Stepanian
US 20070042767Al
(19) United States
(12) Patent Application Publication (10) Pub. No.: US 2007/0042767 A1
Stepanian
(43) Pub. Date:
Feb. 22, 2007
(54)
TETHERED DIGITAL BUTLER CONSUMER
ELECTRONIC DEVICE AND METHOD
(52)
US. Cl.
............................................................ .. 455/420
(57)
(76) Inventor: Robert Stepanian, San Francisco, CA
(Us)
ABSTRACT
The present invention relates to a tethered digital butler
consumer electronics product and method. The tethered
digital butler, of a price and form factor suitable for con
sumer electronics markets of developed and developing
Correspondence Address:
HAYNES BEFFEL & WOLFELD LLP
P 0 BOX 366
countries, includes a communications and multi-media con
sole and a Wireless remote. The remote may resemble a
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 (US)
handheld personal computer (HPC), a palm-held personal
(21) Appl. No.:
11/465,749
(22) Filed:
Aug. 18, 2006
consumer electronics market. In particular, this disclosure
Related US. Application Data
relates to combining telephone service, device control and,
computer (PPC or PDA) or a smart phone, but has a loW cost
and feature set supported by the console that is novel in the
optionally, a ?ngerprint reader for easy user identi?cation/
authorization and personalization. As another option, a cam
era can be incorporated into the remote, thereby enabling
(63) Continuation-in-part of application No. 11/350,980,
?led on Feb. 8, 2006.
(60)
video conferencing and other visual features. Alternatively,
the remote may be packaged separately from a console and
sold to interact With capabilities of a communications and
console, set-top box, multi-media PC or other consumer
Provisional application No. 60/709,666, ?led on Aug.
19, 2005.
electronics device from a different source, such as one
Publication Classi?cation
running on a Windows, OS X or Linux platform, With or
(51)
Without telephone capabilities. The remote may include a
media reader and remote USB port.
Int. Cl.
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Patent Application Publication Feb. 22, 2007 Sheet 1 0f 6
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US 2007/0042767 A1
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FIG. 1
header
Patent Application Publication Feb. 22, 2007 Sheet 2 0f 6
FIG. 2
US 2007/0042767 A1
Patent Application Publication Feb. 22, 2007 Sheet 3 0f 6
US 2007/0042767 A1
FIG. 3
Main Proc
LPC 2132
'
<—>
Keyboard Ctlr
P89LP931
Keyboard Matrix
<—> (8 return lines x 13 scan lines)
FIG. 4
Patent Application Publication Feb. 22, 2007 Sheet 4 0f 6
LPG 2132 CPU
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US 2007/0042767 A1
M49 BEFEQZ'A
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Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
TETHERED DIGITAL BUTLER CONSUMER
ELECTRONIC DEVICE AND METHOD
feature set and a cost-effective allocation of technical tasks
betWeen a remote and a console.
RELATED APPLICATIONS
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[0001] This application is a continuation-in-part of and
claims priority to US. application Ser. No. 11/350,980 ?led
Feb. 8, 2006 by inventor Robert Stepanian, entitled, “TETH
[0006] The present invention relates to a tethered digital
butler consumer electronics product and method. The teth
ERED DIGITAL BUTLER CONSUMER ELECTRONIC
DEVICE AND METHOD”, Which claims the bene?t of US.
ered digital butler, of a price and form factor suitable for
consumer electronics markets of developed and developing
Provisional Application No. 60/709,666 ?led Aug. 19, 2005;
countries, includes a communications and multi-media con
sole and a Wireless remote. The remote may resemble a
it further claims the bene?t of and priority to US. Provi
handheld personal computer (HPC), a palm-held personal
sional Application No. 60/709,666 ?led Aug. 19, 2005.
computer (PPC or PDA) or a smart phone, but has a loW cost
[0002] This application is related to US. Design patent
application Ser. Nos. 29/236,023, 29/236,022 and 29/236,
022, ?led on Aug. 10, 2005 by inventors Phoebe Ng, Robert
Stepanian and Allison S. Conner, entitled, “NAVIGATION
consumer electronics market. In particular, this disclosure
and feature set supported by the console that is novel in the
BUTTON ARRAY FOR REMOTE CONTROL HOUS
ING”, “REMOTE CONTROL HOUSING” and “CON
SOLE HOUSING”. The priority, provisional and related
design applications are incorporated by reference.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
[0003] The present invention relates to a tethered digital
butler consumer electronics product and method. The teth
ered digital butler, of a price and form factor suitable for
consumer electronics markets of developed and developing
countries, includes a communications and multi-media con
relates to combining telephone service, device control and,
optionally, a ?ngerprint reader for easy user identi?cation/
authoriZation and personaliZation. As another option, a cam
era can be incorporated into the remote, thereby enabling
video conferencing and other visual features. Alternatively,
the remote may be packaged separately from a console and
sold to interact With capabilities of a communications and
console, set-top box, multi-media PC or other consumer
electronics device from a different source, such as one
running on a WindoWs, OS X or Linux platform, With or
Without telephone capabilities. The remote may include a
media reader and remote USB port. Particular aspects of the
present invention are described in the claims, speci?cation
and draWings.
sole and a Wireless remote. The remote may resemble a
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
handheld personal computer (HPC), a palm-held personal
computer (PPC or PDA) or a smart phone, but has a loW cost
[0007]
and feature set supported by the console that is novel in the
consumer electronics market. In particular, this disclosure
remote.
relates to combining telephone service, device control and,
[0008]
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the digital butler
Details of the main processor are depicted in FIG.
optionally, a ?ngerprint reader for easy user identi?cation/
2.
authoriZation and personaliZation. The remote may be pack
aged separately from a console and sold to interact With
capabilities of a communications and multi-media console
[0009]
The LPC 2132 memory maps are shoWn in FIG. 3.
[0010]
FIG.
from a different source, such as one running on a WindoWs,
OS X or Linux platform.
[0004] Convergence of digital devices is not unbounded,
because it is guided by market realities. Many concepts are
?oated as trial balloons that burst, never to see an enabling
development effort or a reduction to practice. Some conver
gence trends are strong and noteworthy. Cellular smart
phones or business phones such as Treo or Blackberry
products are becoming poWerful and supplanting separate
PDAs. These smartphones go With the user across a cellular
netWork and even overseas. They are untethered, packing
many features into a small form factor, not requiring a
console. Another trend is to repackage a PC as media center,
complete With a Wireless keyboard. Recent announcements
suggest interfacing a Microsoft media center With a Blue
tooth-equipped cellular telephone to use the sound repro
duction of a TV as a sort of speaker phone, relying on the
cellular telephone for netWork connectivity. In both
instances, the telephone features are untethered from and do
not depend on availability of a console.
[0005] For developing countries and cost-conscious buy
ers, the Treo and media center approaches are over-built and
too expensive. An opportunity arises to provide a loW-cost
integrated consumer electronics system that includes a novel
4
shoWs
the
8051
based
Philips
LPC89LPC931 controller.
[0011]
FIG. 5 shoWs the ZV4301 to other CPU and
peripheral interfaces.
[0012]
FIG. 6 is a block diagram of the console.
[0013]
FIG. 7 is an alternative block diagram of the digital
butler remote, With a CMOS camera module and/ or memory
card reader.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
[0014] The folloWing detailed description is made With
reference to the ?gures. Preferred embodiments are
described to illustrate the present invention, not to limit its
scope, Which is de?ned by the claims. Those of ordinary
skill in the art Will recogniZe a variety of equivalent varia
tions on the description that folloWs.
[0015] A tethered digital butler produces a loW cost,
palm-held remote With a novel combination of features that
are implemented by logic and resources of the console,
connected Wirelessly to the palm-held remote. Tethering the
palm-held device, so that it depends on logic and resources
of the console, runs against the trends and teachings of the
consumer electronics industry and particularly against the
trend toWard more poWerful smartphones.
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0016] Various novel combinations of features are empha
sized in this application. One Will recognize that the features
discussed can be combined in many Ways, While remaining
faithful to the tethered digital butler concept.
[0017]
In a ?rst embodiment of the tethered digital butler,
the palm-held remote alloWs a user to select among and use
logic and resources of a bread-box or smaller sized console
to authenticate users from a ?ngerprint reader on the remote,
to personalize the user’s telephone, TV vieWing, media
access and internet broWsing experiences, to connect the
user to a telephone network consistent With the user’s
authentication, and to control multi-media features, such as
channel control, volume control, DVD/ CD playback control,
and digitally stored music access and playback. In this
embodiment, the palm-held remote integrates at least a
?ngerprint reader, a speaker, microphone and volume con
trol adapted for use as a telephone, a display at least capable
of shoWing a telephone number, a cursor control and trigger
adapted to select and control resources of the console, a
compact keypad including numeric keys usable for tele
phone dialing, the compact keypad further including alpha
betic keys usable for Web broWsing. The bread-box or
smaller sized console integrates at least a DVD/CD player,
a netWork port and logic and resources adapted to authen
ticate users of the palm-held remote and personalize their
Mini, presents a small form factor (presently 6.5><6.5><2
inches) and quiet operation, While including enough com
puting poWer to function as PC.
