Grocery and Related Products_Layout 1

Grocery and Related Products_Layout 1
Industry
Guide
113
Grocery and Related Products
Wholesale Industry
Safety and Health Management Program
N.C. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Division
N.C. Department of Labor
1101 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
Cherie Berry
Commissioner of Labor
N.C. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Program
Cherie Berry
Commissioner of Labor
OSHA State Plan Designee
Allen McNeely
Deputy Commissioner for Safety and Health
Kevin Beauregard
Assistant Deputy Commissioner for Safety and Health
Wanda Lagoe
Author
This guide is in a series of industry guides focused on the Special Emphasis Programs. It is intended to be consistent
with all existing OSHA standards; therefore, if an area is considered by the reader to be inconsistent with a standard,
then the OSHA standard should be followed.
To obtain additional copies of this guide, or if you have questions about North Carolina occupational safety and health
standards or rules, please contact:
N.C. Department of Labor
Education, Training and Technical Assistance Bureau
1101 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
Phone: 919-807-2875 or 1-800-625-2267
____________________
Additional sources of information are listed on the inside back cover of this guide.
____________________
The projected cost of the NCDOL OSH program for federal fiscal year 2012–2013 is $18,073,694. Federal funding provides approximately 30.5 percent
($5,501,500) of this total.
Original 6/2014
Table of Contents
Foreword and Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11v
Special Emphasis Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i1vi
Section 1: Safety and Health Program Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Management Commitment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Safety and Health Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Employee Participation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Recordkeeping and Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
l Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Accident/Incident Investigation Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
l Employee’s Incident Report Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
l Supervisor’s Incident Investigation Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
l Incident Investigation Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Safety and Health Inspection Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
Hazard Prevention and Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
Disciplinary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
Alcohol and Drug Use Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Employee Orientation Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Section 2: Safety and Health Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
Bloodborne Pathogens, Exposure Control Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
l Hepatitis B Vaccine Declination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Compressed Gas Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Confined Space Entry Program (Permit Required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
l Confined Space Entry Permit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
l Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices Program Self-Audit Checklist . .141
Emergency Action Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
Ergonomics Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
Fall Protection Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Fire Prevention Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
l Fire Prevention Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
l Identified Fire Hazards and Responsible Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
l Fire Extinguisher Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
First Aid, CPR and AED Response Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
Fleet Management and Vehicle Safety Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Forklift Safety Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163
l Forklift Inspection Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
Hand and Powered Tools Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Hazard Communication Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .177
Hearing Conservation Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
l Notification of “Quiet Period” Prior to Baseline Hearing Test . . . . . . . . . .185
Hot Work Permit Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
l Hot Work Permit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187
Housekeeping Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Ladder Safety Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190
Lockout/Tagout Program (Control of Hazardous Energy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191
l Types/Locations of Energy-Isolating Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
l LOTO Training Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
iii
Machine Guarding Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .197
l Machines and Machine Guarding Inspection Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Materials Handling and Storage Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
Personal Protective Equipment Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
l PPE Hazard Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Walking and Working Surfaces Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Welding, Cutting and Brazing Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111
Section 3: Training and Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Employee Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
Job Progression Training and Skills Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Periodic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122
Employee Training Roster/Certificate of Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
Management Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .124
Supervisor Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125
Section 4: Reference Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
N.C. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Division . . . . . . .126
Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
Section 5: Facility Inspection Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127
l Comprehensive Safety Inspection Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
l Monthly Inspection Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
iv
Foreword
In North Carolina, the N.C. Department of Labor enforces the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act through
a state plan approved by the U.S. Department of Labor. NCDOL offers many educational programs to the public and
produces publications to help inform people about their rights and responsibilities regarding occupational safety and
health.
When reading this guide, please remember the mission of the N.C. Department of Labor is greater than just regulatory enforcement. An equally important goal is to help citizens find ways to create safe workplaces. Everyone profits
when managers and employees work together for safety. This booklet, like the other educational materials produced by
the N.C. Department of Labor, can help.
Cherie Berry
Commissioner of Labor
Overview
This industry guide is designed to assist employers in the grocery and related products wholesale industry in developing
a comprehensive safety and health program with best practices to be tailored to your own operation. We encourage you to
customize the information in this industry guide as necessary to accomplish this goal. You may also copy any of the material in this guide to be used in your safety and health efforts.
This guide is provided as a best practice and compliance aid. It does not constitute a legal interpretation of OSHA
standards, nor does it replace the need to be familiar with and follow the actual OSHA standards (including any North
Carolina-specific changes.) Though the programs contained in this document are intended to be consistent with
OSHA standards, if an area is considered by the reader to be inconsistent, the OSHA standard should be followed.
Please note that this guide may not include all the programs and policies that may be required by OSHA standards or as a best practice for your specific operation or industry. It may also include more programs than are
needed for your operation.
The N.C. Department of Labor (NCDOL) Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Division’s Consultative Services
Bureau can be contacted for assistance in helping you set up your individual safety and health management program
and with on-site surveys. Feel free to contact them at 1-800-NC-LABOR (1-800-625-2267) or at 919-807-2899. You
may also want to visit their website at http://www.nclabor.com/osha/consult/consult.htm.
For training events, publications, PowerPoint presentations and standard interpretations, please contact the
Education, Training and Technical Assistance (ETTA) Bureau at 919-807-2875 or access their website at
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/etta.htm.
v
Special Emphasis Program (SEP)
The purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of North Carolina is “to ensure so far as possible every
working man and woman in the State of North Carolina safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our
human resources.” The OSH Division’s Five-Year Strategic Plan is designed to promote the achievement of this
purpose through the specific goals and objectives established by the division and its employees.
To reduce injuries, illnesses and fatalities in North Carolina, the OSH Division established a basic strategy of designating specific performance goals affecting specific industry groups and workplace health hazards. By concentrating on
injuries and illnesses and fatalities in these specific areas, the overall rates for days away, restricted or transferred rate
(DART) should be reduced.
The primary SEP groups include:
Special Emphasis Program
Construction
Logging and Arboriculture
Food Manufacturing
Grocery and Related Product
Merchant Wholesalers
Accommodation
Long Term Care
Health Hazards*
Team Leader
Mike Conner
Leighton Dowdle
Rodger Griffin
Grady Bebber
Contact Information
[email protected]
[email protected]
Rodge[email protected]
[email protected]
Brandon Barnhardt
Neesia Hill
John Koneski
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
*Silica, isocyanates, asbestos, hexavalent chromium, lead
To aid employers in each of these industry groups, the Education, Training and Technical Assistance bureau has
developed SEP-specific PowerPoint presentations. These presentations can be downloaded from the NCDOL website
for use by the employer or training may be requested through our outreach services.
For further information regarding SEPs, contact the appropriate team leader of the SEP.
vi
Section 1
Safety and Health Program Management
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Management Commitment
Safety and Health Policy
We place a high value on the safety and health of our employees. We are committed to providing a safe workplace
for all employees and have developed this program for injury prevention to involve management, supervisors and
employees in identifying and eliminating hazards that may develop during our work process.
It is the basic safety and health policy of this company that no task is so important that an employee must violate a
safety and health rule or take a risk of injury or illness to get the job done.
Employees are required to comply with all company safety and health rules and are encouraged to actively participate in identifying ways to make our company a safer place to work.
Supervisors are responsible for the safety and health of their employees and, as a part of their daily duties, must
check the workplace for unsafe conditions, watch employees for unsafe actions and take prompt action to eliminate any
hazards.
Management will do its part by devoting the resources necessary to form a safety and health committee composed
of management and elected employees. We will develop a system for identifying and correcting hazards. We will plan
for foreseeable emergencies. We will provide initial and ongoing training for employees and supervisors and we will
establish a disciplinary policy to ensure that company safety and health policies are followed.
1
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Safety and Health Responsibilities
Manager Responsibilities
l
Ensure that sufficient employee time, supervisor support and funds are budgeted for equipment, training and carrying out the safety and health program.
l
Evaluate supervisors each year to make sure they carry out their responsibilities as described in this program.
l
Ensure that incidents are fully investigated and corrective action is taken to prevent the hazardous conditions or
behaviors from happening again.
l
Ensure that a record of injuries and illnesses is maintained and posted as described in this program.
l
Set a good example by following established safety and health rules and attending required training.
l
Report unsafe practices or conditions to the supervisor of the area where the hazard was observed.
Supervisor Responsibilities
l
Ensure that each employee has received initial orientation before beginning work.
l
Ensure that each employee is competent or has received training on safe operation of equipment or tasks before
starting work.
l
Ensure that each employee receives required personal protective equipment (PPE) before starting work on a
project requiring PPE.
l
Perform a daily safety check of the work area. Promptly correct any hazards you find.
l
Observe the employees you supervise while they are working. Promptly correct any unsafe behavior. Provide
additional training and take corrective action as necessary.
l
Document employee evaluations.
l
Set a good example for employees by following the safety and health rules and attending required training.
l
Investigate all incidents in your area and report findings to management.
l
Talk to management about changes to work practices or equipment that will improve employee safety and health.
Employee Responsibilities
l
Follow the safety and health rules established by your company. Report unsafe conditions or actions to your
supervisor or safety and health committee representative promptly.
l
Report all work-related injuries and illnesses to your supervisor promptly, regardless of how minor they may
seem.
l
Report all near miss incidents to your supervisor promptly.
l
Always use personal protective equipment that is in good working condition when it is required.
l
Do not remove or bypass any safety device or safeguard provided for your protection.
l
Encourage your co-workers to use safe work practices on the job.
l
Make suggestions to your supervisor, safety and health committee representative, or management about changes
that will improve employee safety and health.
2
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Employee Participation
Note: While safety and health committees are not required by law (with the exception of employers covered by N.C.
Gen. Stat. 95-251), the following can be used as a statement when the company has a voluntary safety and health committee and is an example of how the committee members may be selected and function within the company. Alternative
methods may be used as well.
Safety and Health Committees and Meetings
Employers can form safety and health committees to help employees and management work together to identify
safety and health problems, develop solutions, review incident reports, and evaluate the effectiveness of the safety and
health program. The committee should be made up of management-designated representatives and employee-elected
representatives from all areas within the company.
Employees from each operational unit, division or area may volunteer or be nominated from among themselves to be
a representative on the committee. If there is only one volunteer or nomination, the employees may approve the person
by voice vote at a short meeting called for that purpose. If there is more than one volunteer or nomination, a secret
paper ballot may be used to elect the representative.
Elected representatives will serve for (insert number of years) year(s) before being re-elected or replaced. If there is
a vacancy then an election will be held before the next scheduled meeting to fill the balance of the term. (It is recommended that members serve two years, with half of the members replaced after the first year when the initial committee
is formed, so that there are carry-over members on the committee at all times).
In addition to the employee-elected representatives, management should designate no more than three representatives but a minimum of one who will serve until replaced by management. Management representation should not
outnumber employee representation. If the company employs a medical professional on staff, it is recommended that
this individual serve on the safety and health committee as well but at least an individual who manages the workers’
compensation, injury and illness, and first aid logs, such as the company safety and health manager.
A chairperson should be selected by a majority vote by the committee members each year. If there is a vacancy, the
same method should be used to select a replacement.
The duties of safety and health committee members include:
l
Conducting a monthly self-inspection of the area they represent.
l
Communicating with the employees they represent on safety and health issues.
l
Encouraging safe work practices among co-workers.
l
Reviewing the injury, illness and first aid logs for trends and conducting a separate investigation of any incident
(if determined appropriate).
l
Providing any recommendations to management for consideration.
The safety and health committee should meet at least (insert frequency). Each area committee member should bring
information from the monthly inspections of their areas and any concerns from the employees in the area they represent. Using this information, the committee can help identify safety and health problems, develop solutions, review incident reports, provide training, and evaluate the effectiveness of the safety and health program.
A committee member will be designated to keep minutes. A copy of the minutes will be posted in a place where all
affected employees have access to them. The company should archive meeting minutes for a specified period of time
such as one year for follow-up/review purposes. (The company may choose to post minutes on employee bulletin
boards, on an intranet, etc. Additionally, the company may choose to archive such records electronically.)
3
General Employee Safety Meetings
All employees are required to attend a monthly safety and health meeting. This meeting will help identify safety and
health problems, develop solutions, provide training, and evaluate the effectiveness of the safety and health program.
An employee will be designated each month to keep the minutes. A copy of the minutes will be posted in a place
where all affected employees have access to them. The company should archive meeting minutes for a specified period
of time such as one year for follow-up/review purposes. (The company may choose to post minutes on employee bulletin boards, on an intranet, etc. Additionally, the company may choose to archive such records electronically).
4
Note: The following section contains workers’ compensation procedures, and OSHA recordkeeping requirements. It
also contaains best practices that can be modified or deleted to the policy as deemed appropriate. Refer to the NCIC
website http://www.ic.nc.gov/ for information on workers’ compensation.
Recordkeeping and Reporting
(Ref. 29 CFR 1904, 29 CFR 1910.1020)
Injuries and Illnesses Reporting
Employees are required to report any injury or work-related illness to their immediate supervisor regardless of how
serious. Minor injuries such as cuts and scrapes will be entered on the first aid log. The employee will use an “Employee’s Incident Report” form (or Workers’ Compensation Form 18) to report more serious/compensable injuries.
The supervisor will:
l
Investigate all injuries and illnesses in their work area, including serious first-aid cases and near miss incidents.
Complete an “Incident Investigation Report” form and “Supervisor’s Incident Investigation” form immediately
following the incident.
l
Provide all incident investigation report forms to the safety and health manager/company medical professional or
HR/personnel office within three days of the incident.
The safety and health manager/company medical professional/HR or personnel manager will:
l
Determine from the Employee’s Incident Report form, Incident Investigation Report form and any claim form
associated with the incident whether it must be recorded on the OSHA 300 Injury and Illness Log and Summary
according to the instructions for that form. (The N.C. Industrial Commission Form 19 may be used in lieu of
OSHA Form 301.)
l
Enter any recordable incident within seven calendar days after becoming aware of the injury/illness/fatality.
l
If the injury is not recorded on the OSHA log, add it to the first aid log, which is used to record non-OSHA
recordable injuries and near misses.
l
The employer may need to fill out and file a Workers’ Compensation Form 19, “Employer’s Report of Employee’s
Injury,” with the Industrial Commission within five days of learning of an injury or allegation. If a Form 19 is
filed with the Industrial Commission, the employer must provide a copy of the Form 19 to the employee, together
with a blank Form 18, “Notice of Accident to Employer and Claim of Employee,” for use by the employee.
(http://www.ic.nc.gov/)
A signed copy of the OSHA log summary (OSHA Form 300A) for the previous year must be posted on the safety
bulletin board from Feb. 1 through April 30. The log must be kept on file for at least five years. Any employee can view
an OSHA log upon request at any time during the year.
Employee Access to Medical and Exposure Records
Whenever an employee or designated representative requests access to a record, we must ensure that access is provided in a reasonable time, place, and manner. If we cannot reasonably provide access to the record within 15 working
days, we will apprise the employee or designated representative requesting the record of the reason for the delay and
the earliest date when the record can be made available.
The medical record for each employee will be preserved and maintained for at least the duration of employment plus
30 years.
First aid records (not including medical histories) of one-time treatment and subsequent observation of minor
scratches, cuts, burns, splinters, and the like that do not involve medical treatment, loss of consciousness, restriction of
work or motion, or transfer to another job, if made on-site by a nonphysician and if maintained separately from the employer’s medical program and its records and the medical records of employees who have worked for less than one year
for the employer need not be retained beyond the term of employment if they are provided to the employee upon the
termination of employment.
5
Exposure Records
Background data to environmental (workplace) monitoring or measuring, such as laboratory reports and worksheets, need only be retained for one year so long as the sampling results, the collection methodology (sampling plan),
a description of the analytical and mathematical methods used, and a summary of other background data relevant to
interpretation of the results obtained are retained for at least 30 years.
Safety data sheets and records concerning the identity of a substance or agent need not be retained for any specified
period as long as some record of the identity (chemical name if known) of the substance or agent, where it was used,
and when it was used is retained for at least 30 years.
Biological monitoring results designated as exposure records by specific occupational safety and health standards
must be preserved and maintained as required by the specific standard.
Analyses using exposure or medical records must be preserved and maintained for at least 30 years.
Training Records
Some standards require training records to be maintained for three years and some do not require training records.
Records of employees who have worked for less than one year need not be retained after employment, but we are
required to provide these records to the employee upon termination of employment. Our policy is to maintain training
records for (insert time frame).
6
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Accident/Incident Investigation Policy
Accident/Incident Investigation Procedures
If an employee dies while working or within 30 days of the initial accident/incident causing an injury or illness, or
when three or more employees are admitted to the hospital as a result of a work-related accident/incident, the company
must contact the N.C. Department of Labor’s OSH Division within eight hours of becoming aware of the accident/incident. The toll-free notification number is 1-800-NC-LABOR (1-800-625-2267).
Whenever there is an incident that results in death or serious injuries or illnesses, a preliminary investigation will be
conducted by an accident investigation team made up of the immediate supervisor of the injured person(s), a person
designated by management, an employee representative of the safety and health committee, and any others whose expertise would help in the investigation.
The accident investigation team will take written statements from witnesses and photograph the incident scene and
equipment involved. The team will also document, as soon as possible after the incident, the condition of equipment
and any anything else in the work area that may be relevant. The team will complete a written incident investigation
report. The report will include a sequence of events leading up to the incident, conclusions about the incident and any
recommendations to prevent a similar incident in the future. This report will be given to (insert appropriate name/job
title) for corrective action. The report will be reviewed by the safety and health committee at its next regularly scheduled meeting.
When a supervisor becomes aware of an employee injury where the injury was not serious enough to warrant a team
investigation as described above, the supervisor will write an incident investigation report to accompany the employee’s report and forward them to (insert appropriate name/job title).
In addition, whenever there is an incident that did not result in an injury to an employee (a near miss), the supervisor
will investigate the incident. The incident investigation report form will be filled out to investigate the near miss and to
establish any corrective action as applicable. The form will be clearly marked to indicate that it was a near miss and
that no actual injury occurred. The report will be forwarded to (insert appropriate name/job title) to record on the incident log and for further action.
7
Employee’s Incident Report Form
Instructions: Employees will use this form to report all work-related injuries, illnesses or “near miss”
events (which could have caused an injury or illness)—no matter how minor. This helps to identify and
correct hazards before they cause serious injuries. This form will be completed by employees as soon as
possible and given to a supervisor for further action. (NCIC Form 18 may be used in place of this one.)
I am reporting a work related:
‰ Injury
‰ Illness
‰ Near miss
Name:
Job Title:
Supervisor:
Have you told your supervisor about this injury/near miss?
Date of injury/illness/near miss:
‰ Yes
‰ No
Time of injury/illness/near miss:
Names of witnesses (if any):
Where exactly did it happen?
What were you doing at the time?
Describe step by step what led up to the injury/illness/near miss (continue on the back if necessary):
What could have been done to prevent this injury/illness/near miss?
What parts of your body were injured? If a near miss, how could you have been hurt?
Did you see a doctor about this injury/illness?
If yes, whom did you see?
‰ Yes
‰ No
Doctor’s phone number:
Date:
Time:
Has this part of your body been injured before?
If yes, when?
Supervisor:
Employee’s signature:
Date:
‰ Yes
8
‰ No
Supervisor’s Incident Investigation Form
Name of Injured Person
Date of Birth
Address
City
Male
Female
______________________________________________________________
______________
Telephone Number ___________________
______________________________________________________________
______________
State
___________ Zip _____________
What part of the body was injured? Describe in detail.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
What was the nature of the injury? Describe in detail.
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Describe fully how the accident happened. What was employee doing prior to the event? What equipment
and tools were being used?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Names of all witnesses:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Date of Event
______________
Time of Event
___________
a.m.
p.m.
Exact location of event:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
What caused the event?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Were safety regulations in place and used? If not, what was wrong?
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
Employee went to doctor/hospital?
Doctor’s Name:
Hospital’s Name:
Recommended preventive action to take in the future to prevent reoccurrence:
____________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________
________________________________________
Supervisor’s Signature
Date
9
Incident Investigation Report
Instructions: Complete this form as soon as possible after any incident that an employee reports or which
results in serious injury or illness and to investigate a minor injury or near miss that could have resulted in
a serious injury or illness.
This is a report of :
Date of incident:
‰ Death
‰ Lost Time
‰ Dr. Visit Only
‰ First Aid Only
‰ Near Miss
This report is made by: ‰ Employee ‰ Supervisor ‰ Team
‰ Other_________
Step 1: Injured employee (complete this part for each injured employee)
Name:
Sex: ‰ Male ‰ Female
Age:
Department:
Job title at time of incident:
Part of body affected: (shade all
that apply)
Nature of injury: (most serious one):
‰ Abrasion, scrapes
‰ Amputation
‰ Broken bone
‰ Bruise
‰ Burn (heat)
‰ Burn (chemical)
‰ Concussion (to the head)
‰ Crushing Injury
‰ Cut, laceration, puncture
‰ Hernia
‰ Illness
‰ Sprain, strain
‰ Damage to a body system:
‰ Other ___________
Step 2: Describe the incident
Exact location of the incident:
This employee works:
‰ Regular full time
‰ Regular part time
‰ Seasonal
‰ Temporary
Months with this company:
Months doing this job:
Exact time:
What part of employee’s workday? ‰ Entering or leaving work ‰ Doing normal work activities
‰ During meal period ‰ During break ‰ Working overtime ‰ Other___________________
Names of witnesses (if any):
10
Attachments
Written witness statements:
Photographs:
Maps/drawings:
What personal protective equipment was being used (if any)?
Describe, step-by-step the events that led up to the injury. Include names of any machines, parts, objects,
tools, materials and other important details. Attach separate sheets if necessary.
Step 3: Why did the incident happen?
Unsafe workplace conditions: (Check all that apply)
‰ Inadequate guard
‰ Unguarded hazard
‰ Defective safety device
‰ Defective tool or equipment
‰ Hazardous workstation layout
‰ Unsafe lighting
‰ Unsafe ventilation
‰ Lack of needed personal protective equipment
‰ Lack of appropriate equipment/tools
‰ Unsafe clothing
‰ No training or insufficient training
‰ Other:__________________________________
Unsafe acts by people: (Check all that apply)
‰ Operating without permission
‰ Operating at unsafe speed
‰ Servicing equipment that has power to it
‰ Making a safety device inoperative
‰ Using defective equipment
‰ Using equipment in an unapproved way
‰ Unsafe lifting
‰ Taking an unsafe position or posture
‰ Distraction, teasing, horseplay
‰ Failure to wear personal protective equipment
‰ Failure to use the available equipment/tools
‰ Other:_______________________________
Why did the unsafe conditions exist?
Why did the unsafe acts occur?
Is there a reward (such as “the job can be done more quickly” or “the product is less likely to be damaged”)
that may have encouraged the unsafe conditions or acts? ‰ Yes ‰ No If yes, describe:
Were the unsafe acts or conditions reported prior to the incident?
Have there been similar incidents or near misses prior to this one?
11
‰ Yes ‰ No
‰ Yes ‰ No
Step 4: How can future incidents be prevented?
What changes do you suggest to prevent this incident/near miss from happening again?
‰ Stop this activity ‰ Guard the hazard ‰ Train the employee(s) ‰ Train the supervisor(s)
‰ Redesign task steps ‰ Redesign workstation ‰ Write a new policy/rule ‰ Enforce existing policy
‰ Routinely inspect for the hazard ‰ Personal protective equipment ‰ Other: __________________
What should be (or has been) done to carry out the suggestion(s) checked above? Attach separate sheets if
necessary.
Step 5: Who completed and reviewed this form? (Please Print)
Written by:
Title:
Department:
Date:
Names of investigation team members:
Does team agree with corrective action recommended in step 4?
Yes
No
(Step 6 should be completed using investigation team’s final recommendations)
Reviewed by:
Title:
Date:
12
N/A
Step 6: Corrective Action and Follow-up
Written by:
Department:
Title:
Date:
List corrective action to be implemented, date completed and responsible parties.
1.
2.
3.
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________
Date of follow-up:
Conducted by:
13
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Safety and Health Inspection Procedures
We are committed to aggressively identifying hazardous conditions and practices that are likely to result in injury or
illness to employees. We will take prompt action to eliminate any hazards we find. In addition to reviewing injury
records and investigating incidents for their causes, management and the safety committee will regularly check the
workplace for hazards as described below.
l
Annual Site Survey—Once a year, an inspection team made up of members of the safety and health committee
will conduct a wall-to-wall walk-through inspection of the entire worksite. They will write down any safety hazards or potential hazards they find. The results of this inspection will be used to eliminate or control obvious hazards, target specific work areas for more intensive investigation, assist in revising the checklists used during
regular monthly safety inspections, and as part of the annual review of the effectiveness of the accident prevention
program.
l
Periodic Change Survey—A supervisor or a team will be assigned to look at any changes we make to identify
safety issues. Changes include new equipment, changes to production processes or changes to the building structure. The team will be made up of maintenance, production and safety committee representatives. It will examine
the changed conditions and makes recommendations to eliminate or control any hazards that were or may be created as a result of the change.
l
Monthly Safety Inspection—Each month, the safety and health committee representatives will inspect their areas
for hazards using the standard safety and health inspection checklist. They will talk to co-workers about their
safety and health concerns. The committee representatives will report any hazards or concerns to the safety and
health committee at the next scheduled meeting for consideration. The results of the area inspection and any action taken will be posted in the affected area. Safety and health committee representatives should inspect each
other’s area.
14
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Hazard Prevention and Control
Eliminating Workplace Hazards
We are committed to eliminating or controlling workplace hazards that could cause injury or illness to our employees. We will meet the requirements of OSHA standards where there are specific rules about a hazard or potential hazard
in our workplace. Whenever possible, we will design our facilities and equipment to eliminate employee exposure to
hazards. Where these engineering controls are not possible, we will write work practices (administrative controls) that
effectively prevent employee exposure to the hazard. When the above methods of control are not possible or are not
fully effective, we will require employees to use personal protective equipment (PPE) such as safety glasses, hearing
protection and foot protection.
Basic Safety and Health Rules
Note: The company should establish a set of basic safety and health rules; however, the company should not address
requirements for specific standards in this section. They should be addressed as part of/with the specific written program requirements of the standard.
The following basic safety and health rules have been established to help make the company a safe, healthy and efficient place to work. These rules are in addition to safety and health practices that must be followed when doing particular
jobs or operating certain equipment. Those rules are listed in the safety hazard work practices and health hazard work
practices sections of this manual. Failure to comply with any safety or health rules may result in disciplinary action.
The following are examples of basic safety and health rules. The company should base these rules on the hazards in
its work environment.
l
Never do anything that is unsafe in order to get the job done. If a job is unsafe, report it to your supervisor or
safety committee representative. We will find a safer way to do that job.
l
Do not remove or disable any safety device! Keep guards in place at all times on operating machinery.
l
Never operate a piece of equipment unless you have been trained and are authorized.
l
Use your personal protective equipment whenever it is required.
l
Obey all safety warning signs.
l
Loose clothing, jewelry and hair longer than shoulder length will not be worn around moving machinery.
l
Working under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs and using them at work are prohibited.
l
Do not bring firearms or explosives onto company property (including personal vehicles in company-owned parking lots).
l
Smoking is not permitted on company grounds (including in personal vehicles in company-owned parking lots
OR if smoking is permitted, it is only permitted outside the building away from any entry or ventilation intake,
except that smoking is not permitted in any areas where flammable liquid are dispensed, mixed, used or stored).
l
Horseplay, running and fighting are prohibited.
l
Report spills immediately so that they can be cleaned up promptly by appropriately trained employees.
l
Replace all tools and supplies after use.
l
Do not allow materials (especially combustible materials) to accumulate where they will become a tripping or fire
hazard. Keep lids on trashcans at all times.
l
Do not block any fire extinguisher, fire exit or exit pathway with materials or equipment.
15
Note: The following section is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Disciplinary Policy
The company has established a progressive disciplinary program for those acts or practices not considered immediately dangerous to life or health. Unsafe acts will not be tolerated. Each employee has an individual responsibility to
work safely. We have established a progressive disciplinary program for those acts or practices not considered immediately dangerous to life or health.
Note: The following are examples of disciplinary actions. Employers may wish to establish these policies as part of
their general personnel policies and should seek legal advice prior to implementing them in the workplace.
First Instance
Warning, notation in employee file and instruction on proper actions.
Second Instance Written reprimand and instruction on proper actions.
Third Instance
One- to five-day suspension, written reprimand, and instruction on proper actions.
Fourth Instance Termination of employment.
An employee may be subject to immediate termination when a safety or health violation places the employee or coworkers at risk of permanent disability or death. These include but are not limited to:
l
Failure to follow fall protection requirements.
l
Failure to wear required respiratory protection.
l
Failure to follow the substance abuse policy.
l
Failure to wear a protective vest when working on or near a city street.
l
Possession of firearms, explosives or dangerous weapons.
l
Violation of project security rules or procedures.
l
Fighting, horseplay, practical joking or gambling.
l
Entering a confined space without following procedures.
l
Unsafe or reckless operation of motorized vehicles or equipment.
l
Failure to follow lockout/tagout procedures.
l
Failure to follow hot work permit procedures.
16
Note: The following section is a best practice. It is an example of a drug testing and alcohol and drug use policy. Employers may wish to establish these policies as part of their general personnel policies and should seek legal advice prior
to implementing them in the workplace.
Alcohol and Drug Use Policy
(Reference N.C. Gen. Stat. Chapter 90, Article 5)
We have a vital interest in maintaining safe, healthy and efficient working conditions for our employees. Therefore,
the use of substances that impair an employee’s ability to perform the job safely is not allowed. The use of these substances (except legally prescribed drugs reported to the supervisor/employer) during duty hours is prohibited, and their
use may result in disciplinary action. Duty hours consist of all working hours, including break periods and on-call periods, whether on or off company premises.
The consumption of alcohol or illegal drugs while performing company business or while in a company facility or
vehicle is prohibited and will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment. Additionally,
employees must report to their supervisor the use of legally prescribed drugs (such as narcotics) that may affect their
ability to perform any part of their job safely so that alternate assignments/duties may be considered when necessary.
Failure to report this type of drug use may also result in disciplinary action under certain circumstances.
Drug testing will be performed after all accidents that occur on company time or property or in or on a company
owned vehicle or other equipment. Additionally, random drug testing may be performed if employees are suspected of
being under the influence of alcohol or any illegal drug and when they appear to be impaired by any substance, including unreported use of legally prescribed medications, while at work. Refusal to submit to a drug test after an
accident/incident may result in termination of employment.
The Controlled Substance Examination Act sets procedural standards that employers must follow when conducting
drug testing of applicants and employees. The act does not protect employees from adverse actions taken by employers
as a result of test results. A packet containing the rules, forms and frequently asked questions may be downloaded at
http://www.nclabor.com/wh/Controlled_Substance_Examination_Regulation_Act_Packet.pdf.
17
Employee Orientation Checklist
(Example)
EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION CHECKLIST
Areas to be
Covered
Company
Tour
Department
EHS Training
Completed
Yes No
Description
Work areas and facility tour. Introductions.
Hands-on training and safe work practices.
Safe work practices (e.g.: company, department, job-specific)
l Emergency procedures (e.g.: exits, alarms, fire extinguishers, contact list, shelters)
l Hazardous areas and materials
l Equipment and tools - safe work practices and use (e.g.: ladders, power tools)
l Break and lunch areas (food only areas)
l Safety Data Sheets location
l Accident reporting and investigation procedures
l Personal protective equipment (e.g.; use, location, care, repair)
l Security measures (e.g.: ID badges, reporting procedures)
l Employee rights and responsibilities under the aSH Act
l Company safety responsibilities (e.g.; providing safe work place)
l Department safety responsibilities (e.g.: correcting hazards)
l Employee safety responsibilities (e.g.: reporting unsafe conditions)
l Disciplinary policy
l Drug and alcohol abuse policy
l Fleet safety policy
l Inspections
l Housekeeping policy
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
EHS Training
OSHA required safety, environmental, and health training.
Emergency Action Plan
l Hazard Communication Program
l Personal Protective Equipment
l Fire Prevention Plan
l Electrical safety related work practices
l Confined space program
l Bloodborne Pathogens
l
l
l
l
Employee Name:
Date:
Supervisor's Signature:
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Section 2
Safety and Health Programs
Note: The following pages contain example safety and health programs and policies that may be applicable to your
company. It is the responsibility of the company to determine whether these programs are mandatory in your work environment based on the scope and application of the referenced standard. Every effort has been made to include the content required by the NCDOL OSH Division standards. Additionally, other good practices have been included that may
or may not apply to your company. Please add or delete content to these programs as deemed necessary.
While most standards do not require a program administrator or coordinator, it is a good practice to have an employee
who is knowledgeable and appropriately trained assigned to administer and review these programs on a continuing
basis to ensure their effectiveness in the workplace. Individuals such as human resource professionals, risk managers,
safety managers, industrial hygienists and medical professionals are the most appropriate to administer these programs. Additionally, safety and health committees and other suitably trained and experienced employees may also help
administer and review these programs.
19
Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. The standard should
be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Bloodborne Pathogens, Exposure Control Plan
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.1030)
Purpose
The purpose of this exposure control plan is to:
l
Eliminate or minimize employee occupational exposure to blood and/or certain other body fluids.
l
Comply with the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1030.
Exposure Determination
OSHA requires a listing of job classifications in which employees have occupational exposure. Since not all the employees in these categories would be expected to incur exposure to blood or other potential infectious material (OPIM),
tasks or procedures that would cause these employees to have occupational exposure must also be listed to understand
clearly which employees in these categories are considered to have occupational exposure. The job classifications and
associated tasks for these categories are as follows:
Job Classification
Task/Procedure
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
_____________________________________________
Implementation Schedule and Methodology
OSHA requires that this plan include a schedule and method of implementation for the various requirements of the
standard. The following complies with this requirement.
Compliance Methods
Universal precautions will be observed to prevent contact with blood or OPIM. All blood or OPIM will be considered infectious, regardless of the perceived status of the source individual. Engineering and work practice controls will
be utilized to eliminate or minimize exposure to employees at this facility. Where occupational exposure remains after
institution of these controls, personal protective equipment will also be utilized.
Handwashing facilities will be made available to employees who incur exposure to blood or OPIM. When handwashing facilities are not feasible, either an antiseptic cleanser in conjunction with clean cloth/paper towels or antiseptic towelettes will be provided. When using these alternatives, the employees must wash their hands with soap and
running water as soon as feasible.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
(Insert job title of person responsible) is responsible for ensuring that the following provisions are met.
All PPE used will be provided without cost to the employee. PPE will be chosen based on the anticipated exposure
to blood or OPIM. The PPE will be considered appropriate only if it does not permit blood or OPIM to pass through or
reach the employee’s clothing, skin, eyes, mouth or other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for
the duration of time while the protective equipment will be used.
20
PPE Cleaning, Laundering and Disposal
All PPE will be cleaned, laundered or disposed of by the company at no cost to employees. All repairs and replacements will be provided by the company at no cost to employees.
Gloves
Gloves will be worn where it is reasonably anticipated that employees will have hand contact with blood, OPIM,
non-intact skin and mucous membranes; when performing vascular access procedures; and when handling or touching
contaminated items or surfaces.
Disposable gloves are not to be washed or decontaminated for reuse and are to be replaced as soon as practical when
they become contaminated or if they are torn, punctured or their ability to function as a barrier is compromised. Utility
gloves may be decontaminated for reuse, provided that the integrity of the glove is not compromised. Utility gloves will
be discarded if they are cracked, peeling, torn, punctured or show other signs of deterioration or when their ability to
function as a barrier is compromised.
Eye and Face Protection
Masks, in combination with eye protection devices such as goggles or glasses with solid side shields, or chin length
side face shields must be worn whenever splashes, spray, splatter or droplets of blood or OPIM may be generated and
eye, nose or mouth contamination can be reasonably anticipated. The following situations require such protection:
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Housekeeping
Note: A cleaning and decontamination schedule must be developed based on the type of contamination and the surfaces to be decontaminated. This schedule should include the frequency with which decontamination must be accomplished, such as immediately after a blood or body fluid release, once per shift, or after each procedure causing
contamination of materials or surfaces.
Blood or OPIM release or spills must be reported to the supervisor or appropriately trained cleaning staff and surfaces must be decontaminated immediately or per the pre-established cleaning schedule. Decontamination may be accomplished by using sodium hypochlorite mixed with water in a 1:10 to 1:100 concentration. This must be mixed daily
or immediately prior to use. Additionally other appropriate disinfectants may be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions as follows: (insert list of predetermined appropriately selected EPA registered tuberculocidal disinfectants)
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Sharps and Other Regulated Waste
Regulated waste, including sharps, must be placed in containers that are closeable and constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage. Sharps containers must be stored upright during use and may not be opened by employees.
All sharps and regulated waste containers must be labeled or color-coded and closed prior to removal to prevent
spillage or protrusion of contents during handling, storage, transport or shipping.
Note: Disposal of all regulated waste must be in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations.
21
Laundry Procedures
Laundry contaminated with blood or OPIM will be handled as little as possible. Such laundry will be placed in appropriately marked bags (biohazard labeled or color-coded red) at the location where it was used. The laundry will not
be sorted or rinsed in the area of use.
Note: If the facility ships contaminated laundry offsite to a laundry that does not utilize universal precautions in the
handling of all laundry, the contaminated laundry must be placed in bags or containers that are labeled or color-coded.
Hepatitis B Vaccine and Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up
We make available the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series to all employees who have occupational exposure
and post-exposure follow-up to employees who have had an exposure incident.
(Insert job title of person responsible) will ensure that all medical evaluations and procedures including the hepatitis
B vaccine and vaccination series and post-exposure follow-up including prophylaxis are:
l
Made available at no cost to the employee.
l
Made available at a reasonable time and place.
l
Performed by, or under the supervision of, a licensed physician or other licensed healthcare professional
(PLHCP).
l
Provided according to the recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service.
Hepatitis B vaccination will be made available after the employee has received training in occupational exposure and
within 10 working days of initial assignment to all employees who have occupational exposure unless: the employee
has previously received the complete hepatitis B vaccination series; antibody testing has revealed that the employee is
immune; or the vaccine is contraindicated for medical reasons.
For employees who complete the hepatitis B vaccination series, antibody testing will be made available at no cost to
the employee one to two months after completion of the series, as recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service.
Employees who decline the hepatitis B vaccination will sign the OSHA required declination form indicating their refusal (Refer to hepatitis B declination at the end of program). Any employee who initially declines hepatitis B vaccination, but later decides to accept vaccination while still covered by the standard, will be provided the vaccination series
as described above.
If at a future date the U.S. Public Health Service recommends a routine booster dose of hepatitis B vaccine, such
booster doses will be made available at no cost to the employee.
Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follow-up
All exposure incidents will be reported, investigated, and documented. When an employee incurs an exposure incident, it will be reported to (Insert job title of person responsible). Following a report of an exposure incident, the exposed employee will immediately receive a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up, including at least the
