General User Manual | Univega | English

General User Manual | Univega | English
General
User Manual
English
Raleigh Univega GmbH 2011
1 The bike and its components
1Handlebar
2 Handlebar stem
3Bell
4Headset
5 Front light
6Mudguard
7Fork
8 Front wheel brake
9Tyres
10Wheels
11 Bottom bracket
12Pedals
13Chain
14 Rear derailleur
14 a Front derailleur
14 b Rear derailleur
15 Rear light
16Reflector
17 Pannier rack
18Saddle
19Frame
3
18
2
1
4
17
5
15
19
16
7
14a
6
11
6
8
10
10
14b
13
9
2
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12
9
2 Preface
Your bike has been delivered to you fully assembled.
If parts of your bike have not been installed, please consult your specialist cycle shop.
The purpose of this User Manual is to help you use your
bike safely in the manner for which is is intended, and enjoy all its benefits for many years to come. We assume that
you have general knowledge on the handling of bikes.
Every person who uses, cleans, maintains or disposes of
this bike must have read and understood the entire content of this User Manual.
In addition to texts, tables and lists, the User Manual contains the following symbols that denote important information or dangers.
WARNING about possible physical injury,
increased risk of falls or other injuries
IMPORTANT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION or
special information on using the bike
NOTE about possible damage to property or
the environment
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3 Content
9.2.4Adjusting the saddle angle
15
1The bike and its components
2
2Preface
3
9.2.4.1With a two-bolt seatpost
15
3Content
4
9.2.4.2With a seatpost saddle clamp
15
4Safety information
7
9.2.4.3With a suspension seatpost
16
4.1
Basic safety information
4.2For your own safety
7
7
4.3Information for parents and legal guardians 7
4.4Safety in road traffic
7
4.5Bike safety
8
5Legal provisions
8
5.1Applicable road traffic licensing regulations 8
6Intended use
6.1General information
9
9
9.3Adjusting the handlebar position
16
9.3.1Adjusting / aligning the handlebar height
with a conventional handlebar stem
16
9.3.2Adjusting the handlebar height with
A-head systems
17
9.3.3Aligning handlebars with A-head systems
in relation to the front wheel
17
9.3.4Adjusting the handlebar position by
turning the handlebar
17
9.3.5Adjusting the handlebar height with
an adjustable handlebar stem
18
6.2Trekking bike / all-terrain bike (ATB), if
equipped in accordance with the applicable
road traffic licensing regulations
9
10Frame
18
11Headset
19
6.3City, touring, sports, child's and
youngster's bike, if equipped in accordance
with the applicable road traffic licensing
regulations9
12Fork
19
13Suspension frame and suspension elements
20
13.1Frame with rear suspension
20
13.2Care and maintenance
20
6.4Mountain bike (MTB) / cross bike
10
6.5Road bike / fitness bike
10
14Bottom bracket and cranks 21
6.6BMX
10
15Checking the bottom bracket
21
7Before the first ride 11
16Wheels
21
8Before every ride
12
16.1Checking the wheels
21
9Setting up the bike for the rider
12
16.2Checking the hubs
21
9.1Fitting the pedals
12
16.3Checking the rims
22
9.2Adjusting the seat position
13
22
9.2.1Adjusting the bike saddle
13
17.1Tyres
22
9.2.2Operating the quick-release device
13
17.2Tubeless tyres
23
17.3Tubed tyres
23
17.4Inner tubes
23
9.2.3Determining the correct saddle height 14
4
17Tyres and inner tubes I General User Manual
18Repairing a puncture 18.1Opening the brake
24
20Bike chain
40
24
20.1Maintenance of bike chains 40
18.1.1Opening the cantilever or V-brake 24
21Brake, brake levers and brake systems
41
18.1.2Removing the hydraulic rim brake
24
18.1.3Opening the side-pull calliper brake 25
18.1.4Releasing the hub gears, roller, drum
or back-pedal brakes
18.2Removing the wheel
21.1Important information and precautionary
measures41
21.2Brake lever
25
25
42
21.2.1Standard brake lever
21.3Hub brakes 42
42
18.2.1Removing the front wheel 25
21.3.1Drum and roller brakes
42
18.2.2Removing the rear wheel 25
21.3.2Back-pedal brake
43
18.3Removing the tyre and inner tube
26
18.4Mending the inner tube
26
21.4.1Readjusting the brake
44
18.5Fitting the tyre and inner tube
27
18.6Fitting the wheel
27
21.4.2Adjusting the brake-pad clearance
in relation to the rim
44
21.4.3Wear of brake pad
45
18.6.1Inserting the front wheel
27
18.6.2Inserting the rear wheel
27
18.6.2.1Bikes with derailleur gears
27
18.6.2.2Bikes with hub gears
27
19Bike gears
19.1Derailleur gears
19.1.1 Operating the shifting lever
19.1.1.1 Shifting lever on road bike
19.1.1.2Shifting lever on MTB, trekking
and touring bike
19.2Hub gears
19.2.1Operating the hub gears
19.2.1.1Shimano 7/8-speed shift lever
19.2.2Adjusting gears with Shimano
hub gears
30
30
31
31
35
38
38
38
21.4Rim brakes
44
21.5Disc brakes
45
21.5.1Hydraulic disc brake
46
21.5.2Vapour bubble formation
47
21.5.3Cleaning the brake system
47
21.5.4Fitting/removing the wheel
47
22Lighting system
48
22.1Specifications for lighting system
48
22.2Special regulations for road bikes
48
22.3Generator / dynamo
48
22.3.1Sidewall dynamo
22.3.1.1Switching the sidewall dynamo
on and off
48
22.3.2Hub dynamo
39
48
49
22.4Failure of the lighting system
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5
23Add-on components
50
27.5Brake pads
58
50
27.6Brake discs
58
23.1.1Front pannier rack
50
27.7Bike chains or toothed belts
58
23.1.2Rear pannier rack
50
27.8Chainrings, sprocket wheels and jockey
wheels58
23.1Pannier rack
23.2Wheel guards / mudguards 51
27.9Lamps of lighting set
58
27.10Handlebar tapes and handle grips
59
52
27.11Hydraulic oils and lubricants
59
24.1Child seat
52
27.12Gear-shift and brake cables
59
24.2Bike stand
53
27.13Paint finishes
59
24.3Bike trailer
53
27.14Bearings
59
24.4Bike basket
53
24.5Bar ends
53
27.15Sliding bearings and bearings for fullsuspension frames, suspension forks
or other suspension elements
59
23.2.1Re-engaging the safety-release
mechanism51
24Accessories and equipment
25Bike carriers for mounting on roof and rear of car 54
28Regular inspections
60
26Carbon components
54
26.1Properties
54
26.2Torques
54
26.3Visual inspection
55
26.4Carbon frame
55
26.5Carbon handlebar
55
26.6Carbon handlebar stem
55
30.2Maximum permitted loading of pannier rack
63
26.7Carbon wheels 56
30.3Tightening torques for screw connections 63
26.8Carbon fork
56
26.9Carbon seatpost
56
30.3.1General tightening torques for screw
connections65
26.10Splinters
56
26.11Fastening in mounting stand
56
26.12Transportation by car
56
28.1.1Maintenance / checks
60
60
29Link list
61
30Technical data
62
30.1Maximum permitted gross weight of bike 62
30.4Tyres and tyre pressure
65
30.5Lighting set
65
31Warranty conditions
66
57
31.1Prerequisites for the validity of warranty
claims66
27.1Care
57
31.2Warranty exclusions
27.2Wear parts
57
27.3Tyres
58
27.4Rims in conjunction with rim brakes
58
27Care and maintenance of the bike
6
28.1Inspection schedule
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4 Safety information
4.1
I nformation for parents and legal
guardians
Basic safety information
Please read all the warnings and information in this User
Manual carefully before using the bike. Keep this User
Manual near your bike for ready reference.
If you hand this bike over to someone else, don't forget to
give them the User Manual as well.
4.2
4.3
For your own safety
›› Always use a suitable bicycle helmet and wear it
correctly.
›› Make sure that your child has been taught, and
also understands, how to handle the bike safely
and responsibly in the environment in which it is
going to be used.
›› Explain to your child how to operate all the
brakes, and also how they work and any special
features. For further important information on
this matter, refer to ➠ Chapter 21 "Brake, brake
levers and brake systems".
›› As the legal guardian, you are responsible for the
safety of your child and any damage he/she may
cause when cycling. You should therefore make
absolutely sure that the bike is in technically
sound condition and adjust it regularly to the
size of the child.
4.4
›› Wear bright clothing or reflective elements so
that other road users can see you in good time.
›› Wear shoes with a stiff, and whenever possible,
non-slip sole.
›› Wear close-fitting clothing on your legs, or wear
trouser clips.
›› Wear protective clothing such as robust shoes
and gloves.
Safety in road traffic
›› Observe the applicable traffic regulations.
›› Never ride with no hands!
›› In some countries children below a certain age
must ride on the pavement and must also dismount when crossing the road. Please familiarise
yourself with the applicable regulations.
›› Adjust your handling on wet or slippery roads;
ride more slowly and brake carefully and in good
time as you will require a much greater braking
distance.
›› Adopt a speed that reflects the terrain as well as
your riding ability.
›› Do not listen to music through headphones when
cycling.
›› Do not cycle when using a mobile phone.
›› Use designated cycle paths when not using public roads.
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›› Be ready to brake, especially if you are not sure
what lies ahead or are riding downhill.
4.5
Bike safety
›› Only bikes that have been approved for use in
public places, as per the applicable regulations
(e.g. StVZO in Germany), may be used.
›› Observe the maximum permitted gross weight of
the various bike types, as this could otherwise
lead to breakage or failure of safety-relevant
components. The brake system is also only designed for the maximum permitted gross weight
of the bike. For a list of the maximum permitted
gross weights, refer to ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical
data".
The gross weight is the sum of the weight
of the bike + weight of the rider + weight of the
luggage. The gross weight also includes towed
weights such as trailers.
›› If you notice that a part is damaged or warped,
do not use the bike until you have had the part
replaced as otherwise parts that are important to
operation of the bike may fail.
›› Observe the maximum load-carrying capacity of
the pannier rack. This is marked on the pannier
rack directly (also refer to ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
›› Have maintenance and repairs carried out by a
professional bike workshop (for maintenance
intervals, refer to ➠ Chapter 28 "Regular inspections").
›› If you make technical changes to your bike, take
the national traffic regulations and applicable
standards into account. Bear in mind that this
could render your warranty invalid.
›› Only replace electrical components on your bike
with type-tested parts.
›› Only ride with suitable lighting in unfavourable
lighting conditions such as fog, rain, dawn/twilight or in the dark.
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I General User Manual
Bear in mind that with intensive use of your bike wear
increases accordingly. Many bike parts, particularly
on light sports bikes, are only designed for a specific
period of use. If this is exceeded, there is a considerable risk that components could fail.
Perform care and maintenance on your bike regularly.
In doing so, check important components, particularly
the frame, fork, wheel suspension, handlebar, handlebar stem, seatpost and brakes for warping and damage. If you notice changes such as cracks, bulges or
warping, have your bike checked by a specialist cycle
shop before using again.
5 Legal provisions
If you wish to use your bike in road traffic, make sure that
your bike complies with the road traffic regulations. If
necessary, observe ➠ Chapter 22.2 "Special regulations for
road bikes".
5.1
pplicable road traffic licensing
A
regulations
Before you take your bike on the road, find out what the
relevant national regulations in your country are – in
Germany, these are the Road Traffic Licensing Regulations
(StVZO) and the Road Traffic Ordinance (StVO).
In Switzerland, the applicable regulations can be found
in the Ordinances relating to Technical Requirements for
Road Vehicles, Articles 213 to 218.
If you wish to ride in road traffic in Austria, you must observe Ordinance 146 / Bicycle Ordinance.
Make sure each time you use your bike that it actually is
in the prescribed roadworthy condition, that the brakes
are properly adjusted and that the bell and lighting set
comply with the relevant regulations in your country, in
Germany these are the Road Traffic Licensing Regulations
(StVZO).
In some EU countries, battery-operated front lights and
rear lights may only be used by road bikes weighing less
than 11 kg. They must always be carried and have an official approval (sinuous line and K number). All other bikes
must use dynamo lighting sets. Every component of the
system must carry the official test mark which identifies it
as "approved". The applicable regulations in your country
apply in this regard, e.g. the Road Traffic Licensing Regu-
lations (StVZO) in Germany. When performing technical
modifications, bear in mind that electrical components
must only be replaced by type-tested components.
6.2
6 Intended use
6.1
rekking bike / all-terrain bike
T
(ATB), if equipped in accordance
with the applicable road traffic
licensing regulations
General information
Bikes are a means of transportation for one person. In
some countries, regulations exist governing the carrying
of passengers, such as the Road Traffic Ordinance (StVO)
in Germany (tandem or bike child seat).
If you wish to carry luggage, you will require a suitable
fixture on your bike. Bear in mind the maximum loadbearing capacity of the carrier (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
You may use these bikes on surfaced routes and in road
traffic, providing they are equipped accordingly. They are
also suitable for gentle offroad riding, such as on country
lanes.
Not every bike type is suitable for every surface. Bikes are
not designed to cope with extreme stresses such as jumping or riding over steps.
You must not take part in competitions with your bike. The
only exceptions to this are bikes that are offered explicitly
for use in competitions.
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended. This particularly applies for non-observance of the safety information and damage resulting for example from:
The information in this User Manual applies for all bike
types.
Any deviations for individual bike types are identified
accordingly.
Observe the relevant user manual from the individual
component manufacturers which can be found on the CD
or in the Internet. If you have any questions once you
have read the documentation, your specialist cycle shop
will be pleased to provide assistance.
•• overloading or
•• incorrect repairs.
6.3
ity, touring, sports, child's and
C
youngster's bike, if equipped in
accordance with the applicable road
traffic licensing regulations
Intended use also includes compliance with the operating,
maintenance and repair instructions provided in this User
Manual.
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended.
You can use these bikes in road traffic and on surfaced
routes.
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended. This particularly applies for non-observance of the safety information and damage resulting (for example) from:
•• offroad use,
•• overloading or
•• incorrect repairs.
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6.4
Mountain bike (MTB) / cross bike
The bike is exempt from these requirements for the duration of officially approved cycling events.