[0021] In a ?fth embodiment, the remote is emphasized.
One aspect of the remote is to provide a complete I/O
platform in the palm of the user’s hand. Features adaptable
to VoIP and/ or video phone operation, such as a microphone,
can be used for other purposes, such as dictation, note
taking, voice messaging, listening to music or remote vieW
ing video. To support the high demands of streaming video,
a broader communications channel, such as Bluetooth ver
sion 2 or later or 802.1ln, and a more poWerful processor are
included. The remote may function in tandem With a con
sole, PC or set top cable or satellite box. It also could be
con?gured to control other consumer electronics device such
as a TV, IP-TV, home theater system, component stereo,
digital video recorder, DVD player or recorder, VCR, etc. It
can receive streaming media directly from a server. The
palm-held remote may be combined With a glue logic
application that enables a console, PC, set top box or other
consumer electronics device to utilize the special purpose
controls of the remote. The remote may be adapted to invoke
a glue logic application supplied for or native to a commu
nications and/or multi-media console, such as one running
under Windows, OS X or Linux.
[0022]
In a sixth embodiment, a remote control for a
telephone netWork connection and their Internet broWsing
based on ?ngerprints received from the palm-held remote,
cation resources. The gateWay device including logic and
connect telephone features of the palm-held remote to the
resources to process Wireless input and provide access to the
telephone netWork, respond to Internet broWsing commands
multimedia and communication resources. The remote con
from the palm-held remote and display Web pages on a
monitor or television, control channels accessed by a video
trol includes a palm-held remote adapted to invoke glue
receiver, drive speakers and provide volume control, provide
input to the gateWay device. It integrates at least a speaker
playback control for the DVD/CD player, and access and
and volume control adapted for use as a remote speaker, a
playback digitally stored music.
?ngerprint reader and a cursor control and trigger adapted to
select and control resources of the console. Glue logic
[0018] In a second embodiment of the tethered digital
butler, the palm-held remote has feWer components; the
console supports feWer features; thus, the combination Will
be less expensive and more attractive in many markets.
Remote components then include a speaker, microphone and
volume control adapted for use as a telephone, a display at
least capable of shoWing a telephone number, a cursor
control and trigger adapted to select and control resources of
the console, and a compact keypad including numeric keys
usable for telephone dialing. The ?ngerprint reader is not
included, nor is the alphabetic keypad. The logic and
resources of the console are reduced accordingly. Logic and
resources of the console need not authenticate and person
gateWay device t is coupled to multimedia and communi
logic running on the gateWay device by Wirelessly directing
invoked Wirelessly by the remote control is adapted to
connect the speaker to a sound reproduction module and
connect the ?ngerprint reader to an authentication and
personalization module that selects a user pro?le based on
activation of the ?ngerprint reader and authentication of the
user. The personalization module adapted to present the
user’s personalized favorite media access, present the user’s
personalized history lists, automatically authenticate the
user for digital rights management, automatically authenti
cate the user for communication access, and automatically
authenticate the user for electronic Wallet reproduction of
purchasing credentials.
[0023] An alternative to video operation of a camera is
still operation of the camera. The still camera may be
alize based on ?ngerprints or access and playback digitally
stored music. Internet broWsing may be limited or may be
Wirelessly coupled to a photographic capture module run
supported by an on-screen keyboard.
ning on another device, Which persists the pictures taken.
[0019] In a third embodiment of the tethered digital butler,
the DVD/CD player is omitted from the console. The
features of the palm-held remote do not much change, but
and reduce its cost, as only temporary buffering in the
the logic and resources required of the console are reduced.
[0020] In fourth embodiment, the console is implemented
on a PC, Which may be larger than bread-box sized. This
typically Would be less desirable, as most PCs do not ?t a
media room decor and are relatively loud, due to fans and
hard disk rotation. AneW generation of PCs, such as the Mac
The persistence at the other device can simplify the remote
remote is needed.
[0024] An aspect of this disclosure that can be combined
With any of the foregoing embodiments is remote on-screen
menu and controls display, translating a device menu and
controls display that Would normally appear on a TV or
monitor for reproduction on a display that is part of the
remote. To implement this capability, a menu-generating
device can assemble on-screen menus and controls as sepa
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
rate data stream, apart from any video image that the menus
and controls overlay. The data stream can be supplied both
to the device’s oWn on-screen overlay generator and to a
visits a neighbor’s console, they may take along their
hand-held remote and the associated digital rights for use on
the neighbor’s console or other device.
communications module coupled to the remote. The remote
uses the data stream to render the on-screen display in a
legible format, adapted to the reduced size of a screen on the
remote. Preferably, the menu and control organization for
mat on the remote mimics What the vieWer can see on the
screen, to minimize confusion. Technologies such as a
subset of HTML and JavaScript alloW a designer to specify
a menu and control layout in terms that permit rendering to
a variety of display sizes. Remote display of the on-screen
menu and control data stream may preempt a video image
display or may be overlaid on top of the video image.
Optionally, the device’s on-screen menu and controls can be
supplied to the remote exclusively as a data stream and not
as part of a rendered video stream, to avoid confusing menus
of different sizes. Alternatively, the on-screen menus and
controls may just appear on the remote’s display as a
consequence of being rendered to a TV or monitor that is
reproduced on the remote’s display.
[0025]
In any of these embodiments, a camera module can
be incorporated into the remote, thereby enabling video
conferencing and other visual features. The camera is
complemented by a glue logic application supplied for or
[0030] Another feature that can be combined With any of
these embodiments is personalization based on a single
action, a sWipe of the ?ngerprint reader. Coupled Wirelessly
to the ?ngerprint sensor softWare is a personalization mod
ule. If a user does not identify himself by sWiping the
?ngerprint sensor, then a generic pro?le is applied to per
sonalization of music, movies, photos, videos, ?les and
telephone access. If the user sWipes the ?ngerprint sensor,
then personalization can be applied, analogous to sWitching
users in current WindoWs XP implementations. This degree
of context shifting based on a single action at a remote
control is believed to be neW and unique. The personaliza
tion may include: favorite channels/movies/shoWs in a
streaming video environment; favorite music, photos or
video in an on demand environment; approved access to
DRM-controlled content using one or more keys linked to
the ?ngerprint; history of searches, recent topics, personal
interest (a la Google Sidebar or Claria PersonalWeb), per
sonal receptiveness to advertising content, recently accessed
?les; automatic authenticated access to communication
channels linked to the ?ngerprint, such as voice over IP,
instant messaging, Web conferencing and e-mail; electronic
Wallet access, automatically looking up credit card informa
tion and other account authorization information; and shar
native to a communications and/or multi-media console,
such as one running under WindoWs, OS X or Linux. To
support full motion video, Bluetooth version 2 or later or a
ing of information by person logged in.
Wireless Ethernet protocol may be used to supply the
control button that causes the remote to emit a tone Which
[0031]
The console may be equipped With a remote locator
required bandWidth.
makes it easier to locate.
[0026] As a further aspect of these embodiments, the
console may be equipped With a non-volatile memory sized
to time-shift playback from the video receiver and its logic
easily recognized.
and resources are further adapted to provide a menu of
[0032]
The form factor of a palm-held remote should be
[0033] The form factor of a bread-box or smaller sized
console can be judged by volume. A smallish consumer
electronics component uses an enclosure (from Which con
upcoming video content, schedule recording of the video
content and replay the video content. Alternatively, the
nectors and feet protrude) that is 12 by 15 by 3 inches and
non-volatile memory may be sized to hold a library of digital
has a volume of 540 cubic inches. This is an approximately
music.
[0027]
bread-box sized enclosure, although the shape differs from
a loaf of bread.
The U0 platform in the palm of our hand concept
can be enhanced by adding a memory card reader to the
remote. One or more of the many memory card formats noW
in use or as may be developed in the future can be accom
modated.
Remote HardWare
[0034] Introduction
[0035]
The digital butler remote is a gadget based on the
Bluetooth or another Wireless technology used for commu
[0028] Another form of U0 is provided through a USB or
FireWire port. The remote may integrate a USB connector
and port or similar FireWire support. Glue logic running on
nications and remote control applications.
