key to exit.
Soft
In the QOR.32’s Web setup, you can also assign a
default function to the rotary encoder. Doing so allows adjustments to fader options, gain trim, input
gain trim, pan, or input selection to be made just by
rotating the knob.
9.
Always displays the output level of the IQ Program 1
bus. PGM 1-2 Meter:
10.
PGM 3-4 Meter:
This is a dual function meter.
The left side of this meter always displays the output level
for the Program 3 bus. The
right side of this meter displays
the output level of a bus that
may be selected by the operator by using the Meter Select
key (14). Options for this meter
are: PGM 4 or Follow Monitor.
The fourth bus functions
as a regular output bus, but
any sources feeding PGM4 are also sent to a special
Record bus that can feed a
dedicated recording device,
as well as to the Phone bus
that sends mix-minus audio
to any phone callers. These
buses operate independently
11. TALK to Backfeed: This
but simultaneously, allowkey allows the operator to ining jocks plenty of operastantly talkback to any phone
tional flexibility.
or codec source(s) by press»» PGM-4 bus audio output
ing a single key. Pressing
is post-fader, post-ON/
the TALK to Backfeed key
OFF.
routes the board operator’s
»» PGM-4 Record bus aumic to all existing backfeeds.
Figure 3-2: iQ Main - Callouts
dio output is post-fader, prei.e.: you can talk to a codec
ON/OFF.
or
phone
caller’s
mix-minus
»» Phone bus audio is sent to callers pre-fader, prefeed by simply pushing TALK to Backfeed.
ON/OFF.
12. Record: places the iQ in Record Mode. Moni8. Channel Options Control: This control
toring (CR Headphones) will switch from the current
operates in conjunction with the OLED fader dissource to the Record Bus, The 3rd meter will display
play. Pushing the rotary encoder selects OPTIONS
the Record Bus levels. Control Room Monitors and
mode, displaying various choices on the OLED
Preview speakers will be muted. Pressing a Record
beneath. Rotate to select the desired option, and
second time releases Record Mode and restores iQ
then push to “take.” Once an option has been seto its previous state.
lected, you can rotate the control again to adjust
©2011 Axia Audio
3: Console Operation • 25
the Off key while moving the fader up suppresses
turning the channel On.
• In fader-normal mode, the on/off status and
start/stop commands follow the channel ON/
OFF switches independently of the fader position.
13. Clock and Timer Display: This display includes both the Clock and the Timer. The Clock sections includes an NTP indicator that tells you when
the iQ synchronized to an external NTP clock reference. The Timer section displays the count-up timer
that may be controlled by fader-start or by the Timer
controls on the iQ.
14. Meter Key: If all four bus meters are not set
for constant display, this toggles the Soft (middle)
meter between Program
and Monitor metering.
key illuminates while the timer
is running
Stop
17. Profile Key: This key allows you to select the
active iQ Show Profile from a group of four pre-configured profiles. The Studio OLED display tells you
which profile (A, B, C or D) is currently active. The
Studio Monitor knob is used to navigate this screen.
To exit this screen, press the Profile key. You can
also push and hold the profile key for 5 seconds to
reload the current profile.
18.
STUDIO: “Studio”
is defined here as another
room separate from the Control Room, such as a talk studio or news booth. Pushing
this control selects the Studio
Monitor source; rotate it to
adjust the volume of the Studio Monitor speakers. Note
that the Studio
monitors will
be muted whenever any Studio
Microphone is
turned ON.
19. STUDIO Monitor Display: This OLED display indicates the volume and source
that is being delivered your
STUDIO monitors. This may
be changed with the STUDIO
control as described above.
3: Console Operation • 26
15. Clock Key: Pressing
this key toggles between
AUTO and MANUAL
modes for the count-up
timer. AUTO allows it to
be reset and started by any
source starting that has
it’s timer start option enabled. MANUAL ignores
those starts and follows the
RUN/STOP/RESET keys
only. Note that even if you
are set to AUTO, the run/
stop/reset keys still work.
To set the clock, push and
hold the Clock key for 6
seconds to enter clock adjust mode. The Clock key
will illuminate indicating
Figure 3-4: iQ Main - Console Callouts
that clock setup is active.
Release the Clock key and
press RUN-STOP to set the clock display forward, and
press RESET to set it back. Press the Clock key again
20. TALK to STUDIO Key: This push-to-talk key
to save the current time and exit clock adjust mode.
allows the operator to communicate with all Studio
guests simultaneously. The operator mic is routed
If NTP is active and enabled (via web page configudirectly to Studio Headration), the time cannot be adjusted manually.
phone and Studio Monitor outputs while this
16. Timer Controls: Pressing RESET zeroes the
key is pressed.
count-up timer. Pressing the RUN/Stop key manually starts or stops the count-up timer. The RUN/
21. Control Room
©2011 Axia Audio
22. Control Room Monitor Select Keys: This
group of keys selects the source that is delivered to your
control room monitor speakers. The operator may select from PGM 1, PGM 2, PGM 3, PGM 4 or two predesignated external sources. The external sources are
typically used for off-air receivers and are specified
in the web page configuration.
External 1 and External 2 have another function, in
addition to their normal monitor-select action. If you
press and hold one of these keys for 2 seconds, you
will see that the Studio OLED display and Studio
Monitor knob may be used to assign a source on-thefly to that specific External Input. Press Ext 1 or Ext
2 again to exit this Select mode.
23. PREVIEW Level Control: Adjusts the volume level of the Preview output connected to your
external powered PREVIEW speaker. Note that the
PREVIEW speaker will be muted whenever any CR
microphone is ON or when you are in Record mode.
24.
PREVIEW in HEADPHONE Key:
The
H/P
key controls whether audio from the Preview
bus will be fed to the board op’s headphones, and if
so, in what manner. Pressing this key toggles through
the following options:
»» Off: The operator will not hear Preview audio in
the headphone c­ hannel.
»» ON (Stereo): audio from the Preview channel
overrides the Headphone Monitor selection
and is sent to both the left and right channels of
the operator’s headphones.
PREV
25. HEADPHONE Level Control: Rotate to adjust
the Headphone volume. Headphone source follows
CR Monitor selection.
26.
MONITOR:
trol Room Monitors. This output will automatically
MUTE whenever any Control Room microphone is
ON or when Record Mode is active
System Settings
To access System Settings from the iQ console, press
and hold the Meter and Clock keys for three seconds.
The Studio display shows the options and the Studio
Monitor control is used to navigate, select options and
change parameter values. Options available are:
»» IP Address
»» Subnet Mask
»» Gateway
»» Save and Reboot
To exit, select
control.
EXIT
and press the Studio Monitor
iQ 8-Fader Expansion Frame
Operation of the iQ 8-Fader frame is identical to that
of the faders on the iQ Main. As described in Chapter
2, fader number designations are determined by the
QOR.32 Console port to which the Frame is connected.
iQ 6-Fader+Telco Expansion Frame
The iQ 6-Fader+Telco frame includes faders plus
controls for a dual-hybrid telephone system. These controls are specifically designed to work with the Telos
iQ6 phone system, or with the Telos VX VoIP broadcast
phone system.
OLED Display: Call status (using exclusive Telos Status
Symbols icons) and other information is presented on these contextsensitive displays. Indications are:
»» Line 1 is available
»» Line 2 is on hold
»» Line 3 is locked to Hybrid 1
with caller ID shown
»» Line 4 is blocked
»» Line 5 is selected and waiting for digits to dial
»» Line 6 is on-air on the fader to
the right of the button column.
Adjusts the level of your Con©2011 Axia Audio
3: Console Operation • 27
This is a context sensitive OLED
display that indicates the volume and source that
is being delivered to your Control Room monitors, CR Headphones and Preview.
Monitor Display:
Used for placing outbound phone calls
Keypad:
Used to create a “hook flash” in POTS analog
phone systems. Depending on the way you’ve ordered
your Telco service, this key may serve to activate features such as transfer or 3-Way Calling. This button does
not function with ISDN phone lines.
Transfer:
This control triggers your external profanity delay using Livewire GPIO logic. The details of
this feature are still under development.
Delay Dump:
Pressing this key once will “busy” all phone
lines (except those that are on-air or on hold), thus blocking incoming calls. Pressing the key a second time will
release call blocking.
Block All:
Figure 3-6: iQ 8-Fader Frame
Each line has 2 buttons, the left column
for Hybrid 1 and the right column for Hybrid 2. Pressing
a line button places the caller on that line on-air using the corresponding hybrid. Pressing a line button
when a call is already on-air locks the call on-air, preLine Buttons:
A completely dark display indicates that no line is connected to that port. A “pulsating” display indicates a
ringing line.
If you’re familiar with Telos phone systems, you’ll find
iQ’s hybrid controls to be very familiar indeed!
3: Console Operation • 28
VoIP in the broadcast studio: Voice over IP
now dominates the telephone sector, so it’s only
natural for broadcasters to want to put VoIP to
work achieving better fidelity and call-handling
flexibility in the radio studio. After all, technology that sounds this great shouldn’t be reserved just for the board room! With broadcasters adopting IP-Audio as the “new
norm” for studio infrastructure, it makes sense
for the Telco to share the same IP-based studio
systems used for studio audio. This allows phone
systems to be integrated into the broadcast
console as never before, facilitating seamless
call-handling and even (dare we say it) interconnection between the business VoIP PBX and the
on-air phone system. iQ was designed with this
functionality in mind. As a result, iQ requires a Telos iQ6 or a VXseries phone system to take advantage of this
advanced on-console phone integration. iQ’s hybrid controls are not compatible with older products, or those of other hybrid vendors, although
the outputs of these products may be assigned
to any fader and the phone system operated
with its own proprietary controller.
