Self service coin redemption card printer

Self service coin redemption card printer
US008042732B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent No.:
Blake et a].
(54)
(45) Date of Patent:
SELF SERVICE
COIN REDEMPTION CARD
a
a
2
PRINTER DISPENSER
3,998,376 A
Inventors: John R. Blake, St. Charles, IL (US);
4,059,122 A
4,050,218 A
(75)
eSSlIl
Haines .......................... .. 229/33
9/1977
Call .............................. .. 53/167
11/1977 Kinoshita
(Continued)
(73) Assignee: Cummins-Allison Corp., Mt. Prospect,
IL (Us)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
CA
2 235 925
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
Appl. No.: 12/410,623
(22)
Filed:
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
International Search Report corresponding to co-pending Interna
tional Patent Application U.S. Appl. No. GB0905154.1, Great Brit
ain, dated Jun. 29, 2009; 2 pp.
_
Mar. 25, 2009
(65)
11/1995
(Continued)
USC 154(b) by 197 days.
(21)
Oct. 25, 2011
12/1976
Curtis W. HalloWell, Palatine, IL (U S)
( * ) Notice:
US 8,042,732 B2
(Contmued)
Prior Publication Data
_
_
_
Prtmary Exammer * Dan1el Hess
US 2010/0038419 A1
Feb. 18, 2010
Assistant Examiner i Rafferty Kelly
Related U‘s- Application Data
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Ftrm * Nixon Peabody LLP
(60)
Provisional application No. 61/039,264, ?led on Mar.
25> 2008-
(57)
ABSTRACT
A method of transferring funds to a personalized portable
storage medium using a kiosk, includes the acts of receiving
(51)
Int‘ Cl‘
G06F 17/00
(200601)
US. Cl. ...................................... .. 235/375; 235/379
funds comprising a batch of loose mixed coins in a coin
receiving area of the kiosk, processing the coins in a coin
(52)
(58)
Field of Classi?cation Search ................ .. 235/375,
_
_
_
235/379
See aPPhCaUOn ?le for Complete Search hlstol'y_
(56)
user of the kiosk, and permitting the user to select a desired
graphic from amongst a plurality of available graphic selec
tions using via a user input device. The method also includes
References Clted
2,570,920
2,669,998
2,750,949
2,835,260
2,865,561
3,132,654
3,778,595
processing module, determining a total Value Of the funds
using a Controller, displaying the total value Qfthe funds to a
the acts of printing, using a printing device, the user-selected
graphic on a portable storage medium print area, the portable
storage medium comprising a storage medium bearing data to
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
A
10/1951 Clough et a1.
Which a value relating to the total value is associated and
A
A
A
2/1954 Buchholz
6/1956 Kulo et a1.
5/1958 Buchholz
dispensing the portable storage medium bearing the user
selected graphic to the user, the portable storage medium
A
12/1958 Rosapepe
A
A
5/1964 Adams
12/1973 Hatanakaetal.
having a ?rst value relating to the total value.
29 Claims, 8 Drawing Sheets
1D\‘
36
Card Stack
Coin Processing
Module
24/1:
16/
30
US 8,042,732 B2
Page2
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
470757460 A
“978 Gorge“
371227522 A
‘$333
etal
5,055,086 A
10/1991
5,055,657 A
5,064,999 A
10/1991 Milleret a1.
11/1991 Okamoto et a1.
Raterman et a1. ............. .. 453/10
5,080,633 A
1/1992 Ristvedt et a1. ................. .. 435/6
4,172,462 A
10/1979 Uchida et a1.
g‘fgigg A
Z133; Rome and‘
153%; A
$333 gMaleY
5,105,601 A
4/1992 Horiguchi et a1.
5,106,338 A
4/1992 Rasmussenetal. .......... .. 453/10
,
,
,
stvedt et a1.
471977986 A
41980 N123?
4,208,549 A
6/1980 P011110 et a1.
A
472327295 A
11/1980 M°C°nne11
5,120,945 A
6/1992 Nishibe et'al
4,234,003 A
1l/1980 RiSWedt eta1~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~ 133/3
472497552 A
Eggs; A
R,E30,773 E
................. .. 453/6
Z133; [52:21:31
531233873 A
6/1992
“981 Margohn etal'
5,129,205 A
7/1992 Rasmussen ..................... .. 53/52
3132}
5,135,435 A
8/1992 Rasmussen ................... .. 453/56
10/1981 Glaser etal. '
’
473107885 A
V1982
Azcuaetal'
473177957 A
“982 Sendmw
473417951 A
7/1982 Bent?“
AgggggjA
SW11“
Rasmussen
“““““““““ “ 453/l0
57140517 A
8/1992 Nagata etal'
5,141,443 A
8/1992
Rasmussen et a1. .......... .. 453/10
5,141,472 A
8/1992
Toddetal. .... ..
5,145,455 A
9/1992 Todd ............................... .. 453/6
5,146,067 A
.. 453/10
9/1992 slean etal.
1
5,154,272 A
10/1992 Nishiumietal.
473697442 A
M983 wivrihagj
5,163,866 A
11/1992 Rasmussen ................... .. 453/10
473807316 A
M983 Glinka etai
5,163,867 A
11/1992 Rasmussen ..
4,383,540 A
5/1983 DeMeyer et a1.
A
@1335 gg?gliiszfgl
473857285 A
5/1983 Horstetal'
373E753; A
5,175,416 A
31'
4,417,136 A
11/1983 Rushbyetal.
474237316 A
12/1983 Sam’ ‘M17
3723733 A
4,531,531 A
5,176,565 A
,
5132: Egg?“
7/1985 Johnson et a1. ................. .. 133/3
,
A
.. 453/10
12/1992 Mansvelt et a1.
1/1993 Ristvedt et a1. ................. .. 453/6
5133; 5mm.‘
eital'et a1.
atchlnlan
5,184,709 A
2/1993 Nishiumi et al.
5,194,037 A
gégggég A
3/1993 Jones et a1. ................... .. 453/10
Z133; gj‘b etal'
" Agg?g
4,543,969 A
10/1985 Rasmussen ..................... .. 133/3
572077784 A
“993
4,549,561 A
4556140 A
4’558’7ll A
10/1985 Johnsonetal. ................. ..133/3
12/1985 Okada
0/1985 Yoshiaki etal
572097696 A
7
7
5,243,174 A
“993 Rjlw Zen 1“
453%
Smussen eta‘ """"" "
9/1993 Veenemanetal.
4,564,036 A
1/1986 Ristvedt .......................... .. 133/3
4570 655 A
2/1986
475947664 A
4’602’332 A
6/1986 Hashimoto
7/l986 Hiroseetal
4,620,559 A
11/1986 Childersetal.
Raterman
....................... .. 133/3
A
7
S ?mzrstsend'l'?g """"""" "
18%??? gabm‘gskl.
7
a1
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5,253,167 A
5,265,874 A
10/1993 Y(_)sh_1daeta1.
11/1993 D1ck1ns0neta1.
A
131333‘ gmumetal't 1
'
453%
4,641,239 A
2/1987 Takesako
572827127 A
M994 Mgmussene 3' """"" "
4,674,260 A
4,681,128 A
6/1987 Rasmussenetal. .......... .. 53/212
7/1987 Ristvedtetal.
453/6
5286226 A
572867954 A
M994 Rasmussen
453%
M994 Sam etal
"""""""""" "
4,718,218 A
1/1988 Ristvedt ....... ..
53/532
5’291’003 A
M994 Avnetetz'll
4,731,043 A
3/1988 Ristvedtetal. ................. .. 453/6
572937981 A
M994 Abeetal '
4,733,765 A
3/1988 Watanabe
572977030 A
M994 V
4,765,464 A
8/1988 Ristvedt ........................ .. 206/82
572977598
A
,
,
M994 Rjsslg
e a‘
smussen ................. ..
5,297,986 A
3/1994 Ristvedt et a1. .
1332732? A
@1322
4,775,354 A
10/1988 Rasmussen et a1. .......... .. 453/10
4778 983 A
10/1988 Ushikubo
7
7
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4,812,629 A
3/1989 O’Neiletal.
3732722; A
4,863,414
A
4883158 A
7
7
31
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9/1989 Ristvedt et a1. ................. .. 453/6
11/1989 Kobayashi et a1.
7
478847212 A
2
11/1989 Su?sm.“
7
. h ‘t 1
141/314
. 453/6
g/Iazur et al' """"""""" " 453/10
ease and‘
5,370,575 A
12/1994
Ge1b etal.