[0036] Features
the host device may be adapted to treat the USB or FireWire
port as if it Were local to a machine being accessed using the
[0037]
remote.
cessor based solution.
[0029] In another aspect of these embodiments, the remote
may hold a DRM key and automatically deliver the key to
[0038] This remote is built around the Philips LPC2l32
ARM controller. The main processor provides interfaces for
the Keypad, Trackball or other pointing device, 128*32
DRM-enabled device. Either memory on the remote, a
memory module or an identi?cation reader combined With
the remote may hold the DRM key. The identi?cation reader
The digital butler remote board is an ARM7 pro
graphics LCD module, ?ngerprint sensor, and Bluetooth
SOC. The Bluetooth SOC and Zeevo ZV4301 interface With
a microphone, speaker and headphone for voice utilities.
can read a smart card or similar module With memory or can
The system may use a Philips 89LPC931 controller for the
read a ?ngerprint in order to authorize automatic use of the
DRM key to exercise DRM-evidenced rights. When a user
keypad interface through a 12C Bus. Alternative hardWare
con?gurations are illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8.
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0039]
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the digital butler
[0043] In-System/In-Application Programming (ISP/
IAP) via on-chip boot-loader softWare. Single Flash
remote.
sector or full chip erase in 400 ms and programming of
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the digital butler remote.
Embodiment Details
Chip Name
Chip Number
Description
Main processor
(100)
LPC2132, Phillips.
Main CPU, 60 MHZ/
64 Kb ?ash/16 Kb
Keypad controller
89LPC931, Phillips.
8051 MCU compatible
SRAM
(122)
With 8 KB ?ash, 12C
interface.
LCD Display mod
DDG128032AAD, DDTL.
ule (133)
TrackBall (123)
128*32 graphics
parallel/serial LCD
TBW2A00, ITT
Module.
Miniature all direc
Industries, Cannon;
tional scanning sWitch.
Omni- or Vari-Point or
Omni- or Vari-Disk
devices, ITT Industries,
Cannon.
Fingertip sensor
AES3400, Authentech.
Fingertip sensor With
Bluetooth SOC
ZV4301, Zeevo or
Bluetooth SOC With,
(132))
equivalent by Broadcom or UART interface.
(121)
SPI interfaces.
times as loW as 244 us per channel.
[0044] Single 10-bit D/A converter (227) provides vari
able analog output.
[0045] TWo 32-bit timers/counters (With four capture
and four compare channels each) (225), PWM unit (six
outputs) (225) and Watchdog (248).
[0046] Real-time clock (247) equipped With indepen
dent poWer and clock supply permitting extremely loW
poWer consumption in poWer-save modes. Multiple
serial interfaces including tWo UART (16C550) (246),
tWo Fast I2C-bus (400 Kb/s) (244), SP1 and SSP (245)
With bu?‘ering and variable data length capabilities.
[0047] Vectored interrupt controller (253) With con?g
urable priorities and vector addresses.
RSMD.
Flash Memory (131) AT49BV802A, Atmel.
Bluetooth SOC Flash,
Codedc IC (141)
MSM7716, OKI.
PoWer Supply (113) LTC 3440EDD-Linear
Single rail codec.
8 Mb
Technology.
256 bytes in 1 Ms. Embedded Trace interfaces (231)
offer real-time debugging With the on-chip real monitor
softWare and high speed tracing of instruction execu
tion. One 8 channel 10-bit A/D converters (226) pro
vides a total of up to 16 analog inputs, With conversion
Micro poWer syn
chronous 600 ma
Buck-Boost Dc-DC
cconverter
[0048] Up to 47 5 V tolerant general purpose I/0 pins
(228) in tiny LQFP64 package.
[0049]
Up to nine edge or level sensitive external inter
rupt pins (224) available.
[0050]
60 MHZ maximum CPU clock available from
programmable on-chip PLL (241).
[0040] Additional details of the main processor are
depicted in FIG. 2. The LPC2132 (100) is based on a
32/ 16-bit ARM7TDM1-S CPU (232) With real time emula
[0051] On-chip crystal oscillator With an operating
tion and embedded trace support, together With 64 Kbytes
(KB) of embedded high speed ?ash memory (223). A 128 bit
Wide memory interface (211, 212, 222) and accelerator
[0052]
architecture enable 32 bit code execution at maximum clock
rate. For critical code siZe applications, an alternate 16 bit
“thumb mode” reduces code by more then 30% With mini
mal performance penalty. Due to their tiny siZe and loW
poWer consumption, these micro controllers are typically
used for miniaturiZed applications, such as hand-held equip
ment. Most peripheral pins can also be remapped as General
Purpose I/0 pins. The system includes on-chip SRAM of 16
KB (213) and is Well suited for communication gateWays
and protocol converters, soft modems, voice recognition and
loW end managing, providing both large bulTer siZe and high
processing poWer. Various 32-bit timers (247, 248), 10-bit 8
channel ADC(s) (226), 10-bit DAC (227), PWM channels
(225) and 47 GPIO lines (228) With up to nine edge or level
sensitive external interrupt pins, make these microcontrol
lers particularly suitable for industrial control and hand-held
systems.
[0041] The integrated ARM microprocessor operates at 60
MHZ and, in one embodiment, supports the following fea
tures:
range of 1 MHZ to 30 MHZ.
PoWer saving modes include idle and PoWer
doWn.
[0053] Individual enable/ disable of peripheral functions
as Well as peripheral clock scaling doWn for additional
poWer optimiZation.
[0054] Processor Wake-up from PoWer-doWn mode via
external interrupt (224).
[0055] Single poWer supply chip With POR and BOD
circuits.
[0056]
CPU operating voltage range of 3.0 V to 36 V
(33 V:10%) With 5 V tolerant I/O pads.
[0057] The LPC 2132’s 64 KB of ?ash memory (223) may
be used for both code and data storage. Programming of the
?ash memory may be accomplished in several Ways. It may
be programmed in the system via the serial port (245). The
application program may also erase and/ or program the ?ash
While the application is running, alloWing ?exibility for data
storage ?eld ?rm grade upgrades, etc. While the on chip boot
loader is used, 64 KB ?ash memory is available for user
code. The LPC2132 ?ash memory provides a minimum of
100,000 erase/Write cycles and 20 years of data retention.
On-chip static RAM (213) may be used for code and/ or data
[0042] 16/32-bit ARM7TDM1-S microcontroller (232)
in a tiny LQFP64 package. 8/16/32 KB of on-chip static
bits Wide. General purpose parallel U0 is supported by
RAM (213) and 64/512 KB of on-chip Flash program
memory (223). A 128 bit Wide interface/accelerator
device pins that are connected to a speci?c peripheral
function are controlled by the GPIO registers. Pins may be
(211, 212, 222) enables high speed 60 MHZ operation.
dynamically con?gured as inputs or outputs. Separate reg
storage. The SRAM may be accessed as 8 bits, 16 bits or 32
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
isters allow setting or clearing any number of outputs
simultaneously. The value of the output register may be read
back, as Well as the current state of the port pins. The GPIO
lines have the folloWing features.
[0058]
Direction control of individual bits.
[0059]
Separate control of output set and clear.
[0060]
All I/O default to inputs after reset.
[0061]
The LPC 2132 memory maps shoWn in FIG. 3
incorporate several distinct regions. In addition, the CPU
interrupt vectors may be re-mapped to alloW them to reside
in either Flash memory (by default) or on-chip static RAM.
[0062] The vectored interrupt controller (VIC) accepts all
of the interrupt request inputs and categoriZes them as FIQ,
vectored IRQ, and non vectored IRQ as de?ned by pro
address and can operate as either a receiver only device or
a transmitter With the capability both to receive and send
information.
[0072] Transmitters and/or receivers can operate in either
master or slave mode, depending on Whether the chip has to
initiate a data transfer or is only addressed. I2C is a
multi-master bus that can be controlled by more than one bus
master connected to it.
[0073] I2C implemented in LPC2132 support bit rate up to
400 kbit/s (Fast I2C). The features of LPC2132 I2C bus is
listed beloW:
[0074]
Standard I2C compliant bus interface.
[0075]
Easy to con?gure as master, slave, or line-select
master or slave.
grammable setting. The programmable assignment scheme
[0076]
means that priorities of interrupts from the various periph
erals can be dynamically assigned and adjusted.
[0077] Bi-directional data transfer betWeen masters and
slaves.
[0063] Fast interrupt request (FIQ) has the highest priority.
