TAC Xenta family v3, Engineering Guidelines, Manual (SE)

TAC Xenta family v3, Engineering Guidelines, Manual (SE)
TAC Xenta family v3
Engineering Guidelines
LowSupp
ALARM
LowSuppLimit
HYST
PVR
InitValue
3
DelayOn
LowSuppDelay
DelayOff
0
Priority
2
Activate
0
Deactivate
0.5
AINL
SupplyTemp
HeatingREG
MV PIDA
AI
M0-B1
SP
HeatSP
Mod
PVR
G
InitValue
18
DZ
XPI
a?1:3
PVR
InitValue
25
A
XPR
100/A
HeatITime
PVR
InitValue
4
TSg
0
0.5
HeatPband
A
XPR
60*A
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 1998-08-15
UMin
0
Ti
Td
a
ControlInt
10
UMax
100
StrokeTime
60
Foreword
Welcome to the TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines.
Copyright © 1998 TAC AB.
Subject to modification.
This document, as well as the product it refers to, is only intended for licensed users of the product and the document. TAC AB owns
the copyright of this document and reserves the right to make changes, additions or deletions. TAC AB assumes no responsibility for
possible mistakes or errors that might appear in this document.
Do not use the product for any other purposes than those indicated in this document.
Only licensed users of the product and the document are permitted to use the document or any information therein. Distribution,
disclosure, copying, storing or use of the product, the information or the illustrations in the document on the part of non-licensed users,
in electronic or mechanical form, as a recording or by other means, including photocopying or information storage and retrieval
systems, without the express written permission of TAC AB, will be regarded as a violation of copyright laws and is strictly prohibited.
TAC Vista, TAC Menta and TAC Xenta are registered trademarks of TAC AB in Sweden and other countries. All other brand names
are trade marks of their respective owners.
Revisions
Art No
0-004-7639-0
Comment
First version.
Covers TAC Menta version 3.1, TAC Vista version 3.1 and TAC Xenta version 3.1.
Editor
CPHA
Date
1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Contents
TAC Xenta family v3
Engineering Guidelines
Contents
1. Introduction
1-1
1.1. Purpose .................................................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2. Terminology........................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.3. Overall way of working.......................................................................................................... 1-2
1.4. More information................................................................................................................... 1-3
2. Basic project analysis
2-1
2.1. System configuration.............................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1.1. Operator units....................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1.2. The LonWorks network ........................................................................................................ 2-1
2.2. Point identification/Allocation................................................................................................ 2-2
2.2.1. Standard applications............................................................................................................ 2-2
2.2.2. Execution ............................................................................................................................. 2-3
2.2.3. Standard for TAC Xenta 300 point allocation........................................................................ 2-5
2.3. Acronyms and ID's ................................................................................................................ 2-6
2.3.1. General structure .................................................................................................................. 2-6
2.3.2. Create ID in TAC Menta ....................................................................................................... 2-7
2.3.3. Display the ID ...................................................................................................................... 2-7
2.3.4. Physical ID........................................................................................................................... 2-9
3. Programming
3-1
3.1. Preparations........................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1.1. Environment and Tools ......................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1.2. Program licenses................................................................................................................... 3-2
3.1.3. Folder structure .................................................................................................................... 3-2
3.2. Application programming...................................................................................................... 3-3
3.2.1. FBD programming................................................................................................................ 3-3
3.2.2. The Macro Block Library ..................................................................................................... 3-5
3.2.3. OP configuration .................................................................................................................. 3-7
3.2.4. User documentation .............................................................................................................. 3-8
3.3. TAC Vista .............................................................................................................................. 3-9
3.3.1. General................................................................................................................................. 3-9
3.3.2. Database generator ............................................................................................................... 3-9
3.3.3. Colour graphics .................................................................................................................... 3-9
3.3.4. Reports and presentations ................................................................................................... 3-10
3.3.5. General working method ..................................................................................................... 3-11
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Contents
3.3.6. Creating a database for TAC Xenta units ............................................................................ 3-11
3.3.7. System documentation ........................................................................................................ 3-12
3.3.8. Backup............................................................................................................................... 3-12
3.4. Upgrading ............................................................................................................................ 3-13
3.4.1. Upgrading the TAC Xenta units.......................................................................................... 3-13
3.4.2. Upgrading the TAC Vista database..................................................................................... 3-13
4. Commissioning
4-1
4.1. Commissioning with TAC Menta .......................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.1. Initial checking ..................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.2. Network configuration.......................................................................................................... 4-2
4.1.3. I/O test ................................................................................................................................. 4-4
4.1.4. Functional test...................................................................................................................... 4-5
Index
Reply form
This document has 44 pages
0-004-7639-0 (GB)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Introduction
1. Introduction
1.1. Purpose
This document describes tools and working methods in the TAC Xenta
family (TAC Xenta, TAC Menta and TAC Vista), both hardware and
software, that are or could be useful when executing the different tasks
in the contracting business. In the document, working methods are
proposed and available tools to support them are shown. Also, it will in
short describe how to use the tools. All to enable or facilitate the scoop
of work within the contracting cycle.
1.2. Terminology
The following TAC Xenta family terminology is used in this document:
TAC Xenta
A standard controller or a freely programmable
unit with modular I/O configuration.
OP
Operator Panel on the TAC Xenta unit.
LONWORKS™
The standardised network, used for
communication between the TAC Xenta units.
TAC Vista
A PC based operator unit for monitoring and
control of air handling and heating systems.
TAC Menta
Application programming tool for TAC Xenta.
OP configuration
tool
Programming tool for the TAC Xenta Operator
panel, included in TAC Menta.
Network
Tool for definition of the TAC Xenta units
configuration tool network addresses etc., included in TAC Menta.
The following abbreviations and acronyms, not explained where they
occur, are used throughout the document:
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information
Interchange.
BMS
Building Management System
HVAC
Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
ID
Plant specific names/descriptors for points etc.
I/O
Input/Output
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 1:1 (3)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Introduction
1.3. Overall way of working
The overall way of working in a BMS project can be divided into three
parts, which also give the different chapters in this Guideline their
names:
Chapter 2
Basic project analysis
Chapter 3
Programming
Chapter 4
Commissioning
All three parts should be used by all personnel involved in the
contracting business, especially Chapter 2, because if this area is
neglected, it will be hard to compensate for it later on in the project.
The typical way of working in a "normal" project should be:
Project
analysis
1) Read the specifications and the other project documents.
2) Do the physical system configuration, i. e. number of operator units,
their location and need of program modules, number of TAC Xentas
and other units, their location and the network cable wiring (mark it on
the drawing, so it can be found when the under ceiling is mounted).
3) Decide the logical layout i.e. the ID structure. At the same time,
document each TAC Xenta unit's device name and network address.
4) Do the point identification/allocation.
Programming
5) Prepare the programming (folder structure, libraries etc.)
6) Run an off-line network configuration. Note: Do always configure
the complete network before down-loading to any TAC Xenta!
7) Define all central functions and units in TAC Vista.
8) Find the most complex system in the installation, and do the
application program and the OP configuration in TAC Menta. Test the
program, first in the TAC Menta simulation mode and then (primarily
the OP menu texts) on-line in a TAC Xenta unit.
9) Create a colour graphic, a report etc. for the system in TAC Vista.
10) Copy the files to the next system and continue the programming.
Commissioning
11) Do initial checking on site in the installation.
12) Install program and database in the installation PC. Down-load the
application (or a special test application) and the network data base to
every TAC Xenta unit. Network configure the I/O modules.
13) Test I/O.
