"user manual"

"user manual"
Workplace Safety Guide
In the event of a work-related injury immediately
contact the CAPS Risk Management department:
Telephone: 310-280-0755, ext. 2259, 2297 or 2310
E-mail: [email protected]
Fax: 310-733-1802
Revised September 23, 2015
Table of Contents
Introduction: CAPS Statement on Workplace Safety ......................................................... 5
Purpose of This Guide ............................................................................................. 5
Forms and Instructions for Reporting Injuries ................................................................ 5
Reporting an Injury ................................................................................................ 5
What to Do If… ................................................................................................... 6
An employee is injured on the job ........................................................................... 6
Injured employee refuses medical attention ............................................................... 6
After the accident has been reported ....................................................................... 6
CAPS First Report of Injury Form .............................................................................. 7
Right of Refusal of Medical Aid .............................................................................. 10
Workers' Compensation Claim Form (DWC 1) – California Only .......................................... 11
Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) ................................................................ 14
Management Commitment and Responsibility ............................................................... 14
Management Chain of Responsibility ........................................................................ 15
Employee Responsibility ...................................................................................... 15
Hazard Reporting ..............................................................................................16
When an Injury Occurs ........................................................................................16
Close Calls ......................................................................................................16
Safety Communications with Employees ..................................................................... 16
Emergency Procedures ........................................................................................ 17
Safety and Emergency Notice Area .........................................................................17
Emergency Contacts Poster ..................................................................................17
Safety Notice Boards ..........................................................................................17
Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee Bulletins ........................................17
Emergency Action Plan .......................................................................................18
Production Safety Guide ...................................................................................... 18
Safety Training ................................................................................................. 18
Sample Training Outline ......................................................................................18
Safety Meetings ................................................................................................ 18
On-Production..................................................................................................19
Off Production .................................................................................................19
Compliance with Safety Guidelines ......................................................................... 19
Safety Inspections and Reporting .............................................................................. 20
Identified Hazards ............................................................................................. 20
Corrective Action .............................................................................................. 20
Accident Reporting and Investigation ......................................................................... 20
Recordkeeping .................................................................................................... 20
Production Safety Guide......................................................................................... 21
General Safety Rules ............................................................................................ 21
Revised September 23, 2015
Pre- Production and Off Production ......................................................................... 21
Record Keeping ................................................................................................. 21
Injury/Illness and Corrective Action Reports .............................................................. 22
Code of Safe Practice ........................................................................................... 22
Supervisor’s Ten Commandments of Safety .................................................................. 23
Fire Emergencies ................................................................................................. 24
Whether or Not to Fight a Fire ............................................................................... 24
About Fire Extinguishers ...................................................................................... 25
Types of Extinguishers ........................................................................................25
Remember P-A-S-S – Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep..........................................................26
Electricity Safety................................................................................................. 27
Electrical Outlets .............................................................................................. 27
Three-Pronged Outlets ........................................................................................ 27
Portable Power Tools .......................................................................................... 27
Best Practices ..................................................................................................27
Guards ........................................................................................................... 28
Safety Switches................................................................................................. 28
Fall Protection....................................................................................................
Scaffolds.........................................................................................................
Ladders ..........................................................................................................
Aerial Lifts and Scissor Lifts ..................................................................................
29
29
30
30
Hand Tool Safety ................................................................................................. 31
Best Practices .................................................................................................. 31
Electrical Shock .................................................................................................. 31
What to Do ...................................................................................................... 32
Temperature Extremes .......................................................................................... 33
Hot Weather Effects, First Aid and Best Practices ........................................................ 33
Heat Index Free Mobile App .................................................................................33
Heat Exhaustion ...............................................................................................33
Heat Stroke .....................................................................................................33
Heat Cramps ...................................................................................................33
Heat Fainting ...................................................................................................34
Heat Rash .......................................................................................................34
Good Hot Weather Practices .................................................................................34
Cold Weather Effects, First Aid and Best Practices ....................................................... 34
Hypothermia ...................................................................................................34
Frostbite ........................................................................................................35
Good Cold Weather Practices................................................................................36
Protect Your Back ................................................................................................ 36
Back Safety Tips ................................................................................................ 37
Appendix ........................................................................................................... 38
Revised September 23, 2015
Injury and Illness Prevention Program ........................................................................ 38
Responsibility ..................................................................................................38
Compliance .....................................................................................................38
Communication ................................................................................................38
Hazard Assessment ............................................................................................38
Accident/Exposure Investigations ...........................................................................39
Hazard Correction .............................................................................................39
Training and Instruction ......................................................................................39
Recordkeeping .................................................................................................40
List of Training Subjects......................................................................................41
Hazard Assessment Checklists ...............................................................................41
Emergency Contacts Poster .................................................................................... 44
Emergency Action Plan Overview .............................................................................. 45
Minimum Plan Requirements ................................................................................. 45
Stay or Go? ...................................................................................................... 46
Types of Emergency Events ................................................................................... 46
Fire ..............................................................................................................46
Power Failure ..................................................................................................46
Earthquake .....................................................................................................47
Extreme Weather ..............................................................................................47
After Action Safety Checklist ................................................................................. 47
Emergency Action Plan .......................................................................................... 48
Employee Safety Training Sign-In Sheet ...................................................................... 49
Acknowledgement of Safety Training ....................................................................... 50
Line Producer Safety Checklist................................................................................. 51
First Assistant Director/Technical Lead Safety Checklist .................................................. 52
Location Shoot Safety Checklist ............................................................................... 53
Daily Production Safety Report ................................................................................ 56
Safety Suggestion Form ......................................................................................... 58
Sample Safety Inspection ....................................................................................... 59
Corrective Action Guide ........................................................................................
Investigating an Accident .....................................................................................
Analyzing Risk Factors .........................................................................................
Developing Corrective Action ................................................................................
60
60
60
61
Corrective Action Form ......................................................................................... 63
No Smoking Sign .................................................................................................. 64
OSHA Reporting Requirements: Work-Connected Fatalities and Injuries ................................ 65
A summary of the OSHA Fatality and Severe Injury and Illness Reporting Requirements ........... 65
California Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (CAL/OSHA) ..................................... 66
Cal/OSHA Regional and District Offices ...................................................................... 67
Revised September 23, 2015
Introduction: CAPS Statement on Workplace Safety
Your production company has not only the opportunity but the legal responsibility to provide a safe
workplace. This includes identifying and eliminating potential hazards, ensuring that injured workers
receive efficient and effective care, investigating accidents and implementing corrective action, and
employee safety training.
To carry out this purpose, a member of your company will have overall responsibility for workplace
safety during each production. Commonly this is the First Assistant Director for film and commercial,
the Technical Lead in theatrical venues, or the Safety Director if your company has one.
Purpose of This Guide
This guide is intended to provide our clients, their Assistant Directors, Team Leaders and Safety
Directors with tools and information to minimize the incidence of injuries by understanding and
preventing the most common workplace hazards.
This guide covers federal Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) requirements (which
are the standard in many states including New York) as well as Cal/OSHA standards for California. Your
safety program should be in compliance with the applicable state safety regulations.
Please make sure that a health and safety program is implemented on each job you produce as
locations, content and personnel can change. If your company has a safety program your team should
familiarize itself with that guide. If one is not in place please use this guide.
Forms and Instructions for Reporting Injuries
Here you will find the injury reporting forms and instructions you will need if an injury occurs. In
addition to being included in this guide, these forms are available on the CAPS
website: http://capspayroll.com/. Browse to the Resources page, click on Forms and Info and select
the Workers’ Compensation Forms section.
If a workplace injury occurs you must immediately contact the CAPS Risk Management Department to
assist you in completing the required forms and processing the claim:
CAPS Risk Management
Telephone: 310-280-0755, ext. 2259, 2297 or 2310 / Facsimile: 310-733-1802
Click here for the CAPS Risk Management contact list.
E-mail: [email protected]
Reporting an Injury
The following forms and information must be submitted to CAPS as soon as possible but in no case
later than 24 hours after the injury occurs:
1. The First Report of Injury Form must be completed and signed by a company representative such
as the First AD or Production Manager. All sections must be completed in full.

Use the First Report of Injury Form to describe the circumstances surrounding the injury. If
possible take still or moving pictures of the accident scene and submit them along with the
paperwork.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 5 of 67
For injuries occurring in California, the injured employee must fill-out the Employee section of the
Workers’ Compensation Claim Form (DWC 1). The DWC1 form is also available from the State of
California here: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dwc/dwcform1.pdf
2. If the injured employee refuses medical aid, he or she must fill-out the Right of Refusal of Medical
Aid Form. This form should be submitted along with the completed First Report of Injury.
3. A copy of the injured employee’s time card should be submitted along with the other documents.
What to Do If…
An employee is injured on the job

Ensure that the individual receives immediate medical care appropriate to the injury

Contact the CAPS Risk Management Department immediately by phone or e-mail and inform the
representative that an accident has occurred

Fill out a First Report of Injury Form. Describe the accident and contributing factors as completely
as possible.

If in California, have the injured employee fill-out the Employee section of the Workers’
Compensation Claim Form (DWC 1).

E-mail, fax or deliver to CAPS the above forms, a copy of the employee’s time card, and any
supporting information such as photographs, witness statements, within 24 hours.
Injured employee refuses medical attention

If the injured employee refuses medical aid, he/she must fill-out the Right of Refusal of Medical
Aid form

Submit the Right of Refusal of Medical Aid form with the completed First Report of Injury Form.

The First Report of Injury Form should be completed even if the person refuses medical treatment.
After the accident has been reported

Perform an investigation and complete the corrective action form to document appropriate control
methods to prevent future injuries. Analyze risk factors created the hazard and implement
appropriate management controls to eliminate the hazard. Use the attached Corrective Action
Guide for assistance.