©2011 Axia Audio
Figure 3-7: iQ 6-Fader+Telco (partial view)
venting accidental disconnection. To unlock, press the
line button a third time.
These buttons will drop calls
(in their respective column) that are currently on-air, if
that call is not in the “locked” state described above.
Drop 1 and 2 Buttons:
Selects the line which has been ringing longest.
If no line is ringing, it selects the line that has been on
(normal) hold the longest.
Source-Specific Channel Controls
Some fader functions change their behavior to suit
the type of source assigned to the fader. A Guest Mic input has unique functions different from those of a Codec
input, and so forth. In this section we’ll explain the
channel functions unique to each type of source input.
Next:
Channel Soft Key: At this writing, the soft key on a fad-
er with a phone source assigned places the caller on hold.
Control Room Operator Mic Channel
The Control Room Operator microphone is the board
operator’s mic. It’s always located in the Control Room,
so activating a channel designated as the CR Operator
mic affects CR Monitor speaker and Preview speaker
muting.
iQ 6-Fader+User Keys Expansion Frame
Each iQ 6-Fader+User Key frame also includes two
banks of User Keys. Each group consists of five keys
that may be programmed as extensions of two of the iQ’s
GPIO ports. For information on configuring and using
these keys, please refer to Chapter 5: Configuring GPIO.
When the board operator pushes a Talkback key, all
output bus assignments for the Control Room Operator microphone are temporarily muted, while his mic’s
audio is routed to the requested Talkback destination.
Releasing the key returns the channel outputs to normal.
Pressing the channel ON key for the CR Operator
Mic while the channel is already on will mute the channel until the key is released, acting as a “cough” function for the board operator. On-air status and speaker
mutes are unaffected by this action. The CR Operator
microphone channel will mute the CR Monitors (Monitor 1) and the Preview speakers whenever the channel is
On, or if Preview or Record Mode Engage keys are
selected.
Producer Microphone Channel
The Producer’s microphone is meant to be used at
a position within the Control Room where a morning
show or talk show producer would normally sit. This
mic type mimics the operation of the Control Room mic
described above, but does not include the “cough” function; also, a Producer mic can use Talkback to talk to the
board op, but cannot talk directly to the Studio talkback
channel.
Figure 3-8: IQ 6-Fader Module with User Keys
Control Room Guest Microphone Channel
There are often microphones in the Control Room
other than the board operator’s; i.e., an in-studio guest or
perhaps an announcer located physically near the board
©2011 Axia Audio
3: Console Operation • 29
The operation of faders found on this iQ 6-Fader
frame is identical to the operation of the individual faders that are found on the iQ Main. Please refer to the
callout descriptions for iQ Main in the previous section.
op. These microphones also control the muting of the
Control Room monitor speakers.
Control Room Guest Microphone channels will mute
the Control Room speakers and the Preview speakers
whenever the channel is ON, or if Preview key is selected.
Studio Microphone Channel
Another type of microphone channel is a Studio
Microphone. This mic is typically located in a location
separate from the control room — perhaps a voice-over
booth, a talk studio separated by glass, or a news booth.
Logic for Studio Microphone channels is identical
to that of the Control Room Guest Microphone channel.
The Studio Monitor speakers mute when a Studio Microphone channel is turned on, or if it is assigned to the
Program-4/Record bus.
External Microphone Channel
This type of microphone operates identically to a
studio or CR guest microphone except that is does not
incorporate any monitor muting functions.
3: Console Operation • 30
Line Channel
Line-level devices like CD players, tape players, etc.,
use the Line Channel profile. The Line Channel is stereo, but the user can change the input mode to mono, left
only or right only by using the Pan & Mode key in the
Master Module’s Channel Options section.
Line channels have a variety of remote logic functions available at the GPIO interface. ON and OFF keys
can be remotely controlled, as well as the Preview key.
Each function has a corresponding lamp driver.
You’ll also find a Ready command which will remotely illuminate the OFF lamp on the IQ channel and
activate the GPIO OFF lamp driver, allowing source
equipment to signal the operator with either a steadystate OFF key (indicating source ready) or a flashing
OFF lamp (indicating source next). Refer to the GPIO
Node User’s Manual for information on interfacing to
the GPIO’s inputs and outputs.
Phone Channel
The Phone Channel profile is used, naturally, for
telephone hybrid audio sources. Each Phone Channel
has its own discrete Feed-to-Source mix-minus output.
Each iQ can accommodate as many unique, automatically-generated mix-minus feeds as it has faders.
If the Feed-to-Source mode is set to “Auto”, (the most
common option - see Chapter 2: iQ Inputs and Outputs for the section entitled “Source Profile Options”),
phone callers hear the output of the Program-1 bus, minus himself, when the channels they’re assigned to are
ON. When the caller’s channel is OFF, their channel’s
Talkback key is lit and they hear the Board Operator’s
mic routed to their Talkback feed.
Phone feed-to-source outputs can also be locked to
backfeed only PGM-1, PGM-2, PGM-3 or PGM-4, using the options provided when constructing the Source
Profile for your hybrid. This automatic switching mode
makes it very easy to prep callers and then seamlessly
take them to air with a minimum of key pushes.
Codec Channel
The Codec Channel is used for codec sources. Like
the Phone Channel, each codec source is brought up on
its own channel, and an individual Feed-to-Source (mix
minus) output is provided for each codec. Codec Channels can be turned on and off remotely and provide on/
off status to a remote logic device. Remote Talk and
Remote Mute are also provided, allowing talent to take
control using their own On/Off/Mute/Talk panels.
enables remote talent to communicate with the
board op using the Talkback bus. When Talk is activated, all outputs for that channel are muted and the source
audio is fed to the Talkback bus; the channel’s OLED
displays TALK to CR. When the user stops talking, the
channel returns to normal.
Talk
When the operator uses the Softkey to talk to the
phone or codec source, the OLED displays TALKBACK.
When the remote mute function is activated, the
OLED displays MUTED and all the channel outputs are
©2011 Axia Audio
muted until the command is released.
The mix-minus output (configured in the Source
Profile section) normally feeds Program-1 audio to
the remote, but can be switched to Program-2, 3, 4 or
Phone. The Feed-to-Source output on a Codec Channel
is a dual mono output, occupying both sides of the stereo
pair. The Left output is normally used for remote talent’s
headphone feed, and is interrupted by Talkback audio
when the board op talks to the remote. The Right output
sends uninterrupted program audio (without talkback)
for use as a PA feed.
Remote Control
Console channels can be turned on and off remotely,
and will provide on/off status to a remote logic device.
Remote Preview is also provided, as are lamp drivers
for On, Off and Preview. Start and Stop pulses can be
sent when the channel is turned on or off, respectively.
See Chapter 5: Configuring GPIO for detailed information interfacing to GPIO inputs and outputs.
What’s Next
3: Console Operation • 31
Now that you know how what all the controls do,
let’s get acquainted with one of iQ’s most powerful functions: Show Profiles. q
©2011 Axia Audio
Do digital streams
dream of electric DJs?
3: Console Operation • 32
Just Bradbury knows.
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter Four:
Show Profiles
channel with a pending source change will immediately load the waiting source.
Creating A Show Profile
For instance, you could use Show Profiles as a “return to zero” command. iQ is highly customizable; jocks
can might load new sources, change EQ or make other
adjustments during their show. A Show Profile can reset
the console to its default state for the next operator.
Or, you could use Show Profiles to define different
types of broadcasts – one for the morning show, one for
talk segments, one for musical guest interviews, one for
unattended operation – that need only to be loaded to
instantly optimize the board for use with that situation.
You can save and recall up to four unique Show Profiles to customize your iQ for different users or shows.
Important note about using Show Profiles:
If you load a new Show Profile while any channels are still ON, those channels will remain in
their current state - that is, any new source that
is assigned to that channel by the Show Profile
will not be loaded - until the channels are turned
OFF, at which time, the new source will load for
that channel. This is to prevent operators from
accidentally taking an active source off the air.
This also enables operators to load a new Show
Profile a few minutes prior to needing it, secure
in the knowledge that any sources that are ON
will not be affected. Note that this notification
will be given even if the “new” source is the
same as the one currently on-air.
The surface will signal the operator that a source
change is pending by blinking the OFF button and displaying the message Src Waiting
on that channel’s OLED display. Turning OFF a
Build A Show
iQ’s Web interface, which you’ve used to construct
Source Profiles, is also used to help build Show Profiles,
so make sure a computer connected to your QOR.32 or
Livewire network is within easy reach.
Your iQ is shipped from the factory with a default
Show Profile. This loads the first time you turn on your
iQ; it provides the “template” you’ll use to construct custom Show Profiles. You’ve no doubt been exploring your
iQ, so you might want to reload Default Show Profile
A with the Profile key located in the iQ Master section.
Simply press and hold the A key and, after a few seconds,
the default profile will load, resetting the mixing surface
to its factory state.
The first step in building a Show Profile is to set up
iQ using the Channel Options, Monitor, Headphone,
Studio and other board options as described in Chapter
3: iQ Operations. Get started by assigning a source to
each iQ fader using the Options knobs at the top of each
channel.
After you’ve assigned a source for each fader, you
can configure the rest of the Channel Options:
• Gain,
• Pan / Balance,
• Feed to Source.
When you’ve configured all Channel Options, continue on and make monitor and headphone selections
since these are all saved in Show Profiles as well.
When you’ve got the board configured to your satisfaction, proceed to the next section.
Capture It!
It’s now time to save your iQ configuration as a Show
Profile. Enter your iQ’s IP address in your Web browser.
