VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide

VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile
User Guide
Version 1.19
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Copyright © Red Hen Systems
September 2015
VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
Version 1.19
Copyright and Trademarks
VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
©2015 Red Hen Systems, LLC All rights reserved.
First Edition.
This material may not be reproduced or transmitted in whole or in part without the written permission
of Red Hen Systems, 145B W. Swallow Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525.
Trademark Notices
VMS-333 Video Mapping System™, VMS-Mobile, MediaMapper®, MediaMapper ELITE®, EZdiff™,
RHVoice are trademarks of Red Hen Systems, LLC.
All other trademarks listed in this document are the property of their respective owners.
Visit Red Hen Systems on the World Wide Web at www.redhensystems.com
Technical Support
Availability: Monday through Friday during business hours
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 970-493-3952
Feedback
Please email your comments and suggestions about the VMS-333 and documentation to:
[email protected]
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VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
Version 1.19
FCC Notice
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against
harmful interference in a residential installation.
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However,
there is no guarantee interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment causes
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the
equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the
following measures:

Re-orient or relocate the receiving antenna.

Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.

Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.

Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
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VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
Version 1.19
Table of Contents
Preface ....................................................................................................................................7
Who is this guide for? ............................................................................................................................... 7
Why read this guide? ................................................................................................................................ 7
How is this guide organized? .................................................................................................................... 7
What’s New? ............................................................................................................................................ 7
Section 1. Introducing the VMS-333..........................................................................................8
1.1 What is VMS-333 and what does it do? ............................................................................................. 8
1.2 What is VMS-Mobile? ......................................................................................................................... 9
1.3 Why use VMS-333 and VMS-Mobile? ................................................................................................ 9
Section 2. Understanding the Equipment .................................................................................. 10
2.1 Equipment Handling ......................................................................................................................... 10
2.2 Parts Inventory ................................................................................................................................. 10
Hardware ............................................................................................................................................ 10
Software .............................................................................................................................................. 12
GIS ....................................................................................................................................................... 12
2.3 Parts Diagrams .................................................................................................................................. 13
Primary Parts ....................................................................................................................................... 13
Cables .................................................................................................................................................. 13
Adapters and Power............................................................................................................................ 14
Accessories .......................................................................................................................................... 15
3. Getting to Know the Controls and Connectors ....................................................................... 16
3.1 Identify the VMS-333 components .................................................................................................. 16
Side ...................................................................................................................................................... 17
Bottom ................................................................................................................................................ 18
3.2 NanoFLASH ....................................................................................................................................... 19
Front .................................................................................................................................................... 19
4. Setting Up Your GPS Receiver ............................................................................................... 20
4. 1 Wired (GPS unit shipped with VMS-333)......................................................................................... 20
4.2 Wired (GPS unit in aircraft)............................................................................................................... 20
4.3 Unwired (Bluetooth) ......................................................................................................................... 20
5. Setting up the VMS-333 ........................................................................................................ 21
5.1 Connect the VMS-333....................................................................................................................... 21
Scenario 1: Connect VMS-333 to video camera and feature trigger .................................................. 22
Scenario 2: Connect VMS-333 to DSLR still camera ............................................................................ 23
Scenario 3: Connect flash feedback cable to the DSLR camera PC connector ................................... 25
Scenario 4: Connect VMS-333 to DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder ............................................ 26
Scenario 5: Connect VMS-333 to Video Camera and Boreal Laser ..................................................... 27
Scenario 6: Hook the VMS-333 to the NanoFLASH ............................................................................. 28
5.2 Review hookup details: Step-by-step ............................................................................................... 29
5.3 Test your setup ................................................................................................................................. 32
6.0 Using the VMS-333 with Video Recorders ........................................................................... 35
6.1 Turn on the device and record what you see while traveling. ......................................................... 35
6.2 Adjust the speaker volume ............................................................................................................... 35
6.3 Adjust the headphone volume ......................................................................................................... 35
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6.4 Use the feature trigger to mark features of interest........................................................................ 35
6.5 Make an audio note.......................................................................................................................... 35
6.6 Upload recorded data to the computer. .......................................................................................... 36
6.7 View your recorded data .................................................................................................................. 36
6.8 Pay attention to indicators ............................................................................................................... 36
Light indicators (LEDs) ......................................................................................................................... 36
Audio indicators .................................................................................................................................. 37
7.0 Using an Android Device with the VMS-333 and DSLR Cameras ........................................... 38
7.1 Connect the Android device to the VMS-333 ................................................................................... 38
7.2 Optional: Connect the Android device directly to a Nikon DSLR camera......................................... 38
7.3 Start up VMS-Mobile and examine the home screen ...................................................................... 39
7.4 Upload new firmware to the VMS-333 ............................................................................................ 41
7.4 Load the offline map you want to access from VMS-Mobile ........................................................... 42
7.5 Work with offline maps .................................................................................................................... 46
7.6 Load KML files ................................................................................................................................... 47
7.7 Mark individual features of interest and continuous conditions/features ...................................... 52
7.8 Load a feature definition file ............................................................................................................ 55
7.9 Edit a feature definition file .............................................................................................................. 57
7.10 About feature definition files ......................................................................................................... 60
Feature Definition File Details............................................................................................................. 61
7.11 Control the way feature triggers behave ....................................................................................... 65
7.12 Determine if the camera is running properly ................................................................................. 68
7.13 Control the behavior of an external DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder................................... 68
7.14 Configure VMS-333 parameters ..................................................................................................... 70
7.15 Set intervalometry parameters ...................................................................................................... 71
7.16 Set Laser Range Finder parameters ................................................................................................ 75
7.17 Configure VMS-333 data ................................................................................................................ 76
7.18 Configure VMS-333 buttons ........................................................................................................... 79
7.19 Exit and stop background services ................................................................................................. 79
7.20 Get familiar with the VMS-Mobile folder structure ....................................................................... 79
8. Using the Laser Range Finder ................................................................................................ 80
8.1 Introducing the LRF .......................................................................................................................... 80
8.2 LRF Operating Procedure.................................................................................................................. 81
8.3 Making Sure Everything is Working .................................................................................................. 83
9.0 Troubleshooting ................................................................................................................. 85
9.1 Prevent Problems ............................................................................................................................. 85
9.2 Resolve Problems ............................................................................................................................. 85
9.3 Red Hen Systems Support Team ...................................................................................................... 86
Appendix A. Quick Reference for VMS-Mobile Screens ............................................................. 87
Home ...................................................................................................................................................... 87
Home > Control Camera ......................................................................................................................... 87
Home > Android menu ........................................................................................................................... 87
Home > Mark Features (example) .......................................................................................................... 88
Home > Mark Features > Android menu ................................................................................................ 88
Home > Mark Features > Android menu > Load Feature Definitions .................................................... 88
Home > Configure................................................................................................................................... 89
Home > Configure > Feature Definitions ................................................................................................ 89
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Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Load .................................................................................... 89
Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Edit ...................................................................................... 90
Home > Configure > Data ....................................................................................................................... 91
Home > Configure > Data (long press): Advanced section at top .......................................................... 91
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers..................................................................................................... 92
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers > Internal Feature Trigger .......................................................... 92
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers > External Feature Trigger .......................................................... 92
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers > DMRT Feature Trigger ............................................................. 93
Home > Configure > Offline Maps > Android menu ............................................................................... 93
Home > Configure > Parameters ............................................................................................................ 93
Home > Configure > Parameters > Intervalometry Mode > Time .......................................................... 93
Home > Configure > Parameters > Intervalometry Mode > Distance .................................................... 93
Home > Configure > Parameters > Intervalometry Mode > Field of View ............................................. 93
Home > Configure > Load KML ............................................................................................................... 94
Appendix C. Pin-out Diagrams .................................................................................................. 95
C.1 Connectors on VMS-333 ................................................................................................................... 95
FT ......................................................................................................................................................... 95
GPS ...................................................................................................................................................... 95
PWR ..................................................................................................................................................... 95
COM .................................................................................................................................................... 95
Appendix D. External GPS Receivers ......................................................................................... 96
D.1 NMEA 0183 Version 2.0 Interface .................................................................................................... 96
D.2 Trimble GPS Receivers...................................................................................................................... 96
GGA. Global Positioning System Fix Data ........................................................................................... 97
RMC. Recommended Maximum Specific GNSS Data.......................................................................... 98
Appendix E. VMS-333 Warranty ............................................................................................... 99
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Preface
Who is this guide for?
This User Guide is for anyone who will be installing or using the VMS-333 and VMS-Mobile Android
application. If you are reading this, you are probably one of the following types of people:
 Pilots with or without GIS and photography skills. You may even be a member of the Professional
Aeronautic Photography Association.
 Vehicle drivers or vessel pilots with or without GIS or photography skills.
 Operators who are skilled with GIS equipment and cameras (these individuals usually install and
maintain the VMS-333 equipment).
Why read this guide?
This guide provides you with step-by-step instructions for setting up your equipment, as well as
capturing geotagged media, and transferring it to your computer for examination.
How is this guide organized?


This manual is organized for ease-of-use to make things easy to find and read. This means it starts
with a basic introduction and lets you know what’s new since the previous release. Then it moves to
the basics (what you get with the product and how to recognize its parts), proceeds with
instructions for connecting everything, and then moves into using the VMS-333 and the VMS-Mobile
Android application. It even has a short trouble-shooting section to help you deal with any problems
you might encounter.
For those of you who prefer technical details, check out the appendices. There you can review pinout diagrams of connectors.
What’s New?
If you’re someone who’s been using VMS-333 for a while, you’ll probably be interested in
what’s new.
New to VMS-333
 3-button Feature Trigger. VMS-333 now supports a 3-button feature trigger device. This device is
similar to the single-button feature trigger cable except that it lets you mark 3 distinct feature codes
instead of just one. See: External feature trigger three-button cable.
 DMRT. Red Hen Systems has developed a Digital Mapping Reconnaissance Toolkit that combines the
VMS-333 with a Laser Range Finder, DSLR Camera, and GPS unit all in one framework. We mention it
throughout this User Guide whenever an instruction applies specifically to the DMRT.
New to VMS-Mobile

Feature Trigger Definition File and User-defined Buttons. VMS-Mobile now supports custom, userdefined feature trigger button definitions. Edit a custom feature definition file (*.txt) to define up to
12 on-screen feature trigger buttons. Button labels can be text, numbers, or icons. With the touch of
a button, mark a single unique feature, or mark an ongoing feature or condition. View the resulting
.kmz file in Google Earth or isWhere. The the unique features appear as icons and the ongoing
features appear as colored track lines. See: Mark individual features of interest and continuous
conditions/features.
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Section 1. Introducing the VMS-333
1.1 What is VMS-333 and what does it do?
When it comes to right-of-way patrol, whether you are flying over power lines, boating along the coast,
or driving along a railroad line, the VMS-333 is the ideal device for geotagging audio and video data in
real time.
With VMS-333, you can capture both what you see, via an off-the-shelf camcorder, video recorder, or
Nikon DSLR camera (with a memory card or hard drive), and what you say, via a headset and
microphone. You can even take still photos of points of interest and make audio notes about them, if
necessary. The VMS-333 automatically geo-tags the captured data with location and time information,
using a GPS receiver.
VMS-333 works with various types of GPS receivers from hardwired external (NMEA) units to wireless
Bluetooth GPS devices. The GPS unit supplied with the VMS-333 is a wired “puck” style receiver
powered by the VMS-333 through a single cable. It also includes a magnetic mount for easy attachment
to the outside of the vehicle.
When connected to a Nikon DSLR camera, the VMS-333 acts as an intervalometer that controls how
often, how long, and how many shots are taken to create a collection of continuous corridor image
strips. It provides three modes of intervalometry functions:
 Time. Triggers camera shots at specific time intervals.
 Distance. Triggers camera shots at specific distances as measured by GPS.
 Field of View. Triggers aerial camera shots that take in a specific coverage. For example, as altitude
decreases, more shots are taken, and as altitude increases, less shots are taken.
Note: Because the VMS-333 includes a Bluetooth wireless communications channel, you use an Android
tablet running the VMS-Mobile application to set the parameters associated with intervalometry and
camera control.
The GPS data and other metadata are encapsulated in the media files containing the captured audio and
video data. These data files are stored on the hard drive or memory card of the video recorder. You can
then transfer this data to your personal computer and display the results on a map through
MediaMapper. All you need to do is select any video trail on the map to watch the video or click any
marked point of interest on the map to view its associated still photo or listen to its audio notes.
This information can be very useful in corridor management of pipeline and electric transmission right of
ways. It is also beneficial in managing riparian areas along rivers and streams and other types of
corridors, both natural and man-made.
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1.2 What is VMS-Mobile?
VMS-Mobile is an Android application that allows you to control the behavior of the VMS-333 and any
DSLR camera connected to it, as well as download and view maps.
1.3 Why use VMS-333 and VMS-Mobile?

The VMS-333 benefits a wide variety of industries that do right-of-way patrol over highways, gas and
oil pipelines, transmission lines, shorelines, and rivers. You may want to use it because:

Compact, light, and mobile solution that can record more than 7 hours of video.

Expandable—you can connect up to four audio capable recording devices.

Accurate, easy to set up and operate, producing compliant content that is easy to review.
For ease of use, VMS-Mobile allows you to control the VMS-333 and DSLR camera without being
physically connected to it.
Note: If you purchased the Red Hen VMS HD-II, you also got a DVR called a NanoFLASH. You can connect
the VMS-333 to up to four NanoFLASH units.
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Section 2. Understanding the Equipment
This section deals with making sure you have all the parts you need before you get started.
2.1 Equipment Handling
It’s important to take care of the equipment you have purchased. Here are some things you should be
aware of.
VMS-333 hardware is designed to be rugged for portable use; however, it is not a
sealed unit and you should take care to protect the sensitive connectors and
electronic components.
If you use VMS-333 with 120 VAC power, use ONLY the adapter supplied with VMS333. Other models may specify 7-16 VDC output, but those may allow power surges
that will damage the hardware.
Make sure the power switch is in the OFF position when connecting to an external
power source.
2.2 Parts Inventory
This section identifies all the parts you need to properly operate the VMS-333. Photos of each part
appear in Section 2.3 Parts Diagrams.
Hardware
This is the hardware you must have in place to operate the VMS-333. (NA = not applicable)
Item
Notes
Primary parts
Red Hen Systems VMS-333 GPS hardware
Required, included
GPS receiver (wired or wireless)
Required, included
16 GB memory card
included if you purchased the Red Hen VMS
HD-II
Convergent Design NanoFLASH box
included if you purchased the Red Hen VMS
HD-II
Cables
LanC (2.5mm stereo) cable
Microphone/Headphone (3.5 mm stereo)
cable
Computer serial (9-pin) cable
NA
NA
NA
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Item
Notes
Optional: Special Nikon DSLR cable that
connects the Camera PCI socket or the Camera
Flash Hot Shoe to the External Feature Trigger
cable.
Flash feedback cable
Once connected, this cable provides positive
feedback to VMS-333 that the camera has
successfully captured a photo. The feedback
appears as a large green light on the VMSMobile Home screen or on the Android LED
when Android screen is turned off
Cables continued
DC Cable with Cigarette Adapter
NA
COM Cable for Helicopter
NA
FT to Serial Cable
NA
Feature Trigger Cable
NA
Audio Cable 3.5mm Male to Male 3”
NA
Audio Cable 3.5mm Male to Male 4"
NA
Adapters and Power
Cigarette lighter adapter
included
120 VAC adapter (to convert 24V to 12V from
an external power source)
included
Battery
included, Ni-MH 4-6 hr.
Battery charger
included
Accessories
Microphone headset
Required if using voice recognition, included
with complete system bundle.
Video capture device, internal PC, external
USB, or PCMCIA
Required for video capture or onscreen review,
included with complete system bundle.
Digital compass
Cameras and monitors
Optional accessory, order separately
NA
Camera (still or video, hi-def or regular)
NA
Monitor
NA
Video cable converter
Connect between camera and monitor, if
needed.
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Software
If you plan to display the videos and photos collected with VMS-333 on a map, you need Red Hen
MediaMapper, which is NOT included with VMS-333.
Item
Description
Operating system
Windows XP, Windows 7 Professional and above
Red Hen MediaMapper
Version 5.3
Red Hen MediaGeotagger
Geo-tag a video with an accompanying GPS log file
Red Hen VMS-Mobile
Set parameters that control intervalometry, data sent to digital
camera, feature triggers, digital camera behavior, and more.
GIS
When you use Red Hen MediaMapper, you need to load various map layers, some of which are included
with MediaMapper, but others are not.
Item
Description
Base layer
Default layers that come with MediaMapper include counties
and U.S. streets.
Note: You might also want to add other base layers, such as
photo or topo.
Reference layer
There are no default layers. You might add layers such as
county boundaries, rivers, railroads, etc. to suit your needs. Red
Hen Systems provides a map creation service.
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2.3 Parts Diagrams
This section shows you what each part in the hardware inventory looks like for easy recognition.
Primary Parts
Red Hen Systems VMS-333 GPS hardware
GPS receiver (wired)
Cables
Computer serial (9-pin) cable
COM cable for helicopter
Flash Feedback cable
Audio cable 3.5mm male-to-male 4"
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3.5 mm male-to-male audio adapter
Feature trigger cable
LRF cable
External feature trigger three-button cable
Adapters and Power
Cigarette power adapters
Wall 120 V wall adapters
Battery
Battery charger
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Accessories
USB mini-B cable
Cameras: still or video (high-def or standard)