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended. This particularly applies for non-observance of the safety information and damage resulting for example from:
•• offroad use,
•• overloading,
You can use these bikes offroad. You must not use these
bikes in road traffic or competitions. If you wish to use
your bike on public roads, it must have the requisite
equipment features (see ➠ Chapter 5 "Legal provisions").
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended.
This particularly applies for non-observance of the safety
information and damage resulting for example from:
•• use in competitions,
•• overloading,
•• incorrect repairs.
•• riding over steps,
•• jumping,
•• riding through deep water
•• e xtreme stresses on non-designated MTB routes or
MTB courses.
6.5
Road bike / fitness bike
•• incorrect repairs or
•• use in competitions,
6.6
BMX
These bikes are designed for BMX routes and/or BMX practice facilities.
In some EU countries, they are not approved for use in
road traffic, e.g. by the Road Traffic Licensing Regulations
(StVZO) in Germany, and in this case must not be used for
this purpose (see ➠ Chapter 5 "Legal provisions").Always
wear a helmet and protective clothing, such as elbow and
knee pads.
The brakes normally installed on BMX bikes produce a
less effective braking action. You should therefore bear in
mind that this increases the braking distance, especially
in wet conditions. Please test this thoroughly in a safe
location and always adjust your handling accordingly.
The manufacturer and cycle shop will not accept liability
claims should the bike not be used as intended.
This particularly applies for non-observance of the safety
information and damage resulting for example from
•• use in competitions,
•• overloading,
•• incorrect repairs.
•• riding over steps or
You may use these bikes on public roads for training purposes. You may use road bikes weighing up to 11 kg without permanently fitted dynamo lighting. If you choose to
do so, you must carry a battery-operated front light and a
rear light. If the light has the required approval, there will
be an embossed sinuous line and K-number on it.
When using road bikes that weigh more than 11 kg in road
traffic, the required equipment features must be installed.
Please familiarise yourself with the applicable regulations.
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I General User Manual
•• jumping.
7 Before the first ride
Make sure that your bike is ready for use and is set up
for your body size.
Check the following:
•• Positioning and secure fastening of saddle and
handlebar
Never inflate the tyres to less than the minimum or
more than the maximum specified tyre pressure. As a
rule of thumb, e.g. when on the road, you can check
the tyre pressure as follows: If you press your thumbs
into the inflated tyre, there should not be much give
in the tyre even if you press hard.
Check the tyres and rims for damage, foreign bodies,
e. g. glass fragments or sharp stones and deformation.
If cuts, cracks or holes are visible, do not ride off. Instead, take your bike to a professional bike workshop
and have it checked.
•• Installation and correct adjustment of the brakes
•• Secure fastening of wheels in frame and fork
Adjust the handlebar and stem until you find a safe
and comfortable riding position. Instructions on how
to adjust the handlebar are provided in ➠ Chapter 9.3
"Adjusting the handlebar position".
Adjust the saddle until you find a safe and comfortable riding position. Instructions on how to adjust the
saddle are provided in ➠ Chapter 9.2 "Adjusting the
seat position".
Make sure the brake levers are always within easy
reach and that you know how to operate the right/
left brake levers and where to find them. Make a note
of which brake lever operates the front and which the
rear wheel brake.
Modern brake systems can have a far more powerful
and different braking effect than those you are already
familiar with. Before setting off, familiarise yourself
with the effects of the brakes on a safe traffic-free
area.
If you are using a bike with carbon-fibre rims, bear
in mind that the braking behaviour of this material is
much poorer than aluminium rims.
Make sure that the wheels are securely fastened in the
frame and forks. Check that the quick-release device
and all important fastening screws and nuts are securely fastened.
➠ Chapter 9.2.2 "Operating the quick-release device"
contains instructions on how to operate quick-release
devices safely and ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data" contains a table of the tightening torques for important
screws and nuts.
Check the tyre pressure. Information on the prescribed tyre pressure appears on the tyre sidewall.
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8 Before every ride
9 Setting up the bike for the rider
Road bikes or mountain bikes can also be supplied without pedals.
Although a great deal of care has been taken during
production and assembly, parts may still come loose
or change function during transportation for example.
You should therefore always check the following before every ride:
Proceed as follows if you wish to fit pedals to your bike
yourself:
9.1
Fitting the pedals
›› Coat both pedal threads with lubricant (grease).
•• Bell and lighting are working properly and securely fastened
•• Brake system is working properly and securely
fastened
•• If a hydraulic brake is fitted to your bike, make
sure the lines and connections are tight
The left pedal has a left-handed thread which is normally indicated by an "L" embossed on the axle. The
right pedal has a right-handed thread which is normally indicated by an embossed "R".
•• Check the tyres and rims for damage and foreign
bodies and check the wheel runs true, especially
after riding offroad
•• Sufficient tread depth on the tyres
•• The suspension elements are in working order
and are securely fastened
Axle with right pedal thread
Axle with left pedal thread
•• Screws, nuts and quick-release devices are secure
•• Frame and fork for deformation and damage
•• Handlebar, handlebar stem, seatpost and saddle
in the correct position and safely and properly
secured
If you are not sure whether your bike is in a technically sound condition, do not ride it and have it checked
by a professional bike workshop instead.
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›› Screw the left pedal anticlockwise into the left
crank.
›› Screw the right pedal clockwise into the right crank
(on the side of the bike chain).
›› Tighten both pedals using a suitable size 15
open-ended spanner or Allen key. Tighten all
screws to the prescribed torque (➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data"). If you do not do this, the pedals may come loose.
9.2
Make sure you fit or screw in the pedals straight, as
otherwise you could damage the thread in the crank
arm beyond repair.
1
2
3
Adjusting the seat position
9.2.1 Adjusting the bike saddle
The seat position is decisive for your well-being and cycling performance.
›› Do not remove or change the seatpost or saddle
clamp. If you change or modify components, this
renders the warranty invalid.
1 MTB system pedals
2 Touring or sports pedals
3 Road bike system pedals
›› Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as
otherwise screws could shear off and components could come loose or detach altogether (see
➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
Only use the designated cleats and shoes for MTB,
racing and system pedals. If you use other cleats/
shoes you may slip out of the pedals.
Riders who are inexperienced in the use of MTB system
pedals or road system pedals, also referred to as click
pedals, are vulnerable to falls with potentially serious
consequences. If you use system pedals, practise clicking
into the pedal and releasing the shoe from the pedal when
the bike is stationary. Never practise this in road traffic.
Only work on the bike if you have the correct tools
and requisite knowledge. Always have complex or
safety-relevant work carried out by a specialist cycle
shop.
9.2.2 Operating the quick-release device
Read the user manual of the pedal and shoe manufacturer.
You can also find more information on this subject in
the Internet. A list of links is provided in ➠ Chapter 29
"Link list" .
›› All quick-release devices must be tightened securely before you set off. Check this before every
journey.
›› If you leave your bike unattended, check that all
quick-release devices are correctly secured before setting off again.
›› When closing the quick-release lever to lock it,
it must be necessary to apply a force that causes
you to make a fist with your hand as otherwise
the quick-release device could come loose.
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13
Quick-release device
2
1
›› When closed, quick-release levers must lie flat
against the frame, fork and saddle clamp. Make
sure that quick-release devices for the hubs point
backwards when closed as otherwise they could
snag on obstructions when the bike is moving
and open. This could lead to serious accidents.
1 Quick-release lever
2 Adjusting nut
To open the quick-release device, proceed as follows:
›› Throw back the quick-release lever so that its inner
face or the lettering OPEN is visible.
9.2.3 Determining the correct saddle height
›› Sit on the bike saddle.
›› Try to reach the pedal with your heel when it is in
the bottom position. Your knee should be more or
less fully straightened out.
›› Place the balls of your feet on the centre of the
pedal. If your knee is now slightly bent, the saddle
height is correct.
›› Open the quick-release device as far as possible.
›› Turn the adjusting nut anticlockwise to further
slacken the quick-release device.
To close the quick-release device, proceed as follows:
›› Adjust the clamping strength by turning the adjusting nut.
›› If the quick-release device closes too easily, open
it again and turn the adjusting nut clockwise.
›› If the quick-release device still closes too easily,
repeat the previous step.
›› If the quick-release device is too difficult to close,
turn the adjusting nut anticlockwise.
›› Turn back the quick-release lever from the OPEN
position so you can see the outer side of the lever
or the lettering CLOSE.
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Never tighten the seatpost if the maximum mark or
stop mark is above the top of the seat tube as otherwise you could injure yourself or damage the seatpost. Always observe the specified tightening torques.
In full-suspension mountain bikes the seat tube is also
open at the bottom, so the seatpost should only be inserted a certain distance downwards to ensure the rear swing
arm and suspension element never come into contact
when the bike is in use.
9.2.4.1 With a two-bolt seatpost
The minimum insertion depth is marked on the seatpost. If this is not the case, the minimum insertion
depth must be 7.5 cm. In frames with long seat tubes
that project beyond the top tube, the minimum insertion depth is 10 cm.
Some seatposts have two screws for adjusting the saddle angle, one in front of and one behind the seat tube.
If you want to tilt the saddle forwards, loosen the rear
screw with an Allen key and tighten the front screw by the
same number of revolutions. To tilt the saddle backwards,
loosen the front screw and tighten the other to the same
degree. Then retighten both screws observing the correct
tightening torque (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
Observe stop
mark.
Two-bolt seatpost
9.2.4 Adjusting the saddle angle
›› Your bike saddle should be as close as possible to
horizontal.
›› You can make use of longer bike rides to find out
what your most comfortable seat position is. If you
want to tilt the saddle, try tilting it very slightly
forwards. If you tilt the saddle back, this can quickly lead to pain or physical injury.
Adjust the saddle angle as follows:
›› Turn the clamping screw anticlockwise to loosen it.
›› Tilt the bike saddle to the required angle.
›› Turn the clamping screw clockwise to tighten it.
(For tightening torques see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical
data").
9.2.4.2 With a seatpost saddle clamp
If the saddle is attached to the seatpost by a clamp, the
clamping nut will be at the side. Adjust the saddle angle
as follows:
›› Turn the clamping nut anticlockwise to loosen it.
You may need to counter the nut on the other side
using another wrench.
›› Tilt the bike saddle to the required angle.
›› Turn the clamping nut clockwise to tighten it. You
may need to counter the nut on the other side using another wrench. Use the correct tightening
torque (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
Seatpost saddle clamp
Adjusting the saddle angle
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15
9.2.4.3 With a suspension seatpost
Suspension seatposts reduce vibrations caused by uneven
roads thereby reducing stress on the spinal column.
If you need to adjust the suspension elements in the seatpost, consult your specialist cycle shop.
›› Bend your upper body towards the handlebar until
you have found a position that is comfortable for
your back.
›› Stretch out your arms towards the handlebar.
›› Note the approximate position of your hands and
set the handlebar at this height.
9.3.1 A
djusting / aligning the handlebar
height with a conventional handlebar
stem
To release the stem shaft in the head tube, proceed as
follows:
›› Release the stem expander bolt to loosen the handlebar stem. Turn it anticlockwise by two or three
revolutions using an Allen key.
Suspension seatpost
9.3
Adjusting the handlebar position
Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as otherwise screws could shear off and components could
come loose or detach altogether (see ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data").
›› Clamp the front wheel between your legs to prevent the bike fork from turning with the stem shaft.
You can also influence your riding position by changing
the handlebar height.
›› If it is not possible to do this, tap lightly on the
stem expander bolt with a plastic hammer to loosen the clamping fixture inside the stem.
›› Holding the handlebar by the handles, turn it from
right to left and vice-versa.
The lower you set the handlebar, the further you will have
to lean forwards. This increases the strain on your wrists,
arms and upper body and you will need to bend your back
further.
›› Set the handlebar stem to the required height.
The higher the handlebar is, the more upright your riding
position will be. This increases the stress on your spinal
column due to jolting.
›› To secure the stem shaft again, turn the stem expander bolt clockwise using an Allen key until it is
tight (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
You can determine a handlebar height that best suits your
body size as follows:
›› Sit on the bike saddle.
›› Ask another person to hold the bike steady if
required.
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›› Align the handlebar so that it is exactly at right
angles to the front wheel.
Never tighten the handlebar stem if the maximum
mark or stop mark is above the top of the shaft. If you
cannot find a mark, insert the handlebar stem into
the head tube to a depth of at least 6.5 cm. If you do
not do this, the handlebar stem could come loose or
break.
9.3.4 A
djusting the handlebar position by
turning the handlebar
Loosen the hexagon socket screws on the front of the
stem. Turn the handlebar until you find the position that
is comfortable for you. Make sure that the handlebar is
always exactly in the centre of the stem. Now retighten the
hexagon socket screws by turning them clockwise. If the
tightening torque is stamped on the stem, use this value,
and if not, use the tightening torques in ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data".
9.3.2 A
djusting the handlebar height with
A-head systems
With the A-head stems shown here, the handlebar height
must be adjusted by a professional bike workshop.
9.3.3 A
ligning handlebars with A-head
systems in relation to the front wheel
To align the handlebar with the front wheel, proceed as
follows:
›› Loosen the hexagon socket screws on the rear of
the handlebar stem by turning them anticlockwise
with an Allen key.
Once you have adjusted the handlebar, you will also need
to adjust the brake levers and gear-shift handles. Loosen
the hexagon socket screws on the handle grips. Sit on
the saddle and put your finger on the lever. Turn the lever until your hand and lower arm are in a straight line.
Retighten the screws in the handle grips by turning them
clockwise. (For tightening torques see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
›› Turn the handlebar so that it is exactly at right
angles to the front wheel.
›› Tighten the hexagon socket screw by turning it
clockwise with an Allen key (see ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data").
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9.3.5 A
djusting the handlebar height with an
adjustable handlebar stem
With some types of handlebar stems, you can vary the
handlebar tilt. The stem angle can be adjusted via the
clamping screws which are on the side of the articulation
or the top/bottom of the stem. Models equipped with additional stop notches or adjusting screws are available.
10 Frame
The form of the frame depends on the bike type and function. Frames are manufactured from different materials
– steel or aluminium alloys or carbon (carbon fibre), for
example.
Adjusting screw
Hexagon socket screw
(integrated stop notch)
Adjust the handlebar tilt as follows:
›› Undo the clamping screw by turning it anticlockwise through two or three revolutions using an
Allen key.
