05 AI - Davenport

05 AI - Davenport
MEMORANDUM
To:
R. David Laurrell, County Administrator R. David Laurrell 8/5 BOS
From:
Shameka W. Davenport, Deputy Director, HR
Subj.
AGENDA ITEM – Safety Manual (5 minutes)
Date:
July 17, 2014
________________________________________________________________________
BACKGROUND:
In an effort to bring more focus on safety as well as ensure we maintain a safe environment for
employees, and meet state, federal and insurance requirements we have developed a safety
manual. The incorporation of this manual will also help to raise awareness of certain types of
preventable accidents and offer ways to avoid them.
DISCUSSION:
Attached is the proposed Safety Manual that will offer guidance for employees on safety related
items. As a result of safety awareness, our claims experience should decrease which will
ultimately decrease our Workers’ Comp experience modifier.
RECOMMENDATION:
Staff recommends approval of the Safety Manual.
SAFETY MANUAL
FOR THE
COUNTY OF CAMPBELL
Page 2 of 55
Table of Contents
POLICY STATEMENT .............................................................................................................................5
LOSS PREVENTION OBJECTIVES ......................................................................................................6
INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................................................7
PURPOSE .........................................................................................................................................7
CONCEPT OF THE SAFETY PROGRAM ....................................................................................7
BACKGROUND ..............................................................................................................................7
ELEMENTS OF OUR SAFETY PROGRAM .................................................................................7
APPLICATION AND RESPONSIBILITY ......................................................................................8
RESPONSIBILITIES .................................................................................................................................8
SAFETY MANAGEMENT..............................................................................................................8
DEPARTMENT HEADS .................................................................................................................9
SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL .....................................................................................................10
EMPLOYEES .................................................................................................................................11
SAFETY AND LOSS PREVENTION ....................................................................................................12
Purpose................................................................................................................................12
Purchasing Procedures ........................................................................................................12
Reporting Unsafe Conditions ..............................................................................................12
Safety Training....................................................................................................................12
UNIFORM SAFETY PROCEDURES ...........................................................................................13
Required Inspections ...........................................................................................................14
Standards Compliance ........................................................................................................14
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCIDENT PREVENTION ..........................................................................14
ACCIDENTS ARE PREVENTABLE............................................................................................14
CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS............................................................................................................14
UNSAFE ACTS ..............................................................................................................................15
UNSAFE CONDITIONS ...............................................................................................................15
CONTROL OF ACCIDENT CAUSES ..........................................................................................15
Engineering .........................................................................................................................16
Education and Training .......................................................................................................16
Enforcement ........................................................................................................................16
ELIMINATION OF UNSAFE CONDITIONS ..............................................................................16
REPORTING UNSAFE CONDITIONS ........................................................................................17
CORRECTING UNSAFE ACTIONS ............................................................................................17
JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS.............................................................................................................18
SAFETY TRAINING GUIDELINES ............................................................................................18
JOB SAFETY TRAINING .............................................................................................................18
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SAFETY INSPECTIONS ...............................................................................................................19
MEDICAL PROGRAM ...........................................................................................................................19
MEDICAL TESTING PROGRAM ................................................................................................20
EMPLOYEE INJURY PROCEDURES .................................................................................................20
EMPLOYEE INJURY PROCEDURES .........................................................................................20
REPORTING WORK RELATED INJURIES BY EMPLOYEES ................................................20
RETURN TO WORK FROM INJURY OR ILLNESS ..................................................................20
ALTERNATE DUTY/RETURN TO WORK POLICY .................................................................21
COMMITTEES.........................................................................................................................................21
SAFETY & WORKERS' COMP REVIEW TEAM .......................................................................21
Purpose................................................................................................................................21
Authority .............................................................................................................................21
Functions .............................................................................................................................21
Meetings ..............................................................................................................................22
VEHICLE ACCIDENT REVIEW TEAM .....................................................................................22
Authorization ......................................................................................................................22
Function ..............................................................................................................................22
Meetings ..............................................................................................................................22
Employee Appeal ................................................................................................................22
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFE PRACTICES ..............................................................................................22
INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................................................................22
DEFENSIVE DRIVER TRAINING...............................................................................................23
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ........................................................................................................23
General Safe Practices ........................................................................................................23
MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS.................................................................................................25
Vehicle Accident Reporting Procedures and Guidelines ....................................................25
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ..........................................................................................25
EYE SAFETY .................................................................................................................................25
HEAD PROTECTION....................................................................................................................26
HAND SAFETY .............................................................................................................................27
FOOT PROTECTION ....................................................................................................................28
CLOTHING ....................................................................................................................................28
RESPIRATORS ..............................................................................................................................28
HEARING PROTECTION.............................................................................................................31
VESTS, LIFELINES AND SAFETY NETS ..................................................................................31
GENERAL SAFETY RULES..................................................................................................................32
GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING ......................................................................................................32
OFFICE SAFETY ...........................................................................................................................33
VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINALS (VDT) WORKSTATION LAYOUT .......................................34
CHEMICALS SAFETY/HANDLING CHEMICALS ...................................................................35
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HAZARD COMMUNICATIONS ..................................................................................................36
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS STANDARD..............................................................................37
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY.........................................................................................................38
LOCK-OUT/TAG-OUT .................................................................................................................38
MATERIALS HANDLING............................................................................................................40
WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING ......................................................................................40
HANDLING OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS..................................................................41
OVERHEAD CRANES ..................................................................................................................41
FORKLIFTS ...................................................................................................................................42
BATTERY CHARGING AND STORAGE BATTERIES ............................................................43
MACHINERY ................................................................................................................................43
POWER TOOLS .............................................................................................................................44
POWDER ACTUATED TOOLS ...................................................................................................44
JACKS ............................................................................................................................................45
COMPRESSORS, COMPRESSED AIR & PNEUMATIC TOOLS .............................................45
HAND TOOLS ...............................................................................................................................45
ELECTRICAL SAFETY ................................................................................................................46
LADDER SAFETY ........................................................................................................................46
STAIRS ...........................................................................................................................................47
SCAFFOLDING .............................................................................................................................47
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT .............................................................................................................48
FIRE PREVENTION ...............................................................................................................................51
REPORTING FIRES ......................................................................................................................51
PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS ..........................................................................................51
FIXED FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT ................................................................................52
HALON...........................................................................................................................................52
FIRE/SMOKE ALARMS SYSTEMS ............................................................................................52
FIRE DOORS .................................................................................................................................52
GENERAL FIRE SAFETY PRACTICES......................................................................................53
PROTECTING THE PUBLIC ................................................................................................................53
CERTIFICATE OF ACKNOWLEDGMENT .......................................................................................54
Page 5 of 55
CAMPBELL COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS
POLICY STATEMENT
It is the policy of Campbell County government that no function is as critical as to require a
compromise of safety. Accidents and injuries can take a heavy toll on the available resources
within Campbell County, not only monetarily, but also in the human sufferings of employees,
their co-workers, their families and loved ones. Therefore, the safety and health of each
employee is of the utmost concern.
It is our desire not only to provide a safe work environment and comply with all federal, state
and local safety regulations, but also to create an atmosphere that promotes safety. I want each
employee to know that every reasonable step is being taken by management to reduce the
potential for an accident. We will strive to provide a place of employment free from recognized
hazards and with the safest possible working practices. Our safety program has the full support
of the Campbell County Board of Supervisors.
As employees, each of us must pursue the highest standards in our assigned job activities and
responsibilities. The wellbeing of persons involved and the protection of our physical resources
are as important as the activity or work being performed. No assignment is so critical that time
cannot be taken to do it safely.
I encourage every employee to support and participate in this program. Please join your fellow
employees in achieving our ultimate goal of an injury free work place.
R. David Laurrell
County Administrator
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LOSS PREVENTION OBJECTIVES
It is the goal of Campbell County Safety Management to:
•
Protect employees, operations, and assets of Campbell County from losses that may result
from workplace injuries, vehicular accidents, physical damage to property, fraud, and
criminal acts.
•
Protect members of the public from accidents, which may arise out of Campbell County
government operations.
•
Minimize the financial burden incurred by the citizens and taxpayers of Campbell County
as a result of accidental loss.
All employees are charged with the duty and responsibility to actively support all Safety
Management/Loss Prevention policies, directives, reporting requirements, and recommended
procedures. All employees of Campbell County government shall be held responsible for
carrying out all procedures for practicing safe work habits and for reporting all unsafe
conditions, actions, or procedures to their supervisor.
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INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE
The Campbell County Safety Program has been established to protect the safety and health of
County employees, assist in preventing accidents and injuries, increase efficiency of operations,
and save money for the taxpayers of Campbell County. A successful safety program must
provide not only for the safety of County employees but also protect the public by preventing
unsafe acts or conditions created by the County.
This manual is designed to provide a general reference guide for department directors,
supervisors, and employees outlining their duties and responsibilities in the safe daily
performance of their tasks. Specific job-related safety procedures are outlined in each
Department’s safety policies and procedures manual, as needed.
An effective safety program must come from the top in each department, division or section. If a
director or supervisor appears to be unconcerned about the safety program, that attitude will be
adopted by the employees he/she supervises.
All County employees have the responsibility to insure the efficient utilization of each tax dollar
spent for County operations. To be successful, the Safety Program must have the continuous and
active support of all employees.
CONCEPT OF THE SAFETY PROGRAM
Safety/Loss Prevention is based on analysis, identification, and the proper handling of the
hazards that may cause serious injuries and/or material losses. The objective of Safety/Loss
Prevention is to concentrate on specific corrective actions required to neutralize all factors
interfering with the safety of an operation.
BACKGROUND
Loss prevention techniques, when consistently incorporated with other management skills, can
have a dramatic effect on the reduction of on-the-job injuries, property damage, and production
loss. It is a fallacy that accidents are inevitable in certain operations. A properly trained and
supervised employee is less likely to be involved in an accident. The objectives of this program
are focused upon this goal. A low experience of accident losses in any organization indicates top
quality leadership at the managerial and supervisory levels. The loss prevention objectives are in
accordance with Federal and State Occupational Safety and Health Rules and Regulations.
ELEMENTS OF OUR SAFETY PROGRAM
Our safety program includes, but is not limited to, the following functions and responsibilities:
- Holding the individual responsible to act in a safe and prudent manner thereby avoiding
injury to him/herself, others, and damage to equipment.
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-
-
Assigning responsibilities to individuals or committees for safety activities. Designating
one person in each Building and each Department for Public Safety, Public Works and
the Sheriff’s Office as a safety liaison person.
Ensuring equipment, work areas, and working methods are safe.
Assigning personnel to jobs that they are qualified to safely perform.
Identifying hazards and eliminating them.
Encouraging employees to be interested in performing their duties in a safe and efficient
manner.
Correcting unsafe work habits by adequate and effective supervision.
Providing proper protective equipment, training employees in its use, and making its use
mandatory.
Educating and training employees to recognize the specific hazards of their jobs.
Investigating accidents to determine cause and implementing follow-up action to reduce
accident recurrences.
Preparing and maintaining proper and complete accident records.
Adopting and enforcing safety rules, policies and procedures.
APPLICATION AND RESPONSIBILITY
Each employee shall carefully study the safety rules applying to his/her duties. Safety rules shall
be followed and ignorance will not be accepted as an excuse for their violation.
If an employee is assigned a job that he/she considers hazardous and for which he/she is not
properly protected, he/she shall inform the supervisor before commencing work. If questions
arise, interpretation and responsibility rests with the supervisor.
Due to the wide diversity of County operations, as well as the variations in departmental
organizational structures, it is fully realized that certain terminology and specific procedures are
not contained in this manual. Therefore, Department Directors should formulate and implement
safety and health policies and procedures specific to their operations and objectives. The rules
set forth in this program are the minimum standard requirements that apply to everyone within
Campbell County government.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Each County employee is fully responsible for implementing the provisions of the Safety
Program as it pertains to operations under their control. The following responsibilities are
“minimal”. They are not to be construed as to limit individual endeavor in implementing a more
comprehensive procedure and policy for curbing losses.
SAFETY MANAGEMENT
The Safety Manager (Organizational Development Assistant in HR) is responsible for the
administration of this safety and health program. The Safety Manager and staff shall take actions
to help produce a reduction in accidents. Safety Management has full authority to stop
hazardous jobs when prescribed safety precautions are not being enforced.
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Safety Management shall make every effort to:
- Maintain this safety and health program.
- Conduct an aggressive loss prevention program.
