Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User`s Manual

Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User`s Manual
ÎÎ
GE Fanuc Automation
Programmable Control Products
t
Series 90 -20
Programmable
Controller
User’s Manual
GFK-0551C
August 1995
GFL–002
Warnings, Cautions, and Notes
as Used in this Publication
Warning
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that
hazardous voltages, currents, temperatures, or other conditions that
could cause personal injury exist in this equipment or may be
associated with its use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal injury or
damage to equipment, a Warning notice is used.
Caution
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is
not taken.
Note
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to
understanding and operating the equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While
efforts have been made to be accurate, the information contained herein does not
purport to cover all details or variations in hardware or software, nor to provide for
every possible contingency in connection with installation, operation, or maintenance.
Features may be described herein which are not present in all hardware and software
systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no obligation of notice to holders of this
document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or
statutory with respect to, and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,
sufficiency, or usefulness of the information contained herein. No warranties of
merchantability or fitness for purpose shall apply.
The following are trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Alarm Master
CIMPLICITY
CIMPLICITY PowerTRAC
CIMPLICITY 90–ADS
CIMSTAR
Field Control
GEnet
Genius
Genius PowerTRAC
Helpmate
Logicmaster
Modelmaster
ProLoop
PROMACRO
Series Five
Series 90
Copyright 1991-1995 GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
Series One
Series Six
Series Three
VuMaster
Workmaster
RFI Standards
The Series 90-20 Programmable Logic Controller and its associated modules have been
tested and found to meet or exceed the requirements of FCC Rule, Part 15, Subpart J. The
following note is required to be published by the FCC.
NOTE
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not
installed in accordance with this instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. It has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class A digital device pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules, which are
designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential
area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case the user will be required
to correct the interference at his own expense.
The following note is required to be published by the Canadian Department of Communications.
NOTE
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the radio interference regulations of the
Canadian Department of Communications.
GFK-0551C
iii
Preface
iv
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Preface
This manual provides the information necessary to enable you to integrate a GE Fanuc
Series 90t-20 Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) into a wide variety of control
applications. The contents of this manual include descriptions of the hardware
components, installation procedures, system operation information, and maintenance
information for the Series 90-20 PLC.
Revisions to This Manual
This version of the manual (GFK-0551C) adds and corrects some information. Following
is a list of changes to this manual as compared to the previous version (GFK-0551B).
D
Changed references to programming software from Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 to
Logicmaster
90/30/20/Micro.
D
Added references to Series 90-30 model 351 CPU where applicable.
D
Page 1-17, revised programming requirements for runningLogicmaster90/30/Micro
programming software.
D
Page 2-2, added Technical Help information.
D
Page 2-22, 2-23, revised previous information and added additional information for
IC693CBL303 cable.
D
Page 2-26, corrected part number for XICOR EEPROM and added second part
number.
D
Page 5-11, 5-21, 5-31, corrected Bussman part number for fuse, FU2 (changed from
GMG0.25 to GMD0.25).
Content of this Manual
This manual contains the following information:
Chapter 1. Introduction and Product Description: This chapter provides a general
description of the functions and capabilities of the Series 90-20 PLC and
descriptions of the components of a Series 90-20 PLC.
Chapter 2. Installation Procedures: This chapter leads you through the steps required
for installation of a Series 90-20 PLC control system. Included are
installation procedures for the hardware components, connection of field
wiring, initial configuration using the Series 90-30 and 90-20 Hand-Held
Programmer, and basic maintenance procedures.
Chapter 3. System Operation: This chapter provides you with technical details of
operating features of the Series 90-20 PLC that you will need to be familiar
with for an understanding of how the overall PLC system operates.
Chapter 4. Fault Descriptions and Corrections: This chapter provides information to
aid you in troubleshooting a Series 90-20 PLC when using Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro programming Software. Faults appearing in the PLC and
I/OFault Tables are described along with corrective actions for those faults.
GFK-0551C
Preface
v
Preface
Chapter 5. I/O Specifications: This chapter provides specifications and wiring
information for the I/O circuits of the Series 90-20 PLC. It provides you
with the information needed to specify and apply each of the fixedI/O
configuration modules, and wire field devices to those modules.
Chapter 6. Series 90-20 High Speed Counter: This chapter provides specifications,
hardware interface requirements, operation, and configuration
programming information for the High Speed Counter that is built into the
Series 90-20 PLC.
Appendix A. Glossary: A glossary of terms relevant to the Series 90-20 PLC and to
Programmable Logic Controllers in general, and a glossary of basic
instructions and reference types for the Series 90-20 PLC.
Appendix B. Instruction Timing: A group of tables that show the memory size in bytes
and the execution time in microseconds for each of the Series 90-20 PLC
programming functions.
Appendix C. Miniconverter Kit: This appendix contains detailed information about the
Miniconverter Kit (IC690ACC901) for use with Series 90 PLCs.
Related Publications:
D GFK-0401 - Workmastert II PLC Programming Unit Guide to Operation
D GFK-0402 - Hand-Held Programmer for Series 90t-30/20/Micro PLC User’s Manual
D GFK-0466 - Logicmastert 90 Series 90t-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual
D GFK-0467 - Series 90t-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers Reference Manual
At GE Fanuc Automation, we strive to produce quality technical documentation. After
you have used this manual, please take a few moments to complete and return the
Reader ’s Comment Card located on the next page.
Henry A. Konat
Senior Technical Writer
vi
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Contents
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
GFK-0551C
Introduction and Product Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
Series 90-20 PLC System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
Series 90-20 PLC Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
Product Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
CPU 211 Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-3
I/OPower Supply Base Module (Baseplate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6
Programming and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Programming and Configuration With the Hand-Held Programmer . .
1-8
Programming WithLogicmaster90-30/20/MicroSoftware . . . . . . . . . . .
1-10
Configuration WithLogicmaster90-30/20/MicroSoftware . . . . . . . . . . .
1-10
Instructions and Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-10
User References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-15
User Reference Types and Memory Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-15
Module Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-20
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Hardware Packaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
Visual Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
Pre-installation Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
Technical Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
Packing List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
I/OPower Supply Base Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
CPU Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3
Minimum Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3
Pre-Installation Set-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3
Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
I/OPower Supply Base Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
CPU Module Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-9
Power-Up/Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-10
Programming and Configuring the Series 90-20 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-11
Using the Hand-Held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-11
UsingLogicmaster90-30/20/MicroSoftware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-15
Installing the RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-19
Maintenance and Optional Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-24
Replacing A Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-24
User PROM Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-25
Replacing Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-27
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual - August 1995
vii
Contents
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
GFK-0551C
System Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
PLC Sweep Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Standard Program Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Input Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Application Program Logic Scan or Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
Output Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
Logic Program Checksum Calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
Programmer Communications Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
System Communications Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Standard Program Sweep Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Constant Sweep Time Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
PLC Sweep When in STOP Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
PLC Sweep When Using Do I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Software Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Program Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Data Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Power-Up and Power-Down Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-7
Power-Up Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-7
Power-Down Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
Clocks and Timers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
Elapsed Time Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
Watchdog Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
Constant Sweep Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-10
System Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-11
Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-11
I/O System for the Series 90-20 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-12
I/O Scan Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Default Conditions for Series 90-20 Output Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Diagnostic Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Fault Descriptions and Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
Faults and Fault Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
Using This Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
Fault Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
PLC Fault Table Explanations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
Non-Configurable Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual - August 1995
viii
Contents
Chapter 5
Power Supply and I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Definition of Positive and Negative Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Positive Logic - Input Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Positive Logic - Output Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
Negative Logic - Input Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
Negative Logic - Output Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
120 VAC Input/120 VAC Triac Output/120 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MAA541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
120 VAC Input, 16 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
120 VAC Output - 1 Amp, 11 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
High Speed Counter Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-7
5/12/24Volt DC Negative Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output - 1.5 Amp
5-8
DC Input/Relay Output/120 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MDR541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input, 16 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
Relay Output, Normally Open, 2 Amp - 11 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
High Speed Counter Input Circuits, I1 and I2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-16
5/12/24Volt DC Negative Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output-1.5 Amp .
5-18
DC Input/Relay Output/240 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MDR741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-23
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Inputs 16 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-23
Relay Output, Normally Open, 2 Amp - 11 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-24
High Speed Counter Input Circuits, I1 and I2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-26
5/12/24Volt DC Positive Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output-1 Amp . . . .
5-27
Chapter 6
GFK-0551C
Series 90-20 High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
Overview and Uses of the High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
Additional High Speed Counter Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Basic Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
Configuring the High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
Circuit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-4
Field Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-5
Operation of a Type A Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-5
Timing For Type A Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
CPU Interface:
Data Transfer Between High Speed Counter and CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
Data Automatically Sent By The High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-7
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual - August 1995
ix
Contents
Data Automatically Sent To The High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-7
Additional Data Sent To The High Speed Counter Using a COMMREQ Function
Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-7
%AI And %I Data Sent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-8
%Q Data Sent From CPU To High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-9
High Speed Counter Status Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-9
Sending Data Commands To The High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-10
Sending Data With the COMMREQ Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-12
Configuration of the High Speed Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Configurable Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Enable Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Input Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Counter Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Continuous or Single-Shot Counting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-20
Counter Timebase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-20
Count Limits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-20
Output Preset Positions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-20
Preload Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-22
Output Fail Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-22
Configuration Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-23
Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-23
Configuration With Hand-Held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-23
PLC I/O Scanner Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-24
Application Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-29
RPM Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-29
Command and Error Code Reference Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-30
Terminal Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-30
Appendix A
Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
Appendix B
Instruction Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
Appendix C
Miniconverter Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
GFK-0551C
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual - August 1995
x
Contents
Figure 1-1. Series 90-20 CPU and I/O Power Supply Base Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
Figure 1-2. Series 90-20 LED Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-3
Figure 1-3. Serial Port for the Series 90-20 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-5
Figure 1-4. Removable Terminal Strip for User Field Wiring Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-7
Figure 1-5. Hand-Held Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-8
Figure 1-6. Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 Programmer Connection to the Series 90-20 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-17
Figure 1-7. Example of RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter Connection
in a Series 90-20 PLC System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-18
Figure 1-8. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-19
Figure 2-1. Series 90-20 Baseplate Mounting Dimensions and Spacing Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
Figure 2-2. Series 90-20 Power Source Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-5
Figure 2-3. Recommended System Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
Figure 2-4. Installing/Removing a Terminal board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-7
Figure 2-5. CPU Module Attachment to the I/O Power Supply Baseplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-9
Figure 2-6. Battery Location and Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-10
Figure 2-7. Hand-Held Programmer Cable Connection to a Series 90-20 PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-12
Figure 2-8. Examples of Serial Connection from Series 90-20 PLC to Programmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-15
Figure 2-9. Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programmer Connection through a
Work Station Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-16
Figure 2-10. Series 90 PLC to Workmaster II Serial Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-16
Figure 2-11. Example of Series 90 PLC to Programmer 8-Wire Multidrop,
Serial Data Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-18
Figure 2-12. Location of Jumpers for User Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-20
Figure 2-13. Wiring Connections for IC693CBL303 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-23
Figure 2-14. Battery Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-24
Figure 2-15. Location of Socket for User PROM Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-25
Figure 3-1. PLC Sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
Figure 3-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-5
Figure 3-3. Power-up Decision Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-9
Figure 3-4. Series 90-20 I/O Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-13
Figure 5-1. Typical 120 VAC Input Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Figure 5-2. Typical 120 VAC Triac Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Figure 5-3. Typical High Speed Counter Input Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-7
Figure 5-4. Typical High Speed Counter Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Figure 5-5. Alternate Connection as Positive Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
Figure 5-6. Temperature vs. Current for 5/12/24 VDC Negative Output Q1
or High Speed Counter Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
Figure 5-7. Location of Fuses for IC692MAA541 I/O Power Supply Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
Figure 5-8. Field Wiring Connections - IC692MAA541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-11
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Contents
Figure 5-9. Triac Output Current vs. Temperature (Q2 - Q12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-12
Figure 5-10. Typical 24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
Figure 5-11. Typical Relay Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-15
Figure 5-12. High Speed Counter Circuit - Negative Logic Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-16
Figure 5-13. High Speed Counter Circuit - Positive Logic Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-17
Figure 5-14. Typical5/12/24Volt DC Negative Logic Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-19
Figure 5-15. Temperature vs. Current for High Speed Counter Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-19
Figure 5-16. Location of Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-20
Figure 5-17. Field Wiring Information - IC692MDR541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-21
Figure 5-18. Temperature vs. Input/Output Points for IC692MDR541 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-22
Figure 5-19. Typical 24VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-23
Figure 5-20. Relay Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-24
Figure 5-21. High Speed Counter Input Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-26
Figure 5-22. Typical5/12/24VDCPositive Logic Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-27
Figure 5-23. Field Wiring Information - IC692MDR741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-29
Figure 5-24. Temperature vs. Input/Output Points for IC692MDR741 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-30
Figure 5-25. Location of Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-31
Figure I-1. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Miniconverter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
Figure I-2. Miniconverter to PC-AT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-3
Figure I-3. Miniconverter to Workmaster II, PC-XT,PS/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-3
Figure I-4. Miniconverter to 9-Pin Workmaster or PC-XT Computer
(Additional Adapter Required) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-3
GFK-0551C
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual - August 1995
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Contents
Table 1-1. Models of Series 90-20 PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
Table 1-2. Range and Size of User References for Series 90-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-15
Table 2-1. Jumper Configuration for RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-20
Table 2-2. RS-232 Interface Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-21
Table 2-3. RS-422/RS-485 Interface Pin Assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-21
Table 2-4. EEPROM and EPROM Memory Catalog Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-26
Table 3-1. Sweep Time Contribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
Table 3-2. Memory Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-6
Table 4-1. Fault Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
Table 4-2. Fault Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
Table 4-3. Fault References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
Table 4-3. Fault References - Continued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
Table 4-4. Guide to Finding PLC Fault Table Explanations and Corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
Table 5-1. Guide to Page Location for I/O Module Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
Table 5-2. Specifications for 120 Volt AC Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
Table 5-3. Specifications for 120 Volt AC Output, 1 Amp Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-5
Table 5-4. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-7
Table 5-5. Specifications For5/12/24Volt DC Negative Logic - 2 Amp Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-8
Table 5-6. Specifications for 120 VAC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
Table 5-7. List of Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-11
Table 5-8. Specifications For 24 Volt DC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
Table 5-9. Specifications For Relay Output, 2 Amp Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
Table 5-10. Typical Contact Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-15
Table 5-11. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-16
Table 5-12. Specifications For5/12/24Volt DC Negative Logic - 1.5 Amp Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . .
5-18
Table 5-13. Specifications for 120 VAC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-19
Table 5-14. Specifications for 24 VDC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-20
Table 5-15. List of FusesDC in Relay Out/120 VAC PS module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-21
Table 5-16. Specifications For 24 Volt DC Negative/Positive Logic Input Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-23
Table 5-17. Specifications For Relay Output, 2 Amp Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-24
Table 5-18. Typical Contact Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-25
Table 5-19. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-26
Table 5-20. Specifications For5/12/24Volt DC Negative Logic - 1 Amp Output Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-27
Table 5-21. Specifications for 240 VAC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-28
Table 5-22. Specifications for 24 VDC Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-28
Table 5-23. List of Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-31
Table 6-1. Output Polarity Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
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Contents
Table 6-2. Description of %AI Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-8
Table 6-3. Error Codes Returned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-9
Table 6-4. Data Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-10
Table 6-5. Description of Command Block for DATA Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-13
Table 6-6. COMMREQ Data Type Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-13
Table 6-7. Configurable Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
Table 6-8. Abbreviations for Configuration Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-23
Table H-1. Instruction Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
Table H-1. Instruction Timing - Continued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-3
Table H-1. Instruction Timing - Continued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-4
Table I-1. Miniconverter RS-232 Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
Table I-2. Miniconverter RS-422 Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-2
Table I-3. Miniconverter Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-4
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restart lowapp ARestart oddapp: ARestarts for autonumbers that do not restart in
each chapter. figure bi level 1, reset table_big level 1, reset chap_big level 1, reset1
Lowapp Alwbox restart evenap:A1app_big level 1, resetA figure_ap level 1, reset
table_ap level 1, reset figure level 1, reset table level 1, reset these restarts
oddbox reset: 1evenbox reset: 1must be in the header frame of chapter 1. a:ebx, l 1
resetA a:obx:l 1, resetA a:bigbx level 1 resetA a:ftr level 1 resetA c:ebx, l 1 reset1
c:obx:l 1, reset1 c:bigbx level 1 reset1 c:ftr level 1 reset1 Reminders for
autonumbers that need to be restarted manually (first instance will always be 4)
let_in level 1: A. B. C. letter level 1:A.B.C. num level 1: 1. 2. 3. num_in level 1: 1. 2.
3. rom_in level 1: I. II. III. roman level 1: I. II. III. steps level 1: 1. 2. 3.
Chapter
1 Introduction and Product Description
1
The Series 90-20 Programmable Logic Con troller (PLC) is a member of the GE Fanuc
Series 90 PLC family of Programmable Logic Controllers. The Series 90-20 PLC is easy
to install and configure, offers advanced programming features, and is designed for
compatibility with other PLCs in the Series 90 family of PLCs. The Series 90-20 PLC
provides a cost-effective platform for low I/O count applications. The primary
objectives of the Series 90-20 PLC are:
H
H
H
To provide a small PLC that is easy to use, install, upgrade and maintain.
To provide a cost effective family compatible PLC.
To provide easier system integration through standard communication hardware
and protocols.
Series 90-20 PLC System Components
The Series 90-20 PLC system components include:
H
H
H
I/O, Power Supply Base Module (this will be referred to as the baseplate for the
Series 90-20 PLC).
CPU Module (CPU 211).
Hand-Held Programmer or Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 programming software.
Series 90-20 PLC Features
The Series 90-20 PLC combines the desired features of the traditional PLC, with many
improvements and product enhancements. The features traditionally found in most
PLCs, include:
H
An industrial computer that has been hardened to operate in the harsh environment
commonly encountered in the factory.
H
H
H
Familiar relay ladder diagram programming.
H
Communications with cell controllers, operator interface terminals, dumb
terminals, personal computers, and similar devices.
I/O control through user logic programming.
Instruction set designed specifically for the industrial control and process
environment.
The Series 90-20 PLC adds an array of features including:
H
GFK-0551C
Family compatibility throughout the entire Series 90 product line.
1-1
1
H
H
H
H
H
H
Sophisticated Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 programming software.
A configuration software package which provides for easy system configuration.
An alarm processor function.
No jumpers to set on boards.
Hand-Held Programmer for programming in Statement List language.
Password protection to limit access to PLC contents.
a44540
Î
Î
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1
10
20
POWER
GE Fanuc
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
SERIES 90–20
8
INPUTS
PROGRAMMABLE
CONTROLLER
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
OUTPUTS
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
OK RN CT PL
LOW
BATTERY
WARNING
STATUS
PROGRAM
PROM
SYSTEM
PROM
PROGRAMMING AND
COMMUNICA TIONS PORT
BATTERY
FOR PERSONAL SAFETY
DISCONNECT POWER
BEFORE REMOVING
CPU FROM I/O BASE
21
40
Figure 1-1. Series 90-20 CPU and I/O Power Supply Base Modules
Product Description
The Series 90-20 PLC hardware configuration consists of an I/O and Power Supply Base
Module (baseplate) and a plug-on CPU module. The baseplate contains the discrete
input and output circuits, the power supply and terminal strips for user field wiring.
Different I/O and power supply combinations are available to meet the customers
requirements for various applications. The CPU module executes and contains the user
program, communicates to the programmer (Hand-Held Programmer or computer
running Logicmaster 90-30 software), contains LED status indicators and a battery for
backup of memory.
Table 1-1. Models of Series 90-20 PLCs
CatalogNumber
IC692MAA541
IC692MDR541
IC692MDR741
IC692CPU211
n/a = not applicable
1-2
Description
I/O and Power Supply Base Module, 120 VACIn/120VACOut/120VAC
Power Supply
I/O and Power Supply Base Module, 24 VDC In (Positive/Negative)
RelayOut/120VAC Power Supply
I/O and Power Supply Base Module, 24 VDC In (Positive/Negative)
RelayOut/240VAC Power Supply
CPU Module, Model CPU211
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
I/O Points
16In/12
Out
16In/12
Out
16In/12
Out
n/a
GFK-0551C
1
CPU 211 Module
The primary capabilities of the Series 90-20, model CPU 211 Module are:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
80188 Processor 8 Mhz
H
LED status indicators for I/O and CPU status
Input Points - 16
Output Points - 12
High Speed Counter - 10Khz Type A Counter
Maximum User Program - 1K (Words)
Registers - 256 (Words)
Internal Coils - 1024
Memory Back-up with Lithium Battery. Typical Battery Life: 5 years
Typical Scan Rate: 18.0 ms/1K of logic (boolean contacts)
User PROM Option: user program can be stored to EEPROM; user program can be
executed from user PROM (EPROM or EEPROM).
LED Status Indicators
The CPU 211 module contains an LED matrix and two discrete LEDs that provide the
user with a visual indication of the I/O and CPU status.
a44541
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1
10
POWER
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
1
2
3
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1
2
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
OK RN CT PL
LOW
BATTERY
STATUS
Figure 1-2. Series 90-20 LED Status Indicators
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-3
1
Discrete LEDs
H
POWER: the top LED (green) provides an indication of the operating state of the
power supply. The LED is ON when the power supply has a correct source of
power and is operating properly and OFF when a power supply fault occurs or
power is not applied.
H
LOW BATTERY: the bottom LED (red) is ON if the memory backup battery voltage
is too low to maintain the memory under a loss of power condition; otherwise it
remains OFF. If this LED is ON the lithium battery must be replaced before
removing power from the unit (see Battery Replacement in Chapter 2).
LED Matrix
H
INPUT STATUS: the top two rows of LEDs indicate the status of the input points on
the I/O baseplate. If the associated LED is ON, the voltage at the input point is high
enough to energize the input circuit. If the LED is OFF, the voltage is too low to
energize the input circuit (see I/O Specifications in Chapter 5 for thresholds). The
input LEDs will indicate the input status in all CPU modes: STOP with I/O Disabled,
STOP with I/O Enabled and RUN (Standard Sweep or Constant Sweep).
H
OUTPUT STATUS: the third and fourth rows of the LED matrix indicate the status
of the output points on the I/O baseplate. The LED is ON, when the output is
commanded to turn ON (for example if %Q1 = 1, then output 1 LED will be ON).
H
All outputs turn OFF in the STOP with I/O disabled mode. Outputs will hold
last state or the present user commanded state in the STOP with I/O enabled mode.
In the RUN mode, the outputs are controlled by the user’s logic program.
H
USER DEFINED LEDS: output LEDs, for example Q13 through Q16 indicate only
the status of internal coils %Q13 through %Q16 since there are no physical output
points on the I/O module for these references. These indicators are useful as user
defined status indicators.
H
CPU STATUS: the first two LEDs of the last row are used for CPU status.
H
h
OK: is ON if the PLC is operating properly and OFF if a problem is detected by
the PLC.
h
RN (RUN): this LED is ON when the PLC is executing the logic program
entered by the user (RUN mode).
High Speed Counter Status:
h
CT (COUNT): this LED turns ON briefly when a count edge has been received
by the High Speed Counter. If the count rate is high enough, the LED will
appear to be ON continuously. It’s purpose is to indicate active count pulses at
the COUNT input on the I/O module.
h
PL (PRELOAD/STROBE): this LED turns ON when the High Speed Counter
accumulator equals the preload value.
Battery Backup for RAM Memory
The long-life Lithium battery (IC693ACC301) used to maintain the contents of the
CMOS RAM memory in the CPU is accessed by removing the cover plate located at the
bottom of the CPU module. This battery is mounted on a plastic clip attached to the
inside of this cover. The battery connects to the CPU through a cable which has one end
1-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
wired to the positive and negative sides of the battery and the other end wired to a
connector that mates with one of two identical connectors mounted on the CPU circuit
board. This battery may be replaced with power applied to the PLC. Alternatively, it
may be replaced with power OFF or with the CPU module removed from the I/O
baseplate by plugging a new battery into the unused connector on the CPU circuit board
and then removing the old battery (see Battery Installation in Chapter 2, for details).
Caution
If a Low Battery Warning (BATT LED turns ON) occurs, replace the
battery located in the power supply BEFORE removing power from
the rack. Otherwise, there is a possibility that data will be corrupted
or the application program will be cleared from memory.
CPU Serial Port
A 15 pin D-type, female connector, on the right side of the CPU module provides the
connection to an RS-485 compatible serial port which is used to connect to Logicmaster
90-30/90-20 programming software, the Hand-Held Programmer or for general purpose
communications using the Series 90 Protocol (SNP).
a44542
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PROGRAMMING AND
COMMUNICATIONS PORT
40
RS–485 COMPATIBLE
SERIAL PORT
Figure 1-3. Serial Port for the Series 90-20 PLC
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-5
1
I/O Power Supply Base Module (Baseplate)
The I/O Power Supply Base Module (baseplate) provides user mounting locations, a
power supply, I/O conditioning circuits (including the High Speed Counter input
circuits) and terminal strips for user field wiring connections.
Mounting Locations
The baseplate unit can be mounted on a flat panel area by use of mounting screws on
the ends of the unit (see installation instructions in Chapter 2 for more details). These
mounting locations are in the same location as the Series 90-30 PLCs which are more
advanced PLCs in the Series 90 family of PLCs.
Power Supply
The power supply converts the input source power to voltages required for internal
circuitry. In addition, on modules with dc inputs it provides an isolated 24 VDC supply
to power dc input circuits, switches and indicators. This 24 volt supply has a user
replaceable fuse. You can access this fuse by removing the CPU module from the I/O
base.
Input Circuits
The input circuits condition and filter high level dc or ac voltages (depending on the
module type) so that they can be properly detected by the CPU module.
High Speed Counter Inputs
The High Speed Counter inputs condition dc signals which are used by the CPU module
to implement a Type A counter. The Type A counter accepts a count input which
increments a 16 bit accumulator and a preload/strobe input which can either preload the
counter accumulator with a user defined value (PRELOAD mode) or strobe the
accumulator (STROBE mode) into a 16 bit register (for more details on the High Speed
Counter see Chapter 6).
Output Circuits
The output circuits allow the low level signals from the CPU module to control dc or ac
output devices. Each common on a group of output points is fused and can be replaced
by the user. Access to the fuses is obtained by removing the CPU module from the I/O
base.
Connections to Removable Terminal Strips
The baseplate module provides two, 20 terminal removable terminal strips. These
removable terminal strips allow modules to be changed without removing or rewiring
field connections to the terminals. Terminal strip assignments are dependent on the
module type but in general the input connections are on the top and the power supply
and output connections are on the bottom.
1-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
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a44706
REMOVABLE
TERMINAL
STRIP
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BASE
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Figure 1-4. Removable Terminal Strip for User Field Wiring Connections
Programming and Configuration
Programming and configuration of the Series 90-20 PLC can be accomplished through
two different methods.
H
Logicmaster90-30/20/MicroProgramming software on a Workmaster II or Cimstar I
industrial computer or an IBMR PC-XT, PC-AT,PS/2R (Personal System 2R) or
compatible Personal Computer.
H
Series90-30/20/MicroHand-HeldProgrammer (IC693PRG300).
Both configuration and programming can be done with the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro
programmer off-line from the PLC. Configuration and programming with the
Hand-Held Programmer must be done with the Hand-Held Programmer attached to
and interfacing with the PLC.
Use of the programming and configuration software is described in the Logicmaster
90-30/20/MicroProgramming Software User’s Manual, (GFK-0466). The Workmaster II
computer is described in the Workmaster II PLC Programming Unit Guide to Operation
Manual, GFK-0401. Use of the Hand-Held Programmer is described in the Series
90-30/20/MicroPLCHand-HeldProgrammer User’s Manual, (GFK-0402).
RIBM, Personal System 2 and PS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-7
1
Programming and Configuration With the Hand-Held Programmer
The Hand-Held Programmer is used to develop, debug, and monitor ladder logic
programs, and to monitor data tables. The Hand-Held Programmer can do the
following:
H
Statement List logic program development, including insert, edit, and delete
functions. The Statement List programming instructions provide basic (boolean)
instructions to execute logical operations such as AND and OR, and many functions
to execute advanced operations including arithmetic operations, data conversion,
and data transfer.
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
On-line program changes.
H
Start or stop the PLC from any mode of operation.
Search logic programs for instructions and/or specific references.
Monitor reference data while viewing logic program.
Monitor reference data in table form in binary, hexadecimal, or decimal formats.
Monitor timer and counter values.
View PLC scan time, firmware revision code and current logic memory use.
Load, store, and verify program logic and configuration between the Hand-Held
Programmer and a removable Memory Card (IC693ACC303) which allows
programs to be moved between PLCs or loaded into multiple PLCs.
a43052
GEFanuc
SERIES 90–30
PROGRAMMABLE
CONTROLLER
HAND HELD PROGRAMMER
LD
OUT
SETM
RSTM
TMR
OUTM
SET
RST
ONDTR
F
NOT
BLK
D
AND
E
A I
AI
BQ
AQ
7
OR
CM
UPCTR
DNCTR
MODE
RUN
T
G
S
FUNC
DEL
8
9
R
#
SRCH
4
5
6
WRITE
1
2
3
0
INS
READ
SLOT
FOR
MEMORY
CARD
VRFY
HEX
DEC
CLR
ENT
SERIAL PORT CONNECTOR
TO CPU SERIAL PORT
Figure 1-5. Hand-Held Programmer
1-8
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
The Hand-Held Programmer connects to the serial port (labeled Programming and
Communications Port) on the CPU through a 15-pin D-type connector on the Series
90-20 CPU module. The physical connection is through a cable (IC693CBL303) that is 6
feet (2 meters) in length. This cable also provides power connections to the Hand-Held
Programmer, and provides a signal that tells the PLC that a Hand-Held Programmer is
attached. The Hand-Held Programmer can be connected or disconnected to a PLC that
is powered-up.