When the Main Menu appears, choose Shows on the
©2011 Axia Audio
4: Show Profiles • 33
If you’ve read Chapter 2: Inputs and Outputs, you
already have a good understanding of Source Profiles.
In the same way that Source Profiles allow you to determine how an individual channel is configured when
a source is loaded to a fader, Show Profiles let you build
configuration files that determine how the entire console
behaves, which sources are loaded, and what channels
they appear on — “snapshots” that you can load at will
to recall baseline show settings.
tions to assign sources
and set monitor options.
Let them set up the board
exactly the way they want it,
then use the Capture command to save their work. This
way, talent gets the satisfaction of personalizing their
own iQ configuration — and
saves you the work!
Show Profile Options
Figure 4-1: Show Profiles screen
sidebar menu. This is where you’ll come whenever you
need to capture, construct or administer a Show Profile.
4: Show Profiles • 34
Under the Show Profiles list, you’ll find four profiles
listed with three options for each Show Profile:
• Edit. Choose this option to manually edit any existing show profiles.
• Capture. Takes a “snapshot” of the current iQ
console state and saves it for recall. This is the option we’ll use in just a moment.
• Reset. Choose this option when you want to
construct an entire Show Profile completely from
scratch and reset all parameters to their default
state or value.
You’ve already set up your iQ, so now you can just
“capture” your settings for further use. Choose Capture
from the menu. iQ allows you to capture up to four Show
Profiles which are saved as A, B, C and D. You may
also give meaningful names to these Show Profiles as
described in the next section.
There may be a few more options you’d like to tweak,
since not all options are accessible from iQ console itself.
Let’s go a little deeper into Show Profiles to find out exactly what’s available to you.
Suggestion: As part of iQ training, show
your talent how to use the Channel Op-
Although the ability to create
Show Profiles using the “capture” function is powerful, there
are a few more options available
exclusively via the iQ Web interface. You will probably find that
a combination of console setup, capture and edit works
best.
When you select any Show Profile, you will enter the
edit screen as shown in Figure 4-2. Notice that there is a
section for your iQ faders, as well as sections for Phone,
Monitors, External Inputs and some general User Interface settings. At the very top of the page is the Show
Name. Use this to give the Profile a descriptive appellation
We will now look at the individual Show Profile settings in detail.
Fader Channels
This section has settings for each fader channel.
When this specific Show Profile is loaded, these settings
will be applied.
• SOURCE: You can change the source using the dropdown box. The name of the source you assign will be
displayed on the OLED below the fader.
• ON/OFF: Specifies the channel ON/OFF state when
the profile is loaded.
• PGM1/2/3/4: Determines the default bus assignments for this channel when the Show Profile is loaded. When a check-box is selected, the source will be
assigned to the corresponding bus.
• Group Start: There are three possible settings:
©2011 Axia Audio
»»
- this fader
is not associated with any
other fader and operates
independently
»» Master - is used to select
one fader as the master for
group starts.
»» Slave - is used to select
one or more faders as
Slaves that will follow the
action of the fader that has
been designated as the
Master.
Independent
This section contains the settings for connection to your iQ6
or Telos VX phone system. (Of
course, you can also connect your
iQ to any stand-alone hybrid by
using the inputs and outputs on
the QOR.32, but the settings contained in this section function only
with iQ6 or VX phone systems.)
Note that the iQ phone source
profiles contain settings that are
used to specify individual backfeeds and hybrid channels for all
types of phone systems.
• Phone Server IP: Specifies your user name and the
IP address of your iQ6 or
Telos VX phone server. Login information is in the format: user:[email protected] For example, if your VX user name
is Marty and your password
is “C185”, you would enter
Marty:[email protected] where 192.168.0.123
is the IP address of your phone server.
• Studio Name: This is your studio name, as configured in the VX system.
• Show Name: This can be the same as your iQ show
profile for consistency but it must correspond to a
Show Name configured in your VX phone system.
Figure 4-2: Show Profile Options
If you leave this blank, the current VX show will remain in use.
Monitor Section
•
You may specify initial volume settings for the outputs listed below. The default
setting is full mute:
Volume (-85..0 dB):
©2011 Axia Audio
4: Show Profiles • 35
Phone Connection
•
•
•
•
•
•
4: Show Profiles • 36
•
»» CR Monitor
»» CR Headphones
»» Preview
»» Studio Monitor
Volume Adjust: This checkbox determines whether
you will permit the operator to change the volume
settings for the outputs listed below — useful for
locking a console into a certain state during unattended operation. “Allowed” is checked by default.
»» CR Monitor
»» CR Headphones
»» Preview
»» Studio Monitor
Dim Gain (-30..0 dB): You may adjust the Dim
Gain independently for CR Monitor, CR Headphones
and Studio Monitor. This determines the amount of
dimming that will be applied when Talkback is directed to one of these outputs. The default setting is
-12.0 dB.
Mute Gain (-85..0 dB): You can specify the amount
of attenuation that takes place during a Mute function. The default is full mute. Mute can be applied to
CR monitor, Preview and Studio Monitor but it is not
applied to CR Headphones.
Source: Selects the default source for CR Monitor
and Studio Monitor. Available options are Program
1/2/3/4 and External 1/2.
Source Selection: You may prevent the operator or
studio talent from changing their CR Monitor or Studio Monitor source if the corresponding “Allowed”
check box is unchecked.
Preview In: determines whether or not Preview will
be heard in CR Monitor or CR Headphones in addition to the Preview speaker.
Logic Port: Use this to specify the Livewire channel
number assigned to logic ports (GPIO) used for CR
Monitor and Studio Monitor functions. These GPIO
ports are used for on-air lights and other functions as
described in the GPIO tables. Please refer to Chapter 5: Configuring GPIO for more details.
External Inputs
•
Lets you specify two External sources for
monitoring purposes plus one source that is an External Preview source. Note that the drop-down seSource:
lector displays all sources that have been defined as
iQ sources in the Source Profile manager.
What’s External Preview for? “External” refers here to any source not generated inside the
studio you’re working in. Let’s say you have a
Talkback source that you want to feed to the
console’s Preview speaker. To do this, you would
setup a source profile for the Talkback audio and
specify that source as External Preview
User Interface
Several global settings are defined in this section.
Remember that even though these are general settings,
they are specific to each Show Profile so you may accommodate the unique requirements of different shows.
•
•
•
•
•
•
is used to specify the default timer
mode - manual or automatic. In automatic, the timer
may be started by turning a channel ON.
Preview Interlock Mode: If Enable is checked,
pressing any fader’s Preview key causes any other,
previously-lit Preview key to be extinguished, removing that source from Preview. The board operator can assign multiple faders to Preview by pushing
and holding any lit Preview key while pushing other
Preview keys to add or subtract. If unchecked, each
Preview key works like a press-on, press-off latching
switch. Multiple faders can be assigned to Preview
simply by pushing once; a second push cancels any
individual Preview assignment.
Switchable Meter Source: The right half of the
second OLED display is a switchable meter. The
desired default may be selected from the drop-down
menu. Choices are: Program 4 or Follow Monitor.
Logic Port for Timer: Enter the Channel Number
of the GPIO port you wish to use for external control
of your Count-Up timer.
Talk to CR Level: Use up to -30 dB attenuation or
10 dB gain on the contents of the Talkback bus.
Control Lock Map: This section includes several
check boxes. When a box is checked, the selected
actions are allowed. Any unchecked boxes will prohibit the operator from accessing these functions
when this Show Profile is loaded. The selections are:
Timer Mode:
©2011 Axia Audio
»» Meter Source
»» Timer Mode
»» Timer Controls
»» Record Mode
»» Talk to backfeeds
»» Talk to Studio
»» Preview in HP
As usual, please remember to hit
are done to save your changes.
Apply
when you
Record Mode
Record mode has four options:
»» Disabled (default)
»» Enabled
»» CR Ready
»» CR Ready with Auto Reset.
These options control the function of the Record key.
If any option but Disabled is selected, a unique Livewire
channel number must be assigned to the Logic port field.
When enabled, logic follows the Record Device
GPIO table found in the GPIO chapter of this manual.
CR Ready simply enables the first pin on the logic port
when the record button is pressed; CR Ready with Auto
Reset does the same, but the pin resets once a microphone is turned on.
If the console is installed in a Control Room where
the operator will not go “live” with a mic, this option
saves you from the need to assign the Operator Mic
source type to a fader for Talkback to Codecs or Phones.
Assign the appropriate source to External Talk, and with
no Operator mic loaded to a channel, the operator can
still engage Talk functions to backfeeds.
What’s Next?
We have mentioned GPIO many times in the preceding chapters. Join us in Chapter 5 to learn how to interface the logic functions of your iQ console with the real
world. q
©2011 Axia Audio
4: Show Profiles • 37
External Talk
The ten thousand things
How long do they persist? Gates
4: Show Profiles • 38
and RCA, gone.
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter Five:
GPIO Port Definitions
Since the days of rotary-switch source selectors, it’s
been a challenge to properly route machine logic along
with audio. Some complicated schemes have been devised over the years, but broadcasters wanted a simple,
fast way to associate logic with audio in a routable environment.
Since the Axia IP-Audio system was designed as
a true computer network, we were able to start with a
clean sheet of paper to design the first truly routable machine logic/audio interface. Unlike conventional logic
connections which require each command circuit to be
wired individually, Axia sends machine controls over
the same Ethernet your audio travels on, further reducing infrastructure, cost and tedium.
Along with controlling external audio devices, iQ
GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) interface also includes logic commands for routine studio/control room
operations such as tally lights, monitor muting, On-Air
lights and more.
The last chapter explained source profiles and
showed you how you can associate GPIO with a source.