›› If you own a model that is also equipped with
detents, continue turning the clamping screw anticlockwise to disengage the detents.
The frame number of the bike is stamped on the seat
tube, the dropout or the bottom bracket housing.
It may also be found on the motor suspension in Pedelecs. The bike can be identified by the frame number if it is stolen. To identify the bike properly, it is
important to note down the whole number in the right
order.
›› If you own a model with integrated stop notch,
loosen the screw of the stop notch. In many stem
types this is located on the underside of the stem.
›› Tilt the handlebar stem to the required angle.
›› To fasten the handlebar stem, tighten the clamping
screw clockwise using an Allen key . If tightening
torques are specified on the stem, use exactly these
torques, and if not, refer to the table of tightening
torques in ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data".
›› In models with an integrated stop notch, tighten
the screw of the stop notch carefully clockwise.
In doing so, the stop notch must engage with the
teeth.
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Never ride your bike if the frame is warped or
cracked. On no account should you attempt to repair
damaged parts. This can lead to accidents. Replace
defective parts before you ride the bike again.
After an accident or crash, have your bike checked by
a professional bike workshop before riding it again. If
defects on the frame or components go unnoticed this
can lead to accidents.
If your bike does not roll forwards easily in a straight
line, this could mean that the frame is warped. In this
case, have the steering stability checked by a professional bike workshop.
11 Headset
12 Fork
The front wheel is held in place by the bike fork. The bike
fork consists of two fork blades, the fork crown and steering tube.
Headset
The headset is the bearing for the bike fork in the frame. If
the headset has been properly adjusted, it will turn easily.
In doing so, no play should be evident.
The headset is subject to a large amount of stress due to
impacts with the road surface. This can cause it to come
loose or affect its setting. Have the play and ease of movement of the headset checked regularly by your specialist
cycle shop (for inspection intervals see ➠ Chapter 28.1
"Inspection schedule").
Checking the headset
If you do not adjust the headset properly or tighten
it too tightly, this could cause breakages. This should
therefore always be carried out by a professional bike
workshop.
If you ride with the headset loose, this could damage
the bearing shells or fork.
Carbon fork
Suspension fork
The suspension fork is a feature of most mountain bikes,
trekking bikes and city bikes. They can be adjusted in
different ways and provide a greater degree of riding comfort.
For information on the function, maintenance and care of
suspension elements, refer to ➠ Chapter 13 "Suspension
frame and suspension elements". Specific information on
your suspension fork is provided in the manufacturer's
operating instructions which you can find on the CD or the
manufacturer's website.
Never ride with a damaged bike fork. Do not attempt
to repair a defective bike fork. This can lead to serious
accidents. If you notice that the bike fork is warped or
otherwise damaged, replace it before using the bike
again.
Avoid sudden changes in ground level and riding off
high kerb stones. This can damage the fork and lead
to serious accidents.
Check regularly that the screws on the bike fork are
securely fastened. If screws are allowed to come
loose, this can cause serious accidents.
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13 Suspension frame and suspension
elements
response, but does not strike through if you ride over an
obstruction. It must give slightly when you sit on your
bike.
13.1 Frame with rear suspension
13.2 Care and maintenance
If you wish to ride offroad in a particularly sporty manner
or with a high degree of comfort, you may have opted for a
full-suspension model. In this case, the rear triangle of the
main frame is not rigid; instead it can move and is spring
mounted and damped by a shock absorber.
You can clean your full-suspension MTB in the usual manner. Hot water with a little washing-up liquid or a gentle
detergent which you can obtain from your specialist cycle
shop are suitable for this.
You should avoid using a high-pressure cleaner to
clean your bike as the cleaning fluid can also enter
sealed bearings due to the high pressure and damage
them beyond repair.
Full-suspension frame
Different types of suspension elements are used. These
are mainly shock absorbers equipped with a steel spring
or an air chamber whose air is compressed due to the
action of the suspension. In high-quality shock absorbers,
the damping action, that regulates the speed of compression and rebound, can be adjusted. This task is performed
by a system of oil chambers and ducts.
Although this type of shock absorber offers a higher degree of riding safety and comfort, it requires special handling. This User Manual contains only general information
in this regard. Detailed information and advice is provided
in the instructions from the shock absorber manufacturer
enclosed with the CD and can also be obtained from your
specialist cycle shop.
The website of the relevant suspension element
manufacturer may also prove to be a valuable source
of information. Informative and helpful links are provided in ➠ Chapter 29 "Link list".
Your specialist cycle shop should have adjusted the suspension for you before handing over your new bike. Your
bike and the seat position may look different to what you
are used to, and may also feel different when you are riding. The spring strut must be tuned so that it has a soft
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You should carefully wipe down the piston of the shock absorber and the seal with a soft cloth as part of your regular
bike maintenance. If you spray a little spray oil, e.g. from
Brunox, on the running surface of the shock absorber and
the seal, this increases its performance and service life.
You should regularly check the articulations of the rear
triangle for play. To do this, lift the wheel and try to move
the rear wheel sideways.
You can detect play in the mounting bushes of the shock
absorber by lifting the rear wheel up and setting it back
down quickly. If you sense play or hear a rattling noise,
have your bike checked immediately by a professional
bike workshop.
Your safety depends to a large extent on whether the
suspension elements are securely fastened and are
working correctly. You should therefore regularly look
after and inspect your full-suspension bike.
›› Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as
otherwise screws could shear off and components could come loose or detach altogether (see
➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
14 Bottom bracket and cranks
Chainrings are wear parts. Their service life depends on
various factors, e.g.
•• maintenance and care,
•• type of use and
•• distance travelled.
15 Checking the bottom bracket
16 Wheels
16.1 Checking the wheels
The wheels connect the bike with the surface you are riding on. The wheels are subject to a particularly high level
of stress due to unevenness of the riding surface and the
weight of the rider.
The wheels are carefully checked and trued prior to delivery. However, the spokes may settle when you ride the
first kilometres on your bike.
›› Have the wheels checked again and trued if necessary after the first 100 kilometres by a specialist
cycle shop.
The cranks must be securely fastened as this could
otherwise damage the crankset.
›› The cranks can come loose which is why you should
regularly check whether they are securely fastened
by attempting to rock them to and fro.
›› If there is play in the cranks, have the bike checked
and the cranks fastened securely by a professional
bike workshop .
If your bike has a carbon frame and a bottom bracket
housing for a BB30 bottom bracket please note the
following:
›› You should subsequently regularly check the tension in the spokes and have loose or damaged
spokes replaced, and/or have the wheel trued, by a
specialist cycle shop.
The wheel can be attached to the frame and fork in a number of different ways. In addition to the standard systems
in which the wheel is held on by axle nuts or quick-release
devices, different types of floating axles exist. These can
be held in place by a screw connection or different types
of quick-release devices. If your bike has a floating axle,
please also refer to the enclosed manufacturer's user manual or visit the web pages of the relevant manufacturer in
the Internet.
In this case you can fit an adapter so that a bottom
bracket with conventional BSA thread can be used.
However, bear in mind
•• You can only install the adapter if the frame is
completely undamaged. Repairing a defective
BB30 housing serves no purpose. If it is not
installed correctly, the bottom bracket housing
may be damaged which would render the warranty void. This kind of adapter should only be
fitted by a specialist cycle shop.
•• Once the adapter has been fitted in the carbon
frame it cannot be removed.
Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as otherwise screws could shear off and components could
come loose or detach altogether (see ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data").
16.2 Checking the hubs
To check the hub bearings, proceed as follows:
›› Lift the wheel and spin it.
›› Check whether the wheel continues to turn through
several revolutions before it stops moving. If it
stops suddenly, the bearing is damaged. This does
not apply for front wheels with hub dynamos.
›› To determine whether there is play in the hub bearing, try rocking the wheel in the bike fork or rear
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21
triangle backwards and forwards perpendicular to
the direction of travel.
›› If you notice that there is play between the bearings or if you encounter resistance when turning
the wheel, have the hub bearing adjusted by a specialist cycle shop.
17 Tyres and inner tubes
17.1 Tyres
A large number of different tyre types exist. The bike's
offroad capability and rolling resistance depend on tread
profile.
16.3 Checking the rims
If you are using a rim brake, the rim is subject to a higher
degree of wear.
Only inflate the tyre to the maximum permissible tyre
pressure as otherwise it may burst.
If a rim is worn it loses stability which makes it
more susceptible to damage. If the rim is deformed,
cracked or broken this can lead to serious accidents.
If you notice changes in a rim on your bike, do not
ride on it. Have the problem checked by a professional bike workshop.
Inflate the tyre at least to the specified minimum air
pressure. If the tyre pressure is too low, the tyre may
detach from the rim.
The maximum permissible tyre pressure, and normally
also the minimum permissible pressure, can be found
on the tyre sidewall.
Always replace the tyre with a tyre of the same type,
dimension and profile as otherwise the ride characteristics may be adversely affected. This can lead to
accidents.
Rims for bikes with wheel sizes greater than 24" are
supplied with a rim wear indicator. These rims have
a characteristic curve or groove that runs round the
entire circumference.
Replace the rim as soon as you notice marks (grooves,
coloured spots) in one location on the rim, if an
embossed marking has disappeared or if a coloured
marking has worn down.
Tyres are wear parts. Check the tread depth, tyre pressure and condition of the tyre sidewalls regularly.
Replace worn tyres before using the bike.
If the marking consists of a groove or several points
on the rim side wall, have the rim replaced as soon as
it wears off.
Note the dimension of the fitted tyre. Standard designations are used when stating the tyre dimension.
•• Example 1: "46-622" means the tyre is 46 mm
wide and the rim diameter is 622 mm.
•• Example 2: "28 × 1.60 inches" means that the tyre
diameter is 28 inches and the tyre width is 1.60
inches.
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The tyre pressure is frequently stated in PSI. ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data" contains a table which you can
use to convert tyre pressures from PSI into bar.
Only use tubed tyres on the designated rims. These do
not have turned-up edges (rim flanges) and instead
have a smooth inwards-curving surface onto which
the tubed tyre is glued.
17.2 Tubeless tyres
Tubeless tyres are also used nowadays, especially with
modern mountain bikes, but also with road bikes to a lesser extent. Although the offer a number of benefits, they
must be used and handled with caution.
Only use the tubed tyres of the prescribed type and in
the prescribed manner with the correct tyre pressure.
Only use tubeless tyres on suitable rims. These are
identified accordingly, e.g. using the abbreviation
"UST".
Special skills and a great deal of experience are
required to glue on tubed tyres. Always have tubed
tyres replaced at a professional bike workshop. Find
out how to handle tubed tyres correctly and how to
replace them safely.
Only use tubeless tyres of the prescribed type and in
the prescribed manner, with the right tyre pressure
and, if applicable, using the recommended sealing
fluid.
Tools must not be used to remove tubeless tyres from the
rim as otherwise leaks may subsequently occur. If the
sealing fluid does not remedy the defect, the valve can be
removed and a normal inner tube used.
17.4 Inner tubes
The inner tube is necessary to maintain the pressure inside the tyre. It is inflated via a valve.
Three valve types exist:
1
2
3
17.3 Tubed tyres
Tubed tyres are also used, particularly on bikes used in
sports competitions. With this tyre type, the inner tube
is sewn into the casing and this unit is glued firmly to the
designated rim using special adhesive. Tubed tyres offer
enhanced safety in the event of a puncture and improved
emergency-running characteristics
1 Sclaverand or road valve
2 Schrader or car valve
3 Dunlop or Woods valve
All three have a cap to protect them from ingress of dirt.
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To inflate an inner tube with a Sclaverand or road valve,
proceed as follows:
18 Repairing a puncture
To repair a puncture, you will need the following equipment:
•• Plastic tyre lever
•• Patches
•• Rubber solution
•• Sandpaper
•• Spare inner tube, if required
›› Unscrew the valve cap anticlockwise with your
fingers.
›› Unscrew the knurled nut anticlockwise.
›› Push the knurled nut with your finger briefly into
the valve until air escapes.
›› Inflate the inner tube using a suitable tyre pump.
•• Spare valve, if required
•• Open-ended spanner (if your bike is not equipped
with a quick-release device)
•• Tyre pump
We recommend you remove the defective wheel first. Open
or remove the brake beforehand. The procedure for this
depends on the type of bike brake that is installed.
›› Screw the knurled nut back down.
›› Screw the cap clockwise back onto the valve.
Ask a specialist cycle shop for advice on which tyre
pump is suitable for your valve.
To inflate an inner tube with a Dunlop/Woods valve or
Schrader/car valve proceed as follows:
›› Unscrew the valve cap anticlockwise.
Read the chapter on brakes before removing the brake
as otherwise you could damage the brake system and
this could lead to accidents.
18.1 Opening the brake
18.1.1 Opening the cantilever or V-brake
›› Inflate the inner tube using a suitable tyre pump.
›› Grip the wheel with one hand.
›› Screw the cap clockwise back onto the valve.
›› Squeeze the brake pads or brake arms against the
rim.
›› Detach the brake cable at one of the brake arms.
18.1.2 Removing the hydraulic rim brake
›› If quick-release brake mechanisms are fitted, remove a brake unit (see ➠ Chapter 9.2.2 "Operating
the quick-release device").
›› If no quick-release brake mechanisms are fitted,
deflate the tyre.
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18.1.3 Opening the side-pull calliper brake
›› Open the quick-release lever on the brake arm or
brake lever.
›› If no quick-release brake mechanisms are fitted,
deflate the tyre. The wheel can now be pulled out
between the brake pads.
18.1.4Releasing the hub gears, roller, drum
or back-pedal brakes
›› Undo the cable clamping screw or quick-release
device on the brake arm.
›› With back-pedal brakes, the screw connection of
the brake arm on the chain stay must be released.
18.2 Removing the wheel
Please note that the work steps described here are for a
specific example.
Please observe the information by the relevant manufacturer or consult your specialist cycle shop.
18.2.2 Removing the rear wheel
›› If your bike is equipped with derailleur gears, shift
down to the smallest sprocket. The rear derailleur
does not prevent the wheel from being removed in
this position.
›› If quick-release devices are fitted to your bike,
open them (see ➠ Chapter 9.2.2 "Operating the
quick-release device").
›› If axle nuts are fitted to your bike, release these
by turning them anticlockwise using a suitable
spanner.