Hand-Held Programmer Features
The keypad for the Hand-Held Programmer is a sealed type with tactile feedback, and
has 42 keys, arranged in a matrix of six keys across by seven keys down. A two-line by
16 character LCD display screen provides a means of visual information to the user. The
Hand-Held Programmer also provides an interface to a removable memory card
(IC693ACC303). The Hand-Held Programmer can program EEPROM memory devices
in the memory card, which will retain the program stored in it under no-power
conditions. This memory cartridge, through the Hand-Held Programmer interface,
provides a means for off-line storage and retrieval of the user’s application program and
system configuration data. The memory card plugs into a connector accessed through
an opening on the lower right side of the Hand-Held Programmer. This feature
provides program portability and a way to store different programs for use as required.
Hand-Held Programmer Modes Of Operation
The Hand-Held Programmer functionality is basically divided into four modes of
operation which are selected through a key sequence on the keypad. These modes are:
program mode, data mode, protection mode, and configuration mode.
Program Mode allows you to create, change, monitor, and debug Statement List logic.
This mode also allows read, write, and verify functions with the optional memory card.
Data Mode allows you to view, and optionally alter values in various reference tables.
Several display formats can be selected in which to view this data: binary, hexadecimal,
signed decimal, and timer/counter.
ProtectionMode provides a way to control access to (protection of) certain PLC
functions, including program logic, reference data, and configuration information. The
use of this function is optional; however, it is convenient in that it allows you to protect
parts of the PLC system from accidental or deliberate modification. Protection is
provided through four levels of passwords which you can assign.
Configuration Mode allows you to change CPU and High Speed Counter configuration
items, such as baud rate, turning the keyclick feature on or off, High Speed Counter
preload/strobe, and others.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-9
1
Programming With Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software
The Programming Software portion of the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software package
can do the following:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
Develop ladder diagram programs off-line.
Monitor and change reference values on-line.
Edit a program on-line.
Transfer programs and configurations between the PLC and programmer.
Store programs automatically on disk.
Annotate programs.
Print programs with annotation and/or cross references.
Display help information.
Use symbolic references.
Cut and paste program fragments.
Print programs and configurations on various printers.
Configuration With Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software
Configuration with the Configuration Software package, which is included as a part of
the total Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming Software package, can do the
following:
H
H
H
H
H
Specify a name for the system.
Enable the High Speed Counter and change parameters for the High Speed Counter.
Configure CPU parameters.
Archive or save the configuration in a file.
Transfer configurations between the PLC and the programmer.
Instructions and Function Blocks
The Series 90-20 PLC supports many different instruction functions and function blocks.
Detailed descriptions, including examples, on the use of these instructions can be found
in GFK-0467, the Series 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers Reference Manual,
and GFK-0402, the Series 90-30/20/Micro Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual.
A summary of each of the instructions and functions is provided in the following group
of tables.
1-10
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
Basic Instructions (Relay Ladder Contacts and Coils)
The following relay ladder contacts and coils are supported by the Series 90-20 PLC.
Description
Basic Instruction
––]
[––
––] / [––
––(
)––
––( / )––
––( S )––
––( R )––
––( ↑ )––
––( ↓ )––
––(M)––
––(/M)––
––(SM)––
––(RM)––
–––––––
|
normally open contact
normally closed contact
coil
negated coil
set coil
reset coil
positive transition coil
negative transition coil
retentive coil
negated retentive coil
retentive set coil
retentive reset coil
horizontal link
verticallink
Note
The mnemonics listed for the functions in the following tables are as
they appear on the Hand-Held Programmer ’s display.
Timers and Counters
The Series 90-20 PLC supports two types of timers and two types of counters. All four
function blocks are updated each time they are encountered in the logic; timers by the
amount of time consumed by the last sweep, counters by one count.
Description
Stopwatch timer
On-delay timer
Up counter
Down counter
GFK-0551C
Mnemonic
TMR
ONDTR
UPCTR
DNCTR
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
Function Number
10
13
15
16
1-11
1
Math Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports six different math functions. Each function may be used
on any of the following data types: Integer (INT) or Double Integer (DINT).
Description
Add
Subtract
Multiply
Divide
Modulo
Square Root
Mnemonic
Function Number
ADD
SUB
MUL
DIV
MOD
SQRT
60
62
64
66
68
70
DPADD
DPSUB
DPMUL
DPDIV
DPMOD
DPSQRT
61
63
65
67
69
71
Double Precision:
Add
Subtract
Multiply
Divide
Modulo
Square Root
Relational Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports six different relational functions.
Description
Equal
Not Equal
Greater Than
Greater Than or Equal
Less Than
Less Than or Equal
Mnemonic
Function Number
EQ
NE
GT
GE
LT
LE
52
53
57
55
56
54
DPEQ
DPNE
DPGT
DPGE
DPLT
DPLE
72
73
77
75
76
74
Double Precision:
Equal
Not Equal
Greater Than
Greater Than or Equal
Less Than
Less Than or Equal To
1-12
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
Bit Operation Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports 12 different bit operation functions.
Description
Mnemonic
LogicalAnd
Logical Or
Logical exclusive OR
Logicalinvert
Shift bit left
Shift bit right
Rotate bit left
Rotate bit right
Set a bit to 1
Set a bit to 0
Test a bit
Locate a bit set to 1
Function Number
AND
OR
XOR
NOT
SHL
SHR
ROL
ROR
BITSET
BITCLR
BITTST
BITPOS
23
25
27
29
30
31
32
33
22
24
26
28
Conversion Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC provides two different conversion functions: 4-digit binary
coded decimal to 16-bit integer and 16-bit integer to 4-digit binary coded decimal.
Description
Mnemonic
Integer To BCD
BCD To Integer
BCD
INT
Function Number
80
81
Control Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports ten different Control Functions.
Description
Terminate program execution
No operation
Nested jump
Nested master control relay
Target number for jump
Master control sequence end
Do I/O update
System service request:
#6 Change/Read Checksum
Mnemonic
Function Number
ENDSW
NOOP
JUMP
MCR
LABEL
ENDMCR
DOIO
SVCREQ
0
1
3
4
7
8
85
89
PIDISA
PIDIND
86
87
#13 Shut down PLC
#14 Clear fault tables
#15 Read last fault
#16 Read elapsed time clock
Standard PID algorithm
Independent term PID algorithm
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-13
1
Data Move Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports ten different Data Move functions.
Description
Constant block move
Block clear
Bit sequencer
Shift register, word
Shift register, bit
Constant block move, integer
Multiple word move
Multiple integer move
Multiple bit move
Communicationsrequest
Mnemonic
Function Number
BMOVW
BLKCL
SEQB
SHFRW
SHFRB
BMOVI
MOVWN
MOVIN
MOVBN
COMRQ
43
44
47
45
46
38
42
37
40
88
Table Functions
The Series 90-20 PLC supports seven different Table functions. The array search
functions can be operated on by four different data types (Byte, Word, INT, DINT) and
the array move function can be operated on by 5 different data types (Bit, Byte, Word,
INT, DINT).
Description
Search equal to
Search not equal to
Search less than
Search less than or equal to
Search greater than
Search greater than or equal to
Copy array source to definition
1-14
Mnemonic
SREQ
SRNE
SRLT
SRLE
SRGT
SRGE
MOVA
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
Function Numbers
101 to 104
105 to 108
109 to 112
113 to 116
117 to 120
121 to 124
130 to 134
GFK-0551C
1
User References
Data in the Series 90-20 PLC programs is referenced by its address in the system. A
reference specifies both a memory type and a precise address within that memory type.
For example:
%I00001
%R00256
specifies address 1 in input memory.
specifies address 256 in register memory.
The % symbol is used to distinguish machine references from nicknames and is only
used with Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software. The % symbol is not
used with the Hand-Held Programmer.
User Reference Types and Memory Size
The prefix of a user reference indicates where data is stored in the PLC. References in
the Series 90-20 PLC are either discrete or register data types.
Table 1-2. Range and Size of User References for Series 90-20
Reference Type
User program logic
Discrete inputs
Discrete inputs, internal
Discrete outputs
Discrete outputs, internal with LED indicators
Discrete outputs, internal
Discreteglobals
Discrete internal coils
Discretetemporary coils
System status references
System register references
Analog and High Speed Counter inputs
Analogoutputs
System registers [
[
Reference Range
Notapplicable
%I0001 - %I0016
%I0017 - %I0048
%Q0001 - %Q0012
%Q0013 - %Q0016
%Q0017 - %Q0048
%G0001 - %G1280
%M0001 - %M1024
%T0001 - %T0256
%S0001 - %S0032
%SA0001 - %SA0032
%SB0001 - %SB0032
%SC0001 - %SC0032
%R0001 - %R0256
%AI0001 - %AI0016
%AQ0001 - %AQ0016
%SR0001 - %SR0016
Size
1K words
16 bits
32 bits
12 bits
4 bits
32 bits
1280 bits
1024 bits
256 bits
32 bits
32 bits
32 bits
32 bits
256 words
16 words
16 words
16 words
For reference table viewing only; may not be referenced in a user logic program.
User Register References
Register data types are referenced as 16-bit words. The following types of references are
word references:
GFK-0551C
H
%AI - References analog inputs and the High Speed Counter. This prefix is
followed by the actual address of the reference, for example: %AI0015 occupies one
word containing 16 bits. %AI0016 would occupy the next 16 consecutive bits.
H
%AQ - References analog outputs. This prefix is followed by the actual address of
the reference, for example: %AQ0015 occupies one word containing 16 bits.
%AQ0016 would occupy the next 16 consecutive bits.
H
%R - This prefix is used to assign register references that will store word-oriented
program data, such as the results of calculations. These references are retentive.
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-15
1
User Discrete References
Discrete references are addressed as individual bits of data. The following types of
references are discrete references.
H
%I - References discrete machine inputs. This prefix is followed by the reference’s
address in the status input table. For example, %I0012 is the reference for input
number 12. The %I references are located in the input status table, which stores the
states of inputs received from the hardware during the last input scan.
H
%Q - References discrete machine outputs. This prefix is followed by the
reference’s address in the output status table. For example, %Q0012 is the reference
for output 12. %Q references are located in the output status table, which stores the
states of outputs as last set by the application program. The states of these
references are retained through loss of power if not used as an output coil. When
used with an output coil, %Q references are retentive with -(SM)-, -(RM)-, -(M)-,
and -(/M)- coils and non-retentive with -(S)-, -(R)-, -( )- and -(/)- coils.
H
%M - This prefix is used to reference internal coils. They are used in boolean logic
when the result will be used again in the program. The %M references are retained
through loss of power if not used as an output coil. When used with an output coil,
%M references are retentive with -(SM)-, -(RM)-, -(M)-, and -(/M)- coils and
non-retentive with -(S)-, -(R)-, -( )- and -(/)- coils. Since they do not represent actual
machine outputs, any available location in %M memory can be assigned, for
example, %M00064.
H
%T - The %T prefix is used to reference temporary internal coils that are not
retained through loss of power. Temporary coils function like the %M references,
described above. However, they can be used as often as needed as conditional
contacts to control logic within the user program.
H
%G - The %G prefix is used to represent Global Data that is shared between
multiple devices using the Genius Communications Module to communicate over a
Genius I/O bus. These references have the same retentive properties as %M
references.
H
%S - The %S prefix references system memory. %S references are retentive. The
%S memory for fault references has four sections: %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC. This
memory is used by the PLC to store contact references that have special meaning,
such as:
Reference
Nickname
Description
%SA0002
%SA0009
%SB0011
ov_swp
cfg_mm
bad_pwd
Exceeded constant sweep time
System configuration mismatch
PasswordAccess Failure
The Series 90-20 PLC monitors internal operations for either system or user problems
called faults. These faults are reported through the %S references and through an
internal fault table. Access to %S information is available through Logicmaster
90-30/90-20 or with the Hand-Held Programmer. The fault table can only be accessed by
Logicmaster 90-30/90-20. For more details on faults and fault reporting see Chapter 4.
1-16
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
Programmer Requirements For Running Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 Software
In order to run the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software, you will need a
programming computer, which can be one of the following:
H
H
H
A computer with a hard disk:
h
h
A Workmaster II industrial computer with a 101-key keyboard, or
h
A Zenitht Mastersportt SL notebook computer.
A personal computer with an Intel 80386 or higher processor and a minimum of
2 Megabytes of memory, or
At least 4 Megabytes of free disk space.
Both the Logicmaster 90-30/Micro Release 5 WSI and the Standard Serial COM Port
versions require a minimum of 556 KBytes (569,344 bytes) of available DOS
application memory in order to run.
To run Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software, MS-DOSr Version 5.0 (or higher)
must be installed on your computer. For detailed information on requirements for
running Logicmaster software, refer to the Logicmaster 90 Series 90-30/20/Micro
Programming Software User’s Manual, GFK-0466.Logicmaster90-30/20/Micro
programming software provides foreign keyboard support, depending on the
configuration of MS-DOS residing on the host computer. Consult your MS-DOS User’s
Manual for information on configuring for your country.
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software communicates with the Series 90-20
PLC through a standard RS-232 port on the computer when used with an available
RS-232 to RS-422/RS-485 converter or through a Work Station Interface (WSI) board
(IC647WMI320) which must be installed in the computer to be used for programming.
A serial cable provides the physical connection from the computer running Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro programming software to the PLC. The connection to the Series 90-20
PLC is to a dedicated RS-485 compatible serial port connector located on the CPU
module.
IC647WMI320
WSI
SERIAL
a44544
SERIAL
CABLE
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
SERIES 90–20
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WORKMASTER II
RS–232
RS–485
CONVERTER
Figure 1-6. Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 Programmer Connection to the Series 90-20 PLC
t
r
R
GFK-0551C
Zenith and Mastersport are trademarks of Zenith Data Systems Corporation.
MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
Personal System 2 and PS/2 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation.
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-17
1
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
The RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter (IC690ACC900) provides an RS-232 interface to
external devices requiring the RS-232 serial interface through conversion of the
RS-422/RS-485 signals provided at the RS-422/RS-485 port in the Series 90-20 PLC. This
converter provides a direct serial connection to a Workmaster II or other computer used
as the programming device when runningLogicmaster90-30/20/Microprogramming
software for the Series 90-20 PLC. You do not need to have a Work Station Interface
installed in the Workmaster II computer when the converter is used.
a44705
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
SERIES 90–20
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
WORKMASTER II
RS–232
RS–485
CONVERTER
Figure 1-7. Example of RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter Connection
in a Series 90-20 PLC System
This converter is a small, convenient, self-contained device which requires only a cable
connection to the Series 90-20 RS-422/RS-485 port on one end and a cable connection to
the RS-232 device on the opposite end.
The converter operates from a +5 VDC source, which is provided from the PLC
backplane +5 VDC bus, through the cable connection. The pin assignments for the
connections on the cable required for the RS-232 connection are compatible with
available Series 90 Programmable Coprocessor Module (PCM) serial cables
(IC690CBL701, PCM to Workmaster; IC690CBL705, PCM to Workmaster II; and
IC690CBL702, PCM to PC-AT). The RS-422/RS-485 connection at the Series 90-20 serial
port on the CPU module may be made with an available cable (used with the
Hand-Held programmer), IC693CBL303.
The three PCM compatible cables (IC690CBL701/702/705) are 10 feet (3 meters) in
length, and the Hand-Held Programmer compatible cable (IC693CBL303) is 6 feet (2
meters) in length. For those user’s who may want to build their own cables, pin
assignments and recommended cable types for both cables required for use with the
converter are provided in Chapter 2, Installation.
Miniconverter Kit
The Miniconverter Kit (IC690ACC901) consists of an RS-422 (SNP) to RS-232
Miniconverter, a 6 foot (2 meter) serial extension cable, and a 9-pin to 25-pin Converter
Plug assembly. The 15-pin SNP port connector on the Miniconverter plugs directly into
the serial port connector on the Series 90-20 CPU. The 9-pin RS-232 port connector on
the Miniconverter connects to an RS-232 compatible device.
When used with an IBM PC-AT, or compatible computer, one end of the extension cable
plugs into the Miniconverter’s 9-pin serial port connector, the other end plugs into the
1-18
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
1
9-pin serial port of the computer. The Converter plug (supplied with kit) is required to
convert the 9-pin serial port connector on the Miniconverter to the 25-pin serial port
connector on the GE Fanuc Workmaster II computer, or an IBM PC-XT or PS/2 Personal
Computer.
The GE Fanuc Workmaster computer requires an additional adapter (not supplied with kit - please
contact your local GE Fanuc PLC distributor) for use with the Miniconverter.
The Miniconverter is shown in the following figure. For more information on the
Miniconverter, refer to Appendix C.
a44985
RS–422
PORT
RS–232
PORT
Figure 1-8. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Adapter
GFK-0551C
Chapter 1 Introduction and Product Description
1-19
1
Module Specifications
General specifications for the Series 90-20 Programmable Logic Controller are given in
the following table.
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C
32_ to 140_F (inlet air at bottom of rack)
Storage Temperature:
–40 _ to 85_C
–40 _ to +185_F
Humidity:
Vibration:
5% to 95% (non-condensing)
3.5mm peak-to-peak displacement 5-10Hz, 1G 10-200 Hz
Shock:
15 g’s for 11 msec
AC Power Source
Refer to I/O Power Supply specifications for each model in
Chapter 5.
Module Weight:
CPUModule:
I/O Power Supply Base:
0..69 pounds (.31 kg)
3.81 pounds (1.73 kg)
ModuleDimensions:
CPU and I/O Module Connected
Height: 6.4I (162.6mm)
Width: 10.5I (266.7mm)
Depth: 3.54I (89.9mm)
Back-upBattery Type:
Lithium,long-life
Typical Battery Life
About 5 years
Battery Shelf Life
8 to 10 years
Typical Scan Rate:
18.0 ms/1K of logic (boolean contacts)
Maximum number of Discrete Physical I/O Points:
28(16inputs/12outputs)
1-20
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Chapter
2 Installation
2
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes the procedures for installing the Series 90-20 PLC and preparing
the system for use. Included in this chapter are instructions for unpacking, inspecting,
installing the I/O Power Supply Base on a panel, installing the CPU module and
connecting required cables to programming devices.
You should verify that all components of the system have been received and that they
agree with your order. If the modules you receive do not agree with your order, call GE
Fanuc Programmable Control Customer Service, toll free, in Charlottesville, VA at
1-(800) 432-7521. A Customer Service representative will then give you further
instructions. The hardware required for a Series 90-20 PLC system includes:
H
I/O and Power Supply Base module, which contains a power supply, I/O circuitry
and I/O terminal strips for user field connections
H
H
CPU module
H
Appropriate cables to connect the programming device to the PLC.
Programmer, either Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro and a computer to run it on, or a
Series90-30/20/MicroHand-HeldProgrammer
Hardware Packaging
Each of these items are shipped separately and must be connected by the user. The I/O
Power Supply Base Module is designed for panel mounting. The CPU Module connects
to the I/O Power Supply Base Module. A copy of this manual, GFK-0551, is packed with
the Hand-Held Programmer. This manual is also available on CD-ROM. Additional
copies of the manual, if required, may be ordered through your local GE Fanuc PLC
distributor or GE Fanuc sales office.
If the PLC is to be programmed using Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programming
software, a Workmaster II, Cimstar I, or an IBM or compatible computer is required to
run the software. The Workmaster II or Cimstar I computer, if ordered, is packed in a
separate shipping container. Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software can use either a Work
Station Interface (WSI) board or a standard RS-232 interface with an available
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 converter. A cable for connecting the Work Station Interface
board installed in the computer or cables for connecting the converter must be ordered
as separate items, and are packed separately.
GE Fanuc recommends that all shipping containers and packing material be saved
should it be necessary to transport or ship any part of the system.
The Hand-Held Programmer, and the Hand-Held Programmer cable are both packed in
separate shipping containers. The Series 90-30/20/Micro Hand-Held Programmer User’s
Manual, GFK-0402, is packed with the Hand-Held Programmer (IC693PRG300).
GFK-0551C
2-1
2
Visual Inspection
Upon receiving your Series 90-20 PLC system, carefully inspect all shipping containers
for damage which may have incurred during shipping. If any part of the system is
damaged, notify the carrier immediately. The damaged shipping container should be
saved as evidence for inspection by the carrier.
As the consignee, it is your responsibility to register a claim with the carrier for damage
incurred during shipment. However, GE Fanuc will fully cooperate with you, should
such action be necessary.
Pre-installation Check
After unpacking the Series 90-20 PLC I/O Power Supply Base Module, CPU Module, and
programmer, record all serial numbers. These serial numbers may be required if you
should need to contact GE Fanuc Product Service during the warranty period of the
equipment.
Verify that all components of the system have been received and that they agree with
your order. If the system received does not agree with your order, call Programmable
Control Customer Service, toll free, in Charlottesville, VA at 1-800-432-7521. A Customer
Service representative will then give you further instructions.
Technical Help
If at any time you need technical help, PLC Technical Support can be reached at the PLC
Hotline, or via Internet or fax as listed below.
Technical support for the PLC items described in this manual:
PLC Hotline
1-800-828-5747(or804-978-5747)
Internet address
[email protected]
Fax number
804-978-5099
Packing List
The following described items make up a Series 90-20 PLC system. The first thing you
should do is unpack all shipping cartons and verify the contents.
I/O Power Supply Base Module
The I/O Power Supply Base Module package should include the following items:
2-2
D
Module - aluminum base module with an open plastic cover and removable
terminal strips.
D
IPI (Important Product Information) document - this includes information not in
this manual when it was printed, such as updated specifications and errata.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
CPU Module
The CPU Module package should include the following items:
H
Module - this will be a plastic module containing one circuit board and a battery
assembly.
H
IPI Sheet (Important Product Information) this includes information not in this
manual when it was printed, such as updated specifications and errata.
H
Series 90-20 PLC User’s Manual.
Minimum Requirements
In order to set-up and install the Series 90-20 PLC, you will need the following items:
H
H
H
CPU Module
I/OPower Supply Module
Programming device: this can be one of the following items:
A. Hand-Held Programmer and cable
B. Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software, a Workmaster II or Cimstar
I industrial computer, or an IBM PC-XT, AT, PS/2 or compatible personal
computer and appropriate cables
C. Pre-programmed PROM that will run the Series 90-20 PLC
H
Appropriate tools for mounting the PLC and connecting field wiring cables.
Pre-Installation Set-Up
You are not required to configure any jumpers or make any other settings on the
modules.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-3
2
Installation
This section describes the steps required for installation of your Series 90-20 PLC.
I/O Power Supply Base Installation
The Series 90-20 PLC I/O Power Supply Base Module must be panel mounted (normal
orientation is on a vertical surface). Each Base has standard attachment flanges for
mounting on an electrical panel. Base dimensions and proper spacing requirements for
installation purposes are shown in the following figure.
a44545
*
ALLOWANCE FOR COOLING
4.00
* (102)
3.54
(89)
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
10.50
(267)
4.00
* (102)
4.00
* (102)
9.82
(249)
1.42
(36)
3.54
(90)
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
REMOVABLE
CPU
.25 DIA.
(TYPICAL)
6.40
(163)
FRONT VIEW
DIMENSIONS IN INCHES, MILLIMETERS ARE IN PARENTHESIS
4.00
* (102)
Figure 2-1. Series 90-20 Baseplate Mounting Dimensions and Spacing Requirements
Note
For non-standard orientation, derate the operating temperature (0_C to
60_C (32_F to 140_F)) by 10_C (18_F).
2-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Power Supply Connections
Connect a power source meeting specifications of the I/O Base Module you are installing
(See Chapter 5 for detailed specifications). For example, 120 VAC power supply
modules require a 102 to 132 VAC, 50/60 Hz power source.
a44546
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
WARNING
FOR PERSONAL SAFETY
DISCONNECT POWER
BEFORE REMOVING
CPU FROM I/O BASE
21
GND
POWER
SOURCE
Figure 2-2. Series 90-20 Power Source Connections
Warning
Ensure that the protective cover is installed over terminals on the
terminal board when power is applied to the unit. The cover protects
against accidental shock hazard which could cause severe or fatal
injury to the operator or maintenance personnel.
Grounding Requirements
The Series 90-20 PLC and the devices it is controlling must be properly grounded. This is
particularly important for the reasons listed below.
H
A low resistance path from all parts of a system to earth minimizes exposure to
shock in the event of short circuits or equipment malfunction.
H
The Series 90-20 PLC system requires proper grounding for correct operation.
The importance of a properly grounded system cannot be over emphasized.
Ground Conductors
GFK-0551C
H
Ground conductors should be connected with separate branches routed to a central
earth ground point. This method is shown in the following figure.
H
Ground conductors should be as short and as large in size as possible. Braided
straps or ground cables (typically green insulation with a yellow tracer - AWG #12
(3.33 mm2) or larger) can be used to minimize resistance. Conductors must always
be large enough to carry the maximum short circuit current of the path being
considered.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-5
2
SERIES 90–20
PLC CABINET
MOTOR DRIVES
AND
OTHER
ELECTRICAL
CONTROL
EQUIPMENT
RACK
PROGRAMMING
DEVICE
RACK
EARTH
GROUND
CENTRAL
GROUND POINT
MACHINERY
NOTE
SIGNAL AND POWER
CONNECTIONS
NOT SHOWN
Figure 2-3. Recommended System Grounding
Series 90-20 Grounding Procedures
Equipment grounding recommendations and procedures are listed below. These
grounding procedures must be properly followed for safe operation of your Series 90-20
PLC system.
The metal back of the I/O power supply base is ground, when properly installed. Safety
and Reference ground connections should be made from one of the mounting tabs to
earth ground using a minimum AWG #12 (3.33 mm2) wire and a ring terminal. Use of a
nut and star washer for each wire on the ground connection lug is recommended to
ensure adequate grounding.
Warning
The baseplate must be grounded to minimize electrical shock hazard
which could result in severe personal injury to the operator or
maintenance personnel.
The best way to provide proper ground connections is to ensure that the Series 90-20
PLC I/O base metal frame is directly connected to the control panel in which the
baseplate or baseplates are mounted. This can be accomplished by connecting a ground
strap from one of the ground lugs on either side of the baseplate to the control panel or
cabinet following applicable electrical safety codes.
Logicmaster Programming Device Grounding
For proper operation, the programmer for Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro (Workmaster II or
Cimstar I, or IBM-PC or compatible computer) must have a ground connection in
common with the Series 90-20 PLC. Normally, this common ground connection is
provided by ensuring that the programmer’s power cord is connected to the same
power source (with the same ground reference point) as the baseplate.
I/O Installation and Wiring
The following discussion pertains to information on installing and wiring I/O points
and information relevant to field wiring to and from those I/O points. When installing a
2-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
terminal board that has wiring attached verify that the terminal board is connected to the
proper module type.
Wiring To I/O Circuits
In most cases, wiring connections to and from user supplied input and output field
devices are terminated at two detachable terminal boards supplied with each I/O Power
Supply Base module.
Terminal Board Wiring
Removable terminal boards make it easy to pre-wire field wiring to the user supplied
input and output devices, and to replace modules in the field without disturbing existing
field wiring.
The I/O terminal boards have 20 screw terminals and will accept up to one AWG #12
(3.33 mm2) wire or two AWG #14 (2.10 mm2) wires using lug type terminals.
The following figure shows the alignment and screw locations for installation or
removal of a terminal board. Recommended procedures for installation and removal of
a terminal board are described following the figure.
a44543
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Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
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Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
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Ï
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Figure 2-4. Installing/Removing a Terminal board
Installing a Terminal Board
To install a terminal board with no wires attached:
D
D
D
GFK-0551C
Line up the terminal board with the terminal pins.
Push the terminal board towards the module until it snaps into place.
Lock the terminal board in place by tightening the screws at the end of the terminal
board.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-7
2
When installing a terminal board that has wiring attached verify that the terminal board
is connected to the proper module type.
Caution
Check the label on the hinged door and the label on the module to
ensure that they match. If a wired terminal board is installed on the
wrong module type, damage to the module may incur.
Removing a Terminal Board
To remove a terminal board:
H
H
Unscrew the lock down screws at each end of the terminal strip.
Pull up on the terminal strip.
Field Wiring Considerations And Planning
It is recommended that the following procedures be followed when routing and
connecting field wiring from user input devices to the PLC or to output devices (loads)
to be controlled by the PLC.
H
H
All low level signal wires should be run separately from other field wiring.
AC power wiring should be run separately from DC field wiring.
Warning
You should calculate the maximum current for each wire and observe
proper wiring practices. Failure to do so may cause injury to
personnel or damage to equipment.
H
Do not rout field wiring close to any device that could be a potential source of
electrical interference.
H
If severe noise problems are present, additional power supply filtering or an
isolation transformer may be required.
H
Ensure that proper grounding procedures, as previously described, are followed to
minimize potential safety hazards to personnel.
H
Label all wires to and from I/O devices. Record circuit identification numbers or
other pertinent data on the inserts which go in the terminal board cover.
I/O Connections
I/Oconnections are defined on the terminal board hinged cover label. In addition,
wiring examples are given for each I/O baseplate in Chapter 5.
2-8
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
CPU Module Installation
Attachment to the I/O Power Supply Base
Attach the CPU module to the I/O Power Supply Base by placing the CPU module flush
with the top of the I/O Power Supply Base and sliding the module towards the mating
connector as shown in the following figure. The CPU module should be pushed toward
the mating connector until the CPU hook fully engages the I/O Base catch.
I/O
POWER
SUPPLY
BASE
Ï
Ï
a44554
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
CPU
MODULE
Figure 2-5. CPU Module Attachment to the I/O Power Supply Baseplate
The CPU module is shipped from the factory with an insert placed between the LED
matrix and the LED cover to ensure that the matrix is not dislodged during shipment.
Lift the cover, remove this insert and push the cover back down before using the Series
90-20 PLC.