- Incorporate into the program current practices and philosophies adopted by the safety
profession concerning injury prevention, occupational diseases, vehicle accidents,
liabilities, damage and loss to equipment and material.
- Consult, as appropriate, with management personnel and employees on loss prevention
matters, and provide assistance necessary to assure effective administration of this
program.
- Periodically attend Department staff meetings to promote maximum understanding of
program objectives.
- Periodically evaluate compliance with the program within Departments.
- Inspect facilities for hazardous conditions and make frequent checks of field and shop
areas to insure employee compliance with Federal, State and County work rules.
- Maintain an effective driver-training program for County drivers.
- Maintain records on accidents for review with management.
- When consulted, research and recommend specific safety equipment.
- Investigate accidents resulting in death, hospitalization, lost time and property damage.
Make recommendations to help prevent recurrences.
- Actively participate in community efforts of safety professionals and citizen groups
striving to promote accident prevention.
DEPARTMENT HEADS
Department directors are responsible for ensuring the safety and well being of their employees
and the public, and to protect Campbell County property and equipment assigned to them. This
responsibility includes but is not limited to employee training, providing required personal
protective equipment, ensuring that proper safe work procedures and safety rules are formulated
and adhered to, and ensuring that an orderly and safe environment is provided. It is expected that
an unrelenting effort will be directed towards preventing injuries, vehicular accidents, liabilities
and the waste of materials.
Each Department Head will insure that:
- The policies and procedures set forth in this program are complied with by all personnel
under his/her control.
- All employees are familiar with all applicable County and Department safety policies.
- The leadership and direction required to maintain effective loss prevention policies is
provided.
- One individual is appointed within each Department to act as safety representative and be
the liaison to Safety Management.
- A portion of staff meetings is dedicated to review of departmental accidents and losses
and discussion of methods to prevent recurrences.
- All hazardous tasks are covered by specific written work rules in order to minimize injury
and property damage potential.
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-
-
All personnel are briefed and fully understand their Departments’ work procedures and
safety policies.
All employees are instructed and understand the use and need for protective equipment
required for specific tasks.
All employees do, in fact, use the prescribed safety equipment designated for each job.
Safety suggestions from employees are encouraged, and those that are feasible are
adopted. Those ideas with possible general application are forwarded to Safety
Management for review and analysis.
All accidents are thoroughly reported, investigated, and recorded in accordance with
existing directives.
Immediate corrective action is taken whenever hazards are identified and unsafe acts
observed.
Safety Management is called upon for assistance to promote more aggressive and
effective loss prevention measures.
An emergency action plan to ensure employee safety in the event of fire and other
emergency is prepared, in writing, and reviewed with affected employees for each
location. The plan includes the following elements: escape procedures and routes;
critical Departmental operations; employee head count following an emergency
evacuation; rescue and medical duties; means of reporting emergencies; persons to be
contacted for information or clarification.
SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL
A supervisor has full responsibility for the safe actions of their employees and the safe operation
of machines and equipment within their operating area. The supervisor has full authority to
enforce the provisions of this manual and to take all actions necessary to keep losses in the area
of his/her authority at a minimum.
Each supervisor shall:
- Be accountable for preventable injuries and liabilities incurred by their employees. A
supervisors’ effectiveness is measured by the safety of his/her operation.
- Include an employer’s safety record in the basic criteria used to judge each performance.
An employee who causes accidents to himself or others has specific performance
deficiencies that must be recognized, itemized, and corrected. To ignore the deficiency
and reward unsafe performance is a disservice to the individual concerned and
detrimental to the safety efforts of management.
- Insure that all management safety policies are fully implemented.
- Take the initiative in recommending correction of deficiencies noted in facilities and
work procedures.
- Insure that each employee is fully trained for the assigned job, that the employees are
familiar with the hazards of their work and all safety work rules.
- Fully cooperate with Safety Management in correcting operations considered to be a
danger to employees, members of the public, and/or county property.
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-
-
Be familiar with all Department and County safety policies and procedures and be fully
informed of all accidents losses and abatement procedures in the area under his/her
control.
Be firm in enforcement of work policies by being impartial in taking disciplinary action
against those who fail to follow safety rules and work procedures and by being prompt to
give recognition to those who perform well.
EMPLOYEES
Employees are required, as a condition of employment:
- to follow all safety procedures, rules and safe work practices;
- to exercise due care in the course of their work; and
- to prevent injuries to themselves and to their fellow workers.
Each employee shall:
- Obey all safety rules and follow all work instructions. If any doubt exists about the
safety of doing a job, the employee should stop and get instructions from the supervisor
before continuing work.
- Operate only machines/equipment that he/she has been trained to operate.
- Use only the prescribed equipment for the job and handle it properly.
- Wear all required personal protective equipment including, but not limited to, gloves,
safety shoes, safety vests, goggles, hardhats, respirators, seat belts, back belts and hearing
protection whenever conditions make that equipment necessary.
FAILURE TO WEAR AND/OR USE REQUIRED PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT MIGHT RESULT IN A REDUCTION OF WORKERS’ COMPENSATION
BENEFITS IN THE EVENT OF AN ACCIDENT.
-
Take an active part in this safety program.
Promptly report to his/her supervisor all unsafe equipment, unsafe tools and/or hazardous
conditions which may affect County employees, the work area or the general public.
Keep work areas clean and orderly at all times.
Report all accidents no matter how minor immediately to his/her supervisor.
Avoid engaging in any horseplay.
Refrain from the use of any substance that may affect job performance. Follow the
County’s policy on zero-use of any illegal drugs or alcohol. Report the use of any
prescription or over-the-counter medication that may affect job safety.
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SAFETY AND LOSS PREVENTION
PURPOSE
Safety and Loss Prevention Programs are instituted to identify, analyze, and eliminate all hazards
that may result in personal injury to employees, public liability, loss or damage to property, and
loss or damage to equipment. Securing County property and equipment from loss due to fire,
theft, vandalism, and abuse is the responsibility of every County employee. Safety Management,
at its discretion, will investigate any and all losses, and make recommendations to prevent future
occurrences. All County employees shall cooperate fully with investigators. Various safety and
loss prevention programs are defined in this document and in individual department safety
manuals.
PURCHASING PROCEDURES
Whenever possible, anyone with responsibility for equipment purchases will use ergonomics and
increased safety as primary criteria in the selection of new equipment or the upgrading of old
equipment. If assistance is needed in selecting equipment, contact Safety Management.
REPORTING UNSAFE CONDITIONS
All Campbell County employees are to keep alert for unsafe conditions. If an unsafe condition is
identified, it is to be reported to a supervisor. The supervisor will evaluate the risk of personal
injury, public liability, and damage to property or equipment, and initiate steps for immediate
correction of the unsafe condition. If a supervisor is not available and the problem is not
corrected in a timely manner or the hazard is not secured, the employee is to call Safety
Management to report the unsafe condition.
SAFETY TRAINING
All employees will be competently trained and capable of carrying out assigned tasks in a safe
manner. Training on job competency, safety, inspection procedures, the correct use of personal
protective equipment, and hazardous chemicals handling will be conducted prior to an employee
starting operations. Employees will remain under close supervision until they have demonstrated
competency. They will then be monitored periodically. All employee training shall be
documented and filed. All training documentation is subject to review by Safety Management
and regulatory agencies. The County will also periodically provide training on general safety.
Certain departments may have more specific training requirements that should be followed and
maintained.
Inspection Procedures
Employees will inspect their work area and equipment before each shift to identify unsafe
conditions. All employees will complete walk through and detail inspections of equipment,
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work areas, and operating procedures on a regular basis. Inspections should be documented and
all unsafe conditions, procedures, and practices corrected.
UNIFORM SAFETY PROCEDURES
Department procedures should reflect the following:
Every building should have a safety representative; Public Safety, Public Works, and the
Sheriff’s Office should have a departmental safety representative. All employees should be
made aware of the name of the representative and how to contact that person. When an
employee is appointed as a Department/Building Safety Representative, the name of the selected
person is sent to Safety Management. The Department/Building Safety Representative will serve
as liaison between Safety Management and the Department and will be responsible for
coordinating department safety matters.
Every Department should have at least one person assigned to conduct or direct safety
orientation for all newly assigned employees (assisted as required by Safety Management).
When an employee is appointed, the name of the selected person is sent to Safety Management.
This orientation must be documented for the employer’s personnel file.
A continuing job safety analysis is conducted for existing or newly acquired job functions. The
purpose of this program shall be to define all possible safety hazards involved in the performance
of the job, to establish safe work procedures and rules, and to determine if safety protective
equipment or clothing is necessary for the employee performing the job.
All required protective equipment/clothing, as determined by the Department, Safety Committee
Representative or Safety Management is issued to and utilized by the employees performing job
assignments requiring their use.
A safety bulletin board or a designated place on an existing bulletin board is provided for the
display of safety related materials, such as posters, memos, results of safety meetings, etc.
All employees required to drive County vehicles are authorized to do so in accordance with
provisions in this handbook.
All Safety Management Loss Prevention Inspection Reports are responded to in writing detailing
corrective measures to be implemented. Written responses shall be forwarded to Safety
Management within ten (10) working days from the date of the report.
All Commonwealth of Virginia, Commercial Insurer, and Local Fire Department Inspection
Reports are responded to in writing detailing corrective measures to be implemented. Written
responses shall be forwarded to Safety Management within ten (10) working days from the date
of the report, or by the required date stated in the report, whichever is sooner.
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Required Inspections
Annual or semi-annual inspection of all fire extinguishing, prevention, alarm and detection
systems;
Annual inspection of all elevators; and,
Annual and periodic inspection of all lifting or hoisting equipment, including cranes and boomed
equipment (fixed or mobile).
Standards Compliance
It is the responsibility of every Department to insure that all federal, state, county, and local
standards and ordinances are complied with. This includes, but is not limited to:
- All electrical equipment has been approved by Underwriters Laboratories or Factory
Mutual Laboratories.
- Electrical installations are in compliance with the National Electrical Safety Code.
- All fire protection and prevention devices meet the requirements set forth in the
appropriate standards as adopted by the National Fire Protection Association.
- All chemicals and flammable liquids are handled and stored in accordance with the
requirements of the National Fire Protection Association standards.
- All County facilities and operations are in compliance with OSHA and EPA standards.
- Department of Transportation Regulations for traffic control for work areas are adhered
to.
- Required permits are obtained prior to beginning new construction or remodeling
projects.
FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCIDENT PREVENTION
A.
ACCIDENTS ARE PREVENTABLE
Unfortunately, many people, either through ignorance or misunderstanding, believe that
accidents are the inevitable results of unchangeable circumstances, fate, or a matter of bad luck.
It must be emphasized that accidents do not happen without cause, and the identification,
isolation and control of these causes are the underlying principles of all accident prevention
techniques. No person can be effective in accident prevention unless he or she fully believes that
accidents can be prevented and constantly strives to do so. There are many methods of
determining the causes of accidents. Below is one that is used by the National Safety Council.
B.
CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS
Causes of accidents can be divided into three major categories:
1. Unsafe acts of people.
2. Unsafe physical or mechanical conditions.
3. Acts of God (floods, hurricanes).
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According to the National Safety Council statistically, 88% of all accidents are a result of unsafe
acts of people. Approximately 10% of all accidents are caused by unsafe equipment or unsafe
surroundings. The other 2% of all accidents are caused by Acts of God. Therefore, elimination
of unsafe acts of people will be the main thrust of any effective safety program.
C.
UNSAFE ACTS
Some causes of unsafe acts include:
- Failure to follow a proper job procedure
- Cleaning, oiling, adjusting or repairing equipment that is in motion, electrically energized
or pressurized
- Failure to use appropriate personal protective equipment such as gloves, goggles,
hardhats, seat belts
- Failure to wear safe personal attire
- Failure to secure or warn
- Improper use of equipment
- Improper use of hands or body parts
- Making safety devices inoperative
- Operating or working at unsafe speeds
- Taking unsafe position or posture
- Unsafe placing, mixing or combining of materials
- Using tools or equipment known to be unsafe
- Driving errors
- Horseplay
Unsafe acts can usually be attributed to one of the following:
- Lack of knowledge, skill, coordination or planning
- Improper attitude
- Physical or mental defects
- Lack of safety awareness
D.
UNSAFE CONDITIONS
Most unsafe or hazardous conditions can be grouped into one of the following classifications:
- Defective or unsuitable tools, machinery, equipment or materials
- Sloppy housekeeping
- Unsafe or lack of methods or procedures
- Employee not mentally or physically compatible with job requirements
E.