...................... .. 453/3
5,372,542 A
12/1994 Geib et a1.
.. 453/10
273337241‘: A
13133;‘ 521k‘) and‘
,
,
arsson et al.
5,382,191 A
1/1995 Rasmussen ................... .. 453/11
2333);}?
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7
7
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5,410,590 A
4/1995
453%
"""""""""" "
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RE34,934 E
5/1995 Raterman et a1. ............. .. 453/10
479007909 A
2/1990 Nagashlma etal'
5,425,669 A
6/1995
479087516 A
“990 W?“
5,429,550 A
7/1995 Mazur et a1. .................. .. 453/10
9/1995
Geib et a1. .... ..
.. 453/10
4,921,463 A
5/1990 Pnmdahletal. ................ .. 453/3
5,450,938 A
37323723? A
4,964,495 A
$338
et 31
10/1990 Rasmussen ................. .. 194/344
5,453,047 A
gjgggg A
9/1995 Mazur et a1. .................. .. 453/10
“A332 gjgzrér'l'éggt'éi """""""" " 453/10
4,966,570 A
10/1990 Ristvedtetal. ................. .. 453/6
5’474’495 A
12/1995
4970655
11/1990
A
Winnetal.
479887849 A
M991 Sasakietal
479927647 A
M991 K
479957848 A
5,009,627 A
M991 62;“ ‘e 3'
4/1991 Rasmussen ................... .. 453/10
.11. A1
Kadono et 31‘
7
7
5,474,497 A
Rademacher
Geibetal
'
'
453/3
""""""""""" "
12/1995 Jones etal. ..
.. 453/17
5,480,348 A
1/1996 MaZuretaL.
.. 453/10
5,489,237 A
575007514 A
2/1996 Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/12
3/1996 Veeneman eta1~
5010 238 A
4/1991
5,501,631 A
3/1996 MeIlIlle e131. .................. .. 453/3
530102485 A
M991 Bigari
5,507,379 A
4/1996 MaZuretaL.
5,011,455 A
4/1991
Rasmussen ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,, 453/10
5,514,034 A
5/1996
Jones etal. ..
.. 453/10
Rjstvedt et a1. ................. .. 453/6
Rasmussen
.. 453/56
194/318
5,022,889 A
6/1991
5,520,577 A
5/1996
5,025,139 A
6/1991 Halliburton’Jf,
5,538,468 A
7/1996 Ristvedt et a1. .
5,026,320 A
6/1991
5,542,880 A
8/1996
5,031,098 A
7/1991 Miller et a1.
5,542,881 A
8/1996 Geib ............................. .. 453/10
5,039,848 A
8/1991 Stoken
5,553,320 A
9/1996 Matsuura et a1.
Rasmussen ..................... .. 453/6
Geib et a1.
453/3
.. 453/10
US 8,042,732 B2
Page 3
5,559,887 A
5,564,546 A
5,564,974 A
9/1996 Davis et a1.
10/1996 Molbak et a1.
10/1996 Mazur et a1. .................. .. 453/10
6,602,125 B2
8/2003 Martin
6,609,604 B1
6,612,921 B2
8/2003 Jones et a1. ................. .. 194/302
9/2003 Geib et a1.
.. 453/13
5,564,978 A
10/1996
Jones et a1. ................... .. 453/17
6,637,576 B1
10/2003
5,570,465 A
5,573,457 A
10/1996 Tsakanikas
11/1996 Watts et a1. ................... .. 453/31
6,663,675 B2
6,666,318 B2
12/2003 Blake et a1. ................... .. 753/63
12/2003 Gerrity et a1.
5,584,758 A
12/1996
Geib ............................. .. 453/10
Jones et a1. ................. .. 194/216
6,755,730 B2
6/2004
5,592,377 A
1/1997 Lipkin
6,758,316 B2
7/2004 Molbak
Blake et a1. ..................... .. 453/3
5,602,933 A
5,620,079 A
5,625,562 A
2/1997 Blackwell et a1.
4/1997 Molbak
4/1997 Veeneman et al.
6,766,892 B2
6,783,452 B2
6,783,785 B1
7/2004 Martin et a1.
8/2004 Hino et a1.
8/2004 Hino et al.
5,630,494 A
5/1997 Strauts ........................ .. 194/317
6,786,398 B1
9/2004
5,641,050 A
6/1997 Smith et a1.
6,854,581 B2
2/2005 Molbak
Stinson et a1.
5,650,605 A
7/1997 Morioka et a1.
6,854,640 B2
2/2005 Peklo .......................... .. 235/100
5,652,421 A
7/1997 Veeneman et al.
6,863,168 B1
3/2005 Gerrity et a1.
5,743,373 A
4/1998
6,892,871 B2
5/2005
5,746,299 A
5/1998 Molbak et a1.
6,896,118 B2
5/2005 Jones et a1. ..
5,774,874 A
5,782,686 A
5,799,767 A
6/1998 Veeneman et a1.
7/1998 Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
9/1998 Molbak
6,966,417 B2
6,976,570 B2
6,988,606 B2
5,813,510
5,830,054
5,842,188
5,842,916
A
A
A
A
9/1998
11/1998
11/1998
12/1998
Strauts ........................ .. 194/318
Rademacher
Petri
Ramsey et a1.
Gerrity et a1.
6,991,530
7,004,831
7,014,029
7,017,729
B2
B2
B2
B2
Strauts et a1. ............... .. 194/302
194/217
11/2005 Peklo et a1. ................. .. 194/344
12/2005 Molbak
1/2006 Geib et a1. .................. .. 194/334
1/2006
2/2006
3/2006
3/2006
Hino et a1.
Hino et a1.
Winters
Gerrity et a1.
5,850,076 A
12/1998 Morioka et a1.
7,018,286 B2
3/2006 Blake et a1. ................... .. 453/61
5,854,581 A
12/1998 Morietal.
7,028,827 B1
4/2006 Molbaketal.
5,865,673 A
2/1999 Geib et a1. ..
5,868,236 A
2/1999
5,880,444 A
5,892,211 A
5,892,827 A
3/1999 Shibata et a1.
4/1999 Davis et a1.
4/1999 Beach et a1.
7,083,036 B2
7,113,929 B1
7,131,580 B2
8/2006 Adams
9/2006 Beach et a1.
11/2006 Molbak
5,909,793
5,909,794
5,918,748
5,940,623
5,944,600
5,951,476
5,957,262
6/1999
6/1999
7/1999
8/1999
8/1999
9/1999
9/1999
7,149,336
7,158,662
7,188,720
7,213,697
7,243,773
7,269,279
7,290,705
12/2006
1/2007
3/2007
5/2007
7/2007
9/2007
11/2007
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
453/10
Rademacher ............... .. 194/217
Beach et a1.
Molbak et a1.
Clark et a1.
Watts et a1. ................. .. 395/712
Zimmermann
Beach et a1.
Molbak et a1.
5,988,348 A
5,995,949 A
11/1999 Martin et a1.
11/1999 Morioka et al.
5,997,395 A
12/1999
Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
7,036,651 B2
5/2006 Tam et a1.
7,038,398 B1 *
5/2006
B2
B2
B2
B2
B2
B2
B1*
7,303,119 B2
7,331,521 B2
Jones et a1. ................. ..
Chiles ........ ..
Geib et a1. .................. ..
Martin et a1.
Bochonok et al. .......... ..
Chiles ........ ..
Shin ............................ ..
382/135
382/135
194/302
194/350
382/135
235/381
12/2007 Molbak
2/2008 Sorenson et al.
7,337,890 B2
3/2008
6,017,270 A
1/2000 Ristvedt et a1.
7,427,230 B2
9/2008 Blake et a1.
6,021,883 A
2/2000 Casanova et a1. ........... .. 194/217
7,438,172 B2
10/2008
Bochonok et a1. .......... .. 194/353
.. 453/63
Long et a1. .................. .. 194/347
6,032,859 A
3/2000 Muehlberger et al.
7,464,802 B2
12/2008 Gerrity et a1.
6,039,644 A
3/2000 Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
7,520,374 B2
4/2009 Martin et a1.
6,039,645 A
6,042,470 A
3/2000
3/2000
7,551,764 B2
7,552,810 B2
6/2009
6/2009
Mazur .... ..