Battery Installation
The CPU has battery-backed CMOS memory. This battery is connected at the factory. If
the red LOW BATTERY LED comes on after providing power to the baseplate, it is an
indication that the battery may not be connected. To access the battery, remove the
plastic cover at the bottom of the CPU. To connect a battery, use the following
procedure:
GFK-0551C
D
Remove the cover at the bottom of the CPU Module to access the battery mounting
clip on back of this cover and the two connector receptacles mounted on the printed
circuit board.
D
Orient the battery connector with one of the mating receptacles on the board. The
guide tab on the battery connector should face away (be towards you) from the
circuit board for proper orientation.
D
D
Push the battery connector into the receptacle so that it locks into place.
Replace the battery door cover.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-9
2
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
BATTERY
BATTERY
CABLE
CONNECTS
TO EITHER
CONNECTOR
GUIDE TAB
SHOULD BE
AWAY FROM
CIRCUIT BOARDS
a44548
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
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ÏÏÏÏÏ
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Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
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ÏÏÏÏÏ
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40
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
LITHIUM BATTERY
(IC693ACC301)
MOUNTED ON
BATTERY CLIPS
ON BACK OF
BATTERY COVER
Figure 2-6. Battery Location and Mounting
Power-Up/Verification
After the proper power connections have been made to the I/O base and you have
mounted the CPU module on the I/O base, the Series 90-20 PLC can be powered up to
verify that the unit is installed correctly.
Normal Power-up Sequence
Apply the required power to the power inputs of the I/O base.
H
H
H
The Power LED (Green) should turn ON.
H
If any of the input points have been wired to field devices that energize those
circuits, then the corresponding input LEDs should turn ON. Otherwise, all input
LEDs will be OFF.
H
If the RN LED is OFF, then all output LEDs should be OFF (in the Stop with I/O
Disabled mode).
The CPU status LED labeled OK in the LED matrix should turn ON.
If a user PROM has been installed, the CPU status LED labeled RN in the LED
matrix should turn ON if the unit is configured to RUN on power-up.
Error Detection And Correction
One of following conditions will be observed after applying power if there is a problem
with the unit.
H
Power LED OFF. This indicates that either an improper power source is connected
to the module or that the I/O base power supply is not working properly.
h
h
h
2-10
Check that the proper power source is provided and is ON.
Check wiring to the I/O base unit to be sure wiring is connected correctly.
Check that the CPU Module is fully mated with the I/O base.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
h
Check that the line fuse located in the lower left corner of the I/O base unit is not
blown. Refer to Chapter 5 for details on fuse location and replacement for each
type of I/O base.
If none of these actions corrects the problem, then contact the GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Hot Line at 1-(800)-828-5747 for assistance.
H
Power LED ON but OK LED is OFF. This indicates that the power source is good
but that the CPU module has detected an internal fault.
h
Remove power, then remove the CPU module and verify that the 24 volt fuse
on the I/O circuit board is good. If it is open, replace the fuse with a .25A 3AG
fuse (GE Fanuc replacement part number 259A9578P6).
h
Remove the CPU Module and check that the I/O baseplate pins that connect to
the CPU module are all aligned properly. Then, reconnect the CPU module and
ensure that the module is connected properly to the I/O baseplate.
If none of these actions corrects the problem, then contact the GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Hot Line as described above.
After verifying that a good power sequence has occurred, attach a programming device
(Hand-Held Programmer or computer with Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming
software) to start developing programs and setting up configuration for the unit.
Programming and Configuring the Series 90-20 PLC
The Series 90-20 PLC can be programmed and configured using either the Hand-Held
programmer or with Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software. Both of these
methods are described on the following pages.
Using the Hand-Held Programmer
The Hand-Held Programmer is a compact programming device which connects to the
Series 90-20 PLC 15-pin serial port through a 6 foot (3 meters) cable (IC69CBL303).
The Hand-Held Programmer cable provides the connections which allow the
Hand-Held Programmer and the PLC to communicate. This cable supports the RS-485
specification. It also provides the power connections for the Hand-Held Programmer,
and a signal which indicates to the PLC that the Hand-Held Programmer, as opposed to
another device is attached to the serial port. To connect the Hand-Held Programmer
cable for the first time:
GFK-0551C
H
Attach the 15-pin male D connector on one end to the mating 15-pin female D
connector on the Hand-Held Programmer.
H
Attach the connector on the other end of the cable to the connector on the CPU
Module. These connections are shown in the following figure.
Chapter 2 Installation
2-11
2
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
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ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
SERIES 90–20
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
HAND–HELD
PROGRAMMER
(IC693PRG300)
CABLE (IC693CBL303)
Figure 2-7. Hand-Held Programmer Cable Connection to a Series 90-20 PLC
Warning
Always connect the cable to the Hand-Held Programmer first, then
connect the cable to the Series 90-20 PLC. This avoids any chance of
shorting the +5 volt supply on the PLC which could cause incorrect
operation of the Series 90-20 PLC. Incorrect operation of the PLC
could damage the equipment or cause personal injury to an operator.
Initial Programming With the Hand-Held Programmer
The following screen (Main Menu) will be displayed on the Hand-Held Programmer
after the Series 90-20 PLC has successfully completed its power-up sequence.
__1. PROGRAM
2. DATA
<S
This initial screen allows you to select the mode of operation of the program. The
choices are: PROGRAM, DATA, PROTECT and CONFIGURATION. Use of the
Hand-Held Programmer for the Series 90-20 PLC is the same as the Series 90-30 PLC in
the PROGRAM, DATA and PROTECT modes. For information on using these modes
please refer to the Series 90-30 and 90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual,
GFK-0402.
Hand-Held Programmer Configuration Screens for the Series 90-20 PLC
The configuration screens differ from the Series 90-30 PLC because the I/O and power
supply on the Series 90-20 PLC are fixed. Enter the configuration mode by pressing the
4 key then the ENT key from the Main Menu screen. The up and down cursor keys
allow you to move between power supply configuration, CPU configuration, Input
configuration, Output configuration, and High Speed Counter configuration. The left
and right arrows allow selection of parameters within each of the configurations.
R0:01 PLC
KEY CLK: OFF
2-12
<S
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
This screen indicates that the CPU function is located in rack 0 and slot 01 (R01:01). For
compatibility with the Series 90-30 PLCs, the different functions mimic the rack and slot
locations. The Series 90-20 PLC system is always in rack 0. The following table shows
the fixed slot assignments for the different functions.
Slot
Function
Fixed/Configurable
0
Power Supply
Fixed
1
CPU Parameters
Configurable
2
Input Locations
Fixed: %I1 to %I16
3
Output Locations
Fixed: %Q1 to %Q12
4
High Speed Counter
Configurable
If you want to transfer a Series 90-20 PLC developed program to a Series 90-30 PLC, the
I/O modules in the Series 90-30 PLC must be in the above listed rack and slot locations
for the program and configuration to work properly.
The screen shown above also shows the first configuration item which allows you to
change the Hand-Held Programmer Key Click feature. The default is KEY CLK: OFF.
Selecting the up arrow key cause the next screen to be displayed:
R0:00 PWR SUP <S
IO BASE: I16/Q12
This screen indicates that the baseplate located at rack 0 and slot 00 is a generic 16
Input/12 Output type of module. Since this is the only type of baseplate available, it is
not a configurable item.
Pressing the down arrow key causes the previous screen to be displayed:
R0:01 PLC
KEY CLK: OFF
<S
Use the left and right arrow keys to view the other CPU parameters for configuration
and the –/+ key to select the items within each parameter. Refer to the Series 90-30 and
90-20 PLC Hand-Held Programmer Manual, GFK-0402, for detailed information on
configuration.
Pressing the down arrow key again causes the input screen to be displayed:
R0:02 I
<S
I16:I0001–I0016
On the Series 90-20 PLC, the input points are configured in logical rack 0 and slot 02. If
the program is transferred to a Series 90-30 PLC, the input module should be located in
the first I/O slot (slot 02 on the Model 331, 340, 341, or 351, and slot 01 on the Model 311
and Model 313).
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-13
2
Pressing the down arrow key again causes the output screen to be displayed:
R0:03 Q
<S
Q16:Q0001–Q0016
On the Series 90-20 PLC, the output points are configured in logical rack 0 and slot 03. If
the program is transferred to a Series 90-30 PLC, the output module should be located in
the second I/O slot (slot 03 on the Model 331, 340, 341 and 351, and slot 02 on the Model
311 and Model 313).
Pressing the down arrow key again causes the first High Speed Counter screen to be
displayed:
R0:04 HSC
<S
I16:I0033–I0048
On the Series 90-20 PLC, the High Speed Counter is configured in logical rack 0 and slot
04. If the program is transferred to a Series 90-30 PLC, the High Speed Counter module
should be located in the third I/O slot (slot 04 on the Model 331, 340, 341 or 351, and slot
03 on the Model 311 and Model 313).
The rest of the High Speed Counter configuration screens are discussed in Chapter 6,
Series 90-20 High Speed Counter.
2-14
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Using Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software
There are two types of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software packages;
each uses a different cable and interface hardware. The first type uses a standard
RS-422 or RS-232 serial communications port on the IBM-PC compatible computer.
Examples of cable connections for this type of interface are shown below. Note that the
converter shown in the figures is catalog number IC690ACC900, you can also use the
miniconverter kit, catalog number IC690ACC901 (see Appendix C for details).
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
SERIES 90–20
Ï
ÏÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
Ï
IBM PC (XT),
WORKMASTER.
RS–232
IC690CBL701
10 FEET
(3 METERS)
RS–422
RS485/RS232
CONVERTER
IC690ACC900
IC693CBL303
6 FEET (3 METERS)
HAND–HELD PROGRAMMER
CABLE
SERIES 90–20
RS–232
IC690CBL702
10 FEET
(3 METERS)
RS–422
IC693CBL303
6 FEET (3 METERS)
HAND–HELD PROGRAMMER
CABLE
RS485/RS232
CONVERTER
IC690ACC900
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏ
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a45060
IBM PS/2,
WORKMASTER II
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
a45059
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
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ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
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ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
IBM PC (AT)
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
a45058
SERIES 90–20
RS–232
IC690CBL705
10 FEET
(3 METERS)
RS–422
RS485/RS232
CONVERTER
IC690ACC900
IBM COMPATIBLE
WITH RS–422 INTERFACE
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
IC693CBL303
6 FEET (3 METERS)
HAND–HELD PROGRAMMER
CABLE
a45061
SERIES 90–20
RS–422
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
(SEE 90–SERIES 20, 15 PIN CONNECTOR ASSIGNMENT)
Figure 2-8. Examples of Serial Connection from Series 90-20 PLC to Programmer
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-15
2
Catalog numbers for the software package for the above connection are IC640HWP306
(software with converter and cable) or IC640SWP306 (software only).
The second type of Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software package uses a Work Station
Interface board installed in the computer. The cable connection for this configuration is
from the connector on the Work Station Interface board to the Series 90-20 serial port as
shown below.
a44704
SERIAL CABLE
(IC647CBL704)
WSI
SERIAL
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
SERIES 90–20
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
WORKMASTER II
Figure 2-9. Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programmer Connection through a
Work Station Interface
Catalog numbers for the software package for the above connection are IC640HWP310
(for IBM PC-AT), IC640HWP322 (for IBM PS-2), and IC640SWP301 (software only).
Building a Serial Communications Cable
The following information is provided for those users who may want to build a serial
cable with a different length for connecting a Series 90 PLC to a Workmaster II
computer.
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
WORKSTATION
INTERFACE
(WS9A1)
37– PIN
FEMALE
D–TYPE
CONNECTOR
PIN
0V
1
SD (B)
26
Ï
Ï
PIN
7
11
10
9
14
6
8
0V
SD (A)
27
CTS (A)
30
CTS (B)
RTS (B)
RTS (A)
RT
31
32
33
36
15
RD (B’)
RD (A’)
RT
RTS (B)
RTS (A)
CTS (B’)
CTS (A’)
RD (B)
34
13
SD (B)
RD (A)
35
SD (A)
SHLD
37
12
1
37– PIN
MALE
D–TYPE
CONNECTOR
4000 FEET
(1200 METERS)
MAXIMUM
SHLD
15– PIN
MALE
D–TYPE
CONNECTOR
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Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
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a43114
SERIES
90–70
AND
SERIES
90-20
(CPU)
SERIES
90–30
(PS)
15– PIN
FEMALE
D–TYPE
CONNECTOR
Figure 2-10. Series 90 PLC to Workmaster II Serial Cable
2-16
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
H
Cable Type - 24 AWG (0.22 mm2), 30V computer grade. Extra flexible construction
recommended for short lengths.
H
Connectors - 37-pin male D-type with 4-40 screws and AMP hood No. 1-207908-0 or
equivalent. 15-pin male D-type with M3 screws and AMP hood No. 1-207908-4, or
equivalent. Note that an AMP connector is not supplied with M3 (metric) screws.
H
Hardware kit - AMP 207871-1. Kit includes two M3 metric screws and two screw
clips.
Serial Port Compatibility
Termination resistance for the Receive Data (RD) signal needs to be connected only on
units at the end of the line. This termination is made on the Series 90 PLC products by
connecting a jumper between pins 9 and 10 inside the 15-pin D-shell with the following
exception. For the Series 90-20 PLC, catalog number IC692CPU211A, version R03 board
and earlier (as marked on the circuit board inside the module), the termination for the
RD at the PLC is implemented by a jumper between pins 9 and 11, instead of 9 and 10.
The version is indicated by a label located on the lower left corner of the board,
component side. Satisfactory operation of the Series 90-20 PLC has been demonstrated
with the Hand-Held Programmer and Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programmer without
modifying standard cables.
Multidrop Serial Data Configuration to Series 90 PLCs
A typical wiring diagram and requirements for connecting a Workmaster II,
Workmaster, or IBM-PC or compatible computer to Series 90 PLCs in an 8-wire
multidrop, serial data configuration is shown in the following figure. The 15-pin serial
port connector for the Series 90-20 is located on the CPU Module. The 37-pin serial port
connector for the Workmaster II and Workmaster computers is located on the Work
Station Interface board installed in the programming computer. The cable type for these
connections should be 24 AWG (0.22 mm2), 30V computer grade. Extra flexible
construction is recommended for short lengths.
The maximum number of PLCs that can be included in a multidrop system for various
cable lengths is listed below.
Cable Length
Maximum Number of PLCs
4000 feet
2000 feet
1000 feet
8
16
32
For additional information on serial communications, refer to the Series 90 PLC Serial
Communications User’s Manual, GFK-0582.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-17
2
a43846
WORKMASTER OR
WORKMASTER II
WSI
SHIELDED
TWISTED
PAIRS
PIN
SD (A)
SD (B)
RD (A’)
RD (B’)
CTS (A’)
CTS (B’)
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
RT
0V
SHIELD
27
26
35
34
31
30
33
32
36
1
37
MAKE CONNECTIONS
INSIDE D-CONNECTORS
*
*
37-PIN
CONNECTOR
WORKMASTER
PLC 1
PLC 3
PLC 2
*
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
9
7
1
RD (A’)
RD (B’)
SD (A)
SD (B)
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
CTS (A’)
CTS (B’)
RT
0V
SHIELD
15-PIN
CONNECTOR
SERIES
90 PLC
PIN
ALSO IT IS RECOMMENDED TO MAKE ANYNECESSARY CONNECTIONS INSIDE THE
CABLE CONNECTOR TO BE MOUNTED ON
THE PLC.
*
USE TERMINAL STRIPS
OR OTHER TYPES OF
CONNECTORS ALONG THE
LENGTH OF THE TRANSMISSION
LINE WHEN WIRING A
MULTIDROP SERIAL DATA
CONFIGURATION
RD (A’)
RD (B’)
SD (A)
SD (B)
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
CTS (A’)
CTS (B’)
RT
0V
SHIELD
SERIES
90 PLC
PIN
NOTE
WHEN WIRING RS-422/485 MULTIDROP
CABLES, REFLECTIONS ON THE TRANSMISSION LINE CAN BE REDUCED BY CONFIGURING THE CABLE IN A DAISY CHAIN
FASHION AS SHOWN BELOW.
DO NOT
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
9
7
1
15-PIN
CONNECTOR
UP TO A
MAXIMUM OF
4,000 FEET
(1,200 METERS)
IMPORTANT !
SERIES
90 PLC
PIN
IT IS NOT RECOMMENDED TO USE TERMI
NAL STRIPS OR OTHER TYPES OF CONNECTORS ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE
TRANSMISSION LINE.
10
11
12
13
6
14
15
8
9
7
1
RD (A’)
RD (B’)
SD (A)
SD (B)
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
CTS (A’)
CTS (B’)
RT
0V
SHIELD
15-PIN
CONNECTOR
TO OTHER PLC’s
(MAXIMUM OF 8 PLC’s ON A MULTIDROP)
* TERMINATION RESISTANCE FOR THE RECEIVE DATA (RD) SIGNAL NEEDS TO BE CONNECTED ONLY ON UNITS AT THE END OF THE LINES. THIS TERMINATION IS MADE ON
THE SERIES 90 PLC PRODUCTS BY CONNECTING A JUMPER BETWEEN PIN 9 AND PIN 10
INSIDE THE 15-PIN D-SHELL, WITH THE FOLLOWING EXCEPTION. FOR SERIES 90-70 PLCs,
CATALOG NUMBERS IC697CPU731 AND IC697CPU771, THE TERMINATION FOR
RD AT THE PLC IS IMPLEMENTED BY A JUMPER BETWEEN PIN 9 AND PIN 11.
*
CAUTION
GROUND POTENTIAL: MULTIPLE UNITS, NOT CONNECTED TO THE SAME POWER
SOURCE, MUST HAVE GROUND POTENTIAL WITHIN " 7V FOR PROPER OPERATION
OF THIS SYSTEM. FAILURE TO PROVIDE A COMMON GROUND MAY CAUSE DAMAGE
TO PLC COMPONENTS.
Figure 2-11. Example of Series 90 PLC to Programmer 8-Wire Multidrop,
Serial Data Configuration
2-18
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Installing the RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
Installation of the RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter (IC693ACC900) consists of
connecting two cables. Select the proper cables for your installation. Prewired cables
are available, or if cables of different lengths are required by your application, you can
build your own cables. Specifications for building these cables are provided later.
You do not need to connect an external source of power to the converter since the
necessary power connections of +5 VDC and signal ground are derived from the
baseplate’s backplane bus through the cable which connects to the Series 90-20 PLC.
1.
Select one of the three RS-232 compatible cables (10 feet in length) that will connect
the programmer’s (or other serial device) RS-232 serial port to the RS-232 port on
the converter. The catalog numbers of these cables are: IC690CBL701 (use with
Workmaster computer, or IBM PC-XT or compatible personal computer),
IC690CBL702 (use with IBM-PC-AT or compatible personal computer),
IC690CBL705 (use with Workmaster II computer, or IBM PS/2 or compatible personal
computer).
2.
The 6-foot cable (Hand-Held Programmer compatible) that connects from the
RS-422/RS-485 port on the converter to the RS-485 port on the Series 90-20 PLC
baseplate.
Installation of these cables should be done with the PLC powered-down.
H
Connect the 25-pin male connector on the 10 foot cable to the 25-pin female
connector on the converter.
H
Connect the 9-pin female connector on the opposite end of this cable to the male
RS-232 connector (serial port) on the selected programming (or other serial) device.
H
Notice that both ends of the 6-foot RS-422/RS-485 compatible cable are the same; a
15-pin male connector is attached at both ends. Connect one end of this cable to the
15-pin female connector on the RS-422/RS-485 connector on the converter.
H
Connect the other end of this cable to the 15-pin female connector, which interfaces
to the RS-485 compatible serial port on the Series 90-20.
Jumper Configurations
There are three jumper locations on the converter board for selection of user options.
Each jumper position has three pins, as shown in the following illustration. These
jumper positions, labeled JP2, JP3, and JP4, are accessed by removing the square plastic
cover on the top of the converter. Configuration can be changed as required by
carefully removing one or more of the jumpers with a pair of needle nose pliers and
placing it on the desired pair of pins.
Refer to the description of these selectable jumper positions in the following table and
place the jumper on the selected pair of pins. The pin numbers are 1, 2, and 3. Default
jumper locations are indicated by a rectangle around the pins to be jumpered for each
position. The default configuration is for the jumper to be on pins 1 and 2. Default
positions are used when using a Series 90-20 PLC and Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming
software.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-19
2
RS–422/RS485
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
a44680
RS–232
1
2
3
Figure 2-12. Location of Jumpers for User Options
Table 2-1. Jumper Configuration for RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
Jumper
Position
JP2
JP3
JP4
Label
DCD
MODEM
ATTACH
Jumper
Position
Description
1 2 3
Default position 1 and 2 is used when the device communicating
with the PLC does not supply the Carrier Detect signal.
1 2 3
Use jumper positions 2 and 3 if the device does supply the
Carrier Detect signal.
1 2 3
Default position 1 and 2 is used when an attached Modem does
not require the Clear To Send (CTS) signal.
1 2 3
Jumper positions 2 and 3 are used when the attached Modem
does require the CTS signal (most modems require this signal).
1 2 3
Default position 1 and 2 is used for most applications.
1 2 3
Jumper positions 2 and 3 are used if the device communicating
with the PLC is intended to emulate the Hand-Held
Programmerprotocol.
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter Wiring Information
The following information is provided for those who may wish to build their own cables.
RS-232 Interface Pin Assignments
The RS-232 interface of the converter is accessible through the 25-pin D subminiature
female connector. The pin assignment is compatible with the three cables described
above (IC697CBL701/702/705). The opposite end of the connector, which connects to
your RS-232 compatible device, should be selected to fit the requirements of the device.
Most of these devices use a 15-pin D subminiature female connector.
2-20
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Pin assignments for the RS-232 interface of the converter are listed in the following
table.
Table 2-2. RS-232 Interface Pin Assignments
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9/19
20
21 to 25
Signal Name
Shield
SD
RD
RTS
CTS
NC
SG
DCD
NC
DTR
NC
Description
Signal Flow
No connection
Transmitted Data
Received Data
Request To Send
Clear To Send
No connection
Signal Ground
Data Carrier Detect
No connection
Data Terminal Ready
No connection
Out
In
Out
In
In
Out
-
RS-422/RS-485 Interface Pin Assignments
The RS-422/RS-485 interface of the converter is accessible through the 15-pin D
subminiature female connector. The pin assignment is compatible with the cable for the
Hand-Held Programmer (IC693CBL303), as described above. Both ends of this cable are
the same and have a 15-pin male, D subminiature connector attached.
Pin assignments for the RS-422/RS-485 interface are as shown in the following table.
Table 2-3. RS-422/RS-485 Interface Pin Assignments
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
GFK-0551C
Signal Name
Cable Shield
DCD(A)
DCD(B)
ATCH/
+5 VDC
RTS(A)
SG
CTS(Bi)
RT
RD(Ai)
RD(Bi)
SD(A)
SD(B)
RTS(B)
CTS(Ai)
Chapter 2 Installation
Description
Shield
Differential Data Carrier Detect
Differential Data Carrier Detect
Attach (used with HHP)
Logic Power
Differential Request To Send
Logic Power
Differential Clear To Send
Resistor Terminator
Differential Receive Data
Differential Receive Data
Differential Transmit Data
Differential Transmit Data
Differential Request To Send
Differential Clear To Send
Signal Flow
Out
Out
n/a
In
Out
In
In
n/a
In
In
Out
Out
Out
In
2-21
2
Wiring Connections for IC693CBL303 Cable
The specifications and wiring information for this cable are provided below. Note that in
addition to being used to connect the RS-485 serial port on the PLC to the RS-422/RS-485
to RS-232 converter (IC690ACC900). This cable is also used to connect the PLC to the
Hand-Held Programmer.
Cable Specifications
The prewired cable (IC693CBL303) is 6 feet (2 meters) long. This is the cable used with
the Hand-Held programmer. If a different length cable is required for connection to the
converter, refer to the information below for specifications and wiring information.
This information is essential if you intend to build your own cable. The recommended
cable types for this cable are listed below and depend on the length of the cable.
Specifications for IC693CBL303 Prewired cable
Item
Description
Connectors
Same connector is on
both ends
15-pin male, D-Subminiature Type, Canon DA15S (solder pot)
Hood
AMP 207470-1 connector shell
Hardware kit
AMP 207871-1 Kit includes 2 metric screws and 2 screw clips
Cable Type
Belden 9508:
AWG #24 (.22 mm2)
CableLength
6 feet (2 meters)
Wire Types for Custom Cables
CableLength
1.
2.
2-22
AWG Wire Size
CatalogNumber
6 feet (2m)
24 (.199mm2)
Belden 9508
30 feet (10m)
>30 feet to
980 feet
(300m)
22 (.329mm2)
22 (.329mm2)
Belden 9309
Same as for 30 feet. In addition, the +5 VDC logic power
source for the converter cannot be supplied by the PLC. It
must be provided by an external power supply connected to
the +5V and SG pins at the converter end of the connector.
The +5V pin at the PLC connector must not be connected to
the cable. The +5V and SG connections from the power supply must be isolated from its own power line ground connection. Be sure that there is no connection between the external
supply and the PLC except the SG cable connection.
Catalog numbers are provided as suggestions only. Any cable having the same electrical characteristics is
acceptable. It is strongly recommended that you use stranded wire. Since it is sometimes hard to find a
cable with the desired number of twisted pairs (the Belden 9309 has an extra pair), you may end up with a
cable with extra pairs.
A greater cable length between the PLC and the converter increases the possibility of noise coupling into
the data and converter logic power circuits within the cable. The cable should be as short as possible in
noisy environments. In extreme cases, additional noise protection measures, such as double-shielded
cables, may be required.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Wiring Diagram
The following wiring diagram is for the IC693CBL303 cable and for cables that may be
built for connection to the IC690ACC900 converter.
RS–422
TWISTED SHIELDED PAIRS
RS–232/RS–485
CONVERTER
(IC690ACC900)
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Ï
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Ï
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Ï
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Ï
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Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
ÏÏ
25–PI
FEMALE
RS–232 PORT
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
PIN
NOTE:
SHLD
1
1
SHLD
ATTCH
DCD (A)
DCD (B)
RT
RD (A’)
4
2
3
9
10
4
2
3
ATTCH
DCD (A)
DCD (B)
RD (B’)
11
12
SD (A)
SD (B)
SD (A)
SD (B)
12
13
13
9
10
11
+5V
5
5
0V
7
15
0V
CTS (A’)
8
6
CTS (B’)
CTS (A’)
7
6
14
15
CTS (B’)
8
14
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
15–PIN
FEMALE
RS–485 PORT
PIN
15–PIN
MALE
RT
RD (A’)
RD (B’)
+5V
RTS (A)
RTS (B)
15–PIN
MALE
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Ï
Ï
Ï
Ï
a44750
SERIES
90 PLC
RS–422
PORT
15–PIN
FEMALE
PINS 9 AND 10 ARE JUMPERED AT BOTH ENDS OF CABLE TO CONNECT TERMINATING
RESISTORS FOR THE RD SIGNAL WHICH IS INSIDE THE PLC POWER SUPPLY.
Figure 2-13. Wiring Connections for IC693CBL303
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-23
2
Maintenance and Optional Procedures
The following information describes operations and procedures that are required to
maintain a Series 90-20 PLC system. If at any time you need technical help, PLC
Technical Support can be reached at the PLC Hotline, or via Internet or fax as listed on
page 2-2.
Replacing A Battery
If the LOW BATTERY LED on the CPU Module turns ON, replace the battery. Battery
replacement must be done with power on if the user program stored in RAM memory is
to be retained. To replace a battery (catalog number IC693ACC301), use the following
procedure:
H
H
H
H
Remove the battery cover at the bottom of the CPU module.
H
Remove the old battery cable connector from its receptacle and discard the old
battery.
H
Replace the battery cover.
Remove the battery from its mounting clip.
Firmly insert the replacement battery into the battery mounting clip.
With the needle nose pliers, push the new battery connector firmly into the open
receptacle on the board.
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ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
Ï
ÏÏ
Ï
Ï
Ï
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
a44548
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
BATTERY
BATTERY
CABLE
CONNECTS
TO EITHER
CONNECTOR
GUIDE TAB
SHOULD BE
AWAY FROM
CIRCUIT BOARDS
40
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
ÏÏ
LITHIUM BATTERY
(IC693ACC301)
MOUNTED ON
BATTERY CLIPS
ON BACK OF
BATTERY COVER
Figure 2-14. Battery Replacement
Warning
Observe the following precautions when handling a Lithium battery.
Do not discard the battery in fire. Do not attempt to recharge the
battery. The battery may burst or burn or release hazardous materials.
2-24
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Caution
Do not attempt to remove the CPU module circuit board from its
module housing. Failure to observe this caution may result in an
electrostatic build-up and discharge resulting in damage to MOS
circuits. Discharge of the non-rechargeable lithium battery may occur
if the board contacts a conducting surface, causing loss of memory
contents.
User PROM Option
Application programs are normally developed in the CPUs RAM memory and executed
from RAM memory. If additional program integrity is desired, or operation of the PLC
without a battery is desired, an optional EEPROM or EPROM can be installed in a spare
socket (labeled PROGRAM PROM). EEPROMs can be written to and read from using
the HHP, and can be read from EEPROM to user RAM memory and then to the Memory
Card. EPROMS can be read when installed in the PLC, however they must be
programmed with an external PROM burning device.
A typical scheme for using these devices is to develop programs using an EEPROM.
When the program in RAM has been developed and debugged, it is saved to EEPROM.
See the Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual, GFK-0402, on how to Save EEPROM.