Video camera-to-video recorder cable
Your camera may use an SDI cable.
The camera is not included in the VMS-333 Kit
The ends of this cable are keyed, which means they have a notch in them to ensure
they are only connected in a certain manner. Take care NOT to force a
connection—this can ruin your cable or the hardware receptor, or worse, both.
Audio recorders
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VMS-333 & VMS-Mobile User Guide
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3. Getting to Know the Controls and Connectors
Now that you have all the necessary parts, we will show you how to identify the various controls and
connectors found on the VMS-333 and NanoFLASH. This will help when you later have to connect
everything to set up the VMS-333.
3.1 Identify the VMS-333 components
The VMS-333 has a variety of buttons and ports on the front and side of it, as well as some adjustable
screws on the bottom of it. There are currently two versions of labeling as shown below.
Most units use the letters A, B,
C, and D to identify the ports.
Other units use the names
FT/LRF, GPS, DSLR/PWR, and
COM.
Both names and letters are
reflected in the explanations
that follow. The names appear
in parentheses.
The following photos and lists help you recognize each button and port.

1. Audio port that connects to the external microphone port on the camera to store all VMS-333
data from the camera’s storage unit. If the camera stores the data in a format other than mpeg2 you
will have to convert the data to mpeg2 before uploading it to MediaMapper.
Note: If you have the VMS HD-II, port 1 connects to the external microphone port on the
NanoFLASH unit, where the VMS-333 data is automatically converted to mpeg2.

2. Audio port that connects to the external microphone port of a second camera or a second
NanoFLASH, if you have a VMS HD-II.

3. Audio port that connects to the external microphone port of a third camera or a third NanoFLASH,
if you have a VMS HD-II.

4. Audio port that connects to the external microphone port of a fourth camera or a fourth
NanoFLASH, if you have a VMS HD-II.

A (FT/LRF). Feature trigger port where you plug in the external feature trigger or the Laser Range
Finder. The external feature trigger is a cable with a thumb trigger you press to identify an important
feature. VMS-333 marks the location of that feature. The Laser Range Finder takes a measurement
of the distance between it and a target. Note: DMRT units also have an additional thumb trigger
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button you can configure in a similar manner to the external feature trigger button. LRF units may
also have an inline thumb trigger you press to fire the LRF.
After the mission is completed, the feature and target locations show up as special icons on the map
in isWhere, and in the KMZ file generated by VMS-Mobile (for viewing in desktop Google Earth).
Additionally, the KMZ file produced by VMS-Mobile can also be viewed in Desktop Google Earth to
feature trigger locations as well. When you click the icon, you see the still photo.
When you connect the optional Flash Feedback Cable to the External Feature trigger cable on the FT
port, the camera’s flash signal is sent from the DSLR camera to VMS-33 each time a photo is taken,
to indicate the camera is working properly. This means the camera’s battery is fine and is memory
card is not full.
When you use VMS-Mobile, its Home screen briefly displays a large green light indicating successful
flash feedback. If the VMS-Mobile Android screen is off, the Android LED will blink green indicating
successful flash feedback.

B (GPS). Port where you plug in the external GPS receiver.

C (DSLR/PWR). Port where you plug in the power supply (can handle 12-28 volts) to power the
VMS-333 unit. Alternatively, you can also use this port to connect a Nikon DSLR camera with a
10-pin connector to the VMS-333 unit.
Note: The electrical pin configuration of the DSLR/PWR and COM ports allow you to plug a Nikon
DSLR camera into the DSLR/PWR port while plugging a power supply for the VMS-333 into the COM
port.

D (COM). COM port where you plug in the pilot or operator’s headset (or power supply if you
have the Nikon camera connected). If you connect to the headset, the VMS-333 will record what
you say, as well as hear sounds associated with the feature trigger. The right audio channel
records vocal dialogue and the left audio channel records data from the VMS-333.
Side

Vol. Dial that controls the volume of the beeps that occur when you press the red Feature Trigger
button or press the cabled thumb trigger connected to the VMS-333 via the FT port.

Pwr. Power switch that turns the VMS-333 on and off. While it is on, the VMS-333 runs
continuously.
The power switch should NOT be in the On position when connecting to a power
adapter.
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
Data. Red LED Indicating the status of the data sent to the camera or computer. For details, see
section 6.8 Pay Attention to Indicators.

Gps. Blue LED Indicating the current status of the GPS fix. For details, see section 6.8 Pay Attention
to Indicators.

Note: Both the Data and GPS LEDs flash initially until VMS-333 is powered up. The red Data LED
stays on momentarily

FT. Feature trigger button that you press to manually identify an important feature. The VMS-333
marks the location of that feature. Later, this location shows up as a special icon on the map in
MediaMapper and when you click the icon, you see the associated photo.
Note. If the VMS-333 unit is nearby, you can use the FT button instead of the cabled feature trigger.
You can even use both, since each will produce a different icon on the map.
Bottom

Speaker. The item on the top left that looks like a rotary phone, outputs the status tones and clicks
emitted by the VMS-333. For details on what the sounds mean, see section 6.8 Pay Attention to
Indicators.

OutVol. Changes the volume of the GPS audio signal alerts you will hear in the headphone (turn the
screw clockwise to increase the volume; turn the screw counterclockwise to decrease the volume).

RecVol. Changes the volume of your voice as it is recorded (turn the screw clockwise to increase the
volume of your voice; turn the screw counterclockwise to decrease the volume).
Note: Additionally, you can use VMS-Mobile to set options that determine whether the hardware
should emit clicks when data is transferred. For details, see: Section 7.12 Configure VMS-333 Data
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3.2 NanoFLASH
Note: This section is only for those of you who purchased a VMS HD-II and have a NanoFLASH unit
mounted on top of the VMS-333.
Front

Microphone port. Connects to VMS microphone ports 1 to 4.

Status. Indicates the status of the NanoFLASH.

Audio port. Can be used to test the VMS-333 and NanoFLASH connection (connect this to the
headset or speaker to test).

Remote. Connects to a thumb trigger that lets you manually start and stop recording (this is useful if
the NanoFLASH box is too far away to press the red button on the side).
Note: If you have multiple NanoFLASH units, this cable should be one of multiple cables, one for
each NanoFLASH unit. Please contact the Red Hen Sales Team for a quote:
[email protected]

Power. Connects to the power source of aircraft, vessel, or vehicle. It can only handle 12 volts. If the
power source is greater than 12 volts, you must connect this to a converter that in turn connects to
the power source.

SDI/ASI Out. Connects to monitor (standard or hi-definition). Used for video playback.

HDMI – Out. Connects to hi-definition monitor. Used for video playback.

SDI/ASI In. Connects to a camera (standard or hi-definition).

HDMI – In. Connects to hi-definition camera.
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4. Setting Up Your GPS Receiver
Before you can start recording, you need to configure your GPS receiver and place it properly. There are
two types of GPS receivers, wired and unwired. The steps you follow for each are a little different.
4. 1 Wired (GPS unit shipped with VMS-333)
1. There is no need to configure the receiver; it is preconfigured.
2. Place the receiver where it is unimpeded and has a clear view of the sky. The GPS receiver’s
magnetic base may be used to keep it in place on a magnetic surface.
4.2 Wired (GPS unit in aircraft)
1. VMS-333 is compatible with most external GPS, differential, or DGPS receivers through the GPS
connector. The GPS receiver must be set to output the following:
Setting
Value
Data Type
NMEA 0183, version 2.0 or higher
Baud Rate
4800
Bits
8
Parity
none
Stop Bits
1
NMEA strings
GGA and RMC
2. Place the receiver where it is unimpeded by anything metallic, and is facing the sky. See the earlier
diagram in Section 4.1 Wired GPS Unit for details.
4.3 Unwired (Bluetooth)
1. Activate an accompanying Bluetooth GPS Receiver, such as the GlobalSat BT GPS Receiver, in close
proximity to your VMS-333.
2. Once the GPS receiver has obtained a GPS fix, the data will be forwarded to the VMS-333, via the
Bluetooth connection. A GPS fix will then automatically be established on your
VMS-333.
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5. Setting up the VMS-333
You’re almost ready to start using the VMS-333. There are just a few more tasks to complete so
everything is set up.
Note: This section does not apply if your VMS-333 is already part of a Digital Mapping Reconnaissance
ToolKit (DMRT). With the DMRT, everything has been connected for you: VMS-333, DSLR Camera, Laser
Range Finder, and GPS Unit.
5.1 Connect the VMS-333
You can connect the VMS-333 directly to several devices:

Video recorder

NanoFLASH

DSLR camera

Laser Range Finder
Your can also connect the VMS-333 External Feature Trigger cable to:

DSLR camera.
What and how you connect depends on your situation and what you are trying to accomplish. Refer to
the six scenarios that follow.
If you run into any problems, check 5.2 Review connection details for a master list of setup steps.
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Scenario 1: Connect VMS-333 to video camera and feature trigger
Note: This scenario is appropriate when you are carrying all devices in a pack, driving in a car, or are
operating on a smaller budget. You can use most handheld camcorders that have an external
microphone port; however, the camcorder’s mic input must record stereo at line level.
If you are using a video camera to capture a route you are traveling, you will most likely also use a
feature trigger to make note of important features along the way. You may also decide to take audio
notes as well. The photo below shows the typical configuration for such a scenario.
Note: The values in parentheses ( ) indicate alternative labels that may appear on your VMS-333 unit.
Video
Camera
VMS-333
Battery
Feature
Trigger
A (FT/LRF)
D (COM)
B (GPS)





GPS
Receiver
C (DSLR/PWR)
Port A (FT/LRF): Connect the external feature trigger cable to this port if you plan to make note of
features.
Port B (GPS): Connect the wired GPS receiver to this port if you are using a wired receiver.
Port C (DSLR/PWR): Connect the power supply to this port. Make sure to install a charged battery.
Port D (COM): Plug the COM cable from the pilot or operator’s headset into this port.
Port 1-4: Connect the Microphone Import port on the video camera to one of these ports.
IMPORTANT: Make sure the 3.5 mm stereo cable is connected to the Microphone Input on your
video, NOT the Headphone Output during recording.
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Scenario 2: Connect VMS-333 to DSLR still camera
This scenario is useful for capturing a series of still images. When connected to a Nikon DSLR camera,
the VMS-333 acts as an intervalometer. This means it controls how often, for how long, and how many
shots are taken to create a collection of continuous corridor image strips.
You can also configure the VMS-333 Feature Trigger button to record high-resolution images of the
points of interest. This is useful in corridor patrols to aid in detailed analysis of the subject matter. For
details on how to configure the Feature Trigger button, see section 7.7 Customize the Feature Triggers.
Note: The values in parentheses ( ) indicate alternative labels that may appear on your VMS-333 unit.
DSLR
Camera
External
Feature Trigger
VMS-333
GPS
Receiver
A (FT/LRF)
D (COM)
B (GPS)




C (DSLR/PWR)
Port A (FT/LRF): Connect the external feature trigger cable to this port if you plan to make note of
features.
Port B (GPS): Connect the wired GPS receiver to this port if you are using a wired receiver.
Port C (DSLR/PWR): Connect the Nikon DSLR to this port using a Nikon DSLR-VMS Cable with a
Nikon 10-pin connector on one end and a VMS-333 connector on the other.
Port D (COM): Connect the power supply to this port.
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Note: You can also connect the VMS-333 to the Nikon DSLR via the Red Hen Blue2Can attachment
when using the VMS-Mobile application. See the illustration below.
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Scenario 3: Connect flash feedback cable to the DSLR camera PC connector
This scenario is useful when you need to get feedback indicating the system is operating properly.
1. If you use the External Feature Trigger cable for this purpose, you cannot use it to mark features.
2. Additionally, you must configure the VMS-333 for the feedback feature to work. For details on to
configure the settings using VMS-Mobile, see section 7.8. Control the way the VMS-333 feature
triggers behave: External Feature Trigger—Flash Feedback Cable.
Note: The values in parentheses ( ) indicate alternative labels that may appear on your VMS-333
unit.
DSLR
Camera
Flash Feedback
Cable
VMS-333
GPS
Receiver
A (FT/LRF)
D (COM)
B (GPS)




C (DSLR/PWR)
Port A (FT/LRF): Connect the flash feedback cable to this port if you plan to get feedback
indicating the camera is working correctly.
Port B (GPS): Connect the wired GPS receiver to this port if you are using a wired receiver.
Port C (DSLR/PWR): Connect the Nikon DSLR to this port using a Nikon DSLR-VMS Cable with a
Nikon 10-pin connector on one end and a VMS-333 connector on the other.
Port D (COM): Connect the power supply to this port.
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Scenario 4: Connect VMS-333 to DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder
If you are using a LRF to measure distance to an object, You will most likely be using a DSLR camera to
take photos of that object. The photo below shows the typical configuration for such a scenario.
Note: If you only need to take still photos and no LRF measurements, you can remove the LRF from the
configuration.
IMPORTANT! The values in parentheses ( ) indicate alternative labels that may appear on your VMS-333
unit.
DSLR
Camera
GPS
Receiver
VMS-333
Battery
LRF
A (FT/LRF)
D (COM)
B (GPS)




C (DSLR/PWR)
Port A (FT/LRF): Connect the LRF to this port using a purpose-build cable. The small end plugs into
the front of the LRF; the other end plugs into this port.
Port B (GPS): Connect the wired GPS receiver to this port (if you are using a wired receiver)
Port C (DSLR/PWR): Connect the Nikon DSLR to this port using a Nikon DSLR-VMS Cable with a
Nikon 10-pin connector on one end and a VMS-333 connector on the other.
Port D (COM): Connect the power supply to this port.
Note: This configuration is basically the same as the Digital Mapping Reconnaissance Toolkit; the only
difference is that with the DMRT, all the equipment is held within a hand-held frame.
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Scenario 5: Connect VMS-333 to Video Camera and Boreal Laser
If you purchased the Pipe-I Kit, you will be using the VMS-333 in conjunction with the Boreal Laser to
detect fugitive gas emissions. This means you will connect the VMS-333 to the Boreal laser, via a splitter
cable. The photo below shows the typical configuration for such a scenario.
IMPORTANT! The values in parentheses ( ) indicate alternative labels that may appear on your VMS-333
unit.
Boreal Laser
Video camera
Camera
VMS-333
Battery
Central computing unit
for Boreal Laser
Power supply
Supply