Retain for your use and send a copy as soon as possible to CAPS via fax.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 6 of 67
Incident Investigation/First Report of Injury
INSTRUCTIONS
1. This form should be completed by a Supervisor, not the Employee.
2. This form should be completed as soon as possible, and no later than 24 hours after the incident.
3. Once completed, this form can be faxed to 310-733-1802 or e-mailed to [email protected]
INJURED WORKER INFORMATION
Name:
Social Security No.:
Address:
City/State/Zip:
Phone number:
Date of birth:
E-mail address:
 Male
Marital Status:  Married
 Female
 Divorced
 Separated
Date of Injury:
 Single
Wage Rate:
 Widowed
Time of Injury:
Date and time reported by employee:
:
Injury reported to whom (name):
If reporting more than 24 hours after date of injury, please note reason:
Start Time:
Occupation:
Date Hired:
State of hire:
Employee’s last scheduled date to work:
Client Company:
Job/Project Name:
Client Address:
Client Phone:
Assistant Director/Supervisor/Lead Name:
Contact Number:
MEDICAL PROVIDER INFORMATION
Name of Treating Clinic or Hospital:
Address:
Was an ambulance called?
Phone:
 YES  NO
Does employee require additional treatment?
 YES
Is employee missing time from work?
 YES
Revised: September 22, 2015
 AM
 NO
 NO
10600 Virginia Avenue
Culver City, CA 90232
Phone: 310-280-0755
capspayroll.com
 PM
Incident Investigation/First Report of Injury
ACCIDENT LOCATION
Incident’s exact location and address (include location name, city, state and zip code):
Weather conditions:
Witness names and phone numbers:
Onsite Medic Name:
Was this a vehicle accident:
Onsite Medic Phone number:
 YES
 NO
Name of Other Driver:
3rd Party’s Insurance Company and Policy # (if applicable):
Was a police report filed?  YES  NO
If yes, please indicate police report number
INJURY INVESTIGATION
Describe in detail how the
injury/illness occurred:
Nature of Injury/Illness
(e.g. strain, laceration,
contusion):
Part(s) of body affected
(include left or right side of
body):
List direct cause(s). (e.g.
Improper lifting technique,
Poor housekeeping):
Is surveillance or video available?:
 YES
 NO
 ATTACHED
Are photos of the accident location available?:
 YES
 NO
 ATTACHED
Are photos of the equipment related to the incident available?:
 YES
 NO
 ATTACHED
PERSON COMPLETING FORM
Name/Title (Please print)
Phone
Signature
Date
Revised: September 22, 2015
10600 Virginia Avenue
Culver City, CA 90232
Phone: 310-280-0755
capspayroll.com
Incident Investigation/First Report of Injury
Voluntary Statement
Name:
Phone number:
Injured Employee Name:
Date of Loss:
Relationship to Injured Employee:
 Self
 Witness
 Onsite Medic
 Supervisor
Describe the details of the incident (attach additional sheets if necessary):
I have reviewed this statement of _____ page(s) and believe it to be true and accurate to the best of
my recollection. I understand this voluntary statement may be used as legal documentation.
Signature
Revised: September 22, 2015
Today’s Date
10600 Virginia Avenue
Culver City, CA 90232
Phone: 310-280-0755
capspayroll.com
Right of Refusal of Medical Aid
CLIENT COMPANY ___________________________
PROJECT TITLE _______________________________
This form has been given to you because you have refused or declined an initial offer of treatment by
a set medic or other trained medical personnel or transportation for medical treatment by a health
provider.
I, _______________________________________, hereby refuse the first aid treatment by the First Aid
Person employed on this project or transportation for medical treatment by a health provider for the
illness or injury incurred by me on this date _____________________.
In signing this waiver, I relieve the production company and CAPS, LLC ("CAPS") from any all liability or
damages resulting from this refusal to accept such first aid treatment.
Employee Name (Print or Type)
Job Title or Position
Employee Signature
Date
Supervisor Signature
Supervisor Name (printed)
Set Medic Signature
Set Medic Name (printed)
Please return this form to:
New CAPS, LLC
10600 Virginia Avenue
Culver City, CA 90232
FAX: 310-733-1802
You may also e-mail a scan of the completed and signed form to [email protected]
10600 VIRGINIA AVENUE
CULVER CITY, CA 90232
310-280-0755
FAX: 310-733-1802
capspayroll.com
Workers’ Compensation Claim Form (DWC 1) & Notice of Potential Eligibility
Formulario de Reclamo de Compensación de Trabajadores (DWC 1) y Notificación de Posible Elegibilidad
If you are injured or become ill, either physically or mentally, because of
your job, including injuries resulting from a workplace crime, you may be
entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. Attached is the form for filing
a workers’ compensation claim with your employer. You should read all
of the information below. Keep this sheet and all other papers for your
records. You may be eligible for some or all of the benefits listed
depending on the nature of your claim. If required you will be notified by
the claims administrator, who is responsible for handling your claim,
about your eligibility for benefits.
To file a claim, complete the “Employee” section of the form, keep one
copy and give the rest to your employer. Your employer will then
complete the “Employer” section, give you a dated copy, keep one copy
and send one to the claims administrator. Benefits can’t start until the
claims administrator knows of the injury, so complete the form as soon as
possible.
Medical Care: Your claims administrator will pay all reasonable and
necessary medical care for your work injury or illness. Medical benefits
may include treatment by a doctor, hospital services, physical therapy, lab
tests, x-rays, and medicines. Your claims administrator will pay the costs
directly so you should never see a bill. There is a limit on some medical
services.
The Primary Treating Physician (PTP) is the doctor with the overall
responsibility for treatment of your injury or illness. Generally your
employer selects the PTP you will see for the first 30 days, however, in
specified conditions, you may be treated by your predesignated doctor or
medical group. If a doctor says you still need treatment after 30 days, you
may be able to switch to the doctor of your choice. Different rules apply if
your employer is using a Health Care Organization (HCO) or a Medical
Provider Network (MPN). A MPN is a selected network of health care
providers to provide treatment to workers injured on the job. You should
receive information from your employer if you are covered by an HCO or
a MPN. Contact your employer for more information. If your employer
has not put up a poster describing your rights to workers’ compensation,
you may choose your own doctor immediately.
Within one working day after you file a claim form, your employer shall
authorize the provision of all treatment, consistent with the applicable
treating guidelines, for the alleged injury and shall continue to be liable
for up to $10,000 in treatment until the claim is accepted or rejected.
Disclosure of Medical Records: After you make a claim for workers'
compensation benefits, your medical records will not have the same level
of privacy that you usually expect. If you don’t agree to voluntarily
release medical records, a workers’ compensation judge may decide what
records will be released. If you request privacy, the judge may "seal"
(keep private) certain medical records.
Payment for Temporary Disability (Lost Wages): If you can't work
while you are recovering from a job injury or illness, for most injuries you
will receive temporary disability payments for a limited period of time.
These payments may change or stop when your doctor says you are able
to return to work. These benefits are tax-free. Temporary disability
payments are two-thirds of your average weekly pay, within minimums
and maximums set by state law. Payments are not made for the first three
days you are off the job unless you are hospitalized overnight or cannot
work for more than 14 days.
Return to Work: To help you to return to work as soon as possible, you
should actively communicate with your treating doctor, claims
administrator, and employer about the kinds of work you can do while
recovering. They may coordinate efforts to return you to modified duty or
other work that is medically appropriate. This modified or other duty may
Rev. 6/10
Si Ud. se lesiona o se enferma, ya sea físicamente o mentalmente, debido a
su trabajo, incluyendo lesiones que resulten de un crimen en el lugar de
trabajo, es posible que Ud. tenga derecho a beneficios de compensación de
trabajadores. Se adjunta el formulario para presentar un reclamo de
compensación de trabajadores con su empleador. Ud. debe leer toda la
información a continuación. Guarde esta hoja y todos los demás
documentos para sus archivos. Es posible que usted reúna los requisitos
para todos los beneficios, o parte de éstos, que se enumeran, dependiendo
de la índole de su reclamo. Si se requiere, el administrador de reclamos,
quien es responsable por el manejo de su reclamo, le notificará sobre su
elegibilidad para beneficios.
Para presentar un reclamo, llene la sección del formulario designada para el
“Empleado,” guarde una copia, y déle el resto a su empleador. Entonces,
su empleador completará la sección designada para el “Empleador,” le dará
a Ud. una copia fechada, guardará una copia, y enviará una al
administrador de reclamos. Los beneficios no pueden comenzar hasta, que
el administrador de reclamos se entere de la lesión, así que complete el
formulario lo antes posible.
Atención Médica: Su administrador de reclamos pagará toda la atención
médica razonable y necesaria, para su lesión o enfermedad relacionada con
el trabajo. Es posible que los beneficios médicos incluyan el tratamiento
por parte de un médico, los servicios de hospital, la terapia física, los
análisis de laboratorio y las medicinas. Su administrador de reclamos
pagará directamente los costos, de manera que usted nunca verá un cobro.
Hay un límite para ciertos servicios médicos.
El Médico Primario que le Atiende-Primary Treating Physician PTP es
el médico con la responsabilidad total para tratar su lesión o enfermedad.
Generalmente, su empleador selecciona al PTP que Ud. verá durante los
primeros 30 días. Sin embargo, en condiciones específicas, es posible que
usted pueda ser tratado por su médico o grupo médico previamente
designado. Si el doctor dice que usted aún necesita tratamiento después de
30 días, es posible que Ud. pueda cambiar al médico de su preferencia. Hay
reglas differentes que se aplican cuando su empleador usa una
Organización de Cuidado Médico (HCO) o una Red de Proveedores
Médicos (MPN). Una MPN es una red de proveedores de asistencia médica
seleccionados para dar tratamiento a los trabajadores lesionados en el
trabajo. Usted debe recibir información de su empleador si su tratamiento
es cubierto por una HCO o una MPN. Hable con su empleador para más
información. Si su empleador no ha colocado un cartel describiendo sus
derechos para la compensación de trabajadores, Ud. puede seleccionar a su
propio médico inmediatamente.
Dentro de un día después de que Ud. Presente un formulario de reclamo, su
empleador autorizará todo tratamiento médico de acuerdo con las pautas de
tratamiento aplicables a la presunta lesión y será responsable por $10,000
en tratamiento hasta que el reclamo sea aceptado o rechazado.
Divulgación de Expedientes Médicos: Después de que Ud. presente un
reclamo para beneficios de compensación de trabajadores, sus expedientes
médicos no tendrán el mismo nivel de privacidad que usted normalmente
espera. Si Ud. no está de acuerdo en divulgar voluntariamente los
expedientes médicos, un juez de compensación de trabajadores
posiblemente decida qué expedientes se revelarán. Si Ud. solicita
privacidad, es posible que el juez “selle” (mantenga privados) ciertos
expedientes médicos.
Pago por Incapacidad Temporal (Sueldos Perdidos): Si Ud. no puede
trabajar, mientras se está recuperando de una lesión o enfermedad
relacionada con el trabajo, Ud. recibirá pagos por incapacidad temporal
para la mayoría de las lesions por un period limitado. Es posible que estos
pagos cambien o paren, cuando su médico diga que Ud. está en condiciones
de regresar a trabajar. Estos beneficios son libres de impuestos. Los pagos
Workers’ Compensation Claim Form (DWC 1) & Notice of Potential Eligibility
Formulario de Reclamo de Compensación de Trabajadores (DWC 1) y Notificación de Posible Elegibilidad
be temporary or may be extended depending on the nature of your injury
or illness.
Payment for Permanent Disability: If a doctor says your injury or
illness results in a permanent disability, you may receive additional
payments. The amount will depend on the type of injury, your age,
occupation, and date of injury.
Supplemental Job Displacement Benefit (SJDB): If you were injured
after 1/1/04 and you have a permanent disability that prevents you from
returning to work within 60 days after your temporary disability ends, and
your employer does not offer modified or alternative work, you may
qualify for a nontransferable voucher payable to a school for retraining
and/or skill enhancement. If you qualify, the claims administrator will
pay the costs up to the maximum set by state law based on your
percentage of permanent disability.
Death Benefits: If the injury or illness causes death, payments may be
made to relatives or household members who were financially dependent
on the deceased worker.
It is illegal for your employer to punish or fire you for having a job
injury or illness, for filing a claim, or testifying in another person's
workers' compensation case (Labor Code 132a). If proven, you may
receive lost wages, job reinstatement, increased benefits, and costs and
expenses up to limits set by the state.
You have the right to disagree with decisions affecting your claim. If you
have a disagreement, contact your claims administrator first to see if you
can resolve it. If you are not receiving benefits, you may be able to get
State Disability Insurance (SDI) benefits. Call State Employment
Development Department at (800) 480-3287.
You can obtain free information from an information and assistance
officer of the State Division of Workers' Compensation (DWC), or you
can hear recorded information and a list of local offices by calling (800)
736-7401. You may also go to the DWC website at www.dwc.ca.gov.
You can consult with an attorney. Most attorneys offer one free
consultation. If you decide to hire an attorney, his or her fee will be taken
out of some of your benefits. For names of workers' compensation
attorneys, call the State Bar of California at (415) 538-2120 or go to their
web site at www.californiaspecialist.org.
por incapacidad temporal son dos tercios de su pago semanal promedio,
con cantidades mínimas y máximas establecidas por las leyes estatales.
Los pagos no se hacen durante los primeros tres días en que Ud. no trabaje,
a menos que Ud. sea hospitalizado una noche o no pueda trabajar durante
más de 14 días.
Regreso al Trabajo: Para ayudarle a regresar a trabajar lo antes posible,
Ud. debe comunicarse de manera activa con el médico que le atienda, el
administrador de reclamos y el empleador, con respecto a las clases de
trabajo que Ud. puede hacer mientras se recupera. Es posible que ellos
coordinen esfuerzos para regresarle a un trabajo modificado, o a otro
trabajo, que sea apropiado desde el punto de vista médico. Este trabajo
modificado u otro trabajo podría ser temporal o podría extenderse
dependiendo de la índole de su lesión o enfermedad.
Pago por Incapacidad Permanente: Si el doctor dice que su lesión o
enfermedad resulta en una incapacidad permanente, es posible que Ud.
reciba pagos adicionales. La cantidad dependerá de la clase de lesión, su
edad, su ocupación y la fecha de la lesión.
Beneficio Suplementario por Desplazamiento de Trabajo: Si Ud. Se
lesionó después del 1/1/04 y tiene una incapacidad permanente que le
impide regresar al trabajo dentro de 60 días después de que los pagos por
incapacidad temporal terminen, y su empleador no ofrece un trabajo
modificado o alternativo, es posible que usted reúna los requisitos para
recibir un vale no-transferible pagadero a una escuela para recibir un nuevo
entrenamiento y/o mejorar su habilidad. Si Ud. reúne los requisitios, el
administrador de reclamos pagará los gastos hasta un máximo establecido
por las leyes estatales basado en su porcentaje de incapacidad permanente.
Beneficios por Muerte: Si la lesión o enfermedad causa la muerte, es
posible que los pagos se hagan a los parientes o a las personas que viven en
el hogar y que dependían económicamente del trabajador difunto.
Es ilegal que su empleador le castigue o despida, por sufrir una lesión o
enfermedad en el trabajo, por presentar un reclamo o por testificar en el
caso de compensación de trabajadores de otra persona. (El Codigo Laboral
sección 132a.) De ser probado, usted puede recibir pagos por pérdida de
sueldos, reposición del trabajo, aumento de beneficios y gastos hasta los
límites establecidos por el estado.
Ud. tiene derecho a no estar de acuerdo con las decisiones que afecten su
reclamo. Si Ud. tiene un desacuerdo, primero comuníquese con su
administrador de reclamos para ver si usted puede resolverlo. Si usted no
está recibiendo beneficios, es posible que Ud. pueda obtener beneficios del
Seguro Estatal de Incapacidad (SDI). Llame al Departamento Estatal del
Desarrollo del Empleo (EDD) al (800) 480-3287.
Ud. puede obtener información gratis, de un oficial de información y
asistencia, de la División Estatal de Compensación de Trabajadores
(Division of Workers’ Compensation – DWC) o puede escuchar
información grabada, así como una lista de oficinas locales llamando al
(800) 736-7401. Ud. también puede consultar con la pagína Web de la
DWC en www.dwc.ca.gov.
Ud. puede consultar con un abogado. La mayoría de los abogados
ofrecen una consulta gratis. Si Ud. decide contratar a un abogado, los
honorarios serán tomados de algunos de sus beneficios. Para obtener
nombres de abogados de compensación de trabajadores, llame a la
Asociación Estatal de Abogados de California (State Bar) al (415) 5382120, ó consulte con la pagína Web en www.californiaspecialist.org.
Rev. 6/10
State of California
Department of Industrial Relations
DIVISION OF WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
Estado de California
Departamento de Relaciones Industriales
DIVISION DE COMPENSACIÓN AL TRABAJADOR
WORKERS’ COMPENSATION CLAIM FORM (DWC 1)
Employee: Complete the “Employee” section and give the form to
your employer. Keep a copy and mark it “Employee’s Temporary
Receipt” until you receive the signed and dated copy from your em ployer. You may call the Division of Workers’ Compensation and
hear recorded information at (800) 736-7401. An explanation of workers' compensation benefits is included as the cover sheet of this form.
You should also have received a pamphlet from your employer describing workers’ compensation benefits and the procedures to obtain
them.
Any person who makes or causes to be made any knowingly false
or fraudulent material statement or material representation for
the purpose of obtaining or denying workers’ compensation benefits or payments is guilty of a felony.
Employee—complete this section and see note above
PETITION DEL EMPLEADO PARA DE COMPENSACIÓN DEL
TRABAJADOR (DWC 1)
Empleado: Complete la sección “Empleado” y entregue la forma a su
empleador. Quédese con la copia designada “Recibo Temporal del
Empleado” hasta que Ud. reciba la copia firmada y fechada de su empleador.
Ud. puede llamar a la Division de Compensación al Trabajador al (800) 7367401 para oir información gravada. En la hoja cubierta de esta
forma esta la explicatión de los beneficios de compensación al trabajador.
Ud. también debería haber recibido de su empleador un folleto describiendo los
benficios de compensación al trabajador lesionado y los procedimientos para
obtenerlos.
Toda aquella persona que a propósito haga o cause que se produzca
cualquier declaración o representación material falsa o fraudulenta con el
fin de obtener o negar beneficios o pagos de compensación a trabajadores
lesionados es culpable de un crimen mayor “felonia”.
Empleado—complete esta sección y note la notación arriba.
1.
Name. Nombre. _____________________________________________Today’s Date. Fecha de Hoy.
2.
Home Address. Dirección Residencial. _______________________________________________________________________________________
3.
City. Ciudad. _______________________________________ State. Estado. __________________
4.
Date of Injury. Fecha de la lesión (accidente). ________________________ Time of Injury. Hora en que ocurrió. _________a.m. ________p.m.
5.
Address and description of where injury happened. Dirección/lugar dónde occurió el accidente. _________________________________________
___________________________________
Zip. Código Postal. ___________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
6.
Describe injury and part of body affected. Describa la lesión y parte del cuerpo afectada. _______________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
7.
Social Security Number. Número de Seguro Social del Empleado.
8.
Signature of employee. Firma del empleado.
_______________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________
Employer—complete this section and see note below. Empleador—complete esta sección y note la notación abajo.
9.
Name of employer. Nombre del empleador. ___________________________________________________________________________________
10. Address. Dirección. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________
11. Date employer first knew of injury. Fecha en que el empleador supo por primera vez de la lesión o accidente. _____________________________
12. Date claim form was provided to employee. Fecha en que se le entregó al empleado la petición. _________________________________________
13. Date employer received claim form. Fecha en que el empleado devolvió la petición al empleador. _______________________________________
14. Name and address of insurance carrier or adjusting agency. Nombre y dirección de la compañía de seguros o agencia adminstradora de seguros.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
15. Insurance Policy Number. El número de la póliza de Seguro. _____________________________________________________________________
16. Signature of employer representative. Firma del representante del empleador. _______________________________________________________
17. Title. Título. _____________________________________ 18. Telephone. Teléfono. _______________________________________________
Employer: You are required to date this form and provide copies to
your insurer or claims administrator and to the employee, dependent
or representative who filed the claim within one working day of
receipt of the form from the employee.
Empleador: Se requiere que Ud. feche esta forma y que provéa copias a su compañía de seguros, administrador de reclamos, o dependiente/representante de reclamos y al empleado que hayan presentado esta petición dentro del plazo de un día
hábil desde el momento de haber sido recibida la forma del empleado.
SIGNING THIS FORM IS NOT AN ADMISSION OF LIABILITY
EL FIRMAR ESTA FORMA NO SIGNIFICA ADMISION DE RESPONSABILIDAD
❑ Employer copy/Copia del Empleador
6/10 Rev.
❑ Employee copy/ Copia del Empleado
❑ Claims Administrator/Administrador de Reclamos
❑ Temporary Receipt/Recibo del Empleado
Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP)
An Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIPP) is required of most California employers to help
ensure the safety of its employees. The federal government is in the process of developing a similar
requirement as the minimum requirement for employers. Enclosed is a program that we strongly
recommend you adopt to safeguard your employees and to ensure compliance with occupational
health and safety regulations.
The IIPP major requirements are:
1. Management commitment and responsibility
2. Safety communications with employees
3. Compliance with safe work practices
4. A system of safety inspections and reporting
5. Accident Investigation
6. Corrective action to remedy unsafe conditions
7. Safety training
8. Recordkeeping and documentation
This safety guide provides information and recommendations on each of these components, and also
provides forms and checklists that can be used to document safety-related activities. A basic
production safety guide is also provided; however, you may want to supplement the program with
additional provisions appropriate to your production needs. Industry-specific safety sheets web links
are also provided.
Management Commitment and Responsibility
As the safety director for the production you need to lead and conduct safety activities, such as
inspections and training, to help ensure that hazards have been eliminated and safe work practices
are understood and practices.
All safety-related activities such as inspections and safety meetings be documented. This is an
integral part of good safety management practices. You should also develop written safety policies
collected into a safety program.
The production leadership is ultimately accountable for running a safe production or event and each
level of supervision and management have specific roles.
Therefore, you should identify personnel who are ultimately responsible for safety activities and
make sure they have taken appropriate actions to prevent injuries.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Management Chain of Responsibility
Television and Film Production
Theatrical/Music Venue
Program Executive / Executive Producer
Identify safety budget costs (resources to develop a
site safety program, training, and safety/injury
response mechanism)
Director of Operations
Identify safety budget costs (resources to develop a site
safety program, training, and safety/injury response
mechanism)
Program Administrator
 Report any injury to CAPS immediately
 Provide safety documentation such as safety
bulletins
 File all inspection reports and equipment
maintenance records
Venue Administration
 Report any injury to CAPS immediately
 Provide safety documentation such as safety
bulletins
 File all inspection reports and equipment
maintenance records
Production Chain of Responsibility
Line