The EEPROM can then be removed from the PLC and used as a master to make backup
or multiple copies of the program to EPROM memory. The EPROM can then be
installed in the socket provided in the CPU and used as a non-volatile memory for
operation without a battery, or to run the same program in multiple PLCs.
a44701
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1
10
POWER
1
INPUTS
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
1
OUTPUTS
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
OK RN CT PL
LOW
BATTERY
STATUS
PROGRAM
PROM
SYSTEM
PROM
Figure 2-15. Location of Socket for User PROM Option
When the EEPROM or EPROM is installed, the application program stored in the device
is automatically loaded into RAM memory whenever the CPU is powered-up. However,
this only happens, if EEPROM is selected as the PROGRAM SOURCE parameter during
configuration with the Hand-Held ProgrammerorLogicmaster90-30/20/Micro
configuration software.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-25
2
EEPROM and EPROM memory chips can be ordered from GE Fanuc. Catalog numbers
for these devices are:
Table 2-4. EEPROM and EPROM Memory Catalog Numbers
Catalog Number
Description
PROM
Part Number
Third Party Source
Vendor
Part Number
IC693ACC305 (Qty 4)
28C256 EEPROM, 350ns
44A725999-000
XICOR
XICOR
X28C256P or
X28C256P25
IC693ACC306 (Qty 4)
32Kx8 UV EPROM, 150ns
44A723379-000
NEC
Atmel
Toshiba
Hitachi
AMD
Intel
UPD27C256AD-15
AT27C256-15DC1
TC57256AD-15
HN27C256AG-15
AM27C256-150DC
TD27C256A-1
EEPROM Insertion and Removal
The EEPROM location is accessed by removing the LED lens on the CPU module. The
EEPROM socket is located above the words PROGRAM PROM. It is important that the
person performing the insertion or removal be grounded before handling the EEPROM
device to avoid static discharge which may damage the device.
Warning
Remove power when inserting an EEPROM into or removing an
EEPROM from the CPU module.
Inserting an EEPROM
Place the EEPROM in the socket with the polarity of the EEPROM oriented towards the
top of the unit. Apply even pressure and push the EEPROM into the EEPROM socket.
Follow directions for programing the device as described in the Series 90-30 and 90-20
HHP User’s Manual, GFK-0402.
Removing an EEPROM
Using a small slotted screw driver, insert the screw driver through the small rectangular
opening in top of the plastic cover just above the PROGRAM PROM location. Place the
end of the screw driver just under the edge of PROM to start lifting the EEPROM out of
the socket.
Caution
Be sure that the screw driver does not go under the socket to avoid
damage to the EEPROM socket.
After the EEPROM starts to lift up, slide the screw driver carefully under the EEPROM
to fully disengage it from the socket.
2-26
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
2
Replacing Fuses
The Series 90-20 PLC provides replaceable fuses for output points and for a user
accessible 24 volt power supply (on the DC input versions of baseplate only). To replace
these fuses:
H
H
Remove power from the unit.
H
Confirm that power is removed from the I/O Power Supply baseplate.
Remove the CPU module by lifting the latch on the right side of the unit and sliding
the CPU towards the left. Lift the CPU off of the I/O base unit.
Refer to Chapter 5 for I/O power supply fuse location and replacement information.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 2 Installation
2-27
Chapter
3 System Operation
3
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter describes system operations of the Series 90-20 PLC which you should be
familiar with to understand operation of the PLC system. It includes a discussion of the
PLC system sweep sequences, the system power-up and power-down sequences,
system clocks and timers, system security through password assignment, and I/O
system.
PLC Sweep Summary
The logic program in the Series 90-20 PLC executes in a repetitive fashion until stopped
by a command from the programmer, or by a command from another device. The
sequence of operations necessary to execute a program one time is called a sweep. In
addition to executing the logic program, the sweep includes obtaining data from input
devices, sending data to output devices, performing internal housekeeping, and
servicing the programmer.
The following configuration items affect the Series 90-20 PLC sweep:
Stop Mode:
Stop with I/O Disabled
Stop with I/O Enabled
Constant Sweep Mode:
Enable/Disable
In addition, the DO I/O function will cause I/O scanning in the middle of the logic
solution.
Standard Program Sweep
The CPU operates by executing an application program, updating I/O, and performing
communications and other tasks. This occurs in a repetitive cycle called the CPU sweep.
There are seven parts to the execution sequence of the Standard Program Sweep.
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
GFK-0551C
Start-of-Sweep Housekeeping
Input Scan (Read Inputs)
Application Program Logic Solution
Output Scan (Update Outputs)
Programmer Service
Non-Programmer Service
Diagnostics
3-1
3
All of these steps, except Programmer Service execute every sweep. Programmer Service
only occurs if a board fault has been detected or if the programming device issues a
service request.
The sequence of the Standard Program Sweep is shown in the following figure.
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎ
START–OF–SWEEP
HOUSEKEEPING
I/O
ENABLED
?
a43064
HOUSEKEEPING
NO
YES
DATA
INPUT
INPUT SCAN
RUN
MODE
?
NO
YES
LOGIC SOLUTION
I/O
ENABLED
?
YES
OUTPUT SCAN
PROGRAM
EXECUTION
SCAN
TIME
OF
PLC
NO
DATA
OUTPUT
PROGRAMMER
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMER
SERVICE
SYSTEM
COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEM
COMMUNICATIONS
USER PROGRAM
CHECKSUM
CALCULATION
DIAGNOSTICS
START NEXT SWEEP
Figure 3-1. PLC Sweep
3-2
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
3
As shown in the PLC sweep sequence, several items are included in the sweep. These
items contribute to the total sweep time as shown in the following table.
Table 3-1. Sweep Time Contribution
SweepComponent
Description
• Schedule start of next sweep
• Determine mode of next sweep
• Update %SA, %SB, %SC and %S tables
• Reset watchdog timer
TimeContribution
A
Housekeeping
B
Data Input
Input data is received from inputs.
0.345 msec/16 point inputs
C
Program Execution
User logic is solved
18µS per coil or contact. Execution
time is dependent on the length of
the program and the type of
instructions used in the program.
Instruction execution times are listed
in Appendix B.
D
Data output
Output data is sent to outputs.
0.270 msec/12 point outputs
Service requests from programming
device.
0.4 msec overhead, 6 msec maximum
E
Programmer
Service
F
Diagnostics
0.74 msec
• 1 msec average for Logicmaster 90
• 3 msec average for Hand-Held
Programmer
Verify user program integrity
0.4 msec
Sweep Time Calculation
As shown in the previous table, six items contribute to the sweep time of the PLC. The
sweep time consists of fixed times (housekeeping and diagnostics) and variable times.
The variable times vary according to the I/O configuration, size of the user program,
and the type of programming device connected to the PLC.
Housekeeping
The housekeeping portion of the sweep performs all of the tasks necessary to prepare
for the start of the sweep. If the PLC is in the constant sweep mode the sweep will be
delayed until the required sweep time elapses. If the required time had already elapsed,
the ov_swp %SA0002 contact is set and the sweep continues without delay.
Next the timer values (hundredths, tenths, and seconds) are updated by calculating the
difference from the start of the previous sweep and the new sweep time. In order not
to lose accuracy, the actual start of sweep is recorded in 100 msec increments. Each timer
has a remainder field which contains the number of 100 msec ticks that have occurred
since the last time the timer value was incremented.
Input Scan
Scanning of inputs occurs during the Input Scan portion of the sweep, just prior to the
Logic Solution. During this part of the sweep all Series 90-20 Inputs will be scanned and
their data stored in %I (discrete inputs) or %AI (analog inputs) memory, as appropriate.
The %AI1 through %AI15 analog inputs are used by the High Speed Counter (HSC). If
the CPU is in STOP mode and the CPU is configured to not scan I/O in STOP mode, the
input scan will be skipped.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 3 System Operation
3-3
3
Application Program Logic Scan or Solution
The Application Program Logic Scan is when the application logic program actually
executes. The Logic Solution always begins with the first instruction in the application
(user’s) program immediately following the completion of the Input Scan. Solving the
logic provides a new set of outputs. The Logic Solution ends when the END instruction
is executed. The Application program is executed by the 80C188 microprocessor in the
CPU.
Many program control capabilities are provided by the Control Functions, which are
described in the Series 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers Reference Manual,
GFK-0467, and in the Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual for Series 90-30/20/Micro
Programmable Controllers, GFK-0402. A list of execution times for each programming
function can be found in Appendix B in this manual.
Output Scan
Outputs are scanned during the Output Scan portion of the sweep, immediately
following the Logic Solution. During the Output Scan, all Series 90-20 PLC Outputs are
scanned in the same order as for the Input Scan: from lowest to highest reference
address. Outputs are updated using data from the %Q (for discrete outputs) memories.
However, if the CPU is in the STOP mode and the CPU is configured to not scan I/O
during STOP mode, the output scan will be skipped. The Output Scan is completed
when all output data has been sent to all Series 90-20 Outputs.
Logic Program Checksum Calculation
At the end of every sweep a checksum calculation is performed on the application logic
program. Since it would take too long to calculate the checksum over the entire
program at one time, eight words of the program will be checksummed each sweep.
If the calculated checksum does not match the reference checksum, the Program
Checksum Failure exception flag will be raised. This causes a fault entry to be inserted
into the PLC Fault Table and the PLC mode to be changed to STOP.
Programmer Communications Window
This part of the sweep is dedicated to communicating with the programmer. If there is a
programmer attached, the CPU executes the Programmer Communications Window.
The Programmer Communications Window will not execute if there is no programmer
attached.
3-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
3
a43065
START
NOT
ATTACHED
PREVIOUS
STATUS
?
NOT
ATTACHED
NO
PROGRAMMER
REQUEST
?
HAND–HELD
PROGRAMMER
ATTACHED
STATUS
ATTACHED
NOT
ATTACHED
ATTACHED
ABORT
OPERATION
IN PROGRESS
SETUP FOR
HAND–HELD
PROGRAMMER
PREVIOUS
STATUS
?
ATTACHED
KEY
PRESSED
?
YES
NO
YES
PROCESS REQUEST
SETUP FOR
SERIES 90
PROTOCOL
SEND INITIAL
DISPLAY
PROCESS KEY
SEND NEW DISPLAY
STOP
Figure 3-2. Programmer Communications Window Flow Chart
Support is provided for the Hand-Held Programmer and for other programmers that
can connect to the serial port and use the SNP (Series Ninety Protocol) protocol.
The CPU performs one operation for the programmer each sweep, that is, it honors one
service request or response to one key press. If the programmer makes a request that
requires more than 6 milliseconds to process, the request processing will be spread out
over several sweeps so that no sweep is impacted by more than 6 milliseconds. The
previous figure is a flow chart for the Programmer Communications portion of the
sweep.
System Communications Window
This is the part of the sweep where communications requests from intelligent option
modules. The System Communications Window is not used in the Series 90-20 PLC.
Standard Program Sweep Variations
In addition to the normal execution of the Standard Program Sweep, certain variations
can be encountered or forced. These variations are described in the following
paragraphs.
Constant Sweep Time Mode
In the Standard Program Sweep, each sweep executes as quickly as possible with a
varying amount of time consumed each sweep. An alternate to this is the Constant
Sweep Time mode. In the Constant Sweep Time mode, each sweep consumes the same
GFK-0551C
Chapter 3 System Operation
3-5
3
amount of time, which can be selected at configuration to be from 5 to 200 milliseconds.
At the start of each sweep, the PLC starts the constant sweep particular application. For
more information on the constant sweep timer, refer to the description of the constant
sweep timer (see Clocks and Timers).
PLC Sweep When in STOP Mode
When the PLC is in STOP mode, the Application Program is not executed, you can
choose whether or not the I/O is scanned, and communications with the programmer
will continue. For efficiency, the operating system uses larger time-slice values than
those that are typically used in RUN mode (usually about 50 ms per window).
PLC Sweep When Using Do I/O
The Do I/O function, whenever it is executed, enables the logic program to execute an
input or output scan during program execution in addition to the normal I/O update
portion of the sweep.
Software Structure
The Series 90-20 PLC software structure supports both program execution and basic
housekeeping tasks such as diagnostic routines, input/output scanners, and alarm
processing. The operating system also contains routines to communicate with the
programmer; these routines provide for the upload and download of application programs,
return of status information, and control of the PLC. The application (user logic) program
which controls the end process to which the PLC is applied, is called a control program.
Program Structure
Each control program is comprised of a single program block. This includes the user
program and some system overhead. The program block must be less than or equal to
1024 (1K) words.
Data Structure
The Series 90-20 PLC has nine data memories, each designed for a specific purpose. The
following table lists these memories.
Table 3-2. Memory Data Types
Memory Type
Discrete Input
Discrete Output
Discrete User Internals
Discrete Temporaries
Discrete System
Discrete Global
Register
Analog Input
Analog Output
†
User Reference
Data Type
%I
%Q
%M
%T
%S [
%G
%R
%AI
%AQ
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
bit
word
word
word
System discrete bits include System bits, fault bits, and reserved bits.
] The % symbol is used to distinguish machine references from
3-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
3
nicknamesand is only used with Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro
programmingsoftware.
Discrete Memory Reference Definitions
Discrete Inputs (%I) reference input points which are the state of the inputs as detected
during the last input scan. Discrete Outputs (%Q) reference output points which are
the state of the outputs as last set by the application program. User Internals (%M) are
internal coils used for boolean logic when the result of a rung is only required to be used
later in the program as conditional logic. Temporaries (%T) are used with coils similar
to %M references, except that %T references are not saved across a power failure; that is,
they are non-retentive. %M and %Q memories are retentive unless used with a normal
coil, e.g., ––( )––.
User internals (%M) are useful when the coil in a rung is only required to be used later
in the logic solution as conditional logic and not outside of the PLC. The following
example shows %I0012 and %I0016 being used to set user internal %M0005, similar to
the use of a control relay in electro-mechanical logic.
|%I0012 %I0016
%M0005
|——] [——————] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————( )———
|
System Discretes (S, SA, SB, SC) include: System Bits, used internally by the CPU; Fault
Bits, for holding system fault data; and Reserved Bits, for future system expansion.
Many of the Fault Bits are referenced by the application program to determine what
faults exist in the Series 90-20 PLC system. Examples of these fault contacts are over
sweep condition (ov_swp), and low battery (low_bat). The first scan contact (fst_scn)
also resides here. Refer to Chapter 4 for more information on fault bits.
Override Bits
The Series 90-20 PLC has no override capability.
Transition Bits
Transition bits are discrete memory locations used internally by the PLC when solving
logic involving transitional coils. This data is not accessible to the user. The PLC sets
and resets this transition data based upon changes in the associated status table.
Power-Up and Power-Down Sequence
Power-Up Sequence
The power-up sequence for the Series 90-20 PLC consists of the following sequence of
events.
GFK-0551C
1.
The CPU, will run diagnostics on itself. This includes checking a portion of
battery-backed RAM to determine whether or not the RAM contains valid data.
2.
If an EPROM or EEPROM is present and the PROM power-up option in the PROM
specifies that the PROM contents should be used, the contents of PROM are copied
into RAM memory.
Chapter 3 System Operation
3-7
3
3.
The CPU interrogates the I/O module in the system to determine which type is
present.
4.
The hardware configuration is compared with software configuration to ensure that
they are the same. Any mismatches detected will be considered as faults and will be
alarmed. Also, if the I/O is specified in the software configuration but is not present
in the actual hardware configuration, this condition is a fault and will be alarmed.
5.
If there is no software configuration, the CPU will use the default configuration.
6.
The CPU establishes the communications channel between itself and the intelligent
modules.
7.
In the final step of the execution, the mode of the first sweep is determined based
on CPU configuration. If RUN mode, the sweep proceeds as described under
STOP-to-RUN Mode transition. The following figure shows the decision sequence
followed by the CPU when it decides whether to copy from PROM or to power-up
in STOP or RUN mode. Abbreviations used are:
clear
rom_sum
prom_rom
ram_sum
prom_ram
ld_not
ostop
pstop
prun
bal
pdsm
8.
If a PROM is not present
rom_sum
prom_ram
3-8
PressCLR and M/T simultaneously (using HHP)
ROM checksum is good
Run from ROM (parameter in ROM)
RAM checksum is good
Run from ROM (parameter in RAM)
Press LD and NOT simultaneously (using HHP)
Press NOT and RUN simultaneously (using HHP)
Power-up in STOP mode
Power-up in RUN mode
Battery voltage is low
Power-down in STOP mode
= false
= false
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
3
a43068
START
CLEAR
TRUE
FALSE
FALSE
ROM SUM
TRUE
PROM RAM
FALSE
PROM ROM
FALSE
TRUE
RAM SUM
ID NOT
TRUE
TRUE
FALSE
TRUE
FALSE
PROM RAM
STOP MODE
FALSE
TRUE
COPY ROM TO RAM
RAM SUM
FALSE
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
CLEAR RAM
PROGRAM
TRUE
OSTOP
TRUE
FALSE
PSTOP
TRUE
FALSE
TRUE
PRUN
FALSE
BAL
TRUE
FALSE
PDSM
TRUE
FALSE
RUN MODE
STOP MODE
Figure 3-3. Power-up Decision Sequence
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Power-Down Conditions
System power-down occurs under the following conditions:
1.
The power supply detects that incoming AC power has dropped out for more than
one-half power cycle.
2.
The 24 volt output supply accessed on terminals 1 and 2 on I/O bases with DC inputs
is less than 21 volts. This could occur if the output is shorted, which will blow a
replaceable fuse. See Chapter 5 for location of fuses and information on how to
replace fuses.
Clocks and Timers
Clocks and timers provided by the Series 90-20 PLC are: an elapsed time clock, a
watchdog timer, and a constant sweep timer. It also provides two types of timer
function blocks: on-delay timer, and a start-reset timer. Four timed contacts, which cycle
on and off for .01 second, .1 second, 1 second, and 1 minute intervals, are also available.
Elapsed Time Clock
The elapsed time clock uses 100 microsecond ticks to track the time elapsed since the
CPU powered-on. The clock is not retentive across a power failure; it restarts on each
power-up. Once per second the hardware interrupts the CPU to enable a seconds count
to be recorded. This seconds count rolls over approximately 100 years after the clock
begins timing.
Because the elapsed time clock provides the base for system software operations and
timer function blocks, it cannot be reset from the user program or the programmer.
However, the application program can read the current value of the elapsed time clock
by using Function Number 16 of the SVC_REQ (SerViCe_REQuest) Function.
Watchdog Timer
A watchdog timer in the Series 90-20 PLC is designed to catch catastrophic failure
conditions. The timer value for the watchdog timer is 200 milliseconds; this is a fixed
value which cannot be changed. The watchdog timer always starts from zero at the
beginning of each sweep.
If the watchdog timeout value is exceeded, the OK LED goes off, the CPU goes through
its power-up sequence and the PLC is left in STOP mode with a watchdog timer fault
recorded.
Constant Sweep Timer
The Constant Sweep Timer controls the length of a program sweep when the Series
90-20 PLC operates in Constant Sweep Time mode. In this mode of operation, each sweep
consumes the same amount of time. Typically, for most application programs, the Input
Scan, Application Program Logic Scan, and Output Scan do not require exactly the same
amount of execution time in each sweep. For additional information, refer to Constant
Sweep Time Mode. The value of the Constant Sweep Timer is set by the programmer and
can be any value from 5 to 200 milliseconds. The default value is 100 ms.
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3
If the Constant Sweep Timer expires before the completion of the sweep and the
previous sweep was not over-sweep, the PLC places an over-sweep alarm in the PLC
Fault table. At the beginning of the next sweep, the PLC sets the ov_swp fault contact.
The ov_swp contact is reset when the PLC is not in Constant Time Mode or the time of
the last sweep did not exceed the Constant Sweep Timer.
System Security
Security in the Series 90-20 PLC is designed to prevent unauthorized changes to the
contents of a PLC. There are three security or privilegelevels available in the PLC, that
have access to each level protected by a password. A fourth level, which is the default
level, provides only the ability to read PLC data; no changes are permitted to the
application program.
Each higher privilege level permits greater change capabilities than the lower level(s).
Privilege levels accumulate in that the privileges granted at one level are a combination
of that level, plus all lower levels. The levels and their privileges are:
Level 1
Any data, except passwords may be read. This includes all data memories (%I, %Q,
%AQ, %R, etc.), fault tables, and all program block types: data, value, and constant.
No values may be changed in the PLC.
Level 2
This level allows write access to the data memories (%I, %R, etc.).
Level 3
This level allows write access to the application program in STOP mode only.
Level 4
This is the default level for systems with no passwords. The default level for a system with
passwords is to the highest unprotected level. This level, the highest, allows read and
write access to all memories as well as passwords in both RUN and STOP mode
(configuration data cannot be changed in RUN mode).
For more detailed information on system security, see Chapter 7 of the Series
90-30/20/Micro Hand-Held Programmer User’s Manual, GFK-0402.
Passwords
There is one password for each privilege level in the PLC and each password can be
unique; however, the same password can be used for more than one level. Passwords
are one to four ASCII characters in length. Passwords can only be entered or changed
with the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programmer or the Hand-Held Programmer. The
Hand-Held Programmer only allows the ASCII characters 0 to 9 and A to F.
When communicating over a serial link, a privilege level change is in effect only as long
as communications between the PLC and the programmer are intact. There does not
need to be any activity, but the communications link must not be broken. If there is no
communication for 15 minutes, the privilege level returns to the highest unprotected
level.
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3
When the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programmer is connected through the serial
connection, either the PLC or the Work Station Interface board in the programmer may
detect a disconnect. The PLC detects a disconnect when it addresses the Work Station
Interface and receives no response. It then drops the programmer privilege level to the
default privilege level, Level 4. The PLC detects a disconnect of the Hand-Held
Programmer using a dedicated hardware signal. When the Hand-Held Programmer is
disconnected, the PLC reverts to privilege Level 4. Upon connection of the PLC, the
Work Station Interface requests the protection status of each privilege level from the
PLC. The Work Station Interface then requests the PLC to move to the highest
unprotected level, thereby giving the programmer access to the highest unprotected
level without it having to request any particular level. When the Hand-Held
Programmer is connected to the PLC, the PLC reverts to the highest unprotected level.
Privilege Level Change Requests
A programmer requests a privilege level change by supplying the new privilege level
and the password for that level. A privilege level change will be denied if the password
sent by the programmer does not agree with the password stored in the PLCs password
access table for the requested level. The current privilege level will be maintained and
no change will occur. If you attempt to access or modify information in the PLC using
the Hand-Held Programmer without the proper privilege level, the Hand-Held
Programmer will respond with an error message that the access is denied.
I/O System for the Series 90-20 PLC
The I/O system for the Series 90-20 PLC provides the interface between the Series 90-20
CPU and user supplied input devices and equipment to be controlled.
The Series 90-20 I/O module is combined with the power supply and is the baseplate for
the Series 90-20 PLC. I/O modules support 16 inputs, 12 outputs and a High Speed
Counter (HSC) function.
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Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
3
a44551
DISCRETE
MEMORY
WORD
DATA
% AI
%I
% AQ
%T
%R
%G
%S
I/O
SCANNER
I/O CONFIGURATION
DATA
%Q
%M
16 BITS
1 BIT
SERIES 90–20
BACKPLANE
SERIES
90–20
DISCRETE
OUTPUT
POINTS
SERIES
90–20
DISCRETE
INPUT
POINTS
Figure 3-4. Series 90-20 I/O Structure
I/O Scan Sequence
A summary of the I/O Scan sequence is provided below. For more information on
scanning and the CPU sweep, refer to the discussion on that subject earlier in this
chapter.
Input Scan
Inputs to the Series 90-20 PLC are scanned from the lowest to the highest reference
address.
Output Scan
Outputs are scanned during the Output Scan portion of the sweep, immediately
following the Logic Solution. Output boards are scanned in the same order as for
the Input Scan; from lowest to highest reference address.
Default Conditions for Series 90-20 Output Points
At power-up, output points default to outputs off. They will retain this default
condition until the first output scan from the PLC.
Diagnostic Data
Diagnostic bits are available in the %S memory that will indicate a mismatch in I/O
configuration. Diagnostic information is not available for individual I/O points. More
information on fault handling can be found later in this chapter and in Chapter 4, Fault
Descriptions and Corrections.
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3-13
Chapter
4 Fault Descriptions and Corrections
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
4
This chapter is an aid to troubleshooting a Series 90-20 PLC system when using
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming Software or the Hand-Held Programmer. It
explains the Fault Descriptions appearing in the PLC Fault Table and the Fault
Categories in the I/O Fault Table. The chapter is arranged first by Fault Table (PLC Fault
Table then I/O Fault Table), then by Fault Group within each table and finally by Fault
Category within each Fault Group. In addition, this chapter describes faults associated
with %S references which can be observed using the Hand-Held Programmer.
Faults and Fault Handling
More information on Faults and Fault Handling may be found in the Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro Programming Software User’s Manual, GFK-0466, and Series 90-30/20/Micro
Programmable Controllers Reference Manual, GFK-0467. For information on error detection
and correction for Statement List programs and the Hand-Held Programmer, refer to
GFK-0402, the Hand-Held Programmer for Series 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers
User’s Manual.
Using This Chapter
Each fault entry in this chapter lists the Fault Description for the PLC FAULT TABLE or
the Fault Category for the I/O FAULT TABLE. Find the Fault Description or Fault
Category corresponding to the entry on the applicable fault table on your
programmer ’s screen. Beneath it is a description of the cause of the fault. The error
code number (in hexadecimal) which appears with most Fault Descriptions is relevant
when more detailed information about a fault is needed. There may be more than one entry
for a fault group.
Fault Handling
Faults occur in the Series 90-20 PLC system when certain failures or conditions which
affect the operation and performance of the system happen. These conditions may
affect the ability of the PLC to control a machine or process. Other conditions may only
act as an alert, such as a low battery signal, which indicates that the voltage of the
battery protecting the memory is low and needs to be changed.
Alarm Processor
The condition or failure itself is called a fault. When a fault is received and processed by
the CPU, it is called an alarm. The software in the CPU which handles these conditions
is called the Alarm Processor. The interface to the user for the Alarm Processor is through
Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software. Any detected fault is recorded in a
fault table and displayed on either the PLC Fault Table screen or the I/O Fault Table
screens, as applicable.
GFK-0551C
4-1
4
Classes of Faults
The Series 90-20 PLC detects several classes of faults. These include internal failures,
external failures, and operational failures. Following are several examples of these
failures.
D
Internal Failures
Non-responding modules
Low battery condition
Memory checksum errors
D
Operational Failures
Communication failures
Configuration failures
Password access failures
System Reaction to Faults
Typically, hardware failures either require that the system be shut down, or that the
failure can be tolerated. I/O failures may be tolerated by the PLC system, but may be
intolerable by the application or the process being controlled. Operational failures can
normally be tolerated. Series 90-20 PLC faults have two attributes:
Fault Table Affected:
I/OFault Table
PLC Fault Table
Fault Action:
Fatal
Diagnostic
Informational
Fault Action
Two fault tables are provided to make faults easier to find and to keep a single table
from becoming too long. These tables are the PLC Fault Table and the I/O Fault Table.
Fatal faults cause the fault to be recorded in the appropriate table, any diagnostic
variables to be set, and the system to be halted. Diagnostic faults are recorded in the
appropriate table and any diagnostic variables are set. Informational faults are only
recorded in the appropriate table. Possible fault actions are listed in the following table.
Table 4-1. Fault Actions
Fault Action
Response by CPU
Fatal
Log fault in Fault Table
Set fault references
Go to STOP mode
Diagnostic
Log fault in Fault Table
Set fault references
Informational
Log fault in Fault Table
When a fault is detected, the CPU uses a default Fault Action for that fault.
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Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
4
Fault Tables
Two fault tables are maintained in the PLC for logging faults: the I/O Fault Table for
logging faults related to the I/O system, and the PLC Fault Table for logging all other
faults. The following table lists all of the fault groups, their fault actions, the fault tables
affected, and the mnemonic for system discrete %S points that are affected.
Table 4-2. Fault Summary
Fault Group
Fault Action
Fault Table
Special Discretes
SystemConfiguration Mismatch
PLC CPU Hardware Failure
Fatal
Fatal
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
cfg_mm
hrd_cpu
Program Checksum Failure
Low Battery
PLC Fault Table Full
I/OFault Table Full
Fatal
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
-
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_full
io_full
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
pb_sum
low_bat
ApplicationFault
No User Program on Power-up
Corrupted User RAM
PasswordAccess Failure
Diagnostic
Fatal
Fatal
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault table
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
no_prog
sy_pres
sy_pres
apl_flt
bad_ram
bad_pwd
Null System Configuration
PLC Software Failure
PLC Store Failure
Constant Sweep Time Exceeded
Diagnostic
Fatal
Fatal
Diagnostic
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
PLC Fault Table
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
sy_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
sy_pres
sy_pres
sy_pres
nul_cfg
sft_cpu
stor_er
ov_swp
Unknown PLC Fault
Unknown I/O Fault
Fatal
Fatal
PLC Fault Table
I/OfaultTable
sy_flt
io_flt
any_flt
any_flt
sy_pres
io_pres
Fault References
Fault references in the Series 90-20 PLC are of one type: fault summary references.
Fault summary references are set to indicate what fault occurred. The fault reference
remains on until the PLC is cleared or until cleared by the application program.
An example of a fault bit being set and then clearing the bit is shown in the following
example. In this example, the coil light_01 is turned on when an over sweep condition
occurs; the light and the ov_swp contact remain on until the %I0035 contact is closed.
| ov_swp
light_01
|——] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )———
|
|%I0035
ov_swp
|——] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————(R)———
|
Fault Reference Definitions
The Alarm Processor maintains the states of the 128 system discrete bits in %S memory.
These fault references can be used to indicate where a fault has occurred, and what type
of fault it is. Fault references are assigned to %S, %SA, %SB, and %SC memory and they
each have a nickname. These references are available for use in the application program
as required. The mnemonic for these discrete bits and a description of each bit is
provided below. Some discrete bits are reserved for future use.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 4 Fault Descriptions and Corrections
4-3
4
Table 4-3. Fault References
Reference
4-4
Nickname
Definition
%S0001
fst_scn
Current sweep is the first sweep.