CONTROL OF ACCIDENT CAUSES
There are three main methods utilized to control accident causes. They are engineering,
education and training, and enforcement. These three methods are sometimes referred to as the
“three E’s of safety” as outlined below:
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Engineering: Causes of accidents, or unsafe conditions, can sometimes be eliminated through
the application of engineering controls. When an operation is mechanically and physically safe,
it is unnecessary to be as concerned about the uncertain behavior of people. Machines are less
apt to fail than people. It may be necessary to make mechanical revisions or modifications to
eliminate existing unsafe conditions and, in some cases, to prevent unsafe acts. Design of
machine guards, automobile brakes, traffic signals, pressure relief valves, and handrails are
varied examples of safety engineering at work.
Education and Training: Just as safety engineering is the most effective way of preventing
accident causes, safety education is the most effective tool in the prevention of human causes.
Through adequate instruction, personnel gain useful knowledge and develop safe attitudes.
Training is a particularly important accident prevention control; it gives each employee a
personal safety tool by developing habits of safe practice and operation.
Enforcement: Usually, accidents can be prevented through adequate safety engineering and
education. However, there are some people who are a hazard to themselves and others because
of their failure to comply with accepted safety standards. It is these persons for whom the strict
enforcement of safety practices is necessary, backed by prompt corrective action. No organized
accident prevention effort can be successful without effective enforcement because accidents are
frequently the direct result of violations of safety principles.
To be completely effective, accident prevention controls cannot be applied “hit or miss.” All
engineering, education, training, supervision and enforcement measures will be directed toward
the solution of specific problems. These are based on the collection of facts relating to unsafe
acts or unsafe conditions.
F.
ELIMINATION OF UNSAFE CONDITIONS
One of the most effective means of preventing accidents is the elimination of unsafe conditions.
To stress safety while permitting unsafe conditions to exist is bound to create an obstacle to the
cooperation required from employees. Employees are encouraged to report any unsafe
conditions to their supervisors. The supervisor must take the initiative to correct unsafe
conditions and protect employees and the public without the need for instruction from upper
management. If correction is beyond the supervisors’ scope of authority, the matter must be
brought to the attention of management, the director, and/or Safety Management.
The following unsafe conditions must not be permitted to exist:
- Obstacles or defects which hinder the safe movement of personnel, vehicles or machines,
such as blocked fire exits
- Unsafe working and walking surfaces
- Worn, damaged or misused tools
- Failure to provide proper equipment and rigging for the hoisting and movement of heavy
objects
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-
Operation of equipment with guards for moving parts of machinery removed and/or
defeated
Allowing employees to work without using required protective equipment such as
goggles, gloves, hardhats, adequate foot wear or seat belts
Worn and/or damaged or unguarded electrical wiring, fixtures and power cords
Absence of required signage warning of particular hazards in the area
The important factor in eliminating unsafe conditions is doing so before an accident occurs.
Near-miss occurrences need to be investigated and corrected as they are a warning of a condition
that may eventually lead to an accident. A near-miss occurrence is an example of an incident
resulting in neither an injury nor property damage. However, a near-miss occurrence has the
potential to inflict injury or property damage if its cause is not corrected.
All employees are to search out hazardous conditions and eliminate them before they bring about
any injuries or cause work interruption. Too often an unsafe condition is allowed to exist simply
because it has not caused an accident - - - YET.
G.
REPORTING UNSAFE CONDITIONS
All Campbell County employees are to keep alert for unsafe conditions. If an unsafe condition is
identified, it is to be reported to a supervisor. The supervisor will evaluate the risk of personal
injury, public liability and damage to property or equipment. The supervisor will initiate steps
for immediate correction of the unsafe condition. If the problem is not corrected in a timely
manner or the hazard is not secured, the employee is to call Safety Management to report the
unsafe condition.
H.
CORRECTING UNSAFE ACTIONS
Regardless of the degree of safety built into a job, unsafe actions on the part of employees will
always be a cause of injuries. Teaching employees safe work habits means showing them how to
do their tasks with less risk to themselves, less spoilage of materials and less damage to
equipment. Much of this instruction can be boiled down to a few simple principles or job rules.
By concentrating on these safe habits, by showing “why” as well as the “how” of safety and by
constantly supervising employees safe work habits, they will become the accepted method for
the employee to perform tasks.
Actual demonstrations of the right way of doing tasks should be conducted, accompanied by the
basis for preferring one work habit to another. Equally important as this initial instruction is the
review of subsequent performance. When the right way has been presented and agreed to by the
individual worker, it is essential that failure to comply be noted and corrected.
Flagrant or repeated disregard of safety rules should be met with appropriate disciplinary action.
No matter how skillful an employee may be in performing his/her duties, if the employee does
not perform them safely, that employee is placing him/herself and others at risk.
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I.
JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
By performing a Job Safety Analysis, job tasks are evaluated to identify the hazards involved.
Procedures for a job safety analysis are as follows:
List sequence of job steps - the job is broken down into basic steps, describing what is to be done
in a logical sequence.
Search for and list potential hazards - each step is analyzed for hazards that may cause an
accident. The objective is to identify as many hazards as possible.
Decide on a recommended action or procedure. When the risks and potential hazards associated
with each step are identified and their causes understood, then methods of eliminating them
should be outlined. There are four basic methods by which this can be accomplished.
Substitution: Eliminate the process or operation and provide a substitute action.
Isolation: Isolate the process or operation in order to eliminate or minimize the hazard.
Protection: Provide mechanical guards to control access to hazards.
Personal Protective Equipment: Provide and enforce use of personal protective
equipment to reduce the possibility of injury.
The data collected from all of the steps is used to create department specific safety policies and
procedures. These are to be distributed to all affected employees. The policies and procedures
assist supervisors in instructing employees in how to perform their job safely.
J.
SAFETY TRAINING GUIDELINES
No one should assume a newly hired, newly assigned, or reassigned employee knows all the
required safe job procedures. He/She must be trained.
Define the employer’s job and find out what he/she already knows about it.
Get the employee interested in learning the safety aspects of his/her job.
Supervisors will insure all employees are competently trained and capable of carrying out
assigned tasks in a safe manner.
Training on job competency, safety, inspection procedures, the correct use of personal protective
equipment, and hazardous chemicals handling will be conducted prior to an employee starting
operations.
Employee will remain under supervision until he/she has demonstrated competency.
All employee training shall be documented and filed. All training documentation shall be
retained in departmental files and is subject to review by Safety Management and regulatory
agencies.
K.
JOB SAFETY TRAINING
Proper instruction instills employee confidence in his/her capabilities. Providing the employee
with a copy of the work rules after initial and subsequent training affords a ready reference for
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review when needed. Every employee must consider the maintenance of a safe working
environment and safe working practices as an essential, vital, and primary part of his/her
responsibilities. The direct supervisor has the most immediate and influential control over an
employer’s behavior. By their actions and supervision of subordinates, supervisors must
demonstrate safety. It is essential for all supervisors to set a proper example by complying with
all accepted safety practices that apply to assigned tasks. The effectiveness of employee injury
and illness prevention depends upon the involvement of the first line supervisor.
All employees shall be provided safety-training programs in the areas of:
- General safety training for all new or reassigned employees
- Defensive driving for all County employees assigned to duties involving driving
- Safety hazard recognition and hazard elimination
- Special operational training in all instances where specialized equipment or procedures
are utilized
Specialized areas as required by OSHA, NFPA, EPA and other standards such as:
- Hazard Communication Standard
- Respiratory protection for employees required to work in hazardous atmospheres
- Hazardous Materials Handling
- First Aid if required
- Utilization of required protective equipment
L.
SAFETY INSPECTIONS
Every employee is responsible for maintaining a safe working environment. The objectives of a
safety inspection program are to:
- maintain a safe work environment through hazard recognition and removal
- ensure that employees are following proper safety procedures while working
- determine which operations meet or fail to meet acceptable safety standards
Complete walk through and detailed inspections of equipment, work areas, and employee
operating procedures should be performed on a regular basis within each department. Inspections
should be documented and all unsafe conditions, procedures, and practices corrected. Employees
will inspect their work area and equipment before each shift to identify unsafe conditions. In
addition to self-inspections, Campbell County is inspected by other governmental agencies and
commercial insurance carriers. All employees are required to cooperate with these agencies at
the time of the inspection.
MEDICAL PROGRAM
In order to maintain a safe and efficient operation, it is essential that the health and physical well
being of all employees be insured.
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A.
MEDICAL TESTING PROGRAM
Certain County employees will receive physical examinations, testing and immunization shots.
Employees are placed in this program according to their job classification and potential exposure
to hazardous chemicals or conditions.
The criteria for employee physical exams, testing, immunizations and using protective health
equipment may change as additional safety laws are enacted. As these changes occur, Campbell
County will adjust the foregoing program to insure the protection of all affected employees. Any
County employee may be requested to have a physical examination if there is evidence that a
physical or mental condition may affect the employer’s ability to perform his/her job safely.
EMPLOYEE INJURY PROCEDURES
A.
EMPLOYEE INJURY PROCEDURES
If a co-worker is injured, employees are to:
-
Offer first aid to injured victim
Call for emergency assistance, if necessary
Notify supervisor immediately
Secure the scene to prevent further injuries
If a Supervisor is unavailable, call Human Resources for treatment guidelines.
B.
REPORTING WORK RELATED INJURIES BY EMPLOYEES
Employees are required to report all work related injuries to their supervisor. The Report of
Accident or Injury, the Panel of Physicians, and the Prescription Drug forms must be completed
by the supervisor and employee. The Report of Accident or Injury and the Panel of Physicians
will be forwarded to Human Resources within two working days of the injury/illness. The
Prescription Drug form will be kept by the employee to be used in case drugs are prescribed.
These forms are to be completed even if medical treatment is not received. Forms are available
on the County Intranet Site.
C.
RETURN TO WORK FROM INJURY OR ILLNESS
Before an employee is allowed to return to work following an absence due to serious injury,
illness or major surgical operation, whether work-related or not, the supervisor shall require the
employee to present a written doctors’ release indicating that the employee is physically
qualified to resume his/her duties.
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D.
ALTERNATE DUTY/RETURN TO WORK POLICY
It is the policy of Campbell County to arrange, whenever possible, for placement of employees
that are temporarily physically disabled. It is also the policy of Campbell County to administer
these procedures in a fair, consistent, and equitable manner.
The employee’s Department Head or HR, will make every effort to place the employee in a
position within their department that meets the physical limitations recommended by the
attending physician. Due to the limited available positions in each department however, light
duty assignment will not always be available. If the employee is placed on light duty outside
his/her normal work area, the reporting supervisor is responsible for assuring that actual hours
worked, leave taken, etc., are reported to the employee’s supervisor. Employees on light duty are
required to follow the policies and procedures of the department to which they are assigned.
COMMITTEES
The most effective accident prevention measures are those that not only ascertain the cause of
accidents, but also prevent reoccurrences. Therefore, a Safety Committee has been established
for that purpose. The Committee will consist of employees in the following positions - HR
Director, Public Safety Director, Purchasing Agent or Management Services Director, a midlevel manager, a frontline employee, and the safety representatives from each building or
department.
The primary purpose of creating the Safety Committee is to preserve the health and welfare of
our employees and promote the County’s goal to reduce personal injuries and accidental loss.
Within the committee, there will be two teams formed:
a. Workers’ Compensation Review
b. Vehicle Accident Review
A. SAFETY & WORKERS’ COMPENSATION REVIEW TEAM
1.
Purpose
The Campbell County Safety & Workers’ Compensation Review Team is established to review
County operations, employee accidents and make recommendations to eliminate or reduce the
risk of personal injury and/or accident loss.
2.
Authority
This Team is authorized by the County Administrator to review all safety matters brought to the
their attention by the Department Safety Representative, develop recommendations for increased
safety and review Campbell County’s Loss Prevention Programs.
3.
Functions
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The Team shall meet and develop recommendations for the correction of safety deficiencies or
special safety problems coming to the Committee’s attention. (A deficiency is defined as a
condition that would affect the safety and well being of County employees, members of the
public, and/or expose the County to a potential loss). These recommendations will be forwarded
to the appropriate Department Director for consideration.
4.
Meetings
The Committee will convene whenever necessary.
B. VEHICLE ACCIDENT REVIEW TEAM
1.
Authorization
The Vehicle Accident Review Team is authorized by the County Administrator to review vehicle
accidents.
2.
Function
The Team shall review motor vehicle accident reports to determine preventability and may
recommend corrective action to prevent or minimize the frequency/severity of future accidents.