following elements:
l
Documentation of the route of exposure, and the circumstances under which the exposure incident occurred. If the
incident involves percutaneous injury from a contaminated sharp, appropriate information should be entered in the
sharps injury log.
l
Identification and documentation of the source individual, unless it can be established that identification is infeasible or prohibited by state or local law. The source individual’s blood will be tested as soon as feasible, and after
consent is obtained, to determine HBV and HIV infectivity. If consent is not obtained, (Insert job title of person
responsible) will establish that legally required consent cannot be obtained. When the source individual’s consent
is not required by law, the blood (if available) will be tested and the results documented.
l
Results of the source individual’s testing will be made available to the exposed employee, and the employee will
be informed of applicable laws and regulations concerning disclosure of the identity and infectious status of the
source individual.
22
Collection and testing of blood for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serological
status will comply with the following:
l
The exposed employee’s blood will be collected as soon as feasible and tested after consent is obtained.
l
The employee will be offered the option of having his or her blood collected for testing of the employee’s HIV
serological status. The blood sample will be preserved for up to 90 days to allow the employee to decide if the
blood should be tested for HIV status.
Any employee who incurs an exposure incident will be offered post-exposure evaluation and follow-up in accordance with the OSHA standard. All post-exposure follow-up will be provided by (Insert first aid clinic/doctor’s
office/urgent care/emergency room information).
Information Provided to the Health Care Professional
(Insert job title of person responsible) will ensure that the health care professional (HCP) responsible for the employee’s hepatitis B vaccination is provided with a copy of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR
1910.1030).
(Insert job title of person responsible) will ensure that the HCP who evaluates an employee following an exposure
incident is provided with the following:
l
A copy of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.
l
A description of the exposed employee’s duties as they relate to the exposure incident.
l
Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and circumstances under which exposure occurred.
l
Results of the source individual’s blood testing.
l
All medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the employee, including vaccination status.
Health Care Professional’s Written Opinion
(Insert job title of person responsible) will obtain and provide the employee with a copy of the evaluating HCP’s
written opinion within 15 days of completion of the evaluation. For hepatitis B vaccination, the HCP’s written opinion
will be limited to whether the vaccination is indicated for an employee and whether the employee has received such
vaccination.
For post-exposure follow-up, the HCP’s written opinion will be limited to the following:
l
A statement that the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation.
l
A statement that the employee has been told about any medical conditions resulting from exposure to blood or
OPIM which may require further evaluation or treatment.
Note: The doctor must be informed that all other findings or diagnoses unrelated to the bloodborne pathogens exposure incident must remain confidential and must not be included in the written report from the doctor to the company.
Labels and Signs
(Insert job title of person responsible) will ensure that biohazard labels are affixed to containers of regulated waste,
refrigerators and freezers containing blood or OPIM and other containers used to store, transport or ship blood or
OPIM. The universal biohazard symbol will be used. Labels will be fluorescent orange or orange-red and will be affixed as close as feasible to the container by string, wire, adhesive, or other method that prevents loss or unintentional
removal. Red bags or containers may be substituted for labels.
Information and Training
(Insert job title of person responsible) will ensure that training is provided at the time of initial assignment to tasks
where occupational exposure may occur, and that training is repeated within 12 months of the previous training. Training will be tailored to the education and language level of the employee, and offered during the normal work shift.
23
Recordkeeping
Medical Records: (Insert job title of person responsible) is responsible for maintaining medical records as indicated
below. These records are confidential and must be maintained for the duration of employment plus 30 years.
Training Records: (Insert job title of person responsible) is responsible for maintaining BBP training records. These
records will be maintained for three years from the date of training.
24
Note: The declination form must include this exact wording with no additions or deletions. However, the information
may be put on employer’s letterhead or other company form.
Hepatitis B Vaccine Declination
I understand that due to my occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials I may be at risk of
acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. I have been given the opportunity to be vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine, at no charge to myself. However, I decline hepatitis B vaccination at this time. I understand that by declining this
vaccine, I continue to be at risk of acquiring hepatitis B, a serious disease. If in the future I continue to have occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials and I want to be vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine, I
can receive the vaccination series at no charge to me.
______________________________________________
Employee’s name (print)
______________________________________________
Employee’s signature
______________________________________________
Date
25
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements
are being met.
Compressed Gas Cylinders Policy
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.101)
Safe Work Practices
l
Cylinders should be stored in upright positions and immobilized by chains or other means to prevent them from
being knocked over.
l
Cylinders should be stored away from highly flammable substances such as oil, gasoline or waste.
l
Cylinders should be stored away from electrical connections, gas flames or other sources of ignition, and substances such as flammable solvents and combustible waste material.
l
Flammable gases should be separated from oxidizing gases in storage areas.
l
Oxygen and fuel gas cylinders should be separated by a minimum of 20 feet when in storage.
l
Storage rooms for cylinders should be kept dry, cool and well ventilated.
l
Cylinders should be stored away from incompatibles, excessive heat, continuous dampness, salt or other corrosive
chemicals, and any areas that may subject them to damage.
l
Storage areas should be permanently posted with the names of the gases stored in the cylinders.
l
All compressed gas cylinders should have their contents and precautionary labeling clearly marked on their exteriors.
l
Compressed gas cylinder valve covers should be in place when cylinders are not in use.
l
All compressed gas cylinders should be stored so they do not interfere with exit paths.
l
All compressed gas cylinders should be subjected to periodic hydrostatic testing and interior inspection.
l
All compressed gas cylinders should have a safety pressure relief valve.
l
Cylinders should always be maintained at temperatures below 125ºF.
l
The safety relief devices in the valve or on the cylinder should be kept free from any indication of tampering.
l
Repair or alteration to the cylinder, valve or safety relief devices is prohibited. All alterations and repairs to the
cylinder and valve must be made by the compressed gas vendor. Modification of safety relief devices beyond the
tank or regulator should only be made by a competent person appointed by management.
l
Painting cylinders without authorization is prohibited.
l
Charged and full cylinders should be labeled and stored away from empty cylinders.
l
The bottom of the cylinder should be protected from the ground to prevent rusting.
l
All compressed gas cylinders should be regularly inspected for corrosion, pitting, cuts, gouges, digs, bulges, neck
defects and general distortion.
l
Cylinder valves should be kept closed at all times, except when the valve is in use.
l
Compressed gas cylinders should be moved, even short distances, by a suitable hand truck.
l
Using wrenches or other tools for opening and closing valves is prohibited.
l
Suitable pressure-regulating devices should be kept in use whenever the gas is emitted to systems with pressurerated limitations lower than the cylinder pressure.
26
l
All compressed gas cylinder connections such as pressure regulators, manifolds, hoses, gauges, and relief valves
should be checked for integrity and tightness.
l
An approved leak-detection liquid should be used to detect flammable gas leaks.
l
Procedures should be established for when a compressed gas cylinder leak cannot be remedied by simply tightening the valve. The procedures should include the following:
l Attach tag to the cylinder stating it is unserviceable.
l Remove cylinder to a well ventilated out-of-doors location.
l If the gas is flammable or toxic, place an appropriate sign at the cylinder warning of these hazards.
l Notify the gas supplier and follow its instructions as to the return of the cylinder.
l
Employees should be prohibited from using compressed gases (air) to clean clothing or work surfaces.
l
Compressed gases should only be handled by experienced and properly trained persons.
27
Note: This sample program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced OSHA standard. This program may be modified to meet the company’s needs. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Confined Space Entry Program (Permit Required)
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.146)
Purpose
To protect employees from the hazards associated with entry into permit required confined spaces and to develop
procedures by which employees will enter such spaces.
Policy
All spaces owned or operated by the company that meet the definition of permit required confined spaces (PRCS)
will be identified and appropriately marked. The company must control access to these spaces.
Employees are prohibited from entering any space meeting the definition of a PRCS unless the following conditions
are met:
l
The company determines that employees must enter permit required confined spaces to perform assigned duties.
The employees are trained to safely perform these duties in a PRCS.
The confined space is rendered safe for entry:
l
By issuance and compliance with the conditions of a permit.
l
When the space is reclassified as a non-permit space without making entry into the space. (This does not apply to
a PRCS with an actual or potential hazardous atmosphere.)
l
Alternate entry procedures are performed.
Permits issued under the procedures in this policy will be limited to the duration of the job but no longer than one
work shift. A new permit is required if work continues on a second shift or another day.
Definitions
Confined Space—a space that meets all three of the following conditions:
l
Is large enough and so configure that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work.
l
Has limited or restricted means for entry or exit (for example, thanks, vessels, silos, storage binds, hoppers, vaults
and pit are spaces that have limited mean of entry).
l
Is not designed for continuous human occupancy.
Permit Required Confined Space (Permit Space)—a confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics:
l
Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere.
l
Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant.
l
Has an internal configuration such that the entrant could be trap or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or a
floor that slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section.
l
Contains any other recognized serious safety and/or health hazard.
Duties and Responsibilities
Authorized Attendant—The trained individual stationed outside the permit space to monitor the authorized entrants
and to perform all attendant duties. The attendant will:
28
l
Remain outside the permit space during entry operations unless relieved by another authorized attendant.
l
Perform non-entry rescues when specified by the company’s rescue procedure.
l
Know existing and potential hazards, including information on the mode of exposure, signs or symptoms, consequences, and physiological effects.
l
Maintain communication with, and keep an accurate account of, those workers entering the permit space.
l
Order evacuation of the permit space when a prohibited condition exists; when a worker shows signs of physiological effects of hazard exposure; when an emergency outside the confined space exists; or when the attendant
cannot effectively and safely perform required duties.
l
Summon rescue and other services during an emergency.
l
Ensure that unauthorized people stay away from permit spaces or exit immediately if they have entered the permit
space.
l
Inform authorized entrants and the entry supervisor if any unauthorized person enters the permit space.
l
Perform no other duties that interfere with the attendant’s primary duties.
Authorized Entrant—The trained individual who enters the permit space. The entrant is required to:
l
Know space hazards, including information on the means of exposure such as inhalation or dermal absorption,
signs and symptoms, and consequences of the exposure.
l
Use appropriate personal protective equipment properly.
l
Maintain communication with attendants as necessary to enable them to monitor the entrant’s status and alert the
entrant to evacuate when necessary.
l
Exit from the permit space as soon as possible when ordered by the attendant; when he or she recognizes the
warning signs or symptoms of exposure; when a prohibited condition exists; or when an automatic alarm is activated.
l
Alert the attendant when a prohibited condition exists or when warning signs or symptoms of exposure exist.
Entry Supervisor—The trained individual with the responsibility to ensure that acceptable entry conditions are
present within a permit space under his or her jurisdiction; issuing a permit authorizing entry; overseeing entry operations; and terminating the entry and permit.
For each entry into a PRCS, the designated entry supervisor will:
l
Perform the pre-entry duties of the entry supervisor on the permit space to be entered.
l
Prepare an entry permit, reclassify the space as a non-permit space, or authorize alternate entry procedures, in
compliance with the relevant procedures of this section.
l
Perform the post-entry duties of the entry supervisor.
l
Collect the permit from the attendant at the end of entry or prepare the documentation for reclassification or alternate entry.
For the duration of each entry into a permit space, the entrants and attendants will perform the duties outlined in
these procedures, and will return the permit or documentation to (insert job title of responsible person) upon termination of entry.
Contractors
The company must ensure that every contract for work within an identified permit space or work within a non-permit space that will introduce a reclassifying hazard will:
l
Notify the contractor that the space is a permit required confined space and of the hazards within the space.
l
Require the contractor to control entry into the space by a permit system meeting the requirements of 29 CFR
1910.146.
29
l
Require the contractor to eliminate any temporary hazards created by the work or notify the supervisor responsible for the space of any permanent hazards created by the work.
Field Staff
Managers of field staff authorized to enter permit spaces will:
l
Procure the equipment necessary for entry testing and develop procedures to provide entry supervisors with the
equipment as necessary.
l
Designate and train entry supervisors, attendants and entrants.
Rescue Service Personnel
The company must identify emergency responders (either on- or off-site) who are capable of responding to an emergency in a timely manner. The responders must have appropriate rescue equipment, including respirators, and be
trained how to use all equipment.
Rescue service personnel must receive the authorized entrants training and be trained to perform assigned rescue duties.
The standard also requires that all rescuers be trained in first aid and CPR. At a minimum, one rescue team member
must be currently certified in first aid and CPR. Employers must ensure that practice rescue exercises are performed
yearly and that rescue services are provided access to permit spaces so they can practice rescue operations. Rescuers
also must be informed of the hazards of the permit space. This includes off-site rescue teams such as local fire and rescue companies.
If the company is relying on off-site rescue services, the company must notify the off-site rescue of the permit required confined space entry and ensure that the rescue service is on standby during entry.
Harnesses and Retrieval Lines
Authorized entrants who enter a permit space must wear a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached to
the center of their backs near shoulder level or above their heads. Wristlets may be used if the company can demonstrate that the use of a chest or full body harness is not feasible or creates a greater hazard.
The other end of the retrieval line must be attached to a mechanical device or a fixed point outside the permit space.
A mechanical device must be available to retrieve someone from vertical type permit spaces more than 5 feet (1.52 m)
deep.
Safety Data Sheet
If an injured entrant is exposed to a substance for which a safety data sheet (SDS) or other similar written information is required to be kept at the worksite, that SDS or other written information must be made available to the medical
facility personnel treating the exposed entrant.
Training
All Employees
The respective supervisor will ensure that each employee receives awareness training on:
l
The characteristics of a confined space.
l
The characteristics of a permit required confined space.
l
Whether they are allowed to enter permit required confined spaces.
l
Required actions when working around or near a permit space entry.
l
The authority of authorized attendants and entry supervisors.
30
Training will be required:
l
During orientation.
l
Prior to entry into a permit required confined space.
l
Whenever the supervisor becomes aware that the employee has failed to follow the instructions provided in the
training.
The supervisor will provide verification of training to: (insert job title of responsible person).
Entry Supervisors, Attendants and Entrants
The supervisor will ensure that employees designated as entry supervisors, attendants and entrants receive training in:
l
The requirements of this policy and any procedures.
l
The duties, authority and responsibilities of entry supervisors, attendants, lead entrants and entrants.
l
The types of hazards expected to be encountered in permit spaces.
l
The calibration, use, care and cleaning of equipment expected to be used during entry operations
l
The performance of pre-entry actions expected to be required in permit spaces.
Training will be provided:
l
Prior to assignment or authorization of duties within permit spaces.
l
Within one month of revisions to this policy or procedures. Assignment or authorization for permit space entry
will be suspended until training is completed.
l
Whenever the supervisor becomes aware that an employee is deviating from the procedures of this policy. Assignment or authorization for permit space entry will be suspended until training is completed.
l
Annually.
The company will certify that each affected employee has successfully completed training.
The certification must include at least the following:
l
Employee name
l
Name, signature or initials of the trainer
l
Dates of training
Additionally, the certification may include a synopsis of the topics covered, copies of materials used during training
such as handouts and presentations, and copies of tests (if used) to determine trainee understanding and proficiency,
and other documentation deemed appropriate by the company. The certification must be maintained by the company
and a copy may be provided to the employee.
Program Review
The company will review the effectiveness of the program annually, using the canceled permits and other documentation from the preceding 12 months, entry supervisor comments, and other available information. If no entries were
made during the preceding 12 months, no annual review is required.
The entry supervisor, authorized attendant or entrant may make recommendations to management at any time to
make changes in procedures to address and correct weaknesses in the procedures.
The entry supervisor or unit manager may notify the company at any time of potential weaknesses in policy or procedures. The company will view and initiate whatever changes necessary to address confirmed weaknesses.
Retention of Records
Canceled permits and other documentation will be retained by the company not less than one year following the date
of entry. Permits will then be retained as an employee exposure record if applicable.
31
Confined Space Entry Permit Example #1
Date and time issued:
Jobsite/space I.D.:
Equipment to be worked on:
Entrants name(s):
Stand-by personnel:
1. Atmospheric checks:
Time
__________
Oxygen
__________
Explosive
__________
Toxic
__________
________________________
Date and time expires:
________________________
________________________
Job supervisor:
________________________
________________________
Work to be performed:
________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
%
% L.F.L.
PPM
2. Tester’s signature: _________________________________________________________
3. Source isolation (no entry):
Yes
No
N/A
Yes
No
N/A
Pumps or lines blinded
Disconnected or blocked
4. Ventilation modification:
Mechanical
Natural ventilation only
5. Atmospheric check after isolation and ventilation:
Oxygen
____________
%
>
Explosive
____________
% L.F.L
<
Toxic
____________
PPM
<
Time
____________
19.5
10
10
<23.5%
%
H2S PPM
Tester’s signature: __________________________________________________________________________________________
6. Communication procedures: ________________________________________________________________________________
7. Rescue procedures: ______________________________________________________________________________________
8. Entry, standby and backup persons: ______________________________
Yes
No
N/A
Successfully completed required training?
Is it current?
9. Equipment
Direct reading gas monitor-tested
Safety harnesses and lifelines for entry and standby persons
Hoisting equipment
Powered communications
SAR or SCBA for entry and standby persons
Protective clothing
All electric equipment listed Class I, Division I, Group D and nonsparking tools
10. Periodic atmospheric tests:
Oxygen
____________
Oxygen
____________
Explosive
____________
Explosive
____________
Toxic
____________
Toxic
____________
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
Oxygen
Oxygen
Explosive
Explosive
Toxic
Toxic
Yes
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
% Time
No
N/A
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
____________
We have reviewed the work authorized by this permit and the information contained herein. Written instructions and safety procedures have been
received and are understood. Entry cannot be approved if any squares are marked in the “No” column. This permit is not valid unless all
appropriate items are completed.
Permit prepared by: (supervisor)
Approved by: (unit supervisor)
Reviewed by: (operations personnel)
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
(Printed name)
32
___________________________________
___________________________________
___________________________________
(Signature)
Confined Space Entry Permit Example #2
Date:
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
_______________________________________________
Site location and description:
Purpose of entry:
Supervisor(s) in charge of crews:
Crew Phone #
Communication procedures:
Rescue procedures (phone numbers at bottom):
Requirements Completed
Date
Lockout/de-energize/verify
_____________
Line(s) broken-capped-blanked
_____________
Purge (flush and vent)
_____________
Ventilation
_____________
Secure area (post and flag)
_____________
Breathing apparatus
_____________
Resuscitator—inhalator
_____________
Standby safety personnel
_____________
Full body harness with “D” ring
_____________
Emergency escape retrieval equipment
_____________
Lifelines
_____________
Fire extinguishers
_____________
_____________
Lightning (explosive proof)
Protective clothing
_____________
Respirator(s) (air-purifying)
_____________
Burning and welding permit
_____________
Note: Items that do not apply enter N/A in the blank.
**Record continuous monitoring results every two hours
Continuous monitoring**
Permissible
Test(s) to be taken
entry level
Percent of oxygen
19.5% to 23.5%
Lower flammable limit
Under 10%
Time
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
Results
Results
Results
Results
Results
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
_____
See Appendix D-2 in 1910.146 for prior table layout.
*Short-term exposure limit: Employee can work in the area up to 15 minutes.
+8-hour time-weighted average: Employee can work in area 8 hours (longer with appropriate respiratory protection).
Remarks: __________________________________________________________________________________________________
Gas tester name and check #
________________________
________________________
Standby person(s)
_______________
_______________
Instrument(s) used
________________________
________________________
Check #
_______________
_______________
Supervisor authorizing—all conditions satisfied
Department/phone:
Phone # for ambulance:
Phone # for fire department:
Phone # for rescue:
Phone # for gas company:
Model and/or type
________________________
________________________
Instrument(s)
_______________
_______________
Check #
_______________
_______________
Serial and/or unit #
________________________
________________________
Confined space
entrant(s)
_______________
_______________
Check #
_______________
_______________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
33
Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. The standard requires the company to maintain a written copy of the procedures outlined in paragraph
(b)(2) of the standard. The written procedures may be in the form of a copy of paragraph (b) of 1910.333).
Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.331–335)
Scope
Safety-related work practices will be in use by our employees to prevent electric shock or other injuries resulting
from either direct or indirect electrical contact, when work is performed near or on equipment or circuits that are or
may be energized. The specific safety-related work practices will be consistent with the nature and extent of the associated electrical hazards. The content of this electrical safe work practice is as required in OSHA Subpart S (Electrical),
29 CFR 1910.331–335.
This program covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment that have not been placed in an electrically safe working condition and the installation/removal of main disconnect switches on bus ducts. Conductors and
parts of electric equipment that have been de-energized but have not been locked out or tagged will be treated as energized parts. Any machine or equipment that has not been shut down per our lockout/tagout procedures will not be considered to be electrically safe.
Covered Employees
The provisions of these procedures cover electrical safety-related work practices for both qualified persons (those
who have training in avoiding the electrical hazards of working on or near exposed-energized parts) and unqualified
persons (those with little or no such training) working on, near or with the following installations:
l
Premises Wiring—Installations of electric conductors and equipment within or on buildings or other structures,
and on other premises such as yards, parking and other lots, and industrial substations.
l
Wiring for Connections to Supply—Installations of conductors that connect to the supply of electricity.
l
Other Wiring—Installations of other outside conductors on the premises.
l
Optical Fiber Cable—Installations of optical fiber cable where such installations are made along with electric conductors.
l
Bus Duct Switches—Installation and removal of bus duct switches on energized busses.
Qualified persons (i.e., those permitted to work on or near exposed energized parts) will, at a minimum, be trained
in and familiar with the following:
l
The skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed live parts from other parts of electric equipment.
l
The skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts.
Training
The training requirements contained in this document apply to employees who face a risk of shock that is not reduced to a safe level by the installation as required by the National Electrical Code and 29 CFR 1910 Subpart S, Electrical.
Other employees who also may reasonably be expected to face comparable risk of injury due to electric shock or
other electrical hazards must also be trained.
Employees who are covered by the scope of this policy, but who are not qualified persons will also be trained in and
familiar with any electrical safety-related practices not specifically addressed but which are necessary for their safety.
The training required will be of the classroom or on-the-job type (preferably both). The degree of training provided
will be determined by the risk to the employee.
34
Selection and Use of Work Practices
Safety-related work practices will be used to prevent electric shock or other injuries resulting from either direct or
indirect electrical contacts, when work is performed near or on equipment or circuits that are or may be energized. The
specific safety-related work practices will be consistent with the nature and extent of the associated electrical hazards:
l
De-energized parts—Live parts to which an employee may be exposed will be de-energized before the employee
works on or near them, unless the employer can demonstrate that de-energizing introduces additional or increased
hazards or is infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations. Live parts that operate at less than 50
volts to ground need not be de-energized if there will not be increased exposure to electrical burns or to explosion
due to electric arcs.
l
Energized parts—If the exposed live parts are not de-energized (i.e., for reasons of increased or additional hazards
or infeasibility), other safety-related work practices will be used to protect employees who may be exposed to the
electrical hazards involved. Such work practices will protect employees against contact with energized circuit
parts directly with any part of their body or indirectly through some other conductive object. When working on
energized parts, the appropriate PPE will be used.
Note: Examples of work that may be performed on or near energized circuit parts because of infeasibility due to
equipment design or operational limitations include testing of electric circuits that can only be performed with the circuit energized (troubleshooting) and work on circuits that form an integral part of a continuous industrial process that
would otherwise need to be shut down completely to permit work on one circuit or piece of equipment.
Lockout/Tagout
While any employee is exposed to contact with parts of fixed electric equipment or circuits that have been de-energized, the circuits energizing the parts will be locked out or tagged (or both) in accordance with the requirements of this
paragraph in the following order:
l
Procedures will be in place before equipment may be de-energized.
l
Circuits and equipment to be worked on will be disconnected from all electrical energy sources.
l
Stored electrical energy that poses a hazard to workers will be released.
l
Stored nonelectrical energy in devices that could re-energize electric circuit parts will be blocked or relieved to the
extent that the circuit parts could not be accidentally energized by the device.
l
A lock and a tag will be placed on each disconnecting means used to de-energize circuits and equipment on which
work is to be performed, except as provided below.
l
Each tag will contain a statement prohibiting unauthorized operation of the disconnecting means and removal of
the tag.
l
If a lock cannot be applied, or if the employer can demonstrate that tagging procedures will provide a level of
safety equivalent to that obtained by the use of a lock, a tag may be used without a lock.
l
A tag used without a lock as permitted above, will be supplemented by at least one additional safety measure that
provides a level of safety equivalent to that obtained by the use of a lock. Examples include the removal of an isolating circuit element, blocking of a controlling switch or opening of an extra disconnecting device.
l
A lock may be placed without a tag only under the following conditions:
l Only one circuit or piece of equipment is de-energized.
l The lockout period does not extend beyond the work shift.
l Employees exposed to the hazards associated with re-energizing the circuit or equipment are familiar with this
procedure.
l
Before any circuits or equipment can be considered and worked as de-energized:
l A qualified person will operate the equipment operating controls or otherwise verify that the equipment cannot
be restarted.
l A qualified person will use test equipment to test the circuit elements and electrical parts of equipment to which
employees will be exposed and will verify that the circuit elements and equipment parts are de-energized.
35
l
Before circuits and equipment are re-energized, even temporarily, the following requirements will be met, in the
order given:
l A qualified person will conduct tests and visual inspections, as necessary, to verify that all tools, electrical
jumpers, shorts, grounds and other such devices have been removed so that the circuits and equipment can be
safely energized.
l Employees exposed to the hazards associated with re-energizing the circuit or equipment will be warned to stay
clear of circuits and equipment.
l Each lock and tag will be removed by the employee who applied it or under his or her direct supervision. However, if the employee is absent from the workplace, then the lock or tag may be removed by a qualified person
designated to perform this task provided that the employer ensures that the employee who applied the lock or
tag is not available at the workplace and is aware that the lock or tag has been removed before he or she resumes work at that workplace.
l There will be a visual determination that all employees are clear of the circuits and equipment.
Working on or Near Energized Equipment
This section applies to work performed on exposed live parts (involving either direct contact or contact by means of
tools or materials) or near enough to them for employees to be exposed to any hazard they present.
Only qualified persons may work on electric circuit parts or equipment that has not been de-energized under the procedures of these standards. Such individuals will be capable of working safely on energized circuits and will be familiar
with the proper use of special precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools.
Illumination—Employees may not enter spaces containing exposed energized parts unless illumination is provided
that enables the employees to perform the work safely. Where lack of illumination or an obstruction precludes observation of the work to be performed, employees may not perform tasks near exposed energized parts. Employees may not
reach blindly into areas that may contain energized parts.
Conductive Materials and Equipment—Conductive materials and equipment that are in contact with any part of an
employee’s body will be handled in a manner that will prevent them from contacting exposed energized conductors or
circuit parts. If an employee must handle long dimensional conductive objects (such as ducts or pipes) in areas with live
parts, the hazard must be minimized by the use of insulation, guarding or material handling techniques.
Note: Nonconductive fish tapes must be used when pulling wire through conduit that contains energized conductors
or when entering an enclosure with exposed live parts.
l
Portable ladders—Portable ladders must be of the nonconductive type (wood or fiberglass) if they are used where
the employee or the ladder could contact exposed energized parts.
l
Conductive apparel—Conductive articles of jewelry and clothing (such as bands, bracelets, rings, key chains,
necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth with conductive thread or metal headgear) may not be worn if they might contact exposed energized parts unless they are rendered nonconductive by covering, wrapping or other insulating
means.
l
Housekeeping duties—Where live parts present an electrical contact hazard, employees may not perform housekeeping duties in such close proximity to the parts that there is a possibility of contact unless adequate safeguards
(such as insulating equipment or barriers) are provided. Electrically conductive cleaning materials may not be
used in proximity to energized parts unless procedures are followed which will prevent electrical contact.
l
Interlocks—Only a qualified person following the requirements of this section may defeat an electrical safety interlock, and then only temporarily while he or she is working on the equipment. The interlock system will be returned to its operable condition when this work is completed.
l
Confined or enclosed work spaces—When an employee works in a confined or enclosed space (such as a manhole
or vault) that contains exposed energized parts, the employer will provide, and the employee will use, protective
shields, protective barriers or insulating materials as necessary to avoid inadvertent contact with these parts.
Doors, hinged panels and the like will be secured to prevent their swinging into an employee and causing the employee to contact exposed energized parts.
36
l
Overhead lines—Employees will not work on or near (within 12 feet) overhead lines. This 12-foot barrier includes any conductive object in that space. OSHA provides specific instructions regarding work on overhead lines.
Refer to Subpart S—Electrical, 1910.333(c)(3) for more detail.
Use of Equipment
Portable Electric Equipment—This section applies to the use of cord-and-plug connected equipment, including flexible cord sets (extension cords).
Extension Cord Use
l
Employees using extension cords (drop cords) to power tools and/or equipment for the performance of construction, maintenance, repair or demolition will use GFCI protection. This pertains to any part of the company, both
inside and outside.
l
All extension cords must be grounding type, made with UL listed parts, and be in good physical condition.
l
Extension cords may not be lengthened or repaired with tape.
l
Power outlet strips are for equipment needing surge protection (e.g., computers).
l
Extension cords will not be run through holes in walls, ceilings or floors.
l
Extension cords may not be plugged into power strips. Power strips may not be connected to each other (i.e.,
“piggy-backed”).
l
An extension cord should not be run across high traffic areas or used in applications where potential damage to
the cord might occur:
l The use of an extension cord must not create a trip hazard.
l Extension cords will not be attached to building surfaces or used in lieu of fixed wiring of a structure.
l Extension cords will not be run through doorways or windows or concealed behind walls, ceilings or floors.
Handling—Portable equipment will be handled in a manner that will not cause damage. Flexible electric cords connected to equipment may not be used for raising or lowering the equipment. Flexible cords may not be fastened with
staples or otherwise hung in such a fashion as could damage the outer jacket or insulation.
Visual Inspection—Portable cord-and-plug connected equipment and flexible cord sets (extension cords) will be visually inspected before use on any shift for external defects and evidence of possible internal damage:
l
Cord-and-plug connected equipment and extension cords that remain connected once they are put in place and are
not exposed to damage need not be visually inspected until they are relocated.
l
Defective or damaged items will be removed from service until repaired.
Grounding Type Equipment—A flexible cord used with grounding type equipment will contain an equipment
grounding conductor:
l
Attachment plugs and receptacles may not be connected or altered in a manner that would prevent proper continuity of the equipment grounding conductor at the point where plugs are attached to receptacles. Additionally, these
devices may not be altered to allow the grounding pole of a plug to be inserted into slots intended for connection
to the current carrying conductors.
l
Adapters (i.e., “cheaters”) that interrupt the continuity of the equipment grounding connection may not be used.
Conductive Work Locations—Portable electric equipment and flexible cords used in highly conductive work locations (such as those inundated with water or other conductive liquids) or in job locations where employees are likely to
contact water or conductive liquids will be approved for those locations.
Connecting Attachment Plugs—Employees’ hands may not be wet when plugging and unplugging flexible cords and
cord and plug-connected equipment, if energized equipment is involved.
l
Energized plug and receptacle connections may be handled only with insulating protective equipment if the condition of the connection could provide a conducting path to the employee’s hand.
l
Locking type connectors will be properly secured after connection.
37
Electric Power and Lighting Circuits
Routine Opening and Closing of Circuits—Load-rated switches, circuit breakers or other devices specifically designed as disconnecting means will be used for the opening, reversing or closing of circuits under load conditions.
Cable connectors not of the load break type, fuses, terminal lugs and cable splice connections will not be used for such
purposes, except in an emergency.
Reclosing Circuits After Protective Device Operation—After a circuit is de-energized by a circuit protective device,
the circuit may not be manually re-energized until it has been determined that the equipment and circuit can be safely
energized. The repetitive manual reclosing of circuit breakers or re-energizing circuits through replaced fuses is prohibited.
Note: Circuit breakers or fuses can only be energized after an overload condition has been determined. If a fault condition exists, the circuit must be tested and determined safe before the circuit can be energized. Circuit breakers can be
reset; however, repetitive reclosing is prohibited. The problem should be traced to the root cause if a circuit breaker
trips twice in succession.
Overcurrent Protection Modification
Overcurrent protection of circuits and conductors may not be modified, even on a temporary basis, beyond that allowed in the installation safety requirements for overcurrent protection.
Test Instruments and Equipment
l
Use—Only qualified persons may perform testing work on electric circuits or equipment.
l
Visual inspection—Test instruments and equipment and all associated test leads, cables, power cords, probes and
connectors will be visually inspected for external defects and damage before the equipment is used. If there is a
defect or evidence of damage that might expose an employee to injury, the defective or damaged item will be removed from service, and no employee may use it until necessary repairs and tests to render the equipment safe
have been made.
l
Rating of equipment—Test instruments and equipment and their accessories will be rated for the circuits and
equipment to which they will be connected and will be designed for the environment in which they will be used.
Occasional Use of Flammable or Ignitable Materials
Where flammable materials are present only occasionally, electric equipment capable of igniting them will not be
used unless measures are taken to prevent hazardous conditions from developing.
Safeguard for Personnel Protection
Personal Protective Equipment—Employees working in areas where there are potential electrical hazards will be
provided with and will use electrical protective equipment that is appropriate for the specific parts of the body to be
protected and for the work to be performed:
l
Protective equipment will be maintained in a safe, reliable condition and will be periodically inspected or tested,
as required by 29 CFR 1910.137.
l
If the insulating capability of protective equipment may be subject to damage during use, the insulating material
will be protected. (For example, an outer covering of leather is sometimes used for the protection of rubber insulating material.)
l
Employees will wear nonconductive head protection wherever there is a danger of head injury from electric shock
or bums due to contact with exposed energized parts.
l
Employees will wear protective equipment for the eyes or face wherever there is danger of injury to the eyes or
face from electric arcs or flashes or from flying objects resulting from electrical explosion.
38
When working near exposed energized conductors or circuit parts, each employee will use insulated tools or handling equipment if the tools or handling equipment might make contact with such conductors or parts. If the insulating
capability of insulated tools or handling equipment is subject to damage, the insulating material will be protected:
l
Fuse handling equipment, insulated for the circuit voltage, will be used to remove or install fuses when the fuse
terminals are energized.
l
Ropes and handlines used near exposed energized parts will be nonconductive.
l
Protective shields, protective barriers or insulating materials will be used to protect each employee from shock,
burns or other electrically related injuries while that employee is working near exposed energized parts that might
be accidentally contacted or where dangerous electric heating or arcing might occur. When normally enclosed live
parts are exposed for maintenance or repair, they will be guarded to protect unqualified persons from contact with
live parts.
Note: Cabinet doors and electrical enclosures should be kept closed. If, however, this is not possible due to the conditions that follow, additional precautions must be taken to minimize the extent of the hazard.
This section covers situations where:
l
Energized equipment is exposed and must be left unattended.
l
The scope of the energized equipment is so large that the person working cannot monitor it.
l
The equipment cannot otherwise be guarded against accidental intrusion by a passerby.
Alerting Techniques—The following alerting techniques will be used to warn and protect employees from hazards
that could cause injury due to electric shock, burns or failure of electric equipment parts:
l
Safety signs, safety symbols or accident prevention tags will be used where necessary to warn employees about
electrical hazards that may endanger them, as required.
l
Barricades will be used in conjunction with safety signs where it is necessary to prevent or limit employee access
to work areas exposing employees to uninsulated energized conductors or circuit parts. Conductive barricades
may not be used where they might cause an electrical contact hazard.
l
Attendant—If signs and barricades do not provide sufficient warning and protection from electrical hazards, an attendant will be stationed to warn and protect employees.
Safe Work Practices
l
Know the equipment and potential hazards—Define the scope of work.
l
Submit the scope of work to your safety coordinator for approval.
l
Analyze the hazards use engineered methods to mitigate hazards.
l
Establish procedures as necessary.
l
Use barricades or other means to prevent unqualified persons from crossing approach boundaries.
l
Employees will employ insulating barriers to prevent themselves and others from leaning into or falling into live
parts and to prevent live parts that might become loose from contacting other employees.
l
Employees will wear safety glasses.
l
Employees will not wear metallic personal items (e.g., jewelry, glasses, watches) while working on or near live
parts.
l
Employees will use nonconducting ladders when needed.
l
Always assume a conductor is energized until proven otherwise.
l
Employees will wear voltage rated gloves when using tools on or near live parts.
l
Employees will use only PPE that is designed (approved or certified) for the hazard.
39
l
Employees will use only insulated tools when working on or near live parts.
l
Employees will use only tools and instruments that are designed for the system voltage.
l
Employees will not bypass interlocks or safety devices that protect people against electrical shock except when
absolutely necessary and then only with written approval from their supervisor.
l
Whenever possible, do not work alone.
l
Safety watch is required when deemed so by your supervisor. This person will be CPR trained and be familiar
with removing all sources of power to the device being worked upon and have ready access to a phone in order to
call 911 in case of emergency.
l
When operating circuit breakers or fused switches. ALWAYS stand to the side NEVER directly in front of the device being operated.
l
Employees should inspect electrical equipment for defective parts, faulty insulation, improper grounding, loose
connections, ground faults and unguarded live parts and should take appropriate remedial action before working
on or near live parts.
l
Employees should work only where there is adequate clearance.
l
Employees should not work on or near live parts that are in a hazardous location (e.g., in wet or damp areas or
where there are corrosive or flammable atmospheres).
l
Restrict unnecessary people from being in the work area.
40
Electrical Safety-Related Work Practices Self-Audit Checklist
Area: ____________________ Room: ____________ Date: _________ Audit Performed by: _____________
Yes
No
N/A
Model written program available.
Training complete and documented.
Lockout/tagout program includes electrical safety-related
work practices.
Comments
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
Selection and Use of Work Practices
Yes
No
N/A
Minimum safe work distances established when work
involves energized parts.
Illumination provided in all spaces containing exposed
electrical conductors.
Measures taken to avoid inadvertent contact with
energized parts in enclosed or confined spaces.
Measures taken to avoid inadvertent contact of conductive
materials or equipment with energized parts during
handling.
Portable ladders have nonconductive side rails.
Conductive apparel not worn unless rendered
nonconductive.
Measures taken to avoid inadvertent contact with
energized parts during housekeeping duties.
Electrical safety interlocks defeated only by a qualified
person following specific procedures.
Comments
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
Use of Equipment
Yes
No
N/A
Procedures for handling portable equipment implemented.
Procedures for working with extension cords
implemented.
Only qualified persons allowed to perform test work.
Measures taken to prevent hazards from the occasional use
of flammable materials near electrical equipment.
Comments
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
Safeguards for Personnel Protection
Yes
Personal protective equipment appropriate for the
electrical hazard provided and used.
Insulated tools and handling equipment used for work
performed near exposed energized circuits.
Protective shields, barriers or insulating materials used
near exposed electrical circuits or where dangerous
electric heating or arcing may occur.
Appropriate alerting techniques used to warn and protect
workers.
41
No
N/A
Comments
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
_______________________
Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. This program does not
have to be in writing for employers with 10 or fewer employees. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all
requirements are being met.
Emergency Action Plan
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.38)
The intent of this plan is to ensure all employees a safe and healthful workplace. Those employees assigned specific duties
under this plan will be provided the necessary training and equipment to ensure their safety. This plan applies to emergencies
that could be reasonably expected in our workplace such as fire/smoke, tornadoes, bomb threats or chemical releases.
Emergency Plan Coordinators
Building/Department
Name/Title
Phone #
Coordinators are responsible for the proper inventory and maintenance of equipment. They may be contacted by employees for further information on this plan.
Plan Outline/Description
Means of Reporting Emergencies: All fires and emergencies will be reported by one or more of the following means
as appropriate:
l
l
l
Verbally to the coordinator during normal working hours.
By telephone if after hours/weekends.
By the building alarm system.
Note: The following numbers will be posted throughout the facility:
l
l
l
l
l
Fire
Police
Ambulance
Hazmat
Poison Control
Alarm System Requirements: Alarm system requirements for notifying employees during an emergency are as follows:
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Provides warning for safe escape.
Can be perceived by all employees.
Alarm is distinctive and recognizable.
Employees have been trained on the alarm system.
Emergency phone numbers are posted.
Emergency alarms have priority over all other communications.
Alarm system is properly maintained.
Sounding the Alarm
The alarm signals for this facility are below:
l
l
l
l
For fire: (Insert signal)
For chemical release: (Insert signal)
For hazardous weather: (Insert signal)
Other: (Insert signal)
42
Evacuation Plans
Emergency evacuation escape route plans are posted in key areas of the facility. All employees will be trained on primary and secondary evacuation routes for each type of emergency, as well as storm/tornado shelter locations, and
whether employees should exit the facilities or shelter-in-place or in some other internal area of the worksite.
For Building Evacuation