Laptop
Port A (FT/LRF): Connect the Boreal splitter cable to this port (it then connects to both the Boreal
Laser and the laptop where the Boreal software resides)
Port B (GPS): Connect the wired GPS receiver to this port (if you are using a wired receiver)
Port C (DSLR/PWR): Connect the power supply to this port.
Port D (COM): Plug the COM cable from the pilot or operator’s headset into this port.
Port 1-4: Connect the video camera to one of these ports.
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Scenario 6: Hook the VMS-333 to the NanoFLASH
This scenario is useful for both Standard Definition and High Definition gyro-stabilized systems that do
not include a DVR.
1. Make sure you have properly configured (if necessary) and placed the GPS unit. For details, see
Section 4. Setting Up Your GPS Receiver
2. If the receiver is wired, connect it to the GPS port on the VMS-333. Otherwise, if the receiver is
wireless, make sure to charge its battery before traveling or connect it to a power supply.
Note: You can use more than one wireless GPS receiver if you are concerned about loss of power.
That way, if the batteries run out, another receiver will continue to operate.
3. OPTIONAL: Connect a differential receiver to the GPS connector for better accuracy, if desired. The
GPS unit supplied by Red Hen software is a differential receiver.
4. Your vehicle power supply is 24 volts, use an adapter cable to connect it to a converter that will
convert it to 12 volts. Use an adapter cable to connect the output of the converter to the Power
port on VMS-333.
Note: If you do not plan to use the aircraft, vessel, or vehicle power supply, install a charged battery.
5. Use the included 3.5 microphone cable to connect port 1 on VMS-333 to the microphone port on
the NanoFLASH. If you have more than one NanoFLASH, use the same type of cable to connect the
remaining audio ports to the remaining number of NanoFLASH devices, via their microphone ports.
6. If you plan to make audio notes, connect the microphone headset to the COM connector on the
VMS-333, using the COM adapter cable.
7. If you plan to use a cabled feature trigger to identify interesting features, plug the optional feature
trigger cable into the FT port of the VMS-333. Otherwise, make sure the VMS-333 box is close
enough that you can click the red FT button whenever you see an interesting feature.
8. If you are using a headset, plug it into the COM port of the VMS-333, using the COM adapter cable.
This allows you to make audio notes and to hear the sounds coming from the VMS-333 when it is
recording data.
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5.2 Review hookup details: Step-by-step
In case you run into problems with any of the previous scenarios, please refer to this illustrated master
list of steps.
The order of hookup is NOT important. What IS important is that you wait until everything is
connected properly BEFORE powering on the system. For example, if you connect a power
supply to the wrong port, VMS-333 will not turn on; if you plug the GPS receiver into the
wrong port, you will not get any GPS signals and will be unable to geotag the video.
Important! The external Feature Trigger and the COM hookup are NOT necessary to embed
geo-spatial data into your video.
1. Connect camera to recorder with keyed cables.


In the HD-III Kit, the camera is separate from the recorder, requiring SDI cables for connection.
Other cameras have internal recorders or use SDI cables for connection.
2. Connect the 120V converter to the recorder.
a. The most common way to hook things up is to power the recorder using an adaptor and charger
as shown in the illustration below.
Adaptor
Charger
b. It is also possible to power the recorder with a battery, but first you must charge the battery as
shown below.
c. Then run the battery-powered as shown below.
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3. Connect recorder to VMS-333 with 3.5 mm audio cable.
a. Use any of the 3.5mm jacks (Ports 1-4) on the VMS-333.
b. Make sure the cable is plugged into the Mic port of the recorder you are using.
4. If you are using the Panasonic recorder with the VMS-333, connect the 47-ohm resister to prevent
distortion. You may also have to connect the ground loop filter to prevent extra audio noise.
a. Ground loop filter
b. 47-Ohm resistor
a. Ground loop filter. Removes low-frequency noise that could be introduced into the recorder.
Plug the female end of the filter’s audio cable (input) into the VMS-333 audio port (1-4) and the
male end (output) into the Panasonic recorder.
b. 47-ohm resistor. Reduces audio distortion. The VMS-333 produces line-level input, whereas the
Panasonic recorder requires mic-level input. The resistor converts the line-level audio to miclevel audio. Without the resistor, audio distortion results. In fact, without the resistor, the
recorded video may not decode.
Plug the resistor into a VMS-333 audio port (1-4) and plug the recorder into a different audio
port. In the example, the resistor is plugged into Port 4.
Note: If you are using BOTH the resistor and the ground loop filter follow instructions in a and b.
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5. Connect feature trigger for VMS-333.
Always plug the feature trigger into Port A (FT/LRF).
6. Connect GPS to VMS-333
Always connect the GPS to Port B (GPS).
7. Connect power to VMS-333
The VMS-333 will take power from either Port C (DSLR/PWR) or
D (COM), but C is most common.
8. Connect COM to VMS-333.
Always plug the COM connection into Port D.
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5.3 Test your setup
Before you begin using the VMS-333, it is best to test your setup.
1. Check the VMS-333 status indicators (data lights, GPS lights, power lights, and sound) to make sure
the receiver has a navigational fix and is sending GPS data to the camera. For details, see the 6.8 Pay
Attention to Indicators.
a. Check the Gps LED.
A blinking blue light indicates a standard GPS fix.
A solid blue light indicates a differential fix that is more accurate (as shown in photo).
No blue light means no GPS data being received.
b. Check the Data LED.



A blinking red light indicates data is being received (as shown in photo).
A solid red light means VMS-333 is just starting up or not working.
c. Check the receiver light.




A solid red light indicates power is ON but there is NO GPS signal.
A blinking red light indicates a locked GPS signal
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9. Check the recorder.
a. Verify that the camera and recorder are getting power, and that
you are getting a display on the recorder.
b. Make sure the audio cable connecting the recorder to the VMS333 is going into the Mic port on the recorder—NOT to the
headphone port.
c. Ensure the video camera is set to 2-channel stereo mode and that
the volume is set at approximately a midrange level if you are
using a handheld camcorder.
d. The 3.5mm audio cable takes all the geo-spatial data that the
VMS-333 has compiled and records it to the left audio channel,
and embeds it into the video.
e. Make sure that channel 1 (the left audio channel) is receiving an audio signal. See illustration
below.
Channel 1 audio
signal
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f.
If the audio level is peaking over or under the vertical bar, adjust it accordingly by holding the
Shift button and pushing the + or – button to increase or decrease the audio level until it is lined
up with the vertical bar. See illustration below.
Vertical bar
+ and - buttons
Shift button
2. Operate the video camera according to its User’s Manual and record a minute or two of video
outside when the GPS has a fix. The VMS-333 sends GPS data to the video as you record.
3. Play the video. You should hear the “modem” tones that indicate GPS data has been recorded to the
camera.
4. Import your video into Media Mapper or IsWhere software. You should see the location of where
the video has been recorded as you play back the video.
If you have completed all of these tasks, Congratulations! You have successfully operated Red Hen
System’s VMS-333!
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6.0 Using the VMS-333 with Video Recorders
Now that you have tested the setup, it's time to start using your VMS-333 in the air, on land, or at sea.
This device is protected against reverse polarity. However, do not drop the device or
get it wet.
6.1 Turn on the device and record what you see while traveling.
1. If you are using the VMS-333 stand-alone with a video camera, switch the power switch on the VMS333 to the On position. Turn the switch to the Off position to turn it off.
2. If you are using the VMS-333 with the NanoFLASH and a video camera, the NanoFLASH
automatically turns on when powered up and turns off when powered down.
6.2 Adjust the speaker volume
If you do not have a headphone, turn the Volume dial on the side of the VMS-333 box to increase or
decrease the volume of the GPS audio signals that are emitted.
6.3 Adjust the headphone volume
If you have a headphone, locate the input and output audio screws on the bottom of the VMS-333 unit.

RecVol. Turn the screw clockwise to increase the volume of your voice as it is recorded. Turn the
screw counterclockwise to decrease the volume.

OutVol. Turn the screw clockwise to increase the volume of the GPS audio signal alerts you will hear
in the headphone. Turn the screw counterclockwise to decrease the volume.
Note: Your headphone and microphone may also have their own adjustments for increasing or
decreasing the volume of what you hear and the volume of your voice as you record.
6.4 Use the feature trigger to mark features of interest
1. Press the red FT button if the VMS-333 box is accessible; otherwise, press the optional cabled
feature trigger.
6.5 Make an audio note
1. Speak into your headset microphone or aircraft intercom to make an audio note.
Note: The microphone is always on and recording your comments.
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6.6 Upload recorded data to the computer.
1. Remove the card and plug it into your computer.
2. Transfer the mpeg2 or other formatted file to a directory on your computer.
Note: If the recording is not in mpeg2 format, you will have to convert it.
6.7 View your recorded data
1. Use MediaMapper to load a base map and any reference layers.
2. Load the mpeg2 file from your video camera or NanoFLASH unit.

The video tracks you took will appear as trails on the map. Click them to watch the videos from that
starting point.

The features you captured will appear as icons. If you used both the cabled feature trigger and FT
button to capture them, they will appear in two different colors—one color for each method you
used. Select the features, using the Feature Select tool, to view their details.

The audio notes you captured will also appear as icons. Click them to hear the audio recording.
6.8 Pay attention to indicators
Various lights and audio signals help you determine important status information, as shown in the tables
below.
Light indicators (LEDs)
The top (red) light is used to show various activities. It will flash when a picture is taken with a
connected DSLR, it will flash when a feature is dropped, and various other times as a response to an
action. It also flashes if data is being received from a GPS unit that does not have a fix. If the red light is
on solid that indicates that there is some kind of serious system error that should be resolved.
If lights do this:
It means this:
Red Data LED is continuously on
There is some kind of serious system error that needs
to be resolved. This occurs if the VMS-333 is getting
more data than it can put in the audio channel, causing
bandwidth overflow. This may be because the data is
reported too often or unnecessary strings are being
sent.
The solution is to reduce the amount of data, possibly
by eliminating extraneous GPS sentences or AUX data.
You could try using the supplied wired GPS puck or use
the VMS-Mobile GPS from the Android device. Either
device limits the NMEA sentences to the requisite types
being dent to the VMS-333.
Note: For details of the GPS NMEA sentence types
required for VMS-333, see Appendix C: External GPS
Receivers.
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If lights do this:
It means this:
Red Data LED flashes
Flashing occurs in response to a number of activities:

A picture is taken with a connected digital camera
or recorder.

You press the Feature Trigger to manually identify
an important feature.

The GPS unit received data that does not have a fix.
Blue GPS light is off
GPS is not available.
Blue GPS light flashes fast
No GPS fix obtained.
Blue GPS LED flashes slowly (it is on
more than it is off)
A normal GPS fix is obtained by the VMS-333.
Blue GPS light is on continuously.
A differential GPS fix is obtained by the VMS-333. A
differential GPS fix provides better accuracy than the
normal GPS fix.
All lights are on continuously.
Battery is low.
Green Power LED is on
During power up, the Data LED is
on, but no power light is on and an
abnormal beep is emitted (not the
usual power-up “melody.”).
The power is on.
Self-test failure occurred.
Audio indicators
If you hear this:
Three beeps
Two beeps, low to high
Two beeps, high to low
One high beep
One low beep
It means this:
Power is turned on.
GPS fix is acquired.
GPS fix is lost.
Differential signal is acquired.
Differential signal is lost.
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7.0 Using an Android Device with the VMS-333 and DSLR
Cameras
When an Android device, such as a tablet or mobile phone, runs the VMS-Mobile application, you can
remotely control the VMS-333 (and in turn, a DSLR camera), no matter where you are. You can also load
a map, mark features, control a DSLR camera, and more.
Note: VMS-Mobile V1.11 is designed for use with the most recent VMS-333 Firmware Rev K2k (or
newer). For details on installing the firmware, see Appendix B. Updating the Firmware and Configuring
the Parameters.
7.1 Connect the Android device to the VMS-333
1. The most common way to connect the Android device to the VMS-333 is through wireless
technology—a Bluetooth connection. Make sure to turn on Bluetooth in the Android Settings
screen.
2. The VMS-333 is then connected directly to the Nikon DSLR, digital video recorder, or Laser Range
Finder.
7.2 Optional: Connect the Android device directly to a Nikon DSLR camera
WARNING: When using Bluetooth with the VMS-333, VMS-Mobile, or Blue2Can attachments, the
distance between these devices should not exceed 10 meters. If the distance does exceed 10 meters,
you may experience Bluetooth connection failures. Bluetooth connections will automatically be reestablished once the devices are within a 10-meter range.
1. If you have a single Nikon DSLR with the Red Hen Blue2Can attachment, you can connect the camera
directly to the Android device. This eliminates the need to use the 10-pin wired connection from the
VMS-333 to the Nikon DSLR; instead, the Blue2Can connects to the DSLR using the same 10-pin
socket as the wired VMS-333.
2. If you have multiple Nikon DSLRs, you can connect one to VMS-333 via the wired 10-pin cable, and
then connect the others to VMS-Mobile via Blue2Can attachments. In this situation, VMS-Mobile
monitors the Blue2Can-attached cameras and triggers their shutters when VMS-333 triggers the
wired DSLR shutter.
3. There is a noticeable delay of about a half-second or more between the time the wired DSLR camera
is shuttered and when the additional Blue2Can-attached cameras are shuttered. This delay may not
suit your intended use. When using multiple DSLR cameras as described, the same GPS data stream
from the VMS-333 is also sent to each additional DSLR camera and is included in the photo EXIF
metadata.
Note: The Blue2Can attachment is not supplied with the VMS-333 and must be purchased separately.
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7.3 Start up VMS-Mobile and examine the home screen
1.
From your Android device select the VMS-Mobile icon.
2.
The VMS-Mobile home screen appears. It shows a real-time image of the current location on the
map and it may also show details of the most recent Laser Finder measurement.
Top of screen
The following status information is available
whether or not you have a current GPS fix.

D. This is the date.

U. This is the time using UTC (Universal Time
Code – Greenwich time)
The following status information is available when
the GPS receiver has a current fix, and VMSMobile is currently connected to the VMS-333 via
Bluetooth.

Small red light. Mimics the red LED on the
VMS-333, indicating the status of the data
sent to the camera or computer. For details,
see section 6.8 Pay Attention to Indicators.

Large green light. This flashes when the VMS333 receives a flash feedback signal from the
DSLR camera. The large green light also
indicates when a colored “Mark Feature“
button is currently active (see Mark features
of interest: Colored buttons).

Small blue light. Mimics the blue LED on the
VMS-333, indicating the current status of the
GPS fix. It flashes after power up as it
attempts to acquire a signal, and stops
flashing once it does so. For details, see
section 6.8 Pay Attention to Indicators.
Top of Screen (cont’d )
The following information appears in the information area at the top of the screen only if the GPS
receiver has a current fix and you are connected to the VMS-333 via Bluetooth:
 N/S. Latitude
 E/W. Longitude.
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





Q. Fix Quality: 0 = no GPS fix is currently available, 1= GPS fix is currently available, 2 = differential
GPS fix is currently available. For example, Q1T7 means GPS fix is available and is tracking 7
satellites.
B. Bearing/heading in degrees (only accurate when moving)
A. Altitude in meters
K. Speed in knots
C. Magnetic compass direction. This is NOT a True North, declination-adjusted value.
M. Scalar magnetometer field strength in MicroTesla Units. The color of the value indicates the
relative strength of magnetic interference: yellow is low/good and red is high/bad. The red color
alerts you to the presence of nearby magnetic interference, which could prevent you from
obtaining accurate LRF measurements. Note: The magnetic compass direction also becomes
increasingly inaccurate as the magnetometer field strength increases. For accurate locations, try
to take photos and LRF readings where the magnetometer field strength is as small as possible.
WARNING! If your Android device has been exposed to high levels of magnetic interference,
perform the “Figure-8” reset and re-calibration procedure before taking measurements at a new
location. The procedure involves: (a) Moving away from the source of any magnetic interference;
(b) Holding the Android device firmly in your outstretched hand at arm's length and waving the
device around in a large figure-8 pattern for several seconds (5-10 seconds minimum); and (c)
checking that the device is then orientated correctly — it is not upside down and waiting for the
Magnetic Compass Direction to stabilize such that the compass is pointing in approximately the
'right' direction.
Note: If your device has been subject to high levels of magnetic interference over long periods of
time (for example, magnetically attached to a wireless charger), it may take 30 minutes or more
for the residual magnetism to drain away before the magnetic compass and magnetometer field
strength values return to normal values.