3.
Meetings
The Committee will convene when deemed necessary.
4.
Employee Appeal
An employee shall have the right to appeal the ruling of the Vehicle Accident Review Team with
reference to his/her case within 14 calendar days. The appeal must present substantiated facts,
material or evidence which have a bearing on the case and which were not presented to the
committee at the time of their ruling.
If these criteria are met, the Team Chairman will present the case to the Vehicle Accident
Review Committee for re-evaluation.
In the event that the appeal is denied, the original ruling of the Vehicle Accident Review
Committee will stand. In instances where the appeal is upheld by the Committee, all files shall
be corrected to reflect the final ruling by the Committee.
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFE PRACTICES
A.
INTRODUCTION
All employees having the need to drive on County business will:
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-
-
-
Have a valid Virginia State Drivers License.
Only operate vehicles for which they have the proper class license.
Attend a Defensive Driving Course once every five years.
Be trained and authorized to operate County vehicles, special purpose vehicles, and
trucks.
Not be certified as an authorized driver to operate a truck or special purpose vehicle until
that employee has satisfactorily demonstrated complete familiarity with its functions. It
is mandatory that the employee thoroughly understands the manufacturers’ operating
instructions, vehicle limitations, emergency procedures, and is able to successfully pass
an operator’s checkout test to the satisfaction of the supervisor.
Be knowledgeable and understand County vehicle operating rules and safety regulations
before driving a County vehicle.
Inspect assigned vehicles daily for safety discrepancies, malfunctions, signs of abuse,
unreported damage, and cleanliness. Have all repairs related to the safety and reliability
of vehicles made as soon as possible.
Not drive a vehicle if it is found to be unsafe. The employee will report it to his/her
immediate supervisor.
Wear a seat belt at all times while driving or riding in a County vehicle or driving their
personal vehicle on County business. Failure to wear a seat belt will subject the
employee to disciplinary action.
NOTE: Any employee who sustains a bodily injury as a result of a vehicle accident, and it is
determined the employee was not wearing vehicle safety belts, may forfeit partial Workers’
Compensation benefits.
Report to his/her supervisor if evidence of accident damage is found, before leaving. Otherwise,
the employee may be charged with the responsibility for an accident he/she did not have.
Call police to investigate any accident involving County vehicles and report accident details to
immediate supervisor and Safety Management as soon as possible.
B.
DEFENSIVE DRIVER TRAINING
New employees authorized to operate a vehicle on County business will be required to attend the
next available Defensive Driving Training Program or view appropriate materials as approved.
C.
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY
1.
General Safe Practices
Each driver is responsible for the safe and proper operation of his/her vehicle and shall check the
following items before putting the vehicle into service.
- fuel
- turn and stop lights
- windshield wipers
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-
-
-
-
-
-
horn
tires
brakes
cargo
housekeeping
Comply with all traffic ordinances and safe driving practices.
Ensure the safety of the public and county employees.
Drive to prevent accidents in spite of the incorrect actions of others and adverse
conditions.
Where there are two employees in or assigned to a heavy duty or tandem vehicle, one
employee shall be designated as a spotter and stationed where the driver can see and hear
to direct the driver while backing. If a backing accident should occur, both the driver and
spotter may be charged by the Vehicle Accident Review Committee.
No County employee shall operate a motor vehicle while wearing a headset, headphone,
or other listening device, other than a hearing aid or instrument for the improvement of
impaired hearing.
No County employee driving or in charge of any motor vehicle shall permit it to stand
unattended without first stopping the engine, locking the ignition, engaging the parking
brake, and removing the key.
Vehicles must comply with Virginia Statutes 46.2-1121, which requires a 12-inch square
red flag or light on all loads extending 4 feet beyond the rear of a vehicle.
Operators of County owned vehicles are responsible for checking all safety devices
before driving the vehicle. Any defects found shall be reported to the immediate
supervisor and the vehicle shall not be operated until made safe.
No County vehicles and equipment will be used for transport of employees unless they
are designed and equipped to safely carry personnel.
All employees shall ride in the drivers’ compartment or cab with sufficient seating and
seat belts.
Tailgates shall be closed when the vehicle is in operation and not transporting long loads.
Bodies of dump trucks shall be secured in the down position or the hoist lever secured in
the lock position when the vehicle is in motion.
Employees shall not ride on the top of side rails, tops of cabs or running boards of any
vehicles. Each operator and passenger must have all necessary safety equipment.
Drivers of emergency vehicles are not exempt from the duty to drive with due regard for
the safety of all persons using the roadway.
When a vehicle is towing a trailer or semitrailer by means of a trailer hitch, safety chains
from the trailer or semitrailer to the vehicle shall also be attached. Safety chains shall be
connected to the towing vehicle by crossing the chains under the tongue of the trailer.
These safety chains shall be of sufficient strength to maintain connection of the trailer or
semitrailer to the pulling vehicle under all conditions while the trailer or semitrailer is
being towed by the vehicle. The provisions of this subsection shall not apply to trailers
or semitrailers using a hitch known as a fifth wheel.
Loads of all trucks, trailers and semitrailers must be covered or secured to the vehicle in
which they are being transported to prevent escape.
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D. MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS
Vehicular accident and property damage is defined as any accident occurring between a County
vehicle (or an employee’s private car when the employee is on official County business) and
another vehicle, pedestrian, animal or fixed object.
Although police are called to investigate all County vehicle accidents, it is the responsibility of
the employee to insure that all facts are obtained with respect to the other driver. Under no
circumstance should ANY County employee make any statement relative to guilt.
1.
Vehicle Accident Reporting Procedures and Guidelines
-
Stop immediately and investigate even when the accident appears to be minor.
If someone is hurt, request rescue squad assistance.
If there is a danger of fire, call the fire department.
Notify supervisor/manager.
Make no expressed of implied admission of liability or fault. Do not make an expression
of apology or sorrow.
At the scene, make written notes of the details of the accident; obtain complete
information on the other driver and vehicle.
At the scene, only discuss the facts with the police officer or authorized County official
(such as your supervisor, Safety Manager, etc.).
After the fact, do not discuss the accident with insurance agents, the news media,
adjusters, or attorneys without permission from your attorney.
Complete the Motor Vehicle Crash Report with your supervisor/manager.
The Motor Vehicle Crash Report must be submitted to management within two (2)
working days from the time of the accident. All information on the report form must be
provided.
NOTE: Each department head shall be responsible to see that the Vehicle Accident Reporting
Procedures are followed.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF EACH EMPLOYEE TO USE PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT!
A.
EYE SAFETY
It is important to keep flying objects, dusts, rust, vapors, heat, and liquid splashes out of the eyes.
Safety glasses, goggles or face shields are required whenever there is danger of exposing the
eyes to flying particles, caustic substances or harmful light rays. Eye and face protection must be
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used whenever there is a possibility of something entering the eye. All eye protection must meet
ANSI Z87.1 regulations.
In areas that are designated for eye protection, everyone must wear eye and face protection,
including employees performing the job, those working nearby, and visitors.
Safety glasses, goggles or face shields must meet the following requirements:
Provide adequate protection against particular hazards for which they are designed;
Be reasonably comfortable when worn under the designated conditions;
Fit snugly without interfering with the movements of the wearer;
Be durable;
Be capable of being disinfected;
Be easily cleanable; and,
Be kept in good repair.
If prescription eyeglasses are worn to correct vision, safety glasses with safety lenses that meet
ANSI requirements must be worn. Safety glasses/spectacles require special frames.
Combinations of normal street wear frames with safety lenses are not in compliance.
Safety goggles/glasses worn over regular glasses must be comfortable and not disturb the
adjustment of corrective lenses. All employees should check their safety glasses before each
wearing. The brow protector should fit against the face. This helps protect against particles
entering the eye from above the glasses. The glasses should fit snugly, not tightly, without
eyelashes hitting the lenses. If there is a headband, it should fit snugly. Headbands that are slack
should be replaced. Lenses should be clean. Clean with water or with special cleaning solution
for eyeglasses. Lenses should be free of scratches, cracks or pitting. The brow and side protectors
should be in good condition.
Contact lenses are not a substitute for safety glasses. Contact lenses pose a special threat.
Hazardous dusts, gases, vapors, or liquids can get trapped between lenses and eyes. Contact
lenses:
- Must not be worn in hazardous atmospheric conditions
- Must not be worn under respirators
According to OSHA 1910.151, where a person’s eyes or body may be exposed to injurious
corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and body shall
be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use.
B.
HEAD PROTECTION
Head protection equipment (hardhats) shall be worn where there is any possible danger of head
injuries from overhead impact or falling objects. Hardhats must meet ANSI Z89.1 standards.
Hardhats must be worn in designated hardhat areas.
- Wear a hardhat!
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C.
The shell and the suspension of the hardhat should be checked daily and maintained in
good condition.
Do not carry anything in your hardhat; do not use it as a bucket or step stool.
Do not paint the shell. Solvents in the paint may soften the shell material.
HAND SAFETY
Appropriate hand protection will be required where employees are exposed to injurious
chemicals or abrasive materials that have the potential for hand injuries. Gloves of an
appropriate type shall be worn when handling rough, sharp, and/or hot materials, as well as
chemically active substances.
There are three types of hand injuries:
1. Traumatic injury following an accident.
2. Contact with substances that damage the skin.
3. Repetitive motion problems caused by overuse of specific muscle groups in the hands.
Types of Gloves
-
Rubber, vinyl, or neoprene gloves are for use with caustic chemicals such as acids,
cleansers, and petroleum products.
Leather gloves protect against sparks, rough surfaces, and scraping objects. The design
depends on the job.
Metal mesh gloves protect hands from knives, blades, or other sharp instruments.
Plastic-film gloves protect against contact in injury from mild substances.
Cloth gloves provide traction for holding slippery objects, insulate to protect against
moderate heat or cold, and protect hands from sharp edges.
Aluminized fabric or other special materials protect hands against the intense heat of
molten material.
Insulated gloves are often made of rubber and worn underneath leather gloves as
protection against electrical shock and burns.
Other Hand Protection
-
Hand Pads protect against rough materials when fine finger movement is not needed.
Barrier creams protect against corrosive substances and can make cleanup easier, but are
not substitutes for gloves.
Forearm cuffs made of cloth or special fabrics protect against heat and keep sleeves out
of the way.
Wash hands frequently.
Keep hands away from face when working with chemicals.
Do not use hands for feeding materials into saws and other machinery.
Do not use hands to sweep up metal or wood chips.
Rotate tasks to give hands a rest, where possible.
Do not wear jewelry when working around or operating rotating machinery and
equipment.
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D.
FOOT PROTECTION
Safety shoes must be worn where they are required. Department Heads will determine which
operations require foot protection. Safety shoes must meet ANSI Z41.1.standards.
There are different types of safety shoes for different jobs.
- Wear shoes that fit properly.
- Steel-toed shoes are required where employees work with heavy objects or machinery
that could cause foot injury.
- Safety shoes with sole protection may be required in certain applications.
- Electricians must wear electrical hazard safety footwear.
- If the job does not require safety shoes, select sturdy work shoes that will give sufficient
support.
- Inspect shoes regularly for damage such as: dampness or embedded metal that might
impair electrical protection; cuts; cracks, etc. which might expose feet to danger and for
anti-slip soles.
- Never wear defective footwear on the job.
- Employees should not repair their own safety shoes, i.e., never repair non-sparking
footwear with metal nails.
E.
CLOTHING
Employees will wear appropriate clothing for the type of work they are performing. The
Director will determine acceptable attire.
- Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
- Check for tears, leaks, punctures or signs of wear and tear before putting on.
- Be sure the clothing is not contaminated from the last use.
- Contaminated clothing should be decontaminated or discarded as soon as feasible.
- When operating machinery or working with machinery make sure all clothing fits
correctly. Loose fitting clothing can contribute to accidents.
- Beware of heat sickness. Clothing that keeps water and vapors out usually also keeps
them in. Avoid dehydration.
F.
RESPIRATORS – as needed for certain departments
OSHA CFR Part 1910.134 on Respiratory Protection standard requires employers to establish
and maintain a Respiratory Protective Program whenever respirators are necessary to protect the
health of employees.
Respirators will be worn when working with chemicals or products that pose health hazards
when inhaled or ingested in the form of dusts, vapors or mists. Each affected Department is
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responsible to have a written Respiratory Protection Program. Requirements for a minimal
acceptable program are specified in OSHA 1910.134 (b) (1).