In the event of a fire/explosion evacuation, all occupants will promptly exit the building via the nearest exit. Go to
your designated assembly point and report to your supervisor. Each supervisor (or designee) will account for each assigned employee via a head count. All supervisors will report their head count to (insert job title of responsible person)
who will be located at (insert evacuation location) or accessible via cell phone or radio (insert phone number or radio
channel).
In the event of a chemical release, all affected employees will be given evacuation instruction by those in authority
(supervisor, other) via: (Insert alert). Each supervisor (or designee) will account for each assigned employee via head
count. All supervisors will report their head count to (insert job title of responsible person). Under no circumstances
will employees leave the worksite unless instructed to so by management or other authority.
Building Re-Entry
Once evacuated, no one will re-enter the building. Once the fire department or other responsible agency has notified
(insert job title of responsible person) that the building is safe to re-enter, personnel will return to their work areas. If
building re-entry is not permissible, employees will be given further instruction as applicable by those in authority (supervisor, fire department).
Hazardous Weather
A hazardous weather alert consists of (insert alert). When a hazardous weather alert is made, all employees will immediately report to the closest refuge area. Stay in this area until notified by (insert job title of responsible person).
Training
The personnel listed below have been trained to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of employees:
Task
Building/Department
Name/Title/Phone #
Fire Extinguisher/Hoses
Evacuation Assistant
Emergency Shutdown
Employee training is provided when this plan is initiated, when employees’ responsibilities change, when the plan
changes, initially for new hires and annually for all employees. Subjects to be covered include:
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Emergency escape procedures/routes
Fire extinguisher locations and proper use (when the use is required by the company)
Procedures for accounting for employees and visitors
Major facility fire hazards
Fire prevention practices
Means of reporting fires/emergencies (use and types of alarm systems)
Names/titles of emergency coordinators
Availability of the plan to employees
Hazardous weather procedures
Special duties as assigned to coordinators and those listed above.
Written records will be maintained for all training and provided to (insert job title of responsible person).
43
Note: The following topic is in writing as a best practice. There is no specific OSHA standard on ergonomics. Please
modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Ergonomics Policy
Ergonomics is the science of fitting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of the working population. Effective and successful “fits” ensure high productivity, avoidance of illness and injury risks, and increased satisfaction among the workforce. Although the scope of ergonomics is much broader, the term here refers to assessing
those work-related factors that may pose a risk of musculoskeletal disorders and recommendations to alleviate them.
Common examples of ergonomic risk factors are found in jobs requiring repetitive, forceful or prolonged exertions of
the hands; frequent or heavy lifting, pushing, pulling or carrying of heavy objects; and prolonged awkward postures.
Vibration and cold may add risk to these work conditions. Jobs or working conditions presenting multiple risk factors
will have a higher probability of causing a musculoskeletal problem. The level of risk depends on the intensity, frequency and duration of the exposure to these conditions and the individual’s capacity to meet the force of other job demands that might be involved.
Stressor Factors
Not all musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are related to work activities. Other factors, such as personal characteristics and societal factors have also been associated with ergonomic related injuries and illnesses. When analyzing jobs or
work tasks that may be associated with MSDs, conditions to consider may include, but are not limited to:
l
Awkward postures, which might include prolonged work with hands above the head or with the elbows above the
shoulders; prolonged work with the neck bent; squatting, kneeling or lifting; handling objects with back bent or
twisted; repeated or sustained bending or twisting of wrists, knees, hips or shoulders; forceful and repeated gripping or pinching.
l
Forceful lifting, pushing or pulling, which might include handling heavy objects; moving bulky or slippery objects; assuming awkward postures while moving objects.
l
Prolonged repetitive motion, which might include keying; using tools or knives; packaging, handling or manipulating objects.
l
Contact stress, which might include repeated contact with hard or sharp objects, like desk or table edges.
l
Vibration, which might include overuse of power hand tools.
Safe Work Practices
l
Do not exert additional force than is required to perform daily tasks.
l
Practice proper postures when standing, sitting and lifting.
l
Keep a constant awareness of preferred neutral body postures at all times—not only at work, but also in all areas
of your life.
l
Avoid long periods of continuous computer use by performing other jobs or taking quick breaks intermittently.
l
Try to not work more than 30 minutes at a time without some type of break.
l
Take exercise breaks or stretch breaks throughout your workday.
l
Make sure you have plenty of light to safely and comfortably perform you work duties, but stay away from overly
bright or direct lighting.
44
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements
are being met.
Fall Protection Plan
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.66(f) and 269(g))
Types of Fall Protection Systems
l
Articulating manlifts provided with a restraint system and full body harness to an anchor point below the waist
(preferably at the floor level).
l
Guardrails with toeboards.
l
Personal fall arrest systems:
l Anchor points (rated at 5,000 pounds).
l Full body harness.
l Restraint line or lanyard.
l Shock absorbing lanyard.
l Retractable lanyard.
l Rope grabs.
l Connectors (self-locking snap hooks).
l
Engineered lifelines.
l
Warning lines.
l
Safety nets.
l
Safety monitor systems.
Appropriate fall protection will be determined by the task (job) to be performed.
Fall protection is not needed if an employee or employees are on a low slope roof (less than 4/12 pitch) for inspection/observation only.
Note: Fall protection is required whenever an employee is above 4 feet in general industry and 6 feet on construction
sites (except 10 feet on scaffolding and 15 feet during steel erection).
Fall Protection Guidelines—Options
Engineering Controls
Engineering controls will be the first option for selection whenever possible (i.e., light bulb changing, telescoping
arm, changing valve, relocate at ground level) or utilizing a contractor in extremely hazardous areas.
Guardrails
On all projects, only guardrails made from steel, wood, and wire rope will be acceptable. All guardrail systems will
comply with OSHA standards (i.e., withstand 200 pounds of force, 42" high, midrail, and toeboard). These guardrails
will be placed in the following areas if necessary or feasible based on job location or requirements:
l
On all open-sided floors.
l
Around all open excavations or pits.
l
On leading edges of roofs or mezzanines.
45
Personal Fall Protection Systems (PFAS)
All employees on any project that will be required to wear a personal fall arrest or restraint system will follow these
guidelines:
l
A full body harness will be used at all times.
l
All personal fall arrest systems will be inspected before each use by the employee. Any deteriorated, bent, damaged, impacted or harness showing excessive wear will be removed from service.
l
Connectors will be inspected to ensure they are drop forged, pressed or formed steel or are made of equivalent
materials and that they have a corrosion-resistant finish as well as that all surfaces and edges are smooth to prevent damage to interfacing parts of the system.
l
Verify that D rings and snap hooks have a minimum tensile strength of 5,000 pounds and that the D rings and snap
hooks are proof tested to a minimum tensile load of 3,600 pounds without cracking, breaking or taking permanent
deformation.
l
Only shock absorbing lanyards or retractable lanyards are to be used so as to keep impact forces at a minimum on
the body (fall arrest systems).
l
Only nylon rope or nylon straps with locking snap hooks are to be used for restraints.
l
All lanyards will have self-locking snap hooks.
Verify that unintentional disengagement of snap hooks is prevented by either of the following means:
l
Snap hooks are a compatible size for the member to which they are connected.
l
Locking type snap hooks are used.
Verify that unless the snap hook is a locking type and is designed for the following connections, snap hooks are not
engaged in the following manners:
l
Directly to webbing, rope or wire rope.
l
To each other.
l
To a D ring to which another snap hook or other connector is attached to a horizontal lifeline.
l
To any object that is incompatibly shaped or dimensioned in relation to the snap hook such that unintentional disengagement could occur by the connected object being able to depress the snap hook keeper and release itself.
The following factors can affect total fall distance:
l
Length of connecting means (i.e., lanyard length, use of carabineers, snap hooks).
l
Position and height of anchorage relative to work platform/area (always keep above head whenever possible).
l
Position of attachment and D ring slide on the full body harness.
l
Deployment of shock absorber (max 42 inches).
l
Movement in lifeline.
l
Initial position of worker before free fall occurs (i.e., sitting, standing).
Calculating Total Fall Distance
It is the total length of shock absorbing lanyard plus the height of the person plus the location distance of the D ring
from the work surface or platform.
Always allow a minimum of 6 feet of clearance above the ground, equipment, etc., at the end of the fall from the fall
arrest point.
Engineered Lifeline
Lifeline systems must be designed and approved by an engineer or qualified person. Lifeline systems must be engineered to have appropriate anchorages, strength of line designed to hold X number of individuals connected to it, line
strength to aid in the arrest of a fall, and durability to hold fallen employee(s) suspended until rescue can occur.
46
Warning Line System
All greater than 50 feet wide flat roof (i.e., roof with less than 4/12 slope) work that is performed 6 feet or further
back from the edge of the roof can be completed by installing a warning line and using a safety monitor. If the roof is
flat and less than 50 feet wide, a competent person safety monitor may be used.
Warning lines will consist of the following:
l
Be erected 6 feet from the edge of the roof.
l
Be constructed of stationary posts made of wood or metal.
l
Wire or nylon rope and “Caution” tape will be strung from post to post and must be able to withstand 16 pounds
of force.
l
The entire perimeter of the roof where work is being performed will be guarded by the warning line.
If an employee must access an area within 6 feet of the roof for reasons other than exiting the roof via a ladder or
fixed industrial ladder, another employee must monitor that individual and warn him or her of any dangers. If another
employee is not available to act as a safety monitor, the employee must don a full body harness and attach a fall restraint lanyard to an anchor point to prevent reaching the edge of the roof.
Inspection of Fall Protection Systems
The following criteria will be utilized to maintain all equipment in good working condition.
Full Body Harness
Inspect before each use:
l
Closely examine all of the nylon webbing to ensure there are no burn marks, which could weaken the material.
l
Verify there are no torn, frayed, broken fibers, pulled stitches or frayed edges anywhere on the harness.
l
Examine D ring for excessive wear, pits, deterioration, or cracks.
l
Verify that buckles are not deformed or cracked and will operate correctly.
l
Check to see that all grommets (if present) are secure and not deformed from abuse or a fall.
l
Harness should never have additional punched holes
l
All rivets should be tight, not deformed.
l
Check tongue/straps for excessive wear from repeated buckling.
A competent person will conduct an annual inspection of all harnesses. The documentation will be provided to (insert job title of responsible person) and maintained for (insert length of time to keep record).
Storage will consist of hanging in an enclosed cabinet, to protect from damage.
All harnesses that are involved in a fall will be removed from/tagged out of service immediately.
Lanyards/Shock Absorbing Lanyard
Before each use, the employee must:
l
Check lanyard material for cuts, burns, abrasions, kinks, knots, broken stitches and excessive wear.
l
Inspect the snap hooks for hook, locks and eye distortion.
l
Check carabineer for excessive wear, distortion and lock operation.
l
Ensure that all locking mechanisms seat and lock properly.
l
Once locked, locking mechanism should prevent hook from opening.
l
Visually inspect shock absorber for any signs of damage, paying close attention to where the shock absorber attaches to the lanyard.
l
Verify that points where the lanyard attaches to the snap hooks are free of defects.
47
A competent person will conduct an annual inspection of all lanyards. The inspection documentation will be provided to (insert job title of responsible person) and maintained for (insert length of time to keep record).
Storage will consist of hanging in an enclosed cabinet to protect from damage.
All lanyards that are involved in a fall will be destroyed.
Snap Hooks
Before each use, the employee will:
l
Inspect snap hook for any hook and eye distortions.
l
Verify there are no cracks, pitted surfaces, and eye distortions.
l
The keeper latch should not be bent, distorted, or obstructed.
l
Verify that the keeper latch seats into the nose without binding.
l
Verify that the keeper spring securely closes the keeper latch.
l
Test the locking mechanism to verify that the keeper latch locks properly.
A competent person will conduct an annual inspection of all snaphooks. The inspection documentation will be provided to (insert job title of responsible person) and maintained for (insert length of time to keep record).
All snap hooks involved in a fall will be removed from/tagged out of service.
Self-Retracting Lanyards
Before each use, the employee will:
l
Visually inspect the body to ensure there is no physical damage.
l
Make sure all back nuts or rivets are tight.
l
Make sure the entire length of the nylon strap is free of any cuts, burns, abrasions, kinks, knots, broken stitches
and excessive wear and retracts freely.
l
Test the unit by pulling sharply on the lanyard to verify that the locking mechanism is operating correctly.
l
If manufacturer requires, make certain the retractable lanyard is returned to the manufacturer for scheduled annual
inspections.
A competent person will conduct a monthly inspection of all self-retracting lanyards. The inspection documentation
will be provided to (insert job title of responsible person) and maintained for (insert length of time to keep record). Additionally, the lanyard will be inspected for proper function after every fall.
Tie-off Adaptors/Anchorages
l
Inspect for integrity and attachment to solid surface.
l
Annual inspection of all tie-offs and anchorages by a competent person with documentation.
l
All tie-offs and anchorages will be destroyed and replaced after a fall.
Articulating Manlift
l
Inspect before each use.
l
Inspect/service per manufacturer’s guidelines. Forklifts, scissors lifts and safety nets will be inspected at the beginning of each shift in use. Structural integrity of forklift basket will be checked per same schedule.
l
Annual inspection of forklift basket will be completed by a competent person with documentation maintained.
Horizontal Lifelines
l
Inspect before each use for structural integrity of line and anchors.
l
Annual inspection by a competent person.
48
Guardrails
l
Temporary systems—Daily visual inspection will be completed by a competent person.
l
Temporary systems—Weekly, a complete structural inspection will be completed by a competent person.
l
Permanent systems—Annual structural inspection will be completed by a competent person with future frequency
of inspection defined based on conditions/controls present.
Storage and Maintenance of Fall Protection Equipment (Best Practice)
l
Never store the personal fall arrest equipment in the bottom of a toolbox, on the ground or outside exposed to the
elements (i.e., sun, rain, snow).
l
Hang equipment in a cool dry location in a manner that retains its shape.
l
Always follow manufacturer’s recommendations for inspection.
l
Clean with a mild, nonabrasive soap and hang to dry.
l
Never force dry or use strong detergents in cleaning.
l
Never store equipment near excessive heat, chemicals, moisture or sunlight.
l
Never store in an area with exposures to fumes or corrosives elements.
l
Avoid dirt and build-up on equipment.
l
Never use this equipment for any purpose other than personal fall arrest.
l
Once exposed to a fall, remove equipment from service immediately.
Training
The company will provide a fall prevention training program for each employee who might be exposed to fall hazards. The training program will include recognition of the hazards of falling and procedures to follow to minimize these
hazards. Training materials will be reviewed to verify that each employee has been trained, as necessary, by a competent person qualified in the following areas:
l
Nature of fall hazards in the work area.
l
Correct procedures for erecting, maintaining, disassembling and inspecting the fall protection systems to be used.
l
Use and operation of guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, safety net systems, warning line systems,
safety monitoring systems, controlled access zones (CAZs) and other protection to be used.
l
Role of each employee in the safety monitoring system when this system is used.
l
The limitations on the use of mechanical equipment during the performance of roofing work on low sloped roofs.
l
Correct procedures for the handling and storage of equipment and materials and the erection of overhead protection.
l
Role of employees in fall protection plans.
l
Requirements contained in 29 CFR 1926, Subpart M.
l
Understanding and following all components of this fall protection program.
The company will maintain a written certification record for employee training. The record must contain the following information:
l
Name or other identity of the employee trained.
l
Date(s) of the training.
l
Signature of the person who conducted the training or the signature of a company official.
49
When the supervisor has reason to believe that any affected employee who has already been trained does not have
the understanding and skill required, the supervisor will retrain that employee. Retraining is required at least in the following circumstances:
l
Changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete.
l
Changes in the types of fall protection systems or equipment to be used render previous training obsolete.
l
Inadequacies in an affected employee’s knowledge or use of fall protection systems or equipment indicate that the
employee has not retained the requisite understanding or skill.
Enforcement (Best Practice)
l
Subject to discipline.
l
Documentation of any violations will be kept in the staff member’s personnel file.
l
Any employee not following the fall protection program or a portion of this procedure will be subject to disciplinary action.
Rescue Procedures
In the event of a fall, the following people will be notified as soon as possible to initiate rescue:
l
Rescue personnel on-site.
l
Supervisor/management.
l
Fire department or emergency medical services if necessary.
At the beginning of any work activity where fall protection is required, rescue plans must be identified and discussed
with all employees in case of a fall. The supervisor will develop the rescue plans.
All employees involved in a fall arrest or fall will be sent for a medical evaluation to determine extent of injuries, if any.
Program Evaluation
This fall protection program will be evaluated periodically to determine effectiveness. The following criteria will be
used to evaluate its performance:
l
Accident reports, number of accidents.
l
Management/staff compliance with program components.
l
Periodic on-site audits.
l
Staff feedback, interviews.
Contractors
All outside contractors working in or on the premises will be required to follow the guidelines set forth in this fall
protection program when the contractor and employees are exposed to fall hazards. Contractors in the prejob meeting
will be informed of these requirements as well as the on-site construction rules that apply.
50
Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. This program does not
have to be in writing for employers with 10 or fewer employees. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all
requirements are being met.
Fire Prevention Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.39)
The primary goal of this fire protection program is to reduce or eliminate fires in the workplace by heightening the
fire safety awareness of all employees. Another goal of this plan is to provide all employees with the information necessary to recognize hazardous conditions and take appropriate action before such conditions result in a fire emergency.
This plan details the basic steps necessary to minimize the potential for fire occurring in the workplace. Prevention
of fires in the workplace is the responsibility of everyone employed by the company, but must be monitored by each supervisor overseeing any work activity that involves a major fire hazard. Every effort will be made by the company to
identify those hazards that might cause fires and establish a means for controlling them.
The fire prevention plan will be administered by (insert job title of responsible person) who will compile a list of all
major workplace fire hazards, the names or job titles of personnel responsible for fire control and prevention equipment
maintenance, names or job titles of personnel responsible for control of fuel source hazards, and locations of all fire extinguishers in the workplace. The plan administrator or safety and health officer must also be familiar with the behavior
of employees that may create fire hazards as well as periods of the day, month and year in which the workplace could
be more vulnerable to fire.
This fire prevention plan will be reviewed annually and updated as needed to maintain compliance with applicable
regulations and standards and remain state of the art in fire protection. Workplace inspection reports and fire incident
reports will be maintained and used to provide corrections and improvements to the plan. This plan will be available for
employee review at any time during all normal working hours.
Classification
Fires are classified into four groups according to sources of fuel: Class A, B, C and D based on the type of fuel
source. Table 1 below describes the classifications of fire that can be used in making a hazard assessment.
Table 1
Class A
Ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, cloth, and some rubber
and plastic materials.
Class B
Flammable liquids, flammable gases, greases and similar materials,
and some rubber and plastic materials.
Class C
Energized electrical equipment and power supply circuits and related
materials.
Class D
Combustible metals such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, sodium, lithium
and potassium.
Determining Fire Hazards
This section consists of two steps: first, identifying the existing fire hazards in the workplace and second, taking action to resolve them. The inspection checklist (located at end of program) provides a guide for precise fire-safe practices that must be followed. The location of these major fire hazards are denoted in the table found at the end of this
program. Also found is a listing of the personnel responsible for the maintenance of the equipment and systems installed to prevent or control fires.
Material hazards will be identified, as evident on the specific safety data sheets (SDS), and labeled on containers as
soon as they arrive in the workplace. The identification system will also be incorporated into the company’s hazard
communication program.
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Storage and Handling Procedures
The storage of material will be arranged such that adequate clearance is maintained away from heating surfaces, air
ducts, heaters, flue pipes and lighting fixtures. All storage containers or areas will prominently display signs to identify
the material stored within. Storage of chemicals will be separated from other materials in storage, from handling operations and from incompatible materials. All individual containers will be identified as to their contents.
Only containers designed, constructed and tested in accordance with the U.S. Department of Transportation specifications and regulations are used for storage of compressed or liquefied gases. Compressed gas storage rooms will be
areas reserved exclusively for that purpose with good ventilation and at least one hour fire resistance rating. The gas
cylinders will be secured in place and stored away from any heat or ignition source. Pressurized gas cylinders will
never be used without pressure regulators.
Ordinary Combustibles
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Wooden pallets will not be stacked over 6 feet tall. If feasible, extra pallets will be stored outside or in separate
buildings to reduce the risk of fire hazards.
Piles of combustible materials will be stored away from buildings and located apart from each other sufficiently to
allow fire-fighting efforts to control an existing fire.
Flammable Materials
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Flammable liquids must be stored and used in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.106 or the most current NFPA 30.
Potential Ignition Sources
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Ensure that utility lights always have some type of wire guard over them.
Don’t misuse fuses. Never install a fuse rated higher than specified for the circuit.
Investigate any appliance or equipment that smells strange. Space heaters, microwave ovens, hot plates, coffee
makers and other small appliances will be rigidly regulated and closely monitored.
The use of extension cords to connect heating devices to electric outlets will be prohibited.
If a hot or under-inflated tire is discovered, it should be moved well away from the vehicle. As an alternative, the
driver should remain with the vehicle until the tire is cool to the touch and then make repairs. If a vehicle is left
with a hot tire, the tire might burst into flames and destroy the vehicle and load.
Welding and Cutting
Welding and cutting are not permitted unless authorized by management. If practical, welding and cutting operations
will be conducted in well-ventilated rooms with a fire-resistant floor. If this practice is not feasible, contact (insert job
title of responsible person) to ensure that the work areas have been surveyed for fire hazards, the necessary precautions
taken to prevent fires, and issue a hot work permit. This hot work permit will only encompass the area, item and time
that are specified on it.
If welding is to be performed over wooden or other combustible type floors, the floors will be swept clean, wetted
down, and covered with either fire-retardant blankets, metal or other noncombustible coverings.
Welding will not be permitted in or near areas containing flammable or combustible materials (liquids, vapors or
dusts). Welding will not be permitted in or near closed tanks that contain or have contained flammable liquids unless
they have been thoroughly drained, purged, and tested free from flammable gases or vapors and the company’s permit
required confined spaces (PRCS) program is being followed. Welding will not begin until all combustible materials
have been removed at least 35 feet from the affected areas, or if unable to relocate, covered with a fire-retardant covering. Openings in walls, floors or ducts will be covered if located within 35 feet of the intended work area. Welding will
not be permitted on any closed containers.
Fire extinguishers will be provided at each welding or cutting operation. A trained watcher will be stationed at all
times during the operation and for at least 30 minutes following the completion of the operation. This person will ensure that no stray sparks cause a fire and will immediately extinguish fires that do start.
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Open Flames
No open flames will be permitted in or near spray booths or spray rooms. If indoor spray painting work needs to be
performed outside of standard spray-painting booths, adequate ventilation will be provided. All potential ignition
sources will also be eliminated.
Gasoline or alcohol torches will be placed so that the flames are at least 18 inches away from wood surfaces. They
will not be used in the presence of dusts, vapors, flammable liquids, paper or similar materials. Torches will never be
left unattended while they are burning.
The company has a specific policy regarding cigarette/cigar/pipe smoking in the workplace. Smoking and no smoking areas will be clearly delineated with conspicuous signs. Rigid enforcement will be maintained at all times. The plan
administrator will enforce observance of permissible and prohibited smoking areas for employees and outside visitors
to the workplace. Fire safe metal containers will be provided where smoking is permitted. No smoking areas will be
checked periodically for evidence of discarded smoking materials.
Static Electricity
The company recognizes that it is impossible to prevent the generation of static electricity in every situation, but the
company realizes that the hazard of static sparks can be avoided by preventing the buildup of static charges. One or
more of the following preventive methods will be used: grounding, bonding, maintaining a specific humidity level
(usually 60–70 percent), and ionizing the atmosphere.
Where a static accumulating piece of equipment is unnecessarily located in a hazardous area, the equipment will be
relocated to a safe location rather than attempt to prevent static accumulation.
Housekeeping and Fire Prevention Techniques
The following are housekeeping techniques and procedures to prevent occurrences of fire:
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Keep storage and working areas free of trash.
Place oily rags in covered containers and dispose of daily.
Do not use gasoline or other flammable solvent or finish to clean floors.
Use noncombustible oil-absorptive materials for sweeping floors.
Dispose of materials in noncombustible containers that are emptied daily.
Remove accumulation of combustible dust.
Don’t refuel gasoline powered equipment in a confined space, especially in the presence of equipment such as furnaces or water heaters.
Don’t refuel gasoline powered equipment while it is hot.
Don’t refuel plastic gasoline containers in the back of a truckbed.
Follow proper storage and handling procedures.
Ensure combustible materials in areas are present only in quantities required for the work operation.
Clean up any spill of flammable liquids immediately.
Ensure that if a worker’s clothing becomes contaminated with flammable liquids, the individual changes clothes
before continuing to work.
Post “No Smoking” caution signs near the storage areas.
Report any hazardous condition such as old wiring, worn insulation and broken electrical equipment to the supervisor.
Keep motors clean and in good working order.
Don’t overload electrical outlets.
Ensure all equipment is turned off at the end of the workday.
Maintain the right type of fire extinguisher available for use.
Use the safest cleaning solvents (nonflammable and nontoxic) when cleaning electrical equipment.
Ensure that all passageways and fire doors are unobstructed. Stairwell doors must never be propped open, and materials must not be stored in stairwells.
Periodically remove over-spray residue from walls, floors and ceilings of spray booths and ventilation ducts.
Remove contaminated spray booth filters from the building as soon as replaced or keep immersed in water until
disposed.
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Don’t allow material to block automatic sprinkler systems or to be piled around fire extinguisher locations. To obtain the proper distribution of water, a minimum of 18 inches of clear space must be maintained below sprinkler
deflectors. If there are no sprinklers, a 3-foot clearance between piled material and the ceiling must be maintained
to permit use of hose streams. These distances must be doubled when stock is piled higher than 15 feet.
Check daily for any discarded lumber, broken pallets or pieces of material stored on site and remove properly.
Repile immediately any pile of material that falls into an aisle or clear space.
Use weed killers that are not toxic and do not pose a fire hazard.
Fire Protection Equipment
Every building will be equipped with an electrically managed, manually operated fire alarm system. When activated,
the system will sound alarms that can be heard above the ambient noise levels throughout the workplace. The fire alarm
will also be automatically transmitted to the fire department. Any fire suppression or fire detection system will automatically actuate the building alarm system.
The automatic sprinkler system, if applicable, will adhere to NFPA 13, Standard for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems. The sprinkler system and components will be electrically supervised to ensure reliable operation. This includes
gate valve tamper switches with a local alarm at a constantly attended site when the valve is closed. If a single water
supply is provided by a connection to the city water supply, a low pressure monitor will be included. If pressure tanks
are the primary source of water, air pressure, water level and temperature will be supervised. If fire pumps are provided
to boost system pressure, supervision will monitor loss of pump power, pump running indication, low system pressure
and low pump suction pressure.
If portable fire extinguishers are required or placed in a building, the fire extinguishers must be kept fully charged
and in their designated places. The extinguishers must not be obstructed or obscured from view. The fire extinguishers
must be inspected at least monthly to make sure that they are in their designated places, have not been tampered with or
actuated, and are not corroded or otherwise impaired. The attached inspection tags on fire extinguishers will be initialed
and dated each month.
The location of all hydrants, hose houses, portable fire extinguishers or other fire protective equipment will be properly marked with arrows and signs painted on the pavement. Painted arrows and signs will be repainted as necessary to
ensure readability.
Training
All employees will be instructed on the locations and proper use of fire extinguishers in their work areas. Employees
will also be instructed as to how to operate the building’s fire alarm system, and be familiar with evacuation routes. The
training of all employees will include the locations and types of materials and processes that pose potential fire hazards.
Ongoing training will include regularly scheduled fire drills. The training program will also emphasize the following:
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Use and disposal of smoking materials.
The importance of electrical safety.
Proper use of electrical appliances and equipment.
Unplugging heat-producing equipment and appliances at the end of each workday.
Correct storage of combustible and flammable materials.
Safe handling of compressed gases and flammable liquids (where appropriate).
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Fire Prevention Checklist
This checklist should be reviewed regularly and kept up-to date
Electrical Equipment
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No makeshift wiring
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Extension cords serviceable
Motors and tools free of dirt and grease areas
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(if required)
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Lights clear of combustible materials
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Fuse and control boxes clean and closed
Circuits properly fused or otherwise protected
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Equipment approved for use in hazardous
Safest cleaning solvents used
Friction
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Machinery properly lubricated
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Machinery properly adjusted and/or aligned
Special Fire-Hazard Materials
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Storage of special flammable isolated
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Nonmetal stock free of tramp metal
Welding and Cutting
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Area surveyed for fire safety
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Permit issued
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Combustible removed or covered
Open Flames
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Kept away from spray rooms and booths
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No gas leak
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Portable torches clear of flammable surfaces
Portable Heaters
Set up with ample horizontal and overhead
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clearances
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Secured against tipping or upset
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Combustibles removed or covered
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Safely mounted on noncombustible surfaces
Use of steel drums prohibited
Not used as rubbish burners
Hot Surfaces
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Hot pipes clear of combustible materials
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Ample containers available and serviceable
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Soldering irons kept off combustible surfaces
Ashes in metal containers
Smoking and Matches
No smoking” and “smoking” areas clearly
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marked areas
Discarded cigarette containers available and
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serviceable
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No discarded smoking materials in prohibited
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Ashes in metal containers
Spontaneous Ignition
Flammable waste material in closed metal
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containers
Flammable waste material containers emptied
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frequently
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Piled material kept dry and well ventilated
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Trash receptacle emptied daily
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Proper humidity maintained
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Premises free of unnecessary combustible materials
No leaks or dripping of flammables and floor free of
spills
Fire doors unblocked and operating
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Extinguishing system in working order
Service date current
Personnel trained in use of equipment
Personnel exits unobstructed and maintained
Static Electricity
Flammable liquid dispensing vessels grounded
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and bonded
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Moving machinery grounded
Housekeeping
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No accumulation of rubbish
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Safe storage of flammables
Passageways clear of obstacles freely
Automatic sprinklers unobstructed
Fire Protection
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Proper type of fire extinguisher
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Fire extinguisher in proper location
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Access to fire extinguishers unobstructed
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Access to fire extinguishers clearly marked
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Fire protection equipment turned on
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Identified Fire Hazards and Responsible Personnel
Hazard Identification
Type
Building
Control
Extinguisher
Location
Responsible
Personnel
Fire Extinguisher Location
Type
Building
Extinguisher Location
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Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. This policy is not required to be in writing. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
First Aid, CPR and AED Response Policy
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.151, 1910.269 and 1910.146)
The OSHA First Aid standard (29 CFR 1910.151) requires trained first aid providers at all workplaces of any size if
there is no “infirmary, clinic, or hospital in near proximity to the workplace which is used for the treatment of all injured employees.”
In addition to first aid requirements of 29 CFR 1910.151, several OSHA standards such as 1910.269 and 1910.146
require training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because sudden cardiac arrest from asphyxiation, electrocution, or exertion may occur. For these reasons, we have identified employees that are expected to render first aid as part
of their job duties. They are also covered by the requirements of the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (29 CFR
1910.1030). Our designated employees are trained by (insert job title of person responsible).
Employee Name
Department
Phone Number
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Note: Training should be conducted in accordance with the American Red Cross or American Heart Association guidelines or other nationally recognized programs. Instructors should also be certified to train per the requirements of these
programs.
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Note: The following program is a best practice. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary.
Fleet Management and Vehicle Safety Program
Motor Vehicle Record Checks
All employees who drive a company vehicle will have their driving records checked. (Insert how often checks will be
conducted if necessary.) Driving records will be obtained from the N.C. Department of Transportation, Division of
Motor Vehicles, by one of the following methods:
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Use the Internet Driving Record Process online at:
https://edmv-dr.dot.state.nc.us/DrivingRecords/DrivingRecords
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By mail. Follow the instructions found at:
http://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/records/
Violations that result in the suspension of an employee’s license with the state DMV may result in termination of
employment if the employee must drive to perform the job.
Additionally, we have defined the number of violations an employee can have before losing the privilege of driving a
company owned vehicle or piece of equipment for work. If an employee has more than the following on his or her
record using the Moving Violation Point System below as a guide, the employee will lose work driving privileges. The
loss of privileges to drive company owned vehicles may require the employee to use a personal vehicle to continue employment or may result in termination of employment depending upon how the loss of privilege affects the employee’s
ability to perform the job.
______ Maximum number of serious violations allowed.
______ Maximum number of minor violations allowed.
Moving Violation Point System
Serious Violations (seven points)
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Driving under the influence of alcohol or drug (N/A).
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Fleeing the scene of an accident or law enforcement (N/A).
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Driving under license suspension or revocation (N/A).
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Passing a stopped school bus (N/A).
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Speeding in a construction zone.
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15 or more MPH above the speed limit.
Minor Violations (four points)
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From 10 MPH to 15 MPH above the speed limit.
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Passing on the yellow line or through an intersection.
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Running a red light.
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Failure to obey traffic signals.
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Tailgating.
Minor Violations (two points)
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Less than 10 MPH above the speed limit.
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Failure to yield right of way.
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Failure to provide proper signals.
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Company Accident Reporting Procedures
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Call 911.
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Provide first aid to injured parties if qualified and do not move accident victims unless fire or other condition
makes it safer to do so.
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Wait for law enforcement. Do not move vehicle until authorized by law enforcement unless the situation dictates
otherwise.
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Report accident to supervisor as soon as possible.
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Provide accident documentation to supervisor upon return to office and file accident report.
Securing Materials for Transport
Secure tools or equipment while being transported to prevent unsafe movement of materials. During a crash or when
making sudden maneuvers, loose objects can slide around or become airborne, injuring the driver and any passengers.
Objects that could become a hazard should be secured or stored outside the passenger compartment. Objects on the
back or outside of vehicles must be properly secured to prevent it from falling off. Never throw trash or other materials
in the back of open truck or vehicle areas.
Seat Belt Use Policy
Seat belts are extremely effective in preventing injuries and loss of life. All employees must wear seat belts when operating a company owned vehicle or any vehicle on company premises or on company business and all occupants are to
wear seat belts or, where appropriate, child restraints when riding in a company owned vehicle or in a personal vehicle
being used for company business. All employees and their families are strongly encouraged to always use seat belts and
the proper child restraints whenever they are driving or riding in any vehicle in any seating position.
Spotter Safety
A spotter should always be used any time a vehicle or moving equipment with a restricted view is operating on site.
The spotter’s main responsibilities are to look out for himself or herself and look out for all others on the site. Some
tips for the spotter include:
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Never leave the driver’s sight without notifying the operator to stop the vehicle.
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Be consistent with hand signals to ensure understanding.
Safe Operation Techniques
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Do not drive a vehicle/equipment in reverse gear with an obstructed rear view unless it has an audible reverse
alarm distinguishable from the surrounding noise level or another worker signals that it is safe. On sites with multiple vehicles with backup alarms, employees can become accustomed to these alarms and no longer hear them.
Under these circumstances, the use of a spotter may be necessary.
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Workers must be highly visible in all levels of light. Warning clothing, such as red or orange vests, are required
and, if worn for night work, must be of reflective material that meets the requirements of the most current version
ANSI/ISEA 107.
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Never allow untrained workers to operate equipment.
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Drive vehicles or equipment only on roadways or grades that are safely constructed and maintained. Failure to do
so can result in overturned equipment.
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Make sure that you and all other personnel are in the clear before using dumping or lifting devices.
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Lower or block bulldozer and scraper blades, end-loader buckets, dump bodies, etc., when not in use, and leave all
controls in neutral position.
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Set parking brakes when vehicles and equipment are parked, and chock the wheels when on an incline.
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Use of Personal Vehicles for Company Business
When employee-owned vehicles are used for business purposes for more than once-a-week local errands, the following procedures will be followed:
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The vehicle must be properly registered, tagged and inspected per NCDMV requirements.
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The employee must provide semi-annual proof of insurance. Generally, this will be done by providing an up-todate insurance policy or card.
In cases where an employee’s duties require them to drive their own vehicle routinely (defined as “more than once a
week in a continuing fashion”) on company business, the employee will be required to provide a copy of their insurance declaration page and at management’s discretion (based on counsel with the insurance agent/carrier) the employee
may be requested to have the following minimum limits (Example limits) on their personal auto policy:
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$100,000 per person/$300,000 per accident/$50,000 property damage.
Minimum limits of personal autos listed above are for business purposes only. They are not meant to address employee’s entire insurance needs. Evaluation of such needs should be referred to the employee’s insurance agent or company.
Work Zone Safety
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Use traffic signs, barricades or flaggers when construction takes place near public roadways.
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Ensure the traffic control zone is divided and maintained in five distinct areas: advance warning area, transition
area, buffer area, worker area and termination area.
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Display properly spaced advance warning signs to notify drivers of lane tapering, shoulder work, paving or other
activity.
Flaggers, signaling by flaggers and the garments worn must follow the OSHA rules that are incorporated by reference from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, Part 6.
Company Vehicle Maintenance
Vehicles will be inspected by (insert job title of responsible person) every (insert inspection frequency).
At a minimum, the following items will be checked:
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Ensure seat belts are in working order.
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Check vehicles before each shift to ensure that all parts and accessories are in safe operating condition. Examples
include brake system, tire inflation and condition, emergency brakes, steering and all lights.
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Ensure audible alarms and horns are in working order. All bidirectional machines, such as front-end loaders, back
hoes and bulldozers, must be equipped with a horn.
Cell Phones or Radios
The company will provide hands-free cell phones or other radio equipment to employees who have a business need
for such equipment. “Hands-free” in this instance refers to not having to hold the phone while carrying on a discussion;
however, placing calls and hanging up may require handling the phone.
For other employees, use of a cell phone while driving is prohibited when driving on company business. Drivers
using a hands-free system should find a place to safely pull off of the road should they find themselves in complex or
emotional conversations that can hinder safe driving or situations where they must refer to or take notes. No texting
while driving is allowed.
For commercial vehicle operators, any applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSR) or state/local
regulations regarding cell phone use should be followed where stricter than the above policy.
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Commercial Motor Vehicle Operation (Commercial Driver’s License—CDL)
For commercial motor vehicle operation, the following additional requirements under FMCSR 391 must be met.
Some key elements of this section include:
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Drivers must be at least 21 years old.
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Drivers being able to read and speak the English language sufficiently to converse with the general public, to understand highway signs and signals in the English language, to respond to official inquiries, and to make entries
on reports/records.
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Driver can, by reason of experience, training or both, safely operate the type of commercial motor vehicle you intend to have the driver operate.
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Driver is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle.
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Driver has a valid commercial motor vehicle operator’s license.
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Driver has prepared and furnished you a list of moving violations covering the last 12 months.
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Driver is not disqualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle.