If more than one request is assigned to FIQ, the VIC
combines the requests to produce the FIQ signal to the ARM
processor. The fastest possible FIQ latency is achieved When
only one request is classi?ed as FIQ, because then the FIQ
service routine can simply start dealing With that device. But
if more than one request is assigned to the FIQ class, the FIQ
services routine can read a Word from the VIC that identi?es
an FIQ source that is requesting an interrupt. Vectored IRAs
have middle priority. Sixteen of the interrupts can be
assigned to this category. Any of the interrupt requests can
be assigned to any of the 16 vectored IRQ slots, among
Which slot 0 has the highest priority and slot 15 has the
Programming clocks alloW versatile rate control.
[0078] Multi master bus (no center master)
[0079] Arbitration betWeen simultaneously transmitting
masters Without corruption of serial data on the bus.
[0080]
Serial clock synchronization alloWs devices With
different bit rates to communicate via one serial bus.
[0081]
Serial clock synchronization can be used as a
hand shack mechanism to suspend and resume serial
transfer.
[0082]
The I2C bus may be used for test diagnostics
purposes.
loWest. Non-vectored IRQ’s have the loWest priority.
[0083]
[0064] The VIC combines the requests from all the vec
tored and non-vectored IRAs to produce the IRQ signal to
the ARM processor. The IRQ service routine can start by
designed to be able to handle multiple masters and slaves
connected to a given bus. A single master and a single slave
communicate on the interface during a given data transfer.
During a data transfer, the master alWays sends a byte of data
to the slave, and the slave alWays sends a byte of data to the
master. The features of the SPI controller is listed beloW:
reading the register from the VIC and jumping there. If any
of the vectored IRAs are requested, the VIC provides the
address of the highest-priority requesting IRAs service rou
tine, otherWise it provides the address of a default routine
that is shared by all the non vectored IRAs. The default
routine can read another VIC register to see What IRAs are
The SPI (245) is a full duplex serial I/O interface,
[0084] Compliant With serial peripheral interface (SPI)
speci?cation.
[0085] Synchronous, serial, full duplex, communica
active.
[0065] The LPC 2132 contains tWo UARTs (246). One
UART provides a full modem control handshake interface,
the other provides only transmit and receive data lines. The
features of UART is listed beloW:
tion.
[0086]
[0087]
Combined SPI master and slave.
Maximum data bit rate of one eighth of the input
clock rate.
[0066]
16 byte, receive and transmit FIFO s.
[0067] Register locations conform to ‘550’ industry
standard.
[0068] Receiver, FIFO trigger points at 1, 4, 8, and 14
bytes.
[0088] The real time clock (RTC) (247) is designed to
provide a set of counters to measure time When normal or
ideal operating mode is selected. The RTC uses little poWer,
making it suitable for battery poWered systems Where the
CPU is not running continuously (idle mode). The features
of RTC are described beloW.
[0069]
Built in baud rate generator.
[0070]
Standard modem interface signals included on
UART 1.
[0071] I2C (244) is a bi-directional bus for inter IC control
using only tWo Wires, a serial clock line (SCL) and a serial
data line (SDA). Each device is recogniZed by a unique
[0089] Measures the passage of time to maintain a
calendar and clock.
[0090] Ultra loW poWer design to support battery poW
ered systems.
[0091] Provides seconds, minutes, hours, day, month,
year, day of Week, and the day of year.
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0092] Programmable reference clock divider allows
adjustment of the RTC to match various crystal fre
Will generate the keyboard interrupt. The key bounces are
taken care of by the softWare.
quencies.
[0093] The 8051 based Philips LPC89LPC931 controller
in FIG. 4 is suitable for keyboard interface. The
P89LPC930/931(404) is based on a high performance pro
cessor architecture that executes instructions in tWo to four
clocks, six times the rate of standard 80C51 devices. Many
system-level functions have been incorporated into the
P89LPC930/931 in order to reduce component count, board
space, and system cost. The P89LPC931 has the following
enhanced features:
[0108]
The QWERTY keyboard may have a Chinese char
acter entry feature and the softWare transfers the Chinese
corresponding ASCII codes to the main processor in Chinese
key entry mode.
[0109]
The folloWing tables describe interfaces among the
CPU (100), keyboard controller (404) and matrix (406):
Keyboard Controller to CPU Interface
[0094] A high performance ARM processor 80C51
CPU provides instruction cycle times of 111 ns to 222
ns for instructions except multiply and divide, When
executing at 18 MHZ. This is six times the performance
of the standard 80C51 running at the same clock
frequency. A loWer clock frequency for the same per
formance results in poWer savings and reduced EMI.
[0095] 2.4 V to 3.6 V VDD operating range. I/O pins are
5 V tolerant.
[0096]
Signal
LPC2132
P89LPC93
Remarks
Serial I2C Data
Serial I2C clock
SDA
SCL
SDA
SCL
I2C interface
I2C interface
[0110]
8 kB ?ash code memory With 1 kB sectors, and
Keyboard Controller to Matrix Interface
64-byte page siZe.
P89LPC93
[0097] Byte-erase alloWing code memory to be used for
data storage.
Signal
Name
key board
[0098] Flash program operation completes in 2 ms.
K131.0 Keybd input 1
P0.0
RET LINE 1
Signal
Remarks
Keybd Return
line 1
[0099] 256-byte RAM data memory.
KBI.1 Keybd input 2
P0.1
RET LINE 2
Keybd Return
line 2
[0100]
Real-time clock that can also be used as a system
[0101]
K13I.2 Keybd input 3
P0.2
RET LINE 3
Keybd Return
line 3
timer.
Enhanced UART With fractional baud rate gen
erator, break detect, framing error detection, automatic
address detection and versatile interrupt capabilities.
[0102] 400 kHZ byte-Wide 12C-bus communication
port.
K13I.3 Keybd input 4
P0.3
RET LINE 4
KBIA Keybd input 5
PO.4
RET LINE 5
line 4
Keybd Return
line 5
K13I.5 Keybd input 6
P0.5
RET LINE 6
K13I.6 Keybd input 7
P0.6
RET LINE 7
Keybd Return
line 6
Keybd Return
line 7
K13I.7 Keybd input 8
P0.7
RET LINE 8
K130.0 Keybd output 1
P2.0
SCAN LINE 1
[0103] Eight keypad interrupt inputs, plus tWo addi
tional external interrupt inputs.
Keybd Return
Keybd Return
line 8
Keybd Scan
line 1
K130.1 Keybd output 2
P2.1
SCAN LINE 2
Keybd Scan
[0105] On-chip poWer-on reset alloWs operation Without
K130.2 Keybd output 3
P2.2
SCAN LINE 3
Keybd Scan
external reset components. A reset counter and reset glitch
K130.3 Keybd output 4
P2.3
SCAN LINE 4
Keybd Scan
resets. A softWare reset function is also available.
KBOA Keybd output 5
P2.4
SCAN LINE 5
Keybd Scan
[0106] The keypad 8><13 matrix (406) is connected to the
GPIO lines of P89LPC931 micro controller (404). The
K130.5 Keybd output 6
P2.5
SCAN LINE 6
keypad has 8 return lines and 13 scan lines. The return lines
are connected to the keyboard port of the P89LPC931 micro
controller. The P89LPC931 is connected to the main pro
cessor LPC2132 through the 12C bus to minimiZe the
number of pins on the main processor.
K130.6 Keybd output 7
P2.6
SCAN LINE 7
K130.7 Keybd output 8
P2.7
SCAN LINE 8
[0104] Four interrupt priority levels.
suppression circuitry prevent spurious and incomplete
line 2
line 3
line 4
line 5
[0107] The custom softWare is loaded into the ?ash pro
gram memory of the P89LPC931 micro controller Which
scans the keypad and generates ASCII codes and commu
nicates to the main processor through the I2C bus. The
P89LPC931 micro controller is normally kept in poWer save
mode, and it Will aWaken in response to keyboard interrupts
after the key press. The keyboard port of P89LPC931 has a
change on status interrupt feature, and hence any key press
Keybd Scan
line 6
Keybd Scan
line 7
Keybd Scan
line 8
K1308 Keybd output 9
P1.0
SCAN LINE 9
Keybd Scan
line 9
K130.9 Keybd output 10 P1.1
SCAN LINE 10
Keybd Scan
line 10
K130.10 Keybd
output 11
K130.11 Keybd
output 12
K130.12 Keybd
output 13
P1.4
SCAN LINE 11
P1.6
SCAN LINE 12
P1.7
SCAN LINE 13
Keybd Scan
line 11
Keybd Scan
line 12
Keybd Scan
line 13
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0111] The LCD display (133) DD12803AAD, in one
Pad AES3400 utiliZes TruePrint Technology, alloWing the
embodiment, is a 128*32 dot matrix LCD module. The LCD
sensor to look past the easily obscured outer surface of the
Module can be easily accessed via parallel micro controller
GPIO interface. lts features include:
valley patterns of the ?ngerprint originate. Trueprint is
[0112] Trans?ective display mode and positive type,
B/W mode, FSTN LCD.