This chapter explains how to set up iQ GPIO to handle
these functions. We also invite you to read the GPIO
Node User’s Manual, for more in-depth information on
the topic of GPIO.
Note: The iQ console is used with a QOR.32 that
includes eight GPIO ports. GPIO ports on standalone GPIO nodes or other Axia consoles may
also be associated with your iQ sources if your
iQ is a part of a larger network. See Chapter 7:
Livewire Networks and iQ for details.
GPIO ports are programmed to support several different types of devices. How does a GPIO port “know”
which type of device is assigned to it?
Back in Chapter 2, when you constructed a Source
Profile for a telephone hybrid, you defined the source
type (see “Adding Backfeeds and GPIO to a Source Profile”). This is important, because when that source is
assigned to a console fader, iQ uses this Source Profile
selection to tell the GPIO Node what sort of command
to send to the attached device.
If iQ “sees” in the Source Profile that the assigned
device is a microphone, it tells the GPIO Node to send
logic for On, Off, Remote Mute and Remote Talk
commands on the appropriate pins. If it “sees” a line
input, it tells the GPIO Node to send Start, Stop and
Reset commands, plus closures for Ready lights, etc.
Axia GPIO ports can deliver unique command sets
for the following types of devices:
1.
Mic (Operator, Guest, Producer)
2.
Line Input
3.
Codec
4.
Telephone Hybrid
5.
Computer Playback Device
6.
Control Room Monitor
7.
Studio Monitor
8.
Profanity Delay Device
9.
Recording Device
10.
Accessory Button Panel Device
The next few pages contain tables that explain what
function the pins provide in each different device mode.
©2011 Axia Audio
5: Configuring GPIO • 39
Configuring GPIO
The QOR.32 has eight DB-15 connectors on its back
panel. Each connector (also known as a GPIO port) can
be associated with a device in your studio, and provides
five opto-isolated inputs and five opto-isolated outputs
per device for machine control, lamp drives and remote
channel controls. GPIO ports can also be monitored and
controlled by our PathfinderPC software.
GPIO Operator’s Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to Monitor 2) Command
13
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK TO MON2
function and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK button
on every source currently in
preview and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to Monitor 2) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK TO
MON2 is active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
PREVIEWED SOURCE is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic +5 Volt Supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Input Common
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
5: Configuring GPIO • 40
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
©2011 Axia Audio
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Control Room Guest Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
NOT CONNECTED
15
OUTPUTS
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
NOT CONNECTED
5
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
©2011 Axia Audio
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
5: Configuring GPIO • 41
POWER & COMMON
Source Common
GPIO Studio (Monitor 2) Guest Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
NOT CONNECTED
15
OUTPUTS
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
NOT CONNECTED
5
5: Configuring GPIO • 42
POWER & COMMON
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
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GPIO Producer’s Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to MONITOR 2)
­Command
13
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK to MON2
function and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK button
on every source currently in
Preview and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to MONITOR 2) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
MON2 is active.
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
PREVIEWED SOURCE is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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5: Configuring GPIO • 43
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Line Input Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF & sends
100 msec STOP pulse
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Turns preview ON
RESET Command
14
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF, while not
sending a STOP pulse
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF and READY is active
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 msec pulse when the
channel status changes from
OFF to ON
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 msec pulse when the
channel status changes from
ON to OFF
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
POWER & COMMON
5: Configuring GPIO • 44
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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GPIO Codec Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Allows an external button
to activate channel TALK TO
SOURCE function.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE are
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF.
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when the channel
TALK TO SOURCE function is
active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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5: Configuring GPIO • 45
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Telephone Hybrid Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Turns preview ON
RESET Command
14
Active Low Input
Turns channel off while not
sending a STOP pulse
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE is sent when
channel is first turned ON or
when PVW is first selected
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is turned OFF.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
5: Configuring GPIO • 46
POWER & COMMAND
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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GPIO Control Room Monitor Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
MUTE CR Command
11
Active Low Input
Mutes CR monitors and Preview speakers
DIM CR Command
12
Active Low Input
Allows external dimming of
CR monitor speakers.
Enable EXT PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Feeds External Audio Input to
PREVIEW
TALK TO EXT Command
14
Active Low Input
Turns on Talk to External
Audio.
Not used.
15
Active Low Input
CR ON AIR Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever CR
monitors are muted
DIM CR Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever control
room monitors are DIMMED
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW is
active.
TALK TO EXT Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when Talk to
External is active.
TALK (to CR) Active Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever a source has
activated its TALK (to CR)
function
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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5: Configuring GPIO • 47
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Studio Monitor Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
MUTE Studio Command
11
Active Low Input
Allows external muting of
Studio monitor speakers.
DIM Studio/Monitor 2
Command
12
Active Low Input
Allows external dimming of
Studio monitor speakers.
Remote Event Timer Trigger
Command
13
Active Low Input
Resets Count-up Event Timer
to zero and starts timer.
NOT CONNECTED
14
Not Used
15
Active Low Input
Studio ON AIR Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever Studio
monitors are muted
DIM Studio/Monitor 2 Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever Studio
monitors are DIMMED
Event Timer Trigger Output
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
event timer is started from
zero.
NOT CONNECTED
4
TALK TO STUDIO/MONITOR 2
Active Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever the
TALK TO STUDIO/MON2 function is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
5: Configuring GPIO • 48
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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GPIO Computer Playback Device Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF & sends
100 msec STOP pulse
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Turns preview ON
Not Used
14
Active Low Input
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
NEXT Pulse
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
ON button is depressed, except when initially turned ON.
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF and READY is active
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is first turned ON.
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is turned OFF.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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5: Configuring GPIO • 49
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Film Legendable User Button Module / Accessory Panel / Rack Panel
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
User Button 1 Lamp
11
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 1
Lamp
User Button 2 Lamp
12
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 2
Lamp
User Button 3 Lamp
13
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 3
Lamp
User Button 4 Lamp
14
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 4
Lamp
User Button 5 Lamp
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 5
Lamp
User Button 1 Switch
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 1 is
pushed
User Button 2 Switch
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 2 is
pushed
User Button 3 Switch
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 3 is
pushed
User Button 4 Switch
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 4 is
pushed
User Button5 Switch
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 5 is
pushed
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
5: Configuring GPIO • 50
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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GPIO Recording Device Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
Not Used
11
Active Low Input
Not Used
12
Active Low Input
Not Used
13
Active Low Input
Not Used
14
Active Low Input
Not Used
15
Active Low Input
Rec ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever Record Mode
is engaged.
Rec OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever Record Mode
is NOT engaged.
Not used
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
n/a
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Record Mode is engaged.
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Record Mode is disengaged.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
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5: Configuring GPIO • 51
POWER & COMMON
Assigning GPIO to a Source
As you’ve seen by studying the previous pages, a lot
of the work of assigning logic to a source is done for you;
once a GPIO port is linked with a Source Profile, all that
remains to do is to solder cables connecting the GPIO’s
DB-15 connectors to the device’s control interface.
So, how do you link a GPIO port with a Source Profile? It’s very easy; let’s do it step-by-step.
Note: This procedure assumes that you have
already defined at least one Source Profile using
the instructions outlined in Chapter 2.
Figure 5-2: GPIO Select Source popup list
1. Open your Web browser and enter the IP address of your console. Choose GPIO Configuration
from menu. Enter your password if prompted (default
login is “user”, leave the password field blank).
5: Configuring GPIO • 52
2. If you haven’t previously assigned any GPIO
ports, the GPIO definitions screen will be blank. Notice the status indicators at the top of the page, showing the state of the input and output pins of each port.
The “Logic for” option defines how the port will be
used.
»» LWRP: The port will only be controlled through
a control protocol. Software packages, as in Pathfinder use the protocol.
»» LIVEWIRE: Specify a channel number and the
port will follow the logic associated with that
channel (this will be used for CR monitor logic)
»» SPECIFIED INPUT: Define an input port and
the port will follow the logic of that input.
3. If using the LIVEWIRE option, you will need
to specify the Channel Number in the Livewire
Channel column. You can do this by manually entering the number, or browsing the network for an
advertised Livewire channel. When you click on
any list icon, a small popup window will open, enumerating all of the audio sources available on the
Livewire network (Figure 5-2). Choose the source
you wish to associate with a GPIO port by clicking
on it; the window will close and the source’s name
and channel number will appear in the Channel box.
If you’re using a local source, specify the input. If
a source profile has been created to control a phone
hybrid using Analog 5 as the input, select Analog 5
in the drop down list. The functions of the GPIO port
will now follow those shown in the Hybrid Logic
Chart.
4. Type a descriptive name in the Name field, and
click on the Apply button.
5. The source we’ve been using for this demonstration is a telephone hybrid; we can now observe
the pin status indicators change as we turn the chan-
Figure 5-3: Pin status indicators showing
GPIO port activity
Figure 5-1: GPIO Port Assignment
©2011 Axia Audio
See how easy that was? Simply assigning an existing
audio source to a GPIO port automagically configures
the port for the type of device supplying the audio, and
send the appropriate logic commands to that port when
the source is assigned to a iQ channel.
Connections to GPIO Ports
Input Connections
Current on these inputs must be limited to 20 mA or
less, through the use of a current-limiting resistor. An
external power source (24 volts DC maximum) is recommended for all inputs and outputs, to prevent ground
loops between equipment. However, if customer equipment is completely isolated, using power from the GPIO
port connectors is acceptable. Figure 5-4 shows details
for both types of connections:
Figure 5-4 GPIO input connections
©2011 Axia Audio
5: Configuring GPIO • 53
nel on and off, as shown in Figure 5-3.