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Driver has successfully completed a driver’s road test and has been issued a certificate of driver’s road test from a
previous or current employer.
For prospective commercial motor vehicle drivers, inquiries must be made of former employers over the last three
years and, at a minimum, the last three years of the driver’s driving records must be requested from the appropriate
agency of every state where the driver was licensed to operate over the past three years.
Road Tests
Prior to operating a company vehicle, in addition to providing a valid driver’s license and meeting the motor-vehicle
record criteria, drivers must complete a road test provided by an authorized member of management. This is generally a
20-30 minute documented observation of your driving skills with the vehicle you are expected to be operating. Undue
concerns may result in an advanced driver-training course (classroom or over the Internet) being required prior to driving a company vehicle.
Cargo Security
Cargo/equipment falling from vehicles can result in fatalities to pedestrians or other drivers.
Prior to each trip in a company pickup, truck or van, a final walk around of the vehicle by the driver should be completed to ensure that all cargo and equipment is adequately secured. In cases of questionable security, management or
veteran drivers should be contacted for advice. Inspecting the cargo/equipment within the first 50 miles of the trip (as
required for commercial motor vehicles per FMCSR 392.9) is recommended.
Drug and Alcohol Policy: Commercial Motor Vehicles Requiring a CDL
As applicable, FMSCR 382, “Controlled Substances and Alcohol Use and Testing,” will be followed.
Vehicle Inspections
All passenger vehicles over 10,001 gross vehicle weight (GVW) are required to have a minimum of semi-annual inspections to ensure proper preventive maintenance (tire rotations, oil changes, etc.), drivability, care and recordkeeping.
All vehicles over 10,001 GVW, those that are designed for 15 or more passengers (including the driver), or those
hauling hazardous materials to the extent that the vehicle needs to be placarded “Commercial Motor Vehicle” must
have daily post-trip inspections performed and documented by the operator. This should also include documentation on
maintenance concerns that would be seen by the next driver of the vehicle and any mechanical repairs that were completed between inspections.
Pretrip inspections, also known as walk-arounds, are required for commercial motor vehicles. This inspection also
includes review of the last driver vehicle inspection report. No written documentation of this inspection is required unless there needs to be a sign-off on the prior driver vehicle inspection report.
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Accident Review Committee
An accident review committee will be established and composed of three members chosen at large. One member
will be a manager, one member will be a senior/experienced driver, and one member will be an employee chosen at
large.
The purpose of this committee is to review the circumstances involving an accident to determine if the accident was
preventable. The National Safety Council (NSC) guidelines will be used for this determination. A preventable accident
is defined by NSC as: “Any occurrence involving a vehicle which results in property damage and/or personal injury, regardless of who was injured, what property was damaged, to what extent, or where it occurred; in which the driver in
question failed to do everything he/she reasonably could have done to prevent the occurrence.”
The definition of a preventable accident will be strictly and impartially applied. All accidents will be reviewed for
evidence of defensive driving techniques.
Accident Review Findings
The findings of the accident review committee will be presented to the driver. If the committee finds the accident
was preventable and the driver disagrees, the driver is encouraged to present “their side” and ask for a reopening of the
finding. The committee may request assistance from insurance agency/carrier, loss control professionals in the event of
a nonunanimous committee opinion or requested reopening. The committee, however, is under no obligation to reopen
an accident review.
The findings of the committee will be placed in the driver’s personal driving file for future review. If the accident
was preventable, the driver may be subject to additional action as deemed appropriate by their supervisor or top-level
management. These actions may include, but not be limited to, the following:
l
Attendance at an advanced driver training seminar.
l
Assignment (usually temporary) to a nondriving position.
l
One and two above.
l
Probation without pay from one to three weeks.
l
Termination of employment (when driving record criteria is surpassed).
62
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Forklift Safety Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.178)
Purpose
The purpose of this program is to prevent injury or property damage from the unsafe operation of powered industrial
vehicles. The policy provides the fundamentals for the operation, use and maintenance of powered industrial trucks, including fork trucks, tractors, platform lift trucks, motorized hand trucks, and other specialized industrial trucks powered
by electric motors or internal combustion engines. This program has been developed to comply with 29 CFR 1910.178,
Powered Industrial Trucks.
General Requirements
Selection
l
If the load to be handled is such that it presents a hazard to the operator (for instance, boxes falling from a pallet
during travel), the manufacturer will install a vertical load backrest.
l
A vehicle used in dim areas of the plant will come equipped with its own light (including vehicles that are used to
load semi trucks).
l
Nameplates and markings on powered industrial trucks should remain intact and should be maintained in legible
condition. The manufacturer’s written approval must be obtained for any modifications that affect truck capacity
or safe operation. If a modification is made, the capacity, operation and maintenance instruction plates, tags or decals should be changed.
l
Prior to using a truck in each area of the plant, the atmosphere or location should be classified as to whether it is
hazardous or nonhazardous. The type of industrial truck used in each area is dependent on this classification. Only
approved industrial trucks should be used in hazardous locations.
Safety Guards
The following safety guards should be provided on powered industrial trucks:
Enclosure Guards: All hazardous moving parts should be guarded, such as exposed gears and chain-and-sprocket
drives. Tires should also be guarded to prevent objects from being propelled toward the operator.
Overhead Guard: An overhead guard should be provided where there is a danger of falling objects or where loads
are lifted higher the operator’s head. These guards should extend beyond the operator’s position.
Vertical Load Backrest Extension: A load backrest extension should be provided when the type of load present a
hazard to the operator.
Battery Maintenance
The following safety rules should be followed when charging/changing batteries:
l
Batteries should be charged only in the battery charging area.
l
Trucks should be properly positioned and the brake applied before attempting to change or charge batteries. Material handling equipment should be provided for handling batteries.
63
l
Facilities should be provided for:
l Flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolyte
l Fire protection
l Protecting charging apparatus from damage by trucks
l Ventilation for dispersal of fumes from gassing batteries
l
A carboy tilter or siphon should be provided for handling electrolyte.
l
When changing batteries, acid should be poured into water; water should not be poured into acid.
l
Ensure that vent caps are functioning. The battery or compartment covers should be open to dissipate heat.
l
Take precautions to prevent open flames, sparks or electric arcs in the battery charging area.
l
Smoking is prohibited in the charging area.
l
Keep tools and metallic objects away from the top of uncovered batteries.
l
Make sure that reinstalled batteries are properly positioned and secured in the truck.
Fuel Handling and Storage
Liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel fuel) should be handled and stored in accordance with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code (NFPA No. 30).
Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) should be handled and stored in accordance with NFPA Storage and Handling of
Liquefied Petroleum Gases (NFPA No. 58).
l
The engine should be stopped and the driver should dismount the vehicle before a truck is refueled.
l
Fuel tanks will not be filled while the engine is running. Spillage will be avoided. Refueling must be performed
out of all buildings and away from open doors.
l
Spillage of oil or fuel will be carefully washed away or completely evaporated and the fuel tank cap replaced before restarting engine.
l
No forklift will be operated with a leak in the fuel system until the leak has been corrected.
Control of Noxious Gases and Fumes
Concentration levels of carbon monoxide gas created by powered industrial trucks should not exceed levels specified
in 29 CFR 1910.1000. Currently, the 8-hour time weighted average limit is 50 parts per million (ppm). Industrial hygiene sampling should be conducted to verify carbon monoxide levels.
To control the levels of carbon monoxide in the plant, gasoline engines should not be idled in enclosed areas for long
periods of time.
Routine Inspection and Maintenance
l
Operators will be held responsible for checking the mechanical condition of their trucks at the start of each shift or
before initial use.
l
Operators will be instructed never to make adjustments or repairs on trucks, but to promptly report any faulty mechanical condition to maintenance for repair.
l
Maintenance employees will make a thorough mechanical inspection of all trucks at least once a month, at which
time necessary repair and parts replacement will be made.
l
If at any time a powered industrial forklift is found to be in need of repair, defective or in any way unsafe, the
truck will be taken out of service until it has been restored to safe operating condition.
l
Open flames will not be used for checking electrolyte level in storage batteries or gasoline level in fuel tanks.
64
l
Storage batteries used for electric-powered trucks require regular maintenance and charging. Adequate ventilation,
emergency eyewash stations and other appropriate equipment will be provided. Employees will be trained in the
proper procedures to handle and charge batteries and to handle acids.
l
All powered industrial trucks should be maintained in safe operating condition at all times. Maintenance activities
should include regular inspections, preventive maintenance and overhauls when necessary. Trucks that are not in
safe operating condition should be removed from service until repairs are made. Repairs should be made only by
authorized personnel.
l
Powered industrial truck operators should inspect their trucks at the beginning of their shift. The operators should
check the controls, tires, brakes, tires and other moving parts. A standardized operators’ checklist should be used
for these inspections. (A sample form is located at end of this section.)
l
Documentation should be maintained of all inspection and maintenance activities. A file containing the maintenance and inspection records should be maintained for each truck.
Powered Industrial Vehicle Safe Operating Rules
Because of the hazards involved with powered industrial vehicle operations, the following safe operating practices
have been developed to ensure that authorized employees drive in a safe manner.
General
l
Safeguard the pedestrian at all times.
l
When leaving a vehicle unattended (definition: vehicle not in view or is in view, but is more than 25 feet away),
the operator should ensure the following:
l Forks will be fully lowered.
l The transmission is in neutral.
l Power shut off.
l Brakes set and key or connector plug is removed.
l Wheels are chocked if the truck is parked on an incline.
l
A safe distance will be maintained from the edge of ramps or platforms while on any elevated dock, platform or
freight car. Vehicles will not be used for opening or closing doors.
l
Brakes will be set and wheel chocks will be in place to prevent movement of trucks, trailers or railroad cars while
loading or unloading. Fixed jacks may be necessary to support semi-trailer during loading or unloading when the
trailer is not coupled to a tractor. The flooring of the trucks, trailers and railroad cars will be checked for breaks
and weakness before they are entered with a vehicle.
l
An overhead guard will be used as protection against falling objects.
l
A load backrest extension should always be used to minimize the possibility of the load or part of it from falling
forward.
l
Fire aisles, fire doors, access to stairways, and fire equipment and emergency exits will always be kept clear.
l
Any vehicle with hydraulically controlled attachments should only be used for which it was designed.
l
Vehicles will not be driven up to anyone standing in front of a fixed object.
l
The driver will never place his or her arms or legs between the uprights of the mast or outside the running lines of
the vehicle.
l
No person will be allowed to stand or pass under the elevated portion of any vehicle whether loaded or empty.
l
Unauthorized personnel will not be permitted to ride on powered industrial vehicles.
l
The driver will never push one load with another load.
l
Spinner knobs must not be attached to steering hand wheels of trucks not originally equipped with such.
l
Vehicles will never be used to lift people unless you have a properly designed safety platform securely attached to
the forks and the mast.
65
l
Dockboards or bridge plates will be properly secured before they are driven over. Dockboard or bridge plates will
be driven over carefully and slowly and their rate capacity never exceeded.
l
Elevators will be approached slowly and then entered squarely after the elevator car is properly leveled. Once on
the elevator, the transmission will be in neutral, the engine shut off and the brakes set.
l
Never pick up loads in excess of the rated capacity of the vehicle.
Traveling
l
All traffic regulations will be observed, including observing all stop signs and yield signs.
l
The driver must always slow down and sound the horn at cross aisles and when approaching blind corners, intersections or other locations where vision is obstructed.
l
A safe distance under normal conditions will be maintained approximately three vehicle lengths from the truck
ahead.
l
The driver should always keep to the right of the aisle when possible.
l
If the load being carried obstructs forward view, the driver must travel in reverse.
l
Railroad tracks will be crossed diagonally whenever possible. Parking closer than 8 feet from the center of the
railroad tracks is prohibited.
l
Grades will be ascended or descended slowly, keeping the load uphill. Never operate diagonally across an incline.
l
Operators should never reach through the mast of a vehicle to adjust the load.
l
Keep forks slightly tilted back so load is cradled by the backrest to aid in stabilizing loads when traveling.
l
When traveling the forks must be just high enough to clear the floor.
Operation of the Vehicle
l
Vehicles will be inspected before being placed in service. Defects when found will be immediately reported and
corrected.
l
The daily operator’s checkoff list must be filled out completely by each operator at the start of each shift before
the vehicle is put into operation.
l
If at any time during your shift a vehicle is found to be in need of repair or in anyway unsafe, the vehicle will be
taken out of service until it has been restored to safe operating condition.
l
Spillage of oil or fuel will be carefully washed away or completely evaporated and the fuel tank cup replaced before restarting engine.
l
Fuel tanks will not be filled while the engine is running, spillage will be avoided.
l
No vehicle will be operated with a leak in the fuel system or hydraulic system.
l
Open flames will not be used for checking electrolyte level in storage batteries or gasoline level in field tanks.
l
Before changing tanks on liquefied propane powered vehicles, the tank valve should always be turned off and the
engine allowed to run until out of gas.
l
Smoking is not allowed when changing storage batteries or placing them on charge or taking them off charge for
electric powered vehicles.
Loading/Stacking
l
Only stable or safely arranged loads will be handled.
l
Only loads within the rated capacity of the vehicle will be handled.
l
The forks must be placed under the load as far as possible. The mast will be carefully tilted backward.
l
Extreme care should be used when tilting the load forward or backward, especially when the load is raised.
66
l
When stacking or tiering, the operator should use only enough backward tilt to stabilize the load.
l
The operator must be careful not to damage lights, pipes, sprinkler systems, overhead doors, vertical beams, walls,
etc., when stacking material.
l
The uppermost portion of any staked loads will never be closer than 18 inches under overhead installations, lights,
etc.
l
Never tilt the load except where the load is on a deposit position over a rack or stack.
l
If material is not banded or correctly piled and the load obviously is wobbly, the operator will not attempt to lift it.
l
Never stack material so that it causes blind spots at corners and intersections.
l
Only stack material on a stable base that is sufficient in size and capable of supporting the stacked weight.
l
The operator should remove unsafe containers and damaged pallets.
Training Requirements
Operator Training
Operator training will be conducted prior to allowing anyone to operate an industrial vehicle, with recertification for
experienced drivers every three years. Methods will be devised to train operators in the safe operation of powered industrial lift trucks. This training should include the following:
l
All employees covered by this program will receive proper training, including operation and rules for safe driving.
A completed license will serve as documentation of the training. A copy of this license will be maintained on file
with the company.
l
All training for drivers will include classroom and practical driving testing.
l
Operators certified to drive vehicles should be given a certification card to be carried with them whenever operating a vehicle.
Nonoperator Training
Employees working in areas where powered industrial vehicles operate should be made aware of the following general rules:
l
Never pass under the raised forks of a vehicle, whether they are loaded or not.
l
Walk around forks of a vehicle, never over or between them.
l
Never “hitch a ride” on someone else’s vehicle.
l
Allow vehicles the right of way.
67
Forklift Inspection Form
General
Do industrial trucks acquired after Feb. 15, 1972, meet the design
requirements in American National Standard for Powered
Industrial Trucks, Part II, ANSI B56.1-1969?
Has the manufacturer provided written approval for modifications
that affect the capacity and safety operations of the equipment?
Do industrial trucks have labels designating approval for use in
various hazardous and/or nonhazardous locations?
Designations
Are safety coordinator and procurers of equipment aware
of the 11 designations of industrial trucks or tractors
(D, DS, DY, E, ES, EE, EX, G, GS, LP, and LS)?
Designated Use of Requirements
Are safety coordinator and operators knowledgeable
about the use of industrial trucks in various locations?
Fuel Handling and Storage Requirements
Is the storage and handling of liquid fuels in accordance with NFPA
Flammable and Combustible Liquids Code (NFPA No. 58-1969)?
OK
Action Needed
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
Is the storage and handling of liquefied petroleum gas fuel
in accordance with NFPA Storage and Handling of Liquefied
Petroleum Gases (NFPA No. 58-1969)?
Changing and Charging Storage Batteries
Are battery-charging installations located in
areas designated for that purpose?
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
Are facilities provided for flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolyte?
-----
-----------
Are facilities provided for adequate ventilation for
dispersal of fumes from gassing batteries?
-----
-----------
Is proper handling equipment (conveyor and hoists)
provided for handling batteries?
-----
-----------
Is a carbon filter or siphon provided for handling electrolyte?
-----
-----------
Is care taken to ensure that vent caps are functioning when
charging batteries?
Note: The battery or compartment covers will be open to dissipate heat.
-----
-----------
Is smoking prohibited in the charging area?
-----
-----------
Are precautions taken to prevent open flames,
sparks, or electric arcs in battery-charging areas?
-----
-----------
Are tools and other metallic objects kept away from
the tops of uncovered batteries?
-----
-----------
68
Dockboards (bridge plates)
Are portable and powered dockboards strong enough
to carry the load imposed on them?
-----
-----------
Are portable dockboards secured in position, either
by being anchored or equipped with devices that
will prevent slippage?
-----
-----------
Are handholds or other effective means provided
on portable dockboards to ensure safe handling?
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
Are unauthorized personnel prohibited from riding
on powered industrial trucks?
-----
-----------
Is it prohibited for arms or legs to be placed
between the uprights of the mast or outside the
running lines of a truck?
-----
-----------
Is it required for load-engaging means to be fully
lowered, controls neutralized, power shut off and
brakes set when a powered industrial truck is left
unattended?
-----
-----------
Is it required to maintain a safe distance from
the edge of ramps or platforms while on any
elevated dock, platform or freight car?
-----
-----------
Is an overhead guard used as protection against
falling objects?
-----
-----------
Is a load backrest extension used whenever necessary
to minimize the possibility of the load or part of
it from falling backward?
-----
-----------
Are only approved industrial trucks used in
hazardous locations?
-----
-----------
Is positive protection provided to prevent
railroad cars from being moved while dockboards
or bridge plates are in position?
Operator Training
Are only trained and authorized operators permitted
to operate a powered industrial truck?
Truck Operations
Is it prohibited for a person to stand or pass
under the elevated portion of any truck, whether
loaded or empty?
69
Traveling
Is it required that all traffic regulations be
observed, including authorized plant speed limits?
-----
-----------
Is it required to yield the right of way to
ambulances, fire trucks or other vehicles
in emergency situations?
-----
-----------
Is it required that drivers not pass other trucks
traveling in the same direction at intersections,
blind spots or other dangerous locations?
-----
-----------
Is it required that drivers slow down and sound the
horn at cross aisles and other locations where
vision is obstructed?
-----
-----------
Is it required that railroad tracks will be
crossed diagonally wherever possible?
-----
-----------
Is it required that when ascending or descending
grades that exceed 10 percent loaded trucks be
driven with the load upgrade?
-----
-----------
Is it required that on all grades the load and
load-engaging means be tilted back,
if applicable, and raised only as far as necessary
to clear the road surface?
-----
-----------
Is it required that under all travel conditions
the truck be operated at a speed that will permit
it to stop in a safe manner?
-----
-----------
Are stunt driving and horseplay prohibited?
-----
-----------
Are dockboards or bridge plates properly secured
before they are driven over?
-----
-----------
Is it required that elevators be approached slowly
and then entered squarely after the elevator car
is properly leveled?
-----
-----------
Is it required that motorized hand trucks enter
elevators or other confined areas with load end
forward?
Loading
Are drivers instructed that only stable or safely
arranged loads be handled?
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
Are drivers instructed that only loads within the
rated capacity of the truck will be handled?
-----
-----------
Is a load-engaging means placed under the load as
far as possible?
-----
-----------
Are drivers required to use extreme care when
tilting the load forward or backward, particularly
when high tiering?
-----
-----------
70
Operation of the Truck
Are personnel instructed that fuel tanks not be
filled while the engine is running?
-----
-----------
Is it required that spillage of oil or fuel be
carefully washed away or completely evaporated and
the fuel tank cap replaced before restarting the
engine?
-----
-----------
Is it prohibited for a truck to be operated with
a leak in the fuel system until the leak
has been corrected?
-----
-----------
Is it prohibited for open flames to be used for
checking electrolyte level in storage batteries or
gasoline level in fuel tanks?
Maintenance of Industrial Trucks
Is it required that no repairs be made in Class I,
II and III locations?
-----
-----------
-----
-----------
Is it required that repairs to the fuel and
ignition systems of industrial trucks, which involve
fire hazards, be conducted only in locations
designated for such repairs?
-----
-----------
Is it required that trucks in need of repairs to the
electrical system have the battery disconnected
before such repairs are made?
-----
-----------
Is it required that industrial trucks not be altered
without the manufacturer’s approval?
-----
-----------
Is it required that industrial trucks be examined
before being placed in service?
-----
-----------
Is it required that water mufflers be filled daily
or as frequently as necessary to prevent depletion
of the water supply below 75 percent of the filled
capacity?
-----
-----------
Is it required that vehicles with mufflers and
screens or other parts that may become clogged not
be operated while such screens or parts are clogged?
-----
-----------
Is it required that any vehicle that emits hazardous
sparks or flames from the exhaust system be
immediately removed from service and not returned to
service until the cause for the emission of such
sparks and flames has been eliminated?
-----
-----------
Is it required that when the temperature of any part of
any truck is found to exceed its normal operating temperature,
thus creating a hazardous condition, the vehicle be removed
from service and not be returned to service until the cause
for such overheating has been eliminated?
-----
-----------
71
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Hand and Powered Tools Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.241–244)
Appropriate personal protective equipment, such as safety goggles and gloves, will be worn to protect against hazards that may be encountered while using hand tools.
Workplace floors will be kept as clean and dry as possible to prevent accidental slips with or around dangerous hand
tools.
Power tools will be fitted with guards and safety switches. They are extremely hazardous when used improperly. The
types of power tools are determined by their power source: electric, pneumatic, liquid fuel, hydraulic or powder-actuated.
Guards
The exposed moving parts of power tools need to be safeguarded. Belts, gears, shafts, pulleys, sprockets, spindles,
drums, flywheels, chains, or other reciprocating, rotating or moving parts of equipment must be guarded.
Machine guards, as appropriate, must be provided to protect the operator and others from the following:
l
Point of operation
l
In-running nip points
l
Rotating parts
l
Flying chips and sparks
Safety guards must never be removed when a tool is being used. Portable circular saws having a blade greater than 2
inches (5.08 cm) in diameter must be equipped with guards at all times. An upper guard must cover the entire blade of
the saw. A retractable lower guard must cover the teeth of the saw, except where it makes contact with the work material.
The lower guard must automatically return to the covering position when the tool is withdrawn from the work material.
General Safe Work Practices
To prevent hazards associated with the use of power tools, workers should observe general safe work practices:
l
Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
l
Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.
l
Keep cords and hoses away from heat, oil and sharp edges.
l
Disconnect tools when not using them, before servicing and cleaning them, and when changing accessories such
as blades, bits and cutters.
l
Keep all people not involved with the work at a safe distance from the work area.
l
Secure work with clamps or a vise, freeing both hands to operate the tool.
l
Avoid accidental starting. Do not hold fingers on the switch button while carrying a plugged-in tool.
l
Maintain tools with care; keep them sharp and clean for best performance.
l
Follow instructions in the user’s manual for lubricating and changing accessories.
l
Be sure to keep good footing and maintain good balance when operating power tools.
l
Wear proper apparel for the task. Loose clothing, ties or jewelry can become caught in moving parts.
l
Remove all damaged portable electric tools from use and tag them “Do Not Use.”
72
Operating Controls and Switches—Safe Work Practices
The following hand-held power tools must be equipped with a constant-pressure switch or control that shuts off the
power when pressure is released: drills; tappers; fastener drivers; horizontal, vertical and angle grinders with wheels
more than 2 inches (5.08 cm) in diameter; disc sanders with discs greater than 2 inches (5.08 cm); belt sanders; reciprocating saws; saber saws, scroll saws, and jigsaws with blade shanks greater than 1⁄4 inch (0.63 cm) wide; and other similar tools. These tools also may be equipped with a “lock-on” control, if it allows the worker to also shut off the control
in a single motion using the same finger or fingers. The following hand-held power tools must be equipped with either
a positive “on-off” control switch, a constant pressure switch, or a “lock-on” control: disc sanders with discs 2 inches
(5.08 cm) or less in diameter; grinders with wheels 2 inches (5.08 cm) or less in diameter; platen sanders, routers, planers, laminate trimmers, nibblers, shears and scroll saws; jigsaws, saber and scroll saws with blade shanks a nominal 1⁄4
inch (0.63 cm) or less in diameter. It is recommended that the constant-pressure control switch be regarded as the preferred device.
Other hand-held power tools such as circular saws having a blade diameter greater than 2 inches (5.08 cm), chain
saws, and percussion tools with no means of holding accessories securely must be equipped with a constant pressure
switch.
Electric Tools—Safe Work Practices
Employees using electric tools must be aware of several dangers. Among the most serious hazards are electrical
burns and shocks.
Electrical shocks, which can lead to injuries such as heart failure and burns, are among the major hazards associated
with electric powered tools. Under certain conditions, even a small amount of electric current can result in fibrillation
of the heart and death. An electric shock also can cause the user to fall off a ladder or other elevated work surface and
be injured due to the fall.
To protect the user from shock and burns, electric tools must have a three-wire cord with a ground and be plugged
into a grounded receptacle, be double insulated, or be powered by a low voltage isolation transformer. Three-wire cords
contain two current-carrying conductors and a grounding conductor. Any time an adapter is used to accommodate a
two-hole receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known ground. The third prong must never be removed
from the plug.
Double-insulated tools are available that provide protection against electrical shock without third-wire grounding.
On double insulated tools, an internal layer of protective insulation completely isolates the external housing of the tool.
The following general practices should be followed when using electric tools:
l
Operate electric tools within their design limitations.
l
Use gloves and appropriate safety footwear when using electric tools.
l
Store electric tools in a dry place when not in use.
l
Do not use electric tools in damp or wet locations unless they are approved for that purpose.
l
Keep work areas well lighted when operating electric tools.
l
Ensure that cords from electric tools do not present a tripping hazard.
In the construction industry, employees who use electric tools must be protected by ground fault circuit interrupters
(GFCI) or assured equipment grounding conductor program.
Portable Abrasive Wheel Tools—Safe Work Practices
Portable abrasive grinding, cutting, polishing and wire buffing wheels create special safety problems because they may
throw off flying fragments. Abrasive wheel tools must be equipped with guards that (a) cover the spindle end, nut and
flange projections; (b) maintain proper alignment with the wheel; and (c) do not exceed the strength of the fastenings.
Before an abrasive wheel is mounted, it must be inspected closely for damage and should be sound or ring tested to
ensure that it is free from cracks or defects. To test, wheels should be tapped gently with a light nonmetallic instrument.
73
If the wheels sound cracked or dead, they must not be used because they could fly apart in operation. A stable and undamaged wheel, when tapped, will give a clear metallic tone or “ring.”
To prevent an abrasive wheel from cracking, it must fit freely on the spindle. The spindle nut must be tightened
enough to hold the wheel in place without distorting the flange. Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations.
Take care to ensure that the spindle speed of the machine will not exceed the maximum operating speed marked on the
wheel.
An abrasive wheel may disintegrate or explode during start-up. Allow the tool to come up to operating speed prior to
grinding or cutting. The employee should never stand in the plane of rotation of the wheel as it accelerates to full operating speed. Portable grinding tools need to be equipped with safety guards to protect workers, not only from the moving
wheel surface, but also from flying fragments in case of wheel breakage.
When using a powered grinder:
l
Always use eye or face protection.
l
Turn off the power when not in use.
l
Never clamp a hand-held grinder in a vise.
Pneumatic Tools—Safe Work Practices
Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air and include chippers, drills, hammers and sanders.
There are several dangers associated with the use of pneumatic tools. First and foremost is the danger of getting hit
by one of the tool’s attachments or by some kind of fastener the worker is using with the tool.
Pneumatic tools must be checked to see that the tools are fastened securely to the air hose to prevent them from becoming disconnected. A short wire or positive locking device attaching the air hose to the tool must also be used and
will serve as an added safeguard.
If an air hose is more than 1⁄2 inch (1.27 cm) in diameter, a safety excess flow valve must be installed at the source of
the air supply to reduce pressure in case of hose failure.
In general, the same precautions should be taken with an air hose that are recommended for electric cords, because
the hose is subject to the same kind of damage or accidental striking, and because it also presents tripping hazards.
When using pneumatic tools, a safety clip or retainer must be installed to prevent attachments, such as chisels on a
chipping hammer, from being ejected during tool operation.
Pneumatic tools that shoot nails, rivets, staples or similar fasteners and operate at pressures more than 100 pounds
per square inch (689 kPa) must be equipped with a special device to keep fasteners from being ejected, unless the muzzle is pressed against the work surface.
Airless spray guns that atomize paints and fluids at pressures of 1,000 pounds or more per square inch (6,890 kPa)
must be equipped with automatic or visible manual safety devices that will prevent pulling the trigger until the safety
device is manually released.
Eye protection is required, and head and face protection is recommended for employees working with pneumatic
tools.
Screens must also be set up to protect nearby workers from being struck by flying fragments around chippers, riveting guns, staplers or air drills.
Compressed air guns should never be pointed toward anyone. Never “dead-end” them against yourself or anyone
else. A chip guard must be used when compressed air is used for cleaning.
Use of heavy jackhammers can cause fatigue and strains. Heavy rubber grips reduce these effects by providing a secure handhold. When operating a jackhammer, wear safety glasses and safety shoes that protect you against injury if the
jackhammer slips or falls. A face shield should also be used.
Noise is another hazard associated with pneumatic tools. Working with noisy tools such as jackhammers requires
proper effective use of appropriate hearing protection.
74
Liquid Fuel Tools
Fuel powered tools are usually operated with gasoline. The most serious hazard associated with the use of fuel-powered tools comes from fuel vapors that can burn or explode and also give off dangerous exhaust fumes. Be careful to
handle, transport and store gas or fuel only in approved flammable liquid containers, according to proper procedures for
flammable liquids.
Before refilling a fuel powered tool tank, shut down the engine and allow it to cool to prevent accidental ignition of
hazardous vapors. When a fuel-powered tool is used inside a closed area, effective ventilation and/or proper respirators
such as atmosphere-supplying respirators must be utilized to avoid breathing carbon monoxide. Fire extinguishers must
also be available in the area.
Powder-Actuated Tools
Powder-actuated tools operate like a loaded gun and must be treated with extreme caution. In fact, they are so dangerous that they must be operated only by specially trained employees.
When using powder-actuated tools, wear suitable ear, eye and face protection. Select a powder level—high or low
velocity—that is appropriate for the powder-actuated tool and necessary to do the work without excessive force.
The muzzle end of the tool must have a protective shield or guard centered perpendicular to and concentric with the
barrel to confine any fragments or particles that are projected when the tool is fired. A tool containing a high velocity
load must be designed not to fire unless it has this kind of safety device.
To prevent the tool from firing accidentally, two separate motions are required for firing. The first motion is to bring
the tool into the firing position, and the second motion is to pull the trigger. The tool must not be able to operate until it
is pressed against the work surface with a force of at least 5 pounds (2.2 kg) greater than the total weight of the tool.
If a powder-actuated tool misfires, hold the tool in the operating position for at least 30 seconds before trying to fire
it again. If it still will not fire, the user must hold the tool in the operating position for another 30 seconds and then
carefully remove the load in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. This procedure will make the faulty cartridge less likely to explode. The bad cartridge should then be put in water immediately after removal. If the tool develops a defect during use, it should be tagged and must be taken out of service immediately until it is properly repaired.
Safety precautions that must be followed when using powder-actuated tools include the following:
l
Do not use a tool in an explosive or flammable atmosphere.
l
Inspect the tool before using it to determine that it is clean, that all moving parts operate freely, and that the barrel
is free from obstructions and has the proper shield, guard, and attachments recommended by the manufacturer.
l
Do not load the tool unless it is to be used immediately.
l
Do not leave a loaded tool unattended, especially where it would be available to unauthorized people.
l
Keep hands clear of the barrel end.
l
Never point the tool at anyone.
When using powder-actuated tools to apply fasteners, several additional procedures must be followed:
l
Do not fire fasteners into material that would allow the fasteners to pass through to the other side.
l
Do not drive fasteners into very hard or brittle material that might chip or splatter or make the fasteners ricochet.
l
Always use an alignment guide when shooting fasteners into existing holes.
l
When using a high velocity tool, do not drive fasteners more than 3 inches (7.62 cm) from an unsupported edge or
corner of material such as brick or concrete.
l
When using a high velocity tool, do not place fasteners in steel any closer than 1⁄2 inch (1.27 cm) from an unsupported corner edge unless a special guard, fixture, or jig is used.
75
Hydraulic Power Tools
The fluid used in hydraulic power tools must be an approved fire-resistant fluid and must retain its operating characteristics at the most extreme temperatures to which it will be exposed. The exception to fire-resistant fluid involves all
hydraulic fluids used for the insulated sections of derrick trucks, aerial lifts, and hydraulic tools that are used on or
around energized lines. This hydraulic fluid will be of the insulating type.
The manufacturer’s recommended safe operating pressure for hoses, valves, pipes, filters and their fittings must not
be exceeded.
All jacks, including lever and ratchet jacks, screw jacks, and hydraulic jacks, must have a stop indicator and the stop
limit must not be exceeded. Also, the manufacturer’s load limit must be permanently marked in a prominent place on
the jack and the load limit must not be exceeded.
A jack should never be used to support a lifted load. Once the load has been lifted, it must immediately be blocked
up. Put a block under the base of the jack when the foundation is not firm, and place a block between the jack cap and
load if the cap might slip.
To set up a jack, make certain of the following:
l
The base of the jack rests on a firm, level surface.
l
The jack is correctly centered.
l
The jack head bears against a level surface.
l
The lift force is applied evenly.
Proper maintenance of jacks is essential for safety. All jacks must be lubricated regularly. In addition, each jack must
be inspected according to the following schedule: (a) for jacks used continuously or intermittently at one site—inspected at least once every six months, (b) for jacks sent out of the shop for special work—inspected when sent out and
inspected when returned, and (c) for jacks subjected to abnormal loads or shock—inspected before use and immediately thereafter.
76
Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. The standard should
be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met. The 2012 changes to the standard will be included in the
next edition of this guide.
Hazard Communication Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.1200)
This program will describe how to protect the safety and health of employees who are exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace, and to comply with the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.1200.
(Insert job title of responsible person) has been assigned the title of hazard communication program coordinator and
is responsible for monitoring all related activities to ensure compliance with both the intent and specifics of this program.
Each supervisor will be held responsible for strict adherence to these policies and will closely monitor all activities
involving hazardous chemicals.
Each employee will carefully follow established work practices and promptly report observed or potential problems
to supervision.
No job is so vital or urgent as to justify the risk of employee overexposure to a hazardous chemical. Ask when in
doubt. Proceed with a job only after being satisfied that it is safe to do so.
A list of all hazardous chemicals for each workplace has been made and is readily available upon request to any employee working on any shift. It is located at (insert location of hazardous chemical list).
A safety data sheet (SDS) for each hazardous chemical on the list referenced above is on file at (insert location of
SDSs).
The SDSs are accessible during each work shift for any employee to review. If you have further questions about the
SDS procedure, contact your supervisor.
(Insert job title of responsible person) is responsible to ensure that the list of hazardous chemicals is kept current and
that a current SDS is on hand for each hazardous chemical used. A chemical that is not shown on the current list will
not be ordered without prior coordination with (insert job title of responsible person).
All containers of hazardous chemicals in each workplace will be conspicuously labeled with the identity of the
chemical (same as on the applicable SDS) and the appropriate hazard warnings. If the chemical is a known or suspected
cancer causing agent (carcinogen) or if it is known to affect a specific organ of the body, this information will also be
placed on the container label. The person having supervisory responsibility for the storage or use of each hazardous
chemical will ensure that such labels are not defaced and that they remain legible at all times.
(Insert job title of responsible person) will ensure that an adequate supply of labels is kept on hand and made available to the responsible supervisors.
(Insert job title of responsible person) is responsible for anticipating, as much as possible, the hazards that would be
present for nonroutine tasks, such as a chemical spill or container rupture. Cleanup procedures and proper personal protective equipment will be considered and adequate training for such tasks will be addressed.
When an outside contractor will be used, it will be the responsibility of (insert job title of responsible person) to advise the contractor of any hazardous chemicals to which its employees may be exposed and the appropriate protective
measures to be taken. Conversely, it will be the same person’s responsibility to determine if the contractor will be using
any hazardous chemicals during this work that would expose employees. Appropriate training and protective measures
must be taken in order to protect employees. Prior to any work being performed by an outside contractor involving hazardous chemicals, (insert job title of responsible person) is to be advised.
All employees exposed to any hazardous chemicals will complete an information and training program that includes
at least the subjects listed below. New employees must complete similar instruction before initial exposure to any hazardous chemical in the workplace.
77
Adequate training of all employees exposed to hazardous chemicals will be given by (insert job title of responsible
person), assisted as needed by the hazard communication program coordinator.
Employee information for this program will include:
l
The purpose and need for such a program, including the basic concept that gives every employee the right to
know about hazardous chemicals with which they work.
l
The location and availability of the written hazard communication program, plus the list of hazardous chemicals
and their corresponding SDSs.
l
The identity, upon request, of any chemical to which the employee is exposed. In the case of a trade secret chemical, the name shown on the SDS will be provided.
Employee training will include at least the following:
l
Methods and observations used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area, such as
monitoring devices, appearance or odor.
l
The physical and health hazards associated with each chemical, as specified in the SDS.
l
Action that employees can take to protect their own safety and health, including specific procedures that have
been established for normal work practices, emergency procedures and policies on the use of personal protective
equipment.
l
Details of the hazard communication program, including an explanation of the labeling system used on in-house
containers of hazardous chemicals. Also details of how employees can obtain and use information contained in the
SDS.
It is the intent of management to protect the safety and health of each employee. By following correct procedures, no
employee should experience any harmful effects from working with chemicals in the workplace.
78
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require your program to be in writing but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please
modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Hearing Conservation Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.95)
All employees who are exposed at or above 85 dBA as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) will be included in a
hearing conservation program. Monitoring will be repeated whenever a change in production, process, equipment or
control increases noise exposure to the extent that:
l
Additional employees may be exposed at or above the action level.
l
The attenuation provided by the hearing protectors being used by the employees may be rendered inadequate. A
complete sound survey will be conducted every (insert years).
For noise levels exceeding 90 dBA, mandatory hearing protection and engineering and administrative control measures will be utilized to reduce employee exposures.
Under the current OSHA standard, all workers exposed to 85 dBA as an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) are to
be included in a hearing conservation program. It is important to note that for work shifts in excess of eight hours, the
85 dBA TWA is reduced. For example, exposures in excess of 83.4 dBA for a 10-hour work shift and exposures in excess of 82.1 dBA for a 12-hour work shift necessitate inclusion in a hearing conservation program.
Exposure Monitoring
An ongoing noise exposure evaluation program is required under the OSHA Standard for Occupational Noise Exposure (29 CFR 1910.95) when information indicates that any employee’s exposure may equal or exceed an 8-hour timeweighted average of 85 dBA. Monitoring will be repeated whenever a change in production, process, equipment or
control increases noise exposure to the extent that:
l
Additional employees may be exposed at or above the action level.
l
The attenuation provided by the hearing protectors being used by the employees may be rendered inadequate. A
complete sound survey of the company is recommended at least every two years.
If it is determined through noise monitoring that employee are exposed at or above 85 dBA as an 8-hour timeweighted-average, then the employees must be provided with:
l
Annual hearing tests.
l
Annual hearing conservation training.
l
Hearing protection (optional or mandatory).
l
The OSHA Hearing Conservation Standard (29 CFR 1910.95) posted.
l
Notification of the results of the sound survey.
If the noise level exceeds 90 dBA, the standard requires that engineering and administrative control measures must
be investigated, evaluated and, where feasible, utilized to reduce employee exposures. It is important that any measure
investigated, utilized or evaluated to reduce the noise levels be documented. Hearing protection is mandatory for employees exposed at or above 90 dBA as an 8-hour time-weighted average.
Engineering Controls to Reduce Noise
Contact the equipment manufacturer for noise abatement suggestions.
Purchase quieter equipment and perform routine maintenance to reduce noise levels.
79
Reduction of noise levels at the source:
l
Substitution of materials (i.e., plastic for metal).
l
Dampening or reducing surface vibration.
l
Increasing the distance between the employee and the noise source.
l
Enclosures or sound insulation material.
l
Relocation of job tasks that may be completed out of high noise areas.
Administrative Controls to Reduce Noise
When engineering measures alone cannot reduce the noise below 90 dBA, administrative controls may be used to
minimize employee exposure such as worker rotation from high noise levels to quiet areas or limiting the length of time
an employee can work when rotation is not possible.
Hearing Conservation Training
Hearing conservation training is required annually for all employees with noise exposures of 85 dBA TWA or
greater. The goal of the training is to teach the employees the company hearing conservation program policies and the
requirements of the standard.
The following topics will be included in the employee training of the hearing conservation program:
The effects of noise on hearing:
l
It can take many years to occur and the employee may not realize the gradual hearing loss. The loss occurs without any pain and cannot be corrected by any known medical or surgical treatment. A good rule of thumb to remember is that if you have to raise your voice at a distance of 3 feet, you are in an area with a possible hazardous
noise level. Repeated unprotected noise exposure will cause a permanent hearing loss. The hearing conservation
program has been established to ensure that if you ever have a standard threshold shift, your noise exposure can be
lessened by using engineering or administrative controls or more effective hearing protection. Thus the problem
can be controlled.
The purpose of the annual hearing test and an explanation of the test procedures:
l
The purpose of the annual hearing test is to monitor your hearing. Periodic audiometric testing provides an “early
warning” of hearing disability. Factors such as noisy hobbies, ear infections, diseases of the ear, as well as general
illness may also cause hearing loss. All employees’ hearing will be checked upon employment and once a year
thereafter. You will be notified of any changes in your hearing. You cannot “fail” the test and you will not lose
your job due to the results of the test.
The purpose of hearing protectors, instructions on selection, advantages, disadvantages, fitting use and care:
l
The proper use of hearing protection will prevent many types of hearing loss. You must wear the required hearing
protection properly and regularly to reap the benefits of the protection. You should have already been fitted by (insert name) for your size and type of earplug. If you have any problems with the fit of your hearing protectors, contact (insert name).
Hearing Tests
All employees who are exposed to a noise level of 85 dBA or above will be in the hearing conservation program and