A minimal acceptable respirator program should include the following:
- Written Operating Procedures
- Proper Selection of the Respirators
- Training and Fitting
- Cleaning and Disinfecting
- Storage
- Inspection and Maintenance
- Work Area Surveillance
- Inspection/Evaluation of Program
- Medical Examinations
- Approved Respirators
Standard procedures must be developed for respirator use. These should include all information
and guidance necessary for their proper selection, use and care. Possible emergency use and
routine use for the respirator should be anticipated and planned for. The correct respirator must
be specified for each job.
If the respirator has an air or oxygen cylinder, make sure it is fully charged according to the
manufacturers’ instructions.
Respiratory protect devices fall into three classes:
-
air-purifying;
atmosphere or air supplying;
combination air purifying and air supplying.
Proper Selection
Respirators must be selected on the basis of hazards to which the worker is exposed. The
respirator type is usually specified in the work procedures by a qualified individual supervising
the respiratory protective program. The individual issuing them must be adequately instructed to
insure the correct respirator is issued. Respirators must meet the guidelines of ANSI Z88.2-1969.
OSHA recognizes an approved respirator if it has been jointly approved by National Institute of
Safety & Health (NIOSH) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).
NIOSH/MSHA approval for supplied-air and air-purifying respirators is valid only in
atmospheres containing greater than 19.5 percent oxygen. If oxygen deficiency is not an issue,
then the contaminant(s) and their concentrations must be determined.
Training and Fitting
The user must be instructed and trained in the selection, use and maintenance of the respirator.
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Every respirator user must receive fitting instructions including demonstrations and practice in
how the respirator should be worn, how to adjust it, and how to determine if it fits properly.
Respirators must have a good seal around the face to prevent contaminated air from getting in.
Beards and sideburns that interfere with the facial seal are prohibited. The face piece fit must be
checked by the wearer each time the respirator is put on.
Corrective glasses with long temple bars may interfere with the seal. Wearing of contact lenses
in contaminated atmospheres is not allowed.
A good fit and seal includes:
Fits securely but not too lightly around the chin;
Does not pinch the nose;
Does not slip;
Leaves room to move the head and to talk.
Cleaning and Disinfecting
Respirators must be regularly cleaned and disinfected.
Respirators should be inspected during cleaning.
Respirators issued for the exclusive use of one worker should be cleaned after each day’s use or
more often if necessary.
Routinely used respirators must be collected, cleaned and disinfected as frequently as necessary
to insure that proper protection is provided for the wearer.
Storage
Respirators must be stored in a convenient, clean, and sanitary location.
Store in such a manner as to protect against dust, harmful chemicals, sunlight excessive heat and
moisture.
Emergency use respirators must be kept in a convenient place and accessible.
Inspection and Maintenance
Respirators used routinely must be inspected before each use.
Worn or deteriorated parts must be replaced.
Respirators for emergency use such as SCBA must be thoroughly inspected after each use.
According to OSHA regulations, SCBA’s must be inspected every thirty days. A signed and
dated inspection form must be kept by the SCBA to show the inspection record.
Check for holes, cracks or any sign that the respirator may not be providing the best protection.
The employee will refer to the information on the product label or the Material Safety Data Sheet
for specific information as to what type of respirator and/or appropriate chemical cartridge is
required for protection.
Respirators will be worn when working with chemicals or products that pose health hazards
when inhaled or ingested in the form of dusts, vapors, or mists.
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Medical Program
Employees should not be assigned tasks requiring use of respirators unless it has been
determined that they are physically able to perform the work and use the equipment. A
physician must determine what health and physical conditions are pertinent. The respirator
user’s medical status should be reviewed periodically, usually annually.
G.
HEARING PROTECTION
Noise is more than just a nuisance, it is a hazard. Hearing can be damaged temporarily or
permanently. Frequency is the pitch (high or low) of a sound - the number of complete sound
wave cycles each second. Intensity is the loudness of a sound, it is measured in decibels.
There are three Basic Types of Hearing Protection:
Earplugs
a. Formable earplugs – disposable or semi-disposable
b. Pre-molded earplugs – universal type or multi-size type
c. Custom-molded earplugs
Canal Caps – made of a soft, rubber-like substance
Earmuffs
Hearing protection must be worn in designated areas. Any type of approved hearing protection
should have a noise reduction rating (NRR) expressed in decibels. This indicates the amount of
noise reduction that the device provides. Earplugs and earmuffs provide important protection
against noise. Follow manufacturers’ instructions for cleaning and storage. Proper fit is essential!
Cotton balls should not be used for hearing protection. Employees are not permitted to operate
machinery while using personal listening devices, i.e., Walkman, etc.
H.
VESTS, LIFELINES AND SAFETY NETS
In jobs involving potential fall hazards, safety belts, buoyant work vests, lifelines, body
harnesses, and/or lanyards must be used. If there is a danger of falling into water while working,
a Coast Guard-approved life jacket or buoyant vest must be used. Personal floatation devices
must be maintained in a safe condition. They must be taken out of service when they are
damaged so as to affect buoyancy or fastening capability. Where working surfaces at river banks
slope so steeply that an employee could slip or fall into the water, the outer perimeter of the
working surface must be protected by posting or other portable protection such as roping off.
Employees must wear an approved personal floatation device. Flagmen and night workers, who
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might be struck by moving vehicles, need suits or vests designed to reflect light. Always inspect
lifelines and safety belts carefully before each use. Check for signs of deterioration such as torn
fibers. Inspect lifeline attachments carefully.
If lifelines are used where they may be cut or damaged accidentally, such as by contact with
sharp edges, they must be padded or protected. Body harnesses are recommended for fall arrest
systems. Lanyards must be at least ½ inch nylon or the equivalent and should be short enough to
allow a fall of less than six feet. They must be firmly secured above the working surface.
Nets should be used when a lifeline or a safety belt is not practical. Forged steel, safety hooks,
or shackles should be used to fasten a net to its supports. The mesh should be no larger than 6
inches by 6 inches. The nets should extend beyond the edge of the work surface. Safety nets
should be tested to ensure that they are tight enough to prevent an employee from making contact
with any surface or structure. Rope should have strength of 5,400 pounds.
ALWAYS WEAR THE REQUIRED PROTECTIVE GEAR - EVEN IF THE JOB WILL
ONLY TAKE A MINUTE. * * NEVER TAKE SHORTCUTS!!
GENERAL SAFETY RULES
The following general safety rules apply to all County personnel. Each and every employee has
an obligation to perform his/her duties in a safe and efficient manner and to report any and all
unsafe acts or situations to his/her supervisor immediately. In addition to these general safety
rules, all state, local and federal rules and regulations apply.
THESE RULES DO NOT PROHIBIT DEPARTMENT HEADS FROM ESTABLISHING
MORE STRINGENT OR SPECIFIC RULES AND REGULATIONS RELEVANT TO THEIR
PARTICULAR OPERATION.
A.
GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING
Good housekeeping shall be of primary concern to all employees. The following rules shall be
observed by all EMPLOYEES:
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Good housekeeping practices shall be a part of the daily routine, with cleanup being a
continuous procedure.
Aisles and passageways will not be used for the storage of hand trucks, stock, equipment
or materials.
Oil, grease, or other liquids when spilled on the floor or work surfaces should
immediately be wiped up or sprinkled with absorbent floor material. Spill areas should
be marked and barricaded.
Gather up tools and return them to their proper place. Make sure that no tool or other
appliance has been left in any machine or other place where it might fall or cause damage
when the power is turned on.
Return all surplus materials to stock or storage areas.
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B.
All employees are required to keep the work area to which they are assigned clean and
neat. Keep all tools and equipment in a safe, orderly manner.
Scrap material and rubbish shall be placed only in containers provided for that purpose.
Metal stock, lumber, and cased or crated goods should be stored in a neat, safe, and
orderly manner. Round stock should be blocked to prevent rolling, gas cylinders secured
by chains in an upright position and tiered material cross tied.
DO NOT hang clothing, towels, rags, or other combustible materials on radiators, hot
lines, near floors or hot surfaces.
OFFICE SAFETY
The following guidelines shall be observed by all Campbell County employees:
- Good housekeeping is a must in every office.
- Horseplay is unacceptable.
- If spilled liquids are on the floor, arrange for cleanup immediately to prevent a slip or
fall.
- Pick up any items that have fallen on the floor, as they could easily be the cause of a slip
or fall accident.
- All defective equipment should be immediately reported to a supervisor. The supervisor
is responsible to take steps to correct the unsafe condition.
- Desk and cabinets should be kept clean and orderly.
- An open drawer of a desk or cabinet is a hazard that can cause trips or falls. Keep
drawers and cabinet doors closed.
- Use handles when closing desk drawers, file cabinets, safes, and doors. Avoid curling
fingers around tops and sides of drawers where they may be cut or injured when closing
the drawer.
- Position all desk equipment to allow a 2-inch border at the edge of the desk. This will
help prevent items from falling to the floor where they can be trip/slip hazard.
- All chairs should be used for sitting only. Do not lean back to the extent that the front
legs are lifted off the floor.
- Carry pencils, scissors, and other sharp objects with the point down to prevent stabbing
accidents.
- Sharpened pencils should be placed point down in pencil holders or kept in desk drawers.
- Sharp or pointed objects, such as scissors, letter openers, and tacks, should be kept in
protective containers in desk drawers. This would help prevent hand injuries when
rummaging through drawers.
- DO NOT leave open scissors lying on top of a desk or in a desk drawer.
- If items are stored above eye level, use a ladder to retrieve or store them. Avoid standing
on a chair or other type of makeshift ladder.
- DO NOT place file cabinets so that open drawers will block doors or passageways.
- The standard four-drawer filing cabinet can cause injury if it is upset, usually as a result
of opening a heavily loaded top drawer. Open only one drawer at a time. When possible
load heavy ledgers and files in the bottom drawers. Always fill a cabinet from the bottom
drawers to the top drawers to maintain the lowest possible center of gravity in the cabinet.
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C.
Where the possibility exists that a cabinet may tip when opened, request Public Works to
secure the cabinet to the floor or adjacent cabinets.
DO NOT place two drawer cabinets on top of each other to make a four drawer cabinet
unless they are bolted together, the cabinets should be replaced with one four drawer unit.
Electrical and telephone cords are to be located out of the passageways and walkways
where they would create a tripping hazard.
DO NOT overload electrical outlets.
Notify Public Works of any observed defects in electrical appliances.
DO NOT remove the ground prong on three-prong plugs. Electrical equipment with
ground pin requires a three-prong receptacle. In the event an electrical outlet is not the
three-prong type, request Public Works to replace the units.
DO NOT use extension cords, adapter, gang or cheetah plugs.
Check that electric wires and plugs are in good condition, with no frayed or worn areas.
Turn off electrical equipment at end of workday.
Avoid standing in front of closed doors that may suddenly open.
When using stairways, take one step at a time. Stair rails or wall rails should be used to
prevent falls when ascending or descending stairs.
DO NOT stop and talk on stairs. Use landings.
Check that floor surfaces are in good condition. Report slippery areas or torn carpets.
Keep hands and fingers on the handle of the paper cutter before pressing down.
Keep paper cutter handle in closed/locked position when not in use.
Keep fingers away from ejecting slot when loading or testing stapling devices.
DO NOT place objects on windowsills.
Know how to call 9-1-1.
VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINALS (VDT) WORKSTATION LAYOUT
Many employees use computers. Some employees use computers the entire day, others part of
the day, and some use them occasionally. Whatever the frequency of use of the computer is,
there are some basic health and safety procedures to help prevent injuries. No matter how
comfortable your workstation is, sitting still for long periods of time can be tiring and stressful.
Stretch occasionally and look away from the work frequently. If possible, get up from the
terminal and do other tasks. Alternate different tasks throughout the workday to vary work
rhythms. Take time out to collate papers or deliver completed work. This will keep strain and
tension from building up.
1. How to Adjust Your Workstation
Many workstations are not ideal; some simple adjustments can usually improve them.
a. Keyboard Height
The keyboard height should be comfortable - about 2 ½ inches from the top of the table to the
top surface of the space bar and bottom row of keys. At that height, the desktop can give the
needed support to the operator’s wrists. If the desktop is the right height, approximately 24 to 28
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inches, the upper and lower arms form a comfortable angle of approximately 90 degrees. Upper
arms will then hang comfortably at ones sides, taking the strain off the upper back and shoulders.