%S0002
lst_scn
Current sweep is the last sweep.
%S0003
T_10MS
0.01 second timer contact
%S0004
T_100MS
0.1 second timer contact
%S0005
T_SEC
1.0 second timer contact
%S0006
T_MIN
1.0 minute timer contact
%S0007
alw_on
Always On
%S0008
alw_off
Always Off
%S0009
sy_full
Set when the PLC Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from
the PLC Fault Table and when the PLC Fault Table is cleared.
%S0010
io_full
Set when the I/O Fault Table fills up. Cleared when an entry is removed from
the I/O Fault Table and when the I/O Fault Table is cleared.
%S0013
prg_chk
Set when background program check is active.
%SA0001
pb_sum
Set when a checksum calculated on the application program does not match
the reference checksum. If the fault was due to a temporary failure, the
discrete bit can be cleared by again storing the program to the CPU. If the
fault was due to a hard RAM failure, then the CPU must be replaced.
%SA0002
ov_swp
Set when the PLC detects that the previous sweep took longer than the
time specified by the user. Cleared when the PLC detects that the previous
sweep did not take longer than the specified time. It is also cleared during
the transition from STOP to RUN mode.
%SA0003
apl_flt
Set when an application fault occurs. Cleared when the PLC transitions from
STOP mode to RUN mode.
%SA0009
cfg_mm
Set when a configuration mismatch is detected during system power-up.
Cleared by powering-up the PLC when no mismatches are present.
%SA0010
hrd_cpu
Set when the diagnostics detect a problem with the CPU hardware. Cleared
by replacing the CPU module.
%SA0011
low_bat
Set when the Low Battery fault occurs. Cleared by replacing the battery and
ensuring that the PLC powers-up without the low battery condition.
%SB0009
no_prog
Set when an attempt is made to put the PLC in RUN mode when there is no
executable application program stored in the CPU. Cleared by storing an
application program to the CPU and putting the PLC in RUN mode.
%SB0010
bad_ram
Set when the CPU detects corrupted RAM memory at power-up. Cleared when
the CPU detects that RAM memory is valid at power-up.
%SB0011
bad_pwd
Set when a password access violation occurs. Cleared when a password is
successfully used to gain a privilege level.
%SB0012
nul_cfg
Set when an attempt is made to put the PLC in RUN mode when there is no
configuration data present. Cleared when configuration data is present and
the PLC is put in the RUN mode.
%SB0013
sft_cpu
Set when the CPU detects an unrecoverable error in the software. Cleared by
cycling power to the CPU.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
4
Table 4-3. Fault References - Continued
Reference
Nickname
Definition
%SB0014
stor_er
Set when an error occurs during a programmer store operation. Cleared
when a store operation is completed successfully.
%SC0009
any_flt
Set when any fault occurs. Cleared when both fault tables are cleared.
%SC0010
sy_flt
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the PLC Fault
Table. Cleared when the PLC Fault table is cleared.
%SC0011
io_flt
Set when any fault occurs that causes an entry to be placed in the I/O Fault
Table. Cleared when the I/O Fault table is cleared.
%SC0012
sy_pres
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the PLC Fault Table. Cleared when
the PLC Fault Table has no entries.
%SC0013
io_pres
Set as long as there is at least one entry in the I/O Fault Table. Cleared when
the I/O Fault Table has no entries.
Fault Side Effects
Three non-configurable faults described previously have side effects associated with
them that you need to be aware of. A description of the side effects associated with
these faults is provided in the following paragraphs.
D
Null System Configuration for RUN Mode
If a Null System Configuration is detected on a transition from STOP to one of
the RUN modes this fault is generated. This fault is informational in nature so
that if a programmer is present, you can be informed of the condition. Running
without a configuration is not fatal; it is equivalent to having I/O scanning
suspended. The side effect of this fault is to perform the function of a Suspend
I/Oinstruction.
D
PLC CPU Software Failure
Whenever a PLC CPU Software Failure is logged the Series 90-20 CPU immediately
transitions into a special Error Sweep mode. The only activity permitted when the
PLC is in this mode is communications with the programmer. The only method of
clearing this condition is to reset the PLC (cycle power).
D
PLC Sequence Store Failure
During a Sequence Store (a store of program blocks and other data preceded
with the special Start-of-Sequence command and ending with the
End-of-Sequence command), if communications with the programming device
performing the store is interrupted or any other failure occurs which terminates
the download, the PLC Sequence Store Failure fault is logged. As long as this
fault is present in the system, the PLC will not transition to RUN mode.
Accessing Additional Fault Information
The Fault Table Displays seen on the screen of the programmer on which Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro programming software is running contain basic information regarding
the fault. If more detailed information is needed a hexadecimal dump of the fault can
be obtained by positioning the cursor on the fault entry and pressing the Ctrl-F key
sequence.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 4 Fault Descriptions and Corrections
4-5
4
The last entry, Correction, for each fault explanation in this chapter lists the action(s) to
be taken to correct the fault. If more than one action is listed, try each action in the
order listed. Note that the correction description for some of the faults in this chapter
includes the following statement:
Correction:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc Technical
Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
The statement “all the information contained in the fault entry” implies that you should
tell Technical Support both the information readable directly from the Fault Table and
the hexadecimal information you see when you press the Ctrl-F key sequence. Technical
Support personnel will give you further instructions for action to be taken.
An example of the I/O FAULT SCREEN displaying this information is shown below. In
the example, the faults in the table are Loss of I/O Module and Addition of I/O Module.
To initiate the hexadecimal display of additional fault information, use the cursor
up/downkeys to select a fault entry. When you press the Ctrl-F key combination, the
hexadecimal information will be displayed on the line directly below the function key
display.
Quick Guide to Fault Explanation and Correction
The following tables are a guide to help find fault explanations in this chapter. They
contain a list of Fault Description and Fault Category groups arranged by Fault Table
and Fault Group, and page numbers where each Fault Explanation can be found.
Entries listed under the Fault Description (PLC Fault Table) or Fault Category (I/O Fault
Table) headings are as they appear on the programmer’s screen.
Table 4-4. Guide to Finding PLC Fault Table Explanations and Corrections
Fault Table
PLC FAULT TABLE
Fault Description
Bad User RAM
Password Failure
Null System Configuration for Run Mode
PLC CPU Software Failure
Page Number
4-7
4-8
4-8
4-8
PLC Fault Table Explanations
Each fault explanation contains the following information:
Name:
Error Code:
Description:
Correction:
Corrupted Memory
Some faults can occur because the RAM memory on the PLC CPU board has failed or
become corrupted. These same faults may also occur because the system has been
powered off and the battery voltage is too low to maintain memory or through
excessive noise being applied to I/O circuits. To avoid excessive duplication of corrective
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Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
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4
action in the following explanations, the Correction entry contains the following
statement when corrupted memory may be a cause of the error:
Perform the corrections for Corrupted Memory.
These corrections are summarized as follows:
Correction:
(1) If the system has been powered off, replace the battery. Battery voltage
may be insufficient to maintain memory contents.
(2) If a noise problem exists, reload the program and retry the application
program.
(3) Suppress noise on I/O with snubber circuits or by routing wires away
from noise sources.
(4) Replace the CPU module (CPU 211). The integrated circuits associated
with the PLC CPU may be failing.
Non-Configurable Faults
The Fault Action of Non-Configurable Faults cannot be changed. Fatal faults cause the
PLC to enter a form of STOP Mode at the end of the sweep the error occurred in.
Diagnostic faults are recorded in the appropriate fault table and any associated
diagnostic variables are set. Informational faults are only recorded in the appropriate
fault table.
Bad User RAM
The Fault Group Bad User RAM (Group 130) occurs when the PLC CPU detects
corrupted user RAM. The PLC CPU will remain in STOP mode until a valid user
program and Configuration File are downloaded. The default Fault Action for this
group is Fatal.
GFK-0551C
Name:
Corrupted User RAM on Power-Up
Error Code:
1
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (Operating Software) generates this error
when it detects corrupted user RAM on Power-Up.
Correction:
(1) Reload the Configuration File, user program, and references (if any).
(2) Replace the RAM memory backup battery on the power supply.
(3) Verify that excessive noise is not causing the problem. If it is, take
appropriate measures as described previously.
Name:
Bad OpCode Detected
Error Code:
2
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (Operating Software) generates this error
when it detects a bad instruction in the user program.
Correction:
(1) Reload the user program, and references (if any).
(2) Verify that excessive noise is not causing the problem. If it is, take
appropriate measures as described previously.
(3) Replace the CPU module.
Chapter 4 Fault Descriptions and Corrections
4-7
4
Name:
PC Overflow
Error Code:
3
Description:
The PLC operating software generates this fault if it starts to execute user
logic outside of the established user logic memory.
Correction
(1) Reload the user program.
(2) Verify that excessive noise is not causing the problem. If it is, take
appropriate measures as previously described.
Name:
Program Syntax Error
Error Code:
4
Description:
The user logic program contains an illegal instruction list sequence.
Correction
Delete or change the illegal sequence. The program check function of the
Hand-Held Programmer can be used to determine the step number of the
illegal sequence.
Password Failure
The Fault Group Password Failure (Group 132) occurs when the PLC CPU receives a
request to change to a new privilege level and the password included with the request is
not valid for that level. The default Fault Action for this group is Informational.
Correction:
Retry the request with the correct password.
Null System Configuration for Run Mode
The Fault Group Null System Configuration for RUN Mode (Group 134) occurs when
the PLC transitions from STOP to one of the RUN modes and a Configuration File is not
present. The transition to RUN is permitted, but no I/O scan occurs. The effect of this
fault is to suspend the I/O sweep. The default Fault Action for this group is Fatal.
Correction:
Download a Configuration File.
PLC CPU Software Failure
Faults in the Fault Group PLC CPU Software Failure (Group 135) are generated by the
operating software of the Series 90-20 PLC CPU. They occur at many different points of
system operation. When a Fatal fault occurs the PLC CPU immediately transitions into a
special Error Sweep mode. The only activity permitted when the PLC is in this mode is
communications with the programmer. The only method of clearing this condition is to
cycle power on the PLC. The default Fault Action for this group is Fatal.
4-8
Name:
User Memory Could Not Be Allocated
Error Code:
1 through B
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (Memory Manager) generates these errors
when software requests the Memory Manager to allocate or deallocate a
block or blocks of memory from user RAM that are not legal. These errors
should not occur in a production system.
Correction:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
4
GFK-0551C
Name:
System Memory Unavailable
Error Code:
D
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when its request for a block of system memory is denied by the Memory Manager because no memory is available from the system memory heap. It is Informational
if the error occurs during the execution of a DO I/O Function Block. It is Fatal
if it occurs during power-up initialization or auto configuration.
Correction:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault entry.
Name:
System Memory Could Not Be Freed
Error Code:
E
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when it
requests the Memory Manager to deallocate a block of system memory and
the deallocation fails. This error can only occur during the execution of a
Do I/O Function Block.
Correction:
(1) Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for Corrupted Memory.
Name:
Invalid Scan Request of the I/O Scanner
Error Code:
10
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when the
operating system or Do I/O Function Block scan requests neither a full nor a
partial scan of the I/O. This should not occur in a production system.
Correction:
(1) Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
Name:
Unknown IOC Type Found
Error Code:
12
Description:
The PLC Operating Software (I/O Scanner) generates this error when an
unknown IOC type is found in one of the I/O Scanner’s data structures.
Correction:
(1) Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
Name:
PLC Operating Software Error
Error Code:
13
Description:
The PLC Operating Software generates this error when certain PLC Operating Software problems occur. This error should not occur in a production
system.
Correction:
(1) Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
Chapter 4 Fault Descriptions and Corrections
4-9
4
4-10
Name:
PLC Operating Software Error
Error Code:
27 through 4E
Description:
The PLC Operating Software generates these errors when certain PLC Operating Software problems occur. These errors should not occur in a production system.
Correction:
Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
Name:
System Memory Errors
Error Code:
50 through 53
Description:
The PLC Operating Software generates these errors when its request for a
block of System Memory is denied by the Memory Manager because no
memory is available or contains errors.
Correction:
(1) Display the PLC Fault Table on the Programmer. Contact GE Fanuc PLC
Technical Support, giving them all the information contained in the fault
entry.
(2) Perform the corrections for Corrupted Memory.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Chapter
5
5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
This chapter contains specifications and wiring information for each of the available
Series 90-20 I/O and power supply modules. The following table is provided as an aid to
the location of I/O module specifications and wiring information in this chapter. I/O
modules are listed by catalog number, module description, number of I/O points, and to
quickly locate a particular I/O module - the page number where its description starts.
Table 5-1. Guide to Page Location for I/O Module Specifications
Catalog Number
Description of Module
I/O Points
Page Number
IC692MAA541
120 VACIn/120VACOut/120VAC PS
16in/12out
5-4
IC692MDR541
24 VDC in (Pos/Neg)/Relay
Out/120VAC PS
16in/12out
5-13
IC692MDR741
24 VDC in (Pos/Neg)/RelayOut/240VAC PS
16in/12out
5-23
Definition of Positive and Negative Logic
The IEC definitions for positive logic and negative logic, as applied to Series 90-20 I/O
modules, are defined as follows.
Positive Logic - Input Points
Positive logic input points are equivalent to IEC sink input points. Input modules
designed with positive logic characteristics sink current from the input device to the
user common or negative power bus. The input device is connected between the
positive power bus and theinput terminal.
a43839
IEC
SINK
IN
+
24V
Î
Î
Î
+
0V
GFK-0551C
5-1
5
Positive Logic - Output Points
Positive logic output points are equivalent to IEC source output points. Output modules
designed with positive logic characteristics source current to the loads from the user
common or positive power bus. The load is connected between the negative power bus
and the module output.
a43840
IEC
SOURCE
OUT
+
24V
+
0V
Negative Logic - Input Points
Negative logic input points are equivalent to IEC source inputs. Input modules designed
with negative logic characteristics source current through the input device to the user
common or positive power bus. The input device is connected between the negative
power bus and the input terminal.
a43841
IEC
SOURCE
IN
+
24V
+
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
0V
5-2
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
Negative Logic - Output Points
Negative logic output points are equivalent to IEC sink outputs. Output modules
designed with negative logic characteristics sink current from the loads to the user
common or negative power bus. The load is connected between the positive power bus
and the output terminal.
a43842
IEC
SINK
OUT
+ 24V
+
0V
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-3
5
120 VAC Input/120 VAC Triac Output/120 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MA A541
120 VAC Input, 16 Points
The 120 volt AC input circuits provide 16 input points with one common power input
terminal. The input circuits are reactive (resistor/capacitor) inputs. Current into an
input point results in a logic 1 in the input status table (%I). Input characteristics are
compatible with a wide range of user-supplied input devices, such as pushbuttons, limit
switches, and electronic proximity switches. Power to operate the field devices must be
supplied by the user. The input circuits require an AC power source, they cannot be
used with a DC power source.
Table 5-2. Specifications for 120 Volt AC Input Circuits
Rated Voltage:
120 volts AC
Input VoltageRange:
0 to 132 volts AC,50/60Hz,sinusoidal
Inputs per Module:
16 (one group with a single common)
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS between field side and logic side
Input Current:
12.2 mA (typical) at rated voltage
InputCharacteristics:
On-state Voltage
Off-state Voltage
On-stateCurrent
Off-state Current
On response Time
Off response Time
79 to 132 volts AC
0 to 20 volts AC
6 mA minimum
2.2 mA maximum
30 ms maximum
45 ms maximum
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Storage Temperature:
–40 _ to +85_ C (–40_ to +185_ F)
Humidity:
5 to 95% non-condensing
5V
Î
Î
Î
Î
~
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
TERMINAL
STRIP
1
H
N
20
TO OTHER CIRCUITS
a45062
5V
NOISE
FILTER
CPU
I/O BASE
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-1. Typical 120 VAC Input Circuit
5-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
120 VAC Output - 1 Amp, 11 Points
The 120 volt, 1 Amp AC output circuits provide 11 output points in two isolated groups
with 6 and 5 points in each group, respectively. Each group has a separate common
associated with it. The two commons are not tied together inside the module. This
allows each group to be used on different phases of the AC supply, or they can be
powered from the same supply. Each group is protected with a 7 amp fuse for each
common, and an RC snubber is provided for each output to protect against transient
electrical noise on the power line. This module provides a high-degree of inrush current
(10x the rated current) which makes the outputs suitable for controlling a wide range of
inductive and incandescent loads. AC Power to operate loads connected to outputs
must be supplied by the user. This module requires an AC power source, it can not be
used with a DC power source.
User replaceable fuses are supplied internally on the common of each output group.
This fuse does not guarantee that the output point will be protected by a direct short. It
is recommended that each output point be externally fused (minimum 1 amp) to protect
the output point. For lighter loads, the internal common fuse (7 amp) can be replaced
with a 1 amp fuse to protect the output point without adding the external fusing.
Table 5-3. Specifications for 120 Volt AC Output, 1 Amp Circuits
Rated Voltage:
120 volts AC
Output Voltage Range:
85 to 132 volts AC, 50/60 Hz
Outputs per Module:
11 (two groups, one with 5 and one with 6 outputs)
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS between field side and logic side;
500 volts RMS between each group
Output Current:
1 amp maximum per point with all circuits active.
2 amps maximum with adjacent points off see derating tables.
OutputCharacteristics:
Inrush Current
Minimum Load Current
Output Voltage Drop
Output Leakage Current
On Response Time
Off Response Time
10 amps maximum for one cycle
50 mA
1.5 volts maximum
2.5 mA maximum
1 ms maximum
1/2cyclemaximum
Operating Temperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
5V
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
a45063
5V
MOV
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
CPU
L
O
A
D
ÎÎ
ÎÎ Î
Î
H
~
N
TO OTHER
7AMP FUSE
OUTPUT
CIRCUITS
ON SAME GROUP I/O BASE
Figure 5-2. Typical 120 VAC Triac Output Circuit
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-5
5
Bleeder Resistor Calculation for Light Loads
Leakage current is present through the output circuit when the output point is off. This
leakage current is caused by surge absorber circuits. Light loads, such as neon lamps or
small relays, are susceptible to being turned on or prevented from turning off by this
small leakage current. A bleeder resistor in parallel with the load will prevent turn-on of
these devices.
The required size of this bleeder resistor can be calculated as follows:
1.
Calculate the resistor value.
Rbleeder = Vmin B Ileak
where Vmin is the minimum voltage required to turn on the load, Ileak is the
maximum leakage current through the output, and Rbleeder is the maximum resistor
value.
2.
Choose the next lower standard resistor value as the actual bleeder resistor.
3.
Calculate the power rating required for the resistor.
where Vload is the normal voltage on the load.
Example:
The minimum voltage required to turn on a neon light is 20VAC. The normal voltage
applied is 120VAC.
R =
(20VAC)
2.5mA
= 8000 ohms
Choose 7500 ohms which is the closest standard value resistor that is less than 8000
ohms.
P =
120 x 120 x 2
7500
P=
3.84 watts
Choose the next highest standard power rating rating for the resistor, which is 5 watts.
The selected bleeder resistor for this example is 7.5K ohms, 5 watts.
Typical Bleeder Resistor Connection
a44759
L
O
A
D
5-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
High Speed Counter Input Circuits
Two 24VDC negative logic input circuits are available to provide inputs for Type A
counter inputs: count and strobe/preload. These circuits are self-powered by an internal
12VDC supply.
Table 5-4. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications
Rated Input Voltage
12/24voltsDC
Input VoltageRange:
0 to 30 volts DC
Input Current:
2.8mAtypical
Input Threshold Voltage [
ON :
OFF :
0.7Vmaximum
10Vminimum
Response Time (low filter):
10mstypical
Response Time (high filter):
40µs typical
Isolation Voltage:
500 volts field side to logic side
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
[ Threshold Voltage (with respect to count or strobe (+) input and common (–)).
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
12V
COUNT
OR
STROBE
HSCOM
(3)
5V
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
CPU
12V COM
I/O BASE
a45064
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-3. Typical High Speed Counter Input Circuit
These inputs are only used for the High Speed Counter function and their ON/OFF
status is not reported in the input status table. With the high frequency selection, the
highest frequency guaranteed to be detected is 10Khz with a 50/50 duty cycle (50ms ON,
50ms OFF). The maximum frequency in the low frequency mode is 30 Hz (16.7 ms ON,
16.7 ms OFF).
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-7
5
5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output - 1.5 Amp
The 5/12/24 volt DC negative logic 1.5 Amp output circuit provides one isolated output
point. The output circuit is designed to have negative logic characteristics in that it sinks
current from the loads to the user common or negative power bus. The output device is
connected between the positive power bus and the module output. The output
characteristics are compatible with a wide range of user-supplied load devices, such as:
motor starters, solenoids, and indicators. Power to operate the field devices must be
supplied by the user. Power to control the output point is provided by an internal 12
volt supply.
Table 5-5. Specifications For 5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Logic - 2 Amp Output Circuit
Rated Voltage:
5/12/24voltsDC
Output VoltageRange:
5 to 30 volts DC
Outputs per Module
1
Isolation:
500 volts RMS between field side and logic side;
500 volts RMS between each group
Output Current:
1.5 amps maximum at 12 to 24 VDC, 60_C (140_F)
2 amps maximum at 12 to 24 VDC, 0 to 25_C (32 to 77_F)
75 amps maximum at 5 to 11 VDC, 60 _C (140_F)
OutputCharacteristics
0.2 volts maximum, 12 to 24 VDC, 25_C (32 to 77_F)
250 µA maximum, 0.4V maximum, 5 to 11 VDC 25_C (77_F)
0.1 ms
0.1 ms
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Output Voltage Drop
Off-state Leakage
On Response Time
Off Response Time
OperatingTemperature
(1)
(2)
Note that the Q1 common is tied internally to the high speed counter common.
It is recommended that this output be fused with an external fuse since the internal
fuse for the circuit is not easily replaceable (soldered into board).
5V
QI
(25)
12VDC
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
L
O
A
D
HSCOM
CPU
a45065
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
CONNECTED TO HIGH SPEED
COUNTER COMMON
3AMP
PICO FUSE
(SOLDERED IN)
Î ÎÎ
5–24VDC
DCCOM
(26)
I/O BASE
Figure 5-4. Typical High Speed Counter Output Circuit
5-8
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
a45066
TERMINAL
STRIP
QI
(25)
5–24VDC
L
O
A
D
HSCOM
NOTE:
Supply ground must be
isolated from DCCOM or
HSCOM
DCCOM
(26)
Figure 5-5. Alternate Connection as Positive Output
a45075
@ 12 TO 24VDC
2.0
@ 12 TO 24VDC
1.5
OUTPUT
CURRENT
(AMPS)
1.0
.75
@ 5 TO 11VDC
.5
25°C
10°C
20°C
30°C
40°C
50°C
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C)
60°C
Figure 5-6. Temperature vs. Current for 5/12/24 VDC Negative Output Q1
or High Speed Counter Output
120 VAC Power Supply
Table 5-6. Specifications for 120 VAC Power Supply
Range
Frequency
Input Current
Hold-up
Inrush Current
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
102 volts AC to 132 volts AC
47 to 63 Hz
200 mA, maximum
10 ms, minimum
2 amps maximum
5-9
5
Replacing Fuses
The Series 90-20 PLC provides replaceable fuses on this module for output points. To
replace these fuses:
D
D
D
Remove power from the unit.
Remove the CPU module.
Confirm that power is removed from the I/O Power Supply baseplate. Use a small
screw driver or fuse extractor to remove the fuse from the clips on the I/O circuit
board. The output fuses are located near the output terminal board. The output
fuses are located on the common of several circuits; therefore, if a fuse is blown it
will prevent the entire group associated with it from working. The following figure
shows the location of the fuses on the I/O Base module, and the table following the
figure provides a list of these fuses with location, rating, part number, third party
source, and the type of fuse.
a45074
Î
Î
FU2
FU1
(SOLDERED)
Î
Î
Î
OUTPUT
FUSES
FU5
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎ
FU4
Figure 5-7. Location of Fuses for IC692MAA541 I/O Power Supply Base
Warning
Failure to remove power when changing fuses could cause severe or
fatal injury to the operator or maintenance personnel.
5-10
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
Table 5-7. List of Fuses
Current
Rating
GE Fanuc Fuse
Part Number
Third Party Source
and Part Number
FU1
3A
259A9598P10
Littlefuse,239003
Soldered-in
FU2
250 mA
44A724627-120
Bussman,GMD0.25
Replaceable
Location
Fuse Type
Littlefuse,239.250
FU4, FU5
7A
259A9578P18
Bussman, AGC-07
Replaceable
Littlefuse,312007
Field Wiring Information
The following figure provides wiring information for connecting user supplied input
and output devices and a power source to the 120 VAC Input/120 VAC Output Module.
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
*
2
H
120
VAC
*
1
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ ÎÎ Î
a44552
3
COUNT STROBE HSCOM
~N
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
11
I2
I3
I4
I5
I6
I7
I8
I9
I10
I11
I12
I13
I14
I15
I16
ICOM
Q6
COM1
**
H
N
21
22
120
VAC
GND
NC
23
24
Q1
25
N
~H
V
GND
DCCOM
26
NC
27
L
O
A
D
Q2
28
L
O
A
D
+
Q3
29
L
O
A
D
Q4
30
L
O
A
D
Q5
31
L
O
A
D
32
L
O
A
D
33
H
120
VAC
~
N
Q10
Q11
Q12
34
Q7
35
Q8
36
Q9
37
38
39
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
COM2
40
H
120
VAC
~
N
–
SWITCHES SHOULD BE SOLID STATE TO PREVENT BOUNCING WHICH COULD
* THESE
CAUSE UNINTENDED HIGH SPEED COUNTER COUNTS OR STROBE SIGNALS.
* * NOTE: HSCOM AND DCCOM ARE CONNECTED INTERNALLY.
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
Figure 5-8. Field Wiring Connections - IC692MAA541
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-11
5
Derating Information
a44743
1.0
.75
OUTPUT
CURRENT
AVERAGE
.50
PER
PT (A)
.25
10°C
20°C
30°C
40°C
50°C
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C)
60°C
Figure 5-9. Triac Output Current vs. Temperature (Q2 - Q12)
Note
The following maximum current ratings must be followed so that the
current limitations of this module are not exceeded.
D
4A maximum per group of four consecutive outputs below 50_C.
D 3A maximum per group of four consecutive outputs 60_C.
D 2A maximum on any one point. Keep high current points farthest apart.
Examples of Current for Output Points (Q2 - Q12)
At 60_C
Below 50_C
Output
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Q2
2A
1A
.75A
Q3
0
1A
.75A
Q4
1A
0
.75A
Q5
0
1A
.75A
Output
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
Q2
2A
2A
1A
Q3
0
0
1A
Q4
2A
1A
1A
Q5
0
1A
1A
Note
For non-standard orientation the temperature rating is derated by 10_C.
5-12
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
DC Input/Relay Output/120 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MDR541
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input, 16 Points
The 24 volt DC positive/negative logic input circuits provide 16 input points in two
groups, with 4 inputs in one group and 12 inputs in the other group. The input circuits
are designed to have positive or negative logic characteristics. To connect the inputs as
positive logic circuits, the input switching device is connected between the positive
power bus and the module input. The negative bus is connected to the input circuit
common. To connect the inputs as negative logic circuits, the input switching device is
connected between the negative power bus and the module input. The positive bus is
connected to the input circuit common. Current into an input point results in a logic 1 in
the input status table (%I).
Input characteristics are compatible with a wide range of input devices, such as:
pushbuttons, limit switches, and electronic proximity switches. Power to operate field
devices and the input circuits is supplied by an isolated +24 VDC supply. This power
supply is limited to 220 mA maximum.
Table 5-8. Specifications For 24 Volt DC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuits
Negative Logic Mode
Positive Logic Mode
Points/Common
12 (I5-I16) and 4 (I1-I4 ; includes 2 High Speed Counter inputs)
Rated Input Voltage
24 volts DC
24 volts DC
Input VoltageRange
0 to 30 volts DC
0 to 30 volts DC
Input Current
7.3mAtypical
7.3mAtypical
15Vminimum
5Vmaximum
15Vminimum
5Vmaximum
Input Threshold Current ON:
OFF:
4mAmaximum
1.5mAminimum
4mAmaximum
1.5mAminimum
Response Time
4ms typical
4ms typical
Isolation Voltage:
1500V RMS field side to logic side
Input Threshold Voltage
ON:
OFF:
1500V RMS between each group if one group is powered by an external 24V power supply.
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C
32_ to 140_F
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-13
5
* POSITIVE CONNECTION SHOWN; REVERSE POLARITY OF 24VDC
5V
a45067
5V
POWER SUPPLY CONNECTIONS FOR NEGATIVE CONNECTION
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
TERMINAL
STRIP
Î Î
I
*
NOISE
FILTER
24VDC
CPU
COM
I/O BASE
TO OTHER CIRCUITS
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-10. Typical 24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuit
Relay Output, Normally Open, 2 Amp - 11 Points
The 2 Amp Relay Output circuits provide 11 normally-open relay circuits for controlling
output loads provided by the user. The output switching capacity of each of these
circuits is 2 amps. The output points are arranged in three groups; one with three
outputs and two with four outputs. Each group has a common power output terminal.
The relay outputs can control a wide range of user-supplied load devices, such as:
motor starters, solenoids, and indicators. Power for the internal relay circuits is
provided by the +5 volt DC internal supply. The user must supply the AC or DC power
to operate field devices. Each common has a 10 amp replaceable fuse.