have their hearing checked annually. All hearing test results and other required documentation will be maintained in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020.
Employees will be scheduled as follows:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
80
Testing will begin in (time frame) for all employees requiring the annual hearing test. Each employee’s supervisor or
designee will notify that employee of the test.
It is the responsibility of (insert name) to ensure that contractors providing hearing tests to employees meet OSHA
requirements. It will be the responsibility of (insert name) to obtain and file the following documentation annually from
the contractor providing the hearing tests: current audiometer calibration check records, last audiometer check, both
background noise level records and current audiometer technician certification. If a mobile van used for testing cannot
provide these records, then another testing center will be used.
(Insert name) will provide a file for the audiograms that is separate from other medical or personnel files. These files
will be kept confidential.
Hearing Protection
The proper use of hearing protection will prevent many types of hearing loss. The employee must wear the required
hearing protection properly and regularly to reap the benefits of the protection. If you have any problems with the fit of
your hearing protectors, contact (insert name).
How to Properly Wear Hearing Protectors
It is an OSHA requirement that the company ensures the proper initial fitting and that the company provides training
in the use and care of all hearing provided to employees.
Employee hearing protection training is required:
l
Annually during hearing conservation training.
l
Each time an employee shows a standard threshold shift change in hearing.
To prevent a hearing loss, hearing protectors must be worn correctly and taken care of. Keep your ear plugs clean by
washing them in warm soapy water and make sure they are completely dry before inserting them in your ears. Inspect
your hearing protection regularly. If they become damaged, hard or worn out, replace them with a new pair.
Due to the fact that everyone has different size ear canals, each person will be fitted by (insert name) to ensure they
receive the right size. Each employee will be instructed on how to put their personal hearing protectors in and also be
given the chance to practice in front of the hearing conservationist. Two different types of hearing protectors will be
provided to employees. If there is a problem with the fit comfort of your hearing protectors, see (insert name) and you
will be given a different type of protection.
Hearing Protection Life Span
The life of the hearing protector is dependent upon the care it is given. A sponge type hearing protector is disposable.
But, as long as it is clean, it may be used until it no longer expands. How long the hearing protection lasts is unique to
each employee depending on the chemical make-up of their body, as follows:
l
Sponge plugs—one or two days.
l
Custom plugs—18–24 months.
l
Insert plugs—four–six months.
l
Muffs—replace when worn out.
81
Putting In Earplugs
FIRST
Put your left arm over your head and with your left hand, pull up on your right ear.
SECOND
With your right hand insert the earplug. Switch hands and insert the other plug in the
same manner.
Remember both plugs must work for complete protection.
Recordkeeping
Records are an important part of any effective hearing conservation program. The information contained in these
records reflects the quality and effectiveness of the company hearing conservation program.
A number of documents are required to be maintained under the OSHA hearing conservation standard once the action level has been initiated. Some of these records must be retained for specified periods as shown in the following
records and documentation. It is also required that these records be provided, upon request, to employees, former employees, representatives designated by the individual employee, and the assistant secretary of labor.
The following records/documentation is required by OSHA:
l
Sound survey (retain at least two years).
l
Employee notification on the results of the sound survey.
l
Posted OSHA hearing conservation standard.
Hearing testing (retain for at least the duration of employment)
l
Annual
l
Baseline
Audiogram Evaluation Requirements
l
Standard threshold shift requirements
l
Physician review
Hearing Protection
Hearing Conservation Training
Audiometer
l
Acoustic calibration check
l
Exhaustive calibration check
l
Biological calibration check
l
Self-listening check
82
Booth (if testing is done on site)
l
Background noise
Recording hearing loss on the OSHA 300 log.
Employee Notification of the Results of the Sound Survey
Employees must be notified of the results of the sound survey. Whether written or verbal notification is used, documentation must be maintained. It is recommended that the results of the survey be posted in a central location. Records
will be kept for two years.
Posted OSHA Hearing Conservation Standard
It is an OSHA requirement that a copy of the OSHA standard be posted in a location accessible to all employees.
Hearing Testing
The two types of hearing tests are annual hearing tests and baseline hearing tests. The annual hearing testing is required for employees with 85 dBA TWA or higher noise exposures. Testing can be done any time during the day. Baseline hearing testing is done when an employee is initially hired. The baseline is extremely important because it is the
reference against which future audiograms are compared to determine the extent to which an employee’s hearing is deteriorating. The standard requires that a baseline must be done within six months of hire.
If a mobile van is used, the baseline is required within one year of an employee’s first exposure at or above the action level. However, the employee must wear protection for any period exceeding six months until the baseline is obtained. (North Carolina Workers’ Compensation Law has a 90 working day grace period. If a company gives the
baseline before the grace period is up then the company may be liable only for subsequent hearing loss.) It is required
that the baseline audiogram be preceded by at least 14 hours without exposure to workplace noise. Time that hearing
protection is worn may be included as part of the 14 hours without exposure to noise.
All employees will be notified that they need to avoid nonoccupational noise exposure during the 14 hours prior the
audiometric test. If it is not possible to avoid high noise levels prior to testing, the employee should wear hearing protection prior to the test to minimize the possibility of a temporary threshold.
A retest audiogram can be conducted to verify or confirm a standard threshold result. Times when a retest may be
needed:
l
The company may obtain a retest within 30 days of the original test and use the results to determine whether a
persistent threshold shift has occurred.
l
The audiologist or physician requests a retest to confirm test results.
l
The test administrator requests a new test due to errors in the original test.
Audiometer
The company must verify that the following checks are made:
l
The functional operation of the audiometer must be checked before each day’s use by a person with stable hearing
thresholds.
l
Acoustic calibration check annually per the requirements of Appendix E of the standard.
l
Exhaustive calibration checks at least every two years per ANSI S3.6.
Pulsed-tone and self-recording audiometers must meet the requirements of Appendix C of the standard.
83
Booth
The following must be done:
l
Noise levels inside the booth must be checked with the ventilation fan on and off each time the booth location or
environment changes.
l
With no change in the environment or location, it is recommended that the background noise levels be checked
every three years.
Recording Hearing Loss on the OSHA 300 Log
Hearing loss meeting the criteria in 29 CFR 1904.10 must be recorded on the “Occupational Illness or Injury Form”
in the hearing loss column.
Standard Threshold Shift
A standard threshold shift is a change in hearing threshold relative to the baseline audiogram of an average of 10 or
more dBA at 2,000, 3,000 and 4,000 Hz. If a standard threshold shift has occurred, the employee must be informed in
writing within 21 days of the determination. Employees must be trained in using hearing protectors and in care of the
hearing protectors. If the employee is already using hearing protectors, they must be retrained and refitted. If necessary,
hearing protectors can be changed to a different type.
84
Notification of “Quiet Period” Prior to Baseline Hearing Test (nonmandatory)
It is an OSHA hearing conservation standard requirement that employees be free from high noise exposure for 14
hours before each audiometric test. If it is not possible to avoid high noise levels prior to testing, the employee should
wear hearing protection prior to the test to minimize the possibility of a temporary threshold.
The following types of noise exposures should be avoided prior to the test:
l
Workplace noise
l
Lawn mowers
l
Leaf blowers
l
Weed trimmers
l
Chain saws
l
Power tools
l
Small engines
l
Car races
l
Snow mobiles
l
Small airplanes
l
Power boats
l
All firearms (hunting, target shooting, skeet shooting)
l
Loud music (concerts, walkman or other headset radio, radio/stereos)
I have been notified of the need to avoid occupational and nonoccupational noise prior to my test.
____________________________________________________
Employee Signature
85
______________________________________
Date
Note: The following example program is a best practice and does not need to be in writing. Please modify or delete
content to these policies as deemed necessary. 1910.146 - Hot work permit definition: The employer’s written authorization to perform operations (for example; riveting, welding, cutting, burning and heating) capable of providing a
source of ignition.)
Hot Work Permit Program
Hot work operations include tasks such as welding, brazing, torch cutting, grinding and torch soldering. These operations create heat, sparks and hot slag that have the potential to ignite flammable and combustible materials in the area
surrounding hot work activities.
(Insert job title of responsible person) is responsible for issuing hot work permits and will inspect hot worksites prior
to the start of such operations.
When required, an employee will be designated to serve as a fire watch. The fire watch will monitor the safety of hot
work operations and watch for fires. Fire watches are posted during hot work and for at least 30 minutes after work has
been completed.
Prior to beginning work, a hot work permit will be filled out and will be posted in the area where hot work is to be
performed.
86
Hot Work Permit
Date ____________________ Time_________________________
a.m.
p.m.
Name of Person(s) Performing Work _____________________________________________
Specific Location of Work _________________________________
Cutting or welding permitted in an area that has been made fire safe.
All movable fire hazards in the vicinity have been taken to a safe place.
Guards used to contain the heat, sparks and slag if fire hazards cannot be
removed.
Floor or wall openings or cracks, open doorways and windows protected or
closed.
Fire extinguisher available for use.
Fire watch in areas where other than a minor fire might develop, such as
around combustible material.
Floors swept clean of combustible material for a radius of 35 feet.
Combustible floors have been kept wet, covered with damp sand or protected
by fire-resistant shields.
Welding/cutting done only in areas authorized by management. No
welding/cutting in sprinkled building when sprinkler system is impaired or in
presence of explosive atmosphere or in area of storage of readily ignitable
material.
Dusts and conveyor systems that might carry sparks to distant combustibles
protected or shutdown.
Cutter/welder is trained in safe operation of equipment and safe use of the
process.
Any on-site contractors advised about flammable material or hazardous
conditions of which they may not be aware.
Yes
____
____
No
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Yes
____
____
No
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
____
Welding or Cutting Containers:
Container thoroughly cleaned and ventilated.
Any pipelines or connections to containers disconnected or blanked.
PPE used as needed, e.g., eye protection, helmet, protective clothing,
respirator and gloves.
Warning sign posted to warn other workers of hot metal.
Appropriate ventilation provided.
When working in confined spaces, a permit has been issued as per 1910.146.
For specific requirements, refer to General Industry Standards 1910.146, 1910.252–254 and
1910.272 and Construction Standards 1926.803, 1926.350 and 1926.352–353.
_____________________________________
_____________________________________
Authorized Signature—Supervisor
Date
87
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Housekeeping Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.22)
Housekeeping is an important element of every safety and health program. When materials, tools and equipment all
have a place for orderly storage and are returned to the proper place after use, they are easier to find and easier to inspect for damage and wear.
The following housekeeping safety procedures apply:
l
Keep work areas and storage facilities clean, neat and orderly.
l
Keep all aisles, stairways, passageways, exits and access ways to buildings free from obstructions at all times. Remove all grease and water spills from traffic areas immediately.
l
It is everyone’s responsibility to pick up and clean up.
l
Do not place supplies on top of lockers, hampers, boxes or other moveable containers at a height where they are
not visible from the floor.
l
When piling materials for storage, make sure the base is firm and level. Cross tie each layer. Keep piles level and
do not stack piles too high. Keep aisles clear and maintain adequate space to work in them.
l
When storing materials suspended from racks or hooks, secure them from falling and route walkways a safe distance from the surface beneath.
l
When storing materials overhead on balconies or mezzanines, provide adequate toeboards to keep objects from
rolling over the edge.
l
Do not let materials and supplies that are no longer needed accumulate. If it is not needed, get rid of it!
l
Tools, equipment, machinery and work areas are to be maintained in a clean and safe manner. Defects and unsafe
conditions must be reported to your supervisor.
l
Return tools and equipment to their proper place when not in use.
l
Lay out extension cords, air hoses, water hoses, ladders, pipes, tools, etc., in such a way as to minimize tripping
hazards or obstructions to traffic.
l
Clean up spills immediately to avoid hazards. In the event the removal cannot be done immediately, the area must
be appropriately guarded, signed or roped off.
l
Nail points, ends of loop or tie wires, etc., must not be left exposed when packing and unpacking boxes, crates,
barrels, etc. Nails are to be removed as soon as lumber is disassembled.
l
Store sharp or pointed articles to keep co-workers from coming in contact with the sharp edges or points.
l
Dispose of all packing materials properly to reduce the chance of fires.
l
Empty wastebaskets daily into approved containers.
l
Put oily and greasy rags in a metal container for that purpose and dispose of properly and frequently.
l
Maintain adequate lighting in obscure areas for the protection of both employees and the public. Keep landscaping
well manicured to minimize hiding places.
l
Employees are not to handle food, tobacco, etc., with residue from any lead-based product (such as leaded gasoline) on their hands. Consumption of food and beverages is prohibited in areas where hazardous substances are
stored or used.
88
l
All switches or drives on machinery must be shut down and locked out before cleaning, greasing, oiling, or making adjustments or repairs.
l
Circuit breaker boxes and fuse boxes should be kept closed at all times. It is a requirement to maintain a minimum
clearance of 36 inches in front of them.
l
Flammables (kerosene, gasoline) and combustible materials (coats, rags, cleaning supplies) should not be stored in
mechanical rooms or around electrical boxes.
l
Extension cords should not be run across aisles or through oil or water. Inspect cords for kinks, worn insulation
and exposed strands of wire before use.
l
When fuses blow continually, it is an indication of an overload or short. Report this condition to your safety coordinator immediately.
l
Keep electrical equipment properly maintained and free of grease and dirt.
l
To prevent static sparks, keep drive belts dressed. Also check belts for proper tension to prevent overloading motors.
l
Maintain fire inspections and other fire prevention measures.
l
Conduct inspections for vermin (e.g., ants and bedbugs). If infestation is detected call a professional exterminator.
89
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Ladder Safety Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.25-27)
Ladders must be maintained in good condition at all times. Ladders that are not in good condition will be placed out
of service immediately with a tag stating “out of service.” The employee will submit a maintenance request/work order
for ladder repair.
Inspections
Portable ladders will be visually inspected each day prior to use.
Other ladders will be inspected at least annually or more often if the conditions of use or location necessitate more
frequent inspection.
Loads
Self-supporting (foldout) and non-self-supporting (leaning) portable ladders must be able to support at least four
times the maximum intended load, except extra-heavy-duty metal or plastic ladders, which must be able to sustain 3.3
times the maximum intended load.
Angle
Non-self-supporting ladders, which must lean against a wall or other support, are to be positioned at such an angle
that the horizontal distance from the top support to the foot of the ladder is about one-fourth the working length of the
ladder.
In the case of job-made wooden ladders, that angle should equal about one-eighth the working length. This minimizes the strain of the load on ladder joints that may not be as strong as on commercially manufactured ladders.
Rungs
Ladder rungs, cleats or steps must be parallel, level and uniformly spaced when the ladder is in position for use.
Rungs must be spaced between 10 and 14 inches apart. For extension trestle ladders, the spacing must be 8–18 inches
for the base, and 6–12 inches on the extension section. Rungs must be so shaped that an employee’s foot cannot slide
off, and they must be skid resistant.
Slipping
Ladders are to be kept free of oil, grease, wet paint and other slipping hazards. Wood ladders must not be coated with
any opaque covering, except identification or warning labels on one face only of a side rail.
Other Requirements
Foldout or stepladders must have a metal spreader or locking device to hold the front and back sections in an open
position when in use. When two or more ladders are used to reach a work area, they must be offset with a landing or
platform between the ladders.
The area around the top and bottom of a ladder must be kept clear. Ladders must not be tied or fastened together to
provide longer sections, unless they are specifically designed for such use. Never use a ladder for any purpose other
than the one for which it was designed.
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Note: This program may be mandatory for your company. Please reference the scope and application of the referenced
OSHA standard. This is an example written program and may be modified to meet the company’s needs. The standard
requires only your lockout/tagout procedures and inspections to be in writing. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Lockout/Tagout (Control of Hazardous Energy) Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.147)
The purpose of the lockout/tagout (LOTO) program is to provide a system for the locking out and/or tagging out of
energy-isolating devices to protect employees from the unexpected energization or startup of machines or equipment,
or the release of stored energy that could cause injury to the employee. Wherever possible, energy-isolating devices
should be locked out. Before employees service, repair or perform maintenance, the machine or equipment must be isolated from all hazardous energy, and the energy isolation-device(s) for the machine or equipment must be locked out or
tagged out.
Types and Magnitude of Energy and Hazards
Each employee must be instructed in the types and magnitude of energy used by the company. The following types
of energy are used:
(a) _______________________ (b) ______________________
The magnitude of energy (a) (_____________ energy) used is: ____________; the magnitude of hazards presented
by the _____________ energy is: ____________________.
The magnitude of energy (b) (_____________ energy) used is: ____________; the magnitude of hazards presented
by the _____________ energy is: ____________________.
Training and Retraining of Affected and Authorized Employees
Each employee must be thoroughly trained with respect to lockout/tagout procedure used by our company. Each employee must know that lockout/tagout is used to protect employees against hazardous energy from inadvertent operation
of equipment or machinery. Each employee must understand that he or she is to never attempt to operate an energy-isolating device when it is locked or tagged. Each employee must be retrained if there is a change in the employee’s job
assignment, a change in machinery or equipment that presents a new hazard, a change in energy control procedures, or
management considers that retraining is necessary.
Training or retraining must include:
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How to recognize hazardous energy sources.
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Type and magnitude of energy used especially with respect to the machinery or equipment to which the employee
will be exposed.
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Purpose of the lockout/tagout procedure.
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Steps for shutting down, isolating, blocking and securing equipment to which the employee will be exposed.
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Steps for placement, removal and transfer of lockout/tagout devices and the division of responsibility for accomplishing those tasks.
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Requirements for testing to determine and verify effectiveness of lockout/tagout devices.
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The proper use and limitations of tags.
Employees who will use (actually implement) the lockout/tagout procedure must receive written authorization from
supervision.
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Energy-Isolating Devices
Each employee must be instructed that every department has conducted a survey of all machinery, equipment and
processes that possess potentially hazardous energy. The survey located all equipment and identified all isolating devices that must be locked or tagged to render the equipment safe for service, maintenance or repair and describe applicable lockout/tagout procedure. The information for each item of machinery or equipment has been recorded on Form
A, which is maintained in the respective department and is readily available for use in conjunction with the
lockout/tagout procedure.
Form A will be used whenever a new piece of equipment or machine is introduced into the work area or whenever a
new procedure needs to be developed due to a change in process, machine or equipment making previous procedure invalid.
Form A
Types/Locations of Energy-Isolating Devices
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Name of department: __________________________________________________________
Name of equipment or machine: _________________________________________________
Serial number of equipment or machine: ___________________________________________
Location of equipment or machine: _______________________________________________
Each type of energy used by the equipment or machine:
a. ________________________________________________________________________
b. ________________________________________________________________________
6. Magnitude of each source of energy:
a. ________________________________________________________________________
b. ________________________________________________________________________
7. Hazards to be expected from each source of energy:
a. ________________________________________________________________________
b. ________________________________________________________________________
8. Type and location of each device for isolating energy to the machine or equipment and the method of
lockout/tagout to be used (use an additional form, if needed):
Type
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
Location
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
Method of Lockout/Tagout
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
9. Identification of each device and manner by which energy can be stored in the machine or equipment
and identification of the procedure for dissipating or restraining the stored energy (use additional form,
if needed):
Device/Manner
Procedure
a. ________________________________________________________________________________
b.________________________________________________________________________________
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Sequence of Lockout/Tagout System—Procedure and Form
Each employee will be informed of the lockout/tagout sequence. That sequence includes the following steps:
Step One—The authorized employee (designated by supervision to implement lockout/tagout) will notify all affected
employees (operators and others in the area) that lockout/tagout is to be used and the reason for its use. Use Form A,
“Types/Locations of Energy-Isolating Devices,” for the respective machine or equipment lists all pertinent information,
including the magnitude of energy and the hazards to be expected.)
Step Two—The machine must be shut down by normal procedure.
Step Three—Each energy-isolating device must be located. (Use information from Form A for the respective machine or equipment.) Each device must be operated to isolate the equipment from the energy source(s).
Step Four—Each device or manner by which energy can be stored must be located. (Use information from Form A
for the respective machine or equipment.)
Step Five—After responding to important notes (below), each energy-isolating device (information from Form A for
the respective machine or equipment) must now be locked or tagged with assigned individual locks or tags.
Note:
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If a lock can be used, but a tag is chosen instead, complete a tagout justification before going on to step six.
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If more than one authorized employee is required to affix a lockout/tagout device (see group lockout), the designated group coordinator must have each authorized employee who affixes a lockout/tagout device sign his/her
name and enter job title. Use a separate sheet if needed.
Step Six—(a) Ensure that personnel are not exposed; (b) attempt to start the equipment with the normal operating
controls to ensure that lockout/tagout is effective; (c) return the operating controls to “neutral” or “off.” The equipment
is now properly locked or tagged out.
Tagout Justification System
If the machine, equipment or process can be locked out and/or tagged out and a tag is chosen instead, respond to
parts one and two of the following tagout justification system, then return to Sequence for LOTO, Step Six.
Requirement One
Full Employee Protection. If you cannot indicate a “yes” answer by checking each of the following items, do not use
the tagout system:
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Tagout system provides full employee protection.
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Tagout devices placed at the same location where the lockout device would have been placed.
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Tagout system provides safety equivalent to the lockout program.
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Employees can fully comply with all tagout-related provisions.
Additional Safety Measures. Check the measure(s) used to provide equivalent protection and/or state any other alternative used:
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Isolating circuit element removal.
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Control switches blocked.
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Extra disconnecting device opened.
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Removal of valve handles.
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Alternative measures used to provide equivalent protection: ________________________.
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Tagout Device. Check the tagout device against each criterion listed below. The tagout device should satisfy each criterion:
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Singularly identified.
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Device used only for controlling energy.
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Not used for other purposes.
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Durable/substantial.
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Able to withstand its intended environment.
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Nonreusable.
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Attachable by hand.
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Self-locking.
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Indicates employee identity.
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Exposure will not cause deterioration.
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Does not deteriorate in corrosive environment.
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Standardized as to: ___color; ___shape and size; ___print and format.
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Minimum unlocking strength of no less than 50 pounds.
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Equivalent to a one piece, all environment-tolerant nylon cable tie.
Warning Message. Ensure that the tagout device:
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Warns against hazardous conditions.
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Includes “Do Not Start (Open, Close, Energize, Operate, etc.)”
Training. Be certain that the employees have been trained that:
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Tags are simply warning devices.
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Tags do not provide physical restraint.
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Tags must never be removed without authorization.
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Tags may evoke a false sense of security.
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Tags are only part of the overall program.
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Tags must be securely attached.
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Tags must never be ignored or bypassed.
Requirement Two
A. State your reasons for using the tagout system:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
B. State how equivalent employee protection was provided:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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C. Describe the training provided to employees:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
At which location was the training provided:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Include the date of the employee training:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Include the signature of the person who performed the training:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Include signature and date of the person who authorized the use of the tagout system:
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Procedure for Restoring Machines or Equipment to Normal Production Operations:
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When servicing, maintenance or repair is complete and the equipment/machine is ready to be started up, the authorized employee will ensure that: (a) no one is exposed to the equipment/machine; (b) all tools have been removed from the machine/equipment; (c) guards have been reinstalled; (d) there are no exposed electrical wires;
(e) and that he or she is satisfied that it is safe for start up.
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After responding to important notes (below), remove all lockout/tagout devices.
Note:
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If the authorized employee is not available to remove the lockout/tagout devices, the devices may only be removed by or under the direction of the supervisor who completes the following:
(a) Identify the authorized employee whose device is being removed (insert name).
(b) Describe all reasonable efforts to locate this employee: (insert efforts made).
(c) Describe the action taken to ensure that, prior to his or her resumption of work, the employee knows that the
device was removed (insert efforts made).
(d) Enter signature and date of supervisor to certify the above steps were taken (insert signature and date).
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If more than one authorized employee is required to remove a lockout/tagout device, the designated group coordinator will have each employee who removes a device sign his or her name and enter the job title.
Name(s)/Titles:
___________________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
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Operate the devices to restore energy to the machine/equipment.
Temporary Removal of Lockout/Tagout Devices
When testing, the positioning of machines/equipment or other requirements demand the temporary removal of lockout/tagout devices, the authorized employee or supervisor must: (a) follow the sequence steps one through three; (b)
conduct the tests or position the equipment; and (c) de-energize all systems and reapply energy control measures in accordance with policy.
Outside Contractors
If the maintenance, service or repair is performed by an outside contractor, the supervisor must appoint an employee
to serve as the outside contractor’s authorized employee for the purposes of this policy.
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Group Lockout or Tagout
When group lockout/tagout is required and when more than one group is involved, a group coordinator must be designated by supervision. The designated group coordinator must seek agreement from the other authorized employees
and must ensure that each authorized employee: (a) places his or her personal lockout or tagout device on the energyisolating devices; or (b) places the device on a multiple lockout/tagout device (hasp) if the device cannot accept multiple locks/tags; or (c) secures the personal lock to a multiple-lock lockout box or cabinet that holds the key to the single
lock on the energy-isolating device; and (d) signs and enters his/her job title at the time of affixing and removing the
device.
Documentation of Employee Training
Documentation must be completed for each employee following every training or retraining session. Refer to form
“Lockout/Tagout Training Documentation.”
Lockout/Tagout Training Documentation
Name of Equipment/Procedure
____________________________________________
Employee Name:
___________________________________________
Employee Address:
___________________________________________
Home Phone:
( _____ ) – _____ – __________
Cell Phone:
( _____ ) – _____ – __________
Job Title:
___________________________________________
Department:
___________________________________________
Date of Training or Retraining:
_____ / _____ / _____
Signature of Employee:
___________________________________________
Signature of Trainer:
___________________________________________
Is the employee authorized to
implement lockout/tagout procedure?
Yes
No
Date Authorized:
_____ / _____ / _____
Authorizing Supervisor’s Signature:
___________________________________________
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Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Machine Guarding Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.211-219)
The purpose of machine guarding is to protect the machine operator and other employees in the work area from hazards created by ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks. All employees will follow our policy on
guarding. Any discrepancy to our policy without authorization from the Safety Coordinator or management will result
in disciplinary action.
General Requirements
Guards will not create potential hazards and must be attached to the machine where possible. If guards cannot be attached to the machine, attach elsewhere.
Point of Operation Guarding
The point of operation is the area on a machine where work is performed.
Machines that expose an employee to injury must be guarded. The guarding device must:
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Be in conformity with any appropriate standards.
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If specific standards are not available, the machine construction should prevent the operator from having any part
of his/her body in the danger zone during the operating cycle.
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Special hand tools used for placing and removing material from point of operation areas must allow easy handling
of the material without the operator placing a hand in the danger zone. Such tools must not replace guards required by this section.
The following machines usually require point of operation guarding:
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Guillotine cutters
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Shears
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Alligator shears
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Power presses
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Milling machines
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Power saws
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Jointers
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Portable power tools
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Forming rolls and calendars
Requirements for Safeguards
Safeguards will meet these minimum general requirements:
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Prevent contact: The safeguard must prevent hands, arms and any other part of a worker’s body from making contact with dangerous moving parts. A good safeguarding system eliminates the possibility of the operator and other
workers placing parts of their bodies near hazardous moving parts.
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Secure: Workers should not be able to easily remove or tamper with the safeguard, because a safeguard that can
easily be made ineffective is no safeguard at all. Guards and safety devices should be made of durable material
that will withstand the conditions of normal use. They must firmly be secured to the machine.
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Protect from falling objects: The safeguard should ensure that no objects can fall into moving parts. A small tool
that is dropped into a cycling machine could easily become a projectile that could strike and injure someone.
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Create no new hazards: A safeguard defeats its own purpose if it creates a hazard of its own such as a shear point,
a jagged edge or an unfinished surface that can cause a laceration. The edges of guards, for instance, should be
rolled or bolted in such a way that they eliminate sharp edges.
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Create no interference: Any safeguard that impedes a worker from performing the job quickly and comfortably
might soon be overridden or disregarded. Proper safeguarding can actually enhance efficiency as it can relieve the
worker’s apprehensions about injury.
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Allow safe lubrication: If possible, one should be able to lubricate the machine without removing the safeguards.
Locating oil reservoirs outside the guard, with a line leading to the lubrication point, will reduce the need for the
operator or maintenance worker to enter the hazardous area.
Miscellaneous Aids
While these aids do not give complete protection from machine hazards, they may provide the worker with an extra
margin of safety. Sound judgment is needed in their application and usage. Examples of possible application include the
following:
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An awareness barrier serves as a reminder to a person that he or she is approaching the danger area. Although the
barrier does not physically prevent a person from entering the danger area, it calls attention to it. For an employee to
enter the danger area, an overt act must take place, that is, the employee must either reach or step over, under or
through the barrier. Generally, awareness barriers are not considered adequate when continual exposure to the hazard
exists.
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Special hand tools may be used to place or remove stock, particularly from or into the point of operation of a
machine. A typical use would be for reaching into the danger area of a press or press brake. A push stick or block
may be used when feeding stock into a saw blade. When it becomes necessary for hands to be in close proximity
to the blade, the push stick or block may provide a few inches of safety and prevent a severe injury.
Feeding and Ejection Methods
Many feeding and ejection methods do not require workers to place their hands in the danger area. In some cases, no
operator involvement is necessary after the machine is set up. In other situations, operators can manually feed the stock
with the assistance of a feeding mechanism. Properly designed ejection methods do not require any operator involvement after the machine starts to function. Using these feeding and ejection methods does not eliminate the need for
guards and devices. Guards and devices must be used wherever they are necessary and possible in order to provide protection from exposure to hazards.
Automatic Feed
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Stock is fed from rolls, indexed by machine mechanism, etc.
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Eliminates the need for operator involvement in the danger area.
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Other guards are required for worker protection, usually fixed barrier guards.
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Requires frequent maintenance.
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May not be adaptable to stock variation.
Semiautomatic Feed
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Stock is fed by chutes, movable dies, dial feed, plungers or sliding bolster.
Automatic Ejection
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Work pieces are ejected by air or mechanical means.
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May create a hazard of blowing chips or debris.
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Size of stock limits the use of this method.
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Air ejection may present a noise hazard.
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Semiautomatic Ejection
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Work pieces are ejected by mechanical means that are initiated by the worker.
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Operator does not have to enter danger area to remove finished work.
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Other guards are required for operator protection.
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May not be adaptable to stock variation.
Machinery Maintenance and Repair
Good maintenance and repair procedures contribute significantly to the safety of the maintenance crew, as well as
that of machine operators. The variety and complexity of machines to be serviced, the hazards associated with their
power sources, the special dangers that may be present during machine breakdown, and the severe time constraints
often placed on maintenance personnel all make safe maintenance and repair work difficult. If possible, machine design
should permit routine lubrication and adjustment without removal of safeguards. When safeguards must be removed
and the machine serviced, the lockout procedure must be adhered to. The maintenance and repair crew must never fail
to replace the guards before the job is considered finished and the machine released from lockout. In order to prevent
hazards while servicing machines, each machine or piece of equipment should be safeguarded during the conduct of
servicing or maintenance by:
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Notifying all affected employees (usually machine or equipment operators or users) that the machine or equipment must be shut down to perform some maintenance or servicing.
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Stopping the machine.
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Isolating the machine or piece of equipment from its energy source.
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Locking out or tagging out the energy source.
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Relieving any stored or residual energy.
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Verifying that the machine or equipment is isolated from the energy source.
Although this is the general rule, there are exceptions when the servicing or maintenance is not hazardous for an employee, when the servicing conducted is minor in nature, done as an integral part of production, and the employer utilizes alternative safeguards that provide effective protection. When the servicing or maintenance is completed, there are
specific steps that must be taken to return the machine or piece of equipment to service. These include:
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Inspection of the machine or equipment to ensure that all guards and other safety devices are in place and functional.
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Checking the area to ensure that energization and start up of the machine or equipment will not endanger employees.
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Removal of the lockout devices.
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Re-energization of the machine or equipment.
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Notification of affected employees that the machine or equipment may be returned to service.
If it is necessary to oil machine parts while the machine is running, special safeguarding equipment may be needed
solely to protect the oiler from exposure to hazardous moving parts. Maintenance personnel must know which machines can be serviced while running and which cannot. The danger of accident or injury is greatly reduced by shutting
off and locking out all sources of energy.
Exposure of Blades
When the periphery of the blades of a fan is less than 7 feet above the floor or working level, the blades must be
guarded. The guard must not have openings larger than 1⁄2 inch.
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Eye and Face Protection
Eye and face protection must be provided to each employee when exposed to eye or face hazards from flying particles.
Energy Control Procedures
The employer must establish an energy control program consisting of energy control procedures, employee training
and periodic inspections to ensure that before any employee performs any servicing or maintenance on a machine or
equipment, the machine or equipment is isolated from the energy source and rendered inoperative.
Safe Work Practices
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Ensure equipment and machines are equipped with appropriate safeguards.
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Utilize personal protective equipment when necessary.
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Ensure employees receive machine-specific training.
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Do not defeat machine safeguards.
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Inspect equipment before each use.
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Provide assistance in machine safeguard development.
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Get assistance in the selection of personal protective equipment.
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Operate machines with all safeguards in place.
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Follow established safe work practices.
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Report any equipment/machine malfunctions or defects to the supervisor.
Employees will conduct an inspection of each piece of equipment or machine before use to ensure that the equipment is in good working order and that all guards are function appropriately and are in place. Any equipment/machine
not in good working order will be brought to the attention of the safety coordinator for servicing.
The safety coordinator will conduct periodic documented inspections of the equipment/machines using the inspection form located at the end of this policy. The forms will be kept for a period of at least one year.
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Machines and Machine Guarding Inspection Form
Location:
Date:
Supervisor:
Audit Performed By:
Y
A. General Requirements for Machines and Machine Guarding
1. Guards prevent worker’s hands, arms or other body parts from
making contact with moving parts
2. Guards firmly secured and not easily removable
3. Guards permit safe, comfortable, and relatively easy operation of
the machine
4. Machine controls within easy reach of the employee
5. Procedures established to ensure machine is shut down before
guard is removed
B. Guarding of Mechanical Hazards
1. Point-of-operation guards provided and in place
2. Gears, sprockets, pulleys, and flywheels guarded
3. Belts and chain drives guarded
4. Exposed set screws, key ways, collars, and the like guarded
5. Guards provide for any other hazardous moving part of the
machine
C. Evaluation of Non-mechanical Hazards
1. Noise measurements taken, where necessary
2. Substances used in machine operations evaluated
3. Electrical cords or connectors in good repair
4. Personal protective equipment available, where necessary
5. Employee dressed safely for the job
D. Training
1. Employees trained in the recognition of machine hazards and the
importance of using safeguards
2. Lockout/tagout training provide, where necessary
3. Electrical safety-related work practices training provided, where
necessary
4. Personal protective equipment training provided, where
necessary
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N
NA
COMMENTS
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. The assessments
must be in writing. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Materials Handling and Storage Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.176, 1910.179 and 1910.184)
When manually moving materials, employees should seek help when a load is so bulky it cannot be properly grasped
or lifted, when they cannot see around or over it, or when a load cannot be safely handled.
Guidelines for Safe Manual Lifting
General guidelines are that no one person should lift more than 35 pounds on a repetitive basis without some type of
lift assist. However, this weight limit should be further reduced depending on:
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Force required to move a load (load and acceleration)
Size and dimensions of the object
Number of repetitions (frequency of lifting)
Person’s position in relation to the load (posture)
Safe Lifting Practices
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Do not lift loads of more than 35 pounds without a lift assist
Do not reach out; position the load close to your body
Do not lift an item more than chest height
Avoid high repetitions
Avoid quick acceleration, do not jerk the load or twist your body
When lifting, do not over extend your back, bend your knees and concentrate lifting with your legs.
Possible Adjustments to the Lifting Operation
If the job requires that the load to be lifted and moved exceeds the guidelines for safe lifting, then a workplace adjustment should be implemented. The possible adjustments could include:
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Change the size of the container to reduce the overall dimension and/or weight of the part
Change the frequency of lifting by one person
Rotate personnel or use additional personnel
Change the position of the person with respect to the load
Move the loads by pallet instead of individually
Use material handling equipment to lift and transport the loads
Depending on the specific application, material handling equipment represents potential lifting solutions. The following equipment types provide manual, electric or air powered lift assists:
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Hoists and balancers
Manipulators
Enclosed track monorail and crane systems
Patented track and overhead cranes systems
Lift tables
Materials Handling
When an employee is placing blocks under raised loads, the employee should ensure that the load is not released
until his or her hands are clearly removed from the load. Blocking materials and timbers should be large and strong
enough to support the load safely. Materials with evidence of cracks, rounded corners, splintered pieces or dry rot
should not be used for blocking.
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Handles and holders should be attached to loads to reduce the chances of getting fingers pinched or smashed. Workers also should use appropriate protective equipment. For loads with sharp or rough edges, wear gloves or other hand
and forearm protection. To avoid injuries to the hands and eyes, use gloves and eye protection. When the loads are
heavy or bulky, the mover should also wear steel-toed safety shoes or boots to prevent foot injuries if the worker slips
or accidentally drops a load.
When mechanically moving materials, avoid overloading the equipment by letting the weight, size and shape of the
material being moved dictate the type of equipment used for transporting it. All materials handling equipment has rated