[0114] Parallel input data from micro controller.
[0115] 1/33 duty multiplexing ratio.
[0116] 1/16 bias.
[0117] 6 o’clock vieWing direction.
outline
35(W)*28.9(H)*1.75(D)
mm.
[0119] Resolution 128*32 dots.
[0120]
Active area 29.66(W)*8.45(W) mm.
[0121] Dots pitch 0.232(W)*0.265(H) mm.
[0122]
Dots siZe 0.202(W)*0.235(H) mm.
[0123] The lTT Industries, Cannon TBWB2A00 trackball
(123) is a miniature all directional scanning sWitch devel
oped for mobile, remote, PDA, notebook PC, and hand-held
device applications. It includes tWo perpendicular rollers
actuated by friction on the ball and tWo spring contacts
Which generate (by contact closing and opening) the elec
trical pulses and a light tactile e?fect (click) at each pulse. A
sWitch called “Select” is integrated in the trackball. Opti
mally, tWo LEDs can be included With the trackball and
driven according to the Wishes of the user. Several tactile
effects can be obtained according to the number of tooth
integrated in the gear axle; the standard resolution is 12
pulses per ball rotation. When the Trackball is activated, its
relative position changes are analyZed in tWo directions X
and Y. The tWo perpendicular rollers are actuated by friction
on the ball. During their revolution, the rollers activate tWo
spring contacts Which generate (by contact closing and
opening) the electrical pulses.
[0124]
AuthenTec’s unique patented imaging technology. During
imaging, a small near-?eld signal is generated betWeen the
IC and the ?nger’s living tissue layer. 16,384 individual
[0113] Graphic 128*32 dot-matrix display format.
[0118] Dimension
skin to the living layer beloW Where the unique ridge and
To track the ball movements, a simple electronic
elements in the sensor matrix form a planar antenna array
that receives this signal, creating a digital pattern that
accurately reproduces the ?ngerprint’s underlying structure.
A poWerful utility Within TruePrint is Dynamic Optimiza
tion. This tool analyZes each image, controlling up to 15
sensor parameters to optimiZe the ?ngerprint image, regard
less of unusual skin conditions or surface contamination.
The TruePrint high-quality ?ngerprint imaging technology
enables reliable authentication.
[0127] The ?ngerprint sensor is small, battery friendly and
Well-suited to Bluetooth communications. These sensors
automatically generate interrupts and reduce system over
head needed for ?nger detection.
[0128]
Features of the ?ngerprint component, in one
embodiment, include:
[0129] TruePrint technology for ability to acquire
(ATA)
[0130] Compact industry standard 100-Pin LQFP Pack
age
[0131] High de?nition 128x128 TruePrint technology
based pixel array
[0132] 500 pixels per inch (ppi)
[0133] Extended Range 2.7V to 3.6V single poWer
supply
[0134]
nous & asynchronous serial, & 8-bit parallel system
interfaces
[0136]
tied to the ground (or respectively to the poWer supply
potential). The change in state interrupts the main LPC2132
processor (100). The output pulse frequency is directly
KV)
horizontal displacements of the both perpendicular rollers in
logical levels of X-axis and Y-axis displacements: Some
pull-up resistors (or respectively pull doWn resistors) are tied
to the axis direction contacts While the common contact is
proportional to the moving speed and the direction. The
pulse frequency is processed by the main processor
LPC2132 and the corresponding PS2 data sent to the host
6 or 12 MHZ operation With crystal or supplied
clock input
[0137]
[0138]
[0139]
[0140]
[0141]
device tied to the direction contacts converts the vertical and
0° C. to +700 C. operating temperature range
[0135] Easy to integrate USB 2.0 full speed, synchro
USB selective suspend support
Ultra-hard surface coating
1 million rubs W/o degradation
Highly scratch resistant
IEC 61000-4-2 level 3 ESD capability (+/—8
[0142] Built-in loW poWer ?nger detection W/system
interrupt capability
system.
[0143] LoW poWer operation; <6 mW/imaging event.
[0125] Alternatively, the ITT Industries, Cannon Omni- or
[0144] The interface of these ?ngertip sensors is pin
selectable choices. The SPI interface ?nger chip sensor
Vari-Point joystick or the Omni- or Vari-Disk navigation
disk can be used instead of a trackball.
[0126] The AuthenTec EntrePad, AES3400, AuthenTec’s
3rd generation loW poWer, small form-factor ?ngerprint
identi?cation sensor IC (121). This product combines sili
con-based image capture With a proprietary sensor control
and matching algorithms to deliver ability-to-acquire (ATA)
?ngerprint images and authentication. AuthenTec’s Entre
is selected so that the ?nger tip sensor is connected to
the SP1 port (245) of the main processor.
[0145] The Zeevo ZV4301 in FIG. 5 used in one embodi
ment is a Bluetooth SOC adapted to provide a high band
Width CPU system to add Wireless connectivity to their
product. The ZV 4301 (502) incorporates the industry stan
dard 32 bit ARM7TDM1 CPU core With high bandWidth
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
processing capability suf?cient to support a wide range of
embedded applications. The ZV4301 operates from —25 C to
[0169] Integrated power ampli?er supports up to +4
85 C and comes in a lead free version. The ZV4301 is
implemented in a 0.18 micro meter CMOS process and
[0170] High sensitive design (-86 dBm typically).
includes the integration of all RF components and digital
circuitry. The only external components needed are an
antenna, crystal, reference resister, decoupling capacitors,
and ?ash memory. The ZV4301 is designed for low power
applications including sleep and deep sleep modes, and
operates from a single 3.3V supply. The ZV4301 is manu
factured in an 8.6><8.6><1.65 mm LTCC BGA package with
100 balls.
[0146] The ZV4301 is supplied with a link library for a
complete lower layer protocol stack and source code to the
blueOS operating system, target manager and link manager
API. Upper layers are supported through the Zeevo partner
program with ?rmware, Bluetooth protocol stack software
and Bluetooth pro?les available from Zeevo’s extensive
partner list.
[0147] The Zeevo4301 typical application supports AV
equipment, smart phones, personal digital assistants, print
ers, cellular peripherals, access points and industry controls.
Features include:
[0148] Bluetooth 1.2 compliant.
[0149] High bandwidth ARM7TDM1 processor sub
system.
[0150]
12, 24 and 48 MHZ CPU clocksiselectable on
chip PLL from single 12 MHZ input.
[0151] Highly integrated low cost solution: Radio, link
control and CPU are integrated.
[0152] High throughput.
dBm output power for class 2 & 3 operation.
0171
Class 1 o P eration is suPP orted with an external
power ampli?er/LNA interface.
[0172]
IF-enhanced direct conversion receiver architec
ture.
[0173] Integrated TX/Rx switch, balun, and matching
network in an LTCC package.
[0174] Low power consumption receiver design.
[0175] Multiplexed RX/TX antenna interface.
[0176] Fully integrated PLL synthesiZer and loop ?l
terirequires external 12 MHZ crystal.
[0177]
The baseband and software features include:
[0178] Required and optional Bluetooth 1.2 features
faster connection, extended SCO link, adaptive fre
quency hopping (AFH), QOS, ?ow control.
[0179]
Direct memory access (DMA) for low overhead
UART control.
[0180] Standard Bluetooth HCI interface over UART
and USB.
[0181]
Support for a range of Bluetooth data rates
(57.6-723 Kb/sec)
[0182] Support for multiple ACL and HC-SCO packet
types.
[0183] Park, sniff, and hold modes.
[0184] Point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, and scatter
net.
[0153] Tested quali?ed software stack available.
[0154] Support for very low power modesisleep and
deep sleep.
[0155]
Audio capability on an SCO channel.
[0156] On chip crystal tuning and power calibration.
[0157] Complete co-location and co-existence solutions
with 802.11 supported through AWMA, AFH and SFH.
[0158]
The CPU and memory support include:
[0159]
ARM7TDMI processor core.
[0160]
12 24 and 48 MHZ operation.
[0161] 32/ 16 bit RISC architecture, 32 bit ARM instruc
tion.
[0185]
[0186] u-Law, A-Law and CVSD transcoders on SCO
channel
[0187]
[0188]
Full 8- to 128 bit encryption.