Large RED decimal number. If your VMS-Mobile has been configured to display an LRF
measurement (120.0 in the example), this is where you will see the slope distance measurement
in meters. Note: If no LRF measurement was taken, you will see 0.0.
Main portion of the screen
This is where you view the map.
 The red arrow at the center of the screen indicates the current GPS location and heading.
 The cyan (aqua) line shows the path of the most recent Laser Range Finder measurement,
between the source and target locations. The source is where the LRF was located when taking
the measurement and the target is the object it was aimed at.
 The direction of the line indicates the azimuth/compass direction.
 The length of the line between source and target matches the Laser Range Finder range
distance (in meters) and also appears in large red digits at the top right of the display.
 Note: The cyan line is “pinned” to the map display. This means you can zoom, pan, and
rotate, and the position, and appearance of the cyan line will change accordingly; it remains
in the correct location and orientation, no matter how you adjust the map.

Press the Android Menu button
to chose the kind of map you want to display: Google
Satellite, Google Street Map, or Offline Map.
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Large Action Buttons
The main action buttons bring up screens that let you do the following:

Control Camera and LRF. Control a DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder that are connected to
the VMS-333.

Mark Features. Mark features of interest.

Configure. Configure data, parameters, feature triggers, VMS-333 buttons, and more.

Intervalometry ON/OFF. Turn on and off intervalometry. When it is on, photos are
automatically taken at intervals indicated by time, distance, or area of coverage. For details, see
Section 7.11 Set intervalometry parameters.
Bottom of the screen
These buttons control basic navigation.




Back
Home Recent Apps Menu
Back. Return to the previous screen.
Home. Return to your home screen (NOT the application home screen).
Recent Apps. Switch to another recently used application.
Menu. When you click the Menu icon at the bottom of the screen (circled on the far right of the
image below), you see an expanded Android menu above it with three items that control what
you see on the screen.



Exit & Stop Services. Exit the application and stop background services, such as Blue2CAN
and GPS.
Toggle Full Map View. Hide or show the action buttons.
Map Views. Display a menu of maps to choose from:
 Satellite. Google satellite map (aerial
photo). It requires an Internet connection.
 Street Map. Google street map (streets
only). It requires an Internet connection.
 Offline Map. This is a map you have loaded
onto your Android device. For details on
how to load offline maps so they appear on
this menu, see Section 7.4 Load the offline
map you want to access from VMSMobile.
7.4 Upload new firmware to the VMS-333
The Red Hen Systems Support Team will do this for you. This task involves connecting the VMS-333 to
the computer via a USB and then uploading the hexadecimal code to the VMS-333 unit using the Hyper
Terminal interface. For detailed instructions, see Appendix B. Updating the Firmware and Configuring
Parameters .
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7.4 Load the offline map you want to access from VMS-Mobile
When using VMS-Mobile, you need a map displayed on the screen. As long as you are connected to the
Internet, you can display Google maps. However, you are not limited to maps that are only available
with an Internet connection. You can also display maps you have downloaded to your Android device.
IMPORTANT:
To perform the initial download, you must be connected to the Internet, since the offline maps are
Open Street Maps (OSM) that come from the Internet (http://www.openstreetmap.org).
OSM consist of many small, separate map tile files that are later assembled into seamless maps that
VMS-Mobile can use when it is not connected to the Internet. OSM map tiles are downloaded for all
map zoom levels from 3 to 19.
WARNING: To avoid additional 3G/4G cellular network charges, we strongly recommend using a WIFI
Internet connection to download the OSM map tiles to your Android device, since there can be
hundreds or thousands of map tiles downloaded according to the map areas to be covered.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, select Configure and the Configure screen appears.
a. Select Offline Maps.
b. Press the Menu button for an expanded menu of
offline map options:
We will describe these functions as we continue
instructions for downloading offline maps to your
Android.
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3. Next, you must define the area on the screen where you want to download the offline maps. You
can either define a rectangular area or a linear area as follows:
a. To define a rectangular area, select Define Map Area
from the expanded map options menu at the bottom of
the screen. This lets you define the rectangular area you
want covered by the Open Street Map (OSM) tiles you will
download from the Internet.
 Use the Zoom buttons (+ and -) and the arrow keys to
resize the rectangular region so it closely fits the
desired map area.
 Be careful to only define a rectangle that closely
resembles the map area required.
b. To define linear areas for downloading, select Draw
Map Lines from the expanded map options menu at
the bottom of the screen. This lets you draw
freehand lines on the map that define narrow
regions over which OSM tiles will be downloaded to
create VMS-Mobile offline maps.
 Position the map over the desired location and
use the Zoom buttons (+ and -) if necessary.
 Then press the Lock button and use your finger
or a stylus to trace lines on the screen.
 Click Unlock when you are done.
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c. To define linear areas associated with a previously
recorded track log, click Load GPS Data from the
expanded map options menu at the bottom of the
screen.

A list of track logs appears. Select one of them.

The points within the track log create lines on the
map as shown in the illustration to the left. These
lines define narrow regions over which OSM tiles
will be downloaded to create VMS-Mobile offline
maps.
4. Once the map area is defined, you are ready to download the OSM map tiles.
Warning! Downloading map tiles can take a long time. The time depends on the speed of your
Internet connection and can range from a few thousand to approximately ten thousand tiles per
hour. We suggest you connect your Android device to a USB power source during the tile download
to avoid depleting the battery power before the download completes.
a. Click Download Maps. A small message appears. Click OK.
b. A moving progress bar appears as the map loads.
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c. As mentioned before, downloading can take some time. It’s a good idea to periodically check
the Downloading Maps progress bar by accessing it from the Android pull-down notification bar
at the top of the device.
d. When load completes, the progress bar stops moving. We recommend you double-check that
the OSM Maps downloaded successfully and are available for use before undertaking your VMS333 field mission.
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7.5 Work with offline maps
Note: Make sure you pressed Offline Maps from the Home screen and have displayed the expanded
map options menu.
Once offline maps are downloaded and displayed on your Android device, you can select the following
functions from the expanded map options menu.
a. Refresh All Map Tiles. Refreshes all downloaded OSM map tiles by downloading them again. This
allows any associated OSM map updates to display in VMS-Mobile.
b. Delete All Map Tiles. Deletes all previously downloaded OSM map tiles. It’s a good idea to do this to
reclaim file space on the Android device when you finish using the offline maps.
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7.6 Load KML files
VMS-Mobile lets you load KML files on your Android device. KML files are either shape files containing
lines, polygons placemarks and overlays, or output files from VMS-333/VMS-Mobile missions. The
output files include placemarks for GPS “breadcrumbs,” photo locations, and point of interest (POI)
locations.
IMPORTANT!VMS-Mobile outputs both KML and KMZ files, but can only load and display the KML files.
KMZ files are .ZIP files that contain compressed versions of the KML files, as well as any included icon
images. KMZ files can only be displayed in Desktop Google Earth.
Note: For KML and KMZ output files to be correctly generated by VMS-Mobile, you must shut down
VMS-Mobile at end of a session in an orderly manner. This involves: a) exiting the VMS-Mobile Home
screen, and then b) stopping the Blue2Can/VMS-333 background task and GPS background task from
the Android pull-down notification bar.
Once loaded, the information from KML files is rendered as a custom Map Layer for viewing on Google
Earth. Such a map layer is useful for outlining a region over which you are conducting your VMS-333
mission so you know when you have reached the boundaries of that region.
1. From the VMS-333 home screen, select Configure > Load KML.
2. A window opens with a list of KML files.
3. Select the one(s) you want to load by checking their checkboxes. Then click Load.
4. Once the files are loaded, the lines, polygons, placemarks, and ground overlay definitions are
rendered as a custom Map Layer on the VMS-333 home screen.
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5. Return to the home screen, then zoom and pan to locate the custom map layer rendered from the
KML files.
Note: When you touch any placemark icon on the
map, its descriptive text will appear. However, the
text is limited to a single line and will be truncated
if it extends beyond the width of the screen.
The following placemark icons are used in the KML output files. The first four are standard Google
Earth placemark icons; the last three are generated by VMS-Mobile.
Icon
Description
GPS breadcrumb that points in the direction of the GPS heading. Breadcrumbs are
produced each second.
Photo location indicating where the DSLR camera shutter was triggered. Photo locations
are numbered (beginning at 1). They are included in the placemark popup descriptions.
Point of interest location where the VMS-333 feature trigger or VMS-Mobile Mark
Features button was pressed. The twelve user-customized feature names are present in
the placemark pop-up descriptions.
Location where VMS-333 geospatial intervalometry started.
Photo confirmation location where the DSLR Camera Flash Feedback signal was
received. This is typically very close to the corresponding photo location.
Point of interest location where the VMS-333 feature trigger or VMS-Mobile Mark
Features button was released (point of interest triggers and buttons may be held down
for a period of time by the user).
Location where VMS-333 geospatial intervalometry stopped.
Location of LRF target.
Source LRF location where user was standing.
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6. If you click a point of interest
, you will see additional details:

POI: Custom name of the soft feature trigger, if there was one.

UTC: Time and date the feature was noted.

Latitude: Latitude (in degrees)

Longitude: Longitude (in degrees)

Altitude: Altitude of camera (in meters)

Bearing: Direction camera was pointed (in degrees)

Speed: Speed of camera, if it was moving.
7. If you took Laser Range Finder measurements you will also see your location and target location on
the map.

Cyan (aqua) Ruler: Target location (what the
user was targeting).

Yellow Ruler: Source LRF location (where
the user was standing when taking the
measurement).
1
2
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If you click either ruler icon, you get additional details.

UTC: The time at which the LRF measurement was
taken.

Local Date Time: Date measurement was taken.

Altitude: Altitude of LRF.

Latitude: Latitude of LRF.

Longitude: Longitude of LRF.

Altitude: Altitude of LRF.

Bearing: Bearing of LRF.

Speed: Speed of LRF (if you were traveling by foot,
vehicle, or plane while taking the measurement).

MeasureSlope: Slope distance between LRF and
target.

MeasureHorizontal: Horizontal distance between
LRF and target.

MeasureVertical: Vertical distance between LRF and
target.

MeasureAzimuth: Magnetic compass direction of the
LRF.

Declination: Declination value (in degrees) at the LRF
source location.

TrueNorthAzimuth: True North compass direction of
the LRF device (same as magnetic compass direction).

MeasureDateTime: Local date and time of the LRF
measurement.

MeasureTimeStamp: UTC/GMT time of the LRF
measurement.

MeasureLatitude: Latitude of the LRF source location
(where user stood when taking the measurement).

MeasureLongitude: Longitude of the LRF source
location.

MeasureAltitude: Altitude of the LRF source location

TargetLatitude: Latitude of target.

TargetLongitude: Longitude of target.

TargeAltitude: Altitude of target.

lrfType: Brand of LRF (HAGL, Vectronix, and LTI)
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Important Things to Know about VMS-333 and KML Files!
You can use KML files with other VMS-Mobile map types, such as Google Satellite, Google Street Maps,
and OSM Offline Maps. However, Google Earth provides a 3D representation, whereas the maps on your
Android device are only 2D. This means that any reference to altitude values in KML files are ignored.
Instead, all imagery, lines, polygons, placemarks, and ground overlay are rendered on the ground.
Android maps currently only support a small number of ground overlay images. Too many images or
images that are large in size may cause your Android deice to experience Out of Memory errors that
cause VMS-333 to crash. Google is currently fixing these errors: xxx
VMS-333 currently supports only a subset of KML elements (XML tags) for lines, polygons, placemarks,
and ground overlays. Additional KML elements will be added in the future. The currently supported KML
tags include the following:
 COLOR
 MULTIGEOMETRY
 COORDINATES
 NAME
 DESCRIPTION
 NORTH
 EAST
 OUTER_BOUNDARY_IS
 GROUND_OVERLAY
 OUTER_LINEAR_RING
 HREF
 PLACE_MARK
 ICON
 POINT
 ICON_STYLE
 POLY_STYLE
 INNER_BOUNDARY_IS
 ROTATION
 INNER_LINEAR_RING
 SOUTH
 LAT_LOG_BOX
 STYLE
 LINE_STRING
 STYLE_URL
 LINE_STYLE
 WEST
 LINEAR_RING
 WIDTH
For information about where KML and KMZ files are stored on your Android device, see Section 7.15 Get
familiar with VMS-Mobile folder structure.
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7.7 Mark individual features of interest and continuous conditions/features
Home > Mark Features
As well as using the VMS-333 feature trigger, you can conveniently use the VMS-Mobile application to
mark discrete features of interest and note ongoing (continuous) features or conditions.
Note: When the VMS-333 is connected to a video camera, features of interest will be noted in the audio
track of the video recording. Features of interest are also stored in the VMS-Mobile track log and KMZ
files.
When the audio track or track log is processed by a GIS application (for example, isWhere), the features
of interest will appear on the map as different icons or as the same icon in different colors, depending
on the GIS application. The track showing your route will consist of a line in different colors to indicate
the different feature conditions. If you did not specify any conditions, the track will appear as a series of
small arrows in one color.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Mark Features and the Mark Features screen appears.
Here are two examples; the one on the left has buttons with text labels; the one on the right has
icons as well. Note: If you do not see any buttons, follow the instructions under Load a feature
definition file.
 Buttons can be colored or
uncolored; each behaves differently
(see 2 and 3 below)
 The buttons you see are created
using a feature definition file. Red
Hen Systems provides one default
file that serves as a template you
can edit. See Edit a feature
definition file.
 The button labels are generally
industry-specific. If the buttons are
not what you need, press the
Android menu button and select
Load Feature Definitions to quickly
load a different feature definition
file. See Load a feature definition
file.
2. Uncolored Buttons: These buttons indicate discrete features that occur at individual locations, such
as a Stop Sign. Note: Buttons can be labeled with text (up to 20 characters) or with numbers
(ranging from 1 to 40). Text buttons may also use icons. If the text characters do not fit on the
button, you will see ellipses ( … ).
When you press and release a text button, a single feature trigger marker is recorded. When you
press and release a numeric button, a feature trigger marker is recorded where you pressed the
button and where you released it. When you eventually view the track on a map, different icons
appear for the features, based on the buttons you pressed.
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3. Colored Buttons: These indicate continuous conditions or features that are not confined to single,
discrete locations. Once you press a colored button, it displays a border around itself as shown by
the GOOD button. This indicates the button is active and remains in effect until you press a different
button. Note: Colored buttons can be labeled with text or numbers (up to 15 characters). If the
characters do not fit on the button, you see ellipses (…).
Blinking green LED
Currently activated color
feature toggle button.
IMPORTANT!
Only one colored button is active at a time; it remains
active until your press it again or press a different
colored button. When you eventually view the track
on the map, it will change color based on the condition
buttons you pressed.
Once you press a colored button, the green LED
flashes in the upper-right corner of the screen to
remind you that a color feature toggle button is
currently activated.
The blinking indicator also provides positive feedback
that the VMS-333 is properly receiving and processing
these auto-repeating color feature trigger messages.
Note: When you press any feature trigger button on this screen, you may optionally hear a female
voice say the name of the button. This additional audio feedback occurs when you have turned ON
the Speak Feature Trigger Text feature on the Configure Data screen. Make sure to adjust the
Android volume controls so you can clearly hear the audio speech feedback in your operating
environment.
4. Discrete features are pretty self- explanatory, like the uncolored buttons you see above (Stop Sign,
Road Sign, Pot Hole, etc.). But continuous conditions/features, not confined to single location,
might require more explanation. Here are some imaginary examples from different industries:
 Agriculture. Corn = Yellow, Grass = Green, Fallow = Red, Water = Blue
 Roads. Dirt Road = Orange, Gravel Road = Blue, Paved Road = black, Highway = Gray
 Natural Resources. Forest = Green, Plains = Orange, Farm = Red, Mountain = Black, Water = Blue
 Real Estate. Residential = Red, Industrial = Yellow, Commercial = Orange, Unused = Black
5. Press the Back button at the bottom of the screen to return to the VMS-Mobile Home page.
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6. re is an example of what you might see when you view the KMZ file generated by VMS-Mobile in
Google Earth.

