Switches - Mr Bridge

Switches - Mr Bridge
JULIAN POTTAGE on DEFENCE
West
I
♠
♥
♦
♣
AQJ3
A8
K 10 7 5
K87
N
W
E
S
West
Pass
End
North
1♦
3♠
♠
♥
♦
♣
765
J9652
J963
A
East
Pass
Pass
South
1♠
4♠
Partner, West, leads the queen of clubs,
and declarer plays low from dummy.
You win faultlessly with your ace. What
do you return?
HALLMARKED
PENCILS
The fact that you have used your ace
other than to capture dummy’s king
makes your singleton obvious to the
other two players. What you would like
to do is to put partner in before trumps
are drawn, and hope to ruff dummy’s
king of clubs. With the ace of hearts
visible in dummy, you know that
switching to heart will not achieve the
objective of getting partner in quickly,
so you should lead a small diamond.
The full deal may look like this:
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
8
Q74
A842
Q J 10 5 4
AQJ3
A8
K 10 7 5
K87
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
765
J9652
J963
A
K 10 9 4 2
K 10 3
Q
9632
Partner can capture the queen of
diamonds with the ace and revert to
clubs, probably leading the jack. If
dummy plays low, you will discard and
wait to ruff the third round. In practice
declarer calls for the king, so you ruff.
Having scored your ruff, you passively
exit with a trump and hope your opponent
must concede a club at the end.
Let us see another example on which
you have no choice but to change suit:
♠
♥
♦
♣
AKJ753
Q8
10 7 3
J8
Boxed set of four in Silver £125
also available in 9ct or 18ct gold.
Mail Order Service.
See centre pages.
East
Pass
2♥2
Pass
3♠
End
1
12-14
2
Transfer to spades
Switches
n the last issue you may recall that
we discussed why the defenders often
persevere with the suit they led at
trick one. Now we will see some reasons
for switching suits.
The best excuse for opening up a new
suit is that you have run out of the suit
originally led.
North
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
82
K 10 5 4 2
Q92
K 10 4
Page 27
Pass
Pass
South
1NT 1
2♠
4♠
West leads the ace of diamonds and,
when you encourage with the nine,
continues with the king and a low
diamond. South, who had started with
J-x-x of the suit, follows three times.
With 19 points between your hand
and dummy, and South with 12-14, West
must have 7-9. Since you have already
seen the ace and king of diamonds (7
points), partner can have at most a jack
or queen left. This means that you
cannot score a fourth trick quickly, so
you want to bide your time and give
nothing away.
The riskiest lead is a heart. If the
success of the contract depends on it,
declarer will let a heart run round to
dummy and the queen will score.
A club is almost as bad. Whilst it
might give nothing away if West has the
queen, the odds are that South has more
than 12 points (in order to accept the
game invitation), so is likely to hold the
queen of clubs. In this case, a club lead
round to the jack allows declarer to
make three club tricks: the jack now
and, by means of a finesse, the ace and
queen later.
A trump is the safe exit. Even if West
unexpectedly has Q-x, your opponent
could always pick up the suit either by
playing for the drop or by taking the
finesse.
This is the full deal:
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
6
J963
AK64
9752
AKJ753
Q8
10 7 3
J8
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
82
K 10 5 4 2
Q92
K 10 4
Q 10 9 4
A7
J85
AQ63
After your passive trump return,
declarer has only nine tricks: six trumps,
two clubs and a heart.
Continued on page 28 ❿
MODERN
AMERICAN
BIDDING
POTTAGE ON DEFENCE continued from page 27
When the Dummy
is on Your Right . . .
♠
♥
♦
♣
K93
A 10 3
82
K Q 10 8 3
♠
♥
♦
♣
N
W
E
S
Eric Kokish and Beverly Kraft – two of the
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The program consists of 200 prepared deals,
which the user bids as South. The bids selected
are evaluated and commented upon; if your
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they are shown as text on the screen. After the
bidding, you may play the hand.
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with a system summary and a user manual.
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Minor suits facing balanced openers
Smolen
Jacoby transfers
Texas transfers
Inverted minor raises
Developments after two-over-one responses
Semi-forcing 1NT responses
Third- and fourth-suit auctions
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Improved continuations after
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Bidding after a reverse
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West
North
Pass
Pass
2♣
4♥
A Q J 10 5
Q6
J 10 7 4
95
East
Pass
2♠
End
South
1♥
3♣
West leads the six of spades and your ten
wins the first trick. You could continue
spades – but would it be wise?
To continue with ace and another
spade would be ill advised. The bidding
suggests that South has five hearts and
four clubs, so is far more likely to hold
two spades than three. Even if partner
could ruff the third round of spades, it
might be at the cost of a trump trick.
The usual rule, especially when you can
see dummy on your right, is to lead up
to known weakness. You have not been
able to apply that on the previous hands
because dummy had no obviously weak
suit. Here it does: diamonds.
A switch to the jack of diamonds
could beat the contract in a variety of
ways. For one thing, West may produce
the ace and queen of diamonds. Then,
unless South holds a singleton, you will
be able to score the first four tricks with
two spades and two diamonds. The
diamond switch should also work well
if West has the king, the full deal being:
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
764
J84
K9653
J6
K93
A 10 3
82
K Q 10 8 3
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
82
K9752
AQ
A742
Page 28
A Q J 10 5
Q6
J 10 7 4
95
After the diamond lead through the acequeen, your opponent cannot avoid
losing two spades, a diamond and a
trump. If you mistakenly continued
spades or tried a club, declarer would be
able to discard the queen of diamonds
on a black winner, and so avoid losing a
diamond. If partner had the ace of clubs
(instead of the jack of hearts) and the
king of diamonds, the diamond switch
would produce a similarly useful result:
setting up a fourth defensive winner.