capacities that determine the maximum weight the equipment can safely handle and the conditions under which it can
handle those weights. The equipment-rated capacities must be displayed on each piece of equipment and must not be
exceeded except for load testing. When picking up items with a powered industrial truck, the load must be centered on
the forks and as close to the mast as possible to minimize the potential for the truck tipping or the load falling. A lift
truck must never be overloaded because it would be hard to control and could easily tip over. Extra weight must not be
placed on the rear of a counterbalanced forklift to offset an overload. The load must be at the lowest position for traveling, and the truck manufacturer’s operational requirements must be followed. All stacked loads must be correctly piled
and cross-tiered, where possible. Precautions also should be taken when stacking and storing material.
Stored materials must not create a hazard. Storage areas must be kept free from accumulated materials that may
cause tripping, fires or explosions or that may contribute to the harboring of rats and other pests. When stacking and
piling materials, it is important to be aware of such factors as the materials’ height and weight, how accessible the
stored materials are to the user, and the condition of the containers where the materials are being stored.
All bound material should be stacked, placed on racks, blocked, interlocked or otherwise secured to prevent it from
sliding, falling or collapsing. A load greater than that approved by a building official may not be placed on any floor of
a building or other structure. Where applicable, load limits approved by the building inspector should be conspicuously
posted in all storage areas.
When stacking materials, height limitations should be observed. For example, lumber must be stacked no more than
16 feet high if it is handled manually; 20 feet is the maximum stacking height if a forklift is used. Refer to the Forklift
Safety Program. For quick reference, walls or posts may be painted with stripes to indicate maximum stacking heights.
Bags and bundles must be stacked in interlocking rows to remain secure. Bagged material must be stacked by stepping back the layers and cross-keying the bags at least every 10 layers. To remove bags from the stack, start from the
top row first. Baled paper and rags stored inside a building must not be closer than 18 inches to the walls, partitions or
sprinkler heads. Boxed materials must be banded or held in place using crossties or shrink plastic fiber.
Drums, barrels and kegs must be stacked symmetrically. If stored on their sides, the bottom tiers must be blocked to
keep them from rolling. When stacked on end, put planks, sheets of plywood dunnage or pallets between each tier to
make a firm, flat stacking surface. When stacking materials two or more tiers high, the bottom tier must be chocked on
each side to prevent shifting in either direction.
When stacking, consider the need for availability of the material. Material that cannot be stacked due to size, shape
or fragility can be safely stored on shelves or in bins. Structural steel, bar stock, poles and other cylindrical materials,
unless in racks, must be stacked and blocked to prevent spreading or tilting. Pipes and bars should not be stored in
racks that face main aisles; this could create a hazard to passers-by when supplies are being removed.
Using Materials Handling Equipment
To reduce potential accidents associated with workplace equipment, employees will be trained in the proper use and
limitations of the equipment they operate. This includes knowing how to effectively use equipment such as conveyors,
cranes and slings.
Conveyors
When using conveyors, workers’ hands may be caught in nip points where the conveyor runs over support members
or rollers; workers may be struck by material falling off the conveyor; or they may become caught on or in the conveyor, thereby being drawn into the conveyor path.
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To reduce the severity of an injury, an emergency button or pull cord designed to stop the conveyor must be installed
at the employee’s workstation. Continuously accessible conveyor belts should have an emergency stop cable that extends the entire length of the conveyor belt so that the cable can be accessed from any location along the belt. The
emergency stop switch must be designed to be reset before the conveyor can be restarted. Before restarting a conveyor
that has stopped due to an overload, appropriate personnel must inspect the conveyor and clear the stoppage before
restarting. Employees must never ride on a materials handling conveyor. Where a conveyor passes over work areas or
aisles, guards must be provided to keep employees from being struck by falling material. If the crossover is low enough
for workers to run into, it must be guarded to protect employees and either marked with a warning sign or painted a
bright color.
Screw conveyors must be completely covered except at loading and discharging points. At those points, guards must
protect employees against contacting the moving screw; the guards are movable, and they must be interlocked to prevent conveyor movement when not in place.
Overhead and Gantry Cranes
Crane inspection and maintenance are essential to safe equipment operation. Operator safety is improved and operator injury avoided if the equipment is properly inspected and maintained. In addition, manufacturing productivity can
also be improved with scheduled maintenance to maintain proper equipment functionality and to help avert breakdown
repairs. Failure to complete overhead crane and hoist inspections and proper equipment maintenance could lead to serious injury, death or destruction of property.
The rated load of the crane must be plainly marked on each side of the crane, and if the crane has more than one
hoisting unit, each hoist must have its rated load marked on it or its load block, and this marking must be clearly legible
from the ground or floor.
Bridge trucks must be equipped with sweeps that extend below the top of the rail and project in front of the truck
wheels.
Except for floor-operated cranes, a gong or other effective audible warning signal must be provided for each crane
equipped with a power traveling mechanism.
Slings
When working with slings, employers must ensure that they are visually inspected before use and during operation,
especially if used under heavy stress. Riggers or other knowledgeable employees should conduct or assist in the inspection because they are aware of how the sling is used and what makes a sling unserviceable. A damaged or defective
sling must be removed from service.
Slings must not be shortened with knots or bolts or other makeshift devices, sling legs that have been kinked must
not be used. Slings must not be loaded beyond their rated capacity, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Suspended loads must be kept clear of all obstructions, and crane operators should avoid sudden starts and stops when
moving suspended loads. Employees also must remain clear of loads about to be lifted and suspended. All shock loading is prohibited.
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Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. The assessments
must be in writing. Please modify or delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. The standard should be referenced to ensure that all requirements are being met.
Personal Protective Equipment Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.132)
Protective Equipment
When engineering and work practice controls do not completely eliminate hazards, it is necessary to protect workers
with personal protective equipment. Personal protective equipment (PPE) includes hard hats, safety belts, safety goggles, face shields, gloves, aprons, toe guards and respirators. Supervisors will ensure that all their employees are properly protected.
Every effort will be made to select personal protective equipment that is acceptable for comfort, appearance and utility.
Hazard Assessments
The company will assess the hazards in the workplace that require the use of personal protective equipment. Where
such hazards are identified, the company will:
l
Select appropriate types of personal protective equipment to protect the employees from the hazards identified in
the hazard assessment.
l
Communicate selection decisions to each affected employee.
l
Select personal protective equipment that properly fits each affected employee.
l
Require each affected employee to wear the personal protective equipment selected.
The completed assessments are maintained by (insert job title of responsible person).
PPE Training
Each employee who is required to use personal protective equipment will be trained on:
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What personal protective equipment is necessary.
l
When the personal protective equipment is necessary.
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How to properly don, doff, adjust and wear the personal protective equipment.
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The limitations of the personal protective equipment.
l
The proper care, maintenance, useful life and disposal of the personal protective equipment.
As part of the training, each employee will demonstrate an understanding of the items specified above and the ability
to use the equipment properly before being allowed to perform work requiring the use of personal protective equipment.
Retraining will be provided whenever the required PPE changes, or when the employee demonstrates lack of knowledge concerning use of the equipment.
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Personal Protective Equipment Hazard Assessment
Location:
Department:
Job or Task
Date/Revision Date:
Potential Hazards
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PPE Required
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Walking and Working Surfaces Program
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.21–30)
Purpose
Slips, trips and falls constitute the majority of general industry accidents. They cause 15 percent of all accidental
deaths and are second only to motor vehicles as a cause of fatalities.
Responsibilities
Safety Coordinator
l
Conduct routine inspections to ensure all walking and working surfaces are free from slip, trip and fall hazards.
l
Conduct training for employees who use ladders, scaffolds or other elevated platforms.
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Conduct training in use and inspection of fall prevention and arrest equipment.
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Ensure proper ladders are used for specific tasks.
l
Provide adequate fall prevention and arrest equipment.
Employees
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Maintain work areas free from slip, trip and fall hazards.
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Correct or immediately report slip, trip and fall hazards.
l
Use proper ladders for assigned tasks.
Hazard Control
Engineering Controls
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Proper construction of elevated locations.
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Use of hand, knee and toe rails where required.
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Proper design of fixed ladders and stairs.
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Adequate lighting in all areas.
Administrative Controls
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Training for all employees who work at elevated location.
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Routine inspections of ladders, stairs, walking and working surfaces.
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Following housekeeping program requirements.
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Immediate cleanup of material spills.
General Requirements
Housekeeping
Simple housekeeping methods can prevent slip-trip-fall hazards:
l
All work areas, passageways, storerooms and service rooms will be kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition.
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l
The floor of every area will be maintained in a clean and, so far as possible, a dry condition. Where wet processes
are used, drainage will be maintained and gratings, mats or raised platforms will be provided.
l
Every floor, work area and passageway will be kept free from protruding nails, splinters, holes or loose boards.
Aisles and Passageways
l
Aisles and passageways will be kept clear and in good repair with no obstruction across or in aisles that could
create a hazard.
l
Permanent aisles and passageways will be appropriately marked.
l
Where mechanical handling equipment is used, aisles will be sufficiently wide. Improper aisle widths coupled
with poor housekeeping and vehicle traffic can cause injury to employees, damage the equipment and material,
and can limit egress in emergencies.
Floor Loading Protection
Load rating limits will be marked on plates and conspicuously posted. It will be prohibited to place, or cause or permit to be placed, a load greater than that for which such floor or roof is approved on any floor or roof of a building or
other structure.
Guarding Floor and Wall Openings
Floor openings and holes, wall openings and holes, and the open sides of platforms may create hazards. People may
fall through the openings or over the sides to the level below. Objects such as tools or parts may fall through the holes
and strike people or damage machinery on lower levels.
Protection for Floor Openings
Standard railings will be provided on all exposed sides of a stairway opening, except at the stairway entrance. For infrequently used stairways, where traffic across the opening prevents the use of a fixed standard railing, the guard will
consist of a hinged floor opening cover of standard strength and construction along with removable standard railings on
all exposed sides, except at the stairway entrance.
A “standard railing” consists of toprail, midrail and posts, and will have a vertical height of 42 inches nominal from
the upper surface of toprail to floor, platform, runway, or ramp level. Nominal height of midrail is 21 inches. A “standard toeboard” is 4 inches nominal in vertical height, with not more than 1⁄4-inch clearance above floor level.
Floor openings may be covered rather than guarded with rails. When the floor opening cover is removed, a temporary guardrail will be in place or an attendant will be stationed at the opening to warn personnel.
Every floor hole into which people can accidentally walk will be guarded by either:
l
A standard railing with toeboard, or
l
A floor hole cover of standard strength and construction. While the cover is not in place, the floor hole will be
constantly attended by someone or will be protected by a removable standard railing.
Protection of Open-Sided Floors, Platforms and Runways
Every open-sided floor or platform 4 feet or more above adjacent floor or ground level will be guarded by a standard
railing on all open sides, except where there is an entrance to a ramp, stairway or fixed ladder. The railing will be provided with a toeboard wherever, beneath the open sides:
l
People can pass,
l
There is moving machinery, or
l
There is equipment with which falling materials could create a hazard.
Every runway will be guarded by a standard railing, or the equivalent, on all sides 4 feet or more above floor or
ground level. Wherever tools, machine parts, or materials are likely to be used on the runway, a toeboard will also be
provided on each exposed side.
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Stairway Railings and Guards
Every flight of stairs with four or more risers will have standard stair railings or standard handrails as specified
below. Stair width is measured clear of all obstructions except handrails.
l
On stairways less than 44 inches wide having both sides enclosed, at least one handrail will be affixed, preferably
on the right side descending.
l
On stairways less than 44 inches wide with one open side, at least one stair rail will be affixed on the open side.
l
On stairways less than 44 inches wide having both sides open, two stair rails will be provided, one for each side.
l
On stairways more than 44 inches wide, but less than 88 inches, one handrail will be provided on each enclosed
side and one stair rail on each open side.
l
On stairways 88 inches or more in width, one handrail will be provided on each enclosed side, one stair rail on
each open side, and one intermediate stair rail placed approximately in the middle of the stairs.
A “standard stair railing” (stair rail) will be of construction similar to a standard railing, but the vertical height will
be not more than 34 inches nor less than 30 inches from the upper surface of the toprail to the surface of the tread in
line with the face of the riser at the forward edge of the tread.
Fixed Industrial Stairs
Fixed industrial stairs will be provided for access to and from places of work where operations necessitate regular
travel between levels. Requirements include:
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Fixed industrial stairs will be strong enough to carry five times the normal anticipated live load.
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At the very minimum, any fixed stairway will be able to carry safely a moving concentrated load of 1,000 pounds.
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All fixed stairways will have a minimum width of 22 inches.
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Fixed stairs will be installed at angles to the horizontal of between 30 and 50 degrees.
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Vertical clearance above any stair tread to an overhead obstruction will be at least 7 feet measured from the leading edge of the tread.
Portable Ladders
The chief hazard when using a ladder is falling. A poorly designed, maintained or improperly used ladder may collapse under the load placed upon it and cause the employee to fall.
A ladder is an appliance consisting of two side rails joined at regular intervals by crosspieces on which a person may
step to ascend or descend.
The various types of portable ladders include:
l
Stepladder—A self-supporting portable ladder, nonadjustable in length, having flat steps and hinged back.
l
Single Ladder—A non-self-supporting portable ladder, nonadjustable in length, consisting of but one section. Its
size is designed by overall length of the side rail.
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Extension Ladder—A non-self-supporting portable ladder adjustable in length.
Portable Ladder Requirements
l
Portable stepladders longer than 20 feet will not be used.
l
Stepladders will be equipped with a metal spreader or locking device of sufficient size and strength to securely
hold the front and back sections in open position.
l
Single ladders longer than 30 feet will not be used.
l
Extension ladders longer than 60 feet will not be used.
l
Ladders will be maintained in good condition at all times.
l
Ladders will be inspected frequently and those that have developed defects will be withdrawn from service for repair or destruction and tagged or marked as “Dangerous, Do Not Use.”
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Proper use of ladders is essential in preventing accidents. Even a good ladder can be a serious safety hazard when
used by workers in a dangerous way.
Portable Ladder Safety Precautions
l
Ladders will be placed with a secure footing, or they will be lashed, or held in position.
l
Ladders used to gain access to a roof or other area will extend at least 3 feet above the point of support.
l
The foot of a ladder will, where possible, be used at such a pitch that the horizontal distance from the top support
to the foot of the ladder is one-quarter of the working length of the ladder (the length along the ladder between the
foot and the support).
l
The worker will always face the ladder when climbing up or down.
l
Short ladders will not be spliced together to make long ladders.
l
Ladders will never be used in the horizontal position as scaffolds or work platforms.
l
The top of a regular stepladder will not be used as a step.
l
Use both hands when climbing or descending ladders.
l
Metal ladders will never be used near electrical equipment.
Fixed Ladders
A fixed ladder is a ladder permanently attached to a structure, building or equipment. A point to remember is that
fixed ladders, with a length of more than 20 feet to a maximum unbroken length of 30 feet will be equipped with cages
or a ladder safety device. A cage is a guard that is fastened to the side rails of the fixed ladder or to the structure to encircle the climbing space of the ladder for the safety of the person who must climb the ladder.
Cages will extend a minimum of 42 inches above the top of a landing, unless other acceptable protection is provided.
Cages will extend down the ladder to a point not less than 7 feet and no more than 8 feet above the base of the ladder.
Manually Propelled Mobile Ladder Stands and Scaffolds (Towers)
l
All exposed surfaces of mobile ladder stands and scaffolds will be free from sharp edges, burrs or other safety
hazards.
l
The maximum work height will not exceed four times the minimum base dimension unless outriggers, guys or
braces are added to provide stability.
l
This standard requires guardrails and toeboards for work levels 10 feet or more above the ground or floor.
Other Working Surfaces
Portable dockboards (bridge plates) will be secured in position, either by being anchored or equipped with devices
that will prevent their slipping. Movement of the dockboard during material handling operations has resulted in forklifts overturning, or falling off the dock, often with serious injury or death to the driver and damage to equipment and
material.
l
Handholds will be provided on portable dockboards to permit safe handling when the dockboard must be repositioned or relocated.
l
Portable dockboards will be inspected prior to use.
l
When not in use, portable dockboards will be stored in a manner to prevent damage.
Contractors
All outside contractors working in or on the premises will be required to follow the guidelines set forth in this fall
protection program. Contractors in the prejob meeting will be informed of these requirements as well as the on-site
construction rules that apply.
110
Note: The following program is an example of a written program and based on the referenced standard. The standard
does not require a written program, but as a best practice, it has been put into writing in this manual. Please modify or
delete content to these policies as deemed necessary. Please reference the standard for all requirements that may be applicable to your company.
Welding, Cutting and Brazing Policy
(Ref. 29 CFR 1910.252–254)
Introduction
Welding, cutting and brazing are hazardous activities that pose a unique combination of both safety and health risks
to employees.
Hazards and Controls
Health hazards from welding, cutting and brazing operations include exposures to metal fumes and to ultraviolet
(UV) radiation. Safety hazards from these operations include burns, eye damage, electrical shock, cuts, and crushed
toes and fingers. Many of these can be controlled with proper work practices and personal protective equipment (PPE).
Safe Work Practices
Transporting, Moving and Storing Compressed Gas Cylinders
Valve protection caps will be in place and secured. When cylinders are hoisted, they will be secured on a cradle,
slingboard or pallet. They will not be hoisted or transported by means of magnets or choker slings.
Cylinders will be moved by tilting and rolling them on their bottom edges. They will not be intentionally dropped,
struck or permitted to strike each other violently.
When cylinders are transported by powered vehicles, they will be secured in a vertical position.
Valve protection caps will not be used for lifting cylinders from one vertical position to another. Bars will not be
used under valves or valve protection caps to pry cylinders loose when frozen. Warm, not boiling, water will be used to
thaw cylinders loose.
Unless cylinders are firmly secured on a special carrier intended for this purpose, regulators will be removed and
valve protection caps put in place before cylinders are moved.
A suitable cylinder truck, chain or other steadying device will be used to keep cylinders from being knocked over
while in use.
When work is finished, when cylinders are empty, or when cylinders are moved at any time, the cylinder valve will
be closed.
Compressed gas cylinders will be secured in an upright position at all times, if necessary, for short periods of time
while cylinders are actually being hoisted or carried.
Oxygen cylinders in storage will be separated from fuel-gas cylinders or combustible materials (especially oil or
grease), a minimum distance of 20 feet (6.1 m) or by a noncombustible barrier at least 5 feet (1.5 m) high having a fireresistance rating of at least one-half hour.
Inside of buildings, cylinders will be stored in a well-protected, well-ventilated, dry location, at least 20 feet (6.1 m)
from highly combustible materials such as oil or excelsior. Cylinders should be stored in definitely assigned places
away from elevators, stairs or gangways. Assigned storage places will be located where cylinders will not be knocked
over or damaged by passing or falling objects or subject to tampering.
The in-plant handling, storage and use of all compressed gases in cylinders, portable tanks, rail tank cars or motor
vehicle cargo tanks will be in accordance with Compressed Gas Association Pamphlet P-1-1965.
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Placing Cylinders
Cylinders will be kept far enough away from the actual welding or cutting operation so that sparks, hot slag or flame
will not reach them. When this is impractical, fire resistant shields will be provided.
Cylinders will be placed where they cannot become part of an electrical circuit. Electrodes will not be struck against
a cylinder to strike an arc.
Fuel gas cylinders will be placed with valve end up whenever they are in use. They will not be placed in a location
where they would not be subject to open flame, hot metal or other sources of artificial heat.
Cylinders containing oxygen or acetylene or other fuel gas will not be taken into confined spaces.
Treatment of Cylinders
Cylinders, whether full or empty, will not be used as rollers or supports.
No person other than the gas supplier will attempt to mix gases in a cylinder. No one except the owner of the cylinder or person authorized by the owner will refill a cylinder. No one will use a cylinder’s contents for purposes than
those intended by the supplier. All cylinders used will meet the Department of Transportation requirements published in
49 CFR Part 178, Subpart C.
Specification for Cylinders.
No damaged or defective cylinder will be used.
Use of Fuel Gas
The employer will thoroughly instruct employees in the safe use of fuel gas, as follows:
l
Fuel gas will not be used from cylinders through torches or other devices that are equipped with shutoff valves
without reducing the pressure through a suitable regulator attached to the cylinder valve or manifold.
l
Before a regulator to a cylinder valve is connected, the valve will be opened slightly and closed immediately.
(This action is generally termed “cracking” and is intended to clear the valve of dust or dirt that might otherwise
enter the regulator.) The person cracking the valve will stand to one side of the outlet, not in front of it. The valve
of a fuel gas cylinder will not be cracked where the gas would reach welding work, sparks, flame or other possible
sources of ignition.
The cylinder valve will always be opened slowly to prevent damage to the regulator. For quick closing, valves of
fuel gas cylinders will not be opened more than 11⁄2 turns. When a special wrench is required, it will be left in position
on the stem of the valve while the cylinder is in use so that the fuel gas flow can be shut off quickly in case of an emergency. In the case of manifolded or coupled cylinders, at least one such wrench will always be available for immediate
use. Nothing will be placed on top of a fuel gas cylinder, when in use, that may damage the safety device or interfere
with the quick closing of the valve.
Before a regulator is removed from a cylinder valve, the cylinder valve will always be closed and the gas released
from the regulator.
If, when the valve on a fuel gas cylinder is opened, there is found to be a leak around the valve stem, the valve will
be closed and the gland nut tightened. If this action does not stop the leak, the use of the cylinder will be discontinued,
and it will be properly tagged and removed from the work area. In the event that fuel gas should leak from the cylinder
valve, rather than from the valve stem, and the gas cannot be shut off, the cylinder will be properly tagged and removed
from the work area. If a regulator attached to a cylinder valve will effectively stop a leak through the valve seat, the
cylinder need not be removed from the work area.
If a leak should develop at a fuse plug or other safety device, the cylinder will be removed from the work area.
Fuel Gas and Oxygen Manifolds
Fuel gas and oxygen manifolds will bear the name of the substance they contain in letters at least 1-inch high, which
will be either painted on the manifold or on a sign permanently attached to it. These manifolds will be placed in safe,
well-ventilated and accessible locations and not be located within enclosed spaces.
112
Manifold hose connections, including both ends of the supply hose that lead to the manifold, will be such that the
hose cannot be interchanged between fuel gas and oxygen manifolds and supply header connections. Adapters will not
be use to permit the interchange of hose. Hose connections will be kept free of grease and oil.
When not in use, manifold and header hose connections will be capped. Nothing will be placed on top of a manifold,
when in use, which will damage the manifold or interfere with the quick closing of the valves.
Hose
Fuel gas and oxygen hose will be easily distinguishable from each other. The contrast may be made by different colors
or by surface characteristics readily distinguishable by the sense of touch. Oxygen and fuel gas hoses will not be interchangeable. A single hose having more than one gas passage will not be used.
When parallel sections of oxygen and fuel gas hose are taped together, not more than 4 inches out of 12 inches will
be covered by tape.
All hose in use, carrying acetylene, oxygen, natural or manufactured fuel gas, or any gas or substance that may ignite
or enter into combustion, or be in any way harmful to employees, will be inspected at the beginning of each working
shift. Defective hose will be removed from service.
Hose that has been subject to flashback or shows evidence of severe wear or damage will be tested to twice the normal pressure to which it is subject, but in no case less than 300 p.s.i. Defective hose, or hose in doubtful condition, will
not be used.
Hose couplings will be of the type that cannot be unlocked or disconnected by means of a straight pull without rotary
motion.
Boxes used for the storage of gas hose will be ventilated.
Hoses, cables and other equipment will be kept clear of passageways, ladders and stairs.
Torches
Clogged torch tip openings will be cleaned with suitable cleaning wires, drills or other devices designed for such
purpose.
Torches in use will be inspected at the beginning of each working shift for leaking shutoff valves, hose couplings and
tip connections. Defective torches will not be used.
Torches will be lighted by friction lighters or other approved devices and not by matches or from hot work.
Regulators and Gauges
Oxygen and fuel gas pressure regulators, including their related gauges, will be in proper working order while in use.
Oil and Grease Hazards
Oxygen cylinders and fittings will be kept away from oil or grease. Cylinders, cylinder caps and valves, couplings,
regulators, hose, and apparatus will be kept free from oil or greasy substances and will not be handled with oily hands or
gloves. Oxygen will not be directed at oily surfaces, greasy clothes, or within a fuel oil or other storage tank or vessel.
Arc Welding and Cutting
Manual Electrode Holders
Only manual electrode holders that are specifically designed for arc welding and cutting and are of a capacity capable of safely handling the maximum rated current required by the electrodes will be used.
Welding Cables and Connectors
All arc welding and cutting cables will be of the completely insulated flexible type, capable of handling the maximum current requirements of the work in progress, taking into account the duty cycle under which the arc welder or
cutter is working.
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Only cable free from repair or splices for a minimum distance of 10 feet from the cable end to which the electrode
holder is connected will be used, except that cables with standard insulated connectors or with splices whose insulating
quality is equal to that of the cable are permitted.
Cables in need of repair will not be used. When a cable, other than the cable lead referred to above, becomes worn to
the extent of exposing bare conductors, the portion thus exposed will be protected by means of rubber and friction tape
or other equivalent insulation.
When it becomes necessary to connect or splice lengths of cable one to another, substantial insulated connectors of a
capacity at least equivalent to that of the cable will be used. If connections are effected by means of cable lugs, they
will be securely fastened together to give good electrical contact, and the exposed metal parts of the lugs will be completely insulated.
Ground Returns and Machine Grounding
A ground return cable will have a safe current-carrying capacity equal to or exceeding the specified maximum output
capacity of the arc welding or cutting unit that it services. When a single ground return cable services more than one unit,
its safe current-carrying will exceed the total specified maximum output capacities of the all the units that it services.
Pipelines containing gases or flammable liquids or conduits containing electrical circuits will not be used as a ground
return.
When a structure or pipeline is employed as a ground return circuit, it will be determined that the required electrical
contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point will cause rejection of the structures as a
ground circuit.
When a structure or pipeline is continuously employed as a ground return circuit, all joints will be bonded, and periodic inspections will be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis or fire hazard exists by virtue of such use.
The frames of all arc welding and cutting machines will be grounded either through a third wire in the cable containing the circuit conductor or through a separate wire that is grounded at the source of the current. Grounding circuits,
other than by means of the structure, will be checked to ensure that the circuit between the ground and the grounded
power conductor has resistance low enough to permit sufficient current to flow to cause the fuse or circuit breaker to interrupt the current.
All ground connections will be inspected to ensure that they are mechanically strong and electrically adequate for the
required current.
Operating Instructions
Employers will instruct employees in the safe means of arc welding and cutting as follows:
l
When electrode holders are to be left unattended, the electrodes will be removed and the holders will be so placed
or protected that they cannot make electrical contact with employees or conducting objects.
l
Hot electrode holders will not be dipped in water; to do so may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock.
When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave the work or to stop work for any appreciable length of time or
when the arc welding or cutting machine is to be moved, the power supply switch to the equipment will be opened.
Any faulty or defective equipment will be reported to the supervisor.
A disconnecting means will be provided in the supply circuit for each motor generated arc welder and for each AC
transformer and DC rectifier arc welder that is not equipped with a disconnect mounted as an integral part of the
welder.
A switch or circuit breaker will be provided by which each resistance welder and its control equipment can be isolated from the supply circuit. The ampere rating of this disconnecting means will not be less than the supply conductor
ampacity.
Shielding
Whenever practicable, all arc welding and cutting operations will be shielded by noncombustible or flameproof
screen that will protect employees and other persons working in the vicinity from the direct rays of the arc.
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Fire Prevention
When practical, objects to be welded, cut or heated will be moved to a designated safe location or, if these objects
cannot be readily moved, all movable fire hazards in the vicinity will be taken to a safe place or otherwise protected. If
these objects cannot be moved and if all the fire hazards cannot be removed, positive means will be taken to confine the
heat, sparks and slag and to protect the immovable fire hazards from them.
No welding, cutting or heating will be done where the application of flammable paints or the presence of other flammable compounds or heavy dust concentrations creates a hazard.
Suitable fire extinguishing equipment will be immediately available in the work area and will be maintained in a
state or readiness for instant use.
When the welding, cutting or heating operation is such that normal fire prevention precautions are not sufficient, additional personnel will be assigned to guard against fire while the actual welding, cutting or heating operation is being
performed and for a sufficient period of time after completion of the work to ensure that no possibility of fire exists.
Such personnel will be instructed as to the specific anticipated fire hazards and how the firefighting equipment provided is to be used.
When welding, cutting or heating is performed on walls, floors and ceilings, since direct penetration of sparks or
heat transfer may introduce a fire hazard to an adjacent area, the same precautions will be taken on the opposite side as
are taken on the side on which the welding is being performed.
For the elimination of possible fire in enclosed spaces as a result of gas escaping through leaking or improperly
closed torch valves, the gas supply to the torch will be positively shut off at some point outside the enclosed space
whenever the torch is not to be used or whenever the torch is left unattended for a substantial period of time, such as
during the lunch period. Overnight and at the change of shifts, the torch and hose will be removed from the confined
space. Open end fuel gas and oxygen hoses will be immediately removed from enclosed spaces when they are disconnected from the torch or other gas-consuming device.
Except when the contents are being removed or transferred, drums, pails and other containers that contain or have
contained flammable liquids will be kept closed. Empty containers will be removed to a safe area apart from hot work
operations or open flames.
Mechanical Ventilation
Mechanical ventilation will consist of either general mechanical ventilation systems or local exhaust systems.
Occupational Health and Environmental Controls
Contaminated air exhausted from a working space will be discharged clear of the source of intake air.
All air replacing that withdrawn will be clean and respirable.
Oxygen will not be used for ventilation purposes, comfort cooling, blowing dust from clothing or cleaning the work area.
Welding, Cutting and Heating in Confined Spaces
Except where air line respirators are required or allowed as described below, adequate mechanical ventilation meeting the requirements described above will be provided whenever welding, cutting or heating is performed in a confined
space.
When sufficient ventilation cannot be obtained without blocking the means of access, employees in the confined
space will be protected by air line respirators. An employee on the outside of the confined space will be assigned to
maintain communication with those working within it and to aid them in an emergency.
Where a welder must enter a confined space through a small opening, means will be provided for quickly removing
him or her in case of emergency. When safety belts and lifelines are used for this purpose, they will be so attached to
the welder’s body that his or her body cannot be jammed in a small exit opening. An attendant with a preplanned rescue
procedure will be stationed outside to observe the welder at all times and be capable of putting rescue operations into
effect.
115
Welding, Cutting or Heating of Metals of Toxic Significance
Welding, cutting or heating in any enclosed spaces involving the following metals will be performed with adequate
mechanical ventilation as described above:
l
Zinc-bearing base or filler metals or metals coated with zinc-bearing materials.
l
Lead base metals.
l
Cadmium-bearing filler materials.
l
Chromium-bearing metals or metals coated with chromium-bearing materials.
Welding, cutting or heating in any enclosed spaces involving the following metals will be performed with adequate
local exhaust ventilation as described above or employees shall be protected by air line respirators:
l
Metals containing lead, other than as an impurity, or metals coated with lead-bearing materials.
l
Cadmium-bearing or cadmium-coated base metals.
l
Metal coated with mercury-bearing metals.
l
Beryllium-containing base or filler metals. Because of its high toxicity, work involving beryllium will be done
with both local exhaust ventilation and air line respirators.
Employees performing such operations in the open air will be protected by filter-type respirators except that employees performing such operations on beryllium-containing base or filler metals will be protected by air line respirators.
Other employees exposed to the same atmosphere as the welders or burners will be protected in the same manner as
the welder or burner.
Inert-Gas Metal-Arc Welding
Since the inert-gas metal-arc welding process involves the production of ultraviolet radiation of intensities of 5 to 30
times that produced during shielded metal-arc welding, the decomposition of chlorinated solvents by ultraviolet rays,
and the liberation of toxic fumes and gases, employees will not be permitted to engage in or be exposed to the process
until the following special precautions have been taken:
The use of chlorinated solvents will be kept at least 200 feet, unless shielded, from the exposed arc, and surfaces prepared with chlorinated solvents will be thoroughly dry before welding is permitted on such surfaces.
Employees in the area not protected from the arc by screening will be protected by filter lenses. When two or more
welders are exposed to each other’s arc, filter lens goggles of a suitable type will be worn under welding helmets. Hand
shields to protect the welder against flashes and radiant energy will be used when either the helmet is lifted or the shield
is removed.
Welders and other employees who are exposed to radiation will be suitably protected so that the skin is covered completely to prevent burns and other damage by ultraviolet rays. Welding helmets and hand shields will be free of leaks
and openings, and highly reflective surfaces.
When inert-gas metal-arc welding is being performed on stainless steel, adequate local exhaust ventilation as described above or air line respirators will be used to protect against dangerous concentrations of nitrogen dioxide.
General Welding, Cutting and Heating
Welding, cutting or heating not involving conditions or toxic materials described above may normally be done without mechanical ventilation or respiratory protective equipment. These protections will be provided, however, where an
unsafe accumulation of contaminants exists because of unusual physical or atmospheric conditions.
Employees performing any type of welding, cutting or heating will be protected by suitable eye protective equipment.
116
Note: The following section contains example training matrixes. Please add, modify or delete content to each matrix as
deemed necessary to meet your company’s needs. The matrixes and course descriptions are a best practice.
Section 3
Training and Instruction
Employee Training
Orientation/Initial Training
All employees will go through an orientation training program that covers safe work practices, OSHA requirements,
and safety policies and procedures. Depending on the employee’s job or career track, the employee will then be released to the safety coordinator for on-the-job training (OJT), combination OJT/classroom, or other job progression
training schedule. All employees will also be on a probation period dictated by human resources and management.
Orientation Training Matrix—Initial (Example)
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Welcome and
Introductions
PPE*
Hazard
Communication*
Forklifts*
Fall Protection
Company Safety
Policy and
Procedures
Company Safety
Policy and
Procedures
Accident
Reporting and
Investigation
Workers’
Compensation,
Return to Work
Substance Abuse
Policy/Disciplinary
Policy
Walking and
Working Surfaces
PPE*
Hazard
Communication*
Forklifts*
Ladder Safety
Hot Work Permit
Emergency Action
Plan and Fire
Prevention*
Emergency
Eyewash and
Shower
Electrical Safety*
Noise and Hearing
Protection*
Compressed Gas
Cylinders
Fire
Extinguishers*
Bloodborne
Pathogens*
Hand and Power
Tools
Safe Work
Practices
Housekeeping
Welding, Cutting
and Brazing *
Materials
Handling
Materials
Handling
Ergonomics
Fleet Management
Safe Work
Practices
Machine
Guarding*
LOTO*
Emergency
Action*
Safe Work
Practices
Machine
Guarding*
LOTO*
Fire Prevention*
Summary
Note: Orientation topics will be modified as needed to best meet the needs of the employees and the
Company. Each topic will be covered for a minimum of 30 minutes. Some topics may require several hours
depending on the employee’s assigned job duties and responsibilities.
117
On-the-Job Training (OJT)
Each department has an OJT matrix that each new employee goes through before being released. The matrix for each
department will be reviewed and updated as necessary by management.
OJT Matrix (Example)
Job: All
Department:
Conducted by: Safety Coordinator
Company:
Week 1
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
OJT—safe work
practices
OJT—safe work
practices
OJT—safe work
practices
OJT—safe work
practices
OJT—safe work
practices
Note: Dependent on assigned job duties and responsibilities. Training may be a few days to several weeks.
118
Annual Refresher Training
Annual refresher training will be conducted by each department on required OSHA and other safety and health topics along with job safe practices. The following matrix will be updated and modified based on company needs. This
will be the responsibility of management.
Annual Refresher Training Matrix (Example)
Department:
Job: All
Trainer: Safety Coordinator
Location: Company
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Day 4
Day 5
Lockout/Tagout*
PPE
Forklift Safety**
LOTO
Safe Work
Practices
Hearing
Conservation*
Welding, Cutting,
and Brazing
Forklift Safety**
Fleet Management
Safe Work
Practices
Fire Prevention
Walking and
Working Surfaces
Hot Work Permit
Electrical Safety
Safe Work
Practices
Fire
Extinguishers*
Emergency Action
Housekeeping
Bloodborne
Pathogens*
Safe Work
Practices
Machine
Guarding*
Fire Prevention
Fall Protection
Materials
Handling
Safe Work
Practices
Machine
Guarding*
Electrical Safety
Ladder Safety
Materials
Handling
Safe Work
Practices
Accident
Reporting
Safe Work
Practices
Workers’
Compensation,
Return to Work
Ergonomics
Safe Work
Practices
Hand and Power
Tools
Safe Work
Practices
Substance Abuse
Policy/Disciplinary
Policy
Compressed Gas
Cylinders
Summary
Each topic will be covered for a minimum of 30 minutes or based on need. All employees will receive
annual refresher training. Note: Dependent on assigned job duties and responsibilities.
*Required by OSHA annually
**Required by OSHA every three years; OJT is optional.
Note: Fire extinguisher training is required annually when you require your employees to use them—not
required if you don’t. Machinery and machine guarding training is required annually if the company has
mechanical power presses.
119
Note: The following section contains example job progression training and skills assessments and matrixes. Please
add, modify or delete content to each assessment and matrix as deemed necessary to meet your company’s needs. These
are a best practice only.
Job Progression Training and Skills Assessment
The following departments are responsible for ensuring that the identified jobs follow their job progression matrix.
They will also conduct a skills assessment to ensure adequate job progression. The skills assessment will be conducted
at least annually.
Department
Job
Job Progression Matrix
Job:
Department:
Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
The skills assessment form for each employee will be maintained in the personnel files.
120
Skills Assessment Form
Job:
Date:
Skill:
Assessor:
Rating:
Employee:
121
Note: The following section contains example periodic training schedules. Please add, modify or delete content to each
schedule as deemed necessary to meet your company’s needs. These are a best practice only.
Periodic Training
Periodic safety training, which includes daily, weekly and monthly safety talks, will be conducted
within specific departments along with prejob briefings.
Daily Safety Talks
The following departments will conduct daily five-minute safety talks (can be used in lieu of prejob
briefings):
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Topic choices are up to the supervisor or (Insert job title of person responsible). A roster will be
maintained for the personnel files.
Weekly Safety Talks
The following departments will conduct weekly safety talks:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
Topic choices are up to the supervisor or (Insert job title of person responsible). A roster will be
maintained for the personnel files.
Monthly Safety Talks
The following departments will conduct monthly safety talks:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
122
Note: Many OSHA standards require training, and some do not require documentation that the training was conducted.
Documenting all training is a best practice. Many training records are required to be kept for three years; refer to the
relevant OSHA standard for required recordkeeping timelines. If training is only required initially and then as needed
thereafter, as a best practice, maintain your training records as deemed appropriate for your company.
Employee Training Roster/Certificate of Training
Topic: ___________________________________________________Date:______________
Trainer: ____________________________________________________________________
Employee Name:
Department:
Signature:
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
___________________________
123
Management Training
To ensure that managers have the skill sets required for their respective duties and responsibilities, they will receive
at least (insert number of hours) hours annually of safety and health continuing education training. The following matrix will be updated and modified based on company and departmental needs.
This will be the responsibility of: (Insert job title of person responsible).
Management Training Matrix (Example)
Day 1
Welcome and
Introductions
Day 2
Management
Skills
Day 3
Risk Management
Workers’
Compensation
Management
Skills
Risk Management
Workers’
Compensation
Management
Skills
Risk Management
Accident
Investigations and
Reporting
Accident Review
Boards
Management
Skills
Risk Control
Risk Financing
Risk Control
OSHA 300 Log,
DART, and TCR
Risk Financing
Preventive
Maintenance
Safety
Management
Safety
Management
Union Process
Inspections
Day 4
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs
Refresher
Prejob Briefings
Disciplinary
Policy/Alcohol
and Drug Policy
Fleet Management
Safety Talks
124
Day 5
Job Progression
Job Progression
Skills Assessment
Skills Assessment
Job Safety
Analyses
Job Safety
Analyses
Safe Work
Practices
Summary and
Closing Remarks
Supervisor Training
To ensure that supervisors have the skill sets required for their respective duties and responsibilities, they will receive at least (insert number of hours) hours annually of safety and health continuing education training. The following
matrix will be updated and modified based on company and departmental needs.
This will be the responsibility of: (Insert job title of person responsible).
Supervisor Training Matrix (Example)
Day 1
Welcome and
Introductions
Workers’
Compensation
Workers’
Compensation
Day 2
OSHA 300 Log,
DART and TCR
Leadership Skills
Accident
Reporting
Leadership Skills
Supervisor
Accident
Investigations
Supervisor
Accident
Investigations
Accident Reviews
and Corrective
Action
Accident Reviews
and Corrective
Action
Safety
Management
Leadership Skills
Risk Control
Risk Management
Disciplinary
Policy/Alcohol
and Drug Policy
Day 3
Union Process
Conducting
Inspections
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
Company Safety
Programs—
Refresher
125
Department: __________________
Day 4
Company Safe
Work Practices
Company Safe
Work Practices
Company Safe
Work Practices
Day 5
Skills Assessment
Skills Assessment
Skills Assessment
Company Safe
Work Practices
Job Progression
Company Safe
Work Practices
Job Progression
Preventive
Maintenance
Job safety
Analyses
Inspections
Safety Talks
Prejob Briefings
Summary and
Closing Remarks
Section 4
Reference Material
N.C. Department of Labor
A–Z Topics
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/A_to_Z_Topics/a_to_z_toc.htm
OSH Division Compliance Material
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/compliance/manuals.htm
PowerPoint Presentations
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/presentations/presentations.htm
Publications
http://www.nclabor.com/pubs.htm
Safety and Health Programs
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/consult/sample_programs.htm
Training Requirements
http://www.nclabor.com/osha/etta/indguide/ig49.pdf
Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Publications
http://www.osha.gov/pls/publications/publication.html
Training Resources
http://www.osha.gov/dte/index.html
126
Section 5
Facility Inspection Forms
l
Comprehensive Safety Inspection Checklist
l
Monthly Building Inspection Form
127
Comprehensive Safety Inspection Checklist
Yes
No NA
Employer Posting