Producer
Review Call Sheets
Post safety contact Information
Review and post safety bulletins
N/A
First









Assistant Director
Review Call Sheets
Post safety contact information
Communicate emergency procedures
Review and post safety bulletins
Conduct safety inspections
Correct unsafe conditions
Respond to safety complaints
Facilitate safety meetings
Coordinate special meetings to discuss
hazardous special effects
Coordinate medical response services
Investigate accidents
Post-production safety program review
Documentation of safety issues on the
production report
Venue Technical Coordinator /Director of Operations
/Safety Coordinator
 Review Call Sheets
 Post safety contact information
 Communicate emergency procedures
 Review and post safety bulletins
 Conduct safety inspections
 Correct unsafe conditions
 Respond to safety complaints
 Facilitate safety meetings
 Coordinate special meetings to discuss hazardous
special effects
 Coordinate medical response services
 Investigate accidents
 Post production safety program review




Technical Lead Dep. Head
 Read and understand the location safety plan
 Communicate and enforce safety rules with
respective crews
 Discuss emergency action plan with crews
 Review and communicate safety material
that crews have not been trained on
 Report injuries and assist in the investigation
Technical Lead Dep. Head
 Read and understand the location safety plan
 Communicate and enforce safety rules with
respective crews
 Discuss emergency action plan with crews
 Review and communicate safety material that
crews have not been trained on
 Report injuries and assist in the investigation
Employee Responsibility
Every employee should understand his or her role in the overall safety of the workplace and,
accordingly, practice safe work habits. By remaining safety-conscious, employees can prevent workrelated injuries and illnesses for themselves and their co-workers.
Revised September 23, 2015
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
Every employee is responsible for being informed of and following all safety rules.

Employees directly assist in maintaining workplace safety by constant alertness and their own
safe work practices.

Employees should report actual or potential workplace hazards to their supervisors.

Any supervisory employee (for example, a foreman or gang boss) who observes or has knowledge
of unsafe work practices, dangerous equipment or untrained personnel must take action to
correct the situation.
Hazard Reporting
Anyone on or off the set who observes an unsafe situation or hazard should inform the First AD or
Construction Coordinator immediately. If anyone desires to report a safety hazard anonymously, a
Safety Report Form should be completed. The forms should be located in a central location at the
worksite; typically they are available where the safety notice board and emergency contact poster
are located. There will be no reprisal against anyone for reporting safety hazards or concerns.
We encourage anyone to report safety concerns or hazards. You can also send in your observations
to the CAPS Risk Management team by email ([email protected]) or fax (310-733-1802).
The CSATF maintains a list of studio safety hotlines. The Studio Safety Hotlines list is available via
this direct link: http://www.csatf.org/studio_safety_hotlines.pdf
When an Injury Occurs
When an injury occurs, stay with the person and have the set medic or nurse summoned
immediately. If it is apparent that the injury is severe, also phone 911 and stay on the line as
instructed.
Any personnel instructed in first aid practices should assist at the direction of the set medic or 911
operator.
All workplace injuries must be investigated, so in addition, you can contribute to effective
investigation and corrective action if you will:

Make mental or written notes about the accident in addition to taking smart device videos or
photos

Avoid talking to others before talking to the investigator, since this may confuse the facts

Answer all investigator questions about the incident as accurately as possible

Take the investigation seriously – give it your best.
Close Calls
Close calls should be reported. The study of close calls can help prevent incidents in which someone
is actually injured. Such investigations needn't be extensive, but records of close calls often indicate
trends or hazardous conditions that can be corrected.
Safety Communications with Employees
Well-designed emergency procedures and safety guidelines that are clearly understood by all
personnel are essential to injury prevention and to efficient response and care when an injury does
occur. It is your responsibility to communicate to your cast and crew the production emergency
procedures, emergency contact information and where it is located, to whom to report a hazard or
injury and safe workplace practices.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 16 of 67
Emergency Procedures
Emergency plans should encompass what to do in case of fire or evacuation, a clear understanding of
the closest emergency contacts and facilities (fire, ambulance, hospital emergency room, urgent
care), and general emergency procedures. This is even more important if the production is in a
remote location.
The Appendix contains an Emergency Action Plan form which you are required to fill out,
communicate to your cast and crew and keep on file, and the Production Safety Guide contains
information on the most common workplace hazards.
Safety and Emergency Notice Area
A central and conspicuous location should be set up that includes the emergency contacts poster,
OSHA-required safety notice boards, a first aid kit, a fire extinguisher and safety report forms. For a
production on location this could be a small table against a motorhome wall, with the notices taped
to the side of the motorhome.
In any event, pick an obvious and accessible location, and in your safety meetings point it out to the
cast and crew.
Emergency Contacts Poster
A basic emergency contact poster is included in the Appendix. A poster should be filled out and
posted for each production location.
Safety Notice Boards
At every California workplace a Cal/OSHA Health and Safety Board must be displayed along with the
address and telephone number of the nearest hospital. You can rent Cal/OSHA Safety boards for a
nominal fee at Line 204, Anytime Rentals or Heavy Artillery Rentals, to name a few.
The Cal/OSHA Safety and Health Protection on the Job poster is also available
here: www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/shpstreng012000.pdf
The OSHA Safety and Health Protection on the Job poster is
here: www.osha.gov/Publications/poster.html
The OSHA poster must be reproduced on at least 8.5” X 14” paper (legal size).
Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee Bulletins
You should regularly review any applicable industry-specific Safety Bulletins issued by the AMPTP
Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee. The Safety Bulletins cover many productionrelated activities and cover very specific production activities that are beyond the scope of this
guide.
The Safety Bulletins may be reproduced and attached to Call Sheets or otherwise distributed to
employees. They are available as follows:
Film / Television: Management Safety Committee for the Motion Picture and Television Industry.
Safety Bulletins are guidelines recommended by the Safety Committee. You may contact CSATF at
(818) 565-1656 or http://www.csatf.org/bulletintro.shtml for the most recent Safety Bulletins.
Theatrical/Venue: International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians,
Artists, and Allied Crafts (IATSE). You may contact IATSE at (212) 730-1770 or view bulletins
at http://70.47.17.77/services/bulletins.html.
The Ontario (Canada) Ministry of Labour has a similar set of safety guidelines for the film and
television industry. The bulletins are located
here: http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/hs/pubs/filmguide/
Revised September 23, 2015
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Emergency Action Plan
An emergency action plan addresses what should be done during and after a localized environmental
emergencies (fire, earthquake, gas leak, etc.) or a widespread emergency. A general emergency
action plan form for you to complete is included in the Appendix.
Production Safety Guide
Every member of the production company should be given a copy of the Production Safety Guide, and
should sign an Acknowledgement of Receipt of Production Safety Guidelines. Keep the
acknowledgement forms with the safety program records. A sample Production Safety Guide is
provided in the next section of this document for your use.
Safety Training
General safety training should be held at the start of production, as soon as possible after arriving at
the location when the majority of employees can attend. Also include provisions to train employees
who cannot attend the official session.
Whenever the production moves to a new location, when there are significant changes in the cast or
crew, when stunts are scheduled, when extreme conditions exist, or when there are significant
changes to the scheduled activities the training should be repeated to include location-relevant
updates.
Each employee attending safety training should be recorded on a sign-in sheet, and on training
completion should sign and return an Employee Safety Training Acknowledgement form. Samples of
both these forms are in the Appendix.
Sample Training Outline
The safety training should include:

All attendees sign the training sign-in sheet

Introduction to safety team members (e.g. Safety Director, 1st AD, Team Leader, Set Medic)

Orientation to the specifics and challenges of the location (e.g. busy streets, abandoned building,
desert dry brush, snow, indigenous animals, reptiles, insects, weather conditions, drinking water,
sanitation facilities),

Location of emergency contact info, first aid/set medic, fire extinguishers and hydrants

Emergency action plan review (e.g. fire procedure, evacuation routes, where to meet if
evacuated), how to report a hazard

Access routes and exits, vehicle routing, smoking areas, flammable or combustible substances
locations

Personal protective equipment recommendations and best practices specific to the location and
activities (e.g. for smoke, dust, temperature extremes, special tool or chemical handling)
Safety Meetings
Safety meetings should be held at the beginning of the shoot, and when there are changes to the
location, personnel or schedule. For off-production, tailgate or toolbox meetings should be held, and
construction safety meetings are required every ten days.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 18 of 67
On-Production
A safety meeting should be held at the beginning of every on or off-production day, particularly
when the production moves to a new location, when there are significant changes in the cast or
crew, when stunts are scheduled, when extreme conditions exist, or when there are significant
changes to the scheduled activities.
The First Assistant Director or Stage Manager should conduct daily safety meetings.

Use the call sheet and any attached safety bulletins to state any potential safety issues on the
set.

The points discussed should be outlined on the call sheet and initialed by the AD or Safety
Director.

Notify all crew and talent not in attendance of topics discussed during the safety meeting.

Special hazards may require specific safe work practices to be developed. For example, specific
safety practices pertain to activities such as:
Stunts (including air bags), use of high speed vehicles, helicopters, animals, scuba diving, camera
cars, artificially created smoke or fog, pyrotechnics, fixed wing-aircraft usage, gimbals or
venomous reptiles; parachuting or skydiving, bodies of water or boating, railroads, hot air
balloons, and climate extremes.