›› Fold the rear derailleur backwards slightly.
›› Lift the bike up slightly.
›› Pull the wheel out of the frame.
›› If the rear wheel still does not come out, open the
quick-release device further by turning the lock nut
anticlockwise.
›› Strike the wheel from above gently with the palm
of your hand to shift it.
›› The wheel should drop out.
18.2.1 Removing the front wheel
›› If quick-release devices are fitted to your bike,
open them (see ➠ Chapter 9.2.2 "Operating the
quick-release device").
›› If axle nuts are fitted to your bike, release these
by turning them anticlockwise using a suitable
spanner.
›› If your bike is equipped with metal wheel locking
devices, continue loosening the nuts by turning
them anticlockwise.
›› Pull the metal locking devices apart until they are
clear of the dropout.
›› Now pull the front wheel out of the fork.
Disconnect the shifting cable to remove the rear wheel
›› Disconnect the cable from the cassette joint to
remove the rear wheel from the frame
LOCK
›› If the dropouts are specially formed to prevent the
front wheel from falling out, continue loosening
the nuts by turning them anticlockwise. Once the
washers and nuts are clear of the dropouts, pull the
front wheel out of the fork.
The example here shows the removal of a Shimano hub gear:
20
-8S
CJ
N
PA
JA
Cassette joint
›› 1. Set the Revo-shift lever to 1.
Set to 1
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›› 2. Pull the outer casing out from the outer casing
holder of the cassette joint, and then remove the
inner cable from the slit in the bracket.
›› 5. Undo the wheel nuts and put them to one side.
Remove the lock washers from the wheel axle.
›› 6. Pull the rear wheel out of the dropout slits.
Bracket
Outer casing holder
CJ
-8S
JA
PA
20
18.3 Removing the tyre and inner tube
›› Unscrew the valve cap, fastening nut and the cap
nut (if installed) from the valve. Remove the valve
insert from Dunlop or Woods valves.
N
1
Slit
2
›› Allow the remaining air to escape from the inner
tube.
1 Pull out from outer casing holder
2 Remove from the slit
›› 3. Remove the inner cable fixing bolt unit from the
cassette joint pulley.
Inner cable fixing bolt unit
Cassette joint pulley
›› Place the tyre lever on the inner edge of the tyre
opposite the valve.
›› Lever the tyre sidewall over the rim flange.
›› Push the second tyre lever between the rim and
tyre approx. 10 cm away from the first one.
›› Continue levering the tyre off the rim until the tyre
has detached round the entire circumference.
LOCK
›› Take the inner tube out of the tyre.
CJ-8S20
JAPAN
18.4 Mending the inner tube
If it is difficult to pull the outer casing out from the
outer casing holder of the cassette joint, insert a
2 mm Allen key or # 14 spoke into the hole in the
cassette joint pulley, and then turn the pulley to
loosen the inner cable. Then remove the inner cable fixing bolt unit from the pulley first, and after
this remove the outer casing from the outer casing
holder.
2
3
Remove the inner
cable fixing bolt unit
Pull out from
the outer casing
holder
LOCK
JAPAN
1
Pulley hole
2 mm Allen key
or # 14 spoke
›› 4. Undo the screw of the brake arm and remove it.
26
›› Put the inner tube in a container filled with water
to locate the puncture.
›› Push the inner tube below the surface of the water.
Air bubbles will be visible at the point where the
inner tube is torn or perforated.
›› If you start losing air from the tyre on the road and
cannot find the hole, simply inflate the inner tube
hard. The hole will then get bigger as the air will
escape with greater force and you will be able to
hear more easily where it is coming from.
›› Allow the inner tube to dry.
CJ-8S20
Turn the
pulley
›› Pump up the inner tube.
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›› Carefully roughen the inner tube in the area around
the puncture using the sandpaper.
›› Coat this area with rubber solution.
›› Wait for several minutes until the rubber solution
is touch dry.
›› Press the rubber patch firmly onto the damaged
area.
›› Leave the rubber patch to dry for several minutes.
18.5 Fitting the tyre and inner tube
Make sure that foreign bodies do not enter the inside
of the tyre. Make sure that the inner tube is creasefree and not pinched at all times. When fitting the
tyre, bear in mind the running direction. If the tyre
has a running direction, this will be indicated on the
tyre sidewall.
›› Make sure that the rim tape covers the spoke nipples and is undamaged.
18.6 Fitting the wheel
Please note that the work steps described here are for a
specific example.
Please observe the information from the relevant manufacturer or consult your specialist cycle shop.
18.6.1Inserting the front wheel
Bear the running direction of the tyre in mind when
fitting the front wheel.
›› Put the rim with one edge inside the tyre.
›› Push one side of the tyre completely into the rim.
›› Insert the valve through the valve hole in the rim
and fit the inner tube inside the tyre.
›› Push the tyre over the rim sidewall.
›› Pull the tyre forcefully into the centre of the rim.
The area that has already been fitted will slip into
the base of the rim.
If your bike is equipped with a disc brake, make sure
that the brake discs are correctly positioned between
the brake pads.
›› Check once again that the inner tube is seated
correctly.
18.6.2Inserting the rear wheel
›› Push the other side of the tyre completely over the
rim flange using the heel of your hand.
18.6.2.1Bikes with derailleur gears
›› Check that the tyre is correctly seated and is true
using the indicator ring on the rim sidewall. Adjust
the seating of the tyre by hand if it does not run
straight.
›› Inflate the inner tube up to the recommended tyre
pressure.
›› Insert the wheel as far as it will go so it sits centrally in the dropouts.
›› Tighten the hub nut, or firmly close the quickrelease device (see ➠ Chapter 9.2.2 "Operating the
quick-release device").
18.6.2.2Bikes with hub gears
Fitting a wheel with gear hub in the frame
›› 1. Fit the chain on the sprocket and offer up the
hub axle to the dropouts.
Hub axle
JAPAN
›› Inflate the inner tube slightly.
›› If your bike is equipped with derailleur gears, put
the chain back onto the smallest sprocket when
fitting the rear wheel.
CJ-NX10
›› With Dunlop or Woods valves: Put the valve insert
back into position and screw the cap nut tight.
Dropout
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›› 2. Fit the fixing washers onto both sides of the hub
axle. Turn the shifting arm until the projections on
the fixing washers engage with the slits in the
dropouts. In this case the shifting arm can be
mounted more or less parallel to the frame fork.
Locking washer (left-hand side)
Shifting arm
Counter the clamp nut with a 10 mm spanner when
tightening the clamp screw for assembly of the brake
arm clamp.
Tightening torque
2 – 3 Nm
Dropout
Locking washer
(right-hand side)
JA
PA
CJ-
N
NX
10
LOCK
Once you have installed the brake arm clamp, make
sure the clamp screw projects roughly 2 to 3 mm beyond the clamp nut.
Brake arm
7R
Frame fork
Clamp nut
Brake arm clamp
›› The projecting part must be on the dropout side.
›› Fit the fixing washers so the projections precisely
engage in the slits in the dropouts on the front or
rear of the hub axle.
2 – 3 mm
›› 3. Take up the slack in the chain and fasten the
wheel onto the frame with the cap nuts.
Tightening torque
30 – 45 Nm
JA
PA
CJ-
N
10
LOCK
7R
NX
Locking washer
Clamp screw
(M6 × 16 mm)
›› 5. Before using the back-pedal brake, make sure
the brake is working properly and the wheel turns
easily.
Cap nut
›› 4. Fit the brake arm with brake arm clamp correctly
onto the frame fork.
Clamp nut
Brake arm
Clamp screw
Brake arm clamp
Frame fork
Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as otherwise screws could shear off and components could
come loose or detach altogether (see ➠ Chapter 30.3
"Tightening torques for screw connections").
›› Thread in the brake cable and secure it or close the
quick-release brake mechanism.
›› Check that the brake pads make contact with the
brake contact surfaces.
›› Check that the brake arm is securely fastened.
›› Test the brakes.
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Installing the shifting cable with hub gears
›› Bring the cable around to the cassette joint pulley,
hold so that the inner cable fixing nut is facing to
the outside (toward the dropout), and then slide
the flats part of the inner cable fixing washer into
the gap in the pulley.
›› Attach the inner cable to the pulley as shown in the
illustration, pass the inner cable through the slit in
the cassette joint bracket, and then insert the end
of the outer casing securely into the outer casing
holder.
LOCK
Flats part of the inner
cable fixing washer
CJ-8
S20
JAPA
N
Inner cable
fixing nut
Gap in pulley
Inner cable
Pulley
Bracket
Pulley
Bracket
Outer casing holder
LOCK
CJ
-8S
20
JA
PA
N
CJ-8S20
JAPAN
2
Slit
1
›› Turn the cable 60° anticlockwise and attach it on
the hook.
1 Pass through the slit
2 Insert into the outer casing holder
Hook
LOCK
CJ-8S20
Turn the
cable 60°
JAPAN
›› If first inserting the outer casing into the outer
casing holder is easier, then first insert the outer
casing into the outer casing holder, and the insert a
2 mm Allen key or a # 14 spoke into the hole in the
cassette joint pulley, and then turn the pulley so
that the inner cable fixing bolt unit fits into the gap
in the pulley.
1
3
LOCK
CJ-8S20
JAPAN
2
Hole in pulley
2 mm Allen key
or # 14 spoke
1 Insert into the outer casing holder
2 Turn the pulley
3 Insert the inner cable fixing bolt unit
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19 Bike gears
Check that the inner cable is correctly seated inside
the pulley guide.
LOCK
LOCK
Guide OK
CJ-8S20
CJ-8S20
JAPAN
JAPAN
Guide not OK
19.1 Derailleur gears
This User Manual describes the handling of typical, commercially available gear-shift components for MTB, ATB,
cross and road bikes. Separate instructions are provided
for other components on the CD or on the web pages of the
relevant manufacturer in the Internet. If you have questions on installation, adjustment, maintenance and operation, please consult a specialist cycle shop.
If gear-shift components are loose, worn, damaged or
adjusted incorrectly, this poses a risk of injury to the
rider. Have the derailleur gears adjusted at a professional bike workshop.
•• Always contact your specialist cycle shop if the
chain jumps off the chainrings or sprockets when
riding or
•• you hear unusual noises or
•• you cannot change gears easily or
•• the rear derailleur, front derailleur or other
gear-shift components are loose, damaged or
distorted or
•• chain links are defective or worn.
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19.1.1 Operating the shifting lever
The bike chain must not be on the smallest chainring
at the front and the small outer rear sprocket wheel
simultaneously. The bike chain must not be on the
largest chainring at the front and large inner sprocket
wheel at the rear simultaneously. Otherwise the bike
chain could jump off.
19.1.1.1 Shifting lever on road bike
Shimano shifting lever
Lever b
from large to
small chainring
Never pedal backwards when changing gears as you
could damage the gear-shift mechanism.
Only make changes to the gear-shift system carefully
and in small increments. If settings are made incorrectly, the bike chain could jump off the sprocket
wheel and cause you to fall off the bike. If you are
unsure about what to do, have this work carried out
by a professional bike workshop.
Lever a
from small to
large chainring
Lever
a
Lever
Lever
a
Even if the gear system is perfectly adjusted, it can
produce noise if the chain is running at an extremely
sharp angle. This does not mean it is defective and
does not damage the drive. As soon as the chain is at
a more shallow angle, the noise will disappear.
b
Lever b
from large to
small chainring
Lever a
from small to
large chainring
Lever a: Shift to a larger chainring
Lever b: Shift to a smaller chainring
Once released, all levers revert to their initial position.
Never ride without a spoke protector. If a spoke protector is not installed, you must have one retrofitted.
Otherwise the bike chain or rear derailleur could land
in the gap between the sprocket and the spokes.
You should therefore select the lowest gear (largest
sprocket wheel) via the gear-shift handle for the rear
derailleur carefully as otherwise the rear derailleur
could collide with the spokes and damage them.
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Operating the rear derailleur shifting lever
Lever a: Shift to a larger sprocket.
Lever a engages in positions 1, 2 and 3.
Lever
a
When lever a is pressed, lever b moves with it. However, you should avoid putting any pressure on lever b
in doing so. The same applies for lever a when pressing lever b. The gear will not change if both levers are
operated at the same time.
3. Click-in position
Starting position of lever
a
2. Click-in position
Lever a: Shift to a larger chainring
1. Click-in position
1. Shifting up one gear to
next larger sprocket.
Example: shifting from
3rd to 4th gear
Lever
a
2. Shifting up two gears
to a larger sprocket.
Example: shifting from
3rd to 5th gear
Starting position
of lever a
Gear shift complete stroke
3. Shifting up three gears
to a larger sprocket.
Example: shifting from
3rd to 6th gear
Actual pull
If the lever movement does not effect a full changeover of chainring,
press the lever repeatedly by the amount (X') to move the lever the
remaining distance (X) and change gears.
Lever b: Shift to a smaller sprocket. Press lever b once to
change to the next sprocket down (smaller).
Lever
b
Operating the front derailleur lever (standard)
Lever
b
Starting position
of lever b
Gear shift complete
stroke
Starting position
of lever b
Click-in position
Click-in position
Lever b: Shift from intermediate chainring to smallest chainring
1. Shifting up one gear to
next smaller sprocket.
Example: shifting from
4th to 3rd gear
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When lever a is pressed, lever b moves with it. However,
you should avoid putting any pressure on lever b in doing
so. The same applies for lever a when pressing lever b.
The gear will not change if both levers are operated at the
same time.
Operating the front derailleur lever with trimming
(noise prevention), optional
Gear shifting operations
Lever a: Shift to a larger chainring
Lever
a
Starting position
of lever a
Gear shift complete stroke
Trimming (noise prevention)
Depending on the position of the chain after shifting, it
may rub against the outer chain guide plate or inner chain
guide plate of the front derailleur and produce noise. In
this case, lightly press lever a or lever b to move the front
derailleur until it is no longer in contact with the chain.
This procedure is known as "trimming". Trimming is possible if the chain is on the large, intermediate or small
chainring.
If you perform the trimming operation at one of the following positions, the noises will disappear completely.
Actual pull
If the lever movement does not effect a full changeover of chainring,
press the lever repeatedly by the amount (X') to move the lever the
remaining distance (X) and change gears.