The baseband modem includes:
[0189] Demodulator, modulator, RX/TX self calibra
tion, burst timing control and transmitter burst spectral
shaping.
[0190] FEC encoder/decoder, data whitening, encryp
tion-decryption, and cyclic redundancy check.
[0191] Link controller for synchroniZation, frequency
hope control, and receiver/transmitter slot timing.
[0192]
[0162]
Up to 7 slaves and up to 4 Pico nets supported.
The external bus interface includes:
16 bit Thumb instruction set for increased code
density.
[0163] 32 bit ALU and high performance multiplier.
[0164] Extensive debug facilitiesiJTAG.
[0193] 8, 16-bit data bus.
[0194] 23-bit address bus.
[0165]
8 K bytes of boot ROM.
[0195] Support for 2 memory banks. Each bank sup
ports up to 16 Mbytes ?ash and SRAM, with indepen
dent timing control for each bank.
[0166]
64 K bytes of SRAM.
[0196]
[0167]
The radio features include:
[0168] Integrated RF interface connects directly to
antenna.
GPIO can function as additional interrupts.
[0197] 3 dedicated chip selects, each with independent
timing control.
[0198] 3 indicated interrupt lines.
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0199]
The UART includes:
voltages are derived on the CPU card: Processor core
16450 register set compatible UART.
voltage: The core supply for the processor is generated
through a loW dropout regulator that can support current up
[0201] 9600, 19.2K, 38.4K, 57.61K, 1152K, 2304K,
to 15A operating from a 5V-input. The output 1.8V is fed to
the core of the processor. PLL voltage: The core voltage is
[0200]
460.8K, and 921.6 Kbs UART baud rates.
[0202]
RTS and CTS ?oW control signals for UART.
[0203] Direct Memory Access (DMA) for loW overhead
UART control.
[0204] The USB support includes:
[0205] USB version 2.0 compliant interface.
0206
USB Wakeup and detach si'deb and s1gna
'
l s sup
ported.
[0207] Direct Memory Access (DMA) for loW overhead
USB control.
the input to the PLL through a ferrite bead, Which supplies
poWer to clock generation and PLL circuits of the processor.
[0225] Data sheets publicly available for the major IC
components include:
[0226]
1. LPC213x Philips User manual Nov. 22, 2004.
[0227]
2. Zeevo ZV4301 Datasheet Jan. 24, 2005.
[0228]
3. P89LPC930/931 Data Sheet, Rev. 05i15
Dec. 2004.
[0229] 4. DDG128032AAD Data sheet, Rev1.0, Issue
date: 2004 Oct. 6
[0208] The general purpose I/O features:
[0209] Sixteen individually programmable general pur
[0230]
5. ITT Cannon, Miniature all direction scanning
sWitch Data sheet.
pose I/O.
[0210] Con?gurable for UART Wake up hand shaking.
[0231] 6. Authentec Fingerprint sensor AES 3400 Data
sheet.
[0211] Base band and CPU activity indication.
[0232]
[0212] USB/UART mode select.
[0213]
Each GPIO can be used as interrupt.
[0214] The pulse code modulator support includes:
[0215] PCM interface for audio applications: PCM
OUT, PCM_IN, PCM_CLK, and
[0216] PCM SYNC.
[0217] Linear u-LaW and A-LaW codes supported.
[0218] Interface to OKI MSM 7732-01 and OKI 7716
codec.
[0219] Direct Memory Access (DMA) for loW overhead
PCM control
[0220]
A 12 MHZ crystal serves as the primary clock
crystal.
7. MSM7716 OKI Datasheet Version August
1998.
[0233]
8.
AT49BV802A
Datasheet,
Document
3405DiFlash-March/2005.
[0234]
In addition, a camera can be incorporated into the
remote, thereby enabling video conferencing and other
visual features. The camera is complemented by a glue logic
application supplied for or native to a communications
and/or multi-media console, such as one running under
WindoWs, OS X or Linux. A CMOS camera commercially
available for incorporation in camera phones may be suit
able for this application. This is illustrated in FIG. 7.
[0235] FIG. 7 depicts building the digital butler remote
board as an XScale processor based solution With a camera
module and/or memory card reader. This remote is built
around the Intel XScale micro controller or a digital signal
processor (DSP). The main processor provides interfaces for
[0221] FIG. 5 shoWs the ZV4301 to other CPU and
peripheral interfaces. The ZV4301 is interfaced With the
the Keypad, Joystick, 320*240 graphics LCD module, ?n
gerprint sensor, Bluetooth SOC, WiFi 802.11b/g module,
main processor LPC2132 (100) through the UART port. The
8 Mb Flash memory AT49BV802A (501) is interfaced With
ZV4301 through the external bus interface. The single rail
linear codec (141) is interfaced With the ZV4301 through the
audio codec, camera module and memory card reader. The
audio codec interfaces With a microphone, speaker and
headphone for voice utilities. Alternatively, the microphone,
speaker and headphone could interface through the Blue
PCM interface.
tooth module, as described in the context of FIG. 1. A
[0222] Debugging of the remote is supported by JTAG
header and BDM header is used in the board for the
debugging purposes. This section gives the details of the
J TAG header and BDM header.
[0223] The processor complies With the IEEE 1149.1 A
JTAG testing standard. The JTAG test pins are multiplexed
general USB dongle interface (not shoWn) could be provided
to alloW the user to use the USB port as if it resided on the
host device. The USB port of the remote Would function as
a remote USB connection for the host.
[0236] From FIG. 7, the components include the main
processor 700, Which couples to the Bluetooth module 732,
With background debug pins.
WiFi module 751 and audio codec 741. The audio codec
[0224] The system is fed With 5 volts input poWer. The
input poWer is passed through a diode to provide the
protection against reverse polarity. The poWer to the digital
The main processor also may couple to a ?ngerprint sensor
couples to speaker 752, microphone 751, audio jack 753.
721 and a battery pack 712. A battery charger and poWer
management component 724, such as a cradle, couples to a
butler remote comes from an external poWer supply module.
DC poWer input 713 and charges the battery 712. The main
The external poWer supply module Will provide poWer to the
remote and for charging the battery. The input poWer is fed
through a connector. From the 5 volts input, the folloWing
processor also may couple to a camera module 750, a
display 733, a keypad 711 and joy stick 723. The camera
module may, for instance, be a 3 mega pixel CMOS com
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
ponent. The memory card reader 760 can support one or
device, using a display on the remote. The on-screen display
more memory card formats. Currently used memory card
formats, as of submission of this disclosure, include PC
interface is designed to provide easy, smooth, seamless
Memory Stick Duo and Micro M2, Multimedia regular,
reduced siZe and micro, Secure digital regular, mini and
operation of the device. HoWever, most remotes provide an
array of buttons and much different interface than the
on-screen display. Sometimes, the array of buttons antici
pates that no screen Will be available for display. Other
micro, xD-Picture card and g card. The main processor 700
provides an array of ports for interfacing With these various
components. While currently available components are gen
erally identi?ed, such as by resolution or Wireless standard,
one of skill in the art Will recogniZe that these components
times, the manufacturer overbuilds the remote control. They
attempt to expose all of the functionality of the host device
through individual keys on the remote. The sheer number of
keys sometimes pushes controlled devices into states of
operation that are surprising, confusing and dif?cult to undo.
Will evolve over the 20 year life of a patent.
A high resolution display on the remote control can enhance
the user interface. For devices that accept keyboard or
joystick/mouse responses to an on-screen display, the
remote can substantially duplicate the look and feel of the
on-screen display. In this instance, substantially means to the
Card, CompactFlash I and II, SmartMedia, Memory Stick,
Remote SoftWare
[0237]
SoftWare components of the palm-held remote
include an LCD interface module, a keyboard interface
module, a ?ngerprint sensor module, trackball or other
directional device interface module and a Bluetooth module.
Other Wireless protocols such as IEEE 802.1/x protocols can
be substituted for Bluetooth. Wireless protocols developed
for cordless telephones also might be used. Data is trans
mitted and received over Bluetooth or another Wireless
connection betWeen the console and the palm-held remote in
a custom data format. In this format, a record may have
?elds including start of packet, packet type, links, data and
checksum. Different packet types are assigned to keyboard,
trackball, ?ngerprint and LCD packets. The start of packet
?eld indicates that the packet starts here. For instance, 0x7C
can be used as a start of packet ?ag. A data ?eld of just tWo
bytes may be suf?cient. When the checksum contains an
XOR of all the data, link and packet type ?elds, the
checksum ?eld can be used to discard corrupted data pack
ets.
extent alloWed by the form factor of the remote display. For
instance, the same HTML code may be differently rendered
to the on-screen display and the remote display, given the
different dimensions of the displays.