453/10
Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
194/217
Lys et a1. .................... .. 315/291
Chiles et a1. ................ .. 382/135
Mecklenburg .............. .. 194/317
6,047,807 A
4/2000 Molbak
7,580,859 B2
8/2009 Economy
6,047,808 A
4/2000 Neubarth et a1.
7,654,450 B2
2/2010 Mateen et a1.
6,056,104 A
5/2000 Neubarth et a1.
7,658,270 B2
2/2010 Bochonok et a1. .......... .. 194/350
6,080,056 A
6/2000 Karlsson
7,743,902 B2
6/2010 Wendell et a1. .
6,082,519 A
7/2000 Martin et a1.
7,778,456 B2
8/2010 Jones et a1. ................. .. 382/135
6,086,471 A
7/2000 Zimmermann
7,874,478 B2
1/2011 Molbak
6,095,313 A
8/2000 Molbak et a1.
7,886,980 B2
2/2011 Nishimura et a1. ......... .. 194/347
6,116,402 A
9/2000 Beach et a1.
6,131,625 A
6,139,418 A
10/2000
10/2000
Casanova et a1. ........... .. 141/314
Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
6,145,738 A
6,168,001 B1
11/2000 Stinson et a1.
1/2001 Davis
Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
7,931,304 B2
2001/0034203 A1
2002/0065033 A1
2002/0069104 A1
2002/0107738 A1
4/2011 Brown et a1.
10/2001
5/2002
Geib et a1. ...................... .. 453/3
Geib et a1. ...................... .. 453/3
6/2002 Beach et a1.
8/2002 Beach et a1.
6,171,182 B1
1/2001
2002/0117510 A1*
8/2002
6,174,230 B1
6,196,371 B1
1/2001 Gerrityet a1.
3/2001 Martin et a1.
2002/0126885 A1
2002/0130011 A1
9/2002 Mennie et a1. ..
9/2002 Casanova et a1.
6,196,913 B1
3/2001
2002/0151267 A1
10/2002
6,230,928 B1
5/2001 Hanna et a1.
2002/0179401 A1
12/2002 Knox et a1.
Geib et a1. .................... .. 453/10
6,308,887 B1
6,318,536 B1
10/2001
11/2001
Korman et a1.
Korman et a1.
6,318,537 B1
11/2001
Jones et a1. ................. .. 194/346
6,438,230 B1
8/2002 Moore
2003/0013403 A1
2003/0081824 A1
194/302
Simson et a1. ................ .. 221/68
382/135
194/344
Kuhlin et a1. ................... .. 453/3
1/2003
5/2003
Blake et a1. ................... .. 453/60
Mennie et a1. .............. .. 382/135
Jones et a1. ................. .. 194/217
2003/0127299 A1
7/2003
2003/0168309 A1
9/2003 Geib et a1.
9/2003 Strauts et al.
6,471,030 B1
10/2002 Neubarth et a1.
2003/0168310 A1
6,474,548 B1
6,484,863 B1
11/2002 Montross et a1.
11/2002 Molbak
2003/0182217 A1
2003/0190882 A1
9/2003
10/2003
. 194/302
194/302
Chiles ........................... .. 705/35
Blake et a1. ................... .. 453/63
6,484,884 B1
11/2002 Gerrity et a1.
2003/0200180 A1
10/2003 Phelan, III et a1.
6,494,776 B1
12/2002 Molbak
2003/0234153 A1
12/2003
6,499,277 B1
12/2002
2004/0055902 A1
3/2004
2004/0092222 A1
5/2004 KoWalcZyk et a1.
5/2004 Tuchler et a1. .............. .. 235/380
6,520,308 B1
Warner et a1. ................. .. 53/447
2/2003 Martin et a1.
Blake et a1. ................. .. 194/347
Peklo ............ ..
206/815
.. 453/12
6,547,131 B1
4/2003 Foodman et a1.
2004/0099730 A1*
6,552,781 B1
4/2003 Rompelet a1.
2004/0153406 A1
8/2004 Luther et a1.
6,554,185 B1
4/2003 Montross et a1.
2004/0154899 A1
8/2004 Peklo et a1. ................... .. 193/33
6,579,165 B2
6/2003
2004/0173432 A1
9/2004
Kuhlin et a1. ................... .. 453/3
Jones .......................... .. 194/216
US 8,042,732 B2
Page 4
2004/0188221 A1
2004/0200691
2004/0256197
2005/0006197
2005/0040007
A1
A1
A1
A1
9/2004 Carter
10/2004
12/2004
1/2005
2/2005
JP
62/166562
10/1987
194/302
194/350
194/302
194/302
JP
JP
JP
JP
64/042789
64/067698
01/118995
64/035683
2/1989
3/1989
5/1989
6/1989
. 194/318
JP
01/307891
12/1989
206/8
JP
02/050793
2/1990
10/1990
1/1991
Geib et a1. .................. ..
Blake et a1. .
.
Wendell et a1. ............. ..
Geib et a1. .................. ..
2005/0045450 A1
3/2005 Geib et a1.
2005/0067305 A1
3/2005 Bochonok etal
2005/0077142 A1
2005/0087425 A1
4/2005
4/2005
Tarn et a1. .... ..
PeklO ..... ..
. 194/217
. 194/350
JP
JP
02/252096
03/012776
5/2005
Jones etal. ................... .. 705/43
JP
03/063795
3/1991
JP
JP
03/092994
03/156673
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2005/0228717 A1
2005/0256792 A1
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2006/0054455 A1
2006/0054457 A1
3/2006 Kuykendall et a1. ........ .. 194/217
3/2006 Long et a1. .................. .. 194/347
JP
JP
04/085695
04/175993
3/1992
6/1992
2006/0064379 A1
2006/0069654 A1
3/2006 Doran et a1.
3/2006 Beach et a1.
JP
JP
05/274527
06/035946
10/1993
2/1994
2006/0148394 A1
7/2006 Blake et a1. ................... .. 453/12
JP
06/103285
4/1994
2006/0149415 A1
2006/0151285 A1
2006/0154589 A1
7/2006 Richards
7/2006 String
7/2006 String
JP
JP
JP
09/251566
2002/117439
2003/242287
9/1997
4/2002
8/2003
2006/0175176 A1
8/2006 Blake .......................... .. 194/216
JP
2004/213188
7/2004
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8/2006
. 382/135
W0
WO 85/00909
2/1985
194/347
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
2007/0051582 A1
3/2007 Bochonok et a1. .......... .. 194/202
W0
W0 92/20044 A1
11/1992
2007/0071302 A1
3/2007
. 382/135
W0
W0 92/22044 A1
12/1992
2007/0108015 A1
2007/0119681 A1
5/2007 Bochonok et a1. .
. 194/350
5/2007 Blake et a1. ................. .. 194/215
W0
W0
W0 93/00660 A1
W0 93/09621
1/1993
5/1993
2006/0196754
2006/0205481
2006/0207856
2006/0218038
2006/0219519
2006/0283685
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
2007/0187494 A1
2007/0221470
2007/0269097
2008/0033829
2008/0044077
2008/0220707
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
9/2006
9/2006
9/2006
9/2006
10/2006
12/2006
Dominelli
Dean et a1.
Grider
Molbak
Cousin
Jones etal. ...... ..
8/2007 Hanna
9/2007
11/2007
2/2008
2/2008
9/2008
Mennie et a1. .............. .. 194/216
Chiles et a1. ................ .. 382/135
Mennie et a1. ................ .. 705/16
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. 382/135
Jones etal. ..................... .. 453/2
2009/0018959 A1
1/2009 Doran
2009/0057394
2009/0236200
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2009/0239459
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A1
A1
A1
A1
2009/0242626 A1
2009/0320106 A1
2010/0038419 A1
2010/0198726 A1
5/1991
6/1991
8/1991
11/1991
5/1992
11/1992
W0
W0 94/06101
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
4/1994
10/1994
1/1995
2/1995
3/1995
94/08319
94/23397
95/02226
95/04978
95/06920
3/1994
W0
W0 95/09406 A1
4/1995
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
A1
A1
A1
A1
5/1995
7/1995
8/1995
3/1996
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W0
W0
W0
W0 96/07990 A1
W0 96/12253 A1
W0 96/27525 A1
3/1996
4/1996
9/1996
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W0
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CA
CA
DE
DE
EP
EP
EP
EP
FR
GB
GB
GB
GB
GB
JP
JP
JP
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
A1
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DeGironemo
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Blake et a1.
Watts etal. .