 Is the required NCDOL workplace poster displayed in a prominent location where all employees are
likely to see it?


 Are emergency telephone numbers posted where they can be readily found in case of emergency?


 Where employees may be exposed to any toxic substances or harmful physical gents, has appropriate
information concerning employee access to medical and exposure records and safety data sheets (SDS)
been posted or otherwise made readily available to affected employees?


 Are signs concerning “exiting from buildings,” room capacities, floor loading, biohazards, exposures to
X-ray, microwave, or other harmful radiation or substances posted where appropriate?


 Is the summary of occupational injuries and illnesses posted February through April?
Recordkeeping


 Are all occupational injuries and illnesses, except minor injuries requiring only first aid, being recorded
as required on the OSHA 300 log?


 Are employee medical records and records of employee exposure to hazardous substances or harmful
physical agents up-to-date and in compliance with current OSHA standards?


 Are employee training records kept and accessible for review by employees, when required by OSHA
standards?


 Have arrangements been made to maintain required records for the legal period of time for each specific type of record? (Some records must be maintained for at least 40 years.)


 Are operating permits and records up to date for such items as elevators, air pressure tanks and liquefied petroleum gas tanks?
Safety and Health Program


 Do you have an active safety and health program in operation that deals with general safety and health
program elements as well as the management of hazards specific to your worksite?


 Is one person clearly responsible for the overall activities of the safety and health program?


 Do you have a working procedure for handling in-house employee complaints regarding safety and
health?
Medical Services and First Aid


 Is there a hospital, clinic or infirmary for medical care in proximity of your workplace?


 If medical and first aid facilities are not in proximity of your workplace, is at least one employee on
each shift currently qualified to render first aid?


 Have all employees who are expected to respond to medical emergencies as part of their work: (1) received first aid training; (2) had hepatitis B vaccination made available to them; (3) had appropriate
training on procedures to protect them from bloodborne pathogens, including universal precautions;
and (4) have available and understand how to use appropriate personal protective equipment to protect
against exposure to bloodborne diseases?


 Where employees have had an exposure incident involving bloodborne pathogens, did you provide an
immediate post-exposure medical evaluation and follow-up?


 Are medical personnel readily available for advice and consultation on matters of employees’ health?


 Are emergency phone numbers posted?
128
Yes
No NA


 Are first aid kits easily accessible to each work area, with necessary supplies available, periodically
inspected and replenished as needed?


 Have first aid kit supplies been approved by a physician, indicating that they are adequate for a particular
area or operation?


 Are means provided for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body in areas where corrosive
liquids or materials are handled?
Fire Protection


 Is your local fire department well acquainted with your facilities, its location and specific hazards?


 If you have a fire alarm system, is it certified as required?


 If you have a fire alarm system, is it tested at least annually?


 If you have interior standpipes and valves, are they inspected regularly?


 If you have outside private fire hydrants, are they flushed at least once a year and on a routine preventive maintenance schedule?


 Are fire doors and shutters in good operating condition?


 Are fire doors and shutters unobstructed and protected against obstructions, including their counterweights?


 Are fire door and shutter fusible links in place?


 Are automatic sprinkler system water control valves, air and water pressure checked weekly/periodically as required?


 Is the maintenance of automatic sprinkler systems assigned to responsible people or to a sprinkler contractor?


 Are sprinkler heads protected by metal guards, when exposed to physical damage?


 Is proper clearance maintained below sprinkler heads?


 Are portable fire extinguishers provided in adequate number and type?


 Are fire extinguishers mounted in readily accessible locations?


 Are fire extinguishers recharged regularly and noted on the inspection tag?


 Are employees periodically instructed in the use of extinguishers and fire protection procedures?
Personal Protective Equipment and Clothing


 Are protective goggles or face shields provided and worn where there is any danger of flying particles
or corrosive materials?


 Are approved safety glasses required to be worn at all times in areas where there is a risk of eye injuries such as punctures, abrasions, contusions or burns?


 Are employees who need corrective lenses (glasses or contacts) in working environments having harmful exposures required to wear only approved safety glasses or protective goggles or use other medically approved precautionary procedures?


 Are protective gloves, aprons, shields or other means provided and required where employees could be
cut or where there is reasonably anticipated exposure to corrosive liquids, chemicals, blood or other
potentially infectious materials? (See 29 CFR 1910.1030(b) for the definition of “other potentially infectious materials.”)


 Are hard hats provided and worn where danger of falling objects exists?


 Are hard hats inspected periodically for damage to the shell and suspension system?
129
Yes
No NA


 Is appropriate foot protection required where there is the risk of foot injuries from hot, corrosive or poisonous substances, falling objects, and crushing or penetrating actions?


 Are approved respirators provided for regular or emergency use where needed?


 Is all protective equipment maintained in a sanitary condition and ready for use?


 Do you have eyewash facilities and a quick drench shower within the work area where employees are
exposed to injurious corrosive materials?


 Where special equipment is needed for electrical workers, is it available?


 Where food or beverages are consumed on the premises, are they consumed in areas where there is no
exposure to toxic material, blood or other potentially infectious materials?


 Is protection against the effects of occupational noise exposure provided when sound levels exceed
those of the OSHA noise standard?


 Are adequate work procedures, protective clothing and equipment provided and used when cleaning up
spilled toxic or otherwise hazardous materials and liquids?


 Are there appropriate procedures in place for disposing of or decontaminating personal protective
equipment contaminated with, or reasonably anticipated to be contaminated with, blood or other potentially infectious materials?
General Work Environment


 Are all worksites clean, sanitary and orderly?


 Are work surfaces kept dry or appropriate means taken to ensure the surfaces are slip-resistant?


 Are all spilled hazardous materials or liquids, including blood and other potentially infectious materials, cleaned up immediately and according to proper procedures?


 Are combustible scrap, debris and waste stored safely and removed from the worksite promptly?


 Is all regulated waste, as defined in the OSHA bloodborne pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030),
discarded according to federal, state and local regulations?


 Are accumulations of combustible dust routinely removed from elevated surfaces including the overhead structure of buildings?


 Is combustible dust cleaned up with a vacuum system to prevent the dust going into suspension?


 Is metallic or conductive dust prevented from entering or accumulating on or around electrical enclosures or equipment?


 Are covered metal waste cans used for oily and paint-soaked waste?


 Are all oil and gas fired devices equipped with flame failure controls that will prevent flow of fuel if
pilots or main burners are not working?


 Are paint spray booths, dip tanks, etc., cleaned regularly?


 Are the minimum number of toilets and washing facilities provided?


 Are all toilets and washing facilities clean and sanitary?


 Are all work areas adequately illuminated?


 Are pits and floor openings covered or otherwise guarded?
Walkways


 Are aisles and passageways kept clear?


 Are aisles and walkways marked as appropriate?
130
Yes
No NA


 Are wet surfaces covered with nonslip materials?


 Are holes in the floor, sidewalk or other walking surfaces repaired properly, covered or otherwise made
safe?


 Is there safe clearance for walking in aisles where motorized or mechanical handling equipment is operating?


 Are materials or equipment stored in such a way that sharp projectiles will not interfere with the walkway?


 Are spilled materials cleaned up immediately?


 Are changes of direction or elevation readily identifiable?


 Are aisles or walkways that pass near moving or operating machinery, welding operations, or similar
operations arranged so employees will not be subjected to potential hazards?


 Is adequate headroom provided for the entire length of any aisle or walkway?


 Are standard guardrails provided wherever aisle or walkway surfaces are elevated more than 30 inches
above any adjacent floor or the ground?


 Are bridges provided over conveyors and similar hazards?
Floor and Wall Openings


 Are floor openings guarded by a cover, guardrail or equivalent on all sides (except at entrance to stairways or ladders)?


 Are toeboards installed around the edges of permanent floor openings (where people may pass below
the opening)?


 Are skylight screens of such construction and mounting that they will withstand a load of at least 200
pounds?


 Is the glass in the windows, doors, glass walls, etc., which are subject to human impact, of sufficient
thickness and type for the condition of use?


 Are grates or similar type covers over floor openings such as floor drains of such design that foot traffic or rolling equipment will not be affected by the grate spacing?


 Are unused portions of service pits and pits not actually in use either covered or protected by guardrails
or equivalent?


 Are manhole covers, trench covers and similar covers, plus their supports, designed to carry a truck
rear axle load of at least 20,000 pounds when located in roadways and subject to vehicle traffic?


 Are floor or wall openings in fire-resistive construction provided with doors or covers compatible with
the fire rating of the structure and provided with a self-closing feature when appropriate?
Stairs and Stairways


 Are standard stair rails or handrails on all stairways having four or more risers?


 Are all stairways at least 22 inches wide?


 Do stairs have landing platforms not less than 30 inches in the direction of travel and extend 22 inches
in width at every 12 feet or less of vertical rise?


 Do stairs angle no more than 50 and no less than 30 degrees?


 Are stairs of hollow-pan type treads and landings filled to the top edge of the pan with solid material?


 Are step risers on stairs uniform from top to bottom?


 Are steps on stairs and stairways designed or provided with a surface that renders them slip resistant?
131
Yes
No NA


 Are stairway handrails located between 30 and 34 inches above the leading edge of stair treads?


 Do stairway handrails have at least 3 inches of clearance between the handrails and the wall or surface
they are mounted on?


 Where doors or gates open directly on a stairway, is there a platform provided so the swing of the door
does not reduce the width of the platform to less than 21 inches?


 Are stairway handrails capable of withstanding a load of 200 pounds, applied within 2 inches of the top
edge, in any downward or outward direction?


 Where stairs or stairways exit directly into any area where vehicles may be operated, are adequate barriers and warnings provided to prevent employees stepping into the path of traffic?


 Do stairway landings have a dimension measured in the direction of travel at least equal to the width of
the stairway?


 Is the vertical distance between stairway landings limited to 12 feet or less?
Elevated Surfaces


 Are signs posted, when appropriate, showing the elevated surface load capacity?


 Are surfaces elevated more than 30 inches above the floor or ground provided with standard guardrails?


 Are all elevated surfaces (beneath which people or machinery could be exposed to falling objects) provided with standard 4-inch toeboards?


 Is a permanent means of access and egress provided to elevated storage and work surfaces?


 Is required headroom provided where necessary?


 Is material on elevated surfaces piled, stacked or racked in a manner to prevent it from tipping, falling,
collapsing, rolling or spreading?


 Are dockboards or bridge plates used when transferring materials between docks and trucks or rail cars?
Exiting or Egress


 Are all exits marked with an exit sign and illuminated by a reliable light source?


 Are the directions to exits, when not immediately apparent, marked with visible signs?


 Are doors, passageways or stairways that are neither exits nor access to exits and which could be mistaken for exits appropriately marked “NOT AN EXIT,” “TO BASEMENT,” “STOREROOM,” etc.?


 Are exit signs provided with the word “EXIT” in lettering at least 5 inches high and the stroke of the
lettering at least 1⁄2-inch wide?


 Are exit doors side-hinged?


 Are all exits kept free of obstructions?


 Are at least two means of egress provided from elevated platforms, pits or rooms where the absence of
a second exit would increase the risk of injury from hot, poisonous, corrosive, suffocating, flammable
or explosive substances?


 Are there sufficient exits to permit prompt escape in case of emergency?


 Are special precautions taken to protect employees during construction and repair operations?


 Is the number of exits from each floor of a building, and the number of exits from the building itself,
appropriate for the building occupancy load?


 Are exit stairways that are required to be separated from other parts of a building enclosed by at least
two-hour fire-resistive construction in buildings more than four stories in height, and not less than onehour fire-resistive construction elsewhere?
132
Yes
No NA


 Where ramps are used as part of required exiting from a building, is the ramp slope limited to 1 foot
vertical and 12 feet horizontal?


 Where exiting will be through frameless glass doors, glass exit doors, storm doors, etc., are the doors
fully tempered and do they meet the safety requirements for human impact?
Exit Doors


 Are doors that are required to serve as exits designed and constructed so that the way of exit travel is
obvious and direct?


 Are windows that could be mistaken for exit doors made inaccessible by means of barriers or railings?


 Are exit doors openable from the direction of exit travel without the use of a key or any special knowledge or effort when the building is occupied?


 Is a revolving, sliding or overhead door prohibited from serving as a required exit door?


 Where panic hardware is installed on a required exit door, will it allow the door to open by applying a
force of 15 pounds or less in the direction of the exit traffic?


 Are doors on cold storage rooms provided with an inside release mechanism that will release the latch
and open the door even if it’s padlocked or otherwise locked on the outside?


 Where exit doors open directly onto any street, alley or other area where vehicles may be operated, are
adequate barriers and warnings provided to prevent employees stepping into the path of traffic?


 Are doors that swing in both directions and are located between rooms where there is frequent traffic
provided with viewing panels in each door?
Portable Ladders


 Are all ladders maintained in good condition, joints between steps and side rails tight, all hardware and
fittings securely attached, and moveable parts operating freely without binding or undue play?


 Are nonslip safety feet provided on each ladder?


 Are nonslip safety feet provided on each metal or rung ladder?


 Are ladder rungs and steps free of grease and oil?


 Is it prohibited to place a ladder in front of doors opening toward the ladder except when the door is
blocked open, locked or guarded?


 Is it prohibited to place ladders on boxes, barrels or other unstable bases to obtain additional height?


 Are employees instructed to face the ladder when ascending or descending?


 Are employees prohibited from using ladders that are broken, missing steps, rungs, or cleats, broken
side rails, or other faulty equipment?


 Are employees instructed not to use the top step of ordinary stepladders as a step?


 When portable rung ladders are used to gain access to elevated platforms, roofs, etc., does the ladder
always extend at least 3 feet above the elevated surface?


 Is it required that when portable rung or cleat type ladders are used, the base is so placed that slipping
will not occur, or it is latched or otherwise held in place?


 Are portable metal ladders marked with signs reading “CAUTION—Do Not Use Around Electrical
Equipment” or equivalent wording?


 Are employees prohibited from using ladders as guys, braces, skids, gin poles or for other than their intended purposes?


 Are employees instructed to only adjust extension ladders while standing at a base (not while standing
on the ladder or from a position above the ladder)?
133
Yes
No NA


 Are metal ladders inspected for damage?


 Are the rungs of ladders uniformly spaced at 12 inches, center to center?
Hand Tools and Equipment


 Are all tools and equipment (both company- and employee-owned) used by employees at their workplace in good condition?


 Are hand tools such as chisels and punches that develop mushroomed heads during use reconditioned
or replaced as necessary?


 Are broken or fractured handles on hammers, axes and similar equipment replaced promptly?


 Are worn or bent wrenches replaced regularly?


 Are appropriate handles used on files and similar tools?


 Are employees made aware of the hazards caused by faulty or improperly used hand tools?


 Are appropriate safety glasses, face shields, etc., used while using hand tools or other equipment that
might produce flying materials or be subject to breakage?


 Are jacks checked periodically to ensure they are in good operating condition?


 Are tool handles wedged tightly in the head of all tools?


 Are tool cutting edges kept sharp so the tool will move smoothly without binding or skipping?


 Are tools stored in a dry, secure location where they won’t be tampered with?


 Is eye and face protection used when driving hardened or tempered studs or nails?
Portable (Power-Operated) Tools and Equipment


 Are grinders, saws and similar equipment provided with appropriate safety guards?


 Are power tools used with the correct shield, guard or attachment, recommended by the manufacturer?


 Are portable circular saws equipped with guards above and below the base shoe?


 Are circular saw guards checked to ensure they are not wedged up, thus leaving the lower portion of
the blade unguarded?


 Are rotating or moving parts of equipment guarded to prevent physical contact?


 Are all cord-connected, electrically operated tools and equipment effectively grounded or of the approved double-insulated type?


 Are effective guards in place over belts, pulleys, chains, and sprockets on equipment such as concrete
mixers and air compressors?


 Are portable fans provided with full guards or screens having openings 1⁄2 inch or less?


 Is hoisting equipment available and used for lifting heavy objects, and are hoist ratings and characteristics appropriate for the task?


 Are ground-fault circuit interrupters provided on all temporary electrical 15 and 20 ampere circuits
used during periods of construction?


 Are pneumatic and hydraulic hoses on power-operated tools checked regularly for deterioration or
damage?
Abrasive Wheel Equipment—Grinders


 Is the work rest used and kept adjusted to within ⅛ inch of the wheel?


 Is the adjustable tongue on the top side of the grinder used and kept adjusted to within 1⁄4 inch of the wheel?
134
Yes
No NA


 Do side guards cover the spindle, nut, flange and 75 percent of the wheel diameter?


 Are bench and pedestal grinders permanently mounted?


 Are goggles or face shields always worn when grinding?


 Is the maximum RPM rating of each abrasive wheel compatible with the RPM rating of the grinder
motor?


 Are fixed or permanently mounted grinders connected to their electrical supply system with metallic
conduit or other permanent wiring method?


 Does each grinder have an individual on and off control switch?


 Is each electrically operated grinder effectively grounded?


 Before new abrasive wheels are mounted, are they visually inspected and ring tested?


 Are dust collectors and powered exhausts provided on grinders used in operations that produce large
amounts of dust?


 Are splash guards mounted on grinders that use coolant to prevent the coolant from reaching employees?


 Is cleanliness maintained around grinders?
Powder-Actuated Tools


 Are employees who operate powder-actuated tools trained in their use?


 Is each powder-actuated tool stored in its own locked container when not being used?


 Are powder-actuated tools left unloaded until they are actually ready to be used?


 Are powder-actuated tools inspected for obstructions or defects each day before use?


 Do powder-actuated tool operators have and use appropriate personal protective equipment such as
hard hats, safety goggles, safety shoes and ear protectors?
Machine Guarding


 Is there a training program to instruct employees on safe methods of machine operation?


 Is there adequate supervision to ensure that employees are following safe machine operating procedures?


 Is there a regular program of safety inspection of machinery and equipment?


 Is all machinery and equipment kept clean and properly maintained?


 Is sufficient clearance provided around and between machines to allow for safe operations, set up and
servicing, material handling, and waste removal?


 Are equipment and machinery securely placed and anchored when necessary to prevent tipping or
other movement that could result in personal injury?


 Is there a power shut-off switch within reach of the operator’s position at each machine?


 Can electric power to each machine be locked out for maintenance, repair or security?


 Are the noncurrent-carrying metal parts of electrically operated machines bonded and grounded?


 Are foot-operated switches guarded or arranged to prevent accidental actuation by personnel or falling
objects?


 Are manually operated valves and switches controlling the operation of equipment and machines
clearly identified and readily accessible?


 Are all emergency stop buttons colored red?
135
Yes
No NA


 Are all pulleys and belts that are within 7 feet of the floor or working level properly guarded?


 Are all moving chains and gears properly guarded?


 Are splash guards mounted on machines that use coolant to prevent the coolant from reaching employees?


 Are methods provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards
created at the point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks?


 Are machinery guards secure and so arranged that they do not offer a hazard in their use?


 If special hand tools are used for placing and removing material, do they protect the operator’s hands?


 Are revolving drums, barrels and containers required to be guarded by an enclosure that is interlocked
with the drive mechanism, so that revolution cannot occur unless the guard enclosure is in place?


 Do arbors and mandrels have firm and secure bearings and are they free from play?


 Are provisions made to prevent machines from automatically starting when power is restored after a
power failure or shutdown?


 Are machines constructed so as to be free from excessive vibration when the largest size tool is
mounted and run at full speed?


 If machinery is cleaned with compressed air, is air pressure controlled and personal protective equipment or other safeguards utilized to protect operators and other workers from eye and body injury?


 Are fan blades protected with a guard having openings no larger than 1⁄2 inch when operating within 7
feet of the floor?


 Are saws used for ripping equipped with anti-kick back devices and spreaders?


 Are radial arm saws so arranged that the cutting head will gently return to the back of the table when
released?
Lockout/Tagout Procedures


 Is all machinery or equipment capable of movement required to be de-energized or disengaged and
blocked or locked out during cleaning, servicing, adjusting or setting up operations, whenever required?
Where the power disconnecting means for equipment does not also disconnect the electrical control circuit:


 Are the appropriate electrical enclosures identified?


 Is means provided to ensure the control circuit can also be disconnected and locked out?


 Is the locking out of control circuits in lieu of locking out main power disconnects prohibited?


 Are all equipment control valve handles provided with a means for locking out?


 Does the lockout procedure require that stored energy (mechanical, hydraulic, air, etc.) be released or
blocked before equipment is locked out for repairs?


 Are appropriate employees provided with individually keyed personal safety locks?


 Are employees required to keep personal control of their keys while they have safety locks in use?


 Is it required that only the employee exposed to the hazard place or remove the safety lock?


 Is it required that employees check the safety of the lockout by attempting to start up after making sure
no one is exposed?


 Are employees instructed to always push the control circuit stop button prior to re-energizing the main
power switch?


 Is there a means provided to identify any or all employees who are working on locked-out equipment
by their locks or accompanying tags?
136
Yes
No NA


 Are a sufficient number of accident preventive signs or tags and safety padlocks provided for any reasonably foreseeable repair emergency?


 When machine operations, configuration or size requires the operator to leave his or her control station
to install tools or perform other operations and that part of the machine could move if accidentally activated, is such element required to be separately locked or blocked out?


 In the event that equipment or lines cannot be shut down, locked out and tagged, is a safe job procedure established and rigidly followed?
Welding, Cutting and Brazing


 Are only authorized and trained personnel permitted to use welding, cutting or brazing equipment?


 Do all operators have copies of the appropriate operating instructions and are they directed to follow
them?


 Are compressed gas cylinders regularly examined for obvious signs of defects, deep rusting or leakage?


 Is care used in handling and storage of cylinders, safety valves, relief valves, etc., to prevent damage?


 Are precautions taken to prevent the mixture of air or oxygen with flammable gases, except at a burner
or in a standard torch?


 Are only approved apparatus (torches, regulators, pressure-reducing valves, acetylene generators, manifolds) used?


 Are cylinders kept away from sources of heat?


 Are the cylinders kept away from elevators, stairs or gangways?


 Is it prohibited to use cylinders as rollers or supports?


 Are empty cylinders appropriately marked and their valves closed?


 Are signs reading “DANGER—NO SMOKING, MATCHES OR OPEN LIGHTS,” or the equivalent,
posted?


 Are cylinders, cylinder valves, couplings, regulators, hoses and apparatus kept free of oily or greasy
substances?


 Is care taken not to drop or strike cylinders?


 Unless secured on special trucks, are regulators removed and valve protection caps put in place before
moving cylinders?


 Do cylinders without fixed wheels have keys, handles or nonadjustable wrenches on stem valves when
in service?


 Are liquefied gases stored and shipped valve end up with valve covers in place?


 Are provisions made to never crack a fuel gas cylinder valve near sources of ignition?


 Before a regulator is removed, is the valve closed and gas released from the regulator?


 Is red used to identify the acetylene (and other fuel gas) hose, green for oxygen hose, and black for
inert gas and air hose?


 Are pressure-reducing regulators used only for the gas and pressures for which they are intended?