Official safety meeting attendance should be documented in the daily production report. It may
be helpful to use a sign-in sheet in order to track who has been briefed.
NOTE: The CAPS Risk Management Department must be contacted if workers are exposed to
pyrotechnics (fire/explosion), non-scheduled aircraft including helicopters, or stunts.
Off Production
The Construction Coordinator or Department Head should conduct informal “toolbox” or “tailgate”
meetings to make the crew aware of pertinent safety issues including the use of specialized
equipment and construction or rigging operations.
In addition, the Construction Department is required to have a safety meeting every ten days, or
when there are significant changes to the activity. The safety meetings should cover emergency and
evacuation plans, emergency contact information, and should identify any potentially hazardous
situations.
Meetings should occur at the earliest point in the day when the majority of the personnel are able to
attend.
Compliance with Safety Guidelines
Just as OSHA or Cal/OSHA can cite and fine employers for workplace safety hazards, so should a
discipline system be in place for employees who disregard safety practices. Supervisors are required
to enforce safety guidelines and regulations and so should counsel, train or discipline those neglect
safe work practices.
Written and consistent procedures should be in place which acknowledge the safe habits of
employees (such as announcing consecutive accident-free days on a production) and which provide
for an increasing degree of discipline and/or retraining for employees who violate safety rules, cause
hazardous or dangerous situations or who allow such conditions to occur. Records of corrective or
disciplinary action should be maintained.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Safety Inspections and Reporting
Safety inspections should be completed daily to assure that there are no obvious physical hazards
and that production safety preparations are in order. A number of safety checklists are provided in
the Appendix.
Identified Hazards
Hazards are identified during inspections, from verbal notifications from cast and crew, or from
safety reports they submit. When potentially unsafe conditions or work practices are discovered or
reported, they must be corrected as quickly as possible, correcting the most hazardous condition
first.
Corrective Action
When a safety hazard is identified or an accident occurs, employers are required to take corrective
action to:

Analyze why the hazard or injury occurred

Take effective action to prevent the hazardous situation from recurring
The corrective action must be documented and kept as part of the production record. The Appendix
contains a Corrective Action Guide and Corrective Action Form for your use.
Accident Reporting and Investigation
When an injury occurs in the workplace, you are required to fill out the injury reporting forms in
the Forms and Instructions for Reporting Injuries section of this guide. As part of accident reporting
you must investigate the details of the accident and document the corrective action taken using the
Corrective Action Form.
Recordkeeping
All records pertaining to the Injury and Illness Prevention Program should be maintained with the
production records. These would include:
1. An overall document that outlines your IIPP (see Appendix for document template)
2. Safety training records or documentation (e.g. sign-in sheets or other meeting records,
completion attestations, Production Safety Guidelines employee receipts)
3. Completed safety inspection checklists
4. Safety bulletins used during the production
5. Safety meeting minutes or records
6. Employee suggestion/report forms
7. Injury reports investigation records and communications
8. Corrective action reports
9. Disciplinary reports and warnings
10. A copy of this guide or your company’s Workplace Safety Program guide
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 20 of 67
Production Safety Guide
This guide is intended for production companies to provide a code of safe practice and advice on
dealing with potential hazards such as fire, electricity, extreme temperature and above the ground
structures, as well as local and widespread emergencies.
The appropriate production company personnel should review this guide, and may wish to
incorporate pertinent portions into employee health and safety training sessions.
General Safety Rules
All safety rules, codes of safe practices and safety directions must be followed. These rules include
but are not limited to the following:

Always familiarize yourself with emergency procedures for the location

Maintain clear walkways and exits and a clear 4 foot wide perimeter around the stage exterior

Practice good housekeeping at all times

Use safety belts when operating above ground and in elevated work platforms

Keep Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for all hazardous chemicals and substances

Machinery and equipment shall not be serviced, adjusted or repaired while in operation

Temporary guardrails are to be used for elevated areas, pits and holes

Eye, ear and respiratory protection will be provided and must be used where appropriate

Anyone on the set who observes an unprotected hazard or who is uncertain about the safety of
the shot should inform the First AD immediately.

Any stunt or special effects shot must be preceded by a meeting of key personnel and a walkthrough rehearsal.

Any cast or crew observing an unsafe situation in the workplace (carbon monoxide hazards,
unsafe trailer or truck steps, electrical or cabling hazards, etc.) shall notify the First AD, who
shall follow with immediate investigation and corrective action.
Pre- Production and Off Production
Every foreman, gang boss and supervisor is responsible for providing a safe workplace for his or her
employees; each employee is responsible for complying with safety rules.
Each employee MUST be trained in the safe operation of the tools he or she will be using.
Safety meetings must be held when new employees begin work and any time there is a new process,
location, procedure, new equipment or a new work location.
In addition, construction is required to hold a safety meeting every ten days to reinforce safe work
practices, the use of safety equipment, proper work clothing and emergency procedures, and to
identify any unusual safety issues at the worksite.
Record Keeping
The First AD is responsible for recording all safety meetings, stunt rehearsals, regulatory agency
inspections, accidents or injuries on the Production Report.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 21 of 67
The Assistant Director should also ensure that the copies of appropriate "Industry Wide Labor
Management Safety Bulletins" are attached to the Call Sheet when relevant work situations or
equipment are scheduled.
Injury/Illness and Corrective Action Reports
All work-related injuries, illnesses, OSHA citations or other safety violations must be thoroughly
documented and reported to the First AD or the Production Manager who will follow up to assure
corrective action has been taken.
Code of Safe Practice
Film and Video Production
It is our policy to protect employees and visitors from accidents. Safety is a cooperative undertaking
requiring everyone’s participation. Department heads will ensure that employees observe all
applicable company, studio, state or federal safety rules and practices.
To achieve this, employees shall:
1. Report all unsafe conditions or equipment to their department head or the responsible safety
person on set.
2. Be aware of and comply with all production safety guidelines adopted by the production
company.
3. Maintain clear walkways, exits, and 4' perimeters around stages and sets.
4. Use safety belts when working above ground or on elevating work platforms.
5. Use personal protective equipment whenever necessary.
6. Not attempt to use any equipment, tools or substances for which they have not been trained or
authorized to use.
7. Attend all safety meetings, especially if involving a stunt or special effect, which will be held to
reinforce safe work practices, the use of safety equipment, proper work clothing, emergency
procedures, or any unusual safety hazards.
8. Report all accidents, injuries and illness to their department head of the responsible safety
person immediately.
9. Not attempt to work while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs.
10. Not engage in horseplay, scuffling, or other acts which have the potential to cause bodily injury
or property damage.
11. Be aware of emergency evacuation routes and procedures at each location where filming occurs.
12. Store all equipment and materials in a proper manner and place.
13. Maintain work areas in a neat, clean, and orderly fashion.
14. Always use proper lifting techniques and request help if the object is too heavy or unstable.
15. Continually be aware of their surroundings and its conditions.
16. Maintain sufficient access and working space around electrical equipment.
17. Shut off the engine, set the brakes and lock the wheels prior to loading or unloading vehicles.
18. Not eat or drink in areas where hazardous substances are present.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 22 of 67
19. Use electrical tools and equipment properly. All AC electrical equipment must be grounded.
Plugs, connectors, outlet boxes or lines cannot be altered.
20. Not use gasoline for cleaning purposes at any time.
21. Not disconnect air hoses at compressors until the line has been bled.
22. Wear appropriate work clothing and shoes.
Supervisor’s Ten Commandments of Safety
Excerpted from Handbook of OSHA Construction Safety and Health, Second Edition.
1. Care for people at work as you would care for your family. Be sure each employee understands
and accepts his or her personal responsibility for safety
2. Know the rules for safety that apply to the work you supervise. Never let it be said that one of
the workers you supervise was injured because you were not aware of the precautions required
on his or her job.
3. Anticipate the risks that may arise from changes in equipment or methods. Make use of the
expert safety advice that is available to help you guard against such new hazards.
4. Encourage workers to discuss with you the hazards of their work. When you are receptive to the
ideas of workers, you tap a resource of firsthand knowledge that will help you prevent needless
loss and suffering.
5. Instruct workers to work safely, as you would guide and counsel your own family – with
persistence and patience.
6. Follow up your instructions consistently. See to it that workers make use of safeguards provided
to them. If necessary, enforce safety rules by disciplinary action.
7. Set a good example. Demonstrate safety in your own work habits and personal conduct.
8. Investigate and analyze every incident – however slight – that befalls any of the workers that you
supervise. Where minor injuries go unheeded, crippling accidents may strike later.
9. Cooperate fully with those in the organization who are actively concerned with worker safety.
10. Remember: Not only does accident prevention reduce human suffering and loss; from the
practical viewpoint it is no more than good business. Safety, therefore, is one of your prime
obligations to the company, to your fellow supervisors, and to your fellow workers.
Revised September 23, 2015
Page 23 of 67
Fire Emergencies
If a fire breaks out, take the following actions:
Rescue anyone in immediate danger if it is safe to do so
Alert others; sound the fire alarm and call the local fire department
Contain the spread of the fire by closing doors and window before leaving the building.
Evacuate to a safe outside area (this should be a pre-arranged place per your Emergency Action Plan
Follow your company's procedures on responding to fires.
Whether or Not to Fight a Fire
Attempt to fight the fire only if:

You know the type of material that is burning

You have been trained to use the fire extinguisher correctly and have the correct one for the
type of fire

If the fire is still in the beginning stage
Here are risk assessment questions from OSHA regarding whether to attempt to extinguish a fire with
a fire extinguisher or whether to evacuate without attempting to extinguish the fire:
Risk Assessment
Question
May be able to be extinguished using a
fire extinguisher
Do not fight – evacuate
immediately
How big is the fire?
Is it limited to the original material
ignited, is contained (such as in a waste
basket), has not spread, flames are no
higher than the firefighter’s head
The fire involve flammable
solvents, has it spread over 60
square feet, is it partially
hidden behind a wall or ceiling,
or cannot be reached in a
standing position
Is the air safe to
breathe?
The fire has not depleted the oxygen in
the room, is producing only small
quantities of toxic gases. No respiration
equipment required
Smoke, fumes and other
products of combustion require
respiratory protection to fight
the fire
Is the environment too
hot or smoky?
Heat is being generated but the room
temperature is only slightly increased.
Smoke may be accumulating on the
ceiling but visibility is good. No special
protective equipment required
Radiant heat easily felt on
exposed skin making it difficult
to approach within 10-15 feet
of the fire (the effective range
of a fire extinguisher). One
must crawl on the floor due to
heat or smoke, smoke is filling
the room and decreasing
visibility
Is there a safe
evacuation path?
There is a clear evacuation path behind
you as you fight the fire
The fire is not contained, and
fire, heat or smoke may block
the evacuation path
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About Fire Extinguishers
Portable fire extinguishers can be used on fires that have just started and can mean the difference
between a minor loss or a major one. However, the time to learn to use an extinguisher is not when
you see flames. The key points to know about using portable fire extinguishers:

What type of extinguisher should be used for which kind of fire

Basic fire extinguisher operation

Safety guidelines when suppressing a beginning fire
Your company and crew should know the basic facts about portable extinguishers before you need to
use one.
Types of Extinguishers
Class A--For ordinary combustibles such as paper, wood,
cloth, rubber or plastics.
Common extinguishing media is water or dry chemical.
Class B--Flammable liquids or grease or gases.
Common extinguishing media are foam, carbon dioxide or
dry chemical.
Class C--Live electrical fires are Class C fires.
CO2 or dry chemical extinguishers should be used.
However, the actual burning product may be class A
items.
Class D –Combustible metals such as magnesium and
sodium.
The extinguishing material is generally a powder that
sprays in a large and gentle volume to avoid spreading the
burning material.
Multi-class extinguisher – symbols indicate for which
classes of fires extinguisher can be used.
Limited Class – symbols show which types of fires are
unsafe for the type of extinguisher
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Remember P-A-S-S – Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep
P – PULL the fire extinguisher locking pin to break the seal. This may
be a button instead.
A – AIM low, spraying the base of the fire, not at the flames or smoke.
The extinguishing agent should hit the base of the fire.
Most fire extinguishers must be used from a distance of 6 to 10 feet
from the fire to be effective.
S - SQUEEZE the lever of the fire extinguisher to operate and
discharge.
S – SWEEP the fire extinguisher from side to side at the base of the
fire. As the fire diminishes, move slowly forward, keeping the
extinguisher aimed at the base of the fire, until the fire appears to be
out.
If the fire does not immediately die down, evacuate.
If the smoke is becoming a problem, evacuate.
Never turn your back on a fire, even if it seems to be out.
Most extinguishers will only expel extinguishing media for about 10-seconds.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Electricity Safety
Electrical setup and supply is an integral part of film, television and venue productions. When setting
up a show or on location,
Resources:

Safety Bulletin 23: Guidelines for Working with Portable Power Distribution Systems and Other
Electrical Equipment: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/23ELECTRICAL.pdf

Safety Bulletin 23A: Addendum "A" - Power Line Distance
Requirements: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/23ADDENDUM_A.pdf

Safety Bulletin 23B: Addendum "B" - Basic Electric Safety Precautions for Motion Picture and
Television Off Studio Lot Location Productions for the City of Los
Angeles: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/23ADDENDUM_B.pdf

Safety Bulletin 23C: Addendum "C" - Working With 480 Volt Systems:
http://www.csatf.org/pdf/23ADDENDUM_C.pdf

Safety Bulletin 23D: Addendum "D" - Common Motion-Picture and Television Tasks and Associated
Personal Protective Equipment: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/23ADDENDUM_D.pdf
Electrical Outlets
Before using an outlet check for loose cable connections, bare wires, cracked outlets, and missing or
damage face plates. When using an outlet, be sure the plug fits firmly and check for any signs of
heating caused by faulty connections.
Never yank a cord from an outlet because the action can break cord insulation and wires, pull wire
connections loose, bend plug prongs, and spread clips inside the outlet.
Three-Pronged Outlets
Always guard three-pronged plugs. They are your shock lifeguard. Never cut off the third prong to fit
an older, two-hole outlet. Never use a two-wire extension cord with a three-pronged plug. If you use
an adapter at a two-hole outlet, be sure the pigtail is attached to the faceplate screw.
Portable Power Tools
Employees should be trained in the use of all tools, not just power tools. They should understand the
proper operation and use, potential hazards as well as the safety precautions to prevent those
hazards from occurring.
Five basic power tool safety rules:
1. Keep all tools in good condition with regular maintenance.
2. Use the right tool for the job.
3. Examine each tool for damage before use.
4. Operate according to the manufacturer's instructions and within its design limitations.
5. Provide and use the proper protective equipment.
Best Practices

Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
Revised September 23, 2015
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
Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.

Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil, sharp edges and where they can be run over by
vehicles.

When not in use, store tools in a dry place.

Do not use in damp or wet locations.

Make sure work areas are well lit.

Disconnect tools when not in use, before servicing, and when changing accessories such as
blades, bits and cutters.

All observers should be kept at a safe distance away from the work area.

Secure work with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool.

Avoid accidental starting. The worker should not hold a finger on the switch button while carrying
a plugged-in tool.

Tools should be maintained with care. They should be kept sharp and clean for the best
performance. Follow instructions in the user's manual for lubricating and changing accessories.

Be sure to keep good footing and maintain good balance when operating a tool.

Wear proper apparel. Avoid loose clothing, ties, jewelry and untied long hair which can become
caught in moving parts.