Swap Places
with Partner
The time has come to move to the West
chair:
♠
♥
♦
♣
West
Pass
End
♠
♥
♦
♣
10 2
84
KQJ875
K Q 10
983
K Q 10 9 7
A3
J94
North
1♦
2♦
N
W
E
S
East
Pass
Pass
South
1♠
3NT
As the opening leader, you cannot see
either weakness or tenace holdings on
your right, and you often need to rely on
signals from partner and/or logical
powers of deduction.
Here you lead the king of hearts. This
wins the trick but East follows with the
two – clearly a discouraging card.
You place South with both the ace and
jack of hearts, making a continuation
futile. You want to put partner in to lead a
heart before your ace of diamonds
entry is knocked out. Which black suit
should you lead?
Since declarer has bid spades, and
presumably holds strength in the suit, it
may seem natural to try a club, but logic
actually points the other way. To jump
to 3NT your opponent surely has some
sort of stopper in both the unbid suits,
hearts and clubs. Between your hand
and dummy, you can see all the clubs
down to the nine except for the ace.
Continued on page 29 ❿
One Last Example
POTTAGE ON DEFENCE continued from page 28
This makes it a near certainty that the ace
of clubs lies on your right. Accordingly,
you should switch to a spade – either
the eight or nine will get across that you
do not want a spade back.
The full deal may look like this:
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
983
K Q 10 9 7
A3
J94
10 2
84
KQJ875
K Q 10
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
AQ6
632
10 4 2
7653
KJ754
AJ5
96
A82
In a suit contract, you will often want to
try a different suit if declarer or dummy
has run out of your first suit and still has
trumps left. This advice holds particularly
true if both opponents have run out of
the suit.
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
9865
KJ7
10 6
AK82
4
10 9 8 2
AKQJ83
10 9
N
W
E
S
West
North
East
2♦
End
3♠
Pass
South
1♠
4♠
You lead the ace of diamonds, and
continue with the jack. Partner plays the
two and then the nine on these. What
should you lead to the next trick?
With a doubleton diamond, you would
normally expect partner to play highlow. The actual choice to play upwards
therefore implies a three-card holding.
If you play a third round, declarer can
probably ruff in one hand and throw a
loser from the other – not something
you wish to facilitate. A trump lead
can hardly help, and might catch East
with Q-x-x, so which other suit do you
try? Dummy’s hearts are shorter and
weaker than its clubs, so there is
less chance that declarer can throw
clubs on hearts than the other way
round. In any event, if partner has a
club winner, it will be a slow one and
whether you lead the suit now is almost
certainly immaterial.
The lead that stands out is the ten of
hearts. This cannot give anything away
and, on a good day, you will find
partner with the ace and queen. Indeed,
as we will discuss in a future article, the
nine of diamonds may well be a signal
for hearts, making this layout quite
plausible.
This is the full deal:
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
9865
KJ7
10 6
AK82
4
10 9 8 2
AKQJ83
10 9
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
10 7
AQ64
942
7643
AKQJ32
53
75
QJ5
♠
♥
♦
♣
K J 10 3
AK3
962
932
Duplicate Bridge Scoring Program for
Windows 95 or later
£52
95
inc p&p
Single or multi section/session ♦ Any movement scored ♦ Enter names using initials
Prints Master-points ♦ Uploads Sim Pairs results ♦ Creates HTML files
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Page 29
♠
♥
♦
♣
N
W
E
S
AQ
8765
Q J 10
Q J 10 5
South opens a weak no-trump, and then
proceeds to game when North makes an
invitational raise with 2NT. West leads
the seven of spades and you capture
dummy’s jack with your queen.
Returning a spade will only serve to
set up dummy’s suit, so undoubtedly you
wish to direct your attack elsewhere.
This time dummy contains not one weak
suit but two, so which do you try?
Remember, when you are the opening
leader against a no-trump contract, you
often lead your longest suit, and you have
reached an equivalent position here. If
you had been on lead at trick one, you
would have led the queen of clubs. There
is nothing in dummy to suggest that a
diamond will work better, so a club it
should be. Another way to reach the same
conclusion is to reflect on the fact that
even if West has the king of diamonds
and you lead a diamond now, then you
are likely to score two spades and only
two diamonds – not enough to defeat the
contract. If, however, you lead a club and
find West with the king, you may set up
three club tricks, which will be enough.
The full deal is illustrated below.
Given half the chance, declarer can
rattle off ten tricks, which makes it
essential for the defenders to take all
their winners quickly.
SUPERSCORER
From the
At both suit and no-trump contracts,
you may wish to switch if you can see
that the opening lead has not hit
declarer’s weak spot. Please move back
to the East seat for our final example.
♠
♥
♦
♣
♠
♥
♦
♣
9754
10 4
7543
K74
K J 10 3
AK3
962
932
N
W
E
S
♠
♥
♦
♣
862
QJ92
AK8
A86
♠
♥
♦
♣
AQ
8765
Q J 10
Q J 10 5
■
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