The individual features are
marked with default place marks
or with icons of your
specification. In this example
there are several custom icons,
such as a Stop Sign and Traffic
Lights.

The ongoing conditions or
features appear as colored
sections of the track.
Note: If no ongoing conditions
were marked, the track appears
as a series of blue arrows (see
bottom-left segment of the
route in the illustration).

When you click a place mark or
anywhere along the colored
track, you see an informational
popup with details about the
feature. When you hover over
the colored track, you also see a
directional arrow below it
indicating the direction of travel
on the route.
Custom
icon
Informational
pop-up
GOOD condition =
green line
Directional arrow
No condition =
blue arrows
Custom
icon
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Note: For details about feature
definition files, see Edit a feature
definition file.
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7.8 Load a feature definition file
Home > Mark Features > Android menu > Load Feature Definition File > Load
- OR - Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Load
The buttons you see on the Mark Features screen have been created from a feature definition file. If the
buttons are not the ones you need, load a different feature definition file.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Configure > Feature Definitions and skip to Step 3. You
can also press Mark Features.
Note: If this is the first time you have ever pressed
Mark Features, you may see a screen like the one
to the left. It simply means no feature definition
file has ever been loaded — and a feature
definition file is what determines the buttons you
will see on the Mark Features screen.
Please continue with the rest of the instructions
below.
2. From the bottom of the Mark Features screen, press the Android menu button and select Load
Feature Definitions.
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3. The Select Feature Definition File dialog appears.

If no one has yet created a feature definition file, load the
default template provided by Red Hen Systems:
mark_features_template.txt.

Otherwise, press the radio button next to whichever
feature definition file you need, and press Load. Note:
You can only load one feature definition file at a time. All
feature definition files have the same extension — .txt

If you see the name of a feature definition file that you
would like to use, but know it needs to be edited, press
Edit. However, most feature definition files can also be
created and edited on a PC or laptop and then copied to
the Android device. The larger screen and keyboard of a
PC or laptop makes editing so much easier.
Defining your feature definition files on a PC or laptop
helps ensure the same feature definitions are used
consistently across many VMS-Mobile devices when your
organization deploys and uses multiple VMS-333 devices.
For details, see Edit a feature definition file.
4. Once the file is loaded, the Mark Features screen changes to display the buttons defined in the
selected feature definition file.
5. You can now press the press the uncolored buttons to
indicate discrete features or press the colored buttons to
indicate continuing conditions or features.
Note: Depending on the file you loaded, you may only
have one type of button or the other.

If the buttons you see are not the correct ones, press
the Android menu button again and select Load
Feature Definition File so you can choose another file.

If you realize you loaded the correct file, but need to
modify some of the buttons on the screen, you must
re-select the feature definition file and then edit it. For
instructions, see Edit feature definition file.
Note: For an explanation of how to use the buttons, see
Mark Features of interest and continuous
conditions/features: button types.
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7.9 Edit a feature definition file
Home > Mark Features > Android menu > Load Feature Definition File > Edit
- OR - Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Edit
- OR – Transfer these files to your PC or laptop and edit them: VMSMobile/feature_definitions/*.txt)
What if you loaded the correct feature definition file, but the buttons on the Mark Features screen need
modification? You must edit the feature definition file.
1. There are three ways to edit the file as indicated below in a, b, and c:
a. From the Home screen, press Mark Features and when the Mark Feature screen appears, press
the Android menu button at the bottom of the screen. Then select Load Feature Definitions.
When the Select Feature Definition File dialog appears, press the radio button next to a file to
select it and then press Edit.
b. From the Home screen, press Configure and when the Configure screen appears, press Feature
Definitions.
When the Select Feature Definition File dialog appears, press the radio button next to a file to
select it and then press Edit.
c. Connect your Android device to your PC or laptop. Using your PC or laptop, go to this directory
on your Android device: VMSMobile/feature_definitions. Copy the appropriate feature
definition file (*.txt) to your PC and edit it using Notepad or a similar text editor.
Once editing is completed, save your changes and give the file a new name or use the same
name. Next, copy the new or updated feature definition file back to this directory on your
Android device: VMSMobile/feature_definitions. For an explanation of the process, see About
Feature Definition Files.
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2. If you plan to select and edit the file from your Android device, rather than a PC or laptop, continue
with the next steps. Note: You can only edit one feature definition file at a time on your Android
device. All feature definition file names must end in the same extension: .txt
3. The Edit Feature Definition File screen appears for the selected file. Instructions for how to edit it
appear at the beginning of the file. The actual button definitions appear at the end.
The keyboard is available at the bottom of the screen for
editing the button labels at the end of the file under
FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINITIONS.
a. You can define a maximum of twelve (12) buttons.
b. It is acceptable to leave blank items—they will
appear as blank buttons.
c. It is also acceptable to define duplicate items—this
means several buttons will appear with the same
label.
d. Each button label is limited to a maximum of 20
alphanumeric characters.
e. If you prefer having an icon appear on the button
rather than text, enter an alphanumeric label and
make sure an icon file (*.png) exists with that same
name in this directory: VMSMobile/feature_icons
Note: Icon file names are always all lower-case with
underscores (_). However, alphanumeric labels can
contain upper and lower-case text, as well as spaces.
For example, the alphanumeric label, Traffic Lights
refers to an icon file called traffic_lights.png.
f. Uncolored buttons indicate discrete features;
colored ones indicate a continuous feature or
condition. To specify a colored button, use a 6-digit
hex code for the RGB color value, followed by the
label name.
For details about the contents of the feature definition
file and specific rules for button lables, see About
Feature Definition Files.
4. If you no longer want to use the displayed file, press Delete.
5. If you are satisfied with your editing, press Save As. A dialog appears where you can specify the
same name or a different one for the feature definition file.
Enter the file name and press Save.

If you enter the same name as the file you are editing, its
contents will be overwritten with your changes.