14) Do functional tests.
Depending of the size and the contents of the project, the different
points in the list may, of course, be omitted, have different size or be
executed by different persons or in reverse order. Different activities
may happen in parallel, and some times project analysis, programming
and commissioning may overlap.
In this manual, the different moments are described separately, without
taking the parallel activities into consideration.
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 1:2 (3)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Introduction
1.4. More information
x
Engineering guidelines
In addition to this document, there are four important manuals also
describing system working methods, but in specific situations:
TAC Xenta Network guide
Guidelines for how to design a
LonWorks network, with or without
external equipment.
TAC Vista Communication
TAC Xenta, direct
Guidelines for connection of a
LonWorks network to TAC Vista.
TAC Vista Installation and
upgrading
How to installe and uninstall
TAC Vista 3.1, and how to upgrade
from TAC Vista 1.1, 1.2, 2.0 and 3.0.
TAC Xenta Zone System
Guidelines
Working procedures when designing a
zone system based upon TAC Xenta
products.
x
Other manuals
Detailed information about the products in the TAC Xenta family can
be obtained from the technical descriptions.
The TAC Xenta units are described in the following document:
TAC Xenta 300 Handbook.
TAC Xenta 400 Handbook.
TAC Xenta OP Handbook.
TAC Menta is described in the following documents:
TAC Menta User's manual.
TAC Menta Reference manual.
TAC Vista is described in the following documents:
TAC Vista Basic functions.
TAC Vista Database generator.
TAC Vista Technical ref. manual.
and other manuals.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 1:3 (3)
Produkt version X, Manualens namn
TAC AB, 1997-xx-xx
Svarsblankett
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
2. Basic project analysis
The basic project analysis contains some planning activities, which
highly affect the engineering hours needed later in the project.
2.1. System configuration
System configuration deals with the physical and logical lay-out of the
HVAC system: where to place Operator units, TAC Xenta units, and
how to connect them. This, of course, must be done in an early stage of
the project.
2.1.1. Operator units
The networks function (N1 network) in TAC Vista makes it possible to
create a system for large or geographically ‘spread-out’ plants. The
network is usually established by direct connections between several
operator units in a local area network (LAN). From any operator unit
the operator has through the network access to resources, processunits
and all objects in the distributed database, as if they were stored on the
operator unit which he has logged on to. Printers can be connected to
each operator unit for printing of graphics, alarms, reports etc.
The network functions are described in a separate manual; TAC Vista
Networks. How to define nodes in TAC Vista is also described in TAC
Vista Basic Functions.
2.1.2. The LonWorks network
TAC Xenta units communicate with each other, the Xenta OP and the
TAC Vista operator units via the Echelon LONWORKS™ network (N2
network). When designing the network, a lot of things such as network
topology, cable lengths, need of extra units for signal amplification/traffic sectioning etc. have to be taken into consideration. How to
do this design is described in the TAC Xenta Network guide.
Always read the Network guide, also when the network is limited to I/O
module and OP communication!
Note. The LONWORKS™ network can also be used by devices from
other manufacturers forming e.g. light control systems or alarm
systems. No matter if these system works in parallel with the HVAC
system, or if they are integrated, co-operation is not only important, but
necessary to make the systems work at all!
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:1 (10)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
2.2. Point identification/Allocation
The importance of a good point allocation is often underestimated.
There is a very close connection between how well the allocation is
done and the efficiency that can be achieved later in the project.
With a good allocation, copying techniques can substantially reduce the
engineering hours needed for design/manufacturing of electrical panels,
which lowers the project cost. Installation and commissioning work is
positively affected if the point allocation is done in an efficient way. If
standards are followed, and the same point allocation principles are
used for HVAC units with similar function, the commissioning and test
hours can be reduced. There will also be less risk of making errors and
it will be easier to find and correct the faults that are made.
The documents you base your identification/allocation on, are normally
produced by someone outside your company e.g. a Consult Engineer or
a Mechanical contractor. Their main objective when producing these
documents is to describe the system as a HVAC function. It is not to
describe and allocate I/O signals and devices in accordance with
controllers, RPUs and other products from a certain manufacturer.
It is your task to translate their HVAC functions into physical system
layouts. This work should really start already when the quotation is
prepared and submitted. Therefore, even if described in the consultants
documents, you should not just accept the allocation of points. Always
consider the solution from a project execution point of view, using your
intelligence and knowledge to make an "optimal" point allocation.
Sometimes there are points related to the security of the installation or
of the user and where the allocation is specified as a requirement from
some authority e.g. fire authorities or insurance companies etc. In such
cases you should of course comply with the specification.
Often functions specified as hard-wire interlocked or as a function from
a special device, can be carried out in software programming, without
affecting the reliability/quality of the project. Normally your costs can
be reduced and your profit increased if such a solution can be utilised.
Always look for possibilities like that and try to get them accepted by
the persons responsible for the specification. Of course you should
never alter these things without a discussion and an agreement from
them. Any changes must be proposed and documented prior to the
signing of the contract, or stated as a clarification in your offer for the
project.
To summarise: a good point allocation saves money in a project from
the start. A bad allocation will cost money and once you have had it,
your possibilities to improve later during the project will be limited.
2.2.1. Standard applications
The optimum solution is to use complete standard applications for
whole units where the I/O allocation are fixed in a TAC Xenta unit,
where the colour graphic is standardised and where the function of the
whole application is fixed. These standards should be proposed to the
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:2 (10)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
customer already in the sales phase and offered instead of the specified
functions and solutions, and will affect the price in a positive way.
In this way of working in your market place, a library of such
standards should be compiled and well documented and not the least,
introduced both to your own sales engineers and to your customers.
Please note! The whole idea is to sell your standard solutions without
any alterations. As soon as you do any changes to "standard" you will
have to spend engineering hours and this will increase the price to the
same level as a non standard application. Therefore, you shall always
keep the list of available standard applications updated and know
where to find them.
2.2.2. Execution
1.
You begin by identifying the various systems in the specification and
their physical location. By "system" is meant an AHU, a heater etc.
2.
The next step is to divide these systems into groups. Primarily, look for
the systems that already exists as standard applications. Among other
systems, each group should contain systems with similar functions and
layouts. For example, a project may consist of ten AHUs:
- AHU 1 and AHU 2 have two speed fans, a heating coil, a cooling
coil, a heat exchanger, a room temperature sensor and a supply air
sensor. AHU 1 also has a timer for after hours work. Also AHU 3 has
the same function except for the two speed fans and the heat exchanger.
These 3 AHUs could be put in the same group, Group 1.
- Among the other seven AHUs, you are in the same way able to
identify two groups of similar systems.
- Finally, one unique AHU, which has no similarities with the other.
Function
Single speed fans
Two speed fans
Variable speed
Pump, heating
Pump, cooling
Pump, recovery
Damper on/off
Frost protection
Fire/smoke protection
Timer
Cooling coil
Heating coil
Heat exchanger
Damper control
Room temp sensor
Supply air sensor
Extract air sensor
Pressure sensor
Etc. . .
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU AHU
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Diagrams similar to this should be drawn and compiled in the
company's estimate of the system.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:3 (10)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
Further, there are two heating applications for the different parts of the
building, that are similar and could be put in one heating group. There
are also two chiller applications that can be regarded as one group.
3.
After having identified the five groups, you start the actual point
allocation. Start with the system that contains the most complex
functions. This system shall then always be used as a master, even
when you create a new master for a similar type of system.
In this case, select one of the two speed systems in Group 1 as master
when copying for the other systems in this group.