 Is open circuit (no-load) voltage of arc welding and cutting machines as low as possible and not in excess of the recommended limits?


 Under wet conditions, are automatic controls for reducing no-load voltage used?


 Is grounding of the machine frame and safety ground connections of portable machines checked periodically?
137
Yes
No NA


 Are electrodes removed from the holders when not in use?


 Is it required that electric power to the welder be shut off when no one is in attendance?


 Is suitable fire extinguishing equipment available for immediate use?


 Is the welder forbidden to coil or loop welding electrode cable around his or her body?


 Are wet machines thoroughly dried and tested before being used?


 Are work and electrode lead cables frequently inspected for wear and damage and replaced when
needed?


 Do means for connecting cable lengths have adequate insulation?


 When the object to be welded cannot be moved and fire hazards cannot be removed, are shields used to
confine heat, sparks, and slag?


 Are fire watchers assigned when welding or cutting is performed in locations where a serious fire
might develop?


 Are combustible floors kept wet, covered by damp sand or protected by fire-resistant shields?


 When floors are wet down, are personnel protected from possible electrical shock?


 When welding is done on metal walls, are precautions taken to protect combustibles on the other side?


 Before hot work is begun, are used drums, barrels, tanks and other containers so thoroughly cleaned
that no substances remain that could explode, ignite or produce toxic vapors?


 Is it required that eye protection helmets, hand shields and goggles meet appropriate standards?


 Are employees exposed to the hazards created by welding, cutting or brazing operations protected with
personal protective equipment and clothing?


 Is a check made for adequate ventilation where welding or cutting is performed?


 When working in confined places, are environmental monitoring tests taken and means provided for
quick removal of welders in case of an emergency?
Compressors and Compressed Air


 Are compressors equipped with pressure relief valves and pressure gauges?


 Are compressor air intakes installed and equipped so as to ensure that only clean uncontaminated air
enters the compressor?


 Are air filters installed on the compressor intake?


 Are compressors operated and lubricated in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations?


 Are safety devices on compressed air systems checked frequently?


 Before any repair work is done on the pressure system of a compressor, is the pressure bled off and the
system locked out?


 Are signs posted to warn of the automatic starting feature of the compressors?


 Is the belt drive system totally enclosed to provide protection for the front, back, top and sides?


 Is it strictly prohibited to direct compressed air toward a person?


 Are employees prohibited from using highly compressed air for cleaning purposes?


 If compressed air is used for cleaning off clothing, is the pressure reduced to less than 30 psi?


 When using compressed air for cleaning, do employees wear protective chip guarding and personal
protective equipment?
138
Yes
No NA


 Are safety chains or other suitable locking devices used at couplings of high pressure hose lines where
a connection failure would create a hazard?


 Before compressed air is used to empty containers of liquid, is the safe working pressure of the container checked?


 When compressed air is used with abrasive blast cleaning equipment, is the operating valve a type that
must be held open manually?


 When compressed air is used to inflate auto tires, is a clip-on chuck and an in-line regulator preset to
40 psi required?


 Is it prohibited to use compressed air to clean up or move combustible dust if such action could cause
the dust to be suspended in the air and cause a fire or explosion hazard?
Compressed Air Receivers


 Is every receiver equipped with a pressure gauge and with one or more automatic spring-loaded safety
valves?


 Is the total relieving capacity of the safety valve capable of preventing pressure in the receiver from exceeding the maximum allowable working pressure of the receiver by more than 10 percent?


 Is every air receiver provided with a drainpipe and valve at the lowest point for the removal of accumulated oil and water?


 Are compressed air receivers periodically drained of moisture and oil?


 Are all safety valves tested frequently and at regular intervals to determine whether they are in good
operating condition?


 Is the inlet of air receivers and piping systems kept free of accumulated oil and carbonaceous materials?
Compressed Gas Cylinders


 Are cylinders with a water weight capacity over 30 pounds equipped with means for connecting a
valve protector device or with a collar or recess to protect the valve?


 Are cylinders legibly marked to clearly identify the gas contained?


 Are compressed gas cylinders stored in areas that are protected from external heat sources such as
flame impingement, intense radiant heat, electric arcs or high temperature lines?


 Are cylinders located or stored in areas where they will not be damaged by passing or falling objects or
subjected to tampering by unauthorized people?


 Are cylinders stored or transported in a manner to prevent them from creating a hazard by tipping,
falling or rolling?


 Are cylinders containing liquefied fuel gas stored or transported in a position so that the safety relief
device is always in direct contact with the vapor space in the cylinder?


 Are valve protectors always placed on cylinders when the cylinders are not in use or connected for use?


 Are all valves closed off before a cylinder is moved, when the cylinder is empty, and at the completion
of each job?


 Are low pressure fuel gas cylinders checked periodically for corrosion, general distortion, cracks or
any other defect that might indicate a weakness or render it unfit for service?


 Does the periodic check of low pressure fuel gas cylinders include a close inspection of the cylinders’
bottoms?
Hoist and Auxiliary Equipment


 Is each overhead electric hoist equipped with a limit device to stop the hook travel at its highest and
lowest point of safe travel?
139
Yes
No NA


 Will each hoist automatically stop and hold any load up to 125 percent of its rated load if its actuating
force is removed?


 Is the rated load of each hoist legibly marked and visible to the operator?


 Are stops provided at the safe limits of travel for trolley hoists?


 Are the controls of hoists plainly marked to indicate the direction of travel or motion?


 Is each cage-controlled hoist equipped with an effective warning device?


 Are close-fitting guards or other suitable devices installed on hoists to ensure hoist ropes will be maintained in the sheave grooves?


 Are all hoist chains or ropes of sufficient length to handle the full range of movement of the application
while still maintaining two full wraps on the drum at all times?


 Are nip points or contact points between hoist ropes and sheaves that are permanently located within 7
feet of the floor, ground or working platform guarded?


 Is it prohibited to use chains or rope slings that are kinked or twisted?


 Is it prohibited to use the hoist rope or chain wrapped around the load as a substitute for a sling?


 Is the operator instructed to avoid carrying loads over people?


 Are only employees who have been trained in the proper use of hoists allowed to operate them?
Industrial Trucks—Forklifts


 Are only drivers authorized by the employer and trained in the safe operations of industrial trucks permitted to operate such vehicles?


 Does employer ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered
industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of required training and evaluation in accordance with 1910.178(l)—Operator Training?


 Is substantial overhead protective equipment provided on high lift rider equipment?


 Are the required lift truck operating rules posted and enforced?


 Is directional lighting provided on each industrial truck that operates in an area with less than 2 foot
candles per square foot of general lighting?


 Does each industrial truck have a warning horn, whistle, gong or other device that can be clearly heard
above the normal noise in the areas where operated?


 Are the brakes on each industrial truck capable of bringing the vehicle to a complete and safe stop
when fully loaded?


 Will the industrial truck’s parking brake effectively prevent the vehicle from moving when unattended?


 Are industrial trucks operating in areas where flammable gases or vapors or combustible dust or ignitable fibers may be present in the atmosphere approved for such locations?


 Are motorized hand and hand/rider trucks so designed that the brakes are applied and power to the
drive motor shuts off when the operator releases his or her grip on the device that controls the travel?


 Are industrial trucks with internal combustion engines, operated in buildings or enclosed areas, carefully checked to ensure such operations do not cause harmful concentrations of dangerous gases or
fumes?
Entering Confined Spaces


 Are confined spaces thoroughly emptied of any corrosive or hazardous substances, such as acids or
caustics, before entry?
140
Yes
No NA


 Are all lines to a confined space containing inert, toxic, flammable or corrosive materials valved off
and blanked or disconnected and separated before entry?


 Is it required that all impellers, agitators or other moving equipment inside confined spaces be locked
out if they present a hazard?


 Is either natural or mechanical ventilation provided prior to confined space entry?


 Are appropriate atmospheric tests performed to check for oxygen deficiency, toxic substances and explosive concentrations in the confined space before entry?


 Is adequate illumination provided for the work to be performed in the confined space?





 Is there an assigned safety standby employee outside of the confined space, when required, whose sole
responsibility is to watch the work in progress, sound an alarm if necessary and render assistance?


 Is the standby employee appropriately trained and equipped to handle an emergency?


 Is the standby employee or other employees prohibited from entering the confined space without lifelines and respiratory equipment if there is any question as to the cause of an emergency?


 Is approved respiratory equipment required if the atmosphere inside the confined space cannot be made
acceptable?


 Is all portable electrical equipment used inside confined spaces either grounded and insulated or
equipped with ground fault protection?


 Before gas welding or burning is started in a confined space, are hoses checked for leaks, compressed
gas bottles forbidden inside of the confined space, torches lighted only outside of the confined area,
and the confined area tested for an explosive atmosphere each time before a lighted torch is to be taken
into the confined space?


 If employees will be using oxygen-consuming equipment such as salamanders, torches or furnaces in a
confined space, is sufficient air provided to ensure combustion without reducing the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere below 19.5 percent by volume?


 Whenever combustion-type equipment is used in a confined space, are provisions made to ensure the
exhaust gases are vented outside of the enclosure?


 Is each confined space checked for decaying vegetation or animal matter that may produce methane?


 Is the confined space checked for possible industrial waste that could contain toxic properties?


 If the confined space is below the ground and near areas where motor vehicles are operating, is it possible for vehicle exhaust or carbon monoxide to enter the space?
Is the atmosphere inside the confined space frequently tested or continuously monitored during conduct of work?
Environmental Controls


 Are all work areas properly illuminated?


 Are employees instructed in proper first aid and other emergency procedures?


 Are hazardous substances, blood and other potentially infectious materials that may cause harm by inhalation, ingestion, or skin absorption or contact identified?


 Are employees aware of the hazards involved with the various chemicals they may be exposed to in
their work environment, such as ammonia, chlorine, epoxies and caustics?


 Is employee exposure to chemicals in the workplace kept within acceptable levels?


 Are the safest methods and products being used?


 Is the work area’s ventilation system appropriate for the work being performed?
141
Yes
No NA


 Are spray painting operations done in spray rooms or booths equipped with an appropriate exhaust
system?


 Is employee exposure to welding fumes controlled by ventilation, use of respirators, exposure time or
other means?


 Are welders and other workers nearby provided with flash shields during welding operations?


 If forklifts and other vehicles are used in buildings or other enclosed areas, are the carbon monoxide
levels kept below maximum acceptable concentration?


 Has there been a determination that noise levels in the facilities are within acceptable levels?


 Are steps being taken to use engineering controls to reduce excessive noise levels?


 Are proper precautions being taken when handling asbestos and other fibrous materials?


 Are caution labels and signs used to warn of hazardous substances (e.g., asbestos) and biohazards (e.g.,
bloodborne pathogens)?


 Are wet methods used, when practicable, to prevent the emission of airborne asbestos fibers, silica dust
and similar hazardous materials?


 Are engineering controls examined and maintained or replaced on a scheduled basis?


 Is vacuuming with appropriate equipment used whenever possible rather than blowing or sweeping
dust?


 Are grinders, saws and other machines that produce respirable dusts vented to an industrial collector or
central exhaust system?


 Are all local exhaust ventilation systems designed and operating properly such as air flow and volume
necessary for the application, ducts not plugged, or belts slipping?


 Is personal protective equipment provided, used and maintained wherever required?


 Are there written standard operating procedures for the selection and use of respirators where needed?


 Are restrooms and washrooms kept clean and sanitary?


 Is all water provided for drinking, washing and cooking potable?


 Are all outlets for water not suitable for drinking clearly identified?


 Are employees’ physical capacities assessed before being assigned to jobs requiring heavy work?


 Are employees instructed in the proper manner of lifting heavy objects?


 Where heat is a problem, have all fixed work areas been provided with spot cooling or air conditioning?


 Are employees screened before assignment to areas of high heat to determine if their health condition
might make them more susceptible to having an adverse reaction?


 Are employees working on streets and roadways where they are exposed to the hazards of traffic required to wear high visibility or reflective warning vests?


 Are exhaust stacks and air intakes so located that contaminated air will not be recirculated within a
building or other enclosed area?


 Is equipment producing ultraviolet radiation properly shielded?


 Are universal precautions observed where occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials can occur and in all instances where differentiation of types of body fluids or potentially
infectious materials is difficult or impossible?
142
Yes
No NA
Flammable and Combustible Materials


 Are combustible scrap, debris and waste materials (oily rags, etc.) stored in covered metal receptacles
and removed from the worksite promptly?


 Is proper storage practiced to minimize the risk of fire, including spontaneous combustion?


 Are approved containers and tanks used for the storage and handling of flammable liquids?


 Are all connections on drums and piping vapor and liquid tight?


 Are all flammable liquids kept in closed containers when not in use (e.g., parts cleaning tanks and pans)?


 Are bulk drums of flammable liquids grounded and bonded to containers during dispensing?


 Do storage rooms for flammable liquids have explosion-proof lights?


 Do storage rooms for flammable have mechanical or gravity ventilation?


 Is liquefied petroleum gas stored, handled and used in accordance with safe practices and standards?


 Are “NO SMOKING” signs posted on liquefied petroleum gas tanks?


 Are liquefied petroleum storage tanks guarded to prevent damage from vehicles?
Yes
No NA


 Are all solvent wastes and flammable liquids kept in fire-resistant covered containers until they are removed from the worksite?


 Is vacuuming used wherever possible rather than blowing or sweeping combustible dust?


 Are firm separators placed between containers of combustibles or flammables, when stacked one upon
another, to ensure their support and stability?


 Are fuel gas cylinders and oxygen cylinders separated by distance, fire-resistant barriers, etc., while in
storage?


 Are fire extinguishers selected and provided for the types of materials in areas where they are to be used?
Class A: Ordinary combustible material fires.
Class B: Flammable liquid, gas or grease fires.
Class C: Energized electrical equipment fires.


 Are appropriate fire extinguishers mounted within 75 feet of outside areas containing flammable liquids and within 10 feet of any inside storage area for such materials?


 Are extinguishers free from obstructions or blockage?


 Are all extinguishers serviced, maintained and tagged at intervals not to exceed one year?


 Are all extinguishers fully charged and in their designated places?


 Where sprinkler systems are permanently installed, are the nozzle heads so directed and arranged that
water will not be sprayed into operating electrical switchboards and equipment?


 Are “NO SMOKING” signs posted where appropriate in areas where flammable or combustible materials are used or stored?


 Are safety cans used for dispensing flammable liquids at a point of use?


 Are all spills of flammable liquids cleaned up promptly?


 Are storage tanks adequately vented to prevent the development of excessive vacuum or pressure as a
result of filling, emptying or atmosphere temperature changes?


 Are storage tanks equipped with emergency venting that will relieve excessive internal pressure caused
by fire exposure?
143
Yes

No NA

 Are “NO SMOKING” rules enforced in areas involving storage and use of hazardous materials?
Hazardous Chemical Exposure


 Are employees trained in the safe handling practices of hazardous chemicals, such as acids and caustics?


 Are employees aware of the potential hazards involving various chemicals stored or used in the workplace, such as acids, bases, caustics, epoxies and phenols?


 Is employee exposure to chemicals kept within acceptable levels?


 Are eyewash fountains and safety showers provided in areas where corrosive chemicals are handled?


 Are all containers such as vats and storage tanks labeled with their identity and hazards?


 Are all employees required to use personal protective clothing and equipment when handling chemicals (gloves, eye protection, respirators, etc.)?


 Are flammable or toxic chemicals kept in closed containers when not in use?


 Are chemical piping systems clearly marked as to their content?


 Where corrosive liquids are frequently handled in open containers or drawn from storage vessels or
pipelines, are adequate means readily available for neutralizing or disposing of spills or overflows
properly and safely?


 Have standard operating procedures been established and are they being followed when cleaning up
chemical spills?


 Where needed for emergency use, are respirators stored in a convenient, clean and sanitary location?


 Are respirators intended for emergency use adequate for the various uses for which they may be
needed?


 Are employees prohibited from eating in areas where hazardous chemicals are present?


 Is personal protective equipment provided, used and maintained whenever necessary?


 Are there written standard operating procedures for the selection and use of respirators where needed?


 If you have a respirator protection program, are your employees instructed on the correct usage and
limitations of the respirators? Are the respirators NIOSH approved for this particular application? Are
they regularly inspected and cleaned, sanitized and maintained?


 If hazardous substances are used in your processes, do you have a medical or biological monitoring
system in operation?


 Are you familiar with the threshold limit values or permissible exposure limits of airborne contaminants and physical agents used in your workplace?


 Have control procedures been instituted for hazardous materials, where appropriate, such as respirators, ventilation systems and handling practices?


 Whenever possible, are hazardous substances handled in properly designed and exhausted booths or
similar locations?


 Do you use general dilution or local exhaust ventilation systems to control dusts, vapors, gases, fumes,
smoke, aerosols or mists that may be generated in your workplace?


 Is ventilation equipment provided for removal of contaminants from such operations as production,
grinding, buffing, spray painting and vapor degreasing and is it operating properly?


 Do you monitor employees to make sure there are no complaints about dizziness, headaches, nausea,
irritation or other discomfort when they use solvents or other chemicals?


 Do you watch for employee health problems such as dryness, irritation or sensitization of the skin?
144
Yes
No NA


 Have you considered the use of an industrial hygienist or environmental health specialist to evaluate
your operation?


 If internal combustion engines are used, is carbon monoxide kept within acceptable levels?


 Is vacuuming used, rather than blowing or sweeping dusts, whenever possible for cleanup?


 Are materials that give off toxic, asphyxiant, suffocating or anesthetic fumes stored in remote or isolated locations when not in use?
Respiratory Protection Program


 In any workplace where respirators are necessary to protect the health of the employee or whenever
respirators are required by the employer, has a written respiratory protection program with worksitespecific procedures been established and implemented? If NA, go to next section.
The program must be updated as necessary to reflect those changes in workplace conditions that affect
respirator use. You must include in the program the following provisions as applicable:


 Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace.


 Medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators.


 Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators.


 Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations.


 Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding and
otherwise maintaining respirators.


 Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying
respirators.


 Training of employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine
and emergency situations.


 Training of employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any
limitations on their use, and their maintenance.


 Procedures for regularly evaluating the effectiveness of the program.
Hazardous Substances Communication


 Is there a list of hazardous substances used in your workplace?


 Is there a written hazard communication program dealing with safety data sheets (SDS), labeling and
employee training?


 Is each container for a hazardous substance (including vats, bottles and storage tanks) labeled with product identity and a hazard warning (communication of the specific health hazards and physical hazards)?


 Is there a safety data sheet readily available for each hazardous substance used?


 Is there an employee training program for hazardous substances?
This program needs to include:


 An explanation of what an SDS is and how to use and obtain one.


 SDS contents for each hazardous substance or class of substances.


 Explanation of “right to know.”


 Identification of where employees can see the employer’s written hazard communication program and
where hazardous substances are present in their work areas.


 Physical and health hazards of substances in the work area and specific protective measures to be used.
145
Yes

No NA

 Details of the hazard communication program, including how to use the labeling system and SDSs.
Bloodborne Pathogens


 If employees are exposed to blood or other potentially infectious material, is there a written exposure
control plan? If NA, skip to the next section.
The employee training program on the bloodborne pathogens standard needs to contain the following
elements:


 An accessible copy of the standard and an explanation of its contents.


 A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of bloodborne diseases.


 An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne pathogens.


 An explanation of the employer’s exposure control plan and the means by which employees can obtain
a copy of the written plan.


 An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and other activities that may involve
exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials.


 An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will prevent or reduce exposure, including
appropriate engineering controls, work practices and personal protective equipment.


 Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination and disposal of personal protective equipment.


 An explanation of the basis for selection of personal protective equipment.


 Information on the hepatitis B vaccine.


 Information on the appropriate actions to take and people to contact in an emergency involving blood
or other potentially infectious materials.


 An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident occurs, including the methods of reporting the incident and the medical follow-up that will be made available.


 Information on post-exposure evaluations and follow-up.


 An explanation of signs, labels and color-coding.
Are employees trained in the following:


 How to recognize tasks that might result in occupational exposure?


 How to use work practice and engineering controls and personal protective equipment and to know
their limitations?


 How to obtain information on the types, selection, proper use, location, removal, handling, decontamination and disposal of personal protective equipment?


 Who to contact and what to do in an emergency?
Electrical


 Do you specify compliance with OSHA standards for all contract electrical work?


 Are all employees required to report as soon as practicable any obvious hazard to life or property observed in connection with electrical equipment or lines?


 Are employees instructed to make preliminary inspections and/or appropriate tests to determine what
conditions exist before starting work on electrical equipment or lines?


 When electrical equipment or lines are to be serviced, maintained or adjusted, are necessary switches
opened, locked out and tagged whenever possible?


 Are portable electrical tools and equipment grounded or of the double-insulated type?
146
Yes
No NA


 Are electrical appliances such as vacuum cleaners, polishers and vending machines grounded?


 Do extension cords being used have a grounding conductor?


 Are multiple-plug adapters prohibited?


 Are ground-fault circuit interrupters installed on each temporary 15 or 20 ampere, 120 volt AC circuit at
locations where construction, demolition, modifications, alterations or excavations are being performed?


 Are all temporary circuits protected by suitable disconnecting switches or plug connectors at the junction with permanent wiring?


 Do you have electrical installations in hazardous dust or vapor areas? If so, do they meet the National
Electrical Code (NEC) for hazardous locations?


 Are exposed wiring and cords with frayed or deteriorated insulation repaired or replaced promptly?


 Are flexible cords and cables free of splices or taps?


 Are clamps or other securing means provided on flexible cords or cables at plugs, receptacles, tools
and equipment, and is the cord jacket securely held in place?


 Are all cord, cable and raceway connections intact and secure?


 In wet or damp locations, are electrical tools and equipment appropriate for the use or location or
otherwise protected?


 Is the location of electrical power lines and cables (overhead, underground, underfloor, other side of
walls) determined before digging, drilling or similar work is begun?


 Are metal measuring tapes, ropes, handlines or similar devices with metallic thread woven into the fabric
prohibited where they could come in contact with energized parts of equipment of circuit conductors?


 Is the use of metal ladders prohibited in areas where the ladder or the person using the ladder could
come in contact with energized parts of equipment, fixtures or circuit conductors?


 Are all disconnecting switches and circuit breakers labeled to indicate their use or equipment served?


 Are disconnecting means always opened before fuses are replaced?


 Do all interior wiring systems include provisions for grounding metal parts of electrical raceways,
equipment and enclosures?


 Are all electrical raceways and enclosures securely fastened in place?


 Are all energized parts of electrical circuits and equipment guarded against accidental contact by approved cabinets or enclosures?


 Is sufficient access and working space provided and maintained about all electrical equipment to permit ready and safe operations and maintenance?


 Are all unused openings (including conduit knockouts) in electrical enclosures and fittings closed with
appropriate covers, plugs or plates?


 Are electrical enclosures such as switches, receptacles and junction boxes provided with tight-fitting
covers or plates?


 Are disconnecting switches for electrical motors in excess of 2 horsepower capable of opening the circuit when the motor is in a stalled condition without exploding? (The horsepower rating of switches
must be equal to or in excess of the motor’s horsepower rating.)


 Is low voltage protection provided in the control device of motors driving machines or equipment that
could cause probable injury from inadvertent starting?


 Is each motor disconnecting switch or circuit breaker located within sight of the motor control device?
147
Yes
No NA


 Is each motor located within sight of its controller or the controller disconnecting means capable of
being locked in the open position or is a separate disconnecting means installed in the circuit within
sight of the motor?


 Is the controller for each motor in excess of 2 horsepower rated in horsepower equal to or in excess of
the rating of the motor it serves?


 Are employees who regularly work on or around energized electrical equipment or lines instructed in
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?


 Are employees prohibited from working alone on energized lines or equipment over 600 volts?
Noise


 Does every area in the workplace have a continuous noise level that does not exceed 85 dBA? If yes,
skip to the next set of questions.


 Is there an ongoing preventive health program to educate employees in safe levels of noise, exposures,
effects of noise on their health and the use of personal protection?


 Have work areas where noise levels make voice communication between employees difficult been
identified and posted?


 Are noise levels being measured using a sound level meter or octave band analyzer and are records
being kept?


 Have engineering controls been used to reduce excessive noise levels? Where engineering controls are
determined to not be feasible, are administrative controls (such as worker rotation) being used to minimize individual employee exposure to noise?


 Is approved hearing protective equipment (noise attenuating devices) available to every employee
working in noisy areas?


 Have you tried isolating noisy machinery from the rest of your operation?


 If you use ear protectors, are employees properly fitted and instructed in their use?


 Are employees in high noise areas given periodic audiometric testing to ensure that you have an effective hearing protection system?
Fueling


 Is it prohibited to fuel an internal combustion engine with a flammable liquid while the engine is running?


 Are fueling operations done in such a manner that the likelihood of spillage will be minimal?


 When spillage occurs during fueling operations, is the spilled fuel washed away completely, evaporated, or other measures taken to control vapors before restarting the engine?


 Are fuel tank caps replaced and secured before starting the engine?


 In fueling operations, is there always metal contact between the container and the fuel tank?


 Are fueling hoses of a type designed to handle the specific type of fuel?


 Is it prohibited to handle or transfer gasoline in open containers?


 Are open lights, open flames, or sparking or arcing equipment prohibited near fueling or transfer of
fuel operations?


 Is smoking prohibited in the vicinity of fueling operations?


 Are fueling operations prohibited in buildings or other enclosed areas that are not specifically ventilated for this purpose?


 Where fueling or transfer of fuel is done through a gravity flow system, are the nozzles of the selfclosing type?
148
Yes
No NA
Identification of Piping Systems


 When nonpotable water is piped through a facility, are outlets or taps posted to alert employees that it
is unsafe and not to be used for drinking, washing or other personal use?


 When hazardous substances are transported through above ground piping, is each pipeline identified at
points where confusion could introduce hazards to employees?


 When a pipeline is identified by color painting, are all visible parts of the line so identified?


 When pipelines are identified by color painted bands or tapes, are the bands or tapes located at reasonable intervals and at each outlet, valve or connection?


 When pipelines are identified by color, is the color code posted at all locations where confusion could
introduce hazards to employees?


 When the contents of pipelines are identified by name or name abbreviation, is the information readily
visible on the pipe near each valve or outlet?


 When pipelines carrying hazardous substances are identified by tags, are the tags constructed of
durable materials, the message carried clearly and permanently distinguishable, and are tags installed at
each valve or outlet?


 When pipelines are heated by electricity, steam or another external source, are suitable warning signs
or tags placed at unions, valves or other serviceable parts of the system?
Materials Handling


 Is there safe clearance for equipment through aisles and doorways?


 Are aisleways designated, permanently marked and kept clear to allow unhindered passage?


 Are motorized vehicles and mechanized equipment inspected daily or before use?


 Are containers of combustibles or flammables, when stacked while being moved, always separated by
dunnage sufficient to provide stability?


 Are dockboards (bridge plates) used when loading or unloading operations are taking place between
vehicles and docks?


 Are trucks and trailers secured from movement during loading and unloading operations?


 Are dock plates and loading ramps constructed and maintained with sufficient strength to support imposed loading?


 Are hand trucks maintained in safe operating condition?


 Are chutes equipped with sideboards of sufficient height to prevent the materials being handled from
falling off?


 Are chutes and gravity roller sections firmly placed or secured to prevent displacement?


 At the delivery end of the rollers or chutes, are provisions made to brake the movement of the handled
materials?


 Are pallets inspected before being loaded or moved?


 Are hooks with safety latches or other arrangements used when hoisting materials so that slings or load
attachments will not accidentally slip off the hoist hooks?


 Are securing chains, ropes, chockers or slings adequate for the job to be performed?


 When hoisting material or equipment, are provisions made to ensure no one will be passing under the
suspended loads?


 Are safety data sheets available to employees handling hazardous substances?
149
Yes
No NA
Transporting Employees and Materials


 Do employees who operate vehicles on public thoroughfares have valid operator’s licenses?


 When seven or more employees are regularly transported in a van, bus or truck, is the operator’s license appropriate for the class of vehicle being driven?


 Is each van, bus or truck used regularly to transport employees equipped with an adequate number of
seats?


 When employees are transported by truck, are provisions provided to prevent their falling from the vehicle?


 Are vehicles used to transport employees equipped with lamps, brakes, horns, mirrors, windshields and
turn signals in good repair?


 Are transport vehicles provided with handrails, steps, stirrups or similar devices, so placed and
arranged that employees can safely mount and dismount?


 Are employee transport vehicles equipped at all times with at least two reflective type flares?


 When cutting tools or tools with sharp edges are carried in passenger compartments of employee transport vehicles, are they placed in closed boxes or containers that are secured in place?


 Are employees prohibited from riding on top of any load that can shift, topple or otherwise become
unstable?
Control of Harmful Substances by Ventilation


 Is the volume and velocity of air in each exhaust system sufficient to gather the dusts, fumes, mists, vapors or gases to be controlled and to convey them to a suitable point of disposal?


 Are exhaust inlets, ducts and plenums designed, constructed and supported to prevent collapse or failure of any part of the system?


 Are clean-out ports or doors provided at intervals not to exceed 12 feet in all horizontal runs of exhaust
ducts?


 Are proper safeguards taken to ensure that where two or more different types of operations are being
controlled through the same exhaust system, the combination of substances being controlled do not
constitute a fire, explosion or chemical reaction hazard in the duct?


 Is adequate makeup air provided to areas where exhaust systems are operating?


 Is the source point for makeup air located so that only clean, fresh air, which is free of contaminants,
will enter the work environment?


 Where two or more ventilation systems are serving a work area, is their operation such that one will
not offset the function of the other?
Sanitizing Equipment and Clothing


 Is personal protective clothing or equipment that employees are required to wear or use of a type capable of being cleaned easily and disinfected?


 Are employees prohibited from interchanging personal protective clothing or equipment unless it has
been properly cleaned?


 Are machines and equipment that process, handle or apply materials that could be injurious to employees cleaned and/or decontaminated before being overhauled or placed in storage?


 Are employees prohibited from smoking or eating in any area where contaminants that could be injurious if ingested are present?


 When employees are required to change from street clothing into protective clothing, is a clean change
room with separate storage facility for street and protective clothing provided?
150
Yes
No NA


 Are employees required to shower and wash their hair as soon as possible after a known contact has
occurred with a carcinogen?


 When equipment, materials or other items are taken into or removed from a carcinogen-regulated area,
is it done in a manner that will not contaminate nonregulated areas or the external environment?
Tire Inflation


 Where tires are mounted or inflated on drop center wheels, is a safe practice procedure posted and
enforced?


 Where tires are mounted or inflated on wheels with split rims or retainer rings, is a safe practice procedure posted and enforced?


 Does each tire inflation hose have a clip-on chuck with at least 24 inches of hose between the chuck
and an in-line hand valve and gauge?


 Does the tire inflation control valve automatically shut off the airflow when the valve is released?


 Is a tire restraining device, such as a cage, rack or other effective means, used while inflating tires
mounted on split rims or rims using retainer rings?


 Are employees strictly forbidden from taking a position directly over or in front of a tire while it’s
being inflated?
151
Monthly Building Inspection Form
Building: __________________
Yes
No
Inspector:
_______________
Identified Hazard
Electric cord attached to building surface or run
through door/ceiling/wall.
Electric cord frayed, cut, or damaged.
Light-duty 2-prong extension cord used.
Ground pin missing from cord.
Empty opening (knockout) in electric box.
Exposed live electrical parts.
Ungrounded equipment.
Storage within 3' of electric panels.
Circuit breakers/disconnects not labeled.
Fire extinguishers blocked/obscured.
Fire extinguishers w/o monthly check.
Exit doors blocked/locked.
Exit signs/arrows not in place and visible.
Emergency evacuation lights not tested.
Storage >5 feet w/o stepstool or ladder.
Storage within 18 inches of sprinkler heads.
Storage within 3 feet of heater/heat source.
Storage aisles <28 inches wide.
Storage stacks lean/unstable.
Compressed gas not capped/chained
Excessive flammables outside of cabinets.
Incompatible chemicals stored together.
Chemicals not labeled with name/hazards.
Material safety data sheets not available.
Emergency shower/eyewash not tested weekly.
Housekeeping not up to standards.
Wet/slippery floors not marked.
Trip hazards in floor, stairs, sidewalks etc
First aid kit and PPE not available.
Burned out or missing light bulbs.
Oily/greasy rags not in covered metal can.
Machinery guards not in place.
Guardrails/stair-rails missing or not in place.
PPE not provided and/or properly used.
Other:
Other:
152
Date:_______
Comments/Action(s)
Monthly Inspection Checklist
Floors and floor openings
Are floors in good condition, free of broken and pitted surfaces?
Are floor coverings, such as carpets and mats, in good condition?
Are floor openings properly protected?
Are stairways equipped with appropriate handrails, guardrails?
Check floors for slippery conditions—a major cause of falls?
Yes
No
N/A
Aisles and passageways
Are aisles and passageways kept clear?
Are they free of tripping hazards?
Yes
No
N/A
Machines
Are belts, pulleys, gears, chains and sprockets guarded?
Are effective point of operation guards in use?
Is additional guarding needed?
Yes
No
N/A
Electrical
Are extension cords used appropriately, i.e., not in place of permanent wiring?
Are electrical cords stretched across the floor without appropriate floor covers?
Are electrical cords free from damage (exposed wires, missing grounding pins)?
Are portable electrical tools grounded?
Yes
No
N/A
Hand Tools
Are the right tools for the job used?
Are tools in good condition?
Are cutting edges sharp?
Are tools with mushroomed heads, split handles and other defects tagged and
removed from service?
Yes
No
N/A
Housekeeping
Is the department clean and orderly?
Are materials properly stored out of walkways or paths to exits?
Yes
No
N/A
Storage of materials
Are materials and supplies properly stacked—within recommended heights?
Are flammable materials properly handled and stored?
Are all chemical containers appropriately labeled?
Yes
No
N/A
Lighting
Is lighting in work and storage areas, passageways and stairways satisfactory?
Check for burned out bulbs.
Check light guarding and reflectors.
Yes
No
N/A
Ventilation
Is there good general ventilation?
Is there adequate local ventilation to control possible health hazards?
Yes
No
N/A
153
Ladders
Are portable ladders of standard construction and in good condition?
Are fixed ladders of standard construction and securely fastened?
Yes
No
N/A
Fire Extinguishers
Are enough fire extinguishers of the right type available and easily accessible?
Is all fire suppressant equipment in proper working order?
Are fire extinguishers properly mounted?
Are fire extinguishers inspected on a monthly and annual basis?
Yes
No
N/A
Exits
Are emergency exits adequate in number and location and properly identified?
Are any exits blocked or locked, preventing escape to the outside?
Yes
No
N/A
154
OSH Publications
We provide a variety of OSH publications. These include general industry and construction regulations, industry guides that cover different OSH topics, quick cards, fact sheets and brochures that
cover a wide variety of serious safety and health workplace hazards. Workplace labor law posters are
available free of charge. To obtain publications, call toll free at 1-800-NC-LABOR (1-800-625-2267)
or direct at 919-807-2875. You may view the list of publications and also download many of them at
www.nclabor.com/pubs.htm.
Occupational Safety and Health (OSH)
Sources of Information
You may call 1-800-NC-LABOR (1-800-625-2267) to reach any division of the N.C. Department of Labor; or visit the
NCDOL home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.nclabor.com.
Occupational Safety and Health Division
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 3rd Floor)
Local Telephone: 919-807-2900
Fax: 919-807-2856
For information concerning education, training, interpretations of occupational safety and health standards, and
OSH recognition programs contact:
Education, Training and Technical Assistance Bureau
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 4th Floor)
Telephone: 919-807-2875
Fax: 919-807-2876
For information concerning occupational safety and health consultative services contact:
Consultative Services Bureau
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 3rd Floor)
Telephone: 919-807-2899
Fax: 919-807-2902
For information concerning migrant housing inspections and other related activities contact:
Agricultural Safety and Health Bureau
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 2nd Floor)
Telephone: 919-807-2923
Fax: 919-807-2924
For information concerning occupational safety and health compliance contact:
Safety and Health Compliance District Offices
Raleigh District Office (3801 Lake Boone Trail, Suite 300, Raleigh, NC 27607)
Telephone: 919-779-8570
Fax: 919-420-7966
Asheville District Office (204 Charlotte Highway, Suite B, Asheville, NC 28803-8681)
Telephone: 828-299-8232
Fax: 828-299-8266
Charlotte District Office (901 Blairhill Road, Suite 200, Charlotte, NC 28217-1578)
Telephone: 704-665-4341
Fax: 704-665-4342
Winston-Salem District Office (4964 University Parkway, Suite 202, Winston-Salem, NC 27106-2800)
Telephone: 336-776-4420
Fax: 336-767-3989
Wilmington District Office (1200 N. 23rd St., Suite 205, Wilmington, NC 28405-1824)
Telephone: 910-251-2678
Fax: 910-251-2654
***To make an OSH Complaint, OSH Complaint Desk: 919-807-2796***
For statistical information concerning program activities contact:
Planning, Statistics and Information Management Bureau
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 2nd Floor)
Telephone: 919-807-2950
Fax: 919-807-2951
For information about safety videos, labor-related books or electronic resources contact:
N.C. Department of Labor Library
Mailing Address:
Physical Location:
1101 Mail Service Center
111 Hillsborough St.
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
(Old Revenue Building, 5th Floor)
Telephone: 919-807-2850
Fax: 919-807-2849
N.C. Department of Labor (Other than OSH)
1101 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-1101
Telephone: 919-733-7166
Fax: 919-733-6197
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