If you enter a different name, a new file will be created with
your changes.
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6. Now you can return to the Select Feature Definition File dialog and select the edited (or new) file.
When you press Load, a new set of buttons will appear on the Mark Features screen.
Before Editing
After Editing
Button Definition section of file
#00FF00 GOOD
#FFFF00 FAIR
#FF8C00 CRITICAL
#FF0000 LOST
Stop Sign
Speed Limit
Road Sign
Traffic Lights
Surface Damage
Pot Hole
27
Button Definition section of file
#00FF00 GOOD
#FFFF00 FAIR
#FF8C00 CRITICAL
#FF0000 LOST
Cross Roads
T Intersection
Left Turn
Right Turn
Left Bend
Right Bend
Left Merge
Right Merge
Note: #00FF00 is a 6-digit hex code
representing the color green. Hex codes
produce colored buttons that represent
continuous features or conditions. The other
buttons represent discrete features.
Note: The text labels (Cross Roads, T Intersection,
etc.) all have corresponding icon files with the same
names, such as cross_roads.png and
t_intersection.png. This means icons will appear on
the buttons, rather than text labels.
Resulting Mark Features screen
Resulting Mark Features screen
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7.10 About feature definition files
A feature definition file contains the data that determines what buttons appear on the Mark Features
screen, which in turn determine what features you can make note of.
VMS-Mobile includes a single read-only, default “template”' definition file called
mark_features_template.txt. Use this file to create your own customized Feature Trigger definition files
with different names.
You can define any number of feature definition files, but can load only one at a time. A feature
definition file is a plain text file with the extension .txt.
Directory Structure
You may prefer to create feature definition files on a PC or laptop because of the larger screen and
better keyboard. You will then transfer the files to your Android device using either Windows Explorer or
the Google-supplied Android File Transfer application. Note: The feature definition files must be stored
under this directory on your Android device: VMSMobile/feature_definitions
Here is the file structure showing where the feature definition files and icon files are stored on your
Android device. Note: Image files are used as icons on text buttons and represent features on maps.
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Feature Definition File Details
What follows is the information you will find in a feature definition file. The majority of the file contents
describe the rules for defining buttons; only the part of the file contains the button definitions. Note:
For an example of the actual file that you can paste into a text editor, see VMS-Mobile Feature Trigger
Button Definition File for VMS-333 / VMS-DMRT
As a reminder, a Feature Trigger Button Definition file explains how to define Feature Trigger Buttons
that will appear on the Mark Feature screens. These buttons can indicate discrete features or
continuous features/conditions.
a. Discrete features are indicated by a gray button with a text or numeric label on it, or an icon. These
will appear as place markers on a map.
b. Continuous features/conditions are indicated with a colored button and a text label. These will
appear as a colored track on a map.
Rules
1. VMS-Mobile Feature Trigger Button Definition Files. All feature definition files are plain files with
file names that must end with a .txt suffix.
2. Number of Feature Trigger Button Definition Files. You can define an unlimited number of different
Feature Trigger Button Definition files; however, you can only select and load one at a time.
3. Asterisk. Lines that begin with an asterisk (*) are comment lines, just like this line. There can be any
number of comment lines present in a definition text file.
4. Number of Button Definitions. A single definition text file can contain a maximum of 12 button
definitions. Any definitions beyond the first 12 button definitions will be ignored.
5. Types of Feature Trigger Buttons. You can define three (3) different types of Feature Trigger
Buttons.
a. Numeric button. This has a numeric label, from 1 to 40. Each Numeric Button represents a
unique, discrete feature.
 A Numeric Button records a separate Button Press Code and Button Release Code each time
it is pressed, optionally held, and then released.
b. Text or icon button. This has a text label; for example, Bus Stop. A Text Button can have a
maximum of 20 characters. Each Text Button represents a unique, discrete feature.
 A Text Button records only a single Press Code each time it is pressed and released. The
feature will be shown with place mark when you view it on a map.
Note: A Text Button must not include these reserved characters: Comma (,) Dollar ($) New
Line or Asterisk (*). If used, reserved characters will be replaced with spaces when their
feature definitions are loaded by VMS-Mobile.
 Text characters used in feature definitions must be 7- bit ASCII text characters only, in the
range from decimal 32 (the space character) to decimal 126 (the ~ tilde).
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
You can also provide an Icon Image to go with the Text Button. When you do so, the icon
will appear on the button instead of the text label and the feature will be marked with the
specified Icon.
 The Icon Image must be a .png file stored in this directory on your Android device:
VMSMobile/feature_icons. The file name must be almost identical name to the text
label.
 The only difference is the Icon Image file name must be in all lower-case with
underscores instead of spaces.
 For example: If you provide a Text Button definition of Stop Sign, you must have an Icon
Image file named stop_sign.png.
c. Auto-repeating color toggle button. This is a colored button with a text label. The label appears
on the button only, not on the map.
When activated, the button causes a continuous user-defined, colored line to be drawn along
the GPS track in the KMZ map file. For example - #FF0000 POOR - defines a Red Color Toggle
button with the label of POOR.
 Label: A label on a Colored Toggle Button has the same limitations as a label on a Text
button. It can have a maximum of 15 characters.
 Hex color value: You define the color of the button using a 3 or 6-digit hexadecimal value:
#RGB or #RRGGBB. RR = red 2-digit hexadecimal value, GG = green 2-digit hexadecimal
value, and BB = blue 2-digit hexadecimal value.
Note: All hex codes are in the range of 00 to FF.
 List of colors: Some common hex color values include: Red = #FF0000, Orange = #FF8C00,
#FFFF00 = Yellow, #00FF00 = Green, #00FFFF = Cyan, #0000FF = Blue, #FF00FF = Magenta,
#000000 = Black, and #FFFFFF = White.
Note: All 3-digit hexadecimal values are expanded to 6-digit hexadecimal values as
described in the following web page. For a list of common color compatible hexadecimal
color values, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_colors
 How it operates: Color Toggle Buttons are sticky, repetitive, and mutually exclusive.
 Once you press a Color Toggle Button, it will automatically press itself at one-second
intervals until you turn it off by either (a) pressing the button a second time -OR- (b)
pressing a different Color Toggle Button.
 For example, pressing a Red Color Toggle Button and later pressing a Green Color Toggle
Button stops the Red Color repetitions and starts the Green Color repetitions.
6. Duplicate Buttons. Duplicate button definitions are permitted. You can define several buttons with
identical labels for convenience.
7. Blank Buttons. Blank button definitions are also allowed, where a Blank definition is a line in the
Feature Trigger Button Definition Section that contains no characters.
Note: When you define less than 12 buttons, the remaining buttons are blank on the screen. When
you press a Blank Button, nothing occurs.
8. Button Definitions. Button definitions begin on the first line that does not begin with a * comment
character.
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Examples of Actual Button Definitions (12 buttons maximum)
#00FF00 GOOD
#FFFF00 FAIR
#FF8C00 CRITICAL
#FF0000 LOST
Stop Sign
Speed Limit
Road Sign
Traffic Lights
Surface Damage
Pot Hole
27
The next page contains a sample feature definition file you can copy and paste from this PDF file into a
text editor.
Note: The font is very small to prevent the lines from wrapping when you paste the text into a text
editor. Once the text is pasted into the text editor, you will be able to see it without a problem.
However, if you want to read it now, just zoom into the text using your PDF reader’s zoom function.
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Copyright © Red Hen Systems
* ========================================================================
* VMS-Mobile Feature Trigger Button Definition File for VMS-333 / VMS-DMRT
* ========================================================================
* This Feature Trigger Button Definition file explains how to define Feature Trigger Buttons that will appear on the Mark Feature screens. These buttons can indicate discrete features or continuous features/conditions.
*
* (a) Discrete features are indicated by a gray button with a text or numeric label on it, or an icon. These will appear as place markers on a map.
* (b) Continuous features/conditions are indicated with a colored button and a text label. These will appear as a colored track on a map.
*
* NOTE: If you already understand how to define Feature Trigger Buttons, skip to this section at the end of the file: FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINTIONS
*
* ======================================================================
* ABOUT FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTONS
* ======================================================================
**(1) VMS-MOBILE FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINITION FILES. These files are plain text files with file names that must end with a .txt suffix.
*
**(2) NUMBER OF FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINITION FILES. You can define an unlimited number of different Feature Trigger Button Definition files; however, you can only select and load one at a time.
*
**(3) ASTERISK. Lines that begin with an asterisk (*) are comment lines, just like this line. There can be any number of comment lines present in a definition text file.
*
**(4) NUMBER OF BUTTON DEFINITIONS. A single feature definition text file can contain a maximum of 12 button definitions. Any definitions beyond the first 12 button definitions will be ignored.
*
**(5) TYPES OF FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTONS. You can define three (3) different types of Feature Trigger Buttons.
*
* (a) NUMERIC BUTTON. This has a numeric label, from 1 to 40. Each Numeric Button represents a unique, discrete feature.
* A Numeric Button records a separate Button Press Code and Button Release Code each time it is pressed, optionally held, and then released.
*
* (b) TEXT OR ICON BUTTON. This has a text label; for example, Bus Stop. A Text Button can have a maximum of 20 characters. Each Text Button represents a unique, discrete feature.
* A Text Button records only a single Press Code each time it is pressed and released. The feature will be shown with place mark when you view it on a map.
*
* NOTE: A Text Button must not include these reserved characters: Comma (,) Dollar ($) New Line or Asterisk (*).If used, reserved characters will be replaced with spaces when their feature definitions are loaded by VMS-Mobile.
*
* Text characters used in feature definitions must be 7- bit ASCII text characters only, in the range of decimal 32 (the space character) to decimal 126 (the ~ tilde).
*
* You can also provide an Icon Image to go with the Text Button. When you do so, the icon will appear on the button instead of the text label and the feature will be marked with the specified Icon.
*
* The Icon Image must be a .png file stored in this directory on your Android device: VMSMobile/feature_icons. The file name must be almost identical name to the text label.
* The only difference is the Icon Image file name must be in all lower-case with underscores instead of spaces.
* For example: If you provide a Text Button definition of - Stop Sign - you must have an Icon Image file named stop_sign.png.
*
* (c) AUTO-REPEATING COLOR TOGGLE BUTTON. This is a colored button with a text label. The label appears on the button only, not on the map.
* When activated, the button causes a continuous user-defined, colored line to be drawn along the GPS track in the KMZ map file.
*
* For example - #FF0000 POOR - defines a Red Color Toggle button with the label of POOR.
*
* LABEL: A label on a Colored Toggle Button has the same limitations as a label on a Text button. It can have a maximum of 15 characters.
*
* HEX COLOR VALUE: You define the color of the button using a 3 or 6-digit hexadecimal value: #RGB or #RRGGBB. RR = red 2-digit hexadecimal value, GG = green 2-digit hexadecimal value, and BB = blue 2-digit hexadecimal value.
* All hex codes are in the range of 00 to FF.
*
* LIST OF COLORS: Some common hex color values include: Red = #FF0000, Orange = #FF8C00 =, #FFFF00 = Yellow, #00FF00 = Green, #00FFFF = Cyan, #0000FF = Blue, #FF00FF = Magenta, #000000 = Black, and #FFFFFF = White.
*
* NOTE: The 3-digit hexadecimal values are expanded to 6-digit hexadecimal values as described in the following web page. For a list of common color compatible hexadecimal color values, see:
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_colors
*
* HOW IT OPERATES: Color Toggle Buttons are sticky, repetitive, and mutually exclusive.
*
* Once you press a Color Toggle Button, it will automatically press itself at one-second intervals until you turn it off by either (a) pressing the button a second time -OR- (b) pressing a different Color Toggle Button.
* For example, pressing a Red Color Toggle Button and later pressing a Green Color Toggle Button stops the Red Color repetitions and starts the Green Color repetitions.
*
**(6) DUPLICATE BUTTONS. Duplicate button definitions are permitted. You can define several buttons with identical labels for convenience.
*
**(7) BLANK BUTTONS. Blank button definitions are also allowed, where a Blank definition is a line in the Feature Trigger Button Definition Section that contains no characters.
*
* NOTE: When you define less than 12 buttons, the remaining buttons are blank on the screen. When you press a Blank Button, nothing occurs.
*
**(8) BUTTON DEFINTIONS. Button definitions begin on the first line that does not begin with a * comment character. SEE FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINITION SECTION.
*
* =====================================================================
* FEATURE TRIGGER BUTTON DEFINITIION SECTION (12 BUTTONS MAXIMUM)
* =====================================================================
#00FF00 GOOD
#FFFF00 FAIR
#FF8C00 CRITICAL
#FF0000 LOST
Stop Sign
Speed Limit
Road Sign
Traffic Lights
Surface Damage
Pot Hole
27
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7.11 Control the way feature triggers behave
Configure > Buttons
The VMS-333 feature triggers (red FT button on the VMS-333, the external cabled thumb-trigger, and
the button on the DMRT handle) all serve to note an important feature so it can eventually be marked
on the map. You can use VMS-Mobile to control the way these feature triggers behave by configuring
the internal and external feature trigger functions.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, select Configure > Feature Triggers and the Configure Feature
Triggers dialog appears on the screen.
a. Internal Feature Trigger. Configure the behavior of the red
FT button on the VMS-333.
b. External Feature Trigger. Configure the behavior of the
thumb trigger at the end of the Feature Trigger cable.
c. DMRT Handle Feature Trigger. Configure the behavior of
the trigger on the handle of the DMRT (Digital Mapping
Reconnaissance Toolkit), if you are the DMRT.
Note: The DMRT is a Red Hen Systems product that
combines the VMS-333, DSLR camera, Laser Range Finder,
and external GPS receiver in an easy-to-carry framework.
2. If you click the button under Internal Feature Trigger Behavior, another small window appears with
a number of options. Select one option.
Note: The internal feature trigger is the red button on the
VMS-333 unit.
a. Momentary Feature Trigger. When you briefly press and
release the internal feature trigger, you mark a single
feature of interest. If you hold down the feature trigger
for a long period of time, nothing happens.
b. Hold Toggle Intervalometry. When you hold down the
internal feature trigger for a longer period of time, you
turn on intervalometry so photos are taken at regular
intervals. The next time you hold it down, you turn off
intervalometry. If you briefly press the feature trigger,
nothing happens.
c. Mom. FT & Hold Toggle Interval. When you briefly press and release the VMS-333 internal
feature trigger, you mark a single feature. However, when you hold down the VMS-333 internal
feature trigger for a longer period of time, you turn on intervalometry so photos are taken at
regular intervals. The next time you hold it down, you turn off intervalometry (no more
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automatic photo taking). For details on how long to hold the button, see Set intervalometry
parameters.
d. Take Photo. When you briefly press and release the internal feature trigger, you snap a single
photo.
e. Trigger LRF. When you briefly press and release the internal feature trigger, you trigger the LRF
to take a measurement.
f.
Trigger LRF & Mom. FT. When you briefly press and release the VMS-333 internal feature
trigger, you mark a single feature and trigger the LRF to take a measurement.
3. If you click the button under External Feature Trigger, a different small window appears with a
number of options. Select one option.
The external feature trigger is the thumb trigger at the
end of the feature trigger cable.
a. Momentary Feature Trigger. When you briefly press
and release the VMS-333 external feature trigger,
you mark a single feature.
b. Intervalometry On/Off SPST. When you briefly press
and release the VMS-333 thumb trigger, you turn
intervalometry on or off. IMPORTANT: Select this
option only if the switch connected to the external
feature trigger is an on/off switch.
c. Flash Feedback Cable. Use this setting when the
optional flash feedback cable is connected to the
DSLR Camera PC connector and the external feature
trigger switch cable. For details, see: Connect the
VMS-333 External Feature Trigger cable to the DSLR
camera.
d. Take Photo. When you briefly press and release the VMS-333 external feature trigger, you snap
a single photo.
e. Trigger LRF. When you briefly press and release the VMS-333 external feature trigger, you
trigger the LRF to take a measurement.
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4.
If you click the button under DMRT Feature Trigger, a different small window appears with a
number of options. Select one option. Note: Use this option only if you are using the Digital Mobile
Reconnaissance Toolkit (DMRT).
Note: The DMRT is a Red Hen
Systems product that combines
the VMS-333, DSLR camera,
Laser Range Finder, and
external GPS receiver in an
easy-to-carry framework.
The DMRT feature trigger is the trigger on the handle of the
DMRT.
a. Momentary Feature Trigger. When you briefly press and
release the trigger on the DMRT handle, you mark a
single feature.
b. Trigger LRF. When you briefly press and release the
trigger on the DMRT handle, you trigger the LRF to take a
measurement.
c. Trigger LRF & Mom. FT. When you briefly press and
release the trigger on the DMRT handle, you mark a
single feature and trigger the LRF to take a measurement.
d. Take Photo. When you briefly press and release the
trigger on the DMRT handle, you snap a single photo. This
is possible if the camera was previously connected to the
VMS-333 and a Laser Range Finder, or if the camera was
part of the Digital Mobile Reconnaissance Toolkit (DMRT).
Note: When a photo is taken in conjunction with a Laser
Range Finder measurement, the LRF target location
details are encoded into the DSLR photo EXIF header.
5. Press the Back button to save your choices and return to the Buttons screen.
6. Now when you press the VMS-333 feature trigger, an event occurs according to the option you
selected.
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7.12 Determine if the camera is running properly
When the camera cannot be seen or heard from the cockpit, you can use VMS-Mobile to tell if the
camera is working properly with its flash firing. In VMS-Mobile, the large green light on the home screen
lights up briefly when the VMS-333 receives the flash feedback signal. If the Android screen is turned off,
the Android tricolor LED turns green when the camera flashes.
7.13 Control the behavior of an external DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder
With VMS-Mobile you can focus the DSLR camera lens, trigger the camera shutter, receive feedback
when the camera flashes, and trigger the Laser Range Finder to take a measurement.
From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Control Camera & LRF and the Control Camera screen
appears. This screen lets you take individual photos using a camera connected to the VMS-333. Note:
You can take photos only when intervalometry is NOT running.
The four buttons on this screen mimic the functions of
the single camera shutter button on the camera.
a. Half-press ON. “Wakes up” the remote camera,
turns on its light meter, recalculates and sets its
exposure, and initiates auto-focus. Exposure and
focus are then held and locked at that current
position as long as Half-press is ON.
Note: This is a toggle button. It stays ON until you
press it again to turn it OFF.
While Half-press is ON, you can still manually adjust
the camera itself (assuming it is near by) if you need
to change shutter speed, lens aperture, or ISO
settings. No photo is actually captured.
b. Full-press ON. Used with time exposure photos, such
as taking photos at night. Triggers the camera
shutter to capture a photo. This remotely holds
down the actual shutter button on the camera.
When the desired time has elapsed for the time
exposure photo, you must toggle Full-Press OFF to
close the shutter so the camera can store the photo.
Note: This is a toggle button. It stays ON until you
press it again to turn it OFF.
c. Shutter ONLY. Used to take a photo without attempting to focus the camera lens. This is useful
when the camera’s auto-focus fails because the camera cannot focus its lens on the desired subject.
This happens at night and also when the scene has very little contrast, such as pointing the camera
at a mono-tonal wall, or the ceiling, or the sky. In those situations, use Shutter Only, rather than
Focus and Shutter.
Note: This is not a toggle button. It does not stay on and is released when you lift your finger from
the touch screen.
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d. Focus and Sutter. Performs the Half-Press ON function followed immediately by the Full-Press ON
function. This means it focuses the camera, then takes and stores the photo. This is probably the
button you will use most often. Note: This is not a toggle button. It does not stay on and is released
when you lift your finger from the touch screen.
e. Fire LRF: Triggers the Laser Range Finder to take a measurement.
f. Fire LRF and DSLR: Triggers the Laser Range Finder to take a measurement and the DSLR camera to
snap a photo. This means you get both a distance measurement and an image of the target you
were measuring.
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7.14 Configure VMS-333 parameters
Using VMS-Mobile, you can specify values for various parameters that control the VMS-333 and the
camera.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Configure > Parameters and the Configure VMS-333
Parameters screen appears.
2. Fill in the following fields of information.
General
a. AUX Port Baud Rate. Click this button for a new screen with
a list of rates. Select one: 4800 (default), 9600, or 115200.
Intervalometry
a. Intervalometry Mode. Click this button for a new screen
with a list of modes that determine how photos will
automatically be taken: Time, Distance, or Field-of-View.
Once you select a mode, additional fields are available for
you to fill in. For more details, see Section 7.12 Set
intervalometry parameters
Camera
a. Focus Time. Enter the time (in ms) it takes to focus the
camera (signal time). This is equivalent to how long the
shutter button is "half pressed."
b. Shutter Time. How the time (in ms) it takes to shutter the
camera (signal time). This refers to how long the shutter
button is "full pressed." It generally has no effect on picture
taking unless the camera is in "bulb" mode—set to take
multiple images as long as the shutter button is held down.
Laser Range Finder
a. Snap Photo on LRF Data (LRF Snap Photo Mode). Click this button for a new screen that defines
what happens when you press or hold the VMS-333 internal or external feature trigger in
conjunction with the Laser Range Finder. For more details, see Section 7.13 Set Laser Range
Finder parameters.
b. LRF Data Hold (sec). This defines the number of seconds VMS-333 retains the most recent LRF
measurement data when you have configured the VMS-333 for manual photo capture (not
automatic). For more details, see Section 7.13 Set Laser Range Finder parameters.
Set default Values Reset All Parameters. This button resets all VMS-333 configuration parameters
to their original default values. VMS-333 performs this action; VMS-Mobile does not reset its
own internal configuration. For example, any previously loaded KML files or downloaded Open
Street Map tiles will still be present in VMS-Mobile after the VMS-333 has reset itself.
3. Click the Back button at the button of the screen to save your choices and return to the Configure
screen.
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7.15 Set intervalometry parameters
Intervalometry parameters are used to trigger camera shots based on time interval, distance traveled, or
field of view when the VMS-333 is also connected to a DSLR still camera. The VMS-333 contains flash
memory that “permanently” stores the parameters you set. This means the settings are maintained
when power is turned off or when the camera is removed from VMS-333. When the VMS-333 is
powered up again, it will use the stored values of the parameters. As a result, you only need to set the
parameters once.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Configure > Parameters and the Configure Parameters
screen appears.
2. Find the Intervalometry group of parameters on the screen and click the button next to Mode. You
can now select the way you want the photos automatically taken: Time, Distance, or Field of View.
Each option produces its own additional field(s) to
enter in the Intervalometry section of the
Configure Parameters screen.
These are listed below.
a. Time. The VMS-333 triggers the camera
to take pictures at specific time intervals.
You must also provide a value for Time Interval to determine the time between pictures. The range
is from every 10 ms to once a year (most cameras will not shutter faster than about 200 ms per
picture). Enter the value in 10 ms increments. If you enter some other value, it will be rounded to
the closest 10 ms. For example, if you enter 12 ms, the time interval will be rounded to 10 ms.
b. Distance. VMS-333 triggers the camera to
take pictures at specific distance intervals.
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When you select Distance, you must also provide a value for Distance Interval (in meters) to
determine the distance between pictures. The distance between pictures is accumulated along the
path traveled; it is not the straight-line distance between pictures.
For example, suppose you plot points on a map where you want pictures taken and measure the
distance between them. This may not be the distance you want to specify for the parameter
because it is only valid if the path traveled when the pictures are taken is a straight line; otherwise,
the distance between points will be shorter. The distance between pictures is specified in meters,
where the maximum distance is more than you will ever need—about 2.6 million miles!
c. Field-of-View. VMS-333 triggers the camera
to take photos at a rate according to the field
of view of the camera lens, as well as aircraft
speed, aircraft altitude, and ground altitude.
This guarantees full-coverage images along
the corridor with no gaps between them.
This option is used for taking “nadir” images from an aircraft (camera pointing straight down) with
shuttering sufficient to cover the entire corridor with no gaps between images. When you select
Field of View as the intervalometry mode, you must specify a value for Altitude Above Ground (m)
and Field of View (degrees).
You must enter the
red parameters into
the Intervalometry
section of the VMSMobile screen.
The Vertical field of
view and Horizontal
field of view values
are calculated using a
Red Hen Systems
spreadsheet that
comes with VMS-333.
Make sure to fill in
the spreadsheet
and calculate the
values before you
continue.
You will use only ONE
of those values as the
Field of View. See
next page for details.
Intervalometry values you must supply:

Altitude Above Ground (m): Aim for a value that provides efficient coverage. If you fly higher at
a constant speed, you get a wider “swath” covered at lower resolution, and if you fly lower, you
get a narrower “swath” covered at higher resolution.
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
Field of View (degrees): This is either vertical or horizontal field of view, depending on the kind
of photos you plan to take and the orientation of the camera.
 If you plan to take photos in landscape orientation, with the camera oriented so the wide
edge of the sensor faces the direction of flight, you must enter the Vertical Field of View
value from the Red Hen Systems spreadsheet.
 If you plan to take photos in portrait orientation, with the camera oriented so the narrow
edge of the sensor faces the direction of flight, you must enter the Horizontal Field of View
value from the Red Hen Systems spreadsheet.
Note: The greater the Field of View value, the less frequently the camera needs to take photos
at constant altitude and speed. Learn how to calculate the value using the spreadsheet as shown
below.
Filling in the spreadsheet:
The vertical and horizontal field of view value is calculated by filling in a special Red Hen Systems
spreadsheet that comes with the VMS-333. The spreadsheet produces the value based on the userentered camera details such as focal length of the lens, the size of the image sensor, and the
intended altitude along the flight path.
The table below shows you the type of information you must enter into the Red Hen Systems
spreadsheet to calculate the correct value for the Field of View field in the Intervalometry screen.