Allocate the corresponding I/O in this TAC Xenta unit in accordance
with the standards in section 2.2.3. Make sure that all points and
necessary hardware devices are included in your design. If at a later
stage you have to add some points, the layout of the point allocation
becomes unstructured and will in a negative way affect the subsequent
work with the project.
Be careful when you design the master. If you spend some extra time
here, you will gain this many times over when working with copies.
4.
When the point allocation for the master is done, make one copy for
AHU 2 and one for AHU 3. For the single speed unit, leave the points
used for switching between low and high speed, the timer and the heat
exchanger empty for the time being.
Always keep the basic layout of the master intact. This is important for
commissioning and maintenance. If you for some reason remove I/O
points, or as in this case do not need them, avoid compressing the
remaining points. If you do this, in order not to get idle points in the
middle, the copying advantages will be reduced.
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:4 (10)
5.
Complete the other systems in the group and add any signals unique for
the units.
6.
Continue with the next group using the same methodology. Do not
forget to always copy from your origin master!
7.
When all the systems have been arranged into TAC Xenta units,
allocate the remaining alarms and sensors etc. to the most appropriate
TAC Xenta unit. In this way you will use the "idle points" described
above and at the same time not destroy your copying advantages.
8.
Check that all associated functions are placed in the same TAC Xenta
unit as far as possible.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
2.2.3. Standard for TAC Xenta 300 point allocation
• Air handling
X1
X2
X3
X4
B1
B2
B3
B4
U1
U2
U3
U4
15-16
17-16
18-19
20-19
9-10
11-10
12-13
14-13
3-4
5-4
6-7
8-7
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5*
K6*
Y1
Y2
Y3*
Y4*
34/35
36/35
37/38
39/38
31/32
33/32
23-24
25-24
26-27
28-27
Smoke detector (NC)
Timer
Service switch
External alarm
Supply air temperature
Heating coil return water temperature
Outdoor temperature
Room (Exhaust air) temperature
SF Operation indication (Pressure sensor SF)
EF Operation indication (Pressure sensor EF)
Pump Operation indication
Common alarm Thermal wheel, Heat recovery circuit
temperature or Heat exchanger pressure guard
SF Manoeuvre
EF Manoeuvre
Heating pump Manoeuvre
Common alarm
Fans half/full speed (0/1)
Heating valve
Heat recovery
Pressure control SF
Pressure control EF
Heat recovery pump Manoeuvre on I/O module.
• Heating
X1
X2
X3
X4
B1
B2
B3
B4
U1
U2
U3
U4
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5*
K6*
Y1
Y2
Y3*
Y4*
15-16
17-16
18-19
20-19
9-10
11-10
12-13
14-13
3-4
5-4
6-7
8-7
34/35
36/35
37/38
39/38
31/32
33/32
23-24
25-24
26-27
28-27
Pump A Operation indication
Pump B Operation indication
Domestic hot water pump Operation indication
External alarm
Supply water temperature Radiators
Supply water temperature Domestic hot water
Outdoor temperature
Room temperature
Return water temperature District heating
Push button, Timer
Pulse Cold water/Hot water
Pulse District heating
Pump A Manoeuvre
Pump B Manoeuvre
Domestic hot water pump Manoeuvre
Heating valve Radiator
Heating valve Domestic hot water
*) Note. K5/K6 and Y3/Y4 can not be used at the same time.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:5 (10)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
2.3. Acronyms and ID's
2.3.1. General structure
The acronym for a point, physical or logical, in a system should be
built up in a hierarchical way with different levels, normally four.
Level 1 -
Level 2 -
Level 3 -
Level 4
Building/
area number
System
System
number
Point
Example:
012-AHU-008-TS01_SV
Building 12, Air handling unit 8,
Temperature sensor 1, Setpoint value
011-RAD-001-CP02
Building 11, Radiator group 1,
Circulation pump 2
• Level 1
This level should consist of the Area name or Building number/name
or Block. If the point isn't associated with any of the above, it should
get the acronym CS or 000. If the installation handles only one
building, this level could be omitted.
• Level 2
This level should describe the type of connected system, which for
example can be:
AHU
RAD
CH
DH
ZONE
DHW
Air handling
Radiator system
Chiller system
District heating
Zone control
Domestic hot water
• Level 3
This level is the system again followed by the system number.
The system number is a two or three digit number where the first digit
could be used to determine the part of the building, the floor or similar.
If there isn't any logical use for the first digit it should be 0. The second
and third digit is a number between 0 and 9.
• Level 4
This is the point level (will also became the TAC Menta/TAC Xenta
signal name), describing the point as well as the function of the point.
The characters "/ : _" can be used as delimiter between the point and
its function. Example:
-SF01:RI
Run indication for Supply Fan 1.
The function level could be:
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:6 (10)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
MV
SV
SVC
RI
FP
HL
LL
RT
AL
TS
%
Etc.
Basic project analysis
Measured value
Setpoint value, fixed
Setpoint value, calculated
Run indication
Frost protection
High level alarm
Low level alarm
Run time measurement
Alarm
Time schedule
Position indication
Note! These acronyms are suggestions only and must be adapted to
local standards and customs.
2.3.2. Create ID in TAC Menta
Enter the level 4 ID of the point (e. g. SF01:RI) as a signal name or a
constant name in a Function block in TAC Menta, and define it as
public. The name is an alphanumeric string with up to 20 characters.
The level 1-3 ID of the point is in TAC Menta represented by the
block’s Module belonging, which is added to the signal name (syntax:
Module\Signal). The Module concept enables you to divide the
application program into different systems. Structure the application
program so that all public signals that shall be displayed together are
placed in the same Module. If all signals in the application belongs to
the same system, the Module name can be omitted.
Module AHU1 SF01:RI
SF01
AHU1
DI
AHU1
DO
LIGHT
TSCH
Flood
LIGHT
DO
Module LIGHT TS1
All public signals belonging to the same Module will be handled
together (i. e. will be placed in the same logical unit) when being
imported to TAC Vista. At the same time, the Module name can be
replaced by the level 1-3 ID. Therefore, the Module name can be short,
as long as it identifies the system.
2.3.3. Display the ID
• Display the ID on central level in TAC Vista
To be able to import the application program to TAC Vista (cf.
TAC Vista, Communication TAC Xenta, direct), it must have been
saved as an .MTA file in TAC Menta. All public signals in the .MTA
file will be transferred to TAC Vista by first giving the Create
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:7 (10)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Basic project analysis
TAC Xenta description file command in the Database generator, and
then importing the created description file. The three upper ID levels
will be created at the same time, just by defining the logical unit
corresponding to the Module. Thus, each Module name can be changed
to a new logical unit name in TAC Vista.
TAC Vista presentation:
Database generator - Create TAC Xenta description file
TAC Vista - Object selection
Current object ID:
Current unit:
Selected node:
Current object type:
Physical connection:
SF01
012-AHU-AHU01
1
Digital input
012-RPU01 AHU01.SF01
Objects
SF01
SF01:RI
Units
2
3
1 Select TAC Xenta unit.
2 Select application program (the.MTA file).
3 Enter logical unit (ID level 1-3) for the marked
Module. All public signals in the marked Module
are created as TA Vista objects in this unit.
Process unit:
Name
-012-RPU01
Type
TAC Xenta 300
Application program:
Program file
C:\PROJECT\012\RPU01.MTA
Signals
Modules
AHU01
SF01
LIGHT
SF01:RI
LOCK
Logical unit
012-AHU-AHU01
Description file
C:\PROJECT\012\RPU01.DES
Note:
- All points in a Module are automatically placed under the same
logical unit in TAC Vista.