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4/2011
Mennie et a1. .............. .. 700/223
Mennie et a1. ................ .. 705/41
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
2189330
120000
2 143 943
06 60 354
30 21327
0 351217
0 667 973
0 926 634
1 209 639
2042254
2 035 642
2 175 427
2 198 274
2 458 387
2468783 A
49/58899
50/158343
52/014495
3/2003
5/1938
12/1981
1/1990
1/1997
6/1999
5/2002
2/1971
6/1980
11/1986
6/1988
9/2009
90010
6/1974
12/1975
M977
95/13596
95/19017
95/23387
96/07163
W0
WO 98/48383
10/1998
W0
W0
WO 98/48384
WO 98/48385
10/1998
10/1998
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0
W0 98/51082
WO 93/59323
W0 99/00776
W0 99/06937
W0 99/33030
W0 99/41695
W0 99/48057
W0 99/48058
W0 00/48911
W0 00/65546
W0 01/63565
W0 02/071343
W0 03/052700
W0 03/079300
W0 03/085610
W0 03/107280
W0 2004/044853
W0 04/109464
W0 2005/041134
W0 2005/088563
W0 2006/086531
W0 2007/035420
W0 2007/120825
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A1
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A1
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A1
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A1
A1
A1
A2
A1
A2
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12/1998
1/1999
2/1999
7/1999
8/1999
9/1999
9/1999
8/2000
11/2000
8/2001
9/2002
6/2003
9/2003
10/2003
12/2003
5/2004
12/2004
5/2005
9/2005
8/2006
3/2007
10/2007
JP
JP
JP
JP
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56/40992
57/117080
59/79392
6/1977
4/1981
M982
8/1984
JP
JP
JP
06/016271
62/134168
62/ 182995
2/1985
8/1987
8/1987
Amiel Industries: AI-ISOO ‘Pulsar’ High Performance Sorting and
JP
62/221773
9/1987
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A2
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Instructions Manual (©1984), 16 pages.
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* cited by examiner
US. Patent
0a. 25 2011
Sheet 1 of8
US 8,042,732 B2
US. Patent
0a. 25, 2011
I
Sheet 2 of8
US 8,042,732 B2
32
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Paper Printer <
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Card Printer
V
Coin Receptacle
Stations
22
24/|:
/
28
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F38
"
16f
Card
Reader/Writer
FIG. 2
US. Patent
0a. 25, 2011
Sheet 3 of8
FIG. 3
US 8,042,732 B2
US. Patent
0a. 25, 2011
Sheet 4 of8
US 8,042,732 B2
US. Patent
Oct. 25, 2011
Sheet 5 0f 8
US 8,042,732 B2
300\
302\
Start: Receive
Request for Card
304\
"
Prompt User for
Payment
V
306
308
Terminate
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User Payment
Received
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310\
Transport Blank Card to
Card Printer
312\
l
Card Printer Prints User
Selected Graphic on
Blank Card
314\
"
Card Reader/Writer
Reads Account Info
from Card and/or
Writes Monetary value
to Card
316\
V
Card Reader/Writer
Dispenses Card to User
FIG. 5
Transaction
Terminated
US. Patent
0a. 25, 2011
Sheet 6 of8
450
FIG. 6
US 8,042,732 B2
US. Patent
Oct. 25, 2011
446
Sheet 7 of8
US 8,042,732 B2
Media Device<\44s
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Paper Printer =
418
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Bill Processing :
440
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US. Patent
0a. 25, 2011
Sheet 8 of8
FIG. 8
US 8,042,732 B2
US 8,042,732 B2
1
2
SELF SERVICE COIN REDEMPTION CARD
PRINTER-DISPENSER
using a kiosk is provided and includes the acts of receiving
funds comprising a batch of loose mixed coins in a coin
receiving area of the kiosk, processing the coins in a coin
processing module, determining a total value of the funds
using a controller, displaying the total value of the funds to a
RELATED APPLICATION
This application is related to and claims priority to US.
Provisional PatentApplication Ser. No. 61/039,264 ?led Mar.
25, 2008, titled “Self Service Coin Redemption Card Printer
Dispenser,” Which is incorporated herein by reference in its
user of the kiosk, and permitting the user to select a desired
graphic from amongst a plurality of available graphic selec
tions using via a user input device. The method also includes
the acts of printing, using a printing device, the user-selected
graphic on a portable storage medium print area, the portable
storage medium comprising a storage medium bearing data to
entirety.
TECHNICAL FIELD
Which a value relating to the total value is associated and
dispensing the portable storage medium bearing the user
selected graphic to the user, the portable storage medium
The following disclosure relates generally to kiosks and
coin redemption machines. More speci?cally, the following
having a ?rst value relating to the total value.
In another aspect of the present concepts, a method of
disclosure relates to kiosks and coin redemption machines
that dispense multiple types of cards from a single card stack.
transferring funds to a personaliZed portable storage medium
or a remote account in association With a portable storage
BACKGROUND
Coin processing machines are used in both the ?nancial
industry to sort, count and/ or package coins and in the retain
medium in a kiosk includes the acts of receiving in said kiosk
funds from a user, determining a total value of the funds,
permitting a user to select a desired graphic and/or a gift card
sector as a publicly accessible redemption machine to
exchange loose change for a ticket or voucher.
In some conventional processing machines, each of a plu
provider (e.g., Starbucks, etc.) from amongst a plurality of
available graphic selections and/or gift card providers (e.g.,
BlackhaWk, Lettuce Entertain You, etc.) either directly
20
25
through selectable elements or though an internet interface,
printing the user-selected graphic on a portable storage
medium print area, the portable storage medium including a
storage medium bearing data to Which a value relating to the
rality of coin denominations are separated from the remaining
denominations and stored in a receptacle speci?c to that
denomination. In other conventional processing applications,
the sorted coins are counted and collected into at least one or
more coin bins or receptacles of mixed denominations or
30
These approaches provide a service to the consumer that
alloWs the exchange of the coin for a voucher. This voucher is
redeemed for the amount of coins deposited in the form of
banknotes by an employee such as a cashier. Balancing is
transferring funds to a personaliZed portable storage medium
includes a coin receiving area con?gured to receive a batch of
35
device comprising a plurality of articles of a portable storage
medium, each portable storage medium comprising a storage
40
45
table storage medium folloWing printing.
50
includes a value input device con?gured to value only from a
portable electronic storage device, a user-input device con
55
?gured to facilitate a transfer of a ?rst value from the portable
electronic storage device to the kiosk, a storage device com
prising a plurality of articles of a portable storage medium,
each portable storage medium comprising a storage medium
bearing data to Which a value relating to the ?rst value is
betWeen stacks of pre-printed value cards to dispense a
selected card type. HoWever, these prior art systems also
require larger machine footprints and more frequent servicing
In still another aspect of the present concepts, a kiosk for
transferring funds to a personaliZed portable storage medium
chased. Typically, prior art systems require pre-printed value
cards of differing predetermined values speci?c to the type of
value card dispensed. To provide several card varieties, some
prior art systems require additional dispensers, Which unfa
vorably increase the machine’ s footprint and cost. Other prior
art systems disclose carriage mechanisms that shuttle
also includes a printing device con?gured to receive a por
table storage medium from the portable storage medium stor
age device, to print on a print area of the portable storage
medium the user-selected graphic, and to dispense the por
provided back to the ?nancial institution or retail store.
Some prior art systems exist for dispensing a value card
(e.g., a gift card) for the value of coins deposited in coin
redemption machines. HoWever, these prior art systems suffer
from several shortcomings. For example, prior art systems are
limited in the variety of value card types that may be pur
medium bearing data to Which a value relating to the total
value is associated, and a display con?gured, in combination
With the controller and controller-executable instructions, to
display to a user a plurality of user-selectable graphic options
selectable by the user through the user input device. The kiosk
These redemption machines also require service from the
tellers, cashiers, or clerks to manage the bags, change and
clear receptacles and bags, and call for pick-ups as required.
The armored carriers provide a service of picking up the coin
receptacles and processing the coins for a fee. The value is
loose mixed coins, a coin processing module con?gured, in
combination With a controller, sort the loosed mixed coins to
determine a total value thereof, a user-input device, a storage
required, daily, Weekly, or other frequencies betWeen vouch
ers cashed to the coins processed by the armored carrier.
total value is associated, and dispensing the portable storage
medium bearing the user-selected graphic to the user.