If the keyboard is not adjustable, and it is too high for comfort, try placing pads under the wrists
to elevate them to a more comfortable position. Keyboards are rarely too low, but a low
keyboard can be adjusted. Try a pad of paper or flat piece of wood under the keyboard.
b. Screen Face Angle and Screen Height
The face of the screen should be tilted back about 10 to 20 degrees for easier viewing - provided
this does not increase the glare on the screen. The top of the screen should be no higher than eye
level to minimize eye movement. For comfortable viewing, the screen should be about 18 inches
from the eyes. If the angle of the screen is not adjustable, and the screen is too vertical, you can
place a small wedge under the front of the monitor to tilt it back.
c. Chair Height
Good posture is essential. To prevent neck and back strain, keep the spine and head upright. Sit
well back into the chair. The chair is at a comfortable working height when one does not feel
excessive pressure on the legs from the edge of the seat. Pressure from the seat front could make
the legs go to sleep. The backrest should fit comfortable at the small of the back to give good
support.
Use the following methods to determine the correct chair height:
- Sit with the soles of the shoes flat on the floor. Keep the shins perpendicular to the floor
and relax the thigh muscles
- Measure the distance from the hollow of the knees to the floor
- Subtract 1 to 3 inches
- The resulting measurement is the correct height for the top of the chair seat
d.
Glare
Sometimes glare and poor lighting makes it difficult to read the VDT screen. The following are
some hints in improving the workstation lighting. To control glare:
- Adjust the screen’s brightness and contrast controls to compensate for reflections on the
screen
- Close the blinds or pull the shades to block daylight coming through a window from
behind the terminal
- Try to eliminate or adjust any intense light source shining directly into the eyes
- Adjust the angle of the screen to minimize the glare
One can minimize the strain of reading in a dimly lit room by using a small task light. Make
sure the light is positioned so it does not cause glare or reflect on the screen.
D.
CHEMICALS SAFETY/HANDLING CHEMICALS
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All personnel handling or working with acid, caustics, solvents, or petroleum products shall
follow safe work practices and all safety rules. Wear ALL necessary personnel protective
equipment such as goggles, gloves, and proper clothing when working with acids or other
corrosive materials. No food or drink shall be stored or consumed in the area where potentially
toxic substances are stored, mixed or otherwise handled. Employees will use due care to avoid
spills or splashes when handling chemicals. Spilled chemicals must be cleaned up immediately.
Use absorbent materials and proper disposal procedures indicated on the Material Safety Data
Sheet when spills occur. All containers of chemicals or substances shall be clearly labeled to
indicate the hazards and all precautionary measures to be observed. Handle tools carefully while
working around acid or other chemicals to avoid dropping them. They may cause a splash.
After tools have been used around corrosive chemicals, clean them thoroughly. In mixing acid
and water, always pour the acid into water slowly. Never pour water into acid; it may splash.
If contact is made with caustic or corrosive chemicals, take immediate action by flushing the
affected part with water. If swallowed, check the chemical warning label on container or the
Material Safety Data Sheet.
If caustic or corrosive chemicals enter eyes, flush eyes with water for a minimum of 15 minutes.
In the event an eye wash system is not available, use a garden hose or any source of potable
water that is immediately available.
E.
HAZARD COMMUNICATION
OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.1200 Hazard Communication requires employers to communicate to
employees information concerning hazardous chemicals in the workplace. Campbell County
provides information about hazardous materials to all employees who use or who could be
exposed to such materials. The data includes information such as:
- Chemical labeling
- Material safety data sheets
- Personal protective equipment as necessary
- Employee training on the safe use and handling of the materials.
- Emergency Response
- Hazards of Non-Routine Tasks
The following are basic safe work practices to utilize when working with hazardous materials.
Refer to the Department’s Hazard Communication Program for program specifics.
- Know where the written Hazard Communication Program is kept for employee access.
Read it. The written program clearly outlines the purpose and intent of the Hazard
Communication Policy.
- Know where the material safety data sheets (MSDS) are located. Read and use the
MSDS of each product to understand, determine, and apply the safety precautions,
personal protective equipment, and the type of hazards associated with the use and
storage of the material.
- Read warning labels to identify hazardous materials and the hazards associated with
them.
- Read all labels carefully to determine the recommended safety precautions.
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F.
Wear all required personal protective equipment when working with hazardous materials.
Know how to fit, clean, and store the personal protective equipment.
Use established engineering methods to control exposures as instructed. Engineering
controls help reduce exposure to hazardous materials.
Follow all safe work practices when using or handling hazardous chemicals. If in doubt,
ask supervisors for help.
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS STANDARD
OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.1030 Bloodborne Pathogens Standard requires employers to determine
who has occupational exposure to establish methods to reduce workplace exposure to bloodborne
diseases. The standard requires the employer to develop an Exposure Control Plan. The
information in the Exposure Control Plan will insure limited occupational exposure to blood and
other potentially infectious materials. If applicable, refer to the Department’s Bloodborne
Pathogen Exposure Control Plan for specifics.
This standard applies to all Campbell County employees who in the scope of their employment
may be potentially exposed to:
- Blood
- Blood Products
- Body Fluids
- Infectious Materials
An employee is covered by the standard if it is reasonably anticipated that he/she could be
exposed to bloodborne pathogens as a result of performing the job duties. The two most
significant diseases one may be exposed to are Hepatitis B (HBV) and Human
Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).
The Exposure Control Plan must include:
- Identification of tasks, procedures, and job classifications where occupational exposure to
blood or body fluids may occur;
- Methods of compliance emphasizing engineering and work practice controls;
- The type of appropriate personal protective equipment required for each job or task;
- Provisions for general housekeeping and handling of contaminated laundry;
- An outline of training requirements and methods of recordkeeping.
A copy of the Exposure Control Plan will be made available to each employee.
The Exposure Control Plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually to reflect new or
modified tasks and procedures. The employer must make the Hepatitis B vaccination series
available at no cost to the employee to all employees who may have occupational exposure.
Employees shall:
- Observe Universal Precautions set forth by the CDC (Center of Disease Control) to
prevent contact with blood or any other potentially infectious materials.
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G.
Utilize/wear any personal protective equipment required for a task outlined in the
Exposure Control Plan.
Be familiar with warning labels, signs, and color-coding that may indicate bio-hazardous
wastes.
Use established engineering methods to control exposures as instructed in the Exposure
Control Plan.
Not eat, drink, smoke, apply cosmetics or lip balm, handle contact lenses where blood or
other potentially infectious materials are kept.
Not recap, remove or bend any needles or sharps.
Not shear or bread contaminated sharps.
Not wash or decontaminate “disposable” gloves for reuse.
Clean and decontaminate all equipment and work surfaces that have been contaminated
with blood or other potentially infectious materials.
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY
OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.146 Confined Space Entry Standard provides a broad definition of
confined space as one which has limited access or egress (exit), is not normally used for
employee occupancy, and where a hazardous atmosphere may naturally exist or be created by
work procedures or processes. A hazardous atmosphere is further defined as one that contains
one or more of the following:
- Combustible gases or vapors in excess of 10% of the lower explosive limit (LEL) for
those gases or vapors.
- Oxygen deficiency where the atmosphere contains less than 19.5% oxygen or more than
22.0%.
- Toxic gases and vapors present in a quantity that exceeds the threshold limit value
(TLV).
Tanks, pits, boilers, manholes and sewers are some examples of common confined spaces. The
following will be used when entering a confined space:
The area to be entered shall be tested for hazards prior to each entry, using an approved device.
A record of each test shall be completed and turned in to the supervisor each day. The record
will indicate the time, date, location and name of person testing the confined space.
Additionally, oxygen content, any gases present and the serial number of the testing unit will be
noted on the entry permit.
Refer to the department Confined Space Entry Program for specific procedures.
H.
LOCK-OUT/TAG-OUT
OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.147, the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lock-Out/Tag-Out) standard
covers the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected
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energizing or start-up of the machine or equipment could cause injury to employees. According
to OSHA, an energy source is any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic,
chemical, thermal, or other energy. The lock-out/tag-out rule requires the employer to establish
an energy control program that includes:
- Documented energy control procedures.
- An employee-training program.
- Periodic inspections of the procedures.
This standard requires employers to establish an Energy Control Procedure Program and utilize
procedures for affixing appropriate lockout devices or tag-out devices. Refer to the
Department’s Lock-Out/Tag-Out Energy Control Procedure for specifics.
The Energy Control Plan must include:
- A specific statement of the intended use of the procedure.
- A specific statement to ensure that machines and equipment are isolated and inoperative
before any employee performs service or maintenance where the unexpected energizing,
start-up, or release of stored energy could occur and cause injury.
- Specific procedural steps for shutting down, isolating, blocking and securing machines or
equipment to control hazardous energy.
- Specific requirements for testing a machine or equipment to determine and verify the
effectiveness of lockout energy control measures.
An employee having the need to secure an energy source shall:
- Conduct periodic inspections - these inspections shall be conducted by the employee and
an authorized employee other than the one(s) utilizing the energy control procedure
- Utilize tags legible and understandable by all authorized employees
- Utilize lock-out devices substantial enough to prevent accidental removal or would
require the use of excessive force or unusual techniques, such as the use of bolt cutters or
other metal cutting tools
- Utilize lock-out and tag-out devices that indicate the identity of the employee applying
the device
- Utilize specific procedures during shift or personnel changes to ensure the continuity of
lock-out or tag-out protection
Before lock-out/tag-out devices are removed and energy is restored to the machine or equipment,
employees shall ensure the following:
- The work area shall be inspected to ensure non-essential items have been removed and to
ensure machines or equipment components are operationally intact
- The work area shall be checked to ensure all employees have been safely positioned or
removed
- Each lock-out/tag-out device shall be removed from each energy isolating device by the
employee who applied the device
- Blocking the flow of energy from the power source and placing a tag or lock to prevent
others from turning the power on is one way to prevent accidental start up of electrical
equipment
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I.
MATERIALS HANDLING
All personnel engaged in handling materials of any type shall be instructed in the proper method
of lifting heavy objects. Employees are required to follow all safe work practices involved with
lifting and material handling.
- Proper lifting involves: use the large muscles of the legs rather than the small muscles of
the back. Always, take a firm grip, secure a good footing, place the feet at a comfortable
distance apart, keep the load close to the body, keep your back straight, bend the knees
and lift your legs. Always plan the lift and placement of the load.
- If the load is too heavy, get help. DO NOT strain.
- When working with another person and carrying loads such as pipe, etc., let your partner
know before dropping an end or doing anything which might create an accident.
- Fingers and toes shall be kept in the clear before setting down any materials or
equipment.
- When a crane is used to lift heavy or bulky objects, remember to stand clear of the
suspended or overhanging load.
- All materials must be loaded on motor trucks and secured so they will not fall off in
transit. If necessary, tie the load to the truck.
- Materials shall be stored or placed only in authorized areas.
- Defective or broken strappings on materials shall be removed, repaired, or replaced
before handling.
- Materials shall not be thrown from elevated places to the floor or ground. Suitable
lowering equipment should always be used for this purpose.
- Neckties, finger rings, loose clothing, and other such items must not be worn by
personnel working on or near any rotating machinery.
- Lifting and lowering operations being performed by several persons shall be done on
signal from one person chosen to be the group coordinator and only after everyone’s
hands and feet are in the clear.
- Wheelbarrows, hand trucks and other similar devices shall not be over loaded or
unbalanced.
- All stacked materials, cargo, etc. shall be examined for sharp edges, protruding points,
signs of damage, or other factors likely to cause injury to persons handling objects.
These defects must be corrected before proceeding with the operation.
- When removing bulk material from piles, or when excavating, never undercut the pile so
one would have to work under overhanging material.
- Hand trucks should be in safe operating condition.
- Material Safety Data Sheets should be available to employees handling hazardous
substances.
- Pallets must be checked before being used.
- Trailers and trucks should be secured from movement during loading and unloading.
J.
WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING
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Only authorized and trained personnel can operate welding equipment. Compressed gas
cylinders should be examined regularly for signs of defects, deep rusting or leakage.
Only approved apparatus - torches, regulators, safety valves - must be used. Welders must be
certain approved fire-fighting equipment is nearby before commencing welding operations when
working in the vicinity of flammable materials. There must be adequate ventilation in and where
welding or cutting is performed.
SIGNS MUST BE POSTED: DANGER - NO SMOKING, MATCHES OR OPEN FLAMES.
K.
HANDLING OF COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS
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L.
Compressed Gas cylinders must not be stored in direct sunlight, near a heat source or any
hot place.
Employees must not use a cylinder of compressed gas without reducing the pressure
through a regulator attached to the cylinder valve.