[0241] An on-screen menu and controls module can render
a control interface, translating a device menu and controls
display that Would normally appear on a TV or monitor for
reproduction on a display that is part of the remote. To
implement this capability, a menu-generating device can
assemble on-screen menus and controls as a separate data
stream, apart from any video image that the menus and
controls overlay. The data stream can be supplied both to the
device’s oWn on-screen overlay generator and to a commu
nications module coupled to the remote. The remote uses the
data stream to render the on-screen display in a legible
format, adapted to the reduced siZe of a screen on the
remote. Preferably, the menu and control organization for
Audio support enables the remote to act as a remote
mat on the remote mimics What the vieWer can see on the
speaker and/or microphone system for the host system.
screen, to minimize confusion. Technologies such as a
Audio support can be for mono, stereo or other advanced
sound reproduction modes. The audio can function in an
subset of HTML and JavaScript alloW a designer to specify
a menu and control layout in terms that permit rendering to
a variety of display siZes. Remote display of the on-screen
menu and control data stream may preempt a video image
display or may be overlaid on top of the video image.
[0238]
on-the-ear mode (e.g., like a telephone headset), With a
headset or as a speaker phone. These audio features can
enable telephonic capabilities for voice, place-shifting audio
from the host location to another room or ?oor in a home,
private listening via a Wired or Wireless headset and multiple
stream playback, so that the audio reproduced at the remote
is different from the audio reproduced on speakers Wired to
the host.
[0239]
The LCD connected to the main controller uses the
GPIO interface, including data and control lines. The LCD
can be used to display data received over the Wireless link.
The data could be received in an HTML or HTML subset
format and rendered by a compact broWser module. Or, a
Optionally, the device’s on-screen menu and controls can be
supplied to the remote exclusively as a data stream and not
as part of a rendered video stream, to avoid confusing menus
of different siZes. Alternatively, the on-screen menus and
controls may just appear on the remote’s display as a
consequence of being rendered to a TV or monitor that is
reproduced on the remote’s display.
[0242] One of skill in the art Will recogniZe that a display
in the palm of the hand Will be useful to many people,
because it reduces demands for eye-hand coordination and
short-term memory. The form factor is convenient. A single
custom-designed packet format could be used for LCD data.
This format includes eight ?elds: start of packet, packet
remote can control for many devices. Depending on the
type, link, mode, x-position, y-position, data and checksum.
features combined into the remote, varying complexity can
be delivered at varying prices.
The mode ?eld indicates the mode in Which the data is to be
displayed. This module operates in tWo modes, a so-called
font mode and a byte mode. In a phone mode, the given
string is displayed on the LCD display in the prede?ned font
shape and siZe. In the byte mode, the given date is displayed
[0243]
The on-screen display module can be more or less
stateful. JavaScript, for instance, can be used to keep track
as raW data, Which alloWs the user to design their oWn
of the user’s intermediate selections until they are sent to the
host. Or, a Java or similar application could replicate the
states of the host. More simply, the display could be essen
shapes. X- and Y-position coordinates indicate the roW and
column position on the LCD.
transfer from the remote to the host.
[0240] The remote control can duplicate the visual opera
tion of an on-screen display generated by a controlled
natively be a full display With touch sensitive areas and
tially stateless and rerendered by the host after each data
[0244]
The form factor of the remote display could alter
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
rendered buttons that provide visual and/or audio feedback
interface. The Wireless remote communicates over Blue
(as opposed to the tactile feedback of pressed buttons.)
tooth With the USB Bluetooth module.
[0245] The keyboard module of the remote is imple
Features
mented using an 8051. The key press data is sent to the main
microcontroller through an I2C interface for further process
ing. The keyboard is a matrix keyboard including 13 scan
lines and eight return lines. A key press causes the 8051 to
generate make and break codes along With key press values.
This data is given to the main micro controller, Which
operates in an interrupt mode. Here, the 8051 acts as a
master and the LPC2132 acts as a slave.
[0246] Fingerprint sensor software uses SPI code on the
main controller. The ?ngerprint data Will be sent in a
particular packet format over the Wireless link to be pro
cessed on the host side. Authentec provides a useable
appropriate library of routines for ?ngerprint authentication.
[0247] Coupled to the ?ngerprint sensor softWare is a
personaliZation module. If a user does not identify himself
by sWiping the ?ngerprint sensor, then a generic pro?le is
applied to personaliZation of music, movies, photos, videos,
?les and telephone access. If the user sWipes the ?ngerprint
sensor, then personaliZation can be applied, analogous to
sWitching users in current WindoWs XP implementations.
This degree of context shifting based on a single action at a
remote control is neW in this disclosure. The personaliZation
may include: favorite channels/movies/shoWs in a streaming
video environment; favorite music, photos or video in an on
demand environment; approved access to DRM-controlled
content using one or more keys linked to the ?ngerprint;
history of searches, recent topics, personal interest (a la
Google Sidebar or Claria PersonalWeb), recently accessed
?les; automatic authenticated access to communication
channels linked to the ?ngerprint, such as voice over IP,
[0252]
FIG. 6 is a block diagram ofthe console (606). The
host console of the system may be built on a standard
Mini-ITX motherboard and an additional add-on board to
support the features like WAP, Bluetooth, and a MODEM for
PSTN and a PCI-VGA Card. A standard Mini ITX is
available in a 17 cm><17 cm form factor. The motherboard
and/or add-on board may include tWo VGA connectors; for
example, a VGA connector from motherboard (613) and a
second VGA connector using a PCI add-on card (614). The
design also may include a serial port for external interface
(611A) and another serial port for a modem (611B), tWo
USB ports (612B), support for a USB-hub, an 802.11g
WLAN module (632), preferably interoperable With
802.11b, With a separately connected antenna. Other console
components may include a USB to Bluetooth module (632)
With chip antenna, a standard PC hard disk drive (623) and
DVD drive (624) and an ATX poWer supply or Mini-ITX
poWer module.
[0253]
Motherboard support may include a VIA Eden/C3
processor at operating at 1.0-1.5 GHZ or another rate,
integrated Castle Rock graphics With MPEG-2 decoder
(optionally an MPEG-4 decoder for video), a memory
socket, such as al DDR266 SODIMM socket, a PCI slot, tWo
UltraDMA 66/ 100/133 connectors (SATA connectors can be
used), a 10/ 100 Base-T Ethernet physical connection, PS2
mouse and keyboard ports; a parallel port, an RJ-45 LAN
port, a serial port, tWo USB 2.0 ports and a VGA port.
[0254]
A socket modem module (634) is one component
instant messaging, Web conferencing and e-mail; electronic
used to connect the motherboard to a POTS telephone
Wallet access, automatically looking up credit card informa
tion and other account authorization information; and shar
board to a cellular or similar telephone system or to a voice
ing of information by person logged in.
[0248] The trackball or other pointing device interface
module uses sampling techniques to read the ball movement
and click button states. The outputs of the trackball are
connected to general-purpose I/O channels. The modules
system. Alternatively, modules can interface the mother
over IP (VoIP) system. One suitable module is a WMV34
0-TSM-100 from Analog Devices. This serial socket modem
provides complete WorldWide support. An Analog Devices
serial socket modem features a solid state DAA that supports
international operation With compliance to international
A Bluetooth Wireless interface module may be
telephone standards. The modem module can be plugged on
the carrier board by means of board to board connectors and
Will be interfaced to the additional serial port available on
the motherboard header. The socket modem module is
based on Zeevo ZV4301 Bluetooth SOC or a Broadcom or
poWered by 3.3V DC supply and the interfacing signals are
RFMD design With headset and serial port pro?le (SPP)
sense the state of the general-purpose I/O’s at a predeter
mined frequency, such as 1 kHZ.
[0249]
sensor data for authentication and data to be displayed on the
in the 3 .3V LVTTL level. The socket modem module has the
connections for a telephone line. This connection Will be
terminated to a R111 jack (635) on the carrier board for this
purpose. The serial port signals in the motherboard are
terminated to header COM2 Which is in RS232 level. A
remote module’s display.
RS232 transceiver interfaces (631) to the modem (634).