In yet another aspect of the present concepts, a kiosk for
combination of single and mixed denominations.
In addition to processing of a plurality of coins, these
redemption machines have a focus of self-service application,
limiting intervention of attendants and service personnel.
60
associated, a display con?gured, in combination With the
controller and controller-executable instructions, to display
When one particular card type has run out but other card types
to a user a plurality of user-selectable graphic options select
have not.
able by the user through the user input device, and a printing
device con?gured to receive a portable storage medium from
the portable storage medium storage device, to print on a print
area of the portable storage medium the user-selected
SUMMARY
65
In another aspect of the present concepts, a method of
transferring funds to a personaliZed portable storage medium
graphic, and to dispense the portable storage medium folloW
ing printing.
US 8,042,732 B2
3
4
The above summary of the present invention is not
intended to represent each embodiment or every aspect of the
be redeemed at any merchant Within a designated shopping
mall. Additionally, as used herein, the term “open-loop cards”
refers to cards that can be used for multiple purposes and at
present invention. The detailed description and Figures
multiple points of sale, such as making purchases at a variety
describe various embodiments and aspects of the present
invention.
of stores or paying bills. Open-loop cards may be “branded”
With an issuer’s or provider’s logo (e.g., American Express,
VISA, etc.) and are generally redeemable at any merchant
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
that accepts the designated providers company’s regular
FIG. 1 is a perspective vieW of a coin redemption machine
according to one embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 2 is a side vieW of the coin redemption machine shoWn
credit cards (e.g., any merchant that accepts American
Express credit cards Will accept a Prepaid American Express
Gift Credit Card). HoWever, these “branded” open-loop cards
in FIG. 1 Which schematically illustrates the components
present in the coin redemption machine according to one
embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 3 is a perspective vieW of a coin processing system for
use With the coin redemption machine of FIG. 1, according to
one embodiment of the present invention, With portions
bearing the of are not credit cards and are, at least initially,
based technology and enable transactions only through POS
thereof broken aWay to shoW the internal structure.
FIG. 4 is an enlarged bottom vieW of a sorting head for use
commerce and is a branded (e.g., VISA, MasterCard, etc.)
virtual debit card speci?cally for online purchases. These
With the coin processing system of FIG. 3 according to one
embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 5 is a How diagram illustrating a routine for dispens
associated With a speci?c, pre-paid balance. Other open-loop
cards may be “non-branded” value cards that utiliZe PIN
or ATM netWorks in combination With the requisite PIN.
A virtual value card is designed for intemet and mobile
20
like PayPal (an online closed loop private netWork) and Work
under the same rules as value card account. Finally, as used
ing a card in accordance With an embodiment.
FIG. 6 is a perspective vieW of a coin redemption machine
according to another embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 7 is a side vieW of the coin redemption machine shoWn
in FIG. 6 Which schematically illustrates the components
present in the coin redemption machine according to another
embodiment of the present invention.
25
FIG. 8 is a perspective vieW of a coin redemption machine
30
according to yet another embodiment of the present inven
tion.
While the invention is susceptible to various modi?cations
and alternative forms, speci?c embodiments have been
shoWn by Way of example in the draWings and Will be
described in detail herein. It should be understood, hoWever,
herein, the terms “value card types” or “type of value card”
may be used to refer to different card classi?cations (e.g.,
closed-lop vs. open loop) and/or different merchant designa
tions (e.g., Best Buy gift cards vs. Macy’s gift cards) Within
card classi?cations. For example, a closed loop Macy’s card
is a different type from a Prepaid American Express Gift
Credit Card.
The value cards include a data storage media feature for
reading information from and/or Writing information to the
value cards. Such media features may include, for example,
memory chips, bar codes, magnetic strips, radio frequency
tags, embedded integrated circuits, optical devices, solid state
35
that the invention is not intended to be limited to the particular
forms or physical con?gurations depicted or disclosed.
Rather, the invention is to cover all modi?cations, equiva
lents, arrangements and alternatives falling Within the spirit
virtual value cards are associated With accounts that operate
memory devices, combination thereof, or the like. The issuer
or provider is the ?nancial institution or entity that issues the
value card to the card holder and each issuer or provider is
associated With an Issuer Identi?cation Number (IIN) and, in
the case of programs using the MasterCard or VISA net
40
Works, a bank identi?cation number (BIN). These IIN and/or
BIN numbers are encoded into the card media feature to
and scope of the invention.
permit the card to be associated With the identi?ed provider
for consummation of electronic funds transactions.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATED
EMBODIMENTS
Some value cards are linked directly to separate accounts
45
held by the individual card holder, Whereas other value cards
The folloWing disclosure describes apparatuses and meth
ods for dispensing value cards from coin redemption
are not linked to a traditional bank account, but are rather
associated With a pooled funds account or concentrator
machines. The value cards described herein can be classi?ed
account in Which all of the funds associated With the value
cards of all participants of the value program are maintained
With different subaccounts for each card. Providers of value
cards that provide value card netWorks include, but are not
generally as closed-loop cards, semi-closed loop cards, open
loop cards, or virtual value cards, and may be either dispos
50
able or reloadable.
As used herein, the term “closed-loop cards” refers to cards
that have an associated monetary value that is redeemable
only at the merchant that issues or is speci?cally designated
on the card. Non-limiting examples of closed loop cards
limited to, BlackhaWk, Incomm, ValueLink, Stored Value
Systems, VendiCard, TSYS, DataWave, Stored Value Solu
tions, Comdata, and GiftClixx. In these value card netWorks,
55
the provider manages the value card for a number of partici
include prepaid phone cards, prepaid gas cards, prepaid gro
cery cards, prepaid entertainment cards, prepaid movie cards,
pating brands (e. g., Starbucks, Circuit City, Barnes & Noble,
doWnloadable ring tone cards, doWnloadable game cards,
doWnloadable movie cards, doWnloadable music cards that
In some embodiments, a monetary value is locally stored
on the media feature of the value card. Each time a portion of
use MP3, MP4, WMV, WAV, or other music formats, any
other doWnloadable softWare card, customer reWards cards,
and bridge and/or road toll cards. Other examples include
Major League Baseball, etc.).
60
prepaid Best Buy gift Cards, Macy’s gift cards, and ITunes
gift cards. Further, as used herein, the term “semi-closed loop
cards” refers to cards that are redeemable at multiple mer
65
the monetary value is redeemed, the monetary value stored on
the media feature is decremented by the amount of redemp
tion. LikeWise, if additional monetary value is added to the
value card, the monetary value stored on the media feature is
incremented by the amount added. One example of this is a
smart card, Which contains an embedded integrated circuit
chants. One non-limiting example of a semi-closed loop card
(IC) Which can process data, as Well as a tamper-resistant
is a mall gift card With an associated monetary value that may
security system (eg secure cryptoprocessor, secure ?le sys
US 8,042,732 B2
5
6
tem, human-readable features, etc.) to preserve con?dential
area Within the machine 10. According to another alternative
embodiment, the coin input area 14 includes a gravity-feed
coin input tray as is discussed in further detail beloW. Accord
ing to still another alternative embodiment of the coin
redemption machine 10, the coin input area 14 includes a coin
ity of information in the memory of the IC. Value or assets on
the smart card are managed via a central administration sys
tem Which interchanges information and con?guration set
tings With the card through the security system. In other
tray that is pivotable from a ?rst position, Wherein the coin
tray is substantially horiZontal, to a second position, Wherein
the coin tray is lifted causing the coins to slide under the force
of gravity into the coin redemption machine 10.
In its simplest form, the coin redemption machine 10
receives coins via the coin input receptacle 14 and the coins
embodiments, only a user account number is stored on the
media feature of the value card. The monetary value associ
ated With the user account number is maintained in an exter
nal database on, for example, a network, server, remote com
puter, combinations thereof, or the like. Each time a portion of
the monetary value is redeemed, the merchant accesses the
external database, determines the monetary value associated
With the account, decrements the amount of redemption, and
are authenticated and counted. After the user makes a card
type selection and/or other inputs using the touch screen 12, a
card printer prints a graphic on a value card, Which is redeem
applies the amount of redemption toWards the purchase.
able for the total amount of the deposited coins or for an
amount related thereto, such as the total amount of the depos
ited coins less a transaction fee. The transaction fee, in some
aspects, is set to a ?xed percentage of a processed coin value,
In some embodiments, the coin redemption machines may
dispense the value card only after registering and activating
the value card With an issuing entity or approved third party.