- All object names are presented with capital letters in TAC Vista, no
matter how they are defined in TAC Menta.
• Display the ID on local level in the TAC Xenta OP
The user would appreciate if the ID hierarchy in the OP was exactly
the same as in TAC Vista. Unfortunately, this is normally hard to do,
depending on that the OP displays the physical view of the network:
The TAC Xenta groups, and the TAC Xenta units within each group.
If, for example, a TAC Xenta unit holds more than one logical Module,
you cannot display a Module without first selecting TAC Xenta unit.
Therefore, it is better to consequently let the OP display the physical
ID (Cf. Section 2.3.4) down to the level where the OP menu tree of the
TAC Xenta unit is displayed:
TAC Menta FBD:
R02 012_AHU_AHU02
INFORMATION
OP. STATUS
TEMPERATURES
R02 TEMPERATURES
TS01_MV:
18.7°C
TS01_SP:
19.0°C
Outdoor: -10.3°C
AINL
TS01_MV
AHU02
AI
M0-B1
TS01_SP
AHU02
PVR
InitValue
19
The first OP row can be used for presentation of the system(s)
(corresponding to ID level 1-3) being present in this specific
TAC Xenta unit. Use the Name field in the Program specification of
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Basic project analysis
TAC Menta to enter this. The name field allows up to 20 characters,
but since the Abbreviation is presented in the same OP row, a
maximum of 15 characters can be used.
Divide the OP menu tree in different text displays for the different
systems (Modules). The actual layout of the displays are created in the
OP configuration tool, cf. section 3.2.3.
Note that if 15-20 characters are used in a signal name, then you must
use two rows in the OP to show the point; one row for the name and
one for the value. If you want to show both name and value in the same
row the name must be limited to 10-12 characters.
2.3.4. Physical ID
• Structure
The physical ID is used to identify the physical components of the
control system, i. e. the LonWorks network and its TAC Xenta units.
Use three levels, where level 1 is the building or part of the building
(the LonWorks network), level 2 is the cabinet (TAC Xenta group) and
level 3 the TAC Xenta unit.
• Physical ID in the TAC Xenta OP
The ID structure for the Xenta OP is created when giving the
TAC Xenta 300 units their names in the Network configuration tool:
Network configuration tool - Group dialog
TAC Xenta OP display:
Run offline
Master
Changed
Comment
LonWorks Network: 012
Cabinet number (ID level 2) Groups
Nodes
CAB01
CAB02
CAB03
CAB01
CAB02
CAB03
RPU01
RPU02
RPU03
RPU04
MX
X
X
X
RPU number (ID level 3)
RPU01
RPU02
RPU03
RPU04
TAC Menta - Program specification
Abbreviation
R02 012_AHU_AHU02
INFORMATION
OP. STATUS
TEMPERATURES
Name:
012_AHU_AHU02
Abbr:
Type:
Air handling HC-53
Cycle time:
Author:
M. Smythe
Std App.
R02
1000
ms
Date: 1997/10/21
Used resources:
Up to 30 TAC Xenta units can form a TAC Xenta group. A maximum
of 30 groups can be defined per network. The group name is shown on
the OP top level, where all groups are presented.
The OP menu tree of the selected RPU (TAC Xenta unit) is presented
as above, with the RPU number on the first row as an Abbreviation, a
four letter ID which is presented in all OP menus for the TAC Xenta
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
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Basic project analysis
unit. The full ID may have to be shortened when used as abbreviation.
The abbreviation is entered in the Abbr. field in the Program
specification of TAC Menta.
• Physical ID in TAC Vista
The physical structure of the network is converted from the Network
database into TAC Vista, and will then be displayed in the Status
menu. To convert (cf. TAC Vista, Communication TAC Xenta, direct),
use the Create description file command in the Network
configuration tool, and then import the created description file via the
TAC Vista Database generator.
TAC Vista Presentation:
TAC Vista - Status
HOSPITAL
PC_12
012
CAB01
RPU01
RPU02
RPU03
RPU04
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 2:10 (10)
Network configuration tool - Group dialog
LonWorks Network:
Groups
CAB01
CAB02
CAB03
012
Nodes
RPU01
RPU02
RPU03
RPU04
Run offline
Master
Changed
Comment
MX
X
X
X
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Programming
3. Programming
3.1. Preparations
3.1.1. Environment and Tools
The work shall be organised in a PC with Windows environment.
If more than one person does programming, the standards used and the
structure of the programs are the same. If a network and a server is
used, there must be one person responsible so that the organising of the
hard disk and back ups etc. are carried out on regular basis.
Recommended computer configuration:
Computer:
Memory:
Hard disk:
Disk drive:
Display:
Graphic:
Intel“ Pentium processor, at least 90 MHz
> 16 Mbytes
at least 50 Mbytes free
3½"
17" or larger
VGA
Each PC should contain the following programs:
- Windows95™
- A good editor, like Microsoft® Word™
- TAC Menta
- TAC Vista
It is important that tests of the program can be carried out before
delivery to the customer or the on-site commissioning. A basic test
system could consist of:
- A TAC Xenta unit (301/302)
- A TAC Xenta OP
- A "Simulating box"
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Programming
3.1.2. Program licenses
Both TAC Vista and TAC Menta uses a hardware key connected to the
PC printer port to lock/unlock (via password) program modules.
Therefore, it is always important to, in advance, check the program
license of the PC (Both at the customer and at the office) you will be
working with, or always to use your own hardware key. If both
TAC Vista and TAC Menta are installed on the PC, just one (a
common) hardware key shall be used.
• TAC Vista
TAC Vista consists of a basic module with functions for daily
operation of the plant. Depending on the customer's requirements there
are optional program modules such as Colours graphics editor,
Reports and presentations etc. which can be individually
locked/unlocked. Note: Communication with TAC Xenta is such an
optional module.
• TAC Menta
The following TAC Menta licenses are available (cf. figure below):
Demo
No hardware key required. On-line functions, code generation and Save
to file disabled.
Service/configuration
The tools OP configuration and Network configuration are available,
as also On-line functions, simulation and code generation in the main
program. Source code changes are blocked by disabling the Edit mode.
Normal/programming
Access to all functions.
Hardware key
TAC Xenta
Base unit
TAC Menta
Service/
configuration
• On-line functions
• Code generation
Normal/
programming
• On-line functions
• Code generation
• Edit mode
3.1.3. Folder structure
Each programmer should have his own project folder. When he starts a
new project he opens a new sub-directory and copies in suitable
templates from the library.
project
bldg12
012.DES
RPU05.DES
RPU06.DES
012.OGC
RPU05.MTA
RPU06.MTA
012.NDB
...
With the information given in the hand-over meeting, he starts creating
the TAC Xenta unit which is 'master' for a group of similar units.
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Programming
When the 'master' TAC Xenta unit is completed and tested, make
copies for the other TAC Xenta unit's in the group, and complete the
programming of each TAC Xenta unit.
Then start with the next group of systems using the same method.
3.2. Application programming
The application programming of the single TAC Xenta unit can be
divided into the following phases; Function phase, Design phase and
Test phase:
Function phase
Design phase
Test phase
FBD programming
Functional
specification
OP configuration
System
tests
Delivery to plant,
commissioning
User documentation
In the Function phase the Functional specification is read and
completed with your own analysis in accordance with the description in
chapter 2. At this stage you will know how much you can copy the
system from another TAC Xenta unit.
During the Design phase, the Application program (FBD
programming in TAC Menta), OP display texts (OP configuration tool
in TAC Menta) and the User documentation is created more or less in
parallel.