Oil and grease will not be used as a lubricant on valves and attachments of oxygen
cylinders. Keep oxygen cylinders and fittings away from oil and grease, and do not
handle such cylinders or apparatus with oily hands, gloves, or clothing.
Oxygen shall not be used as a substitute for compressed air in pneumatic tools, in oil
preheating burners to start internal combustion engines, or to dust clothing.
Cylinders of oxygen, when stored indoors, shall be kept in areas separate from flammable
gases.
Cylinders must be kept in racks or stands, or set in an upright position, and chained to
prevent being knocked over.
The valve protection cap must be kept in place whenever cylinders are not in use.
Cylinders must never be used for other than their designated kind of gas.
Do not stand in front of gauges when opening the discharge valve.
Handling of cylinders by cranes must be done only when the proper racks are used. Rope
or wire slings are prohibited.
It is prohibited to use cylinders as rollers or supports.
Remove regulators and place caps over valves when transporting cylinders by other than
regular cylinder trucks.
Cylinders must never be dropped or treated roughly.
Leaky cylinders must be placed in the open immediately upon notice.
Inspect hose lines frequently for leaks. Do not place torches in cans or leave in
unventilated places.
OVERHEAD CRANES
The rated load must be visible. Do not lift more than the rated load. The hoist controls must be
plainly marked indicating the direction of travel. An inspection sheet showing the date of
inspection and who inspected the crane must be visibly posted.
1. Overhead Crane Inspection
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a. Conduct frequent inspections from a daily to one-month interval for the following
conditions:
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All functional operating mechanisms for maladjustment interfering with proper
operation.
All functional operating mechanism for excessive wear of components.
All safety devices for malfunctioning.
All hoist and travel limit switches should be checked without a load on the device
at the beginning of each work shift. Each motion should be inched into its limit
switch with extreme care.
Deterioration or leakage in lines, tanks, valves, drain pumps or other parts of air
or hydraulic systems.
Frequent inspection procedure for overhead hoists as specified in ANSI B30.16.
Frequent inspection procedure for hooks as specified in ANSI B30.10.
b. Conduct periodic inspections from one to twelve month intervals for the following
conditions:
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Loose bolts and rivets.
Deformed, cracked or corroded structural members.
Cracked or worn sheaves.
Worn, cracked or distorted parts such as pins, bearings, wheels, shafts, gears,
rollers, clamping devices, bumpers switch baffles, interlock bolts, and trolley
stops.
Wear on brake system parts, linings, pawls and ratchets.
Wear on chain sprockets and chain stretch chain.
Electrical apparatus for signs of pitting or deterioration of control contractors,
limit switches, and pushbutton station.
Worn drive tires.
Wear on lower load carrying flange of all track sections in the system both
straight and curved.
Periodic inspection procedure for overhead hoists as specified in ANSI B30.16.
DAILY INSPECTION REFERS TO EVERY DAY THAT THE CRANE IS USED.
M.
FORKLIFTS
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Only authorized and trained personnel may operate a powered industrial truck (forklift).
Trucks must not be driven up to anyone standing in front of a fixed object.
Under all travel conditions the truck must be operated at a safe speed that will allow it to
be brought to a stop in a safe manner.
No one is allowed to stand or pass under the elevated portion of the truck, whether it is
loaded or not.
Trucks will not be used for opening or shutting freight doors.
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N.
A safe distance must be maintained from the edge of the ramps and platforms while on
any elevated dock.
There must be sufficient headroom under overhead installations, lights, pipes and
sprinkler systems.
Stunt driving and horseplay is prohibited.
Only stable or safely arranged loads should be handled. Caution will be used when
handling off-center loads.
Only loads within the rated capacity of the truck will be handled.
If at any time a powered industrial truck is found to be in need of repair, defective or in
any way unsafe, it will be taken out of service until repaired.
The brakes of highway trucks must be set and wheel chocks placed under the rear wheels
to prevent the truck from rolling while they are boarded with forklift trucks.
A powered industrial truck is considered to be unattended when the driver is dismounted,
over 25 feet from the vehicle, or cannot see the vehicle from where he/she is standing.
No modifications will be made to the forklift without the expressed written permission
from the manufacturer.
Do not turn the forklift on any hill, ramp, or incline.
When ascending or descending grades in excess of 10%, loaded trucks shall be driven
with the load upgrade.
Seatbelts must be equipped and worn on all forklifts.
Forklift must be equipped with an audible warning device.
BATTERY CHARGING AND STORAGE BATTERIES
Battery charging installations should be located in areas designated for that purpose.
According to OSHA 1910.151, where the eyes or body of any person may be exposed to
injurious corrosive materials, suitable facilities for quick drenching or flushing of the eyes and
body shall be provided within the work area for immediate emergency use. Battery charging
must be done in a well-ventilated area. Facilities for flushing and neutralizing spilled electrolyte
must be provided. NO SMOKING signs must be posted in battery charging areas. Tools and
other metallic objects must be kept away from the tops of uncovered batteries.
O.
MACHINERY
Employees must never operate machinery or equipment without authorization, and then only
after receiving full instructions on its safe operation from their supervisor.
- All gears, belts, pulleys, pinch points or other power transmission equipment shall be
adequately guarded.
- Guards and safety devices must be kept in place at all times except when removed for
necessary repairs.
- Lockout and tag out procedures must be followed when adjusting, oiling, clearing, or
repairing equipment.
- A brush shall be used for clearing chips away from machinery, equipment, or
workbenches. Hands shall never be used to clear any chips, dust, or other material.
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P.
POWER TOOLS
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Q.
Never apply a wrench to moving machinery. Stop the machine, and then carefully
remove all tools before starting.
Tool rests, tongue guards, and eye shields shall be kept in adjustment on grinding wheels
at all times.
DO NOT leave machines unattended while in operation.
Machine operators should not be distracted while on the job.
A vice or clamp shall be used to secure work in place, freeing both hands to operate the
tool.
Power shut off switches should be within operators reach.
Safety glasses/goggles must be worn when operating power tools.
On abrasive grinders, the tongue guard must be adjusted at ¼” maximum and the tool rest
must be at 1/8” maximum. The adjustable tongue or the end of the peripheral member at
the top shall never exceed an inch.
Immediately before mounting, all wheels shall be closely inspected and sounded by using
the ring test. Tap the wheel lightly with a non-metallic implement such as the handle of a
screwdriver. If it produces a ringing sound, it is in good condition. If it sounds dull,
replace the wheel. Do not use a cracked wheel. If not properly mounted and used,
sections of the wheel may fly out at high speeds and can strike the operator.
The spindle speed of the machine shall be checked before mounting the wheel to be
certain it does not exceed the maximum operating speed marked on the wheel.
Never carry a tool by the cord or hose.
Never yank the cord or the hose to disconnect it from the receptacle.
All observers should be kept at a safe distance away from the work area.
Avoid accidental starting. Do not hold a finger on the switch button while carrying a
plugged in tool.
Tools should be maintained with care. They should be sharp and clean for the best
performance. Follow instructions in the user’s manual for lubricating and changing
accessories.
All portable electric tools that are damaged should be removed from use and tagged “Do
Not Use”.
Grinders, saws and similar equipment must have appropriate guards in place.
Portable circular saws must be equipped with guards above and below the base plate or
shoe.
All cord connected, electrically operated tools and equipment must be grounded or
approved double insulated.
Hands should be dry before using any electrical equipment and the user should not be
standing in, or be too close to, water.
Carefully examine all electrical equipment, including extension cords, every time they
are used.
POWDER ACTUATED TOOLS
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Powder Actuated Tools (P.A.T.) operates like a loaded gun and should be treated with the same
respect and precautions. They must only be operated by specially trained employees. It is
required for P.A.T. operators to be certified and carry a valid operator’s license. P.A.T.’s must be
stored in their locked containers when not in use. These tools should not be used in explosive or
flammable atmospheres. The tool should be inspected prior to each use. A P.A.T. should never
be pointed at anyone. The tool should not be loaded unless it is to be used immediately. A
loaded tool should not be left unattended. Fasteners must not be driven into very hard or brittle
materials that might chip or splatter.
R.
JACKS
All jacks - lever and ratchet jacks, screw jacks, and hydraulic jacks - must have a device that
stops them from jacking up too high. Also, the manufacturer’s load limit must be permanently
marked in a prominent place on the jack and should not be exceeded. A jack must never be used
to support a lifted load. Once the load has been lifted, it must immediately be blocked up.
Proper maintenance of jacks is essential for safety. All jacks must be inspected before each use
and lubricated regularly. Remove handles from jacks when not in operation.
S.
COMPRESSORS, COMPRESSED AIR & PNEUMATIC TOOLS
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T.
Compressors must be equipped with pressure relief valves and pressure gauges.
Air intakes should be located so that clean air enters the compressor.
It is prohibited to direct compressed air towards a person.
Compressed air used for cleaning purposes must be reduced to 30 psi.
Signs must be posted warning of the automatic starting features of the air compressors.
Compressors must be drained periodically.
Pneumatic tools should be used at the manufacturers listed pressure.
Compressed air shall not be used to blow dust out of hair or to clean clothes while being
worn.
HAND TOOLS
-
Always use the proper tool for the job. Inspect tools for flaws, correct sizes, and cutting
edges before using. If tools are found to be defective, return them for replacements.
Tools must be used for the purpose they were designed.
Keep hand tools clean and in proper working order at all times.
Tools with mushroomed heads or hammers with split or loose handles shall not be used
until repaired.
Files shall be used only when equipped with handles.
Only spark-proof tools shall be used around explosives.
Sharp and pointed tools shall be carried in sheaths instead of loose in the pockets.
Keep hands out of the path of sharp tools. When using knives or chisels cut away from,
instead of toward the body.
DO NOT leave tools lying where others may slip or trip over them.
DO NOT leave chuck wrenches in chuck.
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-
U.
ELECTRICAL SAFETY
-
-
V.
When using air power equipment always shut off air at manifold and bleed air hose
before disconnecting machine, hand tools or air hose.
All portable air drills, air hammers, etc. shall be equipped with a hand grip switch which
will shut off the supply of air when grip is released.
Only authorized and qualified persons shall make repairs to or work on electrical
equipment.
All electrical equipment must be grounded or double insulated.
Hands should be dry before using any electrical equipment and the user should not be
standing in, or too close to, water.
Working surfaces shall be kept dry when working with or near an electrical apparatus.
Steam, water, or oil leaks near electrical equipment shall be reported immediately to the
supervisor in charge.
Carefully examine all electrical equipment, including extension cords, every time they
are used. Check for frayed, torn, or split cords. Look for cracked or broken insulation.
Beware of damaged plugs.
Do not use any electrical equipment with frayed or otherwise deteriorated insulation.
Electrical equipment that is heating or sparking excessively shall be turned off
immediately and an electrician called to correct the situation.
All electrical wires must be considered live until proven otherwise. Test all circuits to
make sure of this.
Follow required lockout/tagout procedures.
Blocking the flow of energy from the power source and placing a tag or lock to prevent
others from turning the power on is one way to prevent accidental start up of electrical
equipment.
The use of makeshift and over capacity fuses is prohibited.
Never yank the cord to disconnect it from the receptacle.
Learn what to do in an emergency. Know where and how to shut down the power.
LADDER SAFETY
The primary safety hazard involved with using a ladder is falling. A poorly designed or
improperly used ladder may collapse under the load placed upon it and cause the worker to fall.
Various types of ladders used include:
FIXED LADDERS – a ladder permanently attached to a structure, building or equipment.
STEP LADDER – a self-supporting portable ladder, non adjustable in length, having flat
steps and hinged back.
SINGLE LADDER – a non self-supporting portable ladder, nonadjustable in length,
consisting of but one section. Its size is designated by overall length of the side rail.
EXTENSION LADDER – a non self-supporting portable ladder adjustable in length.
Ladder safety rules include, but are not limited to the following:
- Never exceed the rated weight limits of the ladder.
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-
-
W.
All ladders should be checked before using to make certain that rungs and side rails are in
sound condition. The rungs should be free of grease and oil.
All wood parts should be free from sharp edges and splinters.
Ladders with broken or missing steps, rungs, or cleats, broken side rails or other faulty
equipment must not be used.
Ladders that have developed defects must be withdrawn from service for repair or
destruction. They must be tagged or marked DANGEROUS, - DO NOT USE.
Portable straight ladders should be firmly placed on secure footing. If there is a danger of
slipping, the ladder should be held by a fellow worker or lashed in place.
Step spacings should be uniform and no more than 12 inches.