To facilitate the use of a single, generic “blank” or “partially
blank” value card to Which may be applied any number of
separate associations With one or more stores or accounts, a 20
coin redemption machine may be connected to a provider or
issuer netWork including blocks of account numbers set aside
for assignment to value cards. For example, in some aspects,
a “blank” value card contains a unique identi?cation number
or code and the database tracks the stored value media by such
identi?cation number or code. The “blank” or “partially
blank” value cards may also comprise some minimal printed
information and/or graphics such as a provider or issuer logo
7% for values betWeen $40.01 and $60.00, etcetera). Still
further, the transaction fee could be set to a ?at fee per trans
25
action. The transaction fees may optionally be set
The fees may, in other aspects, comprise a la carte charges
that vary depending upon the options selected by the user. By
Way of example, printing on cards in color is not inexpensive
(e. g., VISA) and text (e.g., legal printing and provider/issuer
contact information on back of card). A customer desiring to
associate the stored value media to be dispensed to Store X, or
such as 9%, 8%, 7%, etc. of the processed coin value. Alter
natively, the transaction fee could be a variable percentage for
different ranges of values of processed coins (e.g., 9% for a
value up to $20, 8% for values betWeen $20.01 and $40.00,
30
on a per card basis and the customer may be charged a ?rst fee
for a monochromatic card, a second fee for a color card With
color printing on one side, and a third fee for color printing on
even plural stores (e.g., Store X and Store Y), having made
both sides, perhaps in addition to any separate transaction
such selections through a coin redemption machine user
interface, Would be issued a value card having a unique iden
ti?cation number(s) or code(s) associated in the netWork to
fees assessed in correspondence With the total value of the
processed coins. Thus, a customer may be charged 6% of the
total value of the processed coins and a surcharge of $0.50 to
print a color image on both sides. Another customer might
choose to print, for a charge of $0.25, a color image of the
35
the store(s) designated by the customer. Thus, the individual
stored value media need not necessarily have pre-stored or
pre-formatted thereon speci?c account information or spe
front side of a value card and a black and White image or no
image on the back of the card. Moreover, the printing cost per
ci?c store names and such information may be Written to
and/ or printed on such value card, if at all, upon issuance. Of
course, the issued value card may be pre-stored or pre-for
matted thereon to concretely associate the stored value media
to a speci?c store or issuing source (e.g., bank) and all account
information needed to permit activation of the account by
transfer of the account information to the store, issuing
authority, or third party managing card issuance for such store
40
45
Without charging any fee for printing and/or issuance. Thus,
50
from a machine user and also to display outputs to be vieWed
by the user. While a touch screen 12 is illustrated in FIG. 1 for
receiving data entered by a user of the coin redemption
machine 10, the coin redemption machine 10 may also
include input devices comprising, for example, a mechanical
keyboard, a keypad, buttons, and/or touchpad to receive such
in such as aspect of the present concepts, a patron can deposit
$100 in coin and receive a store card having a value of $100
With a user-selected graphic, Whereas Were the patron to
select another alternative (i.e., other than a store card), the
patron Would be assessed a fee. Still further, Where the self
service coin exchange machine 10 dispenses a plurality of
value cards including both a store value card and value cards
55
inputs.
for other providers or issuers (e.g., Starbucks, McDonalds,
Target, etc.), the store card (e.g., SafeWay) could be associ
ated With a loW fee (e.g., 0%, 1% of total value of processed
coins, etc.), Whereas the other stored value cards could be
The coin redemption machine 10 includes a coin input area
associated With a higher fee (e.g., 5%, 6%, 7%, etc.). Still
14 Which receives coins of mixed denominations from a user.
The coin input area 14 alloWs the user of the coin processing
machine 10 to deposit the user’s coins, as a batch, Which Will
Advantageously, hoWever, a store can offer a value card, or
more particularly a store card, a speci?c type of value card,
or issuing authority.
Referring to the draWings and initially to FIG. 1, a coin
redemption machine 10 according to one embodiment of the
present invention includes a touch screen 12 to provide inputs
card could be assessed on a surface area of the image, perhaps
assessed by quadrant or square inches/ centimeters. Thus,
printing of a small image or personaliZed logo Would entail a
smaller printing fee than a full card image. In yet another
aspect, the fee for printing could be Waived.
60
further, the fees for printing on various cards could, of course,
vary in accord With contractual arrangements betWeen the
ultimately be converted to some other sort of fund source
store and the third parties. Thus, for example, the fees
(e. g., value card(s), banknote(s), coins(s), token(s), electronic
betWeen one card (e.g., a Starbucks value card) may differ
funds, etc.) that is available to the user.
According to the embodiment of the coin redemption
machine 10 illustrated in FIG. 1, the coin input area 14 is
generally funnel-shaped to direct coins to a coin processing
65
from that of another card (e.g., Target value card). To illus
trate, the self-service coin exchange machine 10 could be
con?gured to dispense cards and/ or add value to a ?rst stored
value card (e.g., a Starbucks card) for a ?rst fee (e.g., 6% of
US 8,042,732 B2
7
8
the value of the processed coins) and to a second stored value
card (e.g., a McDonalds card) for a second fee (e.g., 7% of the
other type of con?guration adapted to dispense one or more
denominations of bills, in any combination, to a currency
value of the processed coins).
dispensing receptacle for retrieval by the patron. The cur
rency dispensing module may comprise any OEM currency
dispenser. For example, the currency dispensing module may
The coin redemption machine 10 outputs the value card to
the user via a card slot 16. Document slot 18 is advanta
geously provided to output a receipt of the transaction. An
additional document slot(s) may be provided in combination
With a document processing module to permit the receipt of
and/ or the preparation and/ or discharge of documents bearing
value, such as a gift certi?cate, check, cash, or voucher. Thus,
comprise one or more Fujitsu F53, F56, P400, or F510e
multi-cassette media dispensers, or combinations thereof.
The Fujitsu F53 and F56, for example, feature six cassettes
that can hold up to a total of 3,000 bills (500 bills/cassette) in
a compact con?guration. For example, in a six cassette 127
currency dispensing module 110, tWo cassettes could be
loaded to dispense $1 bills, tWo cassettes loaded to dispense
$5 bills, one cassette loaded to dispense $10 bills, and one
cassette loaded to dispense $20 bills. Further aspects of cur
rency dispensing utiliZable in association With the disclosed
coin redemption machine 10 are disclosed in co-pending US.
additional value can be added into the coin redemption
machine 10, further to that of the input coins, and any such
excess money received by the machine 1 0 applied to the value
card or applied to another form of value selected by a patron.
Where the coin redemption machine 10 is utiliZed by a
patron to obtain a value card or to add value to a value card, the
coin redemption machine is optionally con?gured to output to
the patron a code and contact information for replacing the
value card should the patron lose the value card. Such code
and contract information may be provided, for example, on a
patent application Ser. No. 11/726,828 ?led on Mar. 23, 2007,
entitled “Apparatus, System And Method For Coin
Exchange,” incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
20
dispensed receipt associated With the patron’s transaction. In
another aspect, the information is transmitted to a patron’s
pense other items of value including, but not limited to, mer
chandise or value cards having a predetermined value. In yet
selected personal electronic device. In still another aspect, the
patron may elect to have the information emailed to the patron
at a designated email address or texting address. Other modes
of providing such code and contact information to a patron or
25
providing protection against lost value cards are also consid
ered to fall Within these concepts including, but not limited to,
requiring a patron to register their value card directly With a
third party provider or issuer during the transaction or to
other aspects, the coin redemption machine 10 is con?gurable
to dispense items of value including, but not limited to, loose
coin, rolled coin, coupons, tickets, or other value storing
mediums. Still further, the coin redemption machine 10 may
be con?gured to permit an electronic transfer of funds to a
designated device or account via a hardWired or Wireless
30
register their card locally in the retail store in Which the
patron’s card is obtained. Optionally, a patron may further be
communication device and associated communication path,
such electronic transferbeing directed to, for example, a store
patron bank account or store account, an electronic transfer to
a third party account (e.g., a creditor of the patron), or an
electronic transfer to a portable electronic device. For
permitted to associate a PIN With the value card for enhanced
security. Once the patron’s card is registered, should the
patron’s card be lost or stolen, the patron Would be permitted
to provide the code to the appropriate entity, Web-site, tele
phone call service, employee, or the like, and request a
replacement card, upon Which request the lost or stolen value
card Would be cancelled (e.g., voided in the provider’s or
Still further, other dispensing modules can advantageously
be incorporated into the coin redemption machine 10 to dis
35
example, in one aspect, the coin redemption machine 10 is
con?gured to transfer of all of or a portion of the total value
due a patron (e. g., a remainder folloWing disbursement to the
The document processing module may be con?gured to
patron of a portion of the total value in currency) via elec
tronic transmission (e.g., near ?eld communication) of such
desired amount to a patron’s portable electronic storage
device (e.g., a cellular phone, electronic purse, electronic
scan, sort, count, and/or authenticate documents and may
Wallet, electronic cash, fob, etc). Moreover, in some aspects,
comprise elements of, for example, bank note processing
a patron is permitted to supplement any desired output of
value from the coin redemption machine 10 (e.g., a check, a
issuer’s system) and a neW value card issued.