The Test phase contains two parts:
- Off-line functional tests of the program modules are integrated in the
design phase.
- A final system test where the complete application including the OP
menu tree is down-loaded to a TAC Xenta unit and tested.
Please note that the application can and shall be completely tested in
the office before delivery to plant and commissioning.
3.2.1. FBD programming
In a FBD, the function blocks process input signals to generate a
single output signal. The output signal is transported to other blocks
following the route defined by the connections, which represent the
data flow, from left to right, during the program execution.
Data flow
DI
Connections
DO
A complete TAC Menta program description is found in the
TAC Menta User's Manual, and all the function blocks are described in
detail in the TAC Menta Reference Manual.
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Programming
• Structuring the FBD
The design phase is started with the overall structuring i.e. to find the
main function groups and to find out how to graphically place the
groups in relation to other groups.
The first step is to find suitable function groups. This grouping can
be made in a number of ways. The general idea is to make the FBD
easy to understand and alter, therefore function blocks that perform a
function together, also should be placed together. This could be done in
levels, so that for example all blocks used for sequence control are
placed together, but inside this "Sequence control box" we find groups
of blocks for "Heating", "Heat exchanger", "Cooling" etc.
A part of this step is to find the functions which already exist in your
own library or in the Macro Block Library in form of macro blocks,
refer to section 3.2.2.
The second step is to graphically place the groups. Create a left-toright logical sequence in the FBD, meaning that if there is a connection
between two groups, place the "output group" to the left of the "input
group". The logical order from left-to-right should be: START
CONDITION - STOP CONDITION - GENERAL CONTROL - PID
CONTROL SEQUENCES - ALARM HANDLING:
Program header
STOP
CONDITION
START
CONDITION
GENERAL
CONTROL
PID CONTROL
SEQUENCES
ALARM
HANDLING
• Creating the FBD
Start the programming by defining the current configuration (Base unit
type 301, 302 or 401; number and types of I/O modules, if present) in
the Device configuration table.
Thereafter it is time to place blocks and groups in accordance with the
described structure. Use the following rules of thumb:
• Place a bus with common left-to-right directed connections in top of
the diagram. Try to avoid connections going in the opposite direction,
but when necessary, put these connections in a separate bus at the
bottom of the page. Mark the direction of these signals.
1.7-9
1.7-6
1.7-10
1.7-1
1.7-12
1.7-11
1.7-7
1.7-8
1.7-5
1.6-9
1.6-6
1.6-10
1.6-1
1.6-12
1.6-11
1.6-7
1.6-8
1.6-5
Fan control
Cooling/heating sequence
<<<
<<<
1.7-4
1.6-4
1.7-3
1.6-3
1.7-2
1.6-2
• Use plenty of space between the groups, so that there will possibilities
to draw extra connections and additional functions. Also adjust the
FBD to the page break lines, so that the printout will be easy to read.
• Add new pages to the right when needed, but try to use only one page
in vertical direction.
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Programming
• Try to structure every page so that the physical input blocks are
placed in a row to the left, and the physical output blocks are placed in
a row to the right.
• Re-use tested macro blocks from the Macro Block Library or from
your own library as much as possible.
• Enter a framed comment containing last edition date of the FBD in
the upper left corner. Also History notes describing the revision can be
included. Update this information whenever you make a program
revision:
Start/stop
Night heating
Air handling Appl:S3412SS-130
Version no.: 1.0
Last edited: 96-10-24
Author:
Jan Wallsby
Sensor err
One speed fans
Two stage sequence control; cooling/heating
Outdoor compensated supply air control
Night cooling
Night heating
REVISION
Date
Version Alteration
960930 1.00
First version
961024 1.01
System alarm added
• Test and debugging
Use Simulation mode. Don't forget that you can use automatic
generation of different wave forms on the inputs.
3.2.2. The Macro Block Library
You shall always keep a list of updated standard applications and
macro blocks in a locally available library, and know where to find
them.
• The TAC Menta Macro Block Library
TAC supports a central library for application programs designed with
TAC Menta. In the library, you can find examples of control and
supervisory functions, process models and macro blocks for different
other functions. All these applications (or parts of applications) have
been tested and approved according to TAC's quality system, although
not necessarily designed by TAC. The purpose of the official library is
to:
x
x
x
provide examples of how to implement different functions.
make it possible to design a new application easily and quickly.
make it easy to test an application with simulated process response.
Each folder in the Macro Block Library has a README.DOC file
which explains the functionality of the different programs. The
programs in the directories have two parts, a graphical FBD and a text
description in an associated text file.
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Programming
• Macro block
A macro block should follow these rules:
x The whole block should have a dotted line around it.
x Block name in upper left corner; bold text, size 12 and underlined.
x Place last edit date and programmer signature near the block name.
x Place Input signals on the left side, with explanations and units.
x Place Output signals on the right side, with explanations and units.
x A short description of the function, wherever suitable.
Example:
name: hotwater.aut
Domestic hot water control File
Last edition: 96-10-01
Author:
Mikael Krantz
For history notes, please see associated text file.
HotWaterControl
Domestic hot water temperature, °C
ActualHotWaterSP
(R l)
HotWaterSV
1
PVR
InitValue
50
1
MV
PIDA
SP
ControlInt
1
Mod
0
UMin
G
Control signal, %
(R l)
0
Ti
HotWaterPBand HWGain
PVR
HotWaterSetback
PVR
XPR
50
0
0
100
DZ
InitValue
StrokeTime
HWTravelTime
TSg
30
100/A
UMax
Td
PVR
InitValue
InitValue
HWCDzone
HotWaterTime
TSCH
A
HotWaterITime
A
XPB
PVR
InitValue
A<0
The domestic hot water controller has a load depending
deadzone change over, to take care of low flow at
HW C. There is also a time control to set a setpoint offset
during night periods.
1
5
0
HYST
0.5
HWCFlow
PVR
Activate
-1
Deactivate
1
InitValue
10
HW C flow
The dead zone changeover takes place when the
output signal goes below the "HWCFlow" set limit
with a hysteresis of +- 1%.
• Text file
The text file may be written with any kind of editor, but must be an
ASCII-file with the extension .TXT, WRI or .DOC. The text file
should contain a full functional description of the macro block, a list of
inputs and outputs (including their types and units), and also a list of
all public variables with their initial values and units.
It should also have a history list with notes of all changes that are made
in the program with date and signature of the programmer.
Note that text files generally are very useful:
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 3:6 (14)
•
The function descriptions in the macro block text files can be copied to
a text file with the same name as the application program, which then
can be invoked from TAC Menta.
•
Alternatively can the associated text file in TAC Menta be copied from
the origin functional specification.
•
The associated text file can be used in TAC Vista as a notepad file,
which can be chained to a colour graphic to present an information text
for the displayed system.
•
A notepad file can in TAC Vista be chained to an event enrolment
object, and thus give the operator a list what to do when an alarm is
tripped.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Programming
3.2.3. OP configuration
The TAC Xenta OP is used to give the operator access to plant status,
alarms and parameters. The information is presented as a number of
4*20 character displays. The displays are structured as a menu tree.
This chapter contains some hints on how to structure the menu tree.
• Automatic generation of the menu tree
The menu tree will automatically be generated at every
generate/download command in TAC Menta, if Preferences Automatic generation of menu tree is selected in simulation mode. The
generated menu tree will have a fix structure with all public signals and
constants divided into separate displays for digital signals, analog
signals and time schedules. Also, different modules will be presented
separately. This is the quickest way to create a menu tree, and should
be used if there is no specific demand for a menu tree structure. The
disadvantage is that you in this way may get very long and
unstructured signal lists.