Referring to the Hybrid Logic Chart, we can see that
when the iQ channel is Off, the indicator representing Output Pin 2 – the Off Lamp logic command – is
high. Turning the channel On, we see Pin 4 pulse
briefly before Pin 1 goes high: the GPIO has just sent
a Start pulse, then lit the On Lamp. If you turn the
channel Off again, you’ll observe a Stop pulse, and
the Off Lamp command once again becomes active.
Output Connections
The GPIO port’s outputs are opto-isolated. Current
should be limited 100 mA through each output, with the
total current draw from the +5 Volt supply not to exceed
3 amps. Figure 5-5 shows the recommended connections
for outputs:
5: Configuring GPIO • 54
NOTE: Some external devices will allow a logic
control input “sink to ground” to activate. Thus,
some devices may not work with an Axia GPO
control, because they may not fully achieve
ground through the output transistor. The voltage drop between the collector and emitter may
not be low enough to activate the device, so an
external relay controlled by the GPO may need
to be used to provide a “dry” contact closure to
the external device.
Please note that this section is provided as a “jumpstart” introduction to Axia GPIO nodes. For a fuller
understanding of the GPIO node’s options and requirements, you may wish to read the GPIO Node User’s
Manual.
Virtual GPIO
Virtual GPIO ports allow you to to avoid having to
wire a GPO pin to a GPI pin in order to achieve a particular function. The Virtual GPIO ports provide an ability to
define up to five GPO pins that can be “virtually wired”
to a single GPI pin. Typically this is used in cases where
you want a GPO function to trigger a different GPI function. Please refer to the GPIO tables to determine what
those functions are.
Figure 5-5: GPIO output connections
©2011 Axia Audio
An example of this sort of “virtual GPIO” operation
is triggering the TALK TO EXT command and EXT
PREVIEW command of the CR Monitor logic.
Configuring and using iQ User Keys
What's Next
When you’re ready, join us in Chapter 6 for a comprehensive “under the hood” discussion of iQ Advanced
Controls. q
The 6 Fader + User Keys iQ expansion module provides two sets of 5 programmable “user keys.” You’ll use
the iQ Control Center’s Console Configuration page to
configure ports for these keys to use.
When you’ve defined one of the expansion console
units as “Console Ext 6”, you’ll find a section marked
“User Buttons” that you’ll use to configure the functions
of these keys.
• The ID column identifies the User Keys from top to
bottom, and in the left and right columns.
• The GPIO Channel box (and the adjacent selector
boxes) allow you to assign a Livewire GPIO Channel
number to each User Key.
• The Role drop-down selector has two choices:
»» GPIO Snake: Choose this option when you want
a button-press to result in a GPO response at the
GPIO port assigned to the GPIO Channel you’ve
specified.
»» GPIO module: Choose this option when you
want a button-press to be interpreted as a GPI
command at the GPIO port you’ve assigned to the
GPIO Channel. Also, if the GPIO Channel has a
GPO message issued on the network, the corresponding button will light, indicating “ready.”
©2011 Axia Audio
5: Configuring GPIO • 55
Figure 5-6: User Buttons configuration options
In the future, all
radio equipment will
5: Configuring GPIO • 56
be networked. Oh, wait!
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter Six:
Advanced Controls
In previous chapters, we covered the basics of setting
up your iQ. Now that you’re familiar with your console,
you should consider yourself an advanced user! In keeping with your dawning guru status, it’s time for a thorough look at some of iQ’s more advanced configuration
options.
Many of iQ’s features can be customized by software settings. And owners like you have given us great
ideas for new operational capabilities, some of which are
included in our periodic software updates. With that in
mind, we strive to keep our documentation as up-to-date
as possible.
iQ Configuration Screens
The iQ Control Center
Figure 6-1 shows the screen that greets you when
you log into your iQ from your Web browser. The main
menu runs down the left side and gives access to options
and settings. In the main window you can see at a glance
what version of iQ software is loaded, system information, CPU statistics, and more. For diagnostic purposes,
this information screen is openly accessible, but clicking
on any menu heading will prompt you for a password.
Here you’ll find options related to the QOR.32, iO Fader
Frames and Ethernet switch.
The Status Screen
The Status screen is your home page. It displays basic system status as well as information pertaining to the
active software load. A sample of this screen is shown
in figure 6-1. Additional information displayed may in-
clude::
• iQ software version info including the current active
Version and Base
• System Information including:
»» Version of Linux kernel
»» Uptime of the iQ expressed in days, hours and
minutes
»» CPU utilization
»» Network Information
»» Network status and utilization - transmit and receive data rates expressed in Mbps.
»» Debug information
• File System Information - provides information on
memory and solid state disk utilization for the operating system. This information may be requested by
Axia tech support.
The Setup Menu
We touched briefly on the IP features of the Setup
screen in Chapters 1 and 2. Now let’s look at the rest of
the tools on this page shown in Figure 6-2.
• Network Configuration contains the fields for the
iQ IP Address and other network functions.
»» Hostname is the unique name you give the console to identify it in the Web interface. You might
want to name it after the studio it’s in.
©2011 Axia Audio
6: Advanced Controls • 57
If you have questions that are not covered here, we
invite you to contact our 24/7 Support crew:
•
by email at [email protected]
•
by phone at +1 216-241-7225.
Figure 6-1: Status Screen
»» IP Address: This is the network address of your
iQ. We suggest that you have a plan to ensure that
all of your Livewire devices are assigned unique,
IP addresses.
Shortcut Key: You can also set the IP address
of your iQ by simultaneously pressing and holding the Meter and Clock keys on the iQ Console. Use the Studio Monitor knob to navigate
and follow the prompts to give your iQ a new IP
address.
•
By default, the user name
is set to “user” and the password is blank. If you
want to add a password, type it in both boxes and
click Change. Note that passwords will not display
here once changed, so be sure to make a record of all
password changes.
•
This is where you upload new
iQ operating software.
»» Software Versions shows you the software
packages currently stored on your iQ flash memory card. The blue radio button is displayed next
to the active software image.
»» Change Active Bank: When you want to
change the active software package, click on the
radio button next to the image you wish to activate, and click this button. A reboot is necessary
to load the new software choice.
»» Upload Image: From time to time, Axia makes
new software packages available for download from AxiaAudio.com/downloads/. Use the
Browse and Upload Image buttons to install
new software, as described in the Technical Bulletin that accompanies each software release.
Note that uploading a new image will always
over-write the inactive bank.
»» Reboot shuts down iQ and restarts it. A reboot
is required after changing active software or after
changing any settings in your Network Configuration.
»» Netmask: Enter your network’s submask here.
If you are not sure about this - consult your network administrator. In most cases a Netmask of
255.255.255.0 is suitable.
»» Gateway: If you have a Core switch or a network gateway to allow access from outside your
facility, enter that address here. A gateway is required for advanced IP address configurations
and for connection to an external NTP server.
6: Advanced Controls • 58
Note: A reboot is required when any changes
are made to the network parameters on the iQ
Setup Menu.
Web Access Password:
Software Update:
Save your work! We recommend backing
up your Configuration files whenever a major
change is made, or is about to be made, to your
iQ. Whether you are re-configuring Show or
Source profiles en masse or about to perform a
software update, it’s always a good idea to have
a copy of your important data.
The Customize Menu
The Customize page contains Clock settings and
Backup/Restore functions. Future enhancements may
include additional features in this area.
•
Figure 6-2: Setup Screen
Clock Options
»» Clock Format: This is where you define whether
you will view your time in 12 hour or 24 hour format.
©2011 Axia Audio
Each individual IQ in your network can use either
its own internal clock or an external time server
for timekeeping. The next group of settings will
set up NTP (Network Time Protocol) time sync.
»» Time Zone Offset: Specify your local GMT
offset in hours and minutes. For example, if you
live in the Eastern Tome zone in the USA, your
GMT offset will be -5 hours, 0 minutes. If you
live in Riga, Latvia, your offset will be +2 hours.
»» DST in effect (+1 hour): In those area that implement Daylight Savings Time, this check box
is used to tell your system to add one hour to the
GMT offset.
»» NTP: The check box should be checked if your
iQ’s NTP clock sync function is enabled. To
disable NTP service, simply un-check this
box. The other box here is used to enter the
IP address of your external NTP server. This
server may be a PC on your local network or it
may be the IP address of a public NTP server
in the Internet. Note that you must specify an IP address – a URL will not work.
If you wish to connect to a public or external
NTP server, be sure to specify a valid Gateway in your IP configuration.
Log, Log History and Log Setup Menus
iQ keeps a detailed log of user actions and other system events. Choosing the Log menu item lets you examine the last 100 logged activities; choosing the Log
History menu item allows you to view an entire day’s
log at one time and delete old log files if you choose.
The oldest log files are deleted automatically as storage
space dictates.
The Log Setup menu item allows you to specify an
external Syslog server and to configure the debug level.
This menu also allows you to specify from eight different severity level filters. The filter choices (in order of
decreasing severity) are:
•
Emergency: system us unusable
• Alert: action must be taken immediately
•
Critical: critical condition
•
Error: error conditions
• Warning: warning conditions
•
Notice: normal but significant condition
•
Informational: informational messages
•
Debug: debug level messages
You can tell if your NTP connection is working
©2011 Axia Audio
6: Advanced Controls • 59
Figure 6-3: Customize Screen
by observing the presence of the NTP indicator
next to the clock display on your iQ overbridge.
• Connfiguration: This is an extremely important
area of your iQ configuration since this is where you
will backup all of the hard work you have done.
»» Backup Settings: All iQ settings can be
saved in a single operation and backed up to a
location on your local drive. When you select
the Backup option, you will see the familiar location navigator that prompts you for the
folder in which you wish to store your backup
file. The backup file will be named according
to the device name, IP address and date/time
the backup was performed. This naming conventions allows you to store multiple backups
from multiple devices in the same location. An
example of an IQ backup’s file name might be
IQ-192.168.0.200-2010-03-25_17-13.xml.