Table 5-9. Specifications For Relay Output, 2 Amp Circuits
Operating Voltage:
5 to 30 volts DC
5 to 250 volts AC
5-14
Outputs per Module:
11 (three groups: one with 3 outputs; two with 4 outputs)
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS
Leakage Current:
1 mA at 240 VAC maximum
MaximumLoad:
2 amps resistive maximum per output
MinimumLoad:
10 mA
MaximumInrush:
20 amps maximum for one cycle
On Response Time:
15 ms maximum
Off Response Time:
15 ms maximum
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Contact Life:
Mechanical:
Electrical:
(also refer to the following table)
20 x 106 operations
200,000operations resistive load (2A), typical.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
a45068
5V
5V
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
TERMINAL
STRIP
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
QI
L
O
A
D
10 AMP
FUSE
TO OTHER
CIRCUITS
CPU
POWER
Î Î
COMMON
I/O BASE
Figure 5-11. Typical Relay Output Circuit
Table 5-10. Typical Contact Life
Voltage
Resistive
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
2A
1A
.5A
Current
Lamp and Solenoid
Typical Operations
.6A
.3A
.1A
200,000
400,000
800,000
User replaceable fuses are supplied internally on the common of each output group.
This fuse does not guarantee that the output point will be protected by a direct short. It
is recommended that each output point be externally fused (minimum 2 amp) to protect
the output point. For lighter loads, the internal common fuse (10 amps) can be replaced
with a 5 amp fuse to protect the output point without adding the external fusing.
Relay contact life, when switching inductive loads, will approach resistive load contact
life if suppression circuits are used. The following figures are examples of typical
suppression circuits for DC and AC loads. The 1A, 100V diode shown in the DC load
typical suppression circuit is an industry standard 1N4934.
SERIES
90-20
DC LOADS
a44941
SERIES
90-20
.022
1A, 100V
RELAY
OUTPUT
RELAY
OUTPUT
COM
COM
DC SUPPLY
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
AC LOADS
630V
a44942
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
100
1/2W
~
AC SOURCE
5-15
5
High Speed Counter Input Circuits, I1 and I2
Two 12/24VDC input positive/ negative logic circuits are available to provide inputs for
type A counter inputs: count and strobe/preload. These circuits function as either %I1
and %I2 or as count and strobe/preload inputs. These inputs share the same common as
%I3 and %I4. The inputs can be connected either as positive or negative inputs as
described in the DC input circuit section. With the high frequency selection, the highest
frequency guaranteed to be detected is 10Khz with a 50/50 duty cycle (50ms ON, 50ms
OFF). The maximum frequency in the low frequency mode is 30 Hz (16.7 ms ON, 16.7
ms OFF).
Table 5-11. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications
Negative Logic Mode
Positive Logic Mode
Rated Input Voltage:
12VDC/24VDC
12VDC/24VDC
Input VoltageRange:
0 to 30VDC
0 to 30VDC
Input Current:
8.2 mA typical at 24VDC
8.2 mA typical at 24VDC
2.8 mA typical at 12VDC
2.8 mA typical at 12VDC
11.5Vminimum
5Vmaximum
11.5Vminimum
5Vmaximum
Input Threshold Current ON:
OFF:
2.9 mA maximum at 11.5V
.5 mA minimum at 5V
2.9 mA maximum at 11.5V
.5 mA minimum at 5V
Response Time (low filter):
10mstypical
10mstypical
Response Time (high filter):
40µs typical
40µs typical
Isolation Voltage:
1500V field to logic side
1500V field to logic side
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Input Threshold Voltage
ON:
OFF:
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
5V
a45069
24VDC
COM
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
CPU
COUNT
OR
STROBE
I/O BASE
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-12. High Speed Counter Circuit - Negative Logic Connection
5-16
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
24VDC
COM
5V
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
CPU
COUNT
OR
STROBE
I/O BASE
a45070
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-13. High Speed Counter Circuit - Positive Logic Connection
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-17
5
5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output-1.5 Amp
The 5/12/24 volt DC negative logic 1.5 Amp output circuit provides one isolated output
point. The output circuit is designed to have negative logic characteristics in that it sinks
current from the loads to the user common or negative power bus. The output device is
connected between the positive power bus and the module output.
The output characteristics are compatible with a wide range of user-supplied load
devices, such as: motor starters, solenoids, and indicators. Power to operate the field
devices must be supplied by the user.
Table 5-12. Specifications For 5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Logic - 1.5 Amp Output Circuit
Rated Voltage:
5/12/24
VDC
Output VoltageRange:
5 to 30 VDC
Outputs per Module:
1
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS between field side and logic side; 500
volts to other groups
Output Current:
2 amps maximum, 12 to 24 VDC, 0 to 25_C (32 to 77_F);
see derating diagram below
1.5 amps maximum, 12 to 24 VDC, 60_C (140_F)
.75 amps maximum, 5 to 11 VDC, 60 _C (140_F)
OutputCharacteristics:
Output Voltage Drop
Off-state Leakage
On Response Time
Off Response Time
OperatingTemperature:
0.2 volts maximum at 12 to 24 VDC, 25_C (77_F)
0.4 volts maximum at 5 to 11 VDC, 25_C (77_F)
250 µAmaximum
.1 ms maximum
.1 ms maximum
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
It is recommended that this output be externally fused since the internal fuse is not
easily replaceable (it is soldered into the board).
Caution
Connecting the power supply to DCPWR (+) and DCCOM (–) with
polarity reversed will cause an internal fuse to blow.
5-18
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
a45071
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
5V
L
O
A
D
DCPWR
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
QI
24VDC
CPU
Î Î
3 AMP FUSE
CPU
DCCOM
I/O BASE
Figure 5-14. Typical 5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Logic Output Circuit
a44891
2.0
1.5
OUTPUT
CURRENT
(AMPS) 1.0
.5
25°C
10°C 20°C 30°C 40°C 50°C
60°C
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C)
Figure 5-15. Temperature vs. Current for High Speed Counter Output
24 VDC Power Supply On DC Input Modules
An isolated 24 VDC output power supply is available on the I/O Base modules with DC
input circuits. This supply is available for user devices and is typically used to power the
DC input circuits at about 7.3 mA per input. The combination of input circuit current
and external device current must not exceed 220 mA.
120 VAC Power Supply
Table 5-13. Specifications for 120 VAC Power Supply
Range
Frequency
Input Current
Hold-up
Inrush Current
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
102 volts AC to 132 volts AC
47 to 63 Hz
250 mA, maximum
10 ms, minimum
2.4 amps maximum
5-19
5
Table 5-14. Specifications for 24 VDC Power Supply
Voltage:
Current:
Fusing:
24 VDC, " 10%
220 mA maximum
.25 amp fast blow (removable)
Replacing Fuses
The Series 90-20 PLC provides replaceable fuses for output points and for a user
accessible 24 volt power supply (on the dc input versions of I/O Power Supply baseplate
only). To replace these fuses:
D
D
D
Remove power from the unit.
Remove the CPU module.
Confirm that power is removed from the I/O Power Supply baseplate. Use a small
screw driver or fuse extractor to remove the fuse from the clips on the I/O circuit
board. The 24 volt power supply fuse is located near the input terminal board. The
output fuses are located near the output terminal board. The output fuses are
located on the common of several circuits; therefore, if a fuse is blown it will prevent
the entire group associated with it from working. The following figure shows the
location of the fuses on the I/O Base module, and the table following the figure
provides a list of these fuses with location, rating, part number, third party source,
and the type of fuse.
a44550
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎÎ Î
ÎÎ
FU3
24 VOLT
POWER SUPPLY
FUSE
OUTPUT
FUSES
FU2
FU1
(SOLDERED)
Î
Î
Î
FU5
ÎÎÎ
Î ÎÎ
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ ÎÎ
Î
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ ÎÎ
Î
Î
FU6
FU4
Figure 5-16. Location of Fuses
Warning
Failure to remove power when changing fuses could cause severe or
fatal injury to the operator or maintenance personnel.
5-20
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
Table 5-15. List of FusesDC in Relay Out/120 VAC PS module
Current
Rating
GE Fanuc Fuse
Part Number
Third Party Source
and Part Number
FU1
3A
259A9598P10
Littlefuse,239003
Soldered-in
FU2
250 mA
44A724627-105
Bussman,GMD0.50
Littlefuse,239.500
Replaceable
FU3
250 mA
259A9578P6
Bussman, AGC-1/4
Littlefuse,312.250
Replaceable
FU4, FU5, FU6
10A
259A9578P19
Bussman, AGC-10
Littlefuse,312010
Replaceable
Location
Fuse Type
Field Wiring Information
The following figure provides wiring information for connecting user supplied input
and output devices and power sources for the 120 VAC Power Supply/ DC input / Relay
Output Base Module.
1
2
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
Î
*
*
ÎÎÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎÎÎÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎÎÎÎ
3
4
ICOM1
24 VDC
POWER
SUPPLY
H
N
21
22
120
VAC
GND
23
N
V
GND
5
6
I1
I2
COUNT STROBE
DCPWR
24
~
H
a44553
Q1
25
I3
DCCOM
26
L
O
A
D
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
I4
I5
I6
I7
I8
I9
I10
I11
I12
I13
I14
I15
I16
ICOM2
Q2
Q3
Q4
27
28
29
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
COM1
30
Q5
Q6
Q7
Q8
31
32
33
34
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
COM2
35
Q10
Q11
Q12
36
Q9
37
38
39
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
COM3
40
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
* WHEN I1 AND 12 ARE USED AS HIGH SPEED COUNTER INPUTS, THE INPUT SWITCHES SHOULD BE SOLID STATE TO
PREVENT BOUNCING WHICH COULD CAUSE UNINTENDED HIGH SPEED COUNTER COUNTS OR STROBE SIGNALS.
Figure 5-17. Field Wiring Information - IC692MDR541
Note
Although I1 through I4 are shown connected as positive Logic; and I5
through I16 are shown connected as negative Logic, all inputs can be
connected as either positive or negative logic.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-21
5
Derating Information
The following figure provides derating information for this module.
a44744
16I/12Q
NUMBER
OF I/O
POINTS
ACTIVE
8I/6Q
55°C
10°C
20°C
30°C
40°C
50°C
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C)
60°C
Figure 5-18. Temperature vs. Input/Output Points for IC692MDR541
Notes
(1) The Hand-Held Programmer or RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
should not be connected continuously in the shaded region (above
55_C (131_ F)).
(2) For non-standard orientation, derate the temperature in the above
figure by 10_C (18_F).
5-22
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
DC Input/Relay Output/240 VAC Power Supply Module
IC692MDR741
24 VDC Positive/Negative Logic Inputs 16 Points
The 24 volt DC positive/negative logic input circuits provide 16 input points in two
groups of 4 and 12 points. The input circuits are designed to have positive or negative
logic characteristics. To connect the inputs as positive logic circuits, the input switching
device is connected between the positive power bus and the module input. The
negative bus is connected to the input circuit common. To connect the inputs as negative
logic circuits, the input switching device is connected between the negative power bus
and the module input. The positive bus is connected to the input circuit common.
Current into an input point results in a logic 1 in the input status table (%I). Input
characteristics are compatible with a wide range of input devices, such as: pushbuttons,
limit switches, and electronic proximity switches. Power to operate field devices and the
input circuits is supplied by an isolated +24 VDC supply. This power supply is limited
to 220 mA maximum.
Table 5-16. Specifications For 24 Volt DC Negative/Positive Logic Input Circuits
Negative Logic Mode
Positive Logic Mode
12 (I5-I16) and 4 (I1-I4; includes 2
24 volts DC
0 to 30 volts DC
7.3mAtypical
15Vminimum
5Vmaximum
High Speed Counter inputs)
24 volts DC
0 to 30 volts DC
7.3mAtypical
15Vminimum
5Vmaximum
Input Threshold Current ON:
OFF:
4mAmaximum
1.5mAminimum
4mAmaximum
1.5mAminimum
Response Time
Isolation Voltage:
4ms typical
4ms typical
1500V RMS field side to logic side
1500V RMS between each group if one group is powered by an
external 24V power supply.
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Points/Common
Rated Input Voltage
Input VoltageRange
Input Current
Input Threshold Voltage
ON:
OFF:
* POSITIVE CONNECTION SHOWN; REVERSE POLARITY OF 24VDC POWER
5V
SUPPLY CONNECTIONS FOR NEGATIVE CONNECTION
TERMINAL
STRIP
Î Î
I
*
24VDC
COM
NOISE
FILTER
TO OTHER CIRCUITS
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
CPU
I/O BASE
a45067
5V
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-19. Typical 24VDC Positive/Negative Logic Input Circuit
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-23
5
Relay Output, Normally Open, 2 Amp - 11 Points
The 2 amp relay output circuits provide 11 normally-open relay circuits for controlling
output loads provided by the user. The output switching capacity of these circuits is 2
amps. The output points are arranged in three groups; one group with three outputs
and two groups with four outputs each. Each group has a common power output
terminal. The relay outputs can control a wide range of user-supplied load devices, such
as: motor starters, solenoids, and indicators. Power for the internal relay circuits is
provided by the +5 volt internal supply. The user must supply the AC or DC power to
operate field devices. There are 10 amp replaceable fuses on each common.
Table 5-17. Specifications For Relay Output, 2 Amp Circuits
5 to 30 volts DC
Operating Voltage:
5 to 250 volts AC
Outputs per Module:
11 (three groups: one with 3 outputs and two with
4 outputs each)
Fusing:
10A fuse on each common (replaceable)
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS
MaximumLoad:
2 amps resistive maximum per output
MinimumLoad:
10 mA
Leakage Current:
1 mA maximum at 240 VAC
MaximumInrush:
20 amps maximum for one cycle
On Response Time:
15 ms maximum
Off Response Time:
15 ms maximum
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Contact Life:
(also refer to the following table)
20 x 106 operations
200,000operations resistive load (2A), typical.
Mechanical:
Electrical:
a45068
5V
5V
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
CPU
TERMINAL
STRIP
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
QI
L
O
A
D
10 AMP
FUSE
TO OTHER
CIRCUITS
Î Î
POWER
COMMON
I/O BASE
Figure 5-20. Relay Output Circuit
5-24
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
Table 5-18. Typical Contact Life
Voltage
Resistive
Current
Lamp and Solenoid
Typical Operations
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
2A
.6A
200,000
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
1A
.3A
400,000
240VAC, 120VAC, 24VDC
.5A
.1A
800,000
Relay contact life, when switching inductive loads, will approach resistive load contact
life if suppression circuits are used. The following figures are examples of typical
suppression circuits for AC and DC loads. The 1A, 100V diode shown in the DC load
typical suppression circuit is an industry standard 1N4934.
Typical Suppression Circuits
SERIES
90-20
DC LOADS
a44941
SERIES
90-20
.022
1A, 100V
RELAY
OUTPUT
RELAY
OUTPUT
COM
COM
DC SUPPLY
AC LOADS
630V
100
a44942
Î
1/2W
~
AC SOURCE
Fusing
User replaceable fuses are supplied internally on the common of each output group.
This fuse does not guarantee that the output point will be protected by a direct short. It
is recommended that each output point be externally fused (minimum 2 amp) to protect
the output point. For lighter loads, the internal common fuse can be replaced with a 5
amp fuse to protect the output point without adding the external fusing.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-25
5
High Speed Counter Input Circuits, I1 and I2
Two 12/24VDC input positive/negative logic circuits are available to provide inputs for
type A counter inputs: count and strobe/preload. These circuits function as either %I1
and %I2 or as count and strobe/preload inputs. These inputs share the same common as
%I3 and %I4. The inputs can be connected either as positive or negative inputs as
described in the DC input circuit section. With the high frequency selection, the highest
frequency guaranteed to be detected is 10Khz with a 50/50 duty cycle (50ms ON, 50ms
OFF). The maximum frequency in the low frequency mode is 30 Hz (16.7 ms ON, 16.7
ms OFF).
Table 5-19. High Speed Counter Input Circuit Specifications
Negative Logic Mode
Positive Logic Mode
Rated Input Voltage:
12VDC/24VDC
12VDC/24VDC
Input VoltageRange:
0 to 30VDC
0 to 30VDC
Input Current:
8.2 mA typical at 24VDC
8.2 mA typical at 24VDC
2.9 mA typical at 12VDC
2.9 mA typical at 12VDC
11.5Vminimum
5Vmaximum
11.5Vminimum
5Vmaximum
Input Threshold Current ON:
OFF:
2.9 mA maximum at 11.5V
.5 mA minimum at 5V
2.9 mA maximum at 11.5V
.5 mA minimum at 5V
Response Time (low filter):
10mstypical
10mstypical
Response Time (high filter):
40[micro]stypical
40µs typical
Isolation Voltage:
1500V field to logic side
1500V field to logic side
OperatingTemperature:
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
Input Threshold Voltage
ON:
OFF:
TERMINAL
STRIP
5V
24VDC
COM
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
CPU
COUNT
OR
STROBE
I/O BASE
a45069
5V
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
CPU
Figure 5-21. High Speed Counter Input Circuit
5-26
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
5/12/24 Volt DC Positive Output Q1 or High Speed Counter Output-1 Amp
The 5/12/24 volt DC positive logic 1 Amp output circuit provides one isolated output
point. The output circuit is designed to have positive logic characteristics in that it
sources current to the loads from the user common or positive power bus. The output
device is connected between the negative power bus and the module output. The
output characteristics are compatible with a wide range of user-supplied load devices,
such as: motor starters, solenoids, and indicators. Power to operate the field devices
must be supplied by the user.
Table 5-20. Specifications For 5/12/24 Volt DC Negative Logic - 1 Amp Output Circuit
Rated Voltage:
5/12/24
VDC
Output VoltageRange:
5 to 30 VDC
Outputs per Module:
1
Fusing:
2 amp soldered-in fuse
Isolation:
1500 volts RMS between field side and logic side; 1500
volts RMS to other groups
Output Current:
1 amp maximum per point at 12 to 24 VDC
.5 amp maximum at 5 to 11 VDC
OutputCharacteristics:
0.4 volts maximum at 12 to 24 VDC, 1 amp, 25_C (77_F)
0.8 volts maximum at 5 to 11 VDC, 1 amp, 25_C (77_F)
250 µAmaximum
.1 ms maximum
.1 ms maximum
Output Voltage Drop
Off-state Leakage
On Response Time
Off Response Time
0_ to 60_C (32_ to 140_F)
OperatingTemperature:
It is recommended that this output be externally fused since the internal fuse is not easily replaceable (soldered
into board).
Î
Î
Î Î
2 AMP
FUSE
5V
5V
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
LED
MATRIX
ON CPU
a45072
TERMINAL
STRIP
DCPWR
24VDC
QI
L
O
A
D
CPU
CPU
DCCOM
I/O BASE
Figure 5-22. Typical 5/12/24 VDC Positive Logic Output Circuit
Caution
Connecting the power supply to DCPWR (+) and DCCOM (-) with
polarity reversed will cause an internal fuse to blow.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-27
5
240 VAC Power Supply
Specifications for the 240 VAC power supply requirements for this module are as listed
below.
Table 5-21. Specifications for 240 VAC Power Supply
Range:
Frequency:
Input Current:
Hold-up:
In-rush Current:
204 volts AC to 264 volts AC
47 to 63 Hz
130 mA, maximum
10 ms, minimum
1.3 amps maximum
24 VDC Output Power Supply On DC Input Modules
An isolated 24 VDC output power supply is available on the I/O Power Supply Base
modules that have DC input circuits. This supply is available for user devices and is
typically used to power DC input circuits at about 7.3 mA per input. The combination of
input circuit current and external device current must not exceed 220 mA.
Table 5-22. Specifications for 24 VDC Power Supply
Voltage:
Current:
Fusing:
5-28
24 VDC, " 10%
220 mA maximum
.25 amp fast blow (removable)
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
Field Wiring Information
The following figure provides wiring information for connecting user supplied input
and output devices and power sources for the DC Input/Relay Output Base Module
with 240 VAC power supply.
a44943
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎ ÎÎÎ
*
1
2
3
ICOM1
24 VDC
POWER
SUPPLY
H
21
N
22
GND
23
N
240 ~
VAC
H
V
GND
*
4
5
I1
I2
COUNT STROBE
DCPWR
24
Q1
25
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
I3
I4
I5
I6
I7
I8
I9
I10
I11
I12
I13
I14
I15
I16
ICOM2
DCCOM
26
L
O
A
D
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
Q2
Q3
Q4
27
28
29
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
COM1
30
Q5
Q6
Q8
32
33
34
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
*
Q7
31
COM2
35
Q10
Q11
Q12
36
Q9
37
38
39
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
L
O
A
D
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
COM3
40
AC OR DC
POWER SOURCE
WHEN I1 AND 12 ARE USED AS HIGH SPEED COUNTER INPUTS, THE INPUT SWITCHES SHOULD BE SOLID STATE TO
PREVENT BOUNCING WHICH COULD CAUSE UNINTENDED HIGH SPEED COUNTER COUNTS OR STROBE SIGNALS.
Figure 5-23. Field Wiring Information - IC692MDR741
Note
Although I1 through I4 are shown connected as Positive Logic and I5
through I16 are shown connected as Negative Logic, all inputs can be
connected as either positive or negative logic.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
5-29
5
Derating Information
The following figure provides derating information for this module.
a44744
16I/12Q
NUMBER
OF I/O
POINTS
ACTIVE
8I/6Q
55°C
10°C 20°C 30°C 40°C 50°C
AMBIENT TEMPERATURE (°C)
60°C
Figure 5-24. Temperature vs. Input/Output Points for IC692MDR741
Notes
(1) The Hand-Held Programmer or RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 Converter
should not be connected continuously in the shaded region
(above 55_C (131_F).
(2) For non-standard orientation, derate the temperature in the above
figure by 10_C.
Replacing Fuses
The Series 90-20 PLC provides replaceable fuses for output points and for a user
accessible 24 volt power supply (on the dc input versions of baseplate only). To replace
these fuses:
5-30
D
D
D
Remove power from the unit.
D
The 24 volt power supply fuse is located near the input terminal board. The output
fuses are located near the output terminal board.
D
The output fuses are located on the common of several circuits; therefore, if a fuse is
blown it will prevent the entire group associated with it from working.
Remove the CPU module.
Confirm that power is removed from the I/O Power Supply baseplate. Use a small
screw driver or fuse extractor to remove the fuse from the clips on the I/O circuit
board.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
5
The following figure shows the location of the fuses on the I/O Base module, and the
table following the figure provides a list of these fuses with location, rating, part
number, third party source, and the type of fuse.
a44550
ÎÎÎÎ Î
Î
FU3
24 VOLT
POWER SUPPLY
FUSE
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
FU1
FU2
OUTPUT
FUSES
FU5
(SOLDERED)
Î
Î
Î
FU6
FU4
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
Î
ÎÎÎ
Î
Figure 5-25. Location of Fuses
Warning
Failure to remove power when changing fuses could cause severe or
fatal injury to the operator or maintenance personnel.
Table 5-23. List of Fuses
Current
Rating
GE Fanuc Fuse
Part Number
Third Party Source
and Part Number
FU1
3A
259A9598P10
Littlefuse,239002
Soldered-in
FU2
250 mA
44A724627-120
Bussman,GMD0.25
Littlefuse,239.250
Replaceable
FU3
250 mA
259A9578P6
Bussman, AGC-1/4
Littlefuse,312.250
Replaceable
FU4, FU5, FU6
10A
259A9578P19
Bussman, AGC-10
Littlefuse,312010
Replaceable
Location
GFK-0551C
Chapter 5 Power Supply and I/O Modules
Fuse Type
5-31
Chapter
6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6
section level 1 1
figure bi level 1
table_big level 1
The Series 90-20 PLC hardware configuration includes a built-in High Speed Counter
function. This chapter describes:
H
H
H
H
Overview and uses of the High Speed Counter
Basic High Speed Counter features
High Speed Counter inputs and outputs
Configurable features on the High Speed Counter
Overview and Uses of the High Speed Counter
The High Speed Counter function provides direct processing of rapid pulse signals up to
10 kHz for industrial control applications such as:
H
H
H
H
H
H
Turbine flowmeter
Meter proving
Velocity measurement
Material handling
Motion control
Process control
Direct processing means that the High Speed Counter is able to sense inputs, process the
input count information, and control one output independently of the user ladder
program.
The High Speed Counter uses 16 words of input memory. This consists of 16 bits of
discrete input memory (%I) and 15 words of analog input memory (%AI). These inputs
are updated once per CPU sweep. The High Speed Counter also uses 16 bits of discrete
output memory (%Q) which are transferred once per sweep.
The High Speed Counter is configured using the Series 90-30/20/Micro Hand-Held
Programmer or the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software Configurator
function. Many features can be configured from the user’s application program as well.
Each feature is set to a factory default configuration which is suitable for many
applications. There are no jumpers or DIP switches to set. LEDs in the CPU LED matrix
indicate the status of the High Speed Counter inputs and outputs.
The Series 90-20 High Speed Counter is a Type A counter which has one 16-bit counter.
This counter can be programmed to count either up or down. The counter accepts two
inputs:
GFK-0551C
6-1
6
H
H
Count input which increments or decrements a 16 bit accumulator.
Preload/Strobe input which either preloads a user defined value into the
accumulator or strobes the accumulator into a register. In addition, the counter has
one dc output (Q1), with programmable on and off output presets.
Additional High Speed Counter Features
H
H
H
H
H
Two DC inputs with input voltage range of 12 to 30 VDC;
One DC output;
Counts per timebase register;
Software configuration;
Individual LEDs that provide a visual indication of Count input, preload/strobe
input and output status.
One input is used as a count signal. The other input is used as a strobe or preload inputs
depending on user configuration. The dc output can be used to drive indicating lights,
solenoids, relays, and other devices.
Power sources for input and output points must be supplied by the user or by the +24
VDC Isolated output on the Series 90-20 I/O power supply base module.
A Counts per Timebase register indicates the number of counts in a given time interval.
The Counts per Timebase data is a 16-bit signed number. The sign indicates up counts
(+) or down counts (–). The Timebase value is specified in milliseconds and ranges
from 10 to 65535 milliseconds (increments of 10 milliseconds).
All configuration parameters are stored in non-volatile memory in the PLC. An initial
(default) set of configuration parameters is used in the absence of user changes to
configuration.
Basic Features
Direct processing: The module is able to sense inputs, count and directly control one
output without the need to communicate with a CPU.
Selectable counter operation: Counter operation may be configured to count either up
or down.
Continuous or single-shot counting: The counter can be configured to operate in
either continuous or single-shot mode:
Continuous Counter Mode: If either the upper or lower count limit is
exceeded, the counter wraps around to the other limit and continues.
Single-Shot Counter Mode: The counter counts to either limit and stops.
When the counter is at the limit, counts in the opposite direction back it off
the limit. The Accumulator can also be changed by loading a new value
from the CPU or by applying a Preset Input.
Access to Accumulator: An internal memory location stores the accumulated count.
The CPU can read the value in the accumulator, or set it from the
application program. The accumulator value, which may be either positive
or negative, is represented as a two’s complement number.
Accumulator adjust: The Accumulator may be adjusted. The adjustment is an 8-bit
signed two’s complement offset value that is sent from the CPU whenever
an adjustment is required.
6-2
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Selectable Input Filters: The Count and Preload/Strobe inputs can be configured for a
high-frequency filter or a low-frequency filter.
Count Rate: Maximum count rate is 10 kHz with the high-frequency filter.
Selectable On/Off Output Presets: The High Speed Counter output has two Preset
points, ON and OFF. The output state indicates when the counter
accumulator value lies between the defined points. For example:
COUNTS
OFF PRESET
VALUE
ON PRESET
VALUE
CORRESPONDING ON
OUTPUT
OFF
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
ACCUMULATOR
VALUE
a43003
TIME
The output polarity may be configured to be either on or off between points by the
relative location of the ON/OFF presets as shown below.
Table 6-1. Output Polarity Configuration
Preset Closest
to Low Limit
Output ON
Output OFF
ON
> = ON Preset
< = OFF Preset
> OFF Preset
< ON Preset
OFF
< OFF Preset
> ON Preset
< = ON Preset
> = OFF Preset
OFF
PRESET
ON
PRESET
a42970
ON CONDITION INCLUDES PRESET POINTS
OFF
PRESET
ON
PRESET
OFF CONDITION INCLUDES PRESET POINTS
INCREASING COUNTS
Counts per Timebase can be used to measure the rate of counting: The high speed
counter stores the number of counts that have occurred in a specified
period of time. A timebase value from 10 millisecond to 65535 milliseconds
is configurable (increments of 10 ms)
Inputs: Inputs include a count input and preload/strobe input. Input filters can be
configured for high frequency or low frequency operation.
Count Input: A rising current edge on a count input will increment or
decrement the Accumulator depending on the configuration. For each
count, the CT LED will remain on long enough to be seen. If the counts
occur very frequently the LED will appear to be ON continuously.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-3
6
Preload/Strobe Input (Preload mode): The High Speed Counter has a user
adjustable preload register. The contents of this register determine the
value the counter resets to when the Preload input goes active. The default
value of the Preload register is zero.
The Preload input is positive-edge sensitive. It may be configured to have
either the high-frequency or low-frequency filter. The default is
high-frequency.
If Preload occurs during counting, preload data with a resolution of Ç 1
count is stored in the accumulator and a Preload flag is set to indicate to the
CPU that a Preload occurred. In addition, the preload/strobe LED (marked
PL) will turn on as long as the accumulator equals the preload value.
Preload/Strobe Input (Strobe mode): This input is positive edge-sensitive. The
high-frequency filter is enabled in the strobe mode.
When the strobe signal goes active, count data with a resolution of one
count is stored in the Strobe register and a Strobe flag is set to indicate to
the CPU that a strobe value was captured. This value remains in the Strobe
register until the Strobe signal goes active again, at which time it is
overwritten. Each time the CPU acknowledges receipt of the Strobe flag,
the application program should clear it.
High Speed Counter Output (Q1): The High Speed Counter dc output can be used to
drive indicating lights, solenoids, relays, and other devices. The output is
also capable of driving CMOS level loads. The output is a dc output, with
power supplied from a user supplied power source. It is protected against
short circuits by an internal fuse (soldered on board).