All portable electric tools that are damaged shall be removed from use and tagged "Do Not Use."
Guards
Hazardous moving parts of a power tool should have guards. As an example for a portable circular
saw an upper guard must cover the entire blade of the saw and a retractable lower guard must cover
the teeth of the saw, except when it makes contact with the work material. The lower guard must
automatically return to the covering position when the tool is withdrawn from the work.
Examples of tools requiring guards are belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles, drums, fly
wheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating, or moving parts of equipment must be guarded if
such parts are exposed to contact by employees.
Guards, as necessary, should be provided to protect the operator and others from the point of
operation, in-running nip points, rotating parts, and flying chips and sparks.
Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used.
Safety Switches
The following hand-held powered tools must be equipped with a momentary contact "on-off" control
switch: drills, tappers, fastener drivers, horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with wheels larger
than 2 inches in diameter, disc and belt sanders, reciprocating saws, saber saws, and other similar
tools. These tools also may be equipped with a lock-on control provided that turnoff can be
accomplished by a single motion of the same finger or fingers that turn it on.
The following hand-held powered tools may be equipped with only a positive "on-off" control switch:
platen sanders, disc sanders with discs 2 inches or less in diameter; grinders with wheels 2 inches or
less in diameter; routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears, scroll saws and jigsaws with
blade shanks one-fourth of an inch wide or less.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Other hand-held powered tools such as circular saws having a blade diameter greater than 2 inches,
chain saws, and percussion tools without positive accessory holding means must be equipped with a
constant pressure switch that will shut off the power when the pressure is released.
Fall Protection
Falls and falling objects can result from unstable working surfaces, ladders that are not safely
positioned, and misuse of fall protection. Workers are also subject to falls or to the dangers of
falling objects if sides and edges, floor holes, and wall openings are not protected. Any time a
worker is at a height of six feet or more (construction industry) or four feet or more (general
industry), the worker must be protected.
Unprotected work areas such as platforms, sets, walkways, cliffs, floor openings, shafts and rooftops
(when approaching within 6 feet of the roof's edge) require the use of approved fall protection
measures.
These measures include but are not limited to guardrails, barriers, safety net systems, a written fall
protection plan, and/or the use of personal fall arrest, fall restraint, or work positioning systems.
Fall arrest equipment is always required when working in the permanent grid and truss system
(perms) outside the catwalks and handrails.
Do not use fall protection equipment without proper training and instruction. Only use appropriate
anchorage points.
Temporary stair railings and guardrails are required around elevated surfaces, pits, holes or other
unprotected openings. Ensure proper lighting in such areas and post signs as necessary.
Generally it is better to fall prevention systems such as guardrails than fall protection systems such
as harnesses or fall arrest devices. OSHA general fall protection requirements:

Guard every floor hole into which a worker can accidentally walk (using a railing and toe-board or
a floor hole cover).

Construct all floor hole covers so they will support two times the weight of employees,
equipment, and materials that may be imposed on the cover at any one time.

Provide a guard rail and toe-board around every elevated open sided platform, floor or runway.

Regardless of height, if a worker can fall into or onto dangerous machines or equipment
employers must provide guardrails and toe-boards to prevent workers from falling and getting
injured.

Other means of fall protection that may be required on certain jobs include safety and harness
and line, safety nets, stair railings and hand rails.
Scaffolds
Ensure that scaffolding is properly assembled and staged by properly trained personnel in order to
prevent collapse in whole or in part, falls due to lack of railings and edge guards or items falling from
the scaffold.
Ensure that scaffolds are:

Safely secured and supported

Rated for the load they will carry

Level

Provided with safe and appropriate access (e.g. ladders)
Revised September 23, 2015
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
Adequately decked; they have a uniform work surface and platform

The decking materials are straight, sufficient for the load and free from defect (such as lumber)

Provided with guard rails
When using scaffolds:

Fall protection is required at 10 feet.

Only use scaffolds with the appropriate guardrails, mid rails and toe boards.

Do not remove guardrails; contact the scaffold "competent person" if they need to be removed to
perform special work.

Report any missing guardrails at once.

Do not climb across braces.
Ladders

Position portable ladders so the side rails extend at least 3 feet above the landing

Secure side rails at the top to a rigid support and use a grab device when 3 foot extension is not
possible

Make sure that the weight on the ladder will not cause it to slip off its support

Before each use, inspect ladders for cracked, broken, or defective parts

Do not apply more weight on the ladder than it is designed to support

Use only ladders that comply with OSHA standards

If using a fixed ladder (one that cannot be moved because it is an integral part of a building or
structure), fall protection must be used if the length of climb equals or exceeds 24 feet
Aerial Lifts and Scissor Lifts
ONLY authorized personnel may operate the lift.
Do not move the lift with the boom telescoped or the lift extended.
The ground under the scissor lift must be within 3 degrees of level. Do not drive over debris, uneven
ground, or loose soil while extended.
Setting the brakes and chocking the wheels of an aerial lift is a best practice.
Travel speed should be governed by workplace conditions (surfaces and people present)
Avoid overhead power lines and overhead objects.
Inspect the lift for cracks or other mechanical defects.
Do not exceed the load limit; load distribution on the platform must be in accordance with
manufacturer's specifications.
Wear appropriate fall protection specified by the site safety plan and in accordance to the
equipment manufacturer’s recommendations.
If working over or near water, a personal floatation device should be worn.
Related Safety Bulletin: Guidelines for the Use of Elevating Work Platforms (Scissor Lifts) and Aerial
Extensible Boom Platforms: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/22PLATFORMS.pdf
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Hand Tool Safety
Hammers, wrenches, chisels, pliers, screwdrivers, and other handheld tools are often underrated as
a safety concern, but hand tools accidents can cause substantial injuries.
Injuries caused by hand tools include:

Cuts, abrasions, amputations, and punctures: If hand tools are designed to cut or move metal and
wood, remember what a single slip can do to fragile human flesh.

Repetitive motion injuries: Using the same tool in the same way all day long, day-after-day, can
stress human muscles and ligaments. Carpal tunnel syndrome (inflammation of the nerve sheath
in the wrist) and injuries to muscles, joints and ligaments are increasingly common if the wrong
tool is used, or the right tool is used improperly. Injury from continuous vibration can also cause
numbness or poor circulation in hands and arms.

Eye injuries: Flying chips of wood or metal are a common hazard.

Broken bones and bruises: Tools can slip, fall from heights, or even be thrown by inattentive
employees, causing severe injuries. A hammer that falls from a ladder can be extremely
dangerous.
Best Practices

Use the right tool for the job. Don't use your wrench as a hammer. Don't use a screwdriver as a
chisel.

Always keep your tools in top condition. Don't use broken or damaged tools, dull cutting tools, or
screwdrivers with worn tips. Worn tools are harder to use, and a dull blade or blunt point can
lead to injury.

Cut in a direction away from your body.

Make sure your grip and footing are secure when using large tools.

Carry tools securely in a tool belt or box. Don't carry tools up ladders. Use a hoist or rope.

Keep close track of tools and co-workers when working at heights.

Pass a tool to another person by the handle; never toss it to them.

Use the right personal protective equipment for the job. Follow company instructions for
selecting and using safety eyewear, steel toed shoes, gloves, hard hats, etc.

Never carry sharp or pointed tools such as a screwdriver in your pocket.

Select ergonomic tools for your work task when movements are repetitive and forceful.

Be on the lookout for signs of repetitive stress. Early detection might prevent a serious injury.
Avoid using your hands as a fixture. Use clamps when possible.

Store tools properly when you stop work.
Electrical Shock
Electrical shock occurs when:

You come in contact with two exposed wires in a live electrical circuit

You come in contact with one wire of an energized circuit and the ground

A metallic part in contact with you comes in contact with an live electrical source and you are in
contact with the ground
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When live electrical boxes are not properly shielded and marked, when power tools have worn cords
or other worn parts, when power lines are down, or when electrical equipment is not properly
grounded electrical current can travel through the body and cause serious injury.
The severity of the shock depends on the amount of current flowing through the body, the path of
the current through the body, the length of time the body is connected to the electrical source, the
phase of the heart cycle when the shock occurs and the general health of the individual.
The scale of increasing intensity of shock sensation and injury:

A slight tingling sensation

A slight shock feeling, not painful but disturbing (note that involuntary reactions to the shock can
cause a person can be thrown)

A painful shock with loss of muscular control

Extreme pain with severe muscular contractions (which can damage muscles and tendons, and
can break bones), respiratory arrest and the person unable to let go of the electrical source,

Heart fibrillation with muscular contraction and nerve damage

Cardiac arrest with internal organ damage and severe burns
Wet skin can amplify what would be a barely perceptible tingling sensation into a shock that can
cause heart fibrillation.
High voltage electrical energy greatly reduces the body's resistance by quickly breaking down human
skin. Once the skin is punctured, the lowered resistance results in massive current flow.
What to Do
1. Before touching the individual, look to see if he or she is still connected to the electrical
source. Do not touch the person if still in contact with the electrical source.
2. Call emergency response immediately if the injured worker has any of these signs or symptoms:

Cardiac arrest

Heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias)

Respiratory failure

Muscle pain and contractions

Burns

Seizures

Numbness and tingling

Unconsciousness
3. If necessary, turn off the electrical source, or move the source away from the person using a dry
object that does not conduct electricity, such as cardboard, plastic or wood. Do not use a metal
object.
4. Check for breathing, coughing or movement. If these are absent, begin CPR immediately.
5. Do not move a shock victim unless he or she is in immediate danger
6. To prevent shock, lay the person down and if possible position the head slightly lower than the
trunk with the legs elevated.
7. Even if the person has no obvious signs or symptoms of injury, he or she should be transported to
urgent care to be checked.
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Temperature Extremes
Hot Weather Effects, First Aid and Best Practices
It is possible to become accustomed to very hot climates over five to seven days, but if you have to
work in very hot temperatures (such as in the desert) without a period of acclimatization, or if you
are acclimatized but leave for a week or longer and come back, you must be alert to heat-related
ailments.
Acclimatizing is the process of gradual exposure to work in hot conditions. The body adjusts with
changes to the blood vessels and sweating ability.
OSHA recommends this acclimatization schedule. Begin with 50% of the normal workload and time
spent in the hot environment and gradually build up to 100% by the 5th day. Acclimatization may
continue to occur over a longer period, and keep in mind that the ability to acclimatize can vary
greatly between individuals.
OSHA has heat-illness guides and posters
here: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/heat_illnesses.html
Heat Index Free Mobile App
The US Department of Labor has developed a free smart device app for Android, Blackberry and
iPhone which calculates the heat index (the combined effect of temperature and humidity) and gives
a risk level with reminders about protective measures. The download links are
here: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html
Heat Exhaustion
Loss of fluids from sweating and inadequate intake of appropriate fluids can cause heat exhaustion,
which is dehydration with the following symptoms: sweating, cool or clammy skin, weakness, fatigue,
confusion, nausea, headache, low blood pressure and fast or slow pulse and breathing. The
difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke is that in heat exhaustion the body temperature
is normal. Place the individual in a cool, shaded location and replace fluids. Seek medical attention
for someone severely ill.
Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is the most severe heat ailment and is life-threatening. The sweating mechanism of the
body fails, resulting in a sharp rise in body temperature (up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit). The person
can exhibit confusion, anger or delusion and may convulse or become unconscious. The skin is hot,
dry and red, and later turns gray. Heat stroke can cause brain damage and untreated can be fatal.
Remove the person to a cool environment and then transport immediately to a hospital.
Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are painful muscle cramps in the major muscle groups (legs, arms, abdomen, back) that
may be accompanied by profuse sweating and dizziness. Remedy by resting, replenishing fluids; cool
the body down with cool compresses, wrapping in a wet sheet, immersing in a tub of cool water or
by putting into a cool shower or trickle with water from a garden hose. Massage or stretch out
cramped muscles.
Heat cramps can be an early warning sign of heat related illness such as heat exhaustion or
heat stroke.
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Heat Fainting
Heat fainting occurs when there is insufficient blood flow to the head, and may be preceded by
dizziness, lightheadedness and a flushed sensation. The individual should recover fairly quickly if laid
down in a cool, shade environment and given liquids.
Heat Rash
Excessive sweating due to hot weather may cause sweat glands to clog which cause a skin
inflammation known as heat rash or prickly heat. While the rash is not a serious condition, an
individual unable to sweat properly may be more susceptible to heat stroke.
Good Hot Weather Practices
General hot weather practices include:

Acclimatize - Adjust yourself to the heat through short exposure periods followed by longer
exposure until your body is accustomed to the heat. It may take 5-7 days of hot weather exposure
for acclimatization to occur.

Hydrate - Drinking small amounts of water very frequently – a cup of water every fifteen to
twenty minutes

Cool-down breaks - Regular cool-off periods in a shaded or temperature-controlled location

Proper clothing - Wear loose, light clothing including a wide-brimmed hat if possible

Eat properly - Eat regular meals and snacks that provide salt and electrolytes. Avoid consuming
alcohol.

Buddy system - Employ a buddy system if practicable; otherwise regularly check on coworkers or
the employees you supervise

Education - Know the signs and symptoms of heat stress disorders and act quickly.
Related Safety Bulletin: Safety Considerations for the Prevention of Heat Illness:
http://www.csatf.org/pdf/35HOT_TEMPS.pdf
Cold Weather Effects, First Aid and Best Practices
Prolonged exposure to very cold temperatures, especially combined with wind, snow, rain, or while
in the water even at warmer temperatures, can cause the cold-related conditions of frostbite or
hypothermia.
When the outside temperature falls below 50 degrees Fahrenheit and there is wind, the combination
of factors cause an effective drop in the air temperature, called wind chill. For example, a 40 degree
air temperature with a 10 mile per hour wind will cause body heat loss as would a 34 degree air
temperature. Bright sunshine can lessen the effects of wind chill.
Hypothermia
Hypothermia can occur when exposed to land temperatures are above freezing or to water
temperatures below 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Hypothermia is the condition of the body temperature
dropping below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Danger signs include uncontrolled shivering, muscle
tenseness, slurred speech, clumsy movements, fatigue and confused behavior. Do not dismiss these
as the usual effects of the cold. If these signs are observed do the following:
What to Do: Hypothermia on Land

Call for emergency help

Move the person to a warm, dry area.
Revised September 23, 2015
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
Don’t leave the person alone.

Remove any wet clothing and replace with warm, dry clothing or wrap the person in blankets.

Have the person drink warm, sweet drinks (sugar water or sports-type drinks) if they are alert.
Avoid drinks with caffeine (coffee, tea, or hot chocolate) or alcohol.

Have the person move their arms and legs to create muscle heat. If unable to do so, place warm
bottles or hot packs in the arm pits, groin, neck, and head areas.

Do not rub the person’s body or place them in a warm water bath. This may stop the heart.
What to Do: Hypothermia in the Water:

Call for emergency help

Do not remove any clothing. Button, buckle, zip, and tighten any collars, cuffs, shoes, and hoods.
The trapped water against the body provides a layer of insulation that slows the loss of heat.

Keep the head out of the water and put on a hat or hood.

Get out of the water as quickly as possible or climb on anything floating.

Do not attempt to swim unless a floating object or another person can be reached. Swimming or
and physical activity uses the body’s heat and reduces survival time by about 50 percent.