»» Restore Settings: To restore a previous iQ
backup, use the browse button to locate the backup and then select Restore.
Use this section as directed to do so by Tech Support.
The Module Manager
The Module Manager heading displays information about the iQ Main Frame as well as all other modules (fader frames) and accessories connected to your
CANBus ports. Some of these fields are for diagnostics;
below is a list of those you might find useful:
»» Address: displays the number Axia has assigned
to each connected unit.
»» Type: gives you the working name of the module.
»» State: tells you whether or not the module is
working, i.e., communicating with the Core CPU.
»» Ping: Indicated ping response in ms.
»» Messages, Idle Time, Uptime: All indicate diagnostic information that is related to the CANBus communications. Tech support may request
this information for troubleshooting purposes.
»» Hardware Revision: displays the hardware version of the iQ module.
»» Firmware Version: displays the firmware version that’s loaded on the iQ module.
»» Upload Firmware Group: From time to time,
new module firmware may become available
from Axia. You may install new firmware by
choosing Browse and then Upload.
the module’s faders will continue uninterrupted,
keep in mind that while updating (usually about
10-15 seconds) you will not be able to adjust
gain or turn faders on or off on the module being updated.
Brightness Control Menu
This menu offers several options for fine-tuning your
iQ displays to your studio’s ambient lighting. All values are expressed in percent. The default setting will be
suitable for most studio environments, however you may
make adjustments as needed.
User Modules Menu
This menu allows you to set up and use Axia accessory SmartSwitch and Film-Cap Button modules and
accessory panels with your console. This area is where
you will find settings for the 10 User Keys found on
the 6-fader Frame. Axia PathfinderPC software is used
to provide powerful logic functions controlled by these
keys.
GPIO Configuration Menu
This menu is where you configure the assignments
for the four opto-isolated GPIO connections found on
the rear panel of the QOR.32. For a thorough discussion
of this screen and how to configure GPIO, please refer to
Chapter 5: Configuring GPIO.
6: Advanced Controls • 60
NOTE: Updating a module takes it offline during
the update process. While audio playing through
Remote
The remote function available through the
web interface gives you many of the same controls that are on the surface:
• You have the option to load a Show profile
by selecting the show in the dropdown selector, and then pressing the Load button.
• You can activate the Record mode.
• Each fader channel is shown with an option to change the source, change the ON
state, assignments to the four mixes, and
Preview state.
In order to change a state, you must make
the selection to the channel and press the Apply button for that row. This is control of a single channel at a time. Below the Fader Chan-
Figure 6-4: Modules Manager
©2011 Axia Audio
tact [email protected] for explanations of
any differences you may find.
What’s Next
iQ is designed to be the perfect standalone IP console. But what if you want to use your iQ as part of a
larger Livewire studio network? No problem! Read on as
we configure networking options for your iQ. q
Figure 6-5: Remote Screen
nels section are the controls for the monitors, where the
source and volumes for a monitor can be adjusted.
IO Manager Menu
These menus allow you to administer your iQ’s audio Inputs and Outputs. Refer to Chapter 2: Inputs and
Outputs for complete details on configuration of these
controls.
Ethernet Switch settings (Preconfigured)
QOR.32 contains an integrated Ethernet switch. This
switch manages the multicast functions of the console
and enables it to be connected to other devices via your
managed Livewire LAN.
NOTE: We make every effort to keep our manuals up-to-date, but sometimes R&D works
quicker than our documentation elves! Controls
documented in this section may vary from those
actually presented on your product. Please con-
©2011 Axia Audio
6: Advanced Controls • 61
Profile Manager Menu
These menus allow you to construct and administer
Show and Source Profiles specific to this iQ console. Refer to Chapter 2: Inputs and Outputs and Chapter 4:
Show Profiles for details on Source and Show profiles.
Dark, dark as coal tar
it pours out, bitter and strong.
6: Advanced Controls • 62
That’s Starbucks for you.
©2011 Axia Audio
Networking with iQ
iQ is a superb standalone broadcast console — but
that’s just half the story! Like all Axia broadcast products, iQ has networking capabilities as well.
Axia invented networked audio for broadcast. We
call it Livewire, and iQ uses this networking ability in
several different ways:
• Your iQ console can load and utilize sources
from other studios connected to your Livewire
network.
• You may deliver outputs from your iQ to the
Livewire network for use by others.
•
Naturally, iQ can also use GPIO logic that is
available on your Livewire network.
•
The Livewire network allows you to use our
companion software package, PathfinderPC,
for numerous advanced functions. The list of
features provided by PathfinderPC is growing
continuously.
•
Up to four iQ consoles can be configured daisy-chain style, without the need for an external core Ethernet switch, to take advantage of
network redundancy provided by implementation of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
standard.
•
You can manage your iQ remotely using its
web browser interface.
•
Configuration backup and restore operations
may be performed over the network as well.
Congratulations — your iQ console is the world’s
first broadcast mixer with a custom, built-for-broadcast
Ethernet switch built right in!
When properly configured and connected to other
iQ consoles (or, in a large studio facility, to an Ethernet
“core” switch), this network connection permits you to
access the resources of other devices connected to your
network.
iQ has a “gateway” for exchanging audio data with
the rest of your Livewire network, with two modes of
operation.
In the first mode, iQ can consume up to 12 Livewire
audio streams from the network, and it can deliver 4
Livewire audio streams to the network.
For an in-depth discussion of Livewire, please
review our publication “Introduction to
Livewire: IP-Audio System Design Reference and Primer,” which provides an excellent
discussion of IP-Audio and how standard Ethernet can be used to transport real-time broadcast audio in a studio environment. This publication is available at ­A xiaAudio.com/manuals/.
Figure 7-1: Codec Source
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter 7: Networking with iQ • 63
Chapter Seven:
Inputs
In the second mode, iQ can consume up to 8
Livewire audio streams from the network, and it can
deliver 8 Livewire audio streams to the network.
To understand this, it might help to envision this
network connection as a high-speed freeway, with 8
or 12 “lanes” coming towards your studio, and 8, or
4, lanes going away from your studio, to the network.
To select the mode you wish to operate in, point
your browser to the “Customize” page in the QOR
Control Center, and use the “Livewire Mode” option
to select either “8 in, 8 out” or “12 in, 4 out.”
Selecting the Source Input
Chapter 7: Networking with iQ • 64
In Chapter 2: iQ Inputs and Outputs, we discussed the iQ console’s local inputs - those associated with the XLR and RJ-45 connectors on the rear
panel of the QOR.32. We saw how we could associate each of these physical inputs with a Source Profile. The type of source (CR mic, Guest mic, codec,
phone, etc) determined parameters such as monitor muting and backfeeds.
When each Source Profile is configured, you have a
choice for the Source Input. If you select one of the rear
panel connectors, the console source is associated with
that input. If you select Livewire, you are telling the iQ
that this source is not associated with a local input but is,
instead, a source from elsewhere on your Livewire network. You may then assign that Primary Source by using the Browse button to choose from a list of Livewire
sources. That’s all there is to it!
Figure 7-1 shows an example of a codec source
that’s been configured as a Livewire Source Input with a
network Primary Source. In this example, the Livewire
Channel Number of that source is 1037 and it is coming from an Axia node named AES-103. The source has
a designation of CODEC_1 on that node. Everything
else in the configuration of the Source Profile is exactly
the same as if that codec was connected directly to the
QOR.32.
In summary, your iQ console sources inputs may be
Figure 7-2: Livewire Outputs
configured from any of the rear panel connectors (4 x
microphone, 16 stereo analog, 2 x AES) or from as many
as 12 incoming Livewire network sources for a total of
up to 34 sources. These network sources may be redefined at any time, facilitating a highly flexible system!
Outputs
The Output configuration of your iQ has two sections: one for Local Outputs (rear panel connectors)
and one for Livewire Outputs. As you might expect, the
Local Outputs are usually configured for feeds to in-studio devices like CR Monitors, headphone amplifiers, etc.
The Livewire Outputs consist of four streams from
your iQ that you wish to deliver to your Livewire network. These four streams will be available to other devices and users on your network.
The following parameters are configured for each of
the four Livewire Outputs:
• Output : Specifies the audio feed to be delivered to
the network on each of the four Livewire channels.
Selections include:
©2011 Axia Audio
phones. In these cases, select the local source to which
you wish to map the GPIO port by using the Logic For
drop down box.
Sometimes, however, you may wish to use GPIO
logic that is associated with some other Livewire network audio source. In this case, you will select Livewire
from the Logic For drop-down. You may then enter
the Livewire channel number directly or by using the
Livewire button on the right side of the screen. When
you click on this button, a pop-up prompts you to select a
Livewire channel from your network; the GPIO port will
then become the logic interface for that Livewire source.
»» Any of the local inputs: 4 microphone, 16 stereo
line or 2 digital AES inputs.
»» Any internal generated iQ sources including
PGM-1, 2, 3 or 4, Record, CR Monitor, CR
Headphones, Preview, Talk to CR, Talk to External, Studio Guest HP, Studio Monitor, Studio Talent HP, and Auto Backfeed.
»» VMix or VMode outputs.
• Name Override: Allows you to specify a name
(16 characters maximum) that will describe this iQ
source to network users. This field will override the
source name specified in the local Source Profile.
• Channel: The Livewire channel designation. Specify a unique channel number between 1 and 32,767
that will be used by the Livewire network to identify
your iQ’s network audio.