40
modules described in US. Pat. Nos. 5,295,196, 5,870,487,
5,875,259, 6,318,537, 7,187,795, 7,256,874, and 7,391,897,
45
each of Which is incorporated by reference herein in its
entirety. For example, an image capture unit is con?gured to
scan in input document using an image extraction unit (e.g.,
the unit can have any number of heads, such as one head to
image only one side of the document or tWo heads to obtain
from a store patron bank account or store account or from a
patron’s portable electronic device. Thus, a patron inputting
50
full video images of both sides of the documents). The input
document can be scanned in either the Wide or the narroW
direction and the image extraction unit could extract portions
of the image of the document for future processing. For
example, in the case of a check, the image extraction unit may
55
extract MICR data, courtesy amount (CAR) data, legal
machine 10. FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 are intended to illustrate one
60
currency bills via a multi-cassette dispenser or a single-cas
sette dispenser. A multi-cassette dispenser could thus be con
$10 bills, and $20 bills. A currency dispensing module could
?gured to dispense $1 bills, $5 bills, and $10 bills, or any
non-limiting example for a con?guration of the components
of the coin redemption machine 10. The coin redemption
machine 10 includes a coin processing module 20. The coin
processing module 20 counts and authenticates coins of
mixed denominations that are deposited in the coin input area
?gured to dispense denominations including $1 bills, $5 bills,
only $1 bills or only $5 bills, a multi-cassette dispenser con
option to transfer the balance of $46.16, including any
optional, denoted transaction fees to be assessed, from the
patron’s bank account to the coin redemption machine 10
folloWing access to such account (e.g., via input of bank card
FIG. 2 illustrates a side vieW of the coin redemption
Additionally, the coin redemption machine 10 may com
comprise a single-cassette dispenser con?gured to dispense
$85.25 in coin into the coin redemption machine 10 may
transfer an extra $14.75 from the patron’s cellular phone to
permit the purchase of concert tickets having a cost of
$100.00. In another example, a patron desiring to purchase a
$100.00 gift card folloWing an input of $53.84 may select an
and PIN).
amount ?eld (LAR) data, or other data in the case of currency
or other types of documents.
prise a currency dispensing module con?gured to dispense
gift certi?cate, a value card, etc.) through a transfer of funds
65
14, Which leads directly into the coin processing module 20.
The coins may also be sorted in the coin processing module
20 in a variety of Ways such as by sorting based on the
US 8,042,732 B2
9
10
diameter of the coins. When a coin cannot be authenticated by
to retrieve the coin by accessing the rejected coin receptacle
coin processing module 20 may tabulate the value of the coins
that are processed Without ever sorting them. In either of these
situations, the coins are sent from the coin processing module
20 to a single coin receptacle station 28 as mixed coins.
Because the coins are not being sorted by denomination, the
24. Alternatively, non-authenticated coins may be routed to a
coin redemption machine 10 only requires one receptacle
reject coin bin (not shoWn) disposed Within the coin redemp
station 28 for collecting all of the mixed coins.
The currency redemption machine 10 includes a processor
30 Which is coupled to and controls the interaction betWeen
the coin processing module 20, the touch screen 12, a paper
printer 32 for outputting a receipt or voucher via the docu
the coin processing module 20, that coin is directed through a
coin reject tube 22 to the rejected coin receptacle 24 Which
alloWs the user Who deposited such a non-authenticated coin
tion machine 10 and are not returned to the user.
Disk-type coin sorters and authenticating devices Which
can perform the function of the coin processing module 20 of
the coin redemption machine 10 are disclosed in US. Pat. No.
5,299,977 (entitled “Coin Handling System”); US. Pat. No.
5,453,047 (entitled “Coin Handling System”); US. Pat. No.
5,507,379 (entitled “Coin Handling System With Coin Sensor
Discriminator”); US. Pat. No. 5,542,880 (“Coin Handling
System With Shunting Mechanism”); US. Pat. No. 5,865,673
(entitled “Coin Sorter”); andU.S. Pat. No. 5,997,395 (entitled
“High Speed Coin Sorter Having a Reduced SiZe”); each of
Which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety. In
general, in such disc-type systems, a batch of coins are input
ment slot 18, a card printer 34 for printing a user selected
graphic on a value card, a card stack 36 for providing value
cards to the card printer 34, and a card reader/Writer device 38
for reading data from or Writing data to a value card. For
example, the processor 30 may revieW the input totals from
the coin processing module 20, receive the user’s selections
via the touch screen 12, direct the card stack 36 to transport a
20
value card to the card printer 34, direct the card printer 34 to
print a graphic corresponding to the user’s selections on the
by a user into a coin input area comprising a coin tray or coin
touch screen 12, direct the card reader/Writer 38 to assign a
receptacle area (e.g., a funnel, hopper, etc.) or other area
adapted to receive input coins, Where they are conveyed to a
central region of a rotating, resilient pad. As a disc bearing the
resilient pad is rotated at a high speed (e. g., by a shaft or gear
train and electric motor), coins deposited on the resilient pad
slide outWardly over the surface of the pad due to centrifugal
force (i.e., they are subjected to su?icient centrifugal force to
overcome their static friction With the upper surface of the
monetary value to the value card corresponding to the input
totals from the coin processing module 20, and direct the
paper printer 32 to output a receipt indicative of the input
totals from the coin processing module 20.
Referring noW to FIG. 3, a disk-type coin processing sys
resilient pad) and a stationary sorting head disposed adjacent
and opposite to the resilient pad guides coins of speci?c
denominations, via contours (e.g., Walls, grooves, rails, etc.)
25
tem 100 is shoWn Which can be used as the coin processing
module 20 of FIG. 2 according to one embodiment of the
30
head 112. As the coins pass through this opening, they are
formed therein, to designated exit stations, Where they are
each discharged through an exit slot speci?c to the denomi
nation of the coin.
Alternatively, other coin sorters such as, for example, rail
sorters can be used to perform the function of the coin pro
cessing module 20. A rail sorter suitable to perform the func
35
40
present invention is described in US. Pat. No. 5,382,191
(entitled “Coin Queuing Device and PoWer Rail Sorter”),
Which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
Alternatively, the coin sorter may comprise a gravity rail
sorter, such as that disclosed by Molbak in US. Pat. No.
6,976,570, Which is incorporated herein by reference in its
45
entirety, a poWered rail sorter, a multi-disc or disc-to-disc
sorter, or other type of bulk coin processing mechanism or
system.
The coin processing module 20 outputs the authenticated
deposited on the top surface of a rotatable disk 114. This
rotatable disk 114 is mounted for rotation on a shaft (not
shoWn) and is driven by an electric motor 116. The disk 114
typically comprises a resilient pad 118, preferably made of a
tion of the coin processing module 20 of the coin redemption
machine 10 according to an alternative embodiment of the
present invention. The coin processing system 100 includes a
hopper 110 for receiving coins of mixed denominations that
feeds the coins through a central opening in an annular sorting
50
resilient rubber or polymeric material, bonded to the top
surface ofa solid disk 120. While the solid disk 120 is often
made of metal, it can also be made of a rigid polymeric
material.
According to one embodiment, coins are initially depos
ited by a user in a gravity-feed coin tray (e.g., coin input area
14 ofFIG. 1) disposed above the coin processing system 100.