Lever b: Shift from intermediate chainring to smallest
chainring
Lever
b
Starting position
of lever b
Gear shift complete
stroke
Click-in position
Click-in position
When lever b is operated, there is one click where trimming (the
noise prevention mechanism) enagages, and a second stronger click
when the gear shift stroke is completed. After trimming, the next
push will complete the gear shift stroke.
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CHAIN POSITION
large chainring
INDICATION
TRIMMING
LEVER OPERATION
FRONT DERAILLEUR MOVEMENT
Chain in contact with
outer chain guide plate
Lever a
Trimming
Outer
chain guide plate
before trimming
smaller
sprockets
after trimming
Front derailleur movement
Middle chainring
Smaller
sprockets
Small chainring
Click-in
position
Chain
(contact)
Smaller
sprockets
Large chainring
Chain in contact with inner chain guide plate
Lever b
Trimming
Inner
chain guide plate
before trimming
Larger
sprockets
Middle chainring
Larger
sprockets
Small chainring
Click-in
position
Chain
Larger
sprockets
34
after trimming
Front derailleur movement
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(contact)
SRAM shifting lever
Setting the swivel range
The range of the shifting and brake lever pivoting movement can be adjusted individually to suit the size of your
hand.
0°
X°
Click
XX°
Click
Click
Click
0
Rear shifting lever: To shift to a tougher (higher) gear,
press the small shifting lever gently inwards until you hear
or feel a click. To shift to an easier (lower) gear, press the
small shifting lever further inwards until you hear or feel
a second click. You can shift down by up to three gears at
once.
Front shifting lever: Press the small shifting lever inwards
as far as it will go to shift from the small chain wheel to
the large chain wheel. To shift from the large chain wheel
down to the small chain wheel, press the small shifting
lever in the centre until you hear or feel a distinctive click.
To prevent chain rubbing in extreme positions, the
shifting lever at the front has a trimming function for
the front derailleur. You can use this if the chain is on
the large chain wheel.
›› First, set the shifting lever range then adjust the
brake lever until the brake lever limit stop makes
contact with the shifting lever. This ensures that
the brake lever cannot strike the shifting lever
when it springs back.
›› To adjust the range of the shifting lever, push it
inwards to reach the range adjustment screw.
Push the adjustment screw inwards using a mandrel or your fingernail and turn it anticlockwise
to move the shifting lever closer to the handlebars.
19.1.1.2 Shifting lever on MTB, trekking and touring bike
Standard shifting lever
Both levers a and b always revert to the initial position
after they are pressed. The crank must always be turned
when a lever is pressed.
Operating the front derailleur shifting lever
Lever a
starting position
To shift the front derailleur to the trim position, press
the small shifting lever gently inwards until you hear
or feel a gentle click.
Shifting from a small to a large chainring
Press lever a once to move the chain from a small to a
larger chainring.
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Gear shift complete
stroke
Click-in position
Trimming operation
Click-in position
H b l (B)
Lever b
Lever b
Shifting from a large to a smaller chainring
Press lever b once to move the chain from a large to a
smaller chainring.
Operating the standard rear derailleur shifting lever
Lever a
starting position
1
When lever b is operated, there is one click where trimming (the noise prevention mechanism) engages, and a
second stronger click when the gear shift stroke is complete. The noise prevention mechanism no longer clicks
once the trimming operation is complete which means
that only the click-in positions will be heard when shifting
between sprockets.
2
Chain position
Front derailleur movement
Shifting from a small to a larger sprocket
To shift by one gear only, push lever a to position 1. To
shift by two gears, push the shifting lever to position 2.
You can shift a maximum of 3 gears using this method.
If the chain is on the large chainring and the large sprocket, the chain will rub the front derailleur producing a characteristic noise. When this happens, press lever b lightly
to the point where it clicks, this causes the front derailleur
to move slightly towards the smaller chainring, thereby
eliminating the noise.
Twist-grip shifters
To shift up or down one gear only, turn the twist-grip shifter by one increment forwards or backwards.
increasing
pedal force
reducing pedal
force
Abnehmende
Pedalkraft
Zunehmende
Pedalkraft
Lever b
Shifting from a large to a smaller sprocket
Push once to shift to a smaller sprocket.
Abnehmende
Zunehmende
Pedalkraft pedal force Pedalkraft
reducing
increasing pedal force
If you wish to shift up or down several gears at once, continue turning the shifting lever by the required number of
shift positions and in the required direction.
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Rear derailleur
The adjustment screw may also be on the shifting
lever or on the frame.
Have your specialist cycle shop carry out maintenance
on the derailleur gears, or replace or adjust them.
Adjustment screw
Precision adjustment / rear derailleur
B
Operate the shifting lever to shift the chain from the smallest sprocket to the second sprocket. Then take up the
slack in the shifting cable with the shifting lever and turn
the crank.
If the chain
jumps to the third
sprocket:
A
Cable housing adjustment screw
Optimum adjustment
Once the slack in the shifting cable
has been taken up by the shifting
lever, the chain should ideally rub
the third sprocket and produce a
noise.
Adjustment
screw
›› Turn the adjustment screw clockwise until the
chain moves back onto the second sprocket.
If noises cannot
be heard:
Adjustment
screw
›› Turn the screw anticlockwise until the chain rubs
against the third sprocket.
Release the shifting lever in second
gear and turn the crank.
If the chain rubs the third sprocket, turn the adjustment
screw clockwise slightly until the grinding noise stops.
To ensure problem-free SIS operation, you will need to
lubricate all power-transmitting parts.
If the chain is in the position shown, it could rub
against the chainrings or the front derailleur and
make a noise. If this is the case, you can shift the
chain onto the second or next largest sprocket.
Chainrings
Sprockets
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Cleaning
›› Whenever possible, avoid using cleaning agents on
the chain. If you use cleaning agents, such as rust
remover, this may wash lubricant out of the chain
which could lead to malfunctions.
›› The chainrings and sprockets should be cleaned
regularly using a neutral cleaning agent.
›› You should clean the derailleur and lubricate the
moving parts (mechanism and rollers) at regular
intervals.
19.2 Hub gears
This User Manual describes the handling of typical, commercially available gear-shift components of a gear hub on
a city or trekking bike. For other components, refer to the
separate information or enclosed instructions.
If you have questions on installation, adjustment, maintenance and operation, please consult a specialist cycle
shop.
The gears can be changed when the pedals are turning. Very occasionally, the hub may produce a harmless noise which is caused by its internal cogs and
stop notches.
If you encounter resistance when turning the wheel,
the brake pads will need to be replaced or the hub
will need to be lubricated. This should be done by a
professional bike workshop.
If the chain jumps off the the sprockets when you are
riding, the slack in the chain must be taken up immediately. If there is no further scope for adjustment, the
sprockets and chain must be replaced.
19.2.1 Operating the hub gears
19.2.1.1 Shimano 7/8-speed shift lever
›› Turn the twist-shift lever to select all 8 (7) gears.
If the hub is mounted on the frame, the correct fixing washers must be used on both sides and the hub
nuts must be tightened to the prescribed torque (see
➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
•• Increasing pedal force (increasing resistance)
➞ indicator towards 8 (7)
Display
Indicator
Revo-shift lever
If the fixing washers are used on one side only or the
hub nuts are tightened incorrectly, the hub may malfunction: It could rotate. This could cause the shifting
cable to pull the handlebar to one side and cause a
serious accident.
•• Decreasing pedal force (decreasing resistance)
➞ indicator towards 1
These instructions on operation of the Shimano twist-shift
grips also apply for other makes of twist-shift grips.
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19.2.2 Adjusting gears with Shimano hub
gears
Example shown is a 7/8-speed hub.
›› Select shift lever position 4.
›› Check whether the yellow marking lines on the
bracket and cassette joint pulley line up.
›› Turn the cable adjustment bolt on the shift lever to
align the marking lines. Next, set the Revo-shift
lever from position 4 to position 1 then back to
position 4. Check that the yellow marking lines still
line up.
Cable adjustment bolt
yellow marking lines
select position 4
JA
PA
LOCK
20
-8S
CJ N
Yellow marking lines appear at two points on the cassette
joint. Use the line which is most clearly visible.
Bike in normal position
line up markings
Cassette joint
pulley
LOCK
CJ-8S20
JAPAN
Bracket
Bike in inverted position
line up markings
Cassette joint
pulley
JAPAN
LOCK
CJ-8S20
Bracket
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20 Bike chain
There are two types of bike chain:
•• A wide bike chain (½ × 1 / 8") for hub gears and
•• A narrow bike chain for derailleur gears. These are
available in different widths, depending on how
may sprockets are on the cassette. Only use chains
that are approved for precisely the number of
sprocket wheels on your bike.
›› Clean and lubricate your bike chain regularly.
Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as otherwise screws could shear off and components could
come loose or detach altogether (see ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data").
20.1 Maintenance of bike chains
Bike chains are wear parts. Bike chains with hub gears
wear out after roughly 3000 km, and after roughly
2000 km with derailleur gears.
›› To prevent premature wear of the bike chain when
using derailleur gears, select gears that keep the
chain skew as marginal as possible.
To check the wear in the bike chain, proceed as follows:
›› Take the section of the chain that rests on the front
chainring between your thumb and forefinger.
›› Pull the bike chain off the chainring. If the bike
chain can be lifted by a significant amount, it is
worn and must be replaced by a new one.
›› With hub gears, the chain tension must be adjusted
so that vertical play of one to two centimetres is
present in the unsupported chain span between the
chainring and sprocket wheel.
To take up the slack in the bike chain, proceed as follows:
›› Loosen the rear wheel nuts.
›› Pull the wheel back into the dropouts until only the
permissible amount of play is present in the bike
chain.
›› Tighten all screw connections carefully clockwise.
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If the bike chain is worn, it can break and cause a
crash. If your bike chain is worn, have it replaced by
your specialist cycle shop before using the bike again.
21 Brake, brake levers and brake
systems
This User Manual describes the maintenance and handling
of typical, commercially available brake components for
MTB, ATB, cross and road bikes. For other components,
refer to the separate information or enclosed instructions.
If you have questions on installation, adjustment, maintenance and operation, please consult a specialist cycle
shop.
21.1 I mportant information and
precautionary measures
"Bicycles must be equipped with 2 brakes that operate independently of one another."
Paragraph 65 of the German Road Traffic Licensing
Regulation (StVZO), similar rules apply in all other EU
countries.
Have maintenance work on the brakes carried out by a
professional bike workshop.
Do not allow fluids containing oils to come into contact with the brake pads, brake contact surfaces on
the rim, brake blocks or brake disc as this could otherwise impair the effectiveness of the brake.
Rubber brake blocks and brake pads must not come into
contact with oil or grease. If the rubber brake blocks and
brake pads come into contact with oil or grease, this drastically reduces their braking performance and they must
be replaced.
Tighten all screws to the prescribed torque as otherwise screws could shear off and components could
come loose or detach altogether (see ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data").
Brake cables are wear parts. You should check the
wear condition of the brake cables regularly and replace these if necessary.
Check the brake cable for rust and fraying and replace
the cable if it is faulty. If you do not, the brakes could
malfunction.
There are different types of brakes, the type of brake depends on what it is used for:
•• hub brakes,
•• disc brakes and
•• rim brakes.
The brakes can be operated mechanically or hydraulically.
Brake blocks and brake pads are wear parts. Check the
wear condition of these parts regularly. This can be identified by a marking. On the brake block, for example, the
grooves will no longer be visible. Always replace both
brake blocks at the same time.
Use genuine spare parts only as otherwise you could impair the functions of the bike or damage it.
To obtain correct friction pairing, only use brake pads that
are suitable for the rim as otherwise the braking distance
would be extended and wear increased. With carbon rims
in particular, only brake pads that are expressly intended
for this purpose should be used.
With hub gears, the brake lever that operates the front
wheel brake is normally on the right-hand side, and
with derailleur gears it is on the left. Remind yourself
of the position of the brake lever before you ride off.
If you wish to attach the brake lever on the opposite
side of the handlebar, follow the manufacturer's user
manual or ask your specialist cycle shop to do this.
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21.2 Brake lever
21.3.1 Drum and roller brakes
21.2.1 Standard brake lever
The bike is equipped as standard with a suitable brake
lever. Check regularly that when you operate the brake
lever it does not reach the handlebar and make contact
with it. With the brake lever pulled, push the bike forward
and check whether the braking performance is sufficient.
If the bike rolls slightly forwards, you will need to have
the brake cable readjusted or the brake pads replaced.
The brake lever of roller and drum brakes requires
special tuning.
Brake cable adjustment screw
Lever pull range
adjustment screw
With the roller brake or drum brake, the braking force is
transmitted via a cable from the hand brake lever to the
brake system. If applied continuously for an extended
period, roller brakes or drum brakes become very hot.
This reduces the braking performance and can result in
complete failure of the brake. You should adapt your handling accordingly.
Fastening screw
21.3 Hub brakes
Hub brakes are virtually maintenance-free as the brake
block is inside the hub.
›› Check regularly that the screws on the brake lever
are tight.
›› Turn them clockwise to retighten if necessary. For
the correct tightening torque, refer to ➠ Chapter 30
"Technical data".
›› Pull on the front wheel or rear wheel hand brake
lever with the same amount of force as you would
apply when braking sharply during a ride. Then
push the bike forwards. The rear wheel should lock.
The front wheel should decelerate so rapidly that
the bike starts to tip forwards.
›› Lubricate the cable-pull regularly.
If applied continuously for an extended period, hub
brakes become very hot. This reduces the braking
performance and ultimately complete failure of the
brake. You should adapt your handling accordingly.
Brake pads are wear parts. Have the brake pads for
back-pedal, roller and drum brakes checked regularly,
and replaced if necessary, by a professional bike
workshop.
If you have not used your bike for a while, there may
be surface rust in the brake drum which can increase
the braking force. You should therefore brake gently
several times when riding off to remove the surface
rust. This prevents sudden blocking of the brake.
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21.3.2 Back-pedal brake
Avoid operating the back-pedal brake continuously on
long descents as the internal components of the brake
system can become extremely hot which reduces braking performance. On long steep descents, always alternate between the rear wheel brake and the second
brake (front wheel brake) to allow the rear wheel
brake to cool down. As the brake drum can become
extremely hot when braking for prolonged periods,
you should not touch it for at least 30 minutes after
riding.