If unable to get out of the water, wait quietly and conserve body heat by folding arms across the
chest, thighs together, bending the knees and crossing the ankles. If another person is in the
water, huddle together with chests held together closely.
Body heat is lost up to 25 times faster in water.
Frostbite
Frostbite occurs when body tissue freezes due to cold exposure. Frostbite is more common than
hypothermia. The air temperature (without wind chill factor) must be below freezing for frostbite to
develop on exposed skin, and in freezing conditions bare-handed contact with very cold metal can
cause frostbite. The body extremities (fingers, toes, nose, and ear lobes) are most often affected.
The skin loses its color, looks white and waxen, and will lose sensation. Other indicators are itching,
swelling, burning and deep pain.
Degrees of Frostbite
There are increasing degrees of frostbite:
First degree: Ice crystals forming on the skin
Second degree: Skin begins to feel warm, even though it is not yet defrosted.
Third degree: Skin turns red, pale, or white.
Fourth degree: Pain lasts for more than a few hours; dark blue or black and blue areas develop under
skin. See a doctor immediately if these symptoms arise as gangrene is a threat.
What to Do for Frostbite
Seek immediate medical attention for any symptom of frostbite and do the following:

Move the person to a warm dry area.

Don’t leave the person alone.

Remove any wet or tight clothing that may cut off blood flow to the affected area.

Do not rub the affected area, because rubbing causes damage to the skin and tissue.
Revised September 23, 2015
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
Gently place the affected area in a warm (105°F) water bath and monitor the water temperature
to slowly warm the tissue.

Don’t pour warm water directly on the affected area because it will warm the tissue too quickly
which can cause tissue damage. Warming takes about 25-40 minutes.

Note: After the affected area has been warmed, it may become puffy and blister.

The affected area may have a burning feeling or numbness. When normal feeling, movement,
and skin color have returned, the affected area should be dried and wrapped to keep it
warm.
Important: If there is a chance the affected area may get cold again, do not warm the skin. Warmed
frostbitten skin that becomes cold again can suffer severe tissue damage.
Good Cold Weather Practices
Some important safety tips for dealing with cold weather include:

Understand the environmental conditions and prepare accordingly

Learn the signs and symptoms of cold-induced illnesses

Wear proper insulating clothing for cold, wet and/or windy conditions, including layers that can
be adjusted to changing conditions.

Multiple layers trap more warmth than single garments.

Wool retains its insulating abilities when wet.

Wool gives off heat as it absorbs water and can feel dry when it is wet.

Silk is an excellent insulator, is slow to absorb moisture and absorbs up to 30% of its weight
before feeling wet.

Polypropylene and synthetics tend to repel water and dry quickly and make a good outermost
layer.

Synthetic pile and fleece are good insulators

Cover your head. As much as half of body heat can be lost through the head

Be sure to take frequent short breaks in warm dry shelters to allow your body to warm up

If you cannot take a break inside a warm shelter, keep moving: jog in place, shake your arms,
etc., to increase your circulation

Try to schedule outside activities for the warmest part of the day

Avoid exhaustion or fatigue

Eat regular hot meals, snacks and warm beverages to keep the body properly fueled
Related Safety Bulletin: Guidelines for Working in Extreme Cold Temperature
Conditions: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/34COLD_TEMPS.pdf
Protect Your Back
Improperly moving or lifting loads can cause back injuries. The following factors can contribute to
back disorders and injuries:
Reaching while lifting, poor posture, stressful living and working activities, staying in one position for
too long, bad body mechanics - how one lifts, pushes, pulls, or carries objects, poor physical
condition, repetitive lifting of awkward items or equipment, twisting while lifting, bending while
Revised September 23, 2015
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lifting, heavy lifting, fatigue, poor footing such as slippery floors or awkward position or posture,
lifting with great force, and vibration, such as from machinery one is operating.
Back injuries can be hard to repair and are painful. Adopt sensible work habits and be kind to your
back.
Back Safety Tips

If the size, shape or weight of an item is too great for one person to move, get help from other or
employ a tool: Use a forklift, cart, dolly, pallet jack or packing blanket under the item so it
slides easily.

Change the position of the object or your position in relation to the object to avoid repetitive
strain, twisting, stretching or leaning. Where practicable, minimize the distance between you
and the work object.

High-strength push-pull motions should be avoided, but pushing is better than pulling.

Check your intended path for obstructions

Where possible, make adjustments to remain in a relaxed upright stance or a fully supported,
seated position.

Every few hours, rotate employees into a completely different job that uses different muscle
groups and action.

If standing for long periods, use a footrest or rail, floor padding or adjustable height stool.

Store heavy objects at waist level.

Get sufficient food and rest, as well as regular exercise.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Appendix
Injury and Illness Prevention Program
Responsibility
The Injury and Illness Prevention Program (IIP Program) administrator,
___________________________________________________ (Program Administrator) has the authority
and responsibility for implementing and maintaining this IIP Program for
____________________________________________________ (Company Name).
Managers and supervisors are responsible for implementing and maintaining the IIP Program in their
work areas and for answering worker questions about the IIP Program. A copy of this IIP Program is
available from each manager and supervisor.
Compliance
All permanent and intermittent workers, including managers and supervisors, are responsible for
complying with safe and healthful work practices. Our system of ensuring that all workers comply with
these practices include one or more of the following checked practices:
 Informing employees of the provisions of our IIP Program;
 Evaluating the safety performance of all employees;
 Recognizing employees who perform safe and healthful work practices;
 Providing training to employees whose safety performance is deficient;
 Disciplining employees for failure to comply with safe and healthful work practices; and
Communication
All managers and supervisors are responsible for communicating with all permanent and intermittent
workers about occupational safety and health in a form readily understandable by all workers. Our
communication system encourages all workers to inform their managers and supervisors about
workplace hazards without fear of reprisal.
Our communication system includes one or more of the following checked items:
 New employee orientation including a discussion of safety and health policies and procedures.
 Review of our IIP Program.
 Workplace safety and health training programs.
 Regularly scheduled safety meetings.
 Effective communication of safety and health concerns between employees and supervisors, including
translation where appropriate.
 Posted or distributed safety information.
 A system for employees to anonymously inform management about workplace hazards.
 Our establishment has less than ten employees and communicates with and instructs employees
orally about general safe work practices and with respect to hazards unique to each employee's job
assignment.
Hazard Assessment
Periodic inspections to identify and evaluate workplace hazards shall be performed by the following
competent observer(s) in the following areas of our workplace:
Revised September 23, 2015
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Periodic inspections are performed according to the following schedule:

When we initially established our IIP Program;

When new substances, processes, procedures or equipment which present potential new hazards are
introduced into our workplace;

When new, previously unidentified hazards are recognized;

When occupational injuries and illnesses occur;

When we hire and/or reassign permanent or intermittent workers to processes, operations, or tasks
for which a hazard evaluation has not been previously conducted; and

Whenever workplace conditions warrant an inspection.
Periodic inspections consist of identification and evaluation of workplace hazards utilizing applicable
sections of the attached Hazard Assessment Checklist and any other effective methods to identify and
evaluate workplace hazards.
Accident/Exposure Investigations
Procedures for investigating workplace accidents and hazardous substance exposures include:

Interviewing injured workers and witnesses;

Examining the workplace for factors associated with the accident/exposure;

Determining the cause of the accident/exposure;

Taking corrective action to prevent the accident/exposure from reoccurring; and

Recording the findings and corrective actions taken.
Hazard Correction
Unsafe or unhealthy work conditions, practices or procedures shall be corrected in a timely manner
based on the severity of the hazards. Hazards shall be corrected according to the following procedures:

When observed or discovered;

When an imminent hazard exists which cannot be immediately abated without endangering
employee(s) and/or property, we will remove all exposed workers from the area except those
necessary to correct the existing condition. Workers necessary to correct the hazardous condition
shall be provided with the necessary protection
Training and Instruction
All permanent and intermittent workers, including managers and supervisors, shall have training and
instruction on general and job-specific safety and health practices. Training and instruction can be
provided through a brief on-site safety meeting. Any training and instruction shall be provided as
follows:

When the IIP Program is first established;

To all new employees, except for those in construction who are provided training through a
Cal/OSHA approved construction industry occupational safety and health training program;

To all employees given new job assignments for which training has not been previously provided;

Whenever new substances, processes, procedures or equipment are introduced to the workplace and
represent a new hazard;

Whenever the employer is made aware of a new or previously unrecognized hazard;

To supervisors to familiarize them with the safety and health hazards to which workers under their
immediate direction and control may be exposed; and

To all employees with respect to hazards specific to each employee's job assignment.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Workplace safety and health training practices for all industries include, but are not limited to, the
following:

Explanation of the employer's IIP Program, emergency action plan and fire prevention plan, and
measures for reporting any unsafe conditions, work practices, and injuries.

Use of appropriate clothing, including gloves, footwear, and personal protective equipment.

Information about chemical hazards to which employees could be exposed and other hazard
communication program information.

Availability of toilet, hand-washing and drinking water facilities.

Provisions for medical services and first aid including emergency procedures.

Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders, including proper lifting techniques.
In addition, we train all workers about the checked applicable items found in the attached List of
Training Subjects.
Recordkeeping
We have selected one of the following categories as our recordkeeping policy.
 Category 1. Our establishment is on a designated high hazard industry list. We have taken the
following steps to implement and maintain our IIP Program:
a. Records of hazard assessment inspections, including the person(s) conducting the inspection, the
unsafe conditions and work practices that have been identified and the action taken to correct
the identified unsafe conditions and work practices, are recorded on a hazard assessment and
correction form; and
b. Documentation of safety and health training for each employee, including the employee's name
or other identifier, training dates, type(s) of training, and training providers are recorded on an
employee training and instruction form. We also include the records relating to employee
training provided by a construction industry occupational safety and health training program
approved by Cal/OSHA.
Inspection records and training documentation will be maintained according to the following
checked schedule:
 For one year, except for training records of employees who have worked for less than one year
which are provided to the employee upon termination of employment; or
 Since we have less than ten workers, including managers and supervisors, we maintain inspection
records only until the hazard is corrected and only maintain a log of instructions to employees with
respect to employee job assignments when they are first hired or assigned new duties.
 Category 2. Our establishment has fewer than twenty workers and is not on a designated high hazard
industry list. We are also on a designated low hazard industry list or have a workers' compensation
experience modification rate of 1.1 or less, and have taken the following steps to implement and
maintain our IIP Program:
a. Records of hazard assessment inspections; and
b. Documentation of safety and health training for each worker.
Inspection records and training documentation will be maintained according to the following
checked schedule:
 For one year, except for training records of employees who have worked for less than one year
which are provided to the employee upon termination of employment; or
 Since we have less than ten workers, including managers and supervisors, we maintain inspection
records only until the hazard is corrected and only maintain a log of instructions to workers with
respect to worker job assignments when they are first hired or assigned new duties.
Revised September 23, 2015
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 Category 3. We are a local governmental entity (any county, city, or district, and any public or quasipublic corporation or public agency therein) and therefore are not required to keep written records of
the steps taken to implement and maintain our IIP Program.
List of Training Subjects
We train our workers about the following checked training subjects for Motion Picture Production and
Services and Theatrical Producers:
 Fall protection from elevated locations.
 Use of elevated platforms, including condors and scissor lifts.
 Electrical safety.
 Safe use of explosives.
 Slips, falls, and back injuries.
 Noise.
 Ergonomic hazards, including proper lifting techniques.
 Other job-specific hazards, such as _______________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Hazard Assessment Checklists
The following checklists contain safety and health hazard assessment items commonly found in the
workplace. It is the employer's responsibility to identify, evaluate and control job-specific safety and
health hazards in the workplace, and to meet all applicable Cal/OSHA requirements.
The following checklists are to be used as guides in identifying safety and health hazards in your
workplace. Answer the questions contained in the General Workplace checklist and then identify and
answer the questions contained in the checklist that applies to your specific industry.
General Workplace
 Is the Cal/OSHA poster Safety and Health Protection on the Job displayed in a prominent location
where all employees are likely to see it?
 Do you have a written, effective Injury and Illness Prevention Program?
 Are all work areas properly illuminated?
 Are employees instructed in proper first aid and other emergency procedures?
 Do you have a fire prevention plan?
 Are all worksites clean and orderly?
 Are all spilled materials or liquids cleaned up immediately?
 Do you have eye wash facilities and a quick drench shower within the work area where employees are
exposed to injurious corrosive materials?
 When lunches are eaten on the premises, are they eaten in areas where there is no exposure to toxic
materials or other health hazards?
 Are aisles and passageways kept clear?
 Are the directions to exits, when not immediately apparent, marked with visible signs?
 Are hazardous substances identified which may cause harm by inhalation, ingestion, skin absorption
or contact?
 Are employees aware of the hazards involved with the various chemicals they may be exposed to in
their work environment, such as ammonia, chlorine, epoxies or caustics?
Revised September 23, 2015
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 Is personal protective equipment provided, used and maintained wherever required?
 Are there written standard operating procedures for the selection and use of respirators where
needed?
 Are restrooms and washrooms kept clean and sanitary?
 Are employees instructed in the proper manner of lifting heavy objects?
 Is there a list of hazardous substances used in your workplace?
 Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
labeling, and employee training?
 Is each container for a hazardous substance (i.e. vats, bottles, storage tanks,) labeled with product
identity and a hazard warning (communication of the specific health hazards and physical hazards)?
 Is there a Material Safety Data Sheet readily available for each hazardous substance used?
 Is there an employee training program for hazardous substances?
 Can the work be performed without eye strain or glare to the employees?
 Does the task require prolonged raising of the arms and does the neck and shoulders have to be
stooped to view the task?
 Are there pressure points on any parts of the body (wrists, forearms, back of thighs)?
 Are there sufficient rest breaks, in addition to the regular rest breaks, to relieve stress from
repetitive-motion tasks?
 Are tools, instruments and machinery shaped, positioned and handled so that tasks can be performed
comfortably?
 Are you keeping the required records and documentation?
 Have arrangements been made to maintain required records for the legal period of time?
Motion Picture Production and Services and Theatrical Producers
 Are workers protected against accidental falls from elevated locations?
 Is the use of elevated platforms, including condors and scissors lifts, in accordance with safety
regulations?
 Is the use of pyrotechnics in accordance with safe work practices?
 Are only authorized personnel allowed to handle pyrotechnic devices and material?
 Are work areas free from slipping, tripping, and falling hazards?
 Are your workplace electricians familiar with the Cal/OSHA Electrical Safety Orders?
 Do extension cords have a grounding conductor?
 Are all temporary circuits protected by suitable disconnecting switches or plug connectors at the
junction with permanent wiring?
 Are exposed wiring and cords with frayed or deteriorated insulation repaired or replaced promptly?
 Is sufficient access and working space provided and maintained about all electrical equipment to
permit ready and safe operations and maintenance?
 Are workers trained in proper lifting techniques?
 Are work surfaces kept dry or appropriate means taken to assure the surfaces are slip-resistant?
 Is there safe clearance for equipment through aisles and doorways?
 Are employees trained in the use of fire extinguisher?
 Are there areas in the workplace where noise levels may exceed the permissible exposure limits?
Revised September 23, 2015
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 Is approved hearing protective equipment available to employees exposed to excessive noise levels?
 Are combustible scrap, debris and waste materials (i.e. oily rags) stored in covered metal receptacles
and removed from the worksite promptly?
 If internal combustion engines are used, is carbon monoxide kept within acceptable levels?
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EMERGENCY CONTACTS POSTER
FILMING LOCATION ___________________________________
NEAREST EMERGENCY ROOM ___________________________
NEAREST URGENT CARE _______________________________
HOSPITAL ___________________________________________
AMBULANCE _________________________________________
POLICE _____________________________________________
FIRE _______________________________________________
NOTIFICATION TELEPHONE NUMBERS
SAFETY PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR ______________________
OSHA ______________________________________________
INSURANCE CARRIER _________________________________
LOCATION OF EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT
FIRST AID KIT ________________________________________
FIRE EXTINGUISHER ___________________________________
Revised September 23, 2015
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Emergency Action Plan Overview
An Emergency Action Plan (EAP) is a written document to organize the actions of the employer and
employees in the event of a workplace emergency. A well-designed emergency action plan will facilitate
efficient emergency response such as evacuation, avoid injury and property damage and minimize
confusion.
For a production company, certain details of an emergency action plan would necessarily change as the
production moves from location to location.
If shooting at a stage, lot or other established facility, an emergency action plan should already be in
place. You and your designated crew members should familiarize yourselves with the plan and follow the
facility manager’s instructions.
Minimum Plan Requirements
The minimum requirements for an emergency action plan are:
1. Means of reporting fires and other emergencies
2. Evacuation procedures and emergency escape routes
3. Procedures to be followed by employees who remain behind for essential functions