The output can be programmed to turn on or off when the accumulated
count reaches appropriate values.
Configuring the High Speed Counter
There are two schemes that may be followed for configuration of the High Speed
Counter:
H
H
The Hand-Held Programmer may be used for on-line configuration.
Off-Line configuration can be accomplished using the Logicmaster 90-30/90-20
configurator software.
When the High Speed Counter module is enabled, configuration data entered by the
user, in response to the Hand-Held Programmer screens, is stored in the configuration
memory area of the PLC. When the configuration is complete, the PLC stores this
configuration data.
The %I, %AI, and %Q reference locations are fixed in the Series 90-20 PLC.
Circuit Specifications
Refer to Chapter 5 for electrical and circuit specifications for the High Speed Counter
(tables 5-4 and 5-11).
6-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Field Wiring
It is recommended that the following procedures be followed when routing and
connecting field wiring from user devices to the High Speed Counter inputs and
outputs.
H
H
H
Turn-off power to the PLC before connecting field wiring.
All low level signal wires should be run separately from other field wiring.
AC power wiring should be run separately from DC field wiring.
Warning
You should calculate the maximum current for each wire and observe
proper wiring practices. Failure to do so may cause injury to
personnel or damage to equipment.
H
Field wiring should not be routed close to any device that could be a potential
source of electrical interference.
H
If severe noise problems are present, additional power supply filtering or an
isolation transformer may be required.
H
Ensure that proper grounding procedures, as previously described, are followed to
minimize potential safety hazards to personnel.
H
Label all wires to and from I/O devices. Record circuit identification numbers or
other pertinent data on the inserts which go in the module’s faceplate door.
Operation of a Type A Counter
The High Speed Counter may be independently configured to count either up or down.
Details of the Type A counter are shown in the figure below. The counter has an
Accumulator register, Counts per Timebase register, one Strobe register and one set of
on/off Preset values. The counter has two inputs: Preload/Strobe and Count Pulse, and one
output.
UP OR DOWN COUNTER (16–BIT)
a44555
PRELOAD
PRELOAD VALUE
(16–BIT)
ÎÎ
Î
ÎÎ
Î
PRELOAD/
STROBE
A
COUNT
PULSE
ACCUMULA TOR
(16–BIT)
COUNTS PER
TIME BASE
(16–BIT)
STROBE
STROBE REGISTER
(16–BIT)
ON/OFF PRESETS
(16–BIT)
GFK-0551C
ACCUMULA TOR
ADJUST
(8–BIT)
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
OUTPUT
6-5
6
Since the Preload/Strobe input in the preload mode is normally used to perform the reset
function for each counter, the Preload default value has been set to 0 (zero). However, the
Preload value may be configured to any value within the counter’s selected range. The
Preload for each counter is positive current edge-sensitive. When a preload input occurs,
the configured preload value is inserted into the Accumulator and a Preload flag is set to
indicate this to the CPU. If the application program uses this flag indication, then it should
clear the flag before the next preload occurs. A rising edge on the Preload input always
preloads the Accumulator regardless of the state of the Preload flag.
The Preload/Strobe input in the strobe mode is positive current edge-sensitive. When
the Strobe signal goes active, the current value in the accumulator is stored in the
associated Strobe register and a Strobe flag is set to indicate to the CPU that a strobe
value was captured. This value remains in the Strobe register until the Strobe signal
goes active again and is overwritten. Each time the CPU acknowledges receipt of the
Strobe flag, it will stay on until the application program clears it. The Strobe input
always updates the Strobe register with the latest Accumulator value regardless of the
state of the Strobe flag.
The Preload/Strobe input in the strobe mode always uses the high-frequency filter. Preload
inputs and Count inputs can be configured to use either the high-frequency filter, or a
low-frequency filter. The low-frequency filter reduces the effect of signal noise.
The value in the Accumulator may be adjusted by writing an offset adjustment value to
the Accumulator. This adjustment may be any value between –128 and +127. The
adjustment value is added to the contents of the accumulator.
Timing For Type A Counter
The Count signal shown in the following illustrations represents an internal signal that
indicates where counting occurs with respect to the pulse input. Counting always
occurs on the low-to-high current transition of the Pulse input.
a44702
A PULSE
INPUT
COUNT
ACC
VALUE
N
N
N
2
1
CPU Interface:
Data Transfer Between High Speed Counter and CPU
During each I/O scan, the High Speed Counter automatically sends 16 status bits (%I)
and 15 words (%AI) of register data values to the CPU. In return, during each I/O scan,
the CPU sends 16 bits (%Q) of output data to the module. COMMREQ function blocks
in the user program can be used to send additional data commands to the module.
Information about configuration, programming, and monitoring High Speed Counter
operation using a Hand-Held Programmer can be found later in this chapter under
Configuration of the High Speed Counter, page 6-19.
6-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Data Automatically Sent By The High Speed Counter
The 15 register data words (%AI) represent:
H
H
H
H
Latest Counts per Timebase value;
Contents of the Accumulator(s);
Contents of the Strobe registers;
Error code.
The 16 status bits (%I) represent:
H
H
H
H
H
H
Strobe flag status;
Preload flag status;
Disable status;
Output status;
Module ready status;
Error status.
These status bits are sent to the CPU as inputs, and can influence outputs sent from the
CPU to the module. Data formats for the High Speed Counter are shown on the
following pages.
Data Automatically Sent To The High Speed Counter
The 16 output bits (%Q) represent:
H
H
H
H
Strobe flag reset;
Preload flag reset;
Clear error flag;
Output enable.
All of this data is transferred from the High Speed Counter to the CPU once per I/O scan.
The I/O scan is active while the CPU is in the RUN mode or STOP ENABLED mode.
Additional Data Sent To The High Speed Counter Using a COMMREQ Function Block
GFK-0551C
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
Load accumulator;
D
Continuous/Single shot counting.
Load count limits;
Load accumulator increment;
Load output presets;
Load accumulator preload;
Load time base;
Count direction;
Fail mode;
Filter selection;
Preload/Strobeselection;
Enable/Disablecounter;
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-7
6
%AI And %I Data Sent
The 15 words (%AI) of Analog Input data values and 16 status bits (%I) sent to the CPU
are described below.
Table 6-2. Description of %AI Data
Reference
Description
%AI01
%AI02
%AI03-%AI05
%AI06
%AI07
%AI08–%AI15
Module Status Code
Counts per timebase
Not used but occupied
Accumulator
Strobe Register
Not used but occupied
Value
0 to 32767
0
–32768 to 32767
–32768 to 32767
0
Status Bits (%I)
48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41
40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33
Output Status
Strobe Status
0 not used
0 not used
0 not used
0 not used
0 not used
0 not used
Module ready
Preload status
not used (always 0
0 not used
Error
0 not used
0 not used
Strobe/Preload Status: The High Speed Counter sets these bits when a strobe or
preload occurs. The CPU must clear the bit using the corresponding Reset
Strobe/ResetPreload output.
Output Status: The High Speed Counter uses this bit to indicate the ON or OFF
commanded status of the output.
Module Ready: Always a 1 on the Series 90-20. The 90-30 rack mounted high speed
counter module sets this bit to 1 after successfully completing its powerup
tests.
Error: Set to indicate an error condition. When this occurs, the error code is returned in
the High Speed Counter Status code (word 1). When the error is
acknowledged by the CPU, it should be cleared by sending the Clear Error
output.
6-8
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
%Q Data Sent From CPU To High Speed Counter
Once each I/O scan, the CPU sends 16 bits (%Q) of data to the High Speed Counter. The
application program can use these %Q references to send commands to the High Speed
Counter. The %Q data format for the counter is shown below.
40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33
48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41
Enabled Output
Reset Strobe
Not used
Not used
Not used
Not used
Not used
Not used
Not used
Reset Preload
Not used
Not used
Clear error
Not used
Not used
Not used
Reset Strobe: Clears the High Speed Counter’s corresponding Strobe input status bit
(as described on the previous pages). For example, Reset Strobe bit 1 is
used to reset the module’s Strobe status bit 1. If the corresponding Strobe
input status changes to 1, the program logic should set this bit to 1 and then
back to 0 on the next I/O scan.
Reset Preload: Clears the High Speed Counter’s corresponding Preload input status
bit. For example, reset Preload bit 5 is used to reset the module’s Preload
status bit 5. If the corresponding Preload input status changes to 1, the
program logic should set this bit to 1 and then back to 0 on the nextI/O
scan.
Outputs Enable/Disable: Bit 8 is used to enable or disable the module’s outputs. If this
bit is 0, the High Speed Counter output will not turn on.
Clear Error: Set by the CPU to clear error after it has been acknowledged.
High Speed Counter Status Codes
The High Speed Counter Status Code in the %AI Input Data contains the error codes
returned to the PLC. These codes are set as a result of message or configuration
command errors. To clear this code, the clear error bit in the discrete outputs (%Q)
should be set.
Table 6-3. Error Codes Returned
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
GFK-0551C
Description
No Errors
Unused
Unused
InvalidCommand
Invalid Parameter
Invalid Sub-Command
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
Code
6
7-9
10
11
12-14
Description
Invalid Counter Number
Reserved
Reserved
Counter Limit Error
Reserved
6-9
6
Error codes are defined as follows:
H
H
H
H
H
Invalid Command: Command number received was invalid for the High Speed Counter.
Invalid Parameter: Configuration parameter received was invalid.
Invalid Sub-Command: Sub-Command code in the Data Command Word was invalid.
Invalid Counter Number: Counter number in the Data Command Word was not 1.
Counter_LimitError: Counter configuration limit was rejected because new limit set would be
incompatible (High limit < > Low limit).
Sending Data Commands To The High Speed Counter
In addition to the %Q discrete output data which is sent every sweep to the High Speed
Counter, there are a series of commands which can be sent by the PLC (using the
COMMREQ function block) to change the various operating parameters of the
counters. These commands are all 6 bytes in length.
The format for Data Commands is as follows:
MSB LSB
———————
command word
| 0n cc |
|———————|
data word (LSW) | dd dd |
|———————|
data word (MSW) | dd dd |
———————
where:
†
n = counter 1
cc = sub—command code
dd = data byte
Always 0000
The following table lists the Data Command words in both decimal and hexadecimal
numbers. Following the table is a description of each command and a simple example.
Data Commands for the High Speed Counter
Table 6-4. Data Commands
Command Word
Command Name
Load Accumulator
Load Hi Limit
Load Lo Limit
Load Acc Increment
Set Cntr Direction
Load Timebase
Load ON Preset
Load OFF Preset
Load Preload
Load Accumulator
6-10
Decimal
Hexadecimal
01 01
01 02
01 03
01 04
01 05
01 06
01 11
01 21
01 31
01 01
01 02
01 03
01 04
01 05
01 06
01 0B
01 15
01 1F
Command Code = 01H
Used to set any value within counter limits directly into the Accumulator.
Example: To set Counter to 1234H, load COMMREQ command registers
with:
Command word: 0101
LS data word: 1234
MS data word: 0000
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
GFK-0551C
Load Hi Limit
Command Code = 02H
Load Lo Limit
Command Code = 03H
Used to set the Hi and Lo limits to any value within the counter range.
Example: To change the upper limit of counter to 10000 (2710H), load registers with:
Command word: 0102
LS data word: 2710
MS data word: 0000
Note that if the limits are loaded in the wrong order, they may be rejected
and an error flag will be set. To avoid this, remember to always move the
Lo Limit first when shifting the limits down or the Hi Limit first when
shifting the limits up.
Load Acc Increment
Command Code = 04H
Used to offset a counter accumulator by a small number of counts (up to
+127 or –128). Only the least significant byte of data is used with this
command.
Example: To offset counter by –7 counts, load:
Command word: 0104
LS data word: 00F9
MS data word: 0000
This may be done at any time, even while the counter is counting at maximum rate. If the offset causes the counter to exceed its limits, the excess
will be treated just like any other overflow, i.e., if the Continuous mode is
selected, the counter will wraparound through the other limit, or if the
Single-Shot mode is selected the counter will stop at the limit.
Set Cntr Direction
Command Code = 05H
Used to change the count direction (up or down). Only the LSB of the
first data word is used for this command (00 = up, 01 = down).
Example: To set the direction of counter to down, load:
Command word: 0105
LS data word: 0001
MS data word: 0000
Load Timebase
Command Code = 06H
Used to change the time interval referenced by the counter when computing its counts/timebase register data.
Example: To change the timebase for counter to 600 ms (258H), load:
Command word: 0106
LS data word: 0258
MS data word: 0000
Note that the maximum range of the counts/timebase (CTB) register is
+32767 and –32768 counts. The length of the timebase and the maximum
count frequency should be co-ordinated so that these limits are not exceeded. The indication will roll over from (+) to (–) or (–) to (+) if exceeded.
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-11
6
Load ON Preset
Command Code = 0BH
Load OFF Preset
Command Code = 15H
Used to set up the output turn on/off points within the counter range.
There is one output associated with the counter.
Example: To set counter output to turn on at 5000 (1388H counts, load:
Command Code: 010B
LS data word: 1388
MS data word: 0000
and off at 12000 (2EE0H) counts, load:
Command Code: 0115
LS data word: 2EE0
MS data word: 0000
Load Preload
Command Code = 1FH
Used to change the count value that will be loaded into the counter accumulator when the preload input is activated.
Example: Make counter start at 2500 (09C4H) counts at its preload signal,
load:
Command word: 011F
LS data word: 09C4
MS data word: 0000
Sending Data With the COMMREQ Function
The PLC ladder program sends the Data Commands using the COMMREQ
(Communication Request) function. The COMMREQ requires that all its command data
be placed in the correct order in the CPU memory before it is executed. It should then
be executed by a one-shot to prevent sending the data to the High Speed Counter
multiple times. A description of the COMMREQ function and its command block data
follows along with a ladder example which uses registers %R0001 to %R0014 for the
COMMREQ command block & status register.
COMMREQ Function Block Description
The Communications Request (COMMREQ) function is a conditionally executed
function that communicates a particular request, through the ladder logic program, to
the High Speed Counter.
Communications Request Function Block Format
The ladder logic representation of the COMMREQ is as follows:
%Q0200
———————
—] [———(enable)| COMM_ |
| REQ
|
%Q0201
%R0001——|IN
FT|————————————————————————————————————( )——
|
|
CONST ——| SYSID |
0004 |
|
|
|
CONST ——| TASK |
00000 |
|
———————
The Communications Request function block has four inputs and one output. The first
input is an enable input. Generally a one-shot coil is used to enable the COMMREQ
6-12
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
function. This prevents multiple messages from being sent. The second input (IN) is
the starting location of the COMMREQ command block. The SYSID input is used to
indicate which rack and slot to send the message to (physical location of High Speed
Counter module). The SYSID is always 0004 for the Series 90-20 PLC.
In the above example, the SYSID (0004 (in Hexadecimal)) points to rack 0, slot 4 and the
COMMREQ command block starts at Register 0001. The last input (TASK) is ignored
during High Speed Counter communications and should be set to zero.
Command Block
The command block for DATA Commands is composed of 10 words of information
arranged in the following fashion: (all values in hexadecimal unless otherwise
indicated). Use the Block Move (BLKMV) command to move these values to the
Register tables (refer to the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Programmable Controllers Reference
Manual, GFK-0467, for information on using the Block Move function).
Table 6-5. Description of Command Block for DATA Commands
Location
Data
Description
%R0001
%R0002
%R0003
0004
0000
0008
%R0004
%R0005
%R0006
000D
0000
0000
%R0007
E201
%R0008
%R0009
%R0010
0006
0008
000A
Command type (E2 - specific message to High Speed Counter) and Command
Parameter (1 = write)
Byte length of data to High Speed Counter
Data type (8 = registers), see Table below for data type codes.
Start location of data -1 (%R0011)
%R0011
%R0012
%R0013
nnnn
nnnn
nnnn
Command word (Table 6-2)
LS data word
MS data word
Always0004 for this High Speed Counter application
Not used (Always zero)
COMMREQ status data type (8 = registers), see Table below for data type
codes.
COMMREQ status location –1 (%R0014)
Not used
Not used
Table 6-6. COMMREQ Data Type Codes
Enter This Number
Decimal
Hexadecimal
For This Data Type
%I
%Q
%R
%AI
%AQ
GFK-0551C
Discrete Input
Discrete Output
Register
Analog Input
Analog Output
28
30
8
10
12
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
1C
1E
08
0A
0C
6-13
6
Example of Sending Data Commands
An example of ladder logic for sending data commands to the High Speed Counter via
COMMREQ function blocks is shown below. In this example, the COMMREQ
command block is located in registers %R0001 through %R0013 and the COMMREQ
status is returned in %R0014. The command to send the data is initiated by the
conditional input %I3 which sets output %Q013 for one sweep.
Note that register reference pointers in the COMMREQ command block are one less
than the register number pointed to, e.g. 000D (13) indicates R0014 as the COMMREQ
status register.
Note that the comments within /* . . . */ in the ladder logic example have been included for
information purposes only. They are not generated by the Logicmaste 90-30/20/Micro
programming software.
|
|
|%I0003
%Q0013
|——] [————————————————————————————————————————————————————( )
|
|
|%Q0013
—————
|——] [———|BLKMV|—
/* Move Command block into Registers 1—7
|
| WORD|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN1 Q|—%R0001
/* Command block data starts at %R0001
|
0004 |
|
/* Always starts with 0004 for this
|
|
|
/* application
| CONST —|IN2 |
|
0000 |
|
/* Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN3 |
|
0008 |
|
/* 8 indicates command block in register
|
|
|
/* reference
| CONST —|IN4 |
|
000D |
|
/* 0D (13 decimal) points to R0014 for
|
|
|
/* COMMREQ status
| CONST —|IN5 |
|
0000 |
|
/* Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN6 |
|
0000 |
|
/* Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN7 |
|
E201 —————
/* E2 Command code (01 = send data)
|
|
6-14
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
*/
GFK-0551C
6
|
|%Q0013
—————
|——] [———|BLKMV|—
/* Move data into registers 8 through 14 */
|
| WORD|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN1 Q|—%R0008
|
0006 |
|
/* Length of data sent by COMMREQ to HSC */
|
|
|
/* (Always 6 for Data Commands)
*/
| CONST —|IN2 |
|
0008 |
|
/* Data type (8 = registers)
*/
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN3 |
|
000A |
|
/* Start location of data (R0011)
*/
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN4 |
|
0101 |
|
/* First word (Command Word)
*/
|
|
|
/* In this case, load Accumulator 1
*/
| CONST —|IN5 |
|
2211 |
|
/* LSW of data. This and next word will
*/
|
|
|
/* load the Accumulator with 44332211H.
*/
| CONST —|IN6 |
|
0000 |
|
/* MSW of data.
*/
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN7 |
|
0000 —————
/* Zero the COMMREQ status word (R0014)
*/
|
/* before the COMMREQ is called.
*/
|
|
|
|
|
/* Now call the COMMREQ to send the message */
|
|%Q0013
—————
%T0051
|——] [———————————|COMM_|+————————————————————–———————————————————( )——
|
| REQ || /* COMMREQ will set output %T0051 if failure */
|
|
|| /* detected when sending message.
*/
|
%R0001 —|IN FT|+
|
|
|
/* Command block data starts in R0001
*/
|
|
|
|
CONST —|SYSID|
/* High Speed Counter is in rack 0, slot 4
*/
|
0004 |
|
|
|
|
|
CONST —|TASK |
/* Input not used (always 0)
*/
|
00000000 —————
|
|
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-15
6
Example of Changing Configuration with COMMREQ
The High Speed Counter configuration can be changed by using the write configuration
command F1. An example of the ladder logic for this is shown below.
|
|%M0001
%M0002
|——] [———————————————————————————————————————————————————( )——
|
|
|
|%M0002
%M0003
|——] [————————————————————————————————————————————————————(R)——
|
|
|%M0002
—————
|——] [———|BLKMV|—
|
| WORD|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN1 Q|—%R0001
|
0004 |
|
;Always 0004 for High Speed Counter applications
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN2 |
|
0000 |
|
;Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN3 |
|
0008 |
|
;COMMREQ status data type (8 = registers)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN4 |
|
0000 |
|
;COMMREQ status location —1 (R0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN5 |
|
0000 |
|
;Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN6 |
|
0000 |
|
;Not used (always 0000)
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN7 |
|
F101 —————
;Command type — write configuration file
|
|
6-16
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
|
|
|%M0002
—————
|——] [———|BLKMV|—
|
| WORD|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN1 Q|—%R0009
|
000B |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN2 |
|
0008 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN3 |
|
0014 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN4 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN5 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN6 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN7 |
|
0000 —————
|
|
|
|%M0002
—————
|——] [———|BLKMV|—
|
| WORD|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN1 Q|—%R0021
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN2 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN3 |
|
008A |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN4 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN5 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN6 |
|
0000 |
|
|
|
|
| CONST —|IN7 |
|
0000 —————
|
|
|
GFK-0551C
;Byte length of data to High Speed Counter
;Data type (8 = registers)
;Start location of data —1 (R0021)
;not used
;not used
;not used
;not used
;HSC Config Bytes 1/2 (see Byte Definition below)
(fail mode = normal, count input filter = high
preload filter = high)
;HSC Config Bytes 3 and 4 (not used)
;HSC Config Bytes 5/6 (see Byte Definition below)
(strobe enabled, count mode = 1 shot, count
direction = down)
;HSC Config Bytes 7 and 8 (not used)
;HSC Config Bytes 9 and 10 not used
;HSC Config Byte 11 (not used)
;not used
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-17
6
|
|
;Now call the COMMREQ to send the message */
|
|%M0002
—————
%M0003
|——] [———————————|COMM_|+———————————————————————————————————————(S)——
|
| REQ ||
;COMMREQ will set output %M0003 if failure
|
|
||
;detected when sending message.
|
%R0002 —|IN FT|+
|
|
|
;Command block data starts in R0002
|
|
|
|
CONST —|SYSID|
;High Speed Counter is in rack 0, slot 4
|
0004 |
|
|
|
|
|
CONST —|TASK |
;Input not used (always 0)
|
00000000 —————
|
|[
END OF PROGRAM LOGIC
]
|
HSC Config - Bytes 1 and 2 Definition
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |_ Fail Mode:
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | |_____| 00 = Normal
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |
01 = Off
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |
10 = Hold Last State
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |________
| | | | | | | | | | | | |___________| Not used
| | | | | | | | | | | |______________|
| | | | | | | | | | |_________________
| | | | | | | | | |____________________| Counter Type (always 0)
| | | | | | | | |_______________________|
| | | | | | | |__________________________ Count Input Filter (0 =
| | | | | | |
high freq., 1 = low freq.)
| | | | | | |
| | | | | | |_____________________________ Not used
| | | | | |
| | | | | |________________________________ Preload/Strobe Filter (0 =
| | | | |
high freq, 1 = low freq.)
| | | | |
|__|__|__|__|___________________________________ Not Used
HSC Config - Bytes 5 and 6 Definition
16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |__
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | |_____
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | | |________
| | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | | |___________
| | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | | | | | |______________
| | | | | | | | | | |_________________|
| | | | | | | | | |____________________|
| | | | | | | | |_______________________
| | | | | | | |
| | | | | | | |
|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__________________________
6-18
Not Used
Preload/Strobe Select
0 = Preload
1 = Strobe
Counter Enable
0 = Enabled
1 = Disabled
Count Mode
0 = Continuous
1 = Single shot
Not Used
Count Direction
0 = Up
1 = Down
Not Used
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Configuration of the High Speed Counter
This section describes the configurable features of the High Speed Counter, which are:
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
H
Preload/Strobe and Count input filters
Count direction
Continuous or Single-Shot counting
Timebase for measuring count rate
Upper and lower count limits
On and off presets for outputs
Preload counter value
Output Fail Mode
Configurable Features
The following table summarizes the configuration features, selections, and default
configuration values.
Table 6-7. Configurable Features
Features
Enable Counter
Preload Input filter
Count input filter
Count Up or Down
Count mode
Counter timebase
Count limits
Output Preset positions
Preload value
Output Fail mode
Selections
Enable/disable
high/lowfrequency
high/lowfrequency
Up/down
Continuous/single-shot
10 - 65535mS
–32768 to +32767
select ON and OFF positions
–32768 to +32767
Normal, OFF, hold
Default
disable
high frequency
high frequency
up counter
continuous
1000mS
upper = +32767, lower = 0
ON = +32767, OFF = 0
0
Normal
Enable Counter
The Series 90-20 High Speed Counter is defaulted to the disabled mode.
Input Filters
By default, the count and preload/strobe inputs have a built-in high-frequency filter.
This can be changed to a low-frequency filter for the count input and preload/strobe
input when used in the preload mode. The high frequency filter is always selected in
the strobe mode. The low-frequency filter reduces the effect of signal noise.
Counter Direction
The High Speed Counter provides one unidirectional counter. This counter can be
configured to count either up or down. The default is Up.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-19
6
Continuous or Single-Shot Counting
The High Speed Counter has programmable count limits that define its range. The
counter can either count continuously within these limits, or count to either limit, then
stop.
In the continuous counting mode, if either the upper or lower limit is exceeded, the
counter wraps around to the other limit and continues counting. Continuous counting
is the default mode.
If single-shot is selected, the counter will count to its upper or lower limit, then stop.
When the counter is at the limit and the count direction is changed, new counts will
count it back off the limit. The Accumulator can also be changed by loading a new value
from the CPU or by applying a Preset Input.
Counter Timebase
The timebase represents a span of time which can be used to measure the rate of
counting. For example, the program may be required to monitor the number of count
pulses which are occurring every 30 seconds.
A timebase from 10 milliseconds to 65535 milliseconds can be selected for each counter.
The counter timebase is set to 1 second (1000 milliseconds) by default. The module
stores the number of counts that occurred during the last-completed timebase interval
in the Counts/Timebase register. The range of the Counts/Timebase register is –32768
and +32767 counts. The timebase value selected should not allow the Counts/Timebase
register to overflow at the maximum count frequency. If it does, the sign of the
Counts/Timebase will change from (+) to (–) or (–) to (+).
Count Limits
Each counter can be assigned upper and lower count limits. All Accumulator preload
values and output on/off preset values must lie within these limits. The upper (high)
limit is the most positive, and the lower limit is the most negative. Both can be positive,
or both can be negative, but the high limit is always greater than the low limit.
If the Accumulator value is outside the new limits when the limits are changed it is
automatically adjusted to the low limit value. If the new limits are incompatible (high
< low or low > high), then they will be rejected and the old limits retained. In this case
a counter limit error code will be returned. To avoid this situation when the limits are
changed one at a time, a good rule to follow is: always move the high limit first when
shifting the limits up and always move the low limit first when shifting them down.
Output Preset Positions
The counter output has a preset ON and OFF position. The output state indicates when
the counter accumulator value is between the ON and OFF points.
Preset closest
to low limit
6-20
Output ON
Output OFF
ON
> = ON Preset
< = OFF Preset
> OFF Preset
< ON Preset
OFF
< OFF Preset
> ON Preset
< = ON Preset
> = OFF Preset
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
The following illustration may be helpful to indicate the count regions where the High
Speed Counter output is ON and OFF.
———————————
OUTPUT
OFF
———————————
OUTPUT
ON
———————————
OUTPUT
OFF
———————————
High Limit (Ex. 100 counts)
OFF Preset (Ex. 60 counts)
↑ Increasing
| Accumulator
| Counts
ON Preset (Ex. 30 counts)
Low Limit (Ex. 0 counts)
In the above example, the output is ON when the accumulator is between 30 and 60 and
OFF when it is between 0 and 30 and 60 to 100.
———————————
OUTPUT
ON
———————————
OUTPUT
OFF
———————————
OUTPUT
ON
———————————
High Limit (Ex. 100 counts)
ON Preset (Ex. 60 counts)
↑ Increasing
| Accumulator
| Counts
OFF Preset (Ex. 30 counts)
Low Limit (Ex. 0 counts)
In the above example, the output is OFF when the accumulator is between 30 and 60
and ON when it is between 0 and 30 and 60 to 100.
Location of Preset Points
The Preset points may be located anywhere within the counter range. When the
accumulator value is between the Preset points, the output ON/OFF state will always be
that of the lowest (most negative) Preset point. When the accumulator value is NOT
between the Preset points, the output ON/OFF state will be that of the most positive
preset. This is true regardless of the counter direction.
The following example compares the output state and accumulator value of a 16 bit
counter.
a43717
OUTPUT
ON
COUNTER RANGE
0
OFF
8000H
COUNTER
OFF
MINIMUM
LOW
PRESET
LOW LIMIT
LIMIT
ACCUMULATOR
VALUE
ON
7FFFH
COUNTER
PRESET
MAXIMUM
HIGH
HIGH LIMIT
LIMIT
If both preset points are within the counter range, the output always switches at the
Preset points. If only one of the Preset points is programmed within the counter range,
then the counter limits will function as the other Preset point. In the continuous mode,
the output will switch when wraparound occurs.
If neither of the Preset points is in the counter range then the output state will not
change; it will always be the state of the most positive Preset. If both Preset points are
equal and out of range, the output will always be OFF. If both Preset points are equal
and within the counter range, then the output will only be on for one count value - as
defined by the Preset points.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-21
6
Separation of Preset Points
The count accumulators are compared to the Presets at 0.5 millisecond intervals.
Therefore, to guarantee that the outputs will always switch, the Preset points must be
separated by at least the number of counts received in a 0.5 millisecond time period. For
example:
If maximum count rate = 10kHz;
then minimum count separation = (10,000 Hz x .0005 sec) = 5 counts.
Preload Value
A starting count value can be specified which will be used when the Preload input is
activated. If the counter should be reset to 0, enter 0 as the Preload value; this is the
default value.