Brake drum
With back-pedal brakes the braking force is transmitted
by the foot via the chain to the brake system. If applied
continuously for an extended period, back-pedal brakes
become very hot. This reduces the braking performance
and can result in complete failure of the brake. You should
adapt your handling accordingly.
The back-pedal brake is operated by pedalling backwards. The force applied by the back-pedal brake
varies depending on the position of your feet/pedals.
If the crank arms are vertical, i.e. one of your feet is
in the highest position and the other is in the lowest
position, you cannot brake hard. Move the crank arms
into a horizontal position if you think you may want/
have to brake.
The back-pedal brake is easy to apply in a controlled
manner. The maximum braking performance is only
reached after a certain run-in period.
Operate the back-pedal brake carefully to familiarise
yourself with it and get a feel for its retarding effect.
If you have not used your bike for a while, there may
be surface rust in the brake drum which can increase
the braking force. If you have not used your bike for
some time, you should brake gently several times
when riding off to remove the surface rust. This prevents sudden blocking of the brake.
If excessive overheating of the hub occurs, this can
lead to loss of lubricant and a sharper braking effect.
In these cases, have the brake checked by a professional bike workshop.
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21.4 Rim brakes
21.4.2Adjusting the brake-pad clearance in
relation to the rim
Turn the cable adjustment bolt to adjust the clearance
between the brake pad and the rim. Turn the bolt inwards
(clockwise) to increase the brake-pad clearance. Turn the
bolt outwards (anticlockwise) to reduce the brake-pad
clearance. The clearance between the brake blocks and
rim should be roughly 1 mm.
V-brakes produce an extremely high braking force.
You should therefore familiarise yourself with the
V-brake and only apply the brake gradually. Practise
emergency braking until you are sure you will be able
to remain fully in control of your bike if you have to
apply the brakes with force.
Adjusting the cable-pull
Cable adjustment bolt
If additional suspension elements in the brake system
(power modulators) are used improperly, this can lead
to serious accidents. The required spring strength of the
power modulator depends on the gross weight of the bike.
If the brake blocks are so worn that you can no longer see
notches, have them replaced by a professional bike workshop.
With V-brakes
2
21.4.1 Readjusting the brake
Cable adjustment bolt
The brakes on your bike are set correctly at the factory or
by your cycle dealer. The gap between the brake block and
the rim is roughly 1 – 1.5 mm. However, as the brake blocks
wear down the gap steadily increases and the brake lever
must travel a greater distance to achieve the same braking
effect. You should therefore inspect the brake at regular
intervals and adjust it if the brake lever travel distance is
too great or the brake is not working properly.
Check the brake as follows:
›› Pull the front wheel and then the rear wheel hand
brake lever with the same amount of force as you
would apply when braking sharply during a ride.
Then push the bike forwards.
2
1
With side pull brakes
2
1
›› The rear wheel should lock and
›› the front wheel should decelerate so rapidly that
the bike starts to tip forwards.
2
2
1
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1
21.4.3Wear of brake pad
Most brake pads for rim brakes come with grooves or
notches.
If required, you can readjust the rebound force via the
spring adjustment screw so that both brake arms move
symmetrically. Once you have done this, check that the
brake is working properly (see ➠ Chapter 21.4.1 "Readjusting the brake").
If the brake is still not working properly, or the brake
pad is so worn that it is not possible to readjust it,
have your bike checked at a professional bike workshop and replace the brake block.
New brake pad
If these grooves are worn and can no longer be seen, this
is normally a sign that the brake pad is worn.
21.5 Disc brakes
Worn brake pad
Disc brake
Do not ride your bike if the brake pads are worn.
Have them replaced by a professional bike workshop
instead.
2
Have your disc brakes adjusted by a specialist cycle
shop. If this is done incorrectly, an accident may occur.
1
2
2
1
1
1 mm
Spring adjustment
screw
With this brake type, the brake discs are on the hub and
the brake calliper is on the frame or fork.
1 mm
Spring adjustment
screw
Once the brakes have been adjusted, always perform a
brake test by pushing the bike quickly forwards and operating the brake lever. You should only use your bike if you
can safely stop it using the brakes.
Disc brakes require a brake lead time during which the
braking force increases. Bear this in mind throughout the
entire brake lead time. The same effect also occurs after
replacing the brake block or disc.
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If you hear unusual noises when braking, the brake blocks
may have reached their wear limit. Allow the brakes to
cool down then check the brake block depth. Have the
brake blocks replaced if necessary.
If the brake disc is worn, cracked or bent it must be replaced. Have this work carried out by a professional bike
workshop.
If the depth of the brake blocks is less than 0.5 mm, they
must be replaced.
> 0.5 mm
0.5 mm
When installing, removing and carrying out maintenance on the wheel, do not touch the brake disc with
your fingers when it is turning. You could be seriously
injured if you catch your fingers in the cutouts of the
brake disc.
The brake calliper and the disc can become extremely
hot when braking. You should therefore not touch
these parts when riding the bike or immediately after
dismounting as you could burn yourself. Before adjusting the brakes, check that the parts have cooled
down sufficiently.
21.5.1 Hydraulic disc brake
The hand brake lever of the hydraulic disc brake is
equipped with a master cylinder. The hydraulic fluid is
fed through a tube to the brake cylinders. This actuates
the brake pistons which push the brake blocks against the
brake disc. This type of brake requires little maintenance
and can be very powerful.
Once the brakes have been adjusted, always perform
a brake test by pushing the bike quickly forwards and
operating the brake lever. You should only use your
bike if you can safely stop it using the brakes.
You must only fit a disc brake on your bike providing
suitable mounting devices are installed on the frame
and the bike fork. If in doubt, consult a specialist
cycle shop.
If the brake blocks come into contact with oil or grease,
they must be replaced. If the brake disc comes into contact with oil or grease, it must be cleaned as otherwise its
braking performance will be drastically reduced.
Check whether the quick-release lever for the wheel is
on the side opposite the brake disc. If the quick-release
lever is on the same side as the brake disc, there is a
danger you could burn yourself when operating the lever.
The heat in the brake disc could also reduce the clamping
force of the quick-release device.
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Check regularly, also before each journey, that the lines
and connections are tight. If lines and connections are not
tight, brake fluid may escape from the brake system. The
brake may not work properly as a result.
If fluid escapes from the braking system, do not use the
bike and have the necessary repair work carried out immediately by a professional bike workshop.
If you continue riding the bike in this condition, the risk
of brake failure is extremely likely.
If the brake blocks come into contact with oil or grease,
they must be replaced. If the brake disc comes into contact with oil or grease, it must be cleaned as otherwise its
braking performance will be drastically reduced.
21.5.2 Vapour bubble formation
›› Vapour bubble formation can occur if the brakes
are operated continuously for some time, e. g. during a long steep descent.
Instead of applying gentle pressure continuously
with the brakes, operate them for shorter periods,
with more force if necessary, releasing the brake
lever intermittently.
›› Vapour bubbles form if water in the brake fluid
heats up, evaporates and forms bubbles in the
brake system.
As these are easily compressed, the brake lever travel
distance increases.
When transporting or storing the bike upside down,
air bubbles can form in the brake system fluid reservoir.
If you then use the bike, the brakes could fail and
cause a serious accident.
Once the bike is in the correct riding position, pull the
brake lever several times to check whether the brakes
respond normally.
If not, adjust them as follows:
›› Adjust the brake lever so it is parallel to the ground
and operate it slowly several times so the bubbles
return to the reservoir.
›› If the response is still poor, the brake system must
be vented. Have this work carried out by a specialist cycle shop.
Brake pads and brake blocks are wear parts. Have the
brake pads of hydraulic disc brakes checked regularly,
and replaced if necessary, by a professional bike
workshop.
21.5.3 Cleaning the brake system
If the brake blocks come into contact with oil or grease,
they must be replaced. If the brake disc comes into contact with oil or grease, it must be cleaned as otherwise its
braking performance will be drastically reduced.
›› Clean and maintain the brake system using isopropyl alcohol, soapy water or a dry cloth. Do not use
commercially available brake cleaning agents or
agents to prevent braking noises as these can damage components such as the seals.
21.5.4Fitting/removing the wheel
›› When removing the wheel, we recommend you
use a brake block spacer. This prevents the piston
from being pushed out if the brake lever is operated once the wheel has been removed. This also
prevents air bubbles in the expansion vessel from
entering the system.
›› If the brake lever is operated and the brake block
spacer is not inserted, the pistons may extend further than normal. Put the bike in an upright position to push back the brake blocks. Use a clean,
flat screw driver or tyre lever and be careful not to
scratch the brake blocks. If the brake blocks are
not fitted, push the piston back carefully without
damaging it. If you have trouble pushing back the
brake blocks or piston, remove the reservoir cap
and try again. Note that some oil may flow out the
reservoir.
›› After fitting the wheel, check that the quick-release
lever is on the side opposite the brake disc. If it
is on the same side as the brake disc, there is a
danger of the lever and brake disc obstructing one
another and this could also reduce the clamping
force of the quick-release device.
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22 Lighting system
22.3 Generator / dynamo
The dynamo produces the energy required to operate the
front and rear lights. There are different types of dynamos.
In some EU countries, only lighting systems that are
prescribed by national legislation (the Road Traffic Licensing Regulations (StVZO) in Germany for example)
and have been approved for use may be installed on
bikes. If in doubt, ask your specialist cycle shop.
22.3.1 Sidewall dynamo
22.1 Specifications for lighting system
•• At a distance of five metres, the cone of light
thrown by the front light must be at half the height
of its exit point. The centre of the cone of light
determines its height.
5 m
e. g. 1 m
0.5 m
Sidewall dynamo
The dynamo must be positioned so its longitudinal axis
is perpendicular to the wheel axle. The roller must be in
contact with the designated traction surface on the tyre
across its entire width.
Aligning the front light
•• The cone of light thrown by the front light must
only light the road for ten metres at the most. The
centre of the cone of light determines its distance.
22.2 Special regulations for road bikes
•• You can fit battery-operated front lights and rear
lights to sports bikes with a maximum weight
of 11 kg (road bike). Please familiarise yourself
with the applicable regulations and, if applicable, have the bike refitted.
•• Always carry these with you.
•• Dynamo-operated lighting systems must be used
with bikes that weight more than 11 kg. The lighting system must come with an official test mark.
Please familiarise yourself with the applicable
regulations and, if applicable, have the bike refitted.
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Only switch the dynamo on and off when the bike is
stationary as otherwise you could put yourself and
other road users in danger. The sidewall dynamo is
less effective in wet conditions. Provide additional
lighting if necessary.
22.3.1.1 Switching the sidewall dynamo on and off
›› Switch the dynamo on/off via the pushbutton or
the lever. The traction roller is now on the tyre
sidewall.
›› To switch the dynamo off, pull it away from the tyre
and guide it into its starting position. The dynamo
engages in the starting position.
22.3.2 Hub dynamo
22.4 Failure of the lighting system
The hub dynamo is inside the hub of the front wheel. The
hub dynamo is highly efficient, and the wear is extremely
low.
If the lighting system fails or develops a fault when
riding in the dark this could cause a serious accident.
Have the fault repaired at a professional bike workshop before you continue your journey.
Hub dynamo
Extremely powerful (rechargeable) battery-operated bicycle and outdoor lights are available from some retail outlets. With some exceptions, use of these lights on public
roads is not permitted.
There is a switch or a sensor on the back of the front light
on some bikes with a hub dynamo. The sensor switches
the light on automatically in the twilight or when passing
through a tunnel. Other models have a switch on the handlebar that switches the lighting on and off.
If you want to remove the front wheel, you first need
to remove the connecting terminal for the light cable.
When you put the front wheel back on, turn it so that
the connecting terminal for the light cable is on the
right-hand side (facing in the direction of travel). If
the connecting terminal is on the left, the dynamo will
not be able to turn properly or the lighting system
may stop working. Ensure correct polarity of the connections.
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23 Add-on components
23.1.1 Front pannier rack
23.1 Pannier rack
The pannier racks on the bike satisfy the standard
EN 14873.
The load-carrying capacity of the pannier rack falls into
one of four possible categories: 5 kg, 10 kg, 18 kg and
25 kg.
The information on load-carrying capacity is embossed on
the pannier rack.
The maximum load it can handle may be higher, depending on its design. This is stated separately.
If you carry luggage, this changes the ride characteristics of your bike. It increases the braking distance
for one thing. This can lead to serious accidents.
Adapt your handling to the different ride characteristics. Apply the brakes in good time and bear in mind
that the bike's steering response will be more sluggish.
Only carry luggage on the pannier rack provided for
this purpose. Do not attach carriers to the seatpost.
It is not designed for this purpose. Overloading by a
carrier can lead to component breakages and serious
accidents.
If you carry luggage on your bike, it is extremely important that you do not exceed the maximum permissible
loading (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
If you fit another carrier, it must comply with standard EN
14873.
The maximum permissible load must be stated on the carrier (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data").
Front pannier rack
Front pannier racks are attached to the front axle or the
front fork. They are designed to carry smaller loads than
rear pannier racks. If you carry luggage on this pannier
rack, you must familiarise yourself with the changed
steering response.
Only use suitable pannier bags.
Consult a specialised dealer.
23.1.2 Rear pannier rack
Rear pannier rack
This type of luggage carrier attaches to the rear triangle of
the bike.
If you attach a rear pannier rack to a full-suspension
frame, the proportion of unsprung weight increases
which changes the suspension behaviour. You will
therefore have to readjust your suspension / damping
accordingly.
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If you notice that a wheel guard is damaged, always replace it before using the bike again.
If you carry pannier bags or other loads on the pannier racks, make sure they are securely attached.
Make sure that nothing can become caught in the
spokes and the turning wheels.
23.2.1 Re-engaging the safety-release
mechanism
Only fit child seats to rear pannier racks if suitable
fixtures are provided. In doing so, be careful not to
exceed the permissible weight category.
Safety mechanism released Safety mechanism engaged
A plastic clip is attached to the end of the strut.
23.2 Wheel guards / mudguards
Additional struts are mounted to hold the mudguards in
the correct position. The strut is at its ideal length if the
inner edge of the wheel guard runs more or less concentrically and parallel to the tyre.
The wheel guard cannot detach when you are riding
normally. If a foreign object lodges between the front
wheel guard and the tyre and blocks it, the mudguard
struts immediately detach from their mountings on
the fork. This allows the mudguard to deflect and the
wheel will not block.