If any employees will stay behind, the plan must describe in detail the procedures to be followed
by these employees. All employees remaining behind must be capable of recognizing when to
abandon the operation or task and evacuate themselves before their exit path is blocked.

Employees designated with action plan roles must be trained on their duties prior to implementing
the action plan
4. Procedures to account for all employees after an emergency evacuation is complete

Designate an areas or areas, both inside and outside your workplace, where employees should
gather after evacuating. Assembly locations within the building are often referred to as "areas of
refuge." Make sure your assembly area has sufficient space to accommodate all of your
employees. Exterior assembly areas, used when the building must be partially or completely
evacuated, are typically located in parking lots or other open areas away from busy streets. Try to
designate assembly areas so that you will be upwind of the most common or prevailing wind
direction, and where your group will minimize interference with rescue operations.

Take a head count after the evacuation. Identify the names and last known locations of anyone
not accounted for and pass them to the official in charge. Accounting for all employees following
an evacuation is critical. Confusion can lead to delays in rescuing anyone trapped in the building,
or unnecessary and dangerous search-and-rescue operations.

Establish a method for accounting for non-employees such as suppliers and customers; and

Establish procedures for further evacuation in case the incident expands. This may consist of
sending employees home by normal means or providing them with transportation to an offsite
location.
5. Rescue and medical duties for individuals trained to perform them
6. Names and contact information of people who can be contacted for further information or duties
under the plan
7. The plan would also optimally include:

The site of an alternative communications center to be used in the event of a fire or explosion

A secure off-site location to store key documents such as accounting, legal documents, permits,
employee emergency contact lists, etc.
8. The plan must be communicated to employees with roles in the action plan when:
Revised September 23, 2015
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
The plan is developed

When an employee is initially assigned a responsibility in the action plan

When the employee’s responsibility changes

When the plan changes.
For companies with ten or fewer employees, the plan may be communicated orally and need not
be written.
Stay or Go?
Depending on your circumstances and the type of emergency, the first important decision is whether you
stay put or get away. You should understand and plan for both possibilities. Use common sense and
available information to assess the situation.
In general, there are two kinds of crisis response situations:
Isolated Events: Those affecting only a certain area, floor, building, site etc.
Widespread Events: Those affecting large sections of the community or state.
Unless there is an imminent threat, ask employees, customers, clients, and visitors to call their
emergency contact to let them know where they are and that they are safe.
Be aware that cellular telephone equipment may be overwhelmed or damaged during an emergency.
Types of Emergency Events
A variety of emergencies may require emergency response action, including evacuation. These can
include fire, explosion, flood, earthquake, hurricanes, tornadoes, toxic material releases, radiological
and biological accidents, civil disturbances and workplace violence.
In general: If on location in a remote or low traffic area (such as an abandoned building), contact local
authorities and give them your exact location. Although you should have had contact with local officials
during your location setup activities, some emergency response agencies may not know that your
production is on location unless you tell them.
Fire
Whenever you suspect or detect a fire, a fire response should take place. Notify the appropriate fire
response agency as established in your Emergency Notification Poster. Then assess whether to evacuate
employees from the affected area.
If you have placed a call for assistance and have been trained in the use of available fire equipment, you
are may choose to attempt to suppress a small fire in its initial, controlled stage. Also see the section on
fire in the Production Safety Guidelines.
IF YOU HAVE THE SLIGHTEST DOUBT ABOUT WHETHER OR NOT TO FIGHT THE FIRE…DON'T!
Instead move to safety. If inside a building, leave the building, closing the door behind you.
Power Failure
In the event of a partial blackout or a total power failure, the Safety Coordinator or the first person
aware of the situation should call for assistance.
If a significant disruption is anticipated, whether to evacuate the location.
In the event of a lengthy power outage: As a precaution, electrical equipment including computers,
television/audio equipment and other sensitive electronic should be unplugged if safe to do so. This
should be done to avoid a possible electrical surge that may damage equipment when power is restored.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Earthquake

If inside, take shelter if possible under a solid desk or door frame.

If outside, stay clear of buildings, trees and wires.

After shaking stops, evacuate the building (if you are in one), assemble in a safe location

Account for all employees and visitors or vendors who were present when the emergency began.
Contact emergency response/fire department if anyone is missing. Assess whether it is safe enough to
undertake a search while awaiting emergency response personnel.
Extreme Weather
Blizzard, hurricane and tornado warning systems are active in regions of the United States prone to this
type of activity. Continuous monitoring of local weather conditions should take place whenever adverse
conditions are anticipated or weather worsens. Because most weather-related disasters can be predicted,
pre-planning must take place. Contingency weather plans should include provisions for evacuation,
transportation, first-aid and shelter.
Related Safety Bulletin – Guidelines for Inclement or Severe
Weather: http://www.csatf.org/pdf/38Inclement_or_Severe_Weather.pdf
After Action Safety Checklist
If in a location with buildings, check for the following potential risks after any significant disruption:
1. Fire or fire hazards
2. Gas leaks. Shut off the main gas valve if a leak is suspected or identified by the odor of natural gas.
Wait for the gas company to check it and turn it back on.
3. Damaged electrical wiring. Shut off power at the source if there is any damage noted.
4. Downed or damaged chimneys - approach chimneys with caution. After an earthquake or tornado they
may be weakened and could topple.
5. Fallen items in storage units, cupboards and closets - be aware of objects falling from shelves when
doors are opened.
6. Communications – if any landline phones, check that each telephone is on its receiver. Off the hook
phones tie up the telephone network.
7. Account for all employees and visitors or vendors who were present when the emergency began.
Contact emergency response/fire department if anyone is missing. Assess whether it is safe enough to
undertake a search while awaiting emergency response personnel.
As antiquated as it may seem, the local telephone white or yellow pages are an excellent source of
emergency information specific to the region of the country you are located. In addition, specific
emergency first-aid information can also be found in most phone directories.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Emergency Action Plan
Location _______________________________________________________Date________________________
Production Title:
Company Name/Address:
Contact Name/Title:
Telephone/Cell:
E-mail:
Alerts
In the event of an emergency, employees are alerted by (check all that apply):
 Sounding of an alarm
 Public Address system
 Verbal Announcement
announcement
 Other (describe notification system):
Routes (check one)
 In the event of an emergency employees will evacuate via the nearest marked exit
 In the event of emergency employees will evacuate (describe means and route):
Extinguishers (check one)
 Portable fire extinguishers are provided in the workplace for employee use. In the event of fire, any
employee may use extinguishers to attempt to extinguish the fire before evacuating.
 Employees are not authorized to use any portable fire extinguisher that may be present to fight fires.
In the event of fire, employees are to evacuate immediately.
 In the event of a fire, the following individuals are authorized to use portable fire extinguishers to
attempt to extinguish fires before evacuating (describe):
Operations (check one)
 Critical operations shutdown procedures are not required, because no employees are authorized to
delay evacuation for this purpose.
 In the event of an emergency, the following employees are to remain in the workplace to shut down or
monitor critical operations before they evacuate (describe employees by name or job):
Assembly
After an emergency evacuation employees are to gather in the following location(s) (describe):
Accounting for Employees
After an emergency evacuation the procedure for accounting for all employees is (describe):
Additional Evacuation Plan and Procedures (describe):
Revised September 23, 2015
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Employee Safety Training Sign-In Sheet
Production Title:
Date:
Production Location:
Training Delivered by:
Training Subject(s):
Employee Name (Print)
Revised September 23, 2015
Employee Signature
Date
Page 49 of 67
Acknowledgement of Safety Training
Production Title: __________________________________________________
On ________________ (date) I received general safety training relating to this production.
I also understand that I must attend safety meetings whenever they are appropriate for my work.
Employee Signature
Date
Employee Name Printed
Title
This form should be signed, dated and returned to your Safety Program administrator.
Acknowledgement of Safety Training
Production Title: __________________________________________________
On ________________ (date) I received general safety training relating to this production.
I also understand that I must attend safety meetings whenever they are appropriate for my work.
Employee Signature
Date
Employee Name Printed
Title
This form should be signed, dated and returned to your Safety Program administrator.
Acknowledgement of Safety Training
Production Title: __________________________________________________
On ________________ (date) I received general safety training relating to this production.
I also understand that I must attend safety meetings whenever they are appropriate for my work.
Employee Signature
Date
Employee Name Printed
Title
This form should be signed, dated and returned to your Safety Program administrator.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Line Producer Safety Checklist
1
General

Safety Guide received

Safety Guide reviewed and understood

Health & Safety Bulletin Board set up

Legal responsibility reviewed
2
Pre-Production

Storyboards

Tech Scout

Potentially hazardous situations

Health and safety bulletins

Outside facility personnel

Crew experience verified

Rehearsals and run-throughs

Location inspection

Proper casting procedures

Safety meeting with Director and 1st AD
3
Shoot

Shoot day meeting with Director and 1st AD

AM safety meeting with all personnel

Health & Safety bulletins

Rehearsals / run-throughs

Bystander safety
4
Wrap

Wrap crew qualified

Final site inspected

Paperwork completed

Safety suggestion sheets

Record of Safety Meetings

Hazard reports

Accident /illness reports

Reports to outside suppliers

All other pertinent health and safety paperwork
Please give original to program administrator, and keep a copy in the wrap file.
Line Producer Signature
Revised September 23, 2015
Date
Page 51 of 67
First Assistant Director/Technical Lead Safety Checklist


