• Mode: Enables and chooses the stream priority for
this channel. Options are:
»» Disabled - the channel is off.
»» Live Stereo - Choose this when the audio output
contains live voices or other high-priority audio.
»» Standard Stereo - Choose when the audio output consists of pre-recorded music or programming.
GPIO
The QOR.32 has eight physical GPIO ports presented on DB-15 connectors. Often, these ports are associated with local sources for logic control of devices such as
CD players or for external on/off control of your micro-
Networking
To deploy iQ in a network setting, you will interconnect the Ethernet switch built into your QOR.32 with
other QOR.32s, or to external Ethernet switches.
The QOR has a zero-configuration, built-for-broadcast network switch. It does not require any configuration in order to connect it with other Livewire studios.
If you’re connecting it to another QOR in “daisy-chain”
mode, simply use CAT-6 Ethernet cable to connect one
of the Gigabit ports to a Gigabit port on the other QOR.
If you’re connecting it to a larger network’s core switch,
connect one of the Gigabit QOR ports to a properly configured and approved Core switch.
As a point of clarification, the QOR’s Ethernet switch
differs from an off-the-shelf network “core” switch in
the following ways: The Ethernet switch in a QOR.32 is
always at the “edge” of a large Livewire network. In IT
parlance, this type of switch is actually referred to as an
“edge” switch.
IT Note: If your system employs an Ethernet
core switch, the Ethernet core switch must have
an IP address numerically lower than any of
your iQ units or Ethernet edge switches. This
function of the IGMP standard ensures that the
multicast querier is handled by the core switch
if one exists. The querier function will be passed
off transparently to another switch should the
core switch fail or be disconnected.
©2011 Axia Audio
Chapter 7: Networking with iQ • 65
Figure 7-3: GPIO
Mimicking nature,
streams combine to form anew
Chapter 7: Networking with iQ • 66
many become one.
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix A: iQ Specifications
Crosstalk Isolation, Stereo Separation and CMRR
Microphone Preamplifiers
Analog Line channel to channel isolation: 90 dB isolation
minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone channel to channel isolation: 80 dB isolation
minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Stereo separation: 85 dB isolation minimum,
20Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Input CMRR: >50 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone Input CMRR: >50 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Source Impedance: 150 ohms
Input Impedance: 4 k ohms minimum, balanced
Nominal Level Range: Adjustable, -75 dBu to -20 dBu
Input Headroom: >20 dB above nominal input
Output Level: +4 dBu, nominal
Analog Line Inputs
Input Impedance: 20 k Ohms
Nominal Level Range: Selectable, +4 dBu or -10dBv
Input Headroom: 20 dB above nominal input
Audio Processing
Mic Equalizer (applicable to up to 6 faders)
Frequency Bands: 20Hz to 320Hz, 125Hz to 2KHz, 1.25KHz
to 20KHz.
Cut/Boost range on each band: -25dB to +15dB.
Q-factor: Automatic - bandwidth varies based on amount of
cut or boost.
Analog Line Outputs
Output Source Impedance: <50 ohms balanced
Output Load Impedance: 600 ohms, minimum
Nominal Output Level: +4 dBu
Maximum Output Level: +24 dBu
Power Supply AC Input, QOR.32 with iQ Console
Digital Audio Inputs and Outputs
Reference Level: +4 dBu (-20 dB FSD)
Impedance: 110 Ohm, balanced (XLR)
Signal Format: AES-3 (AES/EBU)
AES-3 Input Compliance: 24-bit with selectable sample
rate conversion, 20 kHz to 216kHz input sample rate
capable.
AES-3 Output Compliance: 24-bit
Digital Reference: Internal (network timebase) or external
reference 48 kHz, +/- 2 ppm
Internal Sampling Rate: 48 kHz
Output Sample Rate: 48 kHz
A/D Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
D/A Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
Latency <3 ms, mic in to monitor out, including network
and processor loop
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 100 Watts
Operating Temperatures
-10 degrees C to +40 degrees C, <90% humidity, no condensation
Dimensions (HxWxD) and Weight
QOR.32: 7 x 19 x 15 inches (4RU), 15 pounds
See the figures that follow for detailed dimensions of iQ
frames.
Frequency Response
Any input to any output: +0.5 / -0.5 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Input to Analog Output: 102 dB referenced to 0
dBFS, 105 dB “A” weighted to 0 dBFS
Analog Input to Digital Output: 105 dB referenced to 0
dBFS
Digital Input to Analog Output: 103 dB referenced to 0
dBFS, 106 dB “A” weighted
Digital Input to Digital Output: 125 dB
Equivalent Input Noise
Microphone Preamp: -128 dBu, 150 ohm source, reference
-50 dBu input level
Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise
Mic Pre Input to Analog Line Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -38
dBu input, +18 dBu output
Analog Input to Analog Output: <0.008%, 1 kHz, +18 dBu
input, +18 dBu output
Digital Input to Digital Output: <0.0003%, 1 kHz, -20 dBFS
Digital Input to Analog Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -6 dBFS
input, +18 dBu output
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix A: Specifications • 67
Dynamic Range
Table of Inputs and Outputs
Main Outputs
Type
Comments
Program 1
Stereo
Main stereo bus (Usually referred to as Program)
Program 2
Stereo
Second stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Audition)
Program 3
Stereo
Third stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Utility)
Program 4
Stereo
Fourth stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Auxiliary)
Program 4 Record
Stereo
Fourth stereo bus variation (post fader, pre on/off)
Program 4 Phone
(internal bus only)
Stereo
Fourth stereo bus variation (pre fader, pre on/off)
V-Mixer
Stereo
Stereo Submix - sum of five stereo sources
V-Mode
Stereo
Used for processing MONO sources and creation of MONO streams
Monitor-related Outputs
Type
Comments
CR Monitor
Stereo
Control room monitor speakers, source and level controlled by Monitor 1 control
CR Headphone
Stereo
Control room (board op) headphone, source and level controlled by headphone
control
Studio Monitor
Stereo
Studio monitor speakers, source and level controlled by Studio Monitor control
Studio Headphone Talent
Stereo
Studio (talent) headphones, source same as main, fixed level output, with
talkback
Studio Headphone Guest
Stereo
Studio (guest) headphones, source same as main, fixed level output, no talkback
Preview
Stereo
Allows the connection and level control of external powered speakers.
Talk to External
Mono
Allows board operator mic to talk to other devices, a logic command is associated
Talk to CR Audio
Mono
Allows the Talk to CR audio mix to drive an external destination
Monitor-related Inputs
Type
Comments
External Preview Input
Stereo
Allows an external path into the preview speakers, a logic command is associated
External Monitor Input 1
Stereo
Allows an external source to be monitored by CR or studio selectors
External Monitor Input 2
Stereo
Allows an external source to be monitored by CR or studio selectors
Appendix A: Specifications • 68
Source Inputs
Type
Comments
Microphone Input n
Mono
Typical installations have 2 microphone sources per studio
Analog Line Input n
Stereo
Typical installations have 4-8 analog line sources per studio
Digital Line Input n
Stereo
Typical installations have 2-4 digital line sources per studio
Source-related Outputs
Type
Comments
Feed-to-Source A n
Mono
Mono mix-minus output feeds the left side of a stereo connection. “Talk to...”
function enabled.
Feed-to-Source B n
Mono
Mono mix-minus output feeds the right side of a stereo connection. “Talk to...”
function disabled.