• Structuring the menu tree manually
You can manually configure the OP menu tree and the text displays in
two different ways, both described in the TAC Menta User's Manual:
1) Graphically in the OP configuration tool, or
2) In a text file (the OP description file), which is imported to the OP
configuration tool.
In both cases, the menu tree structuring mainly consists of two parts:
• The Logical structuring, meaning to group items which are logically
connected together e.g. all fan parameters.
• The Operator dependent structuring, meaning to divide the items into
groups with different interest for different operators.
The first rule of thumb is to place items of interest for the daily
operator at the top of the menu tree. The daily operator, having a low
access level, should mainly be able to read the plant status, read and
acknowledge alarms and alter a few values, typically the setpoints.
Settings which are seldom altered, and then by an authorised operator
with medium or high access level, are placed further down in the menu
tree.
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Programming
• Standard for OP menus
The basic menu tree structure should be like this:
NAME
Low
access
INFORMATION
- Application type and version
OP STATUS
VALUES
TEMPERATURES- Measured values and Setpoints (RO)
one display per value
DEGREE DAYS - Last month's degree days
one display per value
ACCESS CODE
Medium
access
(level 1)
DATE & TIME
ALARMS
SETPOINTS
TEMPERATURES- (R/W)
CURVES
TIME SCHEDULES
WEEK CHARTS
HOLIDAYS
START
- Auto/Manual switch and Restart
of the AHU
DAYLIGHT SAVING
CHANGE CODE
High
access
(level 2)
PARAMETERS
- Control parameters, system parameters
such as delays etc.
Note that there is no need for a specific manual control menu. The I/O
points can be manually forced in the status menu, if the user logs in
with the high level password.
3.2.4. User documentation
The printout function of TAC Menta contains a number of
possibilities, but you don't have to use all since some information are
included in more than one list.
The most important TAC Menta printouts in a TAC Vista project are
I/O list, public signals and FBD, together with colour graphics and
description files from TAC Vista, and of course the functional
specification.
In a stand alone project, you should document I/O-list, public signals,
time schedules, alarm texts, FBD and OP menu tree.
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Programming
3.3. TAC Vista
3.3.1. General
A TAC Vista system is built up of objects, defined in a database. The
database must exist before you can convert control programs, or use
address symbols and values in colour graphics etc.
TAC Vista may use absolute or relative addressing. Relative
addressing means that you - for example in a colour graphic (BLDGAFLOOR4-PICT) - refer to the last level of the object IDs. Absolute
address: BLDGA-FLOOR4-T1, relative address: T1. By means of
relative addressing the colour graphics can easily be moved to another
location in the logical tree structure where there also is a point named
T1.
3.3.2. Database generator
To program the objects and their attributes in an efficient way you use
the Database generator, cf. the TAC Vista Database generator manual.
In the Database generator you can perform editing and syntax check of
description files. You can convert RPU documents and TAC Xenta
units and you can export and update data to the description file. You
can also import data to the database.
There are template files with predefined texts and attributes for
different types of process units. Try to create a number of description
files, each for a specific process unit or part of the project. The data in
the different description files can be imported to the database at the
same time via a batch file.
3.3.3. Colour graphics
The colour graphic editor offers the option to document which points
the graphic contains in a list that is easy to survey.
In the editor you may also simulate the dynamic functions in the colour
graphic.
When creating colour graphics for the plant, it is a good idea to create
a tree structure with an overview graphic "at the top", from which you
can reach lower levels of the plant, and to which you can return. The
overview graphic may be in the form of an imported photographic
image or a plant drawing, over which transparent link areas can be
placed. These link areas fetch the colour graphics for the relevant part
of the plant. For further details, see the section on link areas below.
Plan the tree structure for graphics in a way that makes it easy for the
user, and facilitates adding new graphics when the plant is changed.
Be consistent in the use of colours and line types. Create
documentation on the selection of colours and line types in the system
by keeping a record. See the standard on the following page.
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Programming
Example: Record showing colours and line types for the plant
HOSPITAL.
HOSPITAL - colours and line types in colour graphics
Background
..............Dark grey
VARIOUS MEDIA
Line size thickness 2:
Water
Cold..........Dark blue
Water, supply
..............Red
Water, return
..............Dark blue
Water
..............Red
Water
Cooling media.Light blue
Waste water
..............Green
Consumption, hot water
..............Red
Compressed air
..............Light blue
Oil, other gases
..............Yellow
Line size thickness 3:
Air vent system, supply air.............Dark blue
Air vent system, exhaust air............Red
FIXED SYMBOLS
All static symbols
..............Black frame
..............Dark grey backgr.
TEXT
Descriptive text, measuring units and
handling unit names
..............Black
MODES OF OPERATION
In operation
..............Green
Out of operation, also RPU offline......Red
Forced ON
..............Blue
Forced OFF
..............Purple
Alarms are shown as the pre-set colours
of the alarm overview.
ANALOG VALUES
Calculated value
..............Yellow, gray bkgr.
Setpoint
..............Yellow, blk bkgr.
Measured value
..............Light green
Moist in %
..............Green
Damper and valve positions..............Dark red
Values should be shown with three digits accuracy, e. g. temperatures
with one decimal and pressure in Pa with no decimals.
Damper and valve positions will be shown as percentages between 0
and 100% reflecting the opening degree.
3.3.4. Reports and presentations
To create reports, presentations and energy signature, there are three
program modules built around the Microsoft Excel program.
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Programming
3.3.5. General working method
The following general working method shall normally be used when
creating a TAC Vista system, no matter if it is connected to
TAC ZONE II units or TAC Xenta units:
1 - Install the TAC Vista software on the PC.
2 - Do the point identification/allocation in accordance with chapter 2.
3 - Create a system description file (Use either SYSTEM.DEM or
LONWORKS.DEM as a template) describing all central functions and
units such as communication ports, alarm processing objects, alarm
receivers, trend logging objects etc. and import it to the database by
means of the Database generator.
4 - Create a description file for each RPU in the system. Edit the
description file and import it to the database by means of the Database
generator.
5 - Draw, copy and/or edit Colour graphics, Reports and Note files.
Save them as .OGC, .XLS and .TXT files respectively.
6 - Add Colour graphic and Report objects to the RPU description files
and import again. Remember to put the graphic in the same logical unit
as the points it is displaying.
7 - Make a function check, cf. chapter 4.
8 - Update all description files.
3.3.6. Creating a database for TAC Xenta units
Use the working method below when creating a TAC Vista database
for TAC Xenta units, cf. TAC Vista Communication TAC Xenta,
direct.
From version 3.1, it is possible to download the application program to
TAC Xenta either via a direct connection to TAC Menta, or via TAC
Vista and the LonWorks network. Below, download via the network is
shown, but the application might as well be downloaded by using TAC
Menta when directly connected under stage 2.
1 - Create the application program in TAC Menta (cf. section 3.2), and
save all files as an .MTA file in the folder for the TAC Xenta unit in
question. Repeat these actions for all TAC Xenta units.
2 - Create the LonWorks network, the Groups and the Nodes (the TAC
Xenta units) in the Network configuration tool. Configure all the TAC
Xenta units including their I/O modules. Save the network database as
an .NDB file. Thereafter, download the network configuration to the
TAC Xenta units, one by one, via the serial port.
3 - Create a system description file (use LONWORKS.DEM) and
import it to TAC Vista. Note especially the communication port for the
LTA unit and its address, e. g. PCCLON1.