Preload values within the configured counter limits should always be used. When
preload values outside the counter limits are used, a preload input will have the
following effect:
1.
A preload value greater than the counter high limit initially sets the Accumulator to
the preload value. If down counts are being received every 0.5 milliseconds then
the Accumulator is counted down from the preload value. Whenever a 0.5
millisecond period occurs during which no counts are received or up counts are
received the Accumulator is immediately adjusted for overflow. The overflow
adjustment depends on the counter mode selected (continuous or one-shot).
2.
A preload value less than the counter low limit initially sets the Accumulator to the
preload value. If no counts are currently being received the Accumulator stays at
the preload value. If up counts are currently being received the Accumulator is
counted up from the preload value. When down counts are received the
Accumulator is immediately adjusted for underflow according to the selected
counter mode (continuous or one-shot).
Output Fail Mode
If the CPU stops, the High Speed Counter output can respond in three different ways:
1.
It can continue to operate normally, processing the inputs and controlling the
output according to its configuration (NORMAL);
2.
It can force the output to turn off (FRCOFF);
3.
The module can hold the outputs at the current state (HOLD).
These responses remain in effect until the CPU returns to operation or the module is
power-cycled.
6-22
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Configuration Programming
This section defines the messages and actions required to configure the Series 90-20
High Speed Counter. If you want to use the High Speed Counter with a configuration
different than the default configuration, you must change the configuration to suit your
needs. Configuration of the High Speed Counter can be accomplished in three ways:
1.
By using the Series 90-30 Hand-Held Programmer;
2.
By using the configurator function in the Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 Software
Programming package;
3.
By sending data using the COMMREQ command in ladder logic programs.
Defaults
The Series 90-20 High Speed Counter defaults to a disabled mode. The user must enable
the counter to allow operation.
Configuration With Hand-Held Programmer
Configuration can be done using the Hand-Held Programmer. After powering up the
Series 90-20 PLC with the High Speed Counter enabled, enter the Configuration mode
by pressing the MODE 4 and ENT keys in sequence (the CPU must be in STOP mode).
Using the Down Arrow key, sequence to the slot 4. Press the READ key, then ENT. ENT
is the Enter key and when pressed tells the system to invoke the operation specified by
the keys pressed prior to ENT.
The following tables list all of the configuration parameters in the Series 90-20 High
Speed Counter and the abbreviations for those parameters as they are displayed on the
Hand-Held Programmer.
Table 6-8. Abbreviations for Configuration Parameters
Parameter
Number
GFK-0551C
Abbreviation
Value 1
Value 2
Value 3
1
2
ENABLE
CNTR TYPE
DISABLED
TYPE A
ENABLED
–
–
–
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
FAIL MODE
CNT FIL
PLD/STB
PLD/STBFIL
CTR1 DIR
CTR1 MODE
TIME BS
HI LIM
LO LIM
ON PST
OFF PST
PRELD
NORMAL
HIGH
PLD
HIGH
UP
CONT
–
–
–
–
–
–
FRCOFF
LOW
STB
LOW
DOWN
1 SHOT
–
–
–
–
–
–
HOLD
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
Description
Default
Enable High Speed Counter
Counter Type
(notconfigurable)
Output Failure Mode
Count Input Filter
Preload/StrobeSelect
Preload/StrobeInputFilter
Counter Direction
Counter Mode
Time Base
High Limit
Low Limit
ON Preset
OFF Preset
Preload
DISABLED
TYPE A
NORMAL
HIGH
PLD
HIGH
UP
CONT
1000mS
+32767
0
+32767
0
0
6-23
6
PLC I/O Scanner Configuration
Before the PLC allows the High Speed Counter configuration screens to be viewed, it
presents the following I/O Scanner Configuration screens. In the Series 90-20 the I/O
configuration is fixed.
R0:04 HSC
<S
I16:I0033-I0048
On the first line of the screen display, R0 indicates the rack number, 04 is the slot number,
and S indicates that the CPU is in STOP mode. On the second line, I16 shows that this
module has 16 bits of discrete Input data (%I). This is the data transferred from the
High Speed Counter to the PLC each sweep. %I33 indicates the start address for the 16
%I high speed counter bits. The rack and slot numbers are used only on Series 90-30
Model 311 and 331 systems if the same program is transferred to those PLCs.
R0:04 HSC
<S
Q16:Q0033-Q0048
%Q33 indicates the start address for 16 discrete control bits sent to the High Speed
Counter each PLC sweep.
R0:04 HSC
<S
AI15:AI001-AI015
AI01 is the location of the 15 words of return data from the High Speed Counter. This
data is the count accumulator, the strobe register and other pertinent data transferred
from the High Speed Counter to the PLC each sweep.
The next series of screens are the actual count parameters for the High Speed Counter.
For the filter times, count modes and count directions, press the –/+ key to toggle the
screen display, then press the ENT key to record the value. If you change your mind
about a parameter, press the CLR key instead of ENT and the original value will be
recalled. To get to the next screen in the series, simply press the right arrow key. To
backup to previous parameters (screens), use the left arrow key.
6-24
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Configuration Screens
Screen 1 – Enable High Speed Counter
R0:04 HSC
HSC:DISABLED
<S
The High Speed Counter is defaulted to being disabled. To enable the High Speed
Counter press the –/+ key one time. The word ENABLED will be displayed. Then
press the ENT key to enable the High Speed Counter.
Screen 2 – Counter Type
This screen indicates that the High Speed Counter is a Type A counter. This screen is
informational only since you cannot change the type of counter on the Series 90-20 PLC.
The Series 90-30 Model 311 or Model 331 High Speed Counter module supports the
Type B and Type C counters in addition to the Type A.
R0:04 HSC
<S
CNTR TYPE:TYPE A
Screen 3 – Output Default/Module Failure Mode
R0:04 HSC
<S
FAIL MODE:NORMAL
This screen selects the state the outputs will assume if the PLC goes to stop mode with
I/O disabled. NORMAL indicates that the outputs will continue to operate under
control of the counter. FRCOFF causes the outputs to be forced off if the PLC stops,
while HOLD causes the High Speed Counter to retain the last state of the output points
before the PLC stops.
Screen 4 – Count Filter
R0:04 HSC
CNT FIL:HIGH
<S
This screen allows you to specify the filters applied to the count input. The HIGH
selection is used to allow higher count rates up to 10 Khz. The LOW filter is used to
allow only low frequency signals to be recorded as counts. This is used when the count
rate is slow and there is a possibility of high frequency noise coupling into the signal.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-25
6
Screen 5 – Preload/Strobe Select
R0:04 HSC
PLD/STB:PLD
<S
The default is to use the second input as a preload input. To change this input to a strobe
input, press the –/+ key one time then press the ENT key. Once the strobe mode is
selected, the filter for that input is forced to the HIGH mode.
Screen 6 – Preload Filter
R0:04 HSC
PLD FIL:HIGH
<S
This screen allows you to select high or low frequency filtering for the preload input in
the same manner as the count filter.
Screen 7 – Counter Direction
R0:04 HSC
CTR DIR:UP
<S
This screen allow you to specify the direction the counter will operate in - either up or
down counting.
Screen 8 – Counter Mode
R0:04 HSC
<S
CTR MODE:CONT
This screen specifies the Counter Mode - continuous or one shot. When configured in
the continuous (CONT) mode, the counter will roll over to the low limit once the
accumulator passes the high limit. In the one shot (1 SHOT) mode, the counter will stop
when the high (or low - if counting down) limit is reached.
6-26
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Screen 9 – Time Base Value
R0:04 HSC
TIME BS:100
<S
This screen allows you to enter the time base that is used to configure the counts per
time base calculation. The default is 1000 milliseconds (1 second). To enter a new value,
select the value using the numeric keys on the Hand-Held Programmer then press the
ENT key to record the value.
Screen 10 – High Limit
R0:04 HSC
<S
HI LIM: 32767
This screen is used to specify the highest (most positive) value the count accumulator
can obtain. The default is 32767 which is the maximum value the counter can handle.
As with the time base, use the Hand-Held Programmer numeric keys to change the
value, then press the ENT key to record it. Pressing the CLR key instead of the ENT key
will cancel the entry.
Screen 11 – Low Limit
R0:04 HSC
LOW LIM: 0
<S
This screen specifies the lowest (most negative) value for the count accumulator. The
default value is 0.
Screen 12 – ON Preset Value
When the counter accumulator reaches this value (depending also on the value of the
OFF preset) the appropriate output is turned on (depending on the state, either enabled
or disabled, of the output control flags in the %Q data word).
R0:04 HSC
ON PST: 0
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
<S
6-27
6
Screen 13 – OFF Preset Value
R0:04 HSC
OFF PST: 0
<S
This value is used in conjunction with the ON preset to indicate at what accumulator
value the associated output point will be turned off.
Screen 14 – Preload Value
R0:04 HSC
PRELD: 0
<S
This parameter specifies the value that will be loaded into the accumulator when the
appropriate preload input on the terminal strip is asserted.
6-28
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
6
Application Example
Following is an example of a typical application using the Series 90-20 High Speed
Counter. This example is an RPM Indicator.
RPM Indicator
Feature Used:
————————————————————————
Counts/Timebase Register
The High Speed Counter can be used as a position/motion indicator when connected to
a feedback device (such as an encoder) that is coupled to a rotary motion. RPM
indication can be obtained directly from the counter’s Counts/Timebase register (CTB)
or derived from it by a simple calculation.
The RPM is given by:
RPM =
CTB
———————
PPR * T
where:
CTB = counts/timebase reading from the counter
PPR = pulses/revolution produced by the feedback device
T = timebase expressed in minutes
Note that if the pulses/revolution is some integer power of 10, then setting the timebase
for 6, 60, 600, 6000, or 60,000 will yield a direct reading of RPM in the CTB register with
an assumed decimal placement.
Example 1
If feedback produces 1000 pulses/revolution, CTB reading = 5210, and the timebase is
configured for 600 ms: then T = 600 ms / 60000 ms/min = .01 and 1/T = 100
RPM = 5210 B 1000 x 100 = 521
CTB reading is RPM with .1 RPM resolution.
Example 2
Assume the same conditions as example 1, except the timebase is now set to 60 ms,
which gives T = 60/60000 = .0001 and 1/T = 1000.
Since the motion is turning at the same speed as in example 1, the CTB reading now
equals 521
and RPM = 521/1000 x 1000 = 521.
CTB reading is now RPM with 1 RPM resolution.
GFK-0551C
Chapter 6 Series 90-20 High Speed Counter
6-29
6
Command and Error Code Reference Charts
High Speed Counter Data Commands
Command
Definition
Decimal
Hexadecimal
01
02
03
04
05
01
02
03
04
05
Load Accumulator n
Load Hi Limit n
Load Lo limit n
Load Acc Increment n
Set Ctr n Direction (A only)
06
08
11
12
13
06
08
0B
0C
0D
Load Timebase n
Reserved
Load ON Preset n.1
Reserved
Reserved
14
0E
Reserved
21
15
Load OFF Preset n.1
22
16
Reserved
23
17
Reserved
24
18
Reserved
31
1F
Load Preload n.1
32
20
Reserved
50
32
Reserved
Error Codes (% AI Word 1)
Code
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Description
No errors
Unused
Unused
InvalidCommand
Invalid Parameter
Invalid Sub-Command
Invalid Counter Number
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Home Position Error
Counter 1 Limit Error
Terminal Assignments
Terminal assignments for each I/O baseplate are described in Chapter 5. The terminal board
label also provides a visual guide for field wiring to the High Speed Counter inputs.
6-30
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User‘s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Appendix A Glossary
A
This glossary consists of two parts. The first part is a glossary of terms for the Series
90-20 PLC; the second part is a glossary of basic instructions and reference types.
Glossary of Terms for the Series 90-20 PLC
Address
A number following a reference type, which together refer to a
specific user reference (e.g., for %Innnnn, %I is the reference type
and nnnnn is the address).
Alarm Processor
A software function which time-stamps and logs I/O and system
faults in two tables that can be displayed by the programmer or
uploaded to a host computer or other coprocessor.
Analog
An electrical signal activated by physical variables representing
force, pressure, temperature, flow, etc.
AND (Logical)
A mathematical operation between bits. All bits must be 1 for the
result to be 1.
Annotation
Optional explanatory text in a program. Three basic types of annotation include nicknames, reference descriptions, and comments.
Application Program
A program written by the user for control of a machine or process,
that is, the application.
ASCII
An acronym for American Standard Code for Information Interchange, which is an 8-bit (7 bits plus 1 parity bit) code used for data.
Backup
GFK-0551C
A duplicate version of a program, created prior to editing the program.
A-1
A
Battery Connector A connector wired to a lithium battery which connects the battery
to the CMOS RAM memory devices. The battery connector is
plugged into a receptacle accessed through an opening on the
faceplate of the CPU module.
Baud
A unit of data transmission. Baud rate is the number of bits per
second transmitted.
Bit (Binary Digit) The smallest unit of memory. It can be used to store only one piece
of information that has two states (for example, One/Zero, On/Off,
Good/Bad, Yes/No). Data that requires more than two states (e.g.,
numerical values 000 to 999) requires multiple bits (see Word).
Bus
An electrical path for transmitting and receiving data.
Byte
A group of binary digits operated on as a single unit. In the Series
90-20 PLC, a byte is eight bits.
Command Line
The fourth line at the top of the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software display screen. This line displays typed data
and command entries.
Comment
A rung explanation consisting of up to 2048 characters of text.
CONFIG.SYS File
A file that describes the system requirements for the software. The
CONFIG.SYS file must be custom-tailored to fit the specific hardware configuration of your system and Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro
requirements.
Configuration File Set
Two types of files constitute a configuration file set, the I/O configuration (I/O config) file which contains data on the I/O system and
the CPU configuration file which contains data on the PLC itself.
Configuration Software
That portion of the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programming software package which provides the tools for configuration of I/O
and many system parameters.
Constant
A-2
A fixed value or an item of data that does not vary. A constant can
be stored in a register.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
A
Counter
A function which can be programmed to control other devices according to a preset number of on/off transitions.
CPU (Central Processing Unit)
The central device or controller that interprets user instructions,
makes decisions, and executes the functions based on a stored application program.
Data Memory
User references within the CPU which are accessible by the application program for storage of discrete or register data.
Directory
A file which contains the names and specifications of other files in
the computer.
Discrete
The term discrete includes both real and internal I/O that are onebit user references.
Disk
A hard disk or floppy diskette, used as an information storage and
retrieval device.
DOS (Disk Operating System)
A group of utility programs which provide the structure for system
operations on a personal computer.
Drive
A floppy diskette drive or hard disk drive. The identification of the
drive, such as Drive A.
Firmware
A series of instructions contained in ROM (Read Only Memory)
which are used for internal processing functions. These instructions provide the structure for application program operations.
Function Key
A key (F1 through F10) whose function is controlled by software.
This function may change within the program. Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro software displays the current assignments of these
function keys at the top of the screen.
Grounding Terminal
A terminal on each power supply which must be connected to
earth ground (through the AC power source) to ensure that the
rack is properly and safely grounded.
Hardware
GFK-0551C
Appendix A Glossary
All of the mechanical, electrical, and electronic devices that comprise the Series 90-20 PLC and its applications.
A-3
A
Help Screens
Instructive text screens. Help is displayed by pressing the ALT and
H keys simultaneously to display context-sensitive help pertaining
to all programming and configuration functions, ALT-I to access the
Help display for mnemonics, or ALT-K to display a listing of all special keys.
Hexadecimal
A numbering system, having 16 as a base, represented by the digits
0 through 9, then A through F.
Input Module
An I/O module that converts signals from user devices to logic levels that can be used by the CPU.
Input Scan Time
The time required for the CPU to scan all inputs for new input values.
I/O (Input/Output) That portion of the PLC to which field devices are connected and
which isolates the CPU from electrical noise.
I/O Power Supply Base Module
A Series 90-20 module that contains a power supply, I/O conditioning circuits and terminal strips for user field wiring connections.
I/O Electrical Isolation
A method of separating field wiring from logic level circuitry. Typically, this is accomplished through the use of solid-state optical
isolation devices.
I/O Fault Table
A fault table listing I/O faults. These faults are identified by time,
date, and location.
K (Kilo)
An abbreviation for kilo or exactly 1024 in the language of computers.
Ladder Diagram
A graphic representation of combinational logic.
LED (Light Emitting Diode) Status Display
A display consisting of a group of LEDs with two rows of eight
LEDs at the top of each discrete I/O module. Each LED in the two
groups of eight indicates the state of the respective input or output
point on the board.
A-4
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
A
Link
Horizontal and vertical links are used to carry power around an
element in a ladder logic program, or to place elements in parallel
or series with one another.
List
A group of consecutive storage locations in memory, used for data
manipulation. The beginning address and length of the list are set
up in the user program. Data is accessed from either the top or the
bottom of the list.
Load
The function used to transfer programs to the Logicmaster
90-30/20/Microfolder.
Logic Solution Time
The time required to execute all active instructions in the application program.
GFK-0551C
Main Menu
The Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software main menu lists all the
principal system functions, and the function keys which control
these functions.
Memor y Card
A memory cartridge continuing EEPROM memory which is inserted into a slot in the Hand-Held Programmer. This memory
cartridge, provides the Hand-Held Programmer with a means for
off-line storage and retrieval of the application program and system configuration data.
Microsecond
One millionth of a second. 1 x 10 or 0.000001 second. Microsecond may be abbreviated as µs.
Millisecond
One thousandth of a second. 1 x 10 or 0.001 second. Millisecond
may be abbreviated as ms.
Mnemonic
An abbreviation given to an instruction. The mnemonic is usually
an acronym, formed by combining initial letters or parts of words.
Monitor Mode
Monitor mode allows programs to be examined and real-time status to be displayed; but no changes of logic, reference values, or I/O
overrides are allowed.
Nickname
An optional 7-character identifier for a machine reference. All
nicknames used by the program will be included in its variable declaration table.
Appendix A Glossary
A-5
A
Noise
Undesirable electrical disturbances to normal signals, generally of
high frequency content.
Non-Retentive Coil
A coil that will turn off upon removal of applied power to the CPU.
Non-Volatile Memory
A memory (for example, PROM) capable of retaining its stored information under no-power conditions (power removed or turned
off).
Off-Line Mode
Off-Line mode is used for program development. The programmer does not communicate with the PLC in Off-Line mode; the
physical communications link may be intact, but the programmer
is specifically not performing communications with the PLC. Power flow display and reference values are not updated.
On-Line Changes
Changes to I/O or register references and word-for-word changes,
made when the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro system is in On-Line
mode and the programs in both are exactly the same.
On-Line Mode
On-Line mode provides full CPU communications, allowing data to
be both read and written.
OR (Logical)
A logical operation between bits, whereby if any bit is a 1, the result will be a 1.
Output
Data transferred from the CPU, through a module for level conversion to be used for controlling an external device or process.
Output Devices
Physical devices such as motor starters, solenoids, etc., that are
switched by the PLC.
Output Circuit
A circuit that converts logic level signals within the CPU to usable
output signals for controlling a machine or process.
Output Scan Time The time required for the CPU to update all I/O controllers with
new output values. When Model 30 I/O is present, this includes
the time to actually write to each module.
A-6
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
A
Panel Mounting Flange
Flanges, with mounting holes, on the sides of the I/O power supply
base module used to mount the base module on an electrical panel
or wall.
Parallel Communication
A method of data transfer, whereby data is transferred on several
wires simultaneously.
Parity
The anticipated state, either odd or even, of a set of binary digits.
Parity Bit
A bit added to a memory word to make the sum of the bits in a
word always even (even parity) or always odd (odd parity).
Parity Error
A condition that occurs when a computed parity check (checksum)
does not agree with the parity bit.
Peripheral Equipment
External devices that can communicate with a PLC (e.g., programmers and printers).
PLC
An acronym for Programmable Logic Controller, which is a solidstate industrial control device that receives signals from user-supplied control devices, such as switches and sensors, implements
them in a precise pattern determined by ladder diagram based application programs stored in user memory, and provides outputs
for control of processes or user-supplied devices such as machines
or motor starters. It is usually programmed in relay ladder logic
and is designed to operate in an industrial environment.
GFK-0551C
PLC Fault Table
A fault table listing PLC faults. These faults are identified by time,
date, and location.
Power Flow
In a ladder diagram, the symbolic flow of power represents the
logical execution of program functions. For each function, it is important to know what happens when power is received and under
what conditions power flow is output.
Preset Value
A numerical value specified in a function which establishes a limit
for a counter or timer.
Appendix A Glossary
A-7
A
Program Folder
A subdirectory of all the files which constitute a program, including the associated configuration files. The name of the program
folder may contain up to seven characters.
Program Name
The name of the current program. In most cases, it will be the
same as the program folder. The program name may contain up to
seven characters.
Program Sweep Time
The time from the start of one cycle of the application program to
the next. The program sweep is composed of the following: perform start of sweep system tasks, read the inputs, execute the
user’s program, write the outputs, recover faulted boards, complete minimal checksum calculation, schedule the next sweep, communicate with the programmer and other intelligent option modules, and execute background tasks.
Programmer
The hardware device required to runLogicmaster90-30/20/Micro
software. Connection can be through an available converter; or, as
an alternative, a Work Station Interface board can be installed in
the programmer to communicate with the Series 90-20 PLC.
Programmer Port The serial port on the CPU module accessible through a 15-pin
connector, to which the programmer must be connected in order to
communicate with the PLC. Both the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro
programmer and the Hand-Held Programmer connect to this port.
Programming Software
That portion of the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software package
which is used to create ladder logic programs.
PROM
An acronym for Programmable Read Only Memory, which is a retentive digital device programmed at the factory and not easily
changed by the user. PROM usually contains programs for internal
system use.
A-8
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
A
RAM
An acronym for Random Access Memory, which is a solid-state
memory that allows individual bits to be stored and accessed at
random. This memory stores the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro software, program files, and related data while power is applied to the
system. This type of memory, however, is volatile. Because data
stored in RAM is lost under no-power conditions, a backup battery
is required to retain the contents under those conditions. The Series 90-20 PLC uses a long-life lithium battery mounted on the
power supply and PCM modules.
Read
To have data entered or to extract data from a storage device.
Reference Description
An optional text description associated with a user reference. A
reference description can be used with or without a nickname. Reference descriptions are also entered in the variable declaration
table.
Reference Type
A specific group of memory types in the Series 90-20 PLC (e.g., %I
references discrete inputs and %Q references discrete outputs).
The % symbol is used to distinguish machine references from nicknames.
Register
A group of 16 consecutive bits in register memory, referenced as
%R. Each register is numbered, beginning at 00001. Register
memory is used for temporary storage of numerical values and for
bit manipulation.
Removable Terminal Strip
The removable assembly which attaches to the I/O power supply
base module, and contains the screw terminals to which field wiring is connected.
GFK-0551C
Retentive Coil
A coil that will remain in its last state, even though power has been
removed.
RUN Mode
A condition or state of the Series 90-20 PLC, where the CPU
executes the application program. RUN mode executes in the
RUN/OUTPUTS ENABLED mode only. In RUN/OUTPUTS ENABLED, all portions of the program sweep are executed.
Appendix A Glossary
A-9
A
Rung
A unit of ladder logic. One rung may have up to eight parallel
lines of logic.
Rung Explanation A rung explanation consists of up to 2048 characters of text. A
rung explanation is associated with a specific rung by programming a Comment (COMMNT) function.
Serial Communication
A method of data transfer, whereby the bits are handled sequentially rather than simultaneously, as in parallel data transmission.
A-10
Serial Port
The port on the CPU module, accessible through a 15-pin connector, to which the programmer must be connected in order to communicate with the PLC. Both the Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro programmer and the Hand-Held Programmer connect to this port.
Significant Bit
A bit that contributes to the precision of a number. The number of
significant bits is counted, beginning with the bit contributing the
most value (MSB or Most Significant Bit) and ending with the bit
contributing the least value (LSB or Least Significant Bit).
Status Line
The three lines at the bottom of the display screen. The top line
displays information about a PLC and the programmer. The second line identifies the current program, and the third line shows
the status of the keyboard. For some programmer functions, the
third line may also display additional information.
STOP Mode
A condition or state of the Series 90-20 PLC, where the CPU no
longer executes the application program. STOP mode can be
STOP/NO IOSCAN or STOP/IOSCAN. In STOP/NO IOSCAN
mode, the PLC only communicates with the programmer and other devices (GBC, PCM, etc.), recovers faulted boards, reconfigures
boards and executes background tasks. All other portions of the
sweep are skipped. In STOP/IOSCAN mode, the PLC CPU can
monitorI/O. This feature provides a way to monitor and debug
I/O without executing the application program.
Storage
Used synonymously with memory.
Store
The function used to transfer programs from the Logicmaster
90-30/20/Micro folder to the CPU.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
A
Sweep
The CPUs repeated execution of all program logic, I/O service, peripheral service, and self-testing. This occurs automatically, many
times each second.
Teach Mode
A function used to remember a sequence of keystrokes for later
recall.
Timer
A function that can be used to control the operating cycle of other
devices by a preset and accumulated time interval.
User Memory
The portion of system memory in which the application program
and data is stored. This memory is battery-backed CMOS RAM.
User Reference Type
A reference assigned to data which indicates the memory in which
it is stored in the PLC. References can be either bit-oriented (discrete) or word-oriented (register).
Variable Declaration
The portion of a program used to create, display, and change nicknames and reference descriptions assigned to user references. Variable declarations can be displayed in a table which may have up to
2000 entries.
GFK-0551C
Verify
A function used to compare program content. The program in the
current folder may be compared with a program from the CPU.
Volatile Memory
A type of memory that will lose the information stored in it if power is removed from the memory devices. It requires a backup battery for retention of contents of memory. In the Series 90-20 PLC,
a lithium battery is used for this purpose.
Watchdog Timer
A timer in the CPU used to ensure that certain hardware conditions
are met within a predetermined time. The watchdog timer value is
200 milliseconds.
Word
A measurement of memory length, usually 4, 8, or 16-bits long. In
the Series 90-20 PLC, a word is 16-bits in length.
Write
To transfer, record, or copy data from one storage device to another
(for example, from CPU to disk).
Appendix A Glossary
A-11
A
Glossary of Basic Instructions and Reference Types
for Logicmaster 90-30/20/Micro Software Developed Programs
Basic Instruction
Generic Term
–| |–
–|/|–
normally open contact
normally closed contact
contact
contact
–( )–
–(/)–
–(S)–
–(R)–
–( )–
–( –)–
coil
negated coil
SET coil
RESET coil
positive transition coil
negative transition coil
coil
coil
coil
coil
coil
coil
–(M)–
–(/M)–
–(SM)–
–(RM)–
retentive coil
negated retentive coil
retentive SET coil
retentive RESET coil
coil
coil
coil
coil
horizontal link
link
verticallink
link
–––––––
|
Reference Type
A-12
Specific Term
Specific Term
Generic Term
%I
%Q
%M
%T
input
output
internal
temporary
discrete
discrete
discrete
discrete
%G
%S
%SA
%SB
%SC
global
system
system
system
system
discrete
discrete
discrete
discrete
discrete
%R
%AI
%AQ
register
analog input register
analog output register
register
register
register
%Rnnnnn
nnnnn is the address
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Appendix B Instruction Timing
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
B
The Series 90-20 PLC supports many different functions and function blocks. This
appendix contains tables showing the memory size in bytes and the execution time in
microseconds for each function. Memory size is the number of bytes required by the
function in a ladder diagram application program.
Two execution times are shown for each function:
Execution Time
Description
Enabled
Time required to execute the function or function block when power
flows into and out of the function. Typically, best-case times are when
the data used by the block is contained in user RAM (word-oriented
memory) and not in the the discrete memory.
Disabled
Time required to execute the function when power flows into the
function or function block; however, it is in an inactive state, as when a
timer is held in the reset state.
Note
Timers and counters are updated each time they are encountered in
the logic; timers by the amount of time consumed by the last sweep and
counters by one count.
GFK-0551C
B-1
B
Table B-1. Instruction Timing
Function
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
211
211
211
Size
On Delay Timer
Elapsed Timer
Up Counter
Down Counter
144
139
125
125
94
114
112
112
–
–
–
–
15
15
11
11
Math
Addition(INT)
Addition(DINT)
Subtraction(INT)
Subtraction(DINT)
Multiplication(INT)
Multiplication(DINT)
Division(INT)
Division(DINT)
Modulo Division (INT)
Modulo Division (DINT)
Square Root (INT)
Square Root (DINT)
82
94
82
93
87
121
96
393
90
393
188
330
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
49
47
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
9
9
Relational
Equal(INT)
Equal(DINT)
Not Equal (INT)
Not Equal (DINT)
Greater Than (INT)
Greater Than (DINT)
GreaterThan/Equal(INT)
GreaterThan/Equal(DINT)
Less Than (INT)
Less Than (DINT)
LessThan/Equal(INT)
LessThan/Equal(DINT)
79
88
79
88
79
88
79
88
79
88
79
88
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
45
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
Bit Operation
LogicalAND
Logical OR
Logical Exclusive OR
Logical Invert, NOT
Shift Bit Left
Shift Bit Right
Rotate Bit Left
Rotate Bit Right
Bit Position
Bit Clear
Bit Test
Bit Set
82
82
82
77
169
165
168
160
87
80
85
80
52
52
52
–
95
95
51
51
47
33
34
34
–
–
–
–
+12.2L
+12.6L
+13.2L
+12.5L
+N
–
–
–
13
13
13
9
15
15
15
15
13
13
13
Group
Function
Timers
Counters
B-2
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
B
Table B-1. Instruction Timing - Continued
Function
Group
GFK-0551C
Function
Enabled
Disabled
Increment
211
211
211
Size
Data Move
Move (INT)
Move (BIT)
Move (WORD)
Block Move
Block Move (INT)
Block Move (WORD)
Block Clear
Shift Register