›› Insert this clip on the strut into the easy-clip
mount on the fork until it engages.
›› Align the wheel guard so that the tyre and front
wheel guard do not touch.
To securely reattach the safety-release mechanism,
you may need to push the strut and plastic mount
slightly together by pressing hard.
If this happens, the struts must be securely reattached. Have a specialist cycle shop check that the
mudguard, struts and plastic mounts are still in a
serviceable condition.
Never ride with the strut detached, it must be reattached. If this is not possible, have the strut replaced
by a professional bike workshop.
Check regularly that the struts are securely fastened in the
safety-release mechanisms.
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24 Accessories and equipment
Always install enclosed accessories according to
the instructions. Use the correct tightening torques
for screw connections (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical
data").
›› Only use accessory parts that meet the requirements of the national road traffic licensing
regulations (these are the Road Traffic Licensing
Regulations (StVZO) in Germany for example).
›› Non-approved accessory parts are not safe for
use in traffic and can cause accidents. All accessories or add-on components must be compatible
with your bike
›› Never attach the child seat to the bike handlebars directly as it will not be possible to steer
the bike safely.
›› Do not use a suspension saddle if you are carrying a child in a child seat behind the saddle.
The child's fingers could be crushed. The coil
springs under the seat must always be completely wrapped or covered in such a way that
it is impossible to insert fingers into the coils of
the springs.
›› Always strap the child into the child seat as otherwise it could fall out and be severely injured.
›› Make sure that children wear a snug fitting bicycle helmet as otherwise a severe head injury may
result in the event of a crash.
›› Otherwise accidents could occur or the bike
could be damaged. Ask your specialist cycle shop
for advice.
24.1 Child seat
You can carry a child up to the age of seven years on
the child seat. The rider must be at least 16 years old
in Germany.
When using a child seat, this adversely affects the
handling of the bike. The additional weight can cause
the bike to sway and significantly increases the braking distance. Adapt your handling accordingly.
Not all bikes equipped with a suspension system are suitable for transporting child seats
A child seat must not be mounted on a carbon frame
as this could damage the frame.
›› Only use child seats that satisfy the standard
EN 14344.
›› These child seats must safely support the child's
feet.
›› Never leave your child sitting unattended in the
child seat when you park your bike. The bike
could fall over and severely injure the child.
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Check the mounting options or consult your specialist
cycle shop. If the child seat is mounted incorrectly, a serious accident may occur.
Do not exceed the maximum permissible gross weight of
the bike and the maximum load-carrying capacity of the
pannier rack (see ➠ Chapter 30 "Technical data"). If you
do, this could damage the pannier rack and frame and
cause a serious accident.
24.2 Bike stand
›› Never leave your child sitting unattended in the
child seat when you park your bike. The bike
could fall over and severely injure the child.
›› Never ride with the stand folded out.
24.3 Bike trailer
24.4 Bike basket
The fixing for the basket must not damage the handlebar or handlebar stem.
›› Attach the basket so as not to cover the front
light and front reflector.
›› In doing so, be careful not to bend the brake and
shifting cables.
›› Do not carry more than five kilogrammes of luggage in the basket.
›› Bear in mind that the steering characteristics
change when you use a basket.
Not all bikes are suitable for trailers. Ask your specialist cycle shop if your bike is designed and suitable for
this.
24.5 Bar ends
›› Only use trailers that meet the requirements
of the road traffic licensing regulations in your
country (the Road Traffic Licensing Regulations
(StVZO) in Germany for example). Non-approved
trailers can cause accidents.
›› Trailers adversely affect the handling. Adapt your
handling accordingly as otherwise the bike trailer may tip up or detach and cause an accident.
›› Practise starting off, braking, cornering and riding on hills with an unladen trailer.
›› Bear in mind that the gross weight of the bike
also includes the trailer.
Always attach bar ends securely to the handlebars as
otherwise you could have an accident.
›› A bike trailer may increase the braking distance
considerably. Failure to observe these points
could result in an accident.
If a thin-walled handlebar is fitted to your bike, you
may require additional accessory parts to protect the
handlebar from damage. Read the manufacturer's
instructions for use carefully.
If a carbon handlebar is fitted to your bike, find out
from your specialist cycle shop whether this handlebar is approved for use with bar ends.
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25 Bike carriers for mounting on
roof and rear of car
26 Carbon components
Carbon is a specific material that requires special handling and care when setting up and carrying out maintenance on the bike as well as when riding and also during
transportation and storage.
›› Only use roof and rear-mounted bike carriers
that meet the requirements of the road traffic
licensing regulations in your country (the Road
Traffic Licensing Regulations (StVZO) in Germany
for example). Non-approved roof and rear-mounted bike carriers are not safe for use in traffic and
can cause accidents.
26.1 Properties
Carbon parts must not be deformed, dented or bent
following an accident or crash. It is possible that fibres have been destroyed or have detached although
this is not evident externally.
›› Adjust your driving to take the load on your car
roof into account. Bear in mind that your car's
overall height has changed.
You should therefore inspect the carbon frame and all
other carbon components very carefully if you come off the
bike or if it falls over. If you are not absolutely sure that
the bike is still in a sound condition, have the carbon components in question checked by an expert.
The bike could come off the carrier and cause a serious accident. When transporting the bike, check regularly that it is still securely fastened.
Loose parts such as tools, luggage and tool kits, child
seats, tyre pump, etc. could detach in transit and endanger other road users. Remove all loose parts from
the bike before setting off.
26.2 Torques
›› Avoid transporting the bike upside down. Only
attach the bike by the handlebar, handlebar
stem, bike saddle or seatpost if so intended
by the manufacturer of the carrier. Do not use
mountings that could damage the bike fork or
frame.
›› Do not attach your bike to the roof or rear-mounted carrier by its pedal cranks. Always attach
bikes by their wheels when transporting them,
unless the carrier is designed for something else,
as otherwise the frame and fork of the bike could
be damaged.
You can also find important information on using and
fitting add-on components and accessories in the
Internet on the pages of the relevant manufacturer.
➠ Chapter 29 contains a link list.
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Some carbon components require lower tightening
torques than metal components. If the tightening
torques are too high, this can lead to hidden damage
that may not be visible externally. Frames or other
components can break or change to the extent that
they could fall off. You should therefore always observe the information enclosed by the manufacturer
with the component(s) or ask a specialist dealer for
advice. Use a torque wrench to ensure the right tightness is maintained.
If your bike has a carbon frame and a bottom bracket
housing for a BB30 bottom bracket please note the
following:
In this case you can fit an adapter so that a bottom
bracket with conventional BSA thread can be used.
However, bear in mind
•• You can only install the adapter if the frame is
completely undamaged. Repairing a defective
BB30 housing serves no purpose. If it is not
installed correctly, the bottom bracket housing
may be damaged which would render the war-
ranty void. This kind of adapter should only be
fitted by a specialist cycle shop.
•• Once the adapter has been fitted in the carbon
frame it cannot be removed.
26.3 Visual inspection
If your carbon component has pre-existing damage,
it could suddenly fail completely with potentially disastrous consequences. You should therefore inspect
your carbon frame and components thoroughly on a
regular basis.
›› Look for splitting, deep scratches, holes or other
changes in the carbon surface.
›› Check whether the components feel softer or
have more give in them than usual.
›› Check whether individual layers (paint, finish or
fibres) are flaking off.
If you suspect a component is no longer sound, you
should definitely replace it before riding your bike
again. You should ideally hand over your bike to a
specialist dealer for inspection.
Inspect the following components and areas regularly (at
least every 100 km) for cracks, fractures or changes in
surface appearance. Furthermore, if you come off the bike
or if it falls over, these components must always subsequently be inspected:
26.4 Carbon frame
Front derailleur clamp area, derailleur hanger, saddle
clamp, headset spacers, bottom bracket spacers, brake
boss or disc brake mount, dropout slots, suspension
mounts on main frame and rear triangle, bearing mounts
with full-suspension frame, transition areas around
threaded bushes for drinking bottles
Mounting of a child seat to a carbon frame is not permitted. There is a danger of the frame breaking with
serious consequences.
26.5 Carbon handlebar
Transition area at handlebar stem, handles, clamping areas of other components
If your bike falls on its handlebar, the best thing you
can do is replace it. Always have bar ends retrofitted
by your specialist cycle shop.
26.6 Carbon handlebar stem
Clamping area of all screws, head tube inside and outside
If you have changed the handlebar position, bear in
mind that the stem must extensively enclose the head
tube.
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26.7 Carbon wheels
Surface wear, change of surface, e. g. due to heat produced when braking, abrasion of brake blocks, wheel hub
or their flanks
ment of pannier racks, trailers and other fixtures are not
permitted due to the risk of breakage.
26.10Splinters
If you are using a bike with carbon rims, bear in mind that
the braking behaviour of this material is much poorer than
aluminium rims.
Note that only approved brake blocks may be used.
26.8 Carbon fork
Fork blades on fork head, dropouts and clamping area of
quick-release device, fork head below fork cone, clamping
area of A-head stem on inside and outside
If you have changed the handlebar position, bear in
mind that the stem must extensively enclose the carbon section.
26.9 Carbon seatpost
Transition area between seatpost and seat tube, transition
area at head of seatpost, contact area of all screws
If other carbon parts are installed on your bike, inspect
them regularly for cracks, fractures or changes in surface
appearance.
Retapping of the thread and bearing shells and reaming of the seat tube is not permitted.
As a basic rule, if a fixture is not already provided on a
carbon frame or component for an object (e.g. threaded
inserts for bottle cage), it must not be fitted. The attach-
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Carbon fibres are extremely thin and hard. You should
therefore handle damaged carbon parts very carefully.
Individual fibres may detach and stick out. If these
projecting fibres come into contact with your skin,
there is a danger of them splintering off and causing
an injury.
26.11 Fastening in mounting stand
Only clamp your carbon frame at the seatpost when
fastening your carbon frame in a mounting stand, as
otherwise the clamping mechanism may cause visible or
concealed damage to the frame. If your bike has a carbon
seatpost, we recommend you replace it provisionally with
an aluminium or steel seatpost when carrying out this
work.
26.12 Transportation by car
When transporting the bike on the roof rack or on a towbar cycle carrier, never attach it by its frame. Always attach the bike at the seatpost, and never at the down tube,
top tube, seat tube, fork blades, steering tube, chain stay,
cranks or seat stay.
The clamping mechanism could cause visible or concealed
damage to the frame that may affect your safety. If your
bike has a carbon seatpost, we recommend you replace it
provisionally with an aluminium or steel seatpost when
transporting it.
27 Care and maintenance of the bike
›› Have defective parts replaced before you ride the
bike again.
27.1 Care
›› Touch up damaged paintwork.
Do not allow care products or oils to come into contact with brake pads, brake discs and the rim's brake
contact surfaces. This could reduce the effectiveness
of the brake.
Treat all parts that are susceptible to corrosion more
frequently than other parts with preservatives and care
products, especially during the winter and in aggressive
environments such as coastal regions as otherwise your
bike will corrode (rust) more powerfully and quickly.
›› Clean all galvanised and chrome-plated parts as
well as stainless-steel components regularly.
›› Preserve these parts after cleaning with spray wax.
Make sure that wax does not come into contact
with brake discs and rims.
Do not use a powerful water jet or high-pressure
cleaner. If water under under high pressure is directed at the bike, it can enter the bearings. This can dilute the lubricant which increases friction. This leads
to rusting and irrepairable damage to the bearings.
Do not clean your bike with
•• acids,
•• grease,
›› If you stop using your bike for a while, in the winter for example, store it in a dry place at a constant
temperature.
›› Before putting your bike into storage, inflate both
tyres to the prescribed tyre pressure.
To find out more important information on looking after
your bike, visit the Internet pages of the relevant component manufacturer. The link list in ➠ Chapter 29 provides
an overview with links.
•• hot oil,
•• brake cleaners (apart from brake discs) or
•• fluids containing solvents.
These substances attack the surface of the bike and
accelerate wear.
Dispose of used lubricants, cleaning agents and care
products in an environmentally sound manner. Do not
pour these substances into the domestic waste, down
the drain or into natural water bodies or the soil.
How well the bike works and how long it lasts depends on how well you look after it.
27.2 Wear parts
Your bike is a technical product that must be regularly
checked.
Many parts on your bike are subject to a higher degree of
wear due to their function and depending on their use.
Have your bike checked regularly at a professional
bike workshop and have the wear parts replaced.
›› Clean your bike regularly using hot water, a small
amount of cleaning agent and a sponge.
›› You should also always take this opportunity
to check your bike for cracks, dents or material
deformation.
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27.3 Tyres
27.6 Brake discs
Due to their function, bike tyres are subject to wear. This
depends on how the bike is used and the rider can influence this significantly.
Brake discs also wear out as a result of intensive braking,
or during the course of time. Find out from the manufacturer of your brakes or your specialist cycle shop about
the respective wear limits. You can have worn brake discs
replaced at a professional bike workshop.
›› Do not brake so sharply that the wheels lock.
›› Check the tyre pressure regularly. The maximum
permissible tyre pressure, and normally also the
minimum permissible pressure, can be found on
the tyre wall.
›› If necessary, inflate the tyre up to the specified
value. This reduces wear.
›› Do not expose the tyres to things that can damage
them such as sunlight, petrol, oil, etc.
27.4 Rims in conjunction with rim brakes
Owing to the interaction of the rim brake with the rim, not
only the brake pad but also the rim is subject to functionrelated wear. If fine cracks appear or the rim flanges
deform when the tyre pressure increases, this indicates
increased wear. Wear indicators on the rim allow its wear
condition to be easily identified.
›› Check the wear condition of the rim at regular intervals (see ➠ Chapter 16.3 "Checking the rims").
27.5 Brake pads
The brake pads on rim, roller, drum and disc brakes are
subject to wear, the extent of which depends on how the
bike is used. If the bike is ridden in hilly regions, or used
in a sporty manner, the brake pads may need to be replaced more often. Check the wear condition of the pads
regularly and, if necessary, have them replaced by a professional bike workshop.
27.7 Bike chains or toothed belts
The bike chain is subject to function-related wear the extent of which depends on care/maintenance and how the
bike is used (mileage, rain, dirt, salt, etc.).
›› To increase the service life of the bike, clean the
bike chains and toothed belts regularly and lubricate the chain.