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Programming
4 - Create a Network configuration description file (reads the .NDB
file) and import it to TAC Vista. The file should have the same name as
the network, e. g. BLDG012.DES.
5 - Set TAC Vista in on-line mode. Open the LonWorks network
object and check the domain table and the address table. Enter the TAC
Vista Status menu and check that the TAC Xenta units are on-line.
6 - Convert the application program for a TAC Xenta to a description
file via the Create TAC Xenta description file command in the
Database generator's Tools menu. Enter the requested logical unit for
each module in the application program. Place the description file in the
same folder as the .MTA file.
Edit the description file, if needed. Alarm object references etc. may
have to be added. Note that these alterations in the description file are
deleted if you convert the application program a second time.
Therefore, always note your alterations!
Import the description file.
Repeat point 6 for every TAC Xenta unit in the system.
The system definition phase can be speeded up, if the description files
are run via a batch file defined in the Database generator. Place the
batch file and the description files in the same folder.
7 - Download the application program by selecting Status in the menu
Show and mark the unit(s) to be downloaded. Then select Download application and parameters in the pop-up menu (right mouse button).
Check that you have contact with the TAC Xenta points.
3.3.7. System documentation
In TAC Vista it is easy and fast to document the system by means of
predefined lists:
- System configuration
- Process units
- Objects
- Inputs/Outputs
- Check list
- Forced variables
3.3.8. Backup
Note that a new backup function has been implemented in TAC Vista
v3.1, to backup the TAC Vista database. Both a complete and an
incremental backup is included. It is simple to perform backup of all
operator units in a TAC Vista network and storing the backups on a
common network server.
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 3:12 (14)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Programming
3.4. Upgrading
An important part of our work is to upgrade existing plants with new
functions, without having to rewrite the old applications and data.
3.4.1. Upgrading the TAC Xenta units
An upgrade of the TAC Xenta system software is done by using the
Download Wizard, which is a part of TAC Menta. When upgrading,
TAC Menta must be directly connected to the TAC Xenta unit in
question. At the same time as the system software is upgraded, the
application program and the network configuration can either be
reloaded (depending on version, you must in some cases have access to
the original source code files) or be replaced by new data. The
Download Wizard and the TAC Xenta units upgrade is further
described in chapter 9 in the TAC Menta User’s manual.
3.4.2. Upgrading the TAC Vista database
How to upgrade TAC Vista and the database is described in TAC Vista
Installation and upgrading.
A new function in TAC Vista 3.1 is network download of the
application program, cf. chapter 9 in TAC Vista Communication
TAC Xenta, direct. This new possibility implies two things to
especially consider when upgrading to version 3.1:
1 - Updated plant data
Whenever the application program in the TAC Xenta unit is
redesigned, you shall check that the plant data is correct. Normally,
updated values are stored in the TAC Vista database. However, should
the user have altered settings via the TAC Xenta OP, all altered values
will not automatically be uploaded, but an Upload - only parameters is
required. Then, to update the MTA file with the current data from the
TAC Vista database the Export data from database in the database
generator is used. How to alter or change the TAC Xenta application
program is described in detail in section 8.5 in TAC Vista
Communication TAC Xenta, direct.
2- Application for download from TAC Vista
In the previous TAC Vista versions, the TAC Vista database only had
to contain information about the TAC Xenta network configuration and
the variables (I/O points, set points, settings etc.) being present in a
unit. Today, the database must also hold a copy of the TAC Xenta
unit’s application. This application must in most cases be regenerated
in TAC Menta and then be imported to TAC Vista.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 3:13 (14)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Programming
The contents of the data being transferred between TAC Menta and the
different TAC Vista versions are explained in short below:
TAC Menta
COD
TAC Vista
Description file
The parameters of the application were imported
via a separate COD file; the network configuration
via a description file.
v2.0
Values
Application
COD
BIN
CHR
BPR
LonWorks network
Serial port
MTA
COD
...
TAC Vista
TAC Menta
NWC
v3.0
TAC Xenta
The COD file was included in an MTA file, which
also could contain other application files, although
not used by TAC Vista. The network configuration
was imported via a separate NWC file.
Values
Application
COD
BIN
CHR
BPR
TAC Menta
MTA
COD
BIN
CHR
...
TAC Xenta
NDB
NWC
IOD
TAC Vista
v3.1
In addition to the COD file, also BIN and CHR files
must be included in the MTA file to enable network
download. The BPR file is generated from NWC and
IOD files (for I/O modules),included in the NDB file.
Values
Application
COD
BIN
CHR
BPR
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 3:14 (14)
Application
COD
BIN
CHR
BPR
TAC Xenta
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Commissioning
4. Commissioning
How to commission the installation depends on its size and complexity.
A single standard TAC Xenta unit with or without I/O modules can be
commissioned without any other tool than the OP, cf. TAC Xenta
Handbook, on the condition that the Service Menu is present in the OP.
When the TAC system is integrated with systems from other vendors, a
co-operation between TAC Menta and an external tool is needed.
Especially the network and all functions working via the network are
affected, cf. TAC Xenta Network Guide. Always first consult the Guide
when dealing with network tasks such as cable types and lengths,
traffic sectioning and the need of additional equipment (repeaters,
routers, gateways etc.).
In all other situations, the only tool needed is TAC Menta.
4.1. Commissioning with TAC Menta
Commissioning in the following steps:
1 - Initial checking (to avoid high voltage in to the electronics)
2 - Network configuration (Connecting the TAC Xenta units)
3 - I/O test
4 - Functional test (of the application program)
4.1.1. Initial checking
For each TAC Xenta unit and I/O module, the following must be
checked after the wires have been connected, but before the electronics
part is mounted on the terminal part.
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
•
Turn on the power.
•
Check that the supply voltage, 24 V AC or DC is connected to the
proper terminals G and G0.
•
Check that the voltage levels of the input and output terminals are
reasonable.
•
Check the voltage, both AC and DC, between G0 and all other
terminals. Repeat the procedure with G as the reference terminal.
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 4:1 (5)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Commissioning
4.1.2. Network configuration
Before it can start to communicate, each TAC Xenta unit must be
assigned a network address, i. e. a subnet/node address and a device
name. To do this a PC with TAC Menta is needed.
It is a good idea to, if possible, mount and configure the TAC Xenta
units one by one, instead of mounting all at the same time and then
configuring them. For each TAC Xenta unit do the following to set the
network addresses:
•
Note!
Turn off the power and mount the electronics part on the terminal part.
It is important that the electronics part has the same input/output
configuration as the terminal part.
Also check that correct type of base unit is being used:
- TAC Xenta 300 N communicates with other TAC Xenta base units.
- TAC Xenta 300 NP also communicates with TAC Vista.
•
Turn on the power again.
•
Connect the PC to the TAC Xenta unit:
TAC Menta:
- Application download
- Device configuration
- Online simulation
TAC Xenta Base unit
•
Start the Network Configuration tool from the TAC Menta program
group on the PC. Open the network database, cf. TAC Menta User's
manual, and select group and node (the name of the connected
TAC Xenta unit).