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ Main Frame (8 faders + monitor controls)
4.38
(111,175)
20.45
(519,331)
Appendix A: Specifications • 69
19.01
(482,881)
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ Telco expansion frame (6 faders + call controller)
17.25
(438,051)
2.91
(73,963)
Appendix A: Specifications • 70
18.20
(462,376)
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ button expansion frame (6 faders + programmable keys)
17.25
(438,051)
2.91
(73,989)
Appendix A: Specifications • 71
18.20
(462,376)
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ 8-Fader expansion frame
17.25
(438,051)
2.91
(73,989)
Appendix A: Specifications • 72
18.20
(462,376)
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix B:
OPERATOR
MICROPHONE
SOURCE
MUTE
FADER
iQ Block Diagrams
POST
FADER
PAN
PREVIEW
Σ PREVIEW
PRE
FADER
ON
PGM.1
Σ PROGRAM 1
PGM.2
Σ PROGRAM 2
PGM.3
Σ PROGRAM 3
PGM.4
RECORD
PHONE
Σ PROGRAM 4
MODE
Σ PHONE
TALK TO X
Σ TALK TO X
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-1 Block Diagram - Operator Microphone
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 73
Σ RECORD
STEREO
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
iQ Block Diagrams
STUDIO GUEST
MICROPHONE
SOURCE
MUTE
FADER
POST
FADER
PAN
PREVIEW
Σ PREVIEW
PRE
FADER
ON
PGM.1
Σ PROGRAM 1
PGM.2
Σ PROGRAM 2
PGM.3
Σ PROGRAM 3
PGM.4
RECORD
PHONE
Σ PROGRAM 4
MODE
Σ RECORD
STEREO
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
Σ PHONE
TALK TO X
Σ TALK TO X
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 74
TALK TO CR
Σ TALK TO CR
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-2 Block Diagram - Guest Microphone
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ Block Diagrams
LINE
SOURCE
MODE
MUTE
FADER
POST
FADER
PAN
PREVIEW
Σ PREVIEW
STEREO
LEFT
RIGHT
SUM L+R
PRE
FADER
ON
PGM.1
Σ PROGRAM 1
PGM.2
Σ PROGRAM 2
PGM.3
Σ PROGRAM 3
PGM.4
RECORD
PHONE
Σ PROGRAM 4
MODE
Σ RECORD
STEREO
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
JOIN TALK TO X
Σ TALK TO X
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-3 Block Diagram - Line Source
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 75
Σ PHONE
iQ Block Diagrams
MODE
PHONE
SOURCE
MUTE
FADER
POST
FADER
PAN
PREVIEW
Σ PREVIEW
STEREO
LEFT
RIGHT
SUM L+R
PRE
FADER
ON
PGM.1
Σ PROGRAM 1
PGM.2
Σ PROGRAM 2
PGM.3
Σ PROGRAM 3
PGM.4
RECORD
PHONE
Σ PROGRAM 4
MODE
Σ RECORD
STEREO
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
Σ PHONE
JOIN TALK TO X
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 76
Σ TALK TO X
FEED TO
PHONE
SOURCE
MODE
TALK
PGM 1
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
TALK TO BOTH
PGM 2
DIM
PGM 3
PGM 4
PGM 1 MIX
PGM 2 MIX
PGM 3 MIX
PGM 4 MIX
PHONE
PHONE MIX
TALK TO X MIX
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-4 Block Diagram - Phone Source
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ Block Diagrams
MODE
CODEC
SOURCE
MUTE
FADER
POST
FADER
PAN
PREVIEW
Σ PREVIEW
STEREO
LEFT
RIGHT
SUM L+R
PRE
FADER
ON
PGM.1
Σ PROGRAM 1
PGM.2
Σ PROGRAM 2
PGM.3
Σ PROGRAM 3
PGM.4
RECORD
PHONE
Σ PROGRAM 4
MODE
Σ RECORD
STEREO
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
Σ PHONE
JOIN TALK TO X
Σ TALK TO X
TALK TO CR
FEED TO
CODEC
SOURCE
MODE
TALK
PGM 1
SUM TO LEFT
SUM TO RIGHT
TALK LEFT ONLY
PGM 2
DIM
PGM 3
PGM 4
PGM 1 MIX
PGM 2 MIX
PGM 3 MIX
PGM 4 MIX
PHONE
PHONE MIX
TALK TO X MIX
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-5 Block Diagram - Codec Source
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 77
Σ TALK TO CR
iQ Block Diagrams
∑
PGM 1
PGM 1 OUTPUT
PGM 1 METER
(STEREO)
PGM 1 MIX
∑
PGM 2
PGM 2 OUTPUT
PGM 2 METER
(STEREO)
PGM 2 MIX
∑
PGM 3
PGM 3 OUTPUT
PGM 3 METER
(STEREO)
PGM 3 MIX
FOLLOW
MONITOR
MONITOR
METER
∑
PGM 4
PGM 4 OUTPUT
(STEREO)
PGM 4 MIX
∑
RECORD
RECORD OUTPUT
(STEREO)
RECORD MIX
∑
PHONE
PHONE MIX
INPUT 1
FADER 1
INPUT 2
FADER 2
INPUT 3
FADER 3
INPUT 4
FADER 4
INPUT 5
FADER 5
VMIX
MASTER
VMIX1 IN 1
VMIX OUTPUT
(STEREO)
VMIX1 IN 2
VMIX1 IN 3
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 78
VMIX1 IN 4
VMIX1 IN 5
PGM 1
PGM 1 MIX
PGM 2
PGM 2 MIX
PGM 3
PGM 3 MIX
MODE
PGM 4
VMODE OUTPUT
PGM 4 MIX
VMIX
VMIX
Revised: January 2010
Pass Stereo
Mono sum to left only
Mono sum to right only
Combine from left and right
Figure B-6 Block Diagram - Master Output
©2011 Axia Audio
iQ Block Diagrams
DIM
CR MON
CR MON
VOLUME
CR: PGM1
STU: PGM1
CR: PGM2
STU: PGM2
CR: PGM3
STU: PGM3
MUTE
CR MON
CR MONITOR
OUTPUT
DIM LEVEL
PREVIEW
IN CR MON
PGM 1 MIX
PGM 2 MIX
DIM
CR HP
PGM 3 MIX
CR: PGM4
DIM LEVEL
STU: PGM4
CR HP
VOLUME
CR HEADPHONE
OUTPUT
PREVIEW
IN CR HP
PGM 4 MIX
TALK
TO CR
CR: EXT1
STU: EXT1
CR: EXT2
STU: EXT2
EXTERNAL 1
PREVIEW
ACTIVE
MONITOR METER
EXTERNAL 2
TALK
TO CR
PREVIEW
EXTERNAL
PREVIEW IN
MUTE
PREVIEW
PREVIEW
OUTPUT
TALK
LEVEL
EXT PREVIEW
∑
PREVIEW
VOLUME
TALK TO
CR OUTPUT
TALK TO CR
STUDIO GUEST
H/P OUTPUT
DIM
STUDIO
TALK TO
STUDIO
STUDIO
VOLUME
MUTE
STUDIO
STUDIO MON
OUTPUT
DIM LEVEL
STUDIO TALENT
H/P OUTPUT
TALK TO X MIX
TALK TO EXTERNAL
∑ TALK TO X
Revised: January 2010
Figure B-7 Block Diagram - Monitor Output
©2011 Axia Audio
TALK TO
EXT OUT
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 79
∑
The cup steams, sweet scent
wafting lightly in the air.
Appendix B: Block DIagrams • 80
Mmmmm... it is Earl Grey.
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix C:
Channel / IP Worksheets
The scalable nature of Axia Livewire audio networks makes it possible to construct systems of any size - from a
single room to an entire multi-studio facility.
Since Livewire components – Audio Nodes, Elements, StudioEngines, PowerStation, iQ, etc. – are connected with
Ethernet, each one requires a unique IP (Internet Protocol) address. IP addresses are four bytes long and are written
in “dotted decimal” form, with each byte represented decimally and separated by a period. For example, in the IP
address 193.32.216.9, the 193 is the value for the first byte, 32 for the second, etc. Since a byte can hold values from
0 to 255, this is the range for each decimal value. If you run a public network, Host IP addresses are assigned to your
organization by your internet service provider and parceled out to individual host computers by your network administrator. He may give you this number to be entered manually, or could opt for DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol) to let your computer get the address automatically from a pool. Because Livewire devices are permanently
attached and because it is more desirable to know the IP address attached to a particular node (and perhaps assign
them in some kind of logical pattern), we do not support DHCP for our hardware nodes. Therefore, you will need to
enter an IP address into each node.
Livewire systems can support over 10,000 channels of audio; this necessitates giving each audio source or destination its own unique identifier, called Channel ID numbers.
As you can imagine, keeping track of so many unique IP addresses and Channel ID numbers is a big job. Therefore, on the next few pages, we’ve provided you with worksheets that you can use to keep track of the numbers you’ve
assigned.
For a more detailed explanation of IP addresses, subnet masks and related issues, we highly suggest that you refer
to “Network Engineering For Audio Engineers”, Chapter 8 of our Introduction to Livewire: IP Audio System Design
Reference and Primer.
©2011 Axia Audio
Appendix D: Worksheets • 81
A logical convention that is often followed will link the Livewire channel number to the last octet of the device IP
address. For example, if a node has an IP address of 192.168.1.12, the channel numbers assigned to the 8 sources of
that node might be 1201 through 1208.
Axia IP Address Assignment Worksheet
Appendix D: Worksheets • 82
IP Address
Device Name
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Location
©2011 Axia Audio
Notes
Axia Audio Channel Assignment Worksheet - SOURCES
Device Name
Device Location
Notes
Appendix D: Worksheets • 83
Channel ID Number
©2011 Axia Audio
Axia Audio Channel Assignment Worksheet - DESTINATIONS
Device Name
Device Location
Appendix D: Worksheets • 84
Channel ID Number
©2011 Axia Audio
Notes
Warranty
Axia Audio Limited Warranty
This Warranty covers “the Products,” which are defined as the various audio equipment, parts, software and accessories manufactured, sold and/or distributed by TLS Corp., d/b/a Axia Audio (hereinafter “Axia Audio”).
With the exception of software-only items, the Products are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of five (5) years from the date of receipt by the end-user. Software-only items are warranted to be
free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of 90 days from the date of receipt by the end-user.
This warranty is void if the Product is subject to Acts of God, including (without limitation) lightning; improper
installation or misuse, including (without limitation) the failure to use telephone and power line surge protection devices; accident; neglect or damage.
EXCEPT FOR THE ABOVE-STATED WARRANTY, AXIA AUDIO MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS
OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE).
In no event will Axia Audio, its employees, agents or authorized dealers be liable for incidental or consequential
damages, or for loss, damage, or expense directly or indirectly arising from the use of any Product or the inability to
use any Product either separately or in combination with other equipment or materials, or from any other cause.
In order to invoke this Warranty, notice of a warranty claim must be received by Axia Audio within the above-stated
warranty period and warranty coverage must be authorized by Axia Audio. If Axia Audio authorizes the performance
of warranty service, the defective Product must be delivered, shipping prepaid, to: Axia Audio, 1241 Superior Avenue,
Cleveland, Ohio 44114.
Axia Audio at its option will either repair or replace the Product and such action shall be the full extent of Axia
Audio’s obligation under this Warranty. After the Product is repaired or replaced, Axia Audio will return it to the party
that sent the Product and Axia Audio will pay for the cost of shipping.
Axia Audio’s products are to be used with registered protective interface devices which satisfy regulatory requirements in their country of use.
©2011 Axia Audio
Warranty • 85
Axia Audio’s authorized dealers are not authorized to assume for Axia Audio any additional obligations or liabilities in connection with the dealers’ sale of the Products.
Axia Audio, a Telos Company • 1241 Superior Ave. • Cleveland, Ohio, 44114, USA • +1.216.241.7225 • www.AxiaAudio.com
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