Coin ?oW through an aperture in the gravity-feed coin tray
Which funnels the coins into the hopper 110. Alternatively, a
pivoting coin tray can be used in other embodiments of the
present invention. The user lifts the pivoting coin tray Which
funnels the coins into the hopper 110. A pivoting coin tray
suitable foruse in connection With the coin processing system
100 is described in detail in US. Pat. No. 4,964,495 (entitled
coins via one or more exit channels (not shoWn).According to
one embodiment, each coin exit channel is coupled to a coin
“Pivoting Tray for Coin Sorter”), Which is incorporated
herein by reference in its entirety.
tube 26 Which is coupled to a coin receptacle station 28. The
As the disk 114 is rotated, the coins deposited on the
resilient pad 118 tend to slide outWardly over the surface of
the pad 118 due to centrifugal force. As the coins move
outWardly, those coins that are lying ?at on the pad 118 enter
the gap betWeen the surface of the pad 118 and the sorting
head 112 because the underside of the inner periphery of the
coin tubes 26 lead to coin receptacle stations (or bins) 28 for
each of the coin denominations that are to be sorted and
55
authenticated by the coin processing module 20. The coin
receptacle station 28 includes coin bags or bins for holding
each sorted coin denomination. Other coin distribution
schemes are implemented in alternative embodiments of the
present invention. Many alternative coin distribution schemes
sorting head 112 is spaced above the pad 118 by a distance
60
Which is about the same as the thickness of the thickest coin.
As is further described beloW, the coins are processed and sent
to exit stations Where they are discharged. The coin exit
stations may sort the coins into their respective denomina
are described in greater detail in US. Pat. No. 6,318,537
entitled “Currency Processing Machine With Multiple Inter
nal Coin Receptacles,” Which is incorporated herein by ref
machine 10, the coin processing module 20 only counts the
tions and discharge the coins from exit channels in the sorting
head 112 corresponding to their denominations.
Referring noW to FIG. 4, the underside of the sorting head
coins and does not store the coins in a sorted fashion. Or, the
112 is shoWn. The coin sets for any given country are sorted
erence in its entirety.
In an alternative embodiment of the coin redemption
65
US 8,042,732 B2
11
12
by the sorting head 112 due to variations in the diameter siZe.
The coins circulate betWeen the sorting head 112 and the
in the order of decreasing diameter. The number of exit chan
nels can vary according to alternative embodiments of the
rotating pad 118 (FIG. 1) on the rotatable disk 114 (FIG. 1).
present invention.
The coins are deposited on the pad 118 via a central opening
130 and initially enter the entry channel 132 formed in the
The innermost edges of the exit channels 261-268 are
positioned so that the inner edge of a coin of only one par
underside of the sorting head 112. It should be keep in mind
ticular denomination can enter each channel 261-268. The
that the circulation of the coins in FIG. 4 appears counter
clockWise because FIG. 2 is a vieW of the underside of the
coins of all other denominations reaching a given exit channel
sorting head 112.
exit channel so that those coins cannot enter the channel and,
therefore, continue on to the next exit channel under the
extend inWardly beyond the innermost edge of that particular
An outer Wall 136 of the entry channel 132 divides the entry
channel 132 from the loWermost surface 140 of the sorting
circumferential movement imparted on them by the pad 118.
To maintain a constant radial position of the coins, the pad
head 112. The lowermost surface 140 is preferably spaced
from the pad 118 by a distance that is slightly less than the
thickness of the thinnest coins. Consequently, the initial out
Ward radial movement of all the coins is terminated When the
coin engage the outer Wall 136, although the coins continue to
move more circumferentially along the Wall 136 (in the coun
terclockWise directed as vieWed in FIG. 2) by the rotational
movement imparted to the coins by the pad 118 of the rotat
able disk 114.
As the pad 118 continues to rotate, those coins that Were
initially aligned along the Wall 136 move across the ramp 162
leading to the queuing channel 166 for aligning the innermost
edge of each coin along an inner queuing Wall 170. The coins
are gripped betWeen the queuing channel 166 and the pad 118
118 continues to exert pressure on the coins as they move
betWeen successive exit channels 261-268.
Further details of the operation of the sorting head 112
shoWn in FIG. 4 are disclosed in Us. patent application Ser.
No. 10/095,164 (entitled “Disk-Type Coin Processing Device
Having Improved Coin Discrimination System”), Which Was
20
in its entirety.
FIG. 5 is a How diagram illustrating a routine for dispens
ing a selected value card to a user With the coin redemption
machine 10 of FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 in accordance With one
25
to computer-executable instructions stored on a computer
the entry channel 130 as the coins move across the ramp 162
30
is approaching.
Coins determined to be invalid are rejected by a diverting
pin 210 Which is loWered and impacts an invalid coin to
redirect the invalid coin to the reject channel 212 that guides
the rejected coins to a reject chute 22 (FIG. 2), Which directs
the coin back to the user. The diverting pin 210 remains in its
home, or non-diverting position, until an invalid coin is
detected. Those coins not diverted into the reject channel 212
continue along inner queuing Wall 170 to the gauging region
250. The inner queuing Wall 170 terminates just doWnstream
of the reject channel 212; thus, the coins no longer abut the
inner queuing Wall 170 at this point and the queuing channel
166 terminates. The radial position of the coins is maintained,
because the coins remain under pad pressure, until the coins
contact an outer Wall 252 of the gauging region 250.
The gauging Wall 252 aligns the coins along a common
radius as the coins approach a series of coin exit channels
261-268 that discharge coins of different denominations. The
?rst exit channel 261 is dedicated to the smallest coin to be
sorted (e.g., the dime in the Us. coin set). Beyond the ?rst
exit channel 261, the sorting head 112 shoWn in FIG. 2 forms
35
the center of the sorting head 112 so that coins are discharged
solid state device, or any other medium from Which a com
puter can read data. While the embodiments are described
With respect to a processor, it is contemplated that other
suitable means may be provided for implementing routine
300 such as, for example, controller(s), multiple processors,
netWorked computers, combinations thereof, or the like.
40
Additionally, the computer-executable instructions may be
stored externally on, for example, one or more computers,
netWorks, servers, or remote computers.
According to the illustrated embodiment, the routine 300
starts When the processor 30 receives a request for a particular
45
50
type of value card at block 302. This request may be initiated
by the user making selections or inputs on the touch screen
12. The user selections and inputs may include, but are not
limited to, the number of valued cards to be purchased, types
of value cards, redeemable dollar amounts applied to the
value cards, graphics printed on value cards, and Whether the
user desires a voucher for the excess money deposited over
55
the redeemable dollar amounts associated With the card.
For example, the touch screen 12 may prompt the user to
select a type of value card and a dollar amount to be associated
With the purchased value card. The dollar amount may be a
prede?ned ?xed amount (e.g., $5, $10, $20, $50, etc.), a user
selected amount, or an unlimited amount (i.e., all money input
by the user is applied to the value card). If the dollar amount
is a prede?ned ?xed amount or a user selected amount, the
60
seven more exit channels 261-268 Which discharge coins of
different denominations at different circumferential locations
around the periphery of the sorting head 112. Thus, the exit
channels 261-268 are spaced circumferentially around the
outer periphery of the sorting head 112 With the innermost
edges of successive channels located progressively closer to
readable medium such as, for example, a main memory (e. g.,
a random access memory (RAM) or other dynamic storage
device), a read only memory (ROM) or other static storage
device, magnetic disk, optical disk, hard disk, CD-ROM,
DVD, PROM, EPROM, FLASH-EPROM, memory chip,
pad move through the queuing channel 166 along the queuing
Wall 170 passed a trigger sensor 206 and a discrimination
sensor 204 for discriminating betWeen valid and invalid
coins. In other embodiments, the discrimination sensor also
determines the denomination of the coins. The trigger sensors
206 sends a signal to the discrimination sensor 204 that a coin
embodiment. In one aspect of this embodiment, the routine
300 may be carried out by the processor 30 (FIG. 2) according
as the coins are rotated through the queuing channel 166. The
coins, Which Were initially aligned With the outer Wall 136 of
and into the queuing channel 166, are rotated into engage
ment With inner queuing Wall 170. As the pad 118 continues
to rotate, the coins Which are being positively driven by the
?led on Mar. 1 1, 2002 and is incorporated herein by reference
coin redemption machine 10 may reject and return any coins
deposited by the user that exceed the prede?ned ?xed amount
or the user selected amount. Alternatively, the paper printer
32 may output a voucher, Which is redeemable for the money
deposited by the user that exceeded the prede?ned ?xed
65
amount or the user selected amount. The voucher is typically
redeemed by an attendant at the store Where the coin redemp
tion machine 10 is located. It is contemplated that in some
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