›› Have the chain replaced by a professional bike
workshop once its wear limit has been reached
(see ➠ Chapter 20 "Bike chain").
27.8 C
hainrings, sprocket wheels and
jockey wheels
In bikes with derailleur gears, the sprocket wheels, chainrings and jockey wheels are subject to function-related
wear. The extent of the wear depends on care/maintenance and how the bike is used (mileage, rain, dirt, salt,
etc.).
›› To increase the service life of the bike, you should
clean and lubricate these parts regularly.
›› Have them replaced by a professional bike workshop once their wear limit has been reached.
27.9 Lamps of lighting set
Bulbs and other lamps are subject to function-related wear
and therefore may need to be replaced.
›› In case you need to replace damaged bulbs, always
carry spare ones with you.
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27.10 Handlebar tapes and handle grips
Handlebar tapes and handle grips are subject to functionrelated wear and therefore may need to be replaced.
›› Check regularly that the handles are securely
seated.
27.11 Hydraulic oils and lubricants
The effectiveness of hydraulic oils and lubricants decreases over time. If lubricants are not replaced, this increases
the wear of the relevant components and bearings.
›› Clean and relubricate all relevant components and
bearings regularly.
›› Have the brake fluid for disc brakes checked regularly, and replaced if necessary.
27.12 Gear-shift and brake cables
27.15 S
liding bearings and bearings for
full-suspension frames, suspension
forks or other suspension elements
The suspension components on the bike, particularly the
sliding bearings, bearings and suspension elements, must
cope with very high stresses compared to the other bearings. They are therefore subject to a high degree of wear.
›› Check these parts regularly and thoroughly.
›› Observe the enclosed user manual from the
manufacturer.
›› Your specialist cycle shop can advise on how to
look after these sensitive components, and also on
how to replace them if necessary.
To find out more important information on maintenance of
wear parts, visit the Internet pages of the relevant component manufacturer. The link list in ➠ Chapter 29 provides
an overview with links.
›› Carry out regular maintenance on all Bowden
cables.
›› Have defective parts replaced at a professional
bike workshop. This may be necessary especially if
the bike is often left outdoors and is exposed to the
effects of the weather.
27.13 Paint finishes
Paint finishes require regular care, this also ensures that
your bike looks good.
›› Check all painted surfaces regularly for damage
and touch up immediately if required.
›› Consult your specialist cycle shop for advice on
how to care for your bike's surface finishes.
27.14 Bearings
All bearings on the bike, such as the headset, wheel hubs,
pedals and bottom brackets, are subject to function-related wear which depends on the intensity and duration of
use and how well the bike is looked after.
›› Check these parts regularly.
›› Clean and lubricate them regularly.
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59
28 Regular inspections
As the spokes settle, the length of the brake and shifting
cables increases and the bearings will run in during the
first kilometres on the bike, you will have to have an initial inspection carried out by your specialist cycle shop
after the first 200 kilometres, or after four to six weeks.
This is also important for the acceptance of claims made
under the terms of the warranty.
›› Clean your bike after every offroad ride and check
it for damage.
›› Have the following components readjusted:
•• headset,
•• gearshift,
•• brakes,
•• suspension elements.
after every ride
›› Check the following:
›› Have the initial inspection carried out.
•• spokes,
›› Inspect your bike roughly every 300 to 500 km, or
every three to six months.
•• rims for wear and true running,
›› During this inspection, check that all screws, nuts
and quick-release devices are securely fastened.
›› Clean your bike.
›› Grease moving parts (apart from brake contact
surfaces) according to instructions.
›› Have paint damage and rust spots touched up.
›› Apply corrosion inhibitor to bare metal parts (apart
from brake contact surfaces).
›› Have inoperative or damaged parts replaced.
28.1 Inspection schedule
28.1.1 Maintenance / checks
•• tyres for damage and foreign objects,
•• quick-release devices,
•• function of gearshift and suspension,
•• brakes, hydraulic brakes for leaks,
•• lighting and
•• bell.
after 300 to 500 kilometres
›› Have the following checked for wear and replaced
if necessary:
•• bike chain,
•• sprocket,
•• sprocket wheel,
•• rims and
After the first 200 kilometres following purchase,
and subsequently at least once a year
›› Have the following checked:
•• tyres and wheels.
›› Have the tightening torques of the following
checked:
•• handlebar,
•• pedals,
•• pedal cranks,
•• bike saddle,
•• seatpost and
•• fastening screws.
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I General User Manual
•• brake pads.
›› Clean the bike chain, chainring and sprocket
wheel.
›› Lubricate the chain using a suitable lubricant.
›› Check that all screw connections are secure.
after 1000 kilometres
›› Have the brake hub checked and, if necessary, lubricate the brake sleeve with brake sleeve grease
or replace it.
after 3000 kilometres
›› If necessary, the
29 Link list
•• headset,
You can obtain important information on your bike and
its components via these links. The relevant user manual
is normally provided on the manufacturer's web pages, in
addition to important tips for use and making settings.
•• pedals,
www.rohloff.de
•• shifting cables * and
www.speedlifter.com
•• brake cables
www.brooksengland.com
•• hubs,
›› should be
•• dismantled,
•• checked,
•• cleaned,
•• lubricated and,
•• if necessary, replaced by a professional bike
workshop.
www.paul-lange.de / produkte / shimano
www.ritcheylogic.com
www.schwalbe.de
www.srsuntour-cycling.com
www.magura.com
www.sram.com
www.dtswiss.com
*Do not apply lubricants or oils to teflon-coated cable casings.
Following each ride in the rain
›› Clean and lubricate the following:
•• gearshift,
www.fullspeedahead.com
www.paul-lange.de / produkte / selle_italia
www.bike-magazin.de
www.tour-magazin.de
•• brake (apart from brake contact surfaces) and
www.radfahren.de
•• bike chain.
www.tektro.com
www.fallbrooktech.com / nuvinci.asp
www.hebie.de
Not all lubricants and care products are suitable for
your bike. Ask your specialist cycle shop which product you should use in each case. If you use unsuitable
lubricants and care products, this can damage or impair the performance of your bike.
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61
30 Technical data
30.1 M
aximum permitted gross weight
of bike
The maximum permitted gross weight of the bike comprises the weight of the bike, the weight of the rider and the
weight of the luggage. It also includes the laden weight of
a trailer.
BIKE TYPE
MAXIMUM PERMITTED
GROSS WEIGHT
20" trailer
50 kg
20" child's bike:
60 kg
24" child's bike:
80 kg
Urban bike, city / trekking
130 kg
max. 115 kg
Urban bike, semi XXL
150 kg
max. 135 kg
Urban bike, XXL
170 kg
max. 155 kg
E-Bike
130 kg
max. 105 kg
E-Bike semi XXL
150 kg
max. 125 kg
E-Bike XXL
170 kg
max. 145 kg
MTB (hardtail)
110 kg
max. 100 kg
MTB (hardtail), semi XXL
140 kg
max. 125 kg
MTB (dirt)
110 kg
max. 100 kg
MTB (full-suspension)
110 kg
max. 100 kg
MTB (full-suspension), semi XXL
140 kg
max. 125 kg
Road bike
110 kg
max. 100 kg
Road bike, semi XXL
135 kg
max. 125 kg
Cyclo Cross / Cyclo Cross Trekking
110 kg
max. 100 kg
The maximum permitted gross weights of carbon frames
also apply for aluminium frames.
If other gross weights are approved, for lightweight construction components for example, this will be indicated
on the bike or component.
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I General User Manual
WEIGHT OF RIDER:
30.2 M
aximum permitted loading
of pannier rack
Note that the data on your pannier rack or in the manufacturer's user manual may be different.
Maximum weight loading of front pannier rack:
•• Loading area above wheel: 10 kg
•• Low loading area: 18 kg
Observe the minimum screw-in depth. For hard aluminium
alloys this is at least 1.4 times the screw diameter (e.g.
nominal diameter M 5 × 1.4 = 7 mm).
Whenever possible, you should tighten all safety-relevant
screw connections using a torque wrench. This indicates
the tightening torque in Nm (Newton metres) in each case.
›› If no values are indicated on the component, use
the tightening torques in the following table.
›› If the torque has been specified by the manufacturer of the component, this has priority.
›› Carbon parts must be mounted using a special
mounting paste.
Maximum weight loading of rear pannier rack:
•• 20" child's bike and trailer: 10 kg
•• 24" child's bike: 18 kg
Also note other information or markings on carbon
components regarding the recommended torques.
•• Touring bike, city bike, trekking bike, ATB: 25 kg
30.3 T
ightening torques for screw
connections
Only use a suitable tool, a torque wrench for example,
to tighten the screw connections as otherwise the
screws could shear off or break.
If you tighten screws too tightly, this could damage
the components
You should therefore always observe the prescribed
tightening torque.
I General User Manual
63
General
Carbon
SCREW CONNECTION
THREAD
TIGHTENING TORQUE (NM)
Crank arm, steel
M8x1
30
Crank arm, alu
M8x1
30
Pedal
9 / 16"
30
Axle nuts, front
gen.
25
Axle nuts, rear
gen.
30
Stem expander bolt wedge
M8
23
Stem, A-head, angle adjustment
M6
10
Stem, A-head, handlebar clamping fixture
M5 / M6 / M7
M5: 5 / M6: 10 / M7: 14
Stem, A-head, head tube
M5 / M6 / M7
M5: 5 / M6: 10 / M7: 14
Bar end, outer clamp
M5 / M6
M5: 5 / M6: 10
Seatpost, clamp
M8
20
Seatpost, clamp
M6
10
Seatpost, saddle clamping bracket
M7 / M8
M7: 14 / M8: 20
Front derailleur clamp
M5
5
Brake, pad
M6
10
Brake, cable clamp
M6
10
Sidewall dynamo, fixing
M6
10
Derailleur hanger
M10x1
16
Bottom bracket
BSA
according to manufacturer's instructions
Disc brake calliper, Shimano, IS and PM
M6
6 to 8
Disc brake calliper, AVID, IS and PM
M6
8 to 10
Disc brake calliper, Magura, IS and PM
M6
6
Shifting lever clamp
M5
5
Brake lever clamp
M5
5
V-brake, fastening screw
M6
10
Road bike brake
M6
10
Freewheel fastening screw
n. a.
40
Cassette, lock ring
n. a.
30
Handles, screw-on type
M4 / M5
M4: 3 / M5: 5
Carbon frame, saddle clamp
M5 / M6
5
Carbon frame, water bottle holder
M5
5
Carbon frame, front derailleur clamp
M5
4
Carbon handlebar, shifting lever clamp
M5
3
Carbon handlebar, brake lever clamp
M5
3
Carbon handlebar, handlebar clamp
M5
5
Carbon handlebar, stem clamp
M5 / M6
5
Overview of torques, values apply for standard screws
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I General User Manual
30.5 Lighting set
30.3.1General tightening torques
for screw connections
The screw grade, e.g. 8.8, is embossed in the screw head.
Unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer, the following tightening torques (average values) apply depending on the screw grade:
GRADE
THREAD
V2A / V4A
8.8
Depending on which type of lighting set is fitted on your
bike you may require different spare lamps. The following
table shows which bulbs you require.
TYPE OF LIGHTING SET USED
POWER SUPPLY
Front light
6V
2.4 W
10.9
12.9
Front light, halogen
6V
2.4 W
M4
3
2.7
3.8
4.6
Rear light
6V
0.6 W
M5
5
5.5
8
9.5
Rear light with stand light
6V
0.6 W
M6
8
9.5
13
16
M8
20
23
32
39
M10
40
46
64
77
Lighting with LED lights
LED lights cannot be
replaced
Dynamo
6V
3W
Hub dynamo
6V
3W
30.4 Tyres and tyre pressure
The recommended tyre pressure is stated in either bar or
PSI.
The following table shows standard values converted, and
also information on which tyre widths these pressures
normally apply.
TYRE WIDTH
in mm
PSI
BAR
25 HD*
80 – 110
5.5 – 7.6
28 HD*
70 – 80
4.8 – 5.5
28
60
4.1
32
60 – 70
4.1 – 4.8
37
50
3.5
40
60
4.1
42
60
4.1
47
40 – 50
3.5 – 4.1
57 – 62
30 – 40
2.1 – 2.8
* HD = high-pressure tyre
Note that the manufacturer's specifications may differ
and must be observed as otherwise you could damage
the tyres and inner tubes.
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65
31 Warranty conditions
Read ➠ Chapter 27 "Care and maintenance of the bike"
carefully. Comply with the inspection and maintenance
intervals specified in ➠ Chapter 28 "Regular inspections" .
Compliance with the service intervals is a prerequisite for
the assertion of warranty claims.
The statutory warranty period is two years. This starts
when the bike is handed over by the specialist cycle shop
who is also your contact partner for warranty claims.
As proof of purchase and date of handover, please retain
the handover document signed by both parties and record
of purchase, such as the invoice and/or sales receipt, for
the duration of the warranty period.
31.1 P
rerequisites for the validity
of warranty claims
•• Manufacturing, material or information error.
•• The problem or error already existed at the time of
handover to the customer.
31.2 Warranty exclusions
A warranty claim applies only for the initial faultiness of
the defective part. The following are excluded from the
warranty:
•• Damage caused by use in competitions, improper
use and force majeure (see ➠ Chapter 6 "Intended
use").
•• All parts that are subject to function-related wear,
providing this is not a production or material fault
(see ➠ Chapter 27.2 "Wear parts").
•• Damage caused by incorrect or insufficient care
and unprofessional repairs, conversions or replacement of components on the bike. This User Manual
contains detailed information on how to look after
your bike.
•• Accident damage or damage caused by other external factors, providing this is not attributable to
incorrect information or a product error.
•• Repairs carried out with used parts or damage that
occurs as a consequence of this.
•• Special equipment or accessories or non-standard
equipment; especially technical changes, i.e. to the
gearshift system or the bike fork and frame geometries.
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I General User Manual
•• Non-compatible add-on components that were not
part of the scope of delivery at the time the product was handed over, or damage caused by unprofessional installation of these add-on components.
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67
We hope you thoroughly enjoy using your your new bike!
Copyright © 2011 Raleigh Univega GmbH
Reproduction in whole or in part is not permitted without the consent
of Raleigh Univega GmbH. Subject to misprints, errors and technical
modifications.
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