Edit node -RPU03
File
Edit
Database:
Base unit:
Device name:
RPU03
RPU03
Subnet:
10
2
Node:
30
25
Neuron ID:
210987654321
210987654321
Version:
3.00
3.00
Unit type:
302
302
Master
Comment:
Building A, North
I/O modules:
No CF Sub Node NeuronID
1 0 10 33
123456789012
2 0 10 34
826456389219
Status:
4:2 (5), 0-004-7639-0 (GB)
OK
Type Version Status
411 1.00-02 On-line
411 1.00-02 On-line
Close
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
•
Commissioning
Check that the configuration data to be downloaded are correct. It is
very important that all units are defined in the network database before
you start down-loading the data to any unit. Whenever you add a unit
or alter its configuration, you must down-load the configuration data to
all units in the group again! If you add a TAC Xenta group, you must
down-load the configuration data to all units in the network!
Configure the TAC Xenta unit and its I/O modules. To identify an online I/O module, its service pin can be pressed. Note that the
configuration data stored in the TAC Xenta unit will not be affected by
a later download of the application program.
The following network addressing is recommended:
Address the TAC Xenta units as Node no 10, 20, 30 etc. starting on
Subnet no 10 (Subnet 1-9 should be reserved for future use of
routers and external equipment, cf. TAC Xenta Network Guide).
Then, use Subnet no 11, 12 etc. The Subnet no 10 Node no 100
TAC Xenta unit will thus be followed by the TAC Xenta units
addressed as Subnet no 11 Node no 10 and Subnet no 11 Node no
20. Note, however, that you are not allowed to use the same subnet on
both sides of a router, cf. TAC Xenta Network Guide.
TAC Xenta
Device name:
RPU01
Network address:
- Subnet no. 10
- Node no. 10
TAC Xenta
Device name:
RPU02
Network address:
- Subnet no. 10
- Node no. 20
An I/O module always belongs to a specific TAC Xenta unit.
Therefore, if existing, address the I/O modules belonging to the Subnet
no 10 Node no 10 TAC Xenta unit as Subnet no 10 Node no 13 and
Subnet no 10 Node no 14, and the I/O modules belonging to the
Subnet no 10 Node no 20 TAC Xenta unit as Subnet no 10 Node no
23 and Subnet no 10 Node no 24. Note that two node numbers after
the TAC Xenta unit number must not be used, since they are reserved
for dynamic addressing of Operator panels.
RPU03
TAC Xenta
Module no.: 1
Module no.: 2
Module type: 421 Module type: 411
I/O
I/O
Network address: Network address: Network address:
- Subnet no. 10
- Subnet no. 10
- Subnet no. 10
- Node no. 30
- Node no. 33
- Node no. 34
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 4:3 (5)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Commissioning
4.1.3. I/O test
The best way to test the external equipment connected to the
TAC Xenta unit's inputs and outputs, is to down-load the application
program, and then use the TAC Menta on-line functions to test the I/O
points one by one. Thanks to the on-line trend-log one person can
locally open/close the inputs one by one, and then afterwards consult
the trend-log to see that they were activated in the correct order.
Alternatively, you can by means of a special test application, where
each input is connected to an alarm block, open/close the inputs one by
one, and then consult the OP alarm list to see that the alarms were
tripped in the correct order.
Note!
It is important to first check that no danger may occur when setting the
outputs.
•
Connect the PC to the TAC Xenta unit.
•
Start TAC Menta and open the application program.
•
Down-load the program, using the On-line button in TAC Menta's
Simulation mode.
•
Check that the LED on the front starts to blink, indicating that the
internal program is running.
•
Check the I/O points one by one. The current status/value of the I/O
point is dynamically updated in the corresponding function block. Each
I/O value can be forced by means of the Override button in the I/O
configuration table. If a faulty I/O binding (Incorrect terminal
reference, input/output range etc.) should occur, this can be corrected
via the Bind button in the same table. Note, however, that the
application program must be down-loaded again after altering the
binding information.
Note that the same application program can be down-loaded to a
number of TAC Xenta units. In this case, use the Program
specification to set the correct TAC Xenta unit name before downloading each TAC Xenta unit:
4:4 (5), 0-004-7639-0 (GB)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Commissioning
Program specification
Name:
012_AHU_003
Type:
Air handling HC-53
Author:
M. Smythe
Abbr:
Std App.
Used resources:
Blocks:
DIs
3
53
Public signal table:
Identifier
EF
EFAlarmDelay
EF_Op
FanDelay
HeatITime
HeatPband
HeatSP
LowSuppLimit
MV
OK
R03
1000
Cycle time:
Date: 1997/10/21
I/O signals:
AIs DOs
2
4
Type
Access
DIG
PAI
DIG
PAR
ANA
ANA
ANA
ANA
ANA
RO
RW
RO
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
ms
AOs
1
Units
seconds
seconds
minutes
°C
°C
°C
Cancel
The entered Name and Abbreviation (max. 4 characters) will
automatically be generated and down-loaded to the TAC Xenta unit's
OP menu system, after pressing the On-line button.
4.1.4. Functional test
The application program should always be offline tested in the
TAC Menta Simulation mode. At commissioning the following is
tested:
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
•
Connect the TAC Xenta OP. Log in to the TAC Xenta units one by
one.
•
Select the Temp & Status menu (or corresponding) to check that all
inputs have got reasonable values.
•
Check all settings against the specification. Document alterations, when
applicable.
•
Tune the PID control loop parameters. Use the TAC Menta on-line
simulation mode trend-log.
0-004-7639-0 (GB), 4:5 (5)
Produkt version X, Manualens namn
TAC AB, 1997-xx-xx
Svarsblankett
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Index
Index
A
M
Abbreviation 2:8, 4:4
Acronym 2:6
Air handling 2:5, 3:6, 3:10
Application programming 3:3
Macro block 3:4, 3:6
Manuals 1:3
Move a point 2:10
B
N
Backup 3:13
Basic project analysis 2:1
Bus 3:4
Network 2:1, 2:7, 4:1
Network address 4:3
Network configuration tool 1:1, 2:7, 3:12, 4:2
Node 2:7, 4:2
C
O
Colour graphics 2:10, 3:10
Commissioning 4:1
Connection 3:3
Object selection dialog 2:9
OP 1:1, 2:7, 3:8
OP configuration tool 1:1, 2:8, 3:8
Operator unit 2:1
D
Database generator 2:9, 3:10
Debugging 3:5
Description file 2:9
Device configuration table 3:4
Device name 2:8, 4:2, 4:4
E
Environment 3:1
F
FBD programming 3:3
Folder structure 3:2, 3:6
Function block 3:3
P
Point allocation 2:2, 2:5
Program header 3:5
Program license 3:2
Program specification table 2:7, 4:4
Public signal 2:8
R
Relative addressing 2:10, 3:10
Reports 3:11
S
Hardware key 3:2
Heating 2:5, 3:6, 3:10
Standard 2:5, 2:6, 3:9, 3:10
Standard application 2:2
Status menu 2:9
Subnet 4:2
System configuration 2:1
System documentation 3:13
I
T
ID 2:6
I/O module 4:3
I/O test 4:3
TAC Menta 1:1, 3:2, 3:3, 4:1
TAC Vista 1:1, 2:1, 2:9, 3:2, 3:10, 3:13
TAC Xenta 1:1, 3:12, 3:13, 4:2
TAC Xenta group 2:7
Terminology 1:1
Test 3:5, 4:1, 4:4
Text file 3:7
Tools 3:1
H
L
Library 3:5
LONWORKS 1:1, 2:1, 4:3
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
0-004-7639-0 (GB), Ind:1 (2)
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
Index
U
Upgrading 3:13
User documentation 3:9
W
Working method 1:2, 3:3, 3:12, 4:1
Ind:2 (2), 0-004-7639-0 (GB)
TAC AB, 1998-08-15
TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
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TAC Xenta family v3 Engineering Guidelines
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Produkt version X, Manualens namn
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