Console HardWare
[0255] A standard, olf-the-shelf 802.11 g WLAN module
(632) is available module With USB interface. The module
?rmware. This module is coupled to the main controller
through a UART. The module is adapted to convey Wire
lessly a mix of keyboard data, trackball data, ?ngerprint
[0250] Introduction
can be connected to the USB port available on the mother
[0251] The core component of the console or host system
may be a standard mini ITX mother board With ports to add
peripherals. A USB Bluetooth module and USB WLAN
module may be connected to the motherboard through USB
board header. An external antenna may be positioned at the
rear panel of the host system for maximum sensitivity. Some
suitable modules include the Linksys-WUSB54GP and Net
Gear-WG111. These modules are interoperable With
ports. A display is connected through VGA connector and
the socket modern with R111 connector is connected through
serial port 2. The remaining ports can be used for external
Bluetooth module for communications With the remote, or
can provide a netWork interface for the console.
802.11b. A WLAN module may be an alternative to a
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
[0256] A standard, olf-the-shelf Bluetooth module (633) is
[0268] The folloWing combinations of hardWare and soft
available module With USB interface. The module may be
connected to the USB port available on the motherboard
header. The module Will be connected to the host system by
the USB port available on the motherboard header. The
modules built around CSR chipset may be suitable.
Ware features are Within the scope of this disclosure for
[0257] The poWer supply used may be a standard mini
ITX poWer supply. A standard 12 volts DC poWer module
also can be used for this purpose. The poWer supply board
includes DC-DC converters to provide output voltages of
+l2V, —l2V, +3.3V, and +5V DC, similar to an ATX poWer
supply. These poWer supply tapping is used in the carrier
providing services described. Supported by the console, one
or any combination of the folloWing:
General Purpose Computer
TV Set Top Box W/optional personal video recorder (PVR)
Terrestrial, Cable, Satellite, lP
Messaging console (one or any combo)
Text (SMS/Webpages)
Voice (Landline/cell/IP)
board to supply poWer to the add on modules such as socket
Video
modem, WLAN, and Bluetooth modules.
NetWork Port
Console softWare
TV and/or Monitor Out
[0258] Introduction
Optionally
Hard Drive
[0259] A Linux core runs on the VIA Eden processor. The
module drivers loaded on the OS core takes control the
peripheral devices. A dedicated softWare application running
parses data received Wirelessly, such as over Bluetooth. It
Media Card Reader (non-volatile memory)
CD/DVD (Writable versions possible)
also redirects the data to corresponding modules.
Wireless netWork router
[0260] Modules
[0269] Supported by the hand-held remote, one or any
combination of the folloWing:
[0261] The modem connected With the host system moth
erboard is used to make the dial-up connections. This makes
the socket modem module as a portable one.
FingerprintiOptional
Speaker/Mic/Vol control
Display
[0262] On the console or host system processor side, the
serial driver initialiZes and con?gures the serial port baud
rate equal to the modem baud rate. An appropriate modem
driver is loaded to manipulate the connected socket modem.
A WLAN module is a port of the Linux-WLAN driver,
adapted to the host board. The USB WLAN modules iden
Cursor Control
Thumb-board (Alphanumeric)
Video Camera
Media Reader
ti?ed from Linksys and NetGear use the same driver. Once
the WLAN hardWare is connected to the USB port, it is
USB port
logically connected to the access point using the WLAN
[0270] Applied to the folloWing services:
control utility.
Communication, including Phone (LL/Cell/IP), lntemet,
[0263] A suitable Linux Bluetooth softWare stack is
BlueZ. Processing data from the stack involves developing
parsing the data received from the remote. The communi
cation With the remote is established using the BlueZ utilities
from the host for remote headset and serial port function
alities. Once the application knoWs the source of the data
packet, it redirects the data to the appropriate module for the
email, and text/voice/video messenger
Entertainment, including Multimedia apps, including TV,
PVR, DVD, Video, Photo, Music, Radio, and Games.
Productivity apps, such as a personal information manager
(PIM), contacts, calendar, editor.
Some Particular Embodiments
required functionality. The software also provides a facility
to send the data to the LCD available on the remote side. The
application developer can use the ?ngerprint raW data
received from the Bluetooth remote and the authentication
code libraries provided by the vendor to achieve the match
[0271] The present invention may be practiced as a
method or device adapted to practice the method. The same
method can be vieWed from the perspective of a console
adapted for use With a remote, a remote adapted to control
ing operation.
a console or a combination of console and remote.
[0264] The console may support the folloWing functions:
ence to the preferred embodiments and examples detailed
above, it is understood that these examples are intended in
[0265]
Bluetooth remote access.
[0266]
WLAN enabled for netWork communication.
[0272] While the present invention is disclosed by refer
an illustrative rather than in a limiting sense. It is contem
plated that modi?cations and combinations Will readily
occur to those skilled in the art, Which modi?cations and
[0267] Socket modem module for dial-up netWork con
nection.
combinations Will be Within the spirit of the invention and
the scope of the folloWing claims.
Feb. 22, 2007
US 2007/0042767 A1
13
We claim as follows:
1. A multi-media and communications system, including:
a palm-held remote; and
a bread-box or smaller siZed console in Wireless commu
nication With the remote;
Wherein the palm-held remote integrates at least
a ?ngerprint reader,
a speaker, microphone and volume control adapted for
use as a telephone,
a display at least capable of shoWing a telephone
number,
a cursor control and trigger adapted to select and
control resources of the console,
a compact keypad including numeric keys usable for
telephone dialing,
the compact keypad further including alphabetic keys
usable for Web broWsing,
Wherein the bread-box or smaller siZed console integrates
at least a DVD/ CD player, a netWork port and logic and
resources adapted to
authenticate users of the palm-held remote and person
aliZe their telephone netWork connection and their
lntemet broWsing based on ?ngerprints received
from the palm-held remote,
6. A remote control for a media center, the media center
including logic and resources to process Wireless input, the
remote control including:
a palm-held remote adapted to invoke glue logic running
on the media center by Wirelessly directing input to the
media center;
Wherein the palm-held remote integrates at least
a speaker, microphone and volume control adapted for
use as a telephone,
a display at least capable of shoWing a telephone
number,
a cursor control and trigger adapted to select and
control resources of the console,
a compact keypad including numeric keys usable for
telephone dialing,
the compact keypad further including alphabetic keys
usable for Web broWsing,
Wherein the glue logic invoked Wirelessly by the remote
control is adapted to
connect the speaker and microphone to a telecom
module and
connect the keyboard, cursor control and trigger to
an Internet broWsing module and
one or more media center controls of media selec
tion, playback and volume control.
connect the palm-held remote to the telephone netWork,
connect the palm-held remote to the lntemet and dis
play Web pages on a monitor or television,
7. The remote control of claim 6, Wherein:
the palm-held remote further invokes glue logic running
on the media center that is adapted, upon successful
control channels accessed by a video receiver,
authentication of the ?ngerprint reader data by the
drive speakers and provide volume control,
provide playback control for the DVD/CD player, and
authentication module to personaliZe an authenticated
access and playback digitally stored music;
user’s experience With lists of the user’s favorites and
history the user’s recent activity at the media center.
8. The remote control of claim 6, Wherein:
Whereby the palm-held remote alloWs a user of to select
the palm-held remote further integrates a camera,
among and use the bread-box or smaller siZed con
the display is at least capable of shoWing a caller at on a
sole’s user authentication and personaliZation, tele
video conference, and
the palm-held remote invokes glue logic running on the
phone netWork connection, Internet broWsing, chan
nel control, volume control, DVD/CD playback
control, and digitally stored music access and play
back.
2. The system of claim 1, Wherein the palm-held remote
further integrates a media card reader and the logic and
resources of the console are further adapted to treat the
media card reader as local to the console.
3. The system of claim 1, Wherein the palm-held remote
further integrates a media card reader and the logic and
resources of the palm-held remote are further adapted to
broWse media inserted into the media card reader and
previeW the contents of ?les on the inserted media.
4. The system of claim 1, Wherein the logic and resources
of the console to authenticate users based on ?ngerprints is
further adapted to personaliZe the users’ lists of favorite
channels, Web broWsing and digitally stored music.
5. The system of claim 1, Wherein the palm-held remote
further integrates a USB connector and port and the logic
and resources of the console are further adapted to treat the
USB connector and port as local to the console.
media center that is adapted to connect camera data to
a video conferencing module.
9. The remote control of claim 6, Wherein:
the palm-held remote further integrates a camera,
the display is at least capable of shoWing a photograph,
and
the palm-held remote invokes glue logic running on the
media center that is adapted to connect camera data to
a photographic capture module.
10. The remote control of claim 6, Wherein the palm-held
remote further integrates a media card reader and the logic
and resources of the media center are further adapted to treat
the media card reader as local to the media center.
11. The remote control of claim 6, Wherein the palm-held
remote further integrates a media card reader and the logic
and resources of the palm-held remote are further adapted to
broWse media inserted into the media card reader and
previeW the contents of ?les on the inserted media.
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