Yellow fill = values you must specify in the spreadsheet

Blue fill = values the spreadsheet calculates

Red outline = values you must transfer to the VMS-Mobile Intervalometry screen.
Aircraft Data
Aircraft altitude above ground level (m)
Aircraft speed (km/hr)
Camera Data
Camera ON survey hours
Camera sensor width (mm)
Camera sensor width (pixels)
Camera sensor height (mm)
Camera sensor height (pixels)
Image overlap (%)
Lens focal length (mm)
Field of View (use only ONE of these values for VMS-Mobile Field of View)
Vertical field of view (degrees)
Horizontal field of view (degrees)
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Reference Information
Hectares per image
Corridor distance covered per image (m)
Corridor covered per image (m)
Ground resolution (cm/pixel)
Image rate (secs/image)
Data rate (GB/hr)
Survey hours on 64GB card
Total number of survey images
Total data for survey (GB)
Tips for filling out the spreadsheet:

Above ground altitude: Aim for a value that provides efficient coverage. You will always get
complete coverage along the corridor, but if you fly higher you get a wider “swath” covered
at lower resolution, and if you fly lower, you get a narrower “swath” covered at higher
resolution. To determine above-ground altitude, you can do EITHER of the following:
 Use the altitude data from the laser rangefinder if you have one. The rangefinder is
attached to the feature trigger port (Port A or FT/LRF) of VMS-333 and set to range
periodically in time.
- OR  Calculate the value by subtracting the ground altitude (usually available from a digital
elevation map) from your air altitude.
Above-ground elevation = air altitude — ground altitude

Aircraft speed: The greater the speed, the less frequently the camera needs to take photos
at constant altitude and speed.

Horizontal field of view: This value is used with the Vertical field of view to calculate
Hectares per image (the area of ground covered by a single photo)
3. Once the Intervalometry section of the Configure Parameters screen is complete, click the Back
button at the bottom of the screen to save your choices and return to the Configure screen.
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7.16 Set Laser Range Finder parameters
If you plan to use a Laser Range Finder to take distance measurements, you need to set parameters that
determine the Laser Range Finder’s operation.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, click Configure > Parameters and the Configure Parameters
screen appears.
2. Scroll down to find the Laser Range Finder group of
parameters on the screen:
a. Snap Photo on LRF Data.This defines what happens when
you press or hold the VMS-333 internal or external
feature trigger in conjunction with the Laser Range
Finder. Click the down arrow to see the options:

FT button is held. Hold down VMS-333 internal or external
feature trigger to snap a photo.

FT button & spontaneous. Press and release VMS-333
internal or external feature trigger to mark a feature of
interest and trigger an LRF measurement.

On LRF data received. Automatically snap a photo once VMS333 receives data from the LRF
b. LRF Data Hold (sec). This defines the number of seconds VMS-333 retains the most recent LRF
measurement data when you have configured the VMS-333 for manual photo capture (not
automatic). During the LRF data hold period (typically 10 seconds), the VMS-333 emits 1-second
beeps, giving you time to decide if you want to snap a photo manually to associate with the
most recent LRF measurement. This option is useful when you are trying to select a specific LRF
target and the selection process takes a couple of LRF triggering attempts. In this situation, you
do not want a photo automatically snapped each time you make a trial attempt; you only want
it snapped on the final attempt.
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7.17 Configure VMS-333 data
Using VMS-Mobile, you can specify the type of data the VMS-333 sends the camera.
1. From the VMS-Mobile home screen, select Configure > Data. The Configure Data screen appears
with a number of switches you can turn ON and OFF, depending on what data you want sent to the
DSLR camera.
Audio Feedback
a. Beeps Enabled. When ON, enables the beeping sound so you can
hear that things are happening (features being marked, photos
being taken).
b. Speak Feature Trigger Text. When ON, a female voice speaks the
feature trigger text when you press a button on the Mark
Features screen. Make sure to adjust the Android Media Volume
by pressing the Volume Up and Down buttons, or by using this
Android screen: Settings > Sound & notifications.
VMS
c. VMS-333 Friendly Name: This is a short, user- defined custom
Bluetooth name for the VMS-333 unit. You can uniquely name
multiple VMS-333 devices for use in close proximity with multiple
Android devices running VMS-Mobile. Default name = VMS-333.
To change the VMS Friendly Name:

Start the VMS-333 device and VMS-Mobile.

Wait until VMS-Mobile establishes a Bluetooth connection to
the VMS-333 unit.

Return to the Configure > Data screen, press the VMS
Friendly Name entry field, and enter the desired text.
Note: The VMS Friendly Name must be 12 characters or less
in length and must NOT these reserved characters:
o $ (dollar sign)
o
, (comma)
o carriage return or line feed

Once completed, exit from the Configure > Data and return to
the VMS-Mobile Home screen by pressing the Android Back
button.

Exit VMS-Mobile by pressing the Android menu button and
selecting Exit & Stop Services.

A message appears telling you VMS-Mobile can automatically
find and connect to the VMS-333 device:
Connected to RHS_VMS_[friendly name]
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Bluetooth Devices
a. VMS-333. Specify the particular VMS-333 to which VMS-Mobile will connect. Default = Any VMS333.
b. Blue2CAN #1. Specify the particular Blue2CAN to which VMS-Mobile will connect. Default = Any
Blue2CAN.
c. Blue2CAN #2. Specify the particular Blue2CAN to which VMS-Mobile will connect. Default = Any
Blue2CAN.
Tip for Setting Bluetooth Devices options: To operate multiple VMS-Mobile applications in
close proximity to multiple VMS-333 and Blue2CAN devices, configure the specific devices for
use as follows:
1. Turn off all VMS-333 and the Blue2CAN devices or move out of range of them.
2. Next, turn on only the VMS-333 and Blue2CAN devices you want to connect to.
3. Start VMS-Mobile and wait for each device to connect.
4. Press OK to return to the Configure Data screen. From the Configure Data screen, go to
the Bluetooth Devices section and press the down-arrow for the VMS-333, Blue2CAN#1,
or Blue2CAN #2 fields.
5. When the Select Blue2CAN device or Select VMS device dialog appears, select the
Bluetooth address of the specific device to which you want to connect.
Note: When using multiple Blue2CAN devices, use the first device in the list for Blue2CAN #1
and the second for Blue2CAN #2. If you set both Blue2CAN #1 and Blue2CAN #2 to Any
Blue2CAN, VMS-Mobile will connect to more than two Blue2CAN devices if they are available.
If you do not plan to connect to any additional Blue2CAN device, set both options to None.
d. Include Image Direction in EXIF: When set to ON, VMS-Mobile sends the current magnetic compass
sensor details for the Android device to the VMS-333 unit.
Later, when you snap any DSLR photos, the VMS-333 includes the current magnetic compass
sensor value (derived from the Android device compass sensor) into the photo EXIF Image Direction
field.
Note: To ensure proper operation, please follow these instructions:
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
Make sure the Android device running VMS-Mobile points in the same direction as the DSLR
camera lens. This means the Android device must be perpendicular to the DSLR camera lens.
 Hold the Android device in either Portrait (vertical) or Landscape (horizontal) orientation. For
the most accurate results, place the device flat on a horizontal, level surface with its screen
pointed upward or hold the device so it is nearly perpendicular to the ground, as if you were
taking a photo of something directly in front of you. If you hold the device at any other angle,
such as 45 degrees, VMS-Mobile cannot provide accurate compass value results.
 Wait for the compass value to settle after changing direction to ensure accurate results.
 Test the digital compass in your Android device by comparing it with a traditional hand-held
compass before using it in the field.
GPS
a. Use Android GPS Receiver. When ON, VMS-333 uses the GPS receiver in your Android device.
b. Use Bluetooth GPS Receiver. When ON, VMS-333 uses the Bluetooth GPS receiver connected to
your Android device.
Laser
a. View Laser Range Finder. When ON, VMS-Mobile displays the values the Laser Range Finder
provides. The values appear at the top of the map.
Test
a. Test Comms Link (Red LED). When ON, turns on the VMS-333 red LED to indicate the VMS-333
is operational and connected to VMS-Mobile.
2. To view more advanced configuration settings, press and hold (“long press”) Configure > Data. The
Configure VMS-333 Data screen appears with additional Advanced section above the Audio
Feedback section at the top of the screen.
Advanced
a. Send GPS data. When ON, sends raw GPS data (time and
location) to the camera.
b. Send All Logged Data. When ON, sends all marked
features when the feature trigger was pushed.
c. Send DSLR Shutter Events. When ON, sends instructions
about half and full pushes, as well as shuttering and
focusing.
d. Send Navigation Events. When ON, sends a subset of GPSrelated data such as differential fix available or not
available.
e. Send Laser Data. When ON, sends data from the Laser
Range Finder.
3. Click the Back button at the bottom of the screen to save your choices and return to the Configure
screen.
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7.18 Configure VMS-333 buttons
You can specify how you want physical button pushes handled on the: VMS-333 (both the buttons on
the unit and on the cable), camera, and LRF. For details, see Control the way feature triggers behave.
7.19 Exit and stop background services
When you’re done using VMS-Mobile, here’s a short cut for exiting the application and stopping any
Blue2CAN and GPS services that are running in the background. This short cut saves you time because
you do not have to manually turn off the services through the Configure Data screen.
1. Go to the VMS-Mobile Home page.
2. Press the Android menu button and select Exit & Stop Services.
3. The application will exit and the VMS-Mobile Blue2Can and GPS status icons will disappear after a
few seconds.
7.20 Get familiar with the VMS-Mobile folder structure
All files that VMS-Mobile uses are stored in the following folders on the Android device.
VMSMobile\
 “Parent” folder under which all folders and files reside.
feature_definition_files
 Contains the RHS-supplied feature definition template and any
user-created feature definition files. All are *.txt files.
feature_definition_icons
 Contains user-defined image files used as icons on the buttons in
the Mark Features screen and on the map to mark features of
interest.
gps
 Contains NMEA format GPS log files recorded from the Android
(internal) GPS receiver.
help
 Contains the PDF version of the VMS-333 User Guide.
kml

log

osm

Contains KML and KMZ output files produces from VMS-333
missions. KML (shape) files are loaded from this location into
VMS-Mobile for display on the VMS-Mobile map screen.
Contains raw VMS-333 log files. These files are in NMEA format
and each record is preceded by a < or > character indicating
whether the record was received from (<) or sent to (>) the VMS333 by VMS Mobile.
Contains Open Street Maps map tiles that were download by the
user for use as offline maps in VMS-Mobile.
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8. Using the Laser Range Finder
This section describes how to use VMS-333 with a Laser Range Finder (LRF) and a digital single-lens
reflex camera (DSLR) to locate and map objects from a distance. The images you capture with the
camera can then be processed by isWhere or MediaMapper and appropriately placed on a map.
Before You Begin: Make sure you made all the necessary electrical connections to the VMS-333. For
details, see Connect VMS-333 to DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder.
8.1 Introducing the LRF
In general, the most accurate way to capture the GPS coordinates of any object is to put a GPS receiver
at its location. However, it is not always possible or convenient to do so.

In this situation, a Laser Range Finder (LRF) makes the task easier because it maps the location of
objects from a distance. The LRF does this by taking line-of-sight measurements from the “source”
location of the LRF and camera to the “target” location an object (typically up to several hundred
meters).
LTI TruePulse 360B Laser Range Finders
Vectronix Pocket Laser Range Finder
LRF devices measure slope distance, inclination (% slope), and
azimuth. They also calculate horizontal distance, vertical
distance, height, and missing line values. LRF devices typically
come in a ruggedized and waterproof version as well.
LRF devices have different message formats that vary with
each brand of device. MediaMapper Mobile must understand
the message format of each LRF device it supports.
MediaMapper Mobile currently supports only these devices:

LTI TruePulse 360B/R

LTI TruePulse 200B models

Trimble Laser Ace 00 LRF (for details, see:
http://www.trimble.com/mapping/GIS)