Safety Guide received
Safety Guide reviewed and understood
Legal responsibility reviewed
Chain of responsibility reviewed
Pre-production meeting with Director and Line Producer
Emergency responders contact information identified
Health and Safety Bulletin Board posted with Emergency Contacts and Safety Rules
Location of safety facilities identified and listed on crew safety awareness poster
Crew safety awareness orientation/meeting
Shoot day location hazards identified and reviewed
Shoot day meeting with Director and Line Producer
AM safety meeting
Rehearsals/run-throughs
Location inspections/safety check list completed
Health and safety paperwork/reports completed
Condition check of special equipment
Bystander safety controlled
Potentially hazardous situations identified and controlled
Please give original to (________________________) and keep a copy in the wrap file.
First Assistant Director /Technical Lead Signature: _____________________ __________________
Date_____________________
Revised September 23, 2015
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Location Shoot Safety Checklist
Job# & Name:
Your Name:
Date:
Location:
Yes
No
N/A
Requirement
General
Required permits obtained (including special fire/stunt/SFX)
Police and/or fire personnel on the location adequately briefed on the shoot
Cast and crew safety training complete
Applicable safety bulletins attached to Call Sheet
Daily safety briefing for all personnel (crew, cast, clients, visitors, bystanders)
General housekeeping (lights, exits and access)
Building equipped with emergency lighting
Building equipped with fire suppression system
Safety information and emergency contact poster displayed in central location
Fire extinguishers or charged hose line available, in working order, extinguisher inspection
tags current; extinguisher(s) within 75 feet of reach
Telephone service must be available for emergencies (e.g. cell or satellite phone)
Sanitation facilities available and in working order
Medical staff and first aid equipment adequate and available
Special safety equipment and/or clothing required is available and in use
Dressing rooms check
Access
Vehicle traffic routes well marked
Fire lanes clear
Fire hydrants not blocked, minimum 3 feet clearance, no parked vehicles within 15 feet
Standpipe connections clear
Flats, sets, props secured and braced
Interior sets have 4 feet of clear space around the stage perimeter
Pits and floor openings covered and/or guarded
Weather conditions accounted for
Safety check of any confined space associated with the location
Flammables
Flammable liquids in closed containers no greater than 5 gallons in size
Pressurized vessels (e.g. propane) contents identified, stored outside away from vehicle
traffic and marked with No Smoking signs
Refuelers parked in designated areas
Revised September 23, 2015
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Yes
No
N/A
Requirement
No refueling of equipment while in operation
Refueling performed in designated, remote areas
Combustible waste materials (rags, wood chips, sawdust) properly contained in closed
containers and removed frequently
Painting/solvent fumes/set construction off gassing properly ventilated
No Smoking signs posted by all combustibles and pyrotechnic material areas
No flammables, combustibles or pyrotechnics placed in exit hallways, stairways or
passages
Smoking areas marked and equipped with butt cans
Dry brush or other growth properly cleared
Electrical
Cords, cables, wiring free of frays or compromised insulation
Cords, cables, wiring routed safely and neatly, secured in trays or covered by trunking
Extension cords not used as a substitute for permanent wiring
Lighting properly set up and secured
Electrical sources and live parts secure, covered and labeled
If lockout/tagout in process, proper labeling and locks
Appropriate crew members informed of lockout/tagout
Generators in approved locations, grounded and insulated
Generator exhaust directed away from cast and crew areas
Generators inspected for no leaky hoses, no frayed cables, insulated from earth,
extinguisher present
Lighting and heated surfaces adequately separated from combustible materials
Survey of power line proximity
Catering trucks/cooking areas have fire extinguishers
Aerial Platforms, Lifts, Ladders, Scaffolds
Only trained personnel set up and operate aerial equipment
Fall prevention/protection equipment in use
Ladders inspected and in good condition
Aerial equipment on level surfaces, braked and wheels chocked
Ladder extends at least three feet above the working surface
Handrails, guardrails, toe guards and fall prevention/protection in place for platforms,
risers, roofs, cliffs
No ladders blocking doorways, exits, thoroughfares
Stunts
Stunt briefing conducted
Cast and crew briefed on day’s stunts
Smoke/fog ingredients listed on call sheet
All stunt/SFX technicians possess current cards of proper classification (cards must be on
their person)
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Yes
No
N/A
Requirement
Pyrotechnicians provide fire extinguishers
Fires have safety spotter with retardant equipment
Pyrotechnic and ammunition storage marked with No Smoking signs
Appropriate protective equipment for camera and crew in shot (Plexiglas, protective
shields, eye/ear protection
Area inspected by stunt personnel
Helicopter briefing
Stunt noise levels assessed and protective equipment issued to cast/crew as required
Animal handling reviewed
Scuba equipment, instructor, certified diver at underwater locations
Safety check of camera cars/cranes
Smoke/fog/dust properly ventilated
Stunt rehearsal with risk assessment
Key Stunt/Special Effects Personnel Roster (Name/Cell Phone)
Stunt Coordinator:
Special FX
Coordinator:
Assistant Director:
Medic/Nurse:
Police Dept. Rep.:
Fire Dept. Rep.:
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Daily Production Safety Report
(Daily: To be completed by the 1st AD or 2nd AD and turned in to the Production Coordinator)
Production Title:
Date:
Production Location:
For each question, please circle a response and note the applicable information:
1. Was today's filming / work site inspected?
Yes
No
Comments:
By whom (name and title):
Note what, if anything was found, and any changes/corrections made:
2. Were the cast and/or crew notified of any potential safety concerns?
Yes
No
By whom (name and title):
Notified of:
3. Were individual cast/crew safety meetings held?
Yes
No
Briefly note what was discussed for each area:
Special FX:
Stunts:
2nd Unit:
Rig Crew:
Cast:
Other:
4. Were safety bulletins distributed?
Yes
No
Which bulletins:
To whom:
Revised September 23, 2015
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Daily Production Safety Report (Page 2)
Date:
5. Safety training for cast and/or crew held?
Yes
No (If yes, attach completed sign-in sheet)
What type:
6. Were there any accidents?
Yes
No
(If yes, attach investigation report)
7. Additional Comments
Your Name (Print):
Signature:
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Safety Suggestion Form
Use this form to make a suggestion or to report an unsafe condition or practice.
A system should be in place for you to submit a form anonymously if you so choose. However, state law
requires that you be able to inform your employer of workplace hazards without fear of reprisal.
Description of Unsafe Condition
Causes or Contributing Factors
Suggestion for Improvement
Has this been reported to a supervisor?
 Yes
 No
Name (Optional):
Department:
Date:
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Sample Safety Inspection
Production/Venue Name: __________________________________________ Date: ___________________
Completed by: _______________________________________________
General
Safety and emergency information is posted and visible? Is there a backup method to report
emergencies if main communication is down?
Call sheets and applicable safety bulletins have been reviewed for special hazards?

General housekeeping in good order?

Medical staff and first aid equipment is adequate and acceptable for event?

Fall hazards are controlled?

Exits are clear of obstructions?

Warning signs are visible?

Vehicle traffic areas are well marked (including forklifts)?

Vehicles are not allowed near tents, shelters, and blind corners?

Environmental conditions (weather, heat, etc…) have been prepared for?

Chemicals
Solvents, cleaners, paints are properly stored?

Eye wash is available?

Proper waste containers are provided?

Containers are labeled to warn of contents and hazards?

Ladders and Aerial Lifts
Only trained personnel are allowed to use ladders and lifts?

Approved safety harnesses worn when using lifts?

All ladders are in good condition and used properly?

Aerial lifts are not moved with basket extended?

Lifts are not used in winds over 25 miles per hour?

Vehicles
Vehicle traffic areas are well marked (including forklifts)?

Vehicles are not allowed near tents, shelters, and blind corners?

Vehicles are not allowed to idle near crews?

Only trained and authorized persons are allowed to operate carts?

Carts are not allowed to carry excessive passengers or loads?

Fire Safety
Propane and flammable liquids are stored properly and at proper distance from set?

Fire extinguishers marked and accessible?

Fire truck and ambulance access is maintained at 20’ wide?

Fire hydrants are clear of all vehicles?

Flammable material and heat sources are at least 25 feet apart?

No smoking signs are visible and smoking restrictions are in place near flammable material?


Revised September 23, 2015
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Corrective Action Guide
Purpose: To help develop corrective action after an injury or to prevent recurrence of an identified
hazard.
Investigating an Accident
A good accident investigation should answer these questions: What happened? When did it happen?
Where did it happen? Who was involved? Why did it happen? What events and factors led up the
incident? What could have prevented it, and what steps can be taken to prevent a like incident in the
future?
When these questions are answered, patterns often emerge and preventable causes can be
discovered. But the patterns may not be true unless information acquired during the investigation is
complete and accurate. The observations of coworkers and from employees that were directly
involved can be critical.
The first thing to do when an accident happens is to make sure the worker's injuries are treated. The
next step is to carefully investigate the events surrounding the accident. The reason for
investigations is not to place blame but to determine what happened so that similar incidents can be
prevented in the future.
An accident that results in hospitalization or death must be immediately followed by a thorough
investigation. Multiple injuries and fatalities are also investigated by OSHA and insurance personnel,
so accurate facts must be gathered carefully. Photographs, samples and measurements are often
necessary.
The actual investigation is generally carried out by supervisors or trained personnel. Nevertheless, all
employees play an important role in the accident prevention process and in preventing future
mishaps. Once employees understand why it's important for them to report all accidents and close
calls, and to cooperate fully with investigations, management can benefit from their experience and
input.
Analyzing Risk Factors
When analyzing an injury or risk factor you will be breaking the analysis into three categories.
Understand how each of the three elements are involved and ask yourself how these factors could
have created an unsafe condition.
1. People Factors – These are factors related to the injured employee, including the employee’s
condition, as well as other individuals in the organization. You may find that more than one person
that contributed to the injury or hazard.
Ask yourself: Was there proper training for the task? Was the person experienced? Did they follow
proper procedures?
2. Process/Machine Factors – These are factors that related to the machine, tool, workstation design
or the task that is being done at the time of the injury or hazard.
Ask yourself: Was this the right tool for the job? Was the part maintained correctly? Was it used
properly? Were there other related conditions or factors?
Revised September 23, 2015
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3. Environmental Factors – These are factors that relate to the physical environment, such as noise,
light, weather, etc., and which can also influence people. Production demands, short staffing
situations and seasonal fluctuations can create a predisposition to injury or hazard.
Ask yourself: Did we plan ahead and predict these factors? How could this have been avoided?
Developing Corrective Action
Identify the key risk factors and hazards and consider the following actions to prevent recurrence.
Potential Hazard
Possible Safe Procedure
Burn
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Segregate hot areas away from normal traffic
Adequate protection around hazard to prevent contact
Use tools/protection to handle hot materials
Cut / Puncture
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Proper handling and use of knives, case cutters and sharp objects
Housekeeping
Keep tools sharp
Proper disposal of sharp objects
Use safety razor versus an open knife
Maintain guarding on power tools
Contact with
Electricity
Lockout -Tagout procedures (cut the electricity to the item, lock the item
with a padlock and key, tag the item as Do Not Use, test that it won’t start)
Electrical equipment installed and maintained to code
Electrical tools and equipment properly grounded
Do not allow cords to be damaged by foot or vehicle traffic
Maintain clearance from overhead power lines
Assume that a line is live until a qualified operator confirms otherwise
Avoid electrical work in confined spaces
Foreign Body in Eye
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as face shields, safety glasses
Do not blow particles with an air hose; instead use a vacuum to remove
materials
Fall from Elevation
Proper housekeeping
Slip resistant footwear, footwear in good condition
Avoid climbing on equipment
Revised September 23, 2015
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Potential Hazard
Possible Safe Procedure
No “Hands-free” climbing / descending stairs and ladders
Three point contact when climbing in and out of vehicles
Ladder and equipment inspection
Reposition ladder or equipment rather than reaching
Use fall protection equipment
Proximity to eaves, walls or roofs
Fall Same Level
Slip resistant footwear, keep soles of shoes in good condition
Floor condition and housekeeping
Eliminate tripping hazards by running cords and hoses overhead
Do not leave low carts, pallets in positions where people may trip over the
object
Fork Truck Collision
Operator training
Sound horns and stop at intersections and blind turns
Reduce speed
Maintain vehicle clearance spaces
Heat/Cold
Exhaustion
Maintain hydration
Recognize signs of overexposure
Plan for weather and provide appropriate shelter
Exposure to noise,
smoke, fumes and
chemicals
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Exhaust ventilation
Dust collection systems
Only trained personnel use chemicals
Daily stunt meetings and run-through rehearsals
Proper chemical storage
Use safer materials if possible
Struck by / Against
Lockout -Tagout procedures
Traffic control procedures in pedestrian areas
Suspended loads are braced so they cannot fall
Stable positioning to avoid falling into hazard
Do not position your body between the load and another object
Revised September 23, 2015
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Corrective Action Form
List all actions recommended to prevent an accident that occurred or a hazard that has been identified.
When this form is used as part of an accident investigation, please fax or e-mail as soon as possible to the
CAPS Risk Management Department. Also discuss with location/production management to assure that the
identified action items have been completed.
Action Item
Revised September 23, 2015
Person(s) Responsible
Page 63 of 67
No Smoking Sign
OSHA Reporting Requirements: Work-Connected Fatalities and Injuries
As of January 1, 2015, the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA)
recordkeeping rule requires that employers must report the following events to OSHA:

All work-related fatalities

All work-related in-patient hospitalizations of one or more employees

All work-related amputations

All work-related losses of an eye
Employers must report work-related fatalities within 8 hours of finding out about it.
For any in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or eye loss employers must report the incident within 24
hours of learning about it.
Only fatalities occurring within 30 days of the work-related incident must be reported to OSHA. Further,
for an inpatient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye, the incident must be reported to OSHA
only if it occurs within 24 hours of the work-related incident.
A summary of the OSHA Fatality and Severe Injury and Illness Reporting
Requirements
Type
Required Employer Action
Fatalities
Employers are required to report each fatality within 8 hours of the death, for all
fatalities occurring within 30 days of the incident.
Hospitalizations
Employers are required to report each in-patient hospitalization within 24 hours of
the hospitalization, for all hospitalizations occurring within 24 hours of the workrelated incident.
In-patient hospitalization defined as a formal admission to the in-patient service of
a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.
Amputations
Employers are required to report each amputation within 24 hours of the
amputation, for all amputations occurring within 24 hours of the work-related
incident.
Definition comes from BLS OIICS Manual 2010.
Losses of an eye
Employers are required to report each loss of an eye within 24 hours of the loss of
an eye, for all losses of an eye occurring within 24 hours of the work-related
incident.
Knowledge of
event
Employer is required to report if event (fatality, in-patient hospitalization,
amputation, loss of an eye) is reported to employer or employer’s agent(s).
Employers have three options for reporting the event:

By telephone to the nearest OSHA Area Office during normal business hours.

By telephone to the 24-hour OSHA hotline (1-800-321-OSHA or 1-800-321-6742).

OSHA is developing a new means of reporting events electronically, which will be released soon and
accessible on OSHA's website.
These reporting requirements will apply to all employers under OSHA jurisdiction, including those who
are exempt from routinely keeping OSHA records due to company size or industry.
Revised September 23, 2015
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More information on this recordkeeping requirement can be found
here: https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping2014/faqs.html#reporting
California Occupational Safety and Health Regulations (CAL/OSHA)
Regulations of the Division of Occupational Safety and Health
§330. Definitions.
(h) "Serious injury or illness" means any injury or illness occurring in a place of employment or in
connection with any employment which requires inpatient hospitalization for a period in excess of 24
hours for other than medical observation or in which an employee suffers a loss of any member of the
body or suffers any serious degree of permanent disfigurement, but does not include any injury or
illness or death caused by the commission of a Penal Code violation, except the violation of Section 385
of the Penal Code, or an accident on a public street or highway.
§342. Reporting Work-Connected Fatalities and Serious Injuries.
(a) Every employer shall report immediately by telephone or telegraph to the nearest District Office of
the Division of Occupational Safety and Health any serious injury or illness, or death, of an employee
occurring in a place of employment or in connection with any employment.
Immediately means as soon as practically possible but not longer than 8 hours after the employer knows
or with diligent inquiry would have known of the death or serious injury or illness. If the employer can
demonstrate that exigent circumstances exist, the time frame for the report may be made no longer
than 24 hours after the incident.
Serious injury or illness is defined in section 330(h), Title 8, California Administrative Code.
(b) Whenever a state, county, or local fire or police agency is called to an accident involving an
employee covered by this part in which a serious injury, or illness, or death occurs, the nearest office of
the Division of Occupational Safety and Health shall be notified by telephone immediately by the
responding agency.
(c) When making such report, whether by telephone or telegraph, the reporting party shall include the
following information, if available:
(1) Time and date of accident.
(2) Employer's name, address and telephone number.
(3) Name and job title or badge number of person reporting the accident.
(4) Address of site of accident or event.
(5) Name of person to contact at site of accident.
(6) Name and address of injured employee(s).
(7) Nature of injury.
(8) Location where injured employee(s) was (were) moved to.
(9) List and identity of other law enforcement agencies present at the site of accident.
(10) Description of accident and whether the accident scene or instrumentality has been altered.
(d) The reporting in (a) and (b) above, is in addition to any other reports required by law and may be
made by any person authorized by the employers, state, county, or local agencies to make such reports.
Revised September 23, 2015
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Cal/OSHA Regional and District Offices
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