Both hands should be kept on the ladder while ascending or descending.
The worker should always face the ladder when climbing up or down.
When on a ladder, exercise caution and DO NOT over-reach.
When necessary to place ladders in front of a blind doorway, the door should be locked
or guarded by a fellow employee.
Barrels, boxes, chairs, or crates shall not be used in place of stepladders.
Ladders must not be placed on boxes, barrels, or other unstable bases to obtain additional
height.
Short ladders must not be spliced together to provide long sections.
Straight ladders shall not be used unless equipped with safety shoes.
Ladders should not be used for any other purposes than for what they were intended.
Stepladders must be fully extended and in sound condition before using. They must be
equipped with a metal spreader or locking device to hold the front and back sections in
the open position.
The top step of a stepladder should not be used as a step.
Extension ladders longer than 60 feet must not be used.
Metal ladders must never be used near electrical equipment.
Ladders used to gain access to a roof or other area must extend at least 3 feet above the
top point of support.
Ladders shall be equipped with a line near the top rung and shall be secured to support
where possible.
The foot of a ladder shall, where possible, be used at such a pitch that the horizontal
distance from the top support to the foot of the ladder is one-quarter of the working
length of the ladder (the length along the ladder between the foot and the support).
STAIRS
-
The use of handrails is encouraged.
Packages or other materials carried on stairways should be held so that vision is not
obscured.
When using stairways, take one step at a time. Stair rails or wall rails should be used to
prevent falls when ascending or descending stairs.
Do not stop and talk on stairs. Use landings.
All stairways, catwalks, gangways, and open work areas above the ground or floor shall
be provided with substantial guardrails.
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X.
SCAFFOLDING
-
Y.
All scaffolds shall be equipped with lifelines that shall be worn by personnel working on
such structures.
DO NOT sit, lean, or rest on or against any railing or lifeline.
A safe means must be provided to gain access to the working platform level through the
use of a ladder, ramp, etc.
Overhead protection must be provided for personnel on a scaffold exposed to overhead
hazards.
Tools and equipment must not be left unsecured in any elevated position.
The footing or anchorage for scaffolds must be sound, rigid and capable of carrying the
maximum intended load without settling or displacement. Unstable objects, such as
barrels, boxes, loose brick, or concrete blocks must not be used to support scaffolds or
planks.
Scaffold planks must extend over their end supports not less than 6 inches and no more
than 18 inches.
Scaffold planking must be overlapped a minimum of 12 inches or secured from
movement.
Guardrails, midrails, and toe boards must be installed on all open sides and ends of
platforms more than 10 feet above the floor.
There should be a screen with ½ inch maximum opening between toe boards and the
guardrails where persons are required to work or pass under the scaffold.
Scaffolds must be maintained in a safe condition and must not be altered or moved
horizontally while they are in use or occupied.
Built-up scaffolds shall be erected by qualified personnel and inspected at appropriate
periods to insure the structure is safe.
Damaged or weakened scaffolds must be reported immediately and not used until
repaired.
Employees must not work on scaffolds during storms or high winds.
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
1. Landscaping Equipment
When working with any landscape equipment, the following procedures should be observed:
- Read the manufacturers manual for each piece of equipment.
- Follow the recommended operating procedures at all times.
- Check and inspect machinery for defects.
- Use proper fueling method.
- Inspect equipment for all proper safety features - do not override safety devices.
- Dress for safety - wear all necessary Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE).
The following Personal Protective Equipment is recommended to be used when working with
landscaping equipment:
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2.
Eye protection - safety glasses or goggles - tinted when available
Hearing protection
Safety shoes
Close fitting clothing, not loose or tight
Gloves
Hard hat (chain saws)
Cut resistant chaps (chain saws)
Fueling and Refueling Procedures
The following procedures will be observed when fueling/refueling:
- DO NOT SMOKE!
- Always fill on a level surface.
- Do not fill while engine is running or hot. Let the engine cool.
- Do not overfill the tank, wipe up all spills.
- Remove any dirt and debris from the surface of the equipment to prevent debris from
entering fuel tank.
- Wipe off any spilled fuel after filling.
- Keep fuel in an approved safety can.
- Mix two cycle fuel in the safety can - not the fuel tank.
3.
Weed Cutters
-
4.
Check shield for cracks.
Use the correct shield for the blade in use. Plastic/nylon line - use plastic shield. Metal
blades - use metal shields.
Utilize the proper length of nylon cord.
Make sure lock handle is in place.
Throttle must operate freely.
Know where debris goes - curved shaft models throw debris in a clockwise direction,
with straight shaft models debris is thrown in a counter clockwise direction.
Use the safety harness as it distributes the weight of the machine.
Avoid hazards; be aware for pedestrians, wire fences, hidden objects.
When using the metal blades - the bullhorn handle keeps the operator away from the
blade.
Store safely - let machine cool before storage.
Hedge Trimmers
-
Start tool on a firm surface; do not start in mid-air (drop start).
Do not override safety features or switches - do not tape switches in an “““on””” position.
Do not modify equipment.
Do not overreach when using the trimmer.
To clear debris from the blades - turn off the machine.
Do not remove muffler cover, if worn - replace it.
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5.
Blowers
-
6.
Check fan guard.
Make sure there are no bystanders in the way.
NEVER point the blower at anyone.
Riding Mower
-
Before riding:
Check the machine for defects.
Check for all safety devices.
Make sure the instruction decals are in good condition, easily readable, and
understandable.
Make sure the deflector chute or back chute is clear.
Make sure all guards are in place.
Make sure the parking brake is in good operational order.
Check and clear the area - the area should be free from pets, children, and debris. All
debris must be cleaned up before starting.
DO NOT OVERRIDE SEAT SAFETY SWITCHES!
Use blade disengagement lever when not in a mower situation.
When cutting on a slope - go up and down the slope to avoid tipping over.
Passengers are not allowed on the mower at any time.
No County employee shall operate a motor vehicle while wearing a headset, headphone, or other
listening device, other than a hearing aid or instrument for the improvement of impaired hearing.
When dislodging anything caught in the blade or chute:
- Turn off the engine.
- Remove the key.
- Disengage spark plug wire
- Then remove debris.
When transporting mower:
- Carriage should be raised as high as possible.
- Parking brake should be engaged.
7.
Chain Saws
-
Plan the work - ensure that there is an obstacle-free work area and, in the case of felling,
an escape from the falling tree.
Remove all obstructions from the path of the saw.
Secure a good footing.
Grip the handle firmly; the thumbs and fingers should encircle the handle.
Chain saws should be started on the ground and not in the cuts.
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-
Never operate a chain saw that is damaged, improperly adjusted, or not completely and
securely assembled.
When cutting - avoid reaching above shoulder height.
Never adjust the guide bar or saw chain when the engine is operating.
Never carry a chain saw with its engine running (idling). Cut the engine and carry the
chain saw with the guide bar point to the rear and with the muffler away from the body.
Be sure that the saw chain stops moving when the throttle control trigger is released.
Before servicing, fueling or transporting - switch off engine.
FIRE PREVENTION
One of the most costly and destructive causes for loss of life and property that the County could
experience would be from a major fire.
A.
REPORTING FIRES
All employees should:
B.
Report fires immediately to 9-1-1 and follow the procedures outlines in your Emergency
Fire Plan.
Know their Department’s Emergency Fire Plan.
Know the location of the exits.
Know the location, correct operation and usage of the nearest fire extinguisher.
PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Know the location of the closest and correct fire extinguisher. A fire extinguisher should be used
only on a small fire. Use a fire extinguisher only if trained to use it.
Most portable fire extinguishers are classified:
A
for fires involving combustibles like wood or paper
B
for flammable liquids
C
for electrical wiring and equipment
ABC for combinations fires
D
for combustible metals like magnesium, sodium
Additionally, portable Halon fire extinguishers should be used to extinguish fires involving
computers or other sensitive electrical equipment. Have the used fire extinguishers replaced or
recharged as soon as possible after use.
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C.
FIXED FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT
1.
Automatic Sprinklers
Materials must not be stacked within (18) inches of sprinkler heads. (No high storage). There
must not be any storage above the sprinkler protection. Do not store materials above the
suspended ceiling. Sprinkler heads must be in good condition, with no accumulation of dirt, dust
or grease and free from paint.
2.
Dry Chemical Systems
In the event of a fire, the fire protection system should automatically activate. If it fails to
activate, there is an emergency manual pull. Employees who work in the areas protected by a dry
chemical system should know where the manual pull station is located. The manual pull must be
located in an exit pathway and is to be activated as you leave the area in the event of a fire.
D.
HALON
Halon 1301/1211 is a gas and is usually used to protect sensitive electrical equipment, such as
computer and telephone rooms. A typical Halon system is triggered by ion, smoke or flame
detectors, or manual control. Since the detectors are sensitive to the by-products of combustion,
the devices register an alarm condition well before the system activates. There is a time device
delay of 30 seconds, to allow personnel to evacuate and seal the room before the Halon is
discharged. Combustible materials shall not be stored in a Halon protected area.
If work is done in an area that is protected by a Halon system, the employee should know:
a.
What the fire alarm sounds like.
b.
Emergency procedures for evacuating and sealing the room.
c.
The location and how to use the ABORT button to stop the activation of the system, if
required.
E.
FIRE/SMOKE ALARMS SYSTEMS
In the event an alarm rings, employees should:
- Know what the smoke detector sounds like.
- Follow your emergency fire plan.
- Prepare to evacuate, according to your emergency fire plan.
F.
FIRE DOORS
A fire door and its assemblies is a special door designed to contain the spread of fire and smoke
within a building. Some models of fire doors will operate automatically in case of a fire. Do not
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prop open self-closing doors. Keep self-closing doors closed, but not locked, at all times. Check
that nothing blocks or will prevent full closure of a fire door.
G.
GENERAL FIRE SAFETY PRACTICES
-
-
Exit doors must be unlocked during normal working hours and free passage to and
through these exits must be maintained at all times.
Exit signs and directional exit signs, where required, must be visible and properly
indicate the direction and location of the exits. Other doors and passageways that could
be confused as an exit, must be properly marked as “NO EXIT”.
Do not overload electrical outlets. Check that electric wires and plugs are in good
condition, no frayed or worn areas. Turn off electrical equipment at end of workday.
With the exception of coffee makers and microwave ovens, the use of cooking and
heating equipment should be discouraged.
Observe “NO SMOKING” requirements.
Flammable liquids must be stored in U.L. approved safety cans or U.L. approved
flammable liquid cabinets and clearly labeled.
When transferring flammable liquids from one container to another, the containers must
be bonded and/or grounded.
NO SMOKING AROUND FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS.
PROTECTING THE PUBLIC
The public shall be kept away from locations where work activity presents hazards. Holes,
trenches, and obstructions shall be barricaded. When exposed to traffic, holes, trenches, and
obstructions shall be marked with warning signs and flags in daylight and electric flashers at
night, so located as to give the traveling public ample time to stop if necessary.
When leaving material, equipment or other obstructions on a roadway overnight, the following
precautions shall be taken:
- Equipment shall not be left adjacent to fire hydrants or directly in front of entrances to
parks, playgrounds, churches, houses, schools, or other places of public entry.
- Equipment shall be locked or otherwise secured so that unauthorized persons cannot start,
move or operate them.
- Any obstruction shall be adequately protected by approved warning devices.
Warning devices and barricades shall be placed to adequately protect the public and employees
before excavations or trenches are opened. They shall not be removed until excavations have
been back filled and the area made safe. Trucks, air compressors, welding machines, and other
equipment shall be so placed as to present the least hazard to traffic consistent with a safe
working space for employees. Trucks and equipment shall be placed between the work area and
the oncoming traffic.
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County of Campbell
SAFETY MANUAL ACKNOWLEDGMENT
I hereby acknowledge that the Campbell County Safety Manual is available for viewing on the
County Intranet under the County Information Folder and in the Human Resources office. I
further understand I may copy/print any and/or all portions of the handbook.
It is the purpose of the Safety Manual to set forth the guidelines and safety protocols of the
Board of Supervisors. The manual should not be read as including the fine detail of each
regulation, but as a general overview.
I shall make an honest effort to abide by all the rules, regulations, and procedures in this manual.
Additionally, I understand there are some portions related specifically to my position and I will
adhere to the guidelines as required.
NAME: ________________________________________________________________
DEPARTMENT:
_____________________________________________________
DATE: ____________________________________________________________
EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE: ______________________________________________
NOTE TO EMPLOYEE:
Please sign, date, and forward this certificate to Human Resources.
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