Vectronix Pocket Laser Range Finder
Note: Whenever MediaMapper Mobile loses Bluetooth
connection with the Laser Range Finder, it provides automatic
network reconnections for up to 5 minutes.
Here is how it works:
1. A GPS receiver locates the position of the LRF and camera. Note: The LRF does not have to be
mounted on the camera, but it does have to be in close proximity with the camera.
2. The LRF measures the distance, inclination, and compass bearing from the LRF and camera to the
object.
3. The VMS-333 captures the data output by the LRF, as well as the usual GPS data. It presents this
data in the proper format for automatic recording as either: (a) part of the audio track of a video
recording or (b) in the EXIF metadata stored in the image file of every photo taken by a supported
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DSLR camera (Nikon DSLR). Note: We will focus on item (b), since this document addresses using
the LRF with a DSLR.
4. Once the GPS data and the LRF data become part of the image file, the data cannot be easily
associated with the wrong photo or lost. If you have the photo, you also have the geospatial data for
it. This is called a “geotagged” image.
5. You can then transfer the geotagged images to isWhere or MediaMapper. The software performs
calculations to “offset” the GPS location of each object by the measured distance at the measured
bearing angle. This pinpoints the object’s location with real-world GPS coordinates.
8.2 LRF Operating Procedure
1. Calibrate your LRF. For details, refer to Calibration Guide provided by your LRF manufacturer.
2. Look through the LRF to target your object of interest, then trigger the LRF to make a measurement
(see Step 2 below). The measurement can take as long as 2 seconds. During this time you must keep
the LRF trained on the object of interest, holding it as steady as possible.
3. Trigger the LRF, using any of the following methods:
a. Press the button on top of the LRF
b. Press the button on the cable that connects the LRF to VMS
c. Press the red button on VMS-333. In this situation, the VMS-333 i and e parameter let you hold
down the red button to trigger the LRF to take a measurement and the camera to take a photo.
For details, see Setup: i parameter.
Use the method that works best in your situation:
 Method (a) and (b) work equally well when your LRF and camera are not attached to one
another. Simply press the button that is most convenient.
- When you use either method, the LRF starts the range measurement as soon as you press
the button.
- When the range measurement completes, the VMS 333 produces a series of “high” beeps.
This lets you know that range data is available and you are free to move the LRF off target
and take photos.
 Method (c) works best when your LRF and camera are attached to one another—typically, the
LRF is mounted on top of the camera. This method is convenient because the camera is always
aimed correctly when the range measurement completes because the LRF is pointing at that
object as well.
- When you use this method, the LRF starts the range measurement as soon as you press the
button, but it also causes the VMS-333 to emit a short beep indicating it was pressed.
- When the range measurement completes, the VMS-333 emits a high beep; however, if you
are still holding down the button at this point in time, the DSLR will automatically shutter. If
you have released the button and it’s not down when the range data is received, everything
works exactly like the other two methods. This feature lets you use the “Automatic image
capture” function sometimes, and manually capturing images at other times.
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4. Manually or automatically take photo.
a. By default, VMS-333 gives you a 10-second interval to manually take a photo with the DSLR after
the ranged data is received. During that interval, VMS-333 emits a series of high beeps, one per
second, until a low beep indicates the end of the time interval.
If you do not take a photo by the time you hear the low beep, you must range again because the
range data is discarded. Any photo taken after the low beep contains only GPS data; it does not
contain any range data.
b. If you want the camera to automatically take photos whenever range data changes, you must
set the VMS-333 q parameter. For details, see Setup: q parameter.
Note: All photos taken during the “LRF Data Valid Time Window” contain the same range
measurements and GPS metadata in their EXIF tags. This is because the GPS data is locked in when
new range data is received and then held until the time expires, just like the range data.
Warning! Suppose you trigger the LRF and hear the beeping indicating it’s time to take a photo, but
then you realize you were focused on the wrong object or did not hold the LRF as still as necessary –
what do you do? Simply trigger the LRF again. You will get another 10-second interval take a photo.
However the GPS data will remain latched at the position it was at earlier, indicating when the first
range was measured. To avoid this problem, wait for the low beep before you trying to trigger the
LRF again.
5. The LRF communicates its data using an RS-232 serial interface. It is essential that the baud rate of
the VMS-333 match that of the LRF. To ensure this, you can do either of the following.
a. If you know the LRF baud rate. Run the terminal emulator and use this command to set the
VMS-333 baud rate: $PRHS,CMD,B,[LRF-baud-rate]
Acceptable baud rates are: 4800, 9600, and 115200. Once set, the baud rate remains in effect,
even when you power down the system.
b. If you do not know the LRF baud rate. Let VMS-333 use its “auto-baud” system. Here is how it
works:
 When the communication parameters of your LRF do not match the default VMS-333
communication parameters, the first measurement received after power up will be used to
determine the correct setting.
 If that measurement is not recognized as range data by the system, the second and
subsequent measures should be.
 Once determined, the communication parameters are locked in until VMS-333 is powered
down.
6. You must calibrate the compass in the Laser Range Finder to reduce the effects of "hard iron" in the
local environment and ensure that your measurements are accurate.
 For the calibration to work, make sure the disturbance to the local field is static with respect to
the LRF. Fortunately, disturbance generally falls off as the cube of the distance. This means that
most objects that could affect calibration are too far away to do so.
 To make sure measurements are not compromised by a local field, take measurements of an
object’s location from several places.
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7. Properly configure your LRF device as follows:
 Take single point measurements only.
 Report all measurement data values in Meter and Degree units.
 Make sure declination adjustment is stet to 0.0 or turned OFF. Declination is the difference
between Magnetic North and True North that varies across the Earth. Red Hen Systems
software automatically compensates for the declination when you load the images into isWhere
or MediaMapper, which is why the LRF device does not need to. Note: Consult the User Guide
for your LRF for further details on how to configure and calibrate your LRF device.
8.3 Making Sure Everything is Working
From configuring parameters, to connecting devices, to taking photos, it’s important to ensure that
everything is working correctly. Here is a checklist you should review.
1. Verify you have the correct version of the firmware (Firmware Version J or higher) installed on VMS333.
a. Turn on the system.
b. Aim the Laser Range Finder at a target and press the button on top of the Laser Range Finder.
c. After 2 seconds or so, you should hear VMS-333 beep once per second for 10 seconds. When
this happens, the firmware is updated.
Note: You can also open the terminal emulator and type this command to view the latest version of
the firmware: $PRHS,R[Enter]
2. Verify you are collecting both GPS and range data with the camera and LRF.
a. After taking a photo, press the review button on the camera to view it on the rear screen.
b. Press the up-arrow of the 4-way control until GPS data displays.
c. If the GPS data never displays, then GPS data was not recorded with the image. Next time you
operate your camera, make sure you get GPS symbol in the top LCD of the camera just before
you are ready to range or shoot a geo-tagged photo.
d. If the photo has range data in it, you will see the HEADING parameter in the list. However, if the
GPS data is there but the HEADING parameter is missing, then the range data was not recorded
with the photo. In addition to the HEADING field, the number in the Altitude field should be
larger than 100000. If it is not it’s not, then the Range data was not recorded. Refer to Step 5 for
more items to check.
3. Make sure devices are operating correctly to gather Range and GPS data.
a. Check that equipment is connected to the correct ports as described in 4.1 Make necessary
cable connections.
b. Check that all battery-operated devices are charged or have fresh new batteries. Note: Always
carry spare batteries!
c. Check that memory cards in the DSLR have adequate free space to record sufficient photos and
video.
d. Check that all the equipment is turned on and ready to use (remember to remove the lens cap
on the DSLR camera lens).
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
Try taking a test photo with the camera by manually pressing the shutter button.
 Try triggering the camera via the VMS-333 or via the terminal emulator (using the
appropriate VMS-333 command entry).
 Try pressing the LRF trigger button to capture a LRF Range Measurement.
e. Make sure the GPS equipment provides a valid GPS fix.
 VMS-333: Look at the blue LED on the VMS-333: if it is blinking, you have a normal fix (30 m
accuracy); if it is solid blue, you have a WAAS fix (3 m accuracy); and if it is not on, there is
no fix. Note: Wait until a GPS fix is obtained — perhaps by moving into a better location
away from any obstructions that are blocking your clear view to the open sky.
 DSLR camera: Make sure the GPS indicator is displayed.
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9.0 Troubleshooting
With software or hardware, problems are bound to occur at one time or another. You might have made
a simple mistake, or maybe you misunderstood the explanation in the User Guide, or perhaps there's a
problem with the equipment.
Whatever the issue, we recommend following this procedure so the problem gets resolved as quickly as
possible:
1. Review the most Common Fixes (see section 9.1) and see if any of them apply to your situation.
2. Find the task in this User Guide and make sure you followed each step correctly. You may be able to
find out where you made a mistake and correct it.
3. Contact the Red Hen Systems Support Team (see section 9.2).
9.1 Prevent Problems
Power
1. Make sure the power is on and the power source is connected.
2. If you are using a battery, make sure it is charged.
Connections
3. Check the cable connections. In particular, ensure the 3.5 mm stereo cable is connected to the
camera’s microphone input during recording, or connected to the camera’s headphone output
during indexing or review.
4. If MediaMapper cannot find the VMS-333 hardware connections, make sure the COM port on the
computer is not “blocked” by another application.
5. If VMS-Mobile will not connect to the VMS-333, make sure that Bluetooth is enabled in the Android
System Settings screen. If VMS-Mobile takes a long time to connect to the VMS-333 (more than 30
seconds) try disabling and then re-enabling Bluetooth in the Android System Settings screen.
Camera
6. Check the camera’s volume setting. If the setting is too high or too low, the data will not be
recorded or processed correctly by VMS-333. Set the camera’s volume at approximately midrange.
9.2 Resolve Problems
1. DSLR camera does not always trigger the shutter.
 Possible reason: This may be caused by lens auto-focus failure. Auto-focus does not perform
well under the following conditions and the shutter release may become disabled if the camera
is unable to focus:
- There is little or no contrast between the subject and the background.
- The focus point contains objects at different distances from the camera.
- The subject is dominated by regular geometric patterns.
- The focus point contains areas of sharp contrasting brightness.
- Background objects appear larger than the subject.
- Subject contains many fine details.
 Solution: Turn off auto-focus from the Camera Control screen. For details, see: Control the
behavior of an external DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder
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2. DSLR camera takes multiple photos in very rapid succession, instead of just the expected single
photo.
 Possible reason: This is caused when you have the camera set to take Continuous photo rather
than Single Shot.
 Solution: Set the camera to take single-shot photos, typically by adjusting the ring on the top
left of the camera to the S position (not the CL or CH position). Consult your camera manual if
necessary.
 Possible reason: This may also occur when you use the Camera Flash Feedback cable coupled
with an incorrect setting for the External Feature Trigger.
When External Feature Trigger is incorrectly set to trigger a DSLR photo, the Camera Flash
Feedback cable creates a runaway positive feedback loop where the camera is repeatedly
instructed by the VMS-333 to take photos based on the signal the VMS-333 is receiving from
the Camera Flash cable.
 Solution: Either (a) Remove the Camera Flash Feedback cable if you are not using it; or (b) Gp tp
the Configure > Buttons screen and change the External Feature Trigger setting to Flash
Feedback Cable (not Take Photo).
9.3 Red Hen Systems Support Team
If you reviewed the most common fixes, read the instructions in the manual, and still have problems, it’s
time to contact the Red Hen Systems Support Team. Before you do so, make sure to write down this
information:
3. What you were doing when the problem occurred (step-by-step, if possible)
4. The equipment and cables you were using.
5. The version of software you were using.
Then email or call the Red Hen Systems Support Team. Please allow at least 24 hours for a reply.
 Availability: Monday through Friday during business hours
 Email: [email protected]
 Phone: 970-493-3952
Provide members of the Support Team with the information you captured and they will work with you
to find a solution.
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Appendix A. Quick Reference for VMS-Mobile Screens
This appendix serves as a quick reference for the various screens of the VMS-Mobile Android
application. The title of each screen tells you what to click to bring up that screen.
Home
Home > Control Camera
For details, see: Start up VMS-Mobile and
examine the home screen
For details, see: Control the behavior of an
external DSLR camera and Laser Range Finder
Home > Android menu
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Home > Mark Features (example)
Home > Mark Features > Android menu
Home > Mark Features > Android menu >
Load Feature Definitions
For details, see: Mark individual features
of interest and continuous conditions.
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Home > Configure
Home > Configure > Feature Definitions
Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Load
Loads a feature definition files and populates the Mark
Feature Screen. For details, see Home > Mark Features
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Home > Configure > Feature Definitions > Edit
For details, see Edit a feature definition file.
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Home > Configure > Data
Home > Configure > Data (long press):
Advanced section at top
For details, see: Configure VMS-333 data
For details, see: Configure VMS-333 data
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Home > Configure > Feature Triggers
For details, see: Control the way feature
triggers behave
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers >
Internal Feature Trigger
Home > Configure > Feature Triggers >
External Feature Trigger
For details, see: Control the way feature
triggers behave
For details, see: Control the way feature triggers
behave
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Home > Configure > Feature Triggers >
DMRT Feature Trigger
Home > Configure > Offline Maps > Android
menu
For details, see: Control the way feature triggers
behave
For details, see: Load offline maps you want to
access from VMS-Mobile
Home > Configure > Parameters
Home > Configure > Parameters >
Intervalometry Mode > Time
For details, see: Set intervalometry parameters
Home > Configure > Parameters >
Intervalometry Mode > Distance
For details, see: Set intervalometry parameters
Home > Configure > Parameters >
Intervalometry Mode > Field of View
For details, see: Configure VMS-333 parameters
For details, see: Set intervalometry parameters
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Home > Configure > Load KML
For details, see: Load KML and KMZ files
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Appendix C. Pin-out Diagrams
C.1 Connectors on VMS-333
FT
Pin #
1
2
Functional Description
Power – Out (12 V)
Ground
3
4
Aux-In (RS-232)
Aux-Out (RS-232)
5
FT1 (VCC)
6
Ground
GPS
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
Functional Description
GPS In (RS-232)
Ground
GPS In (TTL)
GPS Out (TTL)
GPS Power
GPS Out (RS-232)
Pin #
1
2
3
4
5
6
Functional Description
Power
Ground
Half Press
Full Press
Nkn GPS Out
Ground
Pin #
Functional Description
PWR
COM
1
Power – In (7-30V)
2
3
Ground
From Comm+
4
5
6
From CommTo Comm+
To Comm-
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Appendix D. External GPS Receivers
This appendix contains more information about external GPS receivers.
D.1 NMEA 0183 Version 2.0 Interface
VMS-333 is compatible with most external GPS, differential, or DGPS receivers through the GPS
connector. The external receiver must be set to output the following:
Setting
Data Type
Baud Rate
Bits
Parity
Stop Bits
Value
NMEA 0183, version 2.0 or higher
4800
8
none
1
Note: When using VMS-333 with an external GPS that has a data logger or hand-held computer, the
VMS-333 hardware unit is connected directly to the GPS receiver, NOT to the data logger. You will have
one receiver port connected to the data logger, and another receiver port used as the data output to the
VMS-333 hardware unit’s GPS port. Your GPS receiver should have a suitable cable for this connection.
The NMEA strings required by VMS-333 are GGA and RMC. They are explained in section B.2 Trimble
GPS Receivers.
D.2 Trimble GPS Receivers
Some Trimble GPS units do not output the RMC string normally required by VMS-333. Follow your
manufacturer’s instructions to set up your receiver so it outputs the ZDA and VTG strings instead. These
strings compensate for the lack of RMC. Units known to require this adjustment are the GPS Patfinder
ProXR and ProXRS.
The figures on the following pages provide detailed information about the GGA and RMC strings for
Trimble GPS Receivers.
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GGA. Global Positioning System Fix Data
This string provides the time, position, and fix related data for a GPS receiver.
Source: NMEA 0183 – Standard for Interfacing Marine Electronic Devices, Version 3.0, July 1, 2000
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RMC. Recommended Maximum Specific GNSS Data
This string conveys the time, date, position, course, and speed data provided by a GNSS navigation
receiver. This string is transmitted at intervals not exceeding 2 seconds and is always accompanied by
RMB when a destination waypoint is active. RMC and RMB are the recommended minimum data
provided by a GNSS receiver. All data fields must be provided; null fields are used only when data is
temporarily unavailable.
Source: NMEA 0183 – Standard for Interfacing Marine Electronic Devices, Version 3.0, July 1, 2000.
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Appendix E. VMS-333 Warranty
1.1 Limited Warranty. Subject to Section 1.3 (“Limitation”), RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC warrants to USER
that, during the period commencing on USER’s purchase of the VMS-333 Video Mapping System™
(“Product”) and terminating one (1) year thereafter, the hardware portion of the Product will
perform substantially in accordance with the appropriate Documentation provided with the Product
at the time of purchase. In the event of a failure of the Product to comply with the foregoing
warranty during the applicable warranty period (a “Defect”), RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC shall, at its
option, repair or replace the Product or refund the fees paid by USER (following USER’s return of the
Product), or provide a workaround for the Defect. The foregoing sets forth USER’s sole and exclusive
remedies for a breach of the above limited warranties.
1.2 Return Procedures. Product shall be non-returnable except as provided in Section 1.1 (“Limited
Warranty”). USER shall return the Product to RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC, 2627 Redwing Road, Suite 235,
Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 USA, freight prepaid, along with a written statement describing the
Defect, proof of purchase and the license. RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC shall only be obligated under its
warranty for Product with Defects that are reproducible by RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC in the execution
environment. RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC will be responsible for all return shipping costs of repaired or
replacement units to USER. Replacement Products will be warranted for the remaining warranty
period of the original Product.
1.3 Limitation. The warranties set forth above shall not apply to (i) any third party software or
hardware, whether or not such third party software or hardware is provided by RED HEN SYSTEMS,
LLC, except that RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC will, at its option, repair or replace the internal GPS card for
a one (1) year period following USER’s purchase of the Product; (ii) any Product which has been
modified, repaired or altered, except by RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC; or (iii) any Product which has not
been maintained in accordance with any handling or operating instructions supplied by RED HEN
SYSTEMS, LLC or has been subjected to unusual physical or electrical stress, misuses, negligence,
accidents, abuse, neglect, vandalism or acts of nature.
1.4 Disclaimer of Warranties. Except as set forth above, RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC makes no other
warranties, express, implied or statutory, regarding products. All implied warranties as to
satisfactory quality, performance, merchantability, fitness for particular purpose or noninfringement are expressly disclaimed. Some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion of implied
warranties or limitations on how long an implied warranty may last, so such limitations or exclusions
may not apply to USER.
1.5 Limitation of Liability. In no event will RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC be liable to USER for any special,
incidental, consequential or exemplary damages of any kind, including but not limited to any lost
profits and lost savings, however caused, whether for breach or repudiation of contract, tort, breach
of warranty, negligence, or otherwise, whether or not RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC was advised of the
possibility of such loss or damages. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this agreement, RED
HEN SYSTEMS, LLC’s total liability to USER arising from or in relation to this agreement or the
product shall be limited to the total payments to RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC for the product. In no event
will RED HEN SYSTEMS, LLC be liable for the cost of procurement of substitute goods. The foregoing
limitations shall not apply to damages arising from death or personal injury to persons or tangible
property in any jurisdiction where such limitation is prohibited by applicable law. Some jurisdictions
do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so such exclusions
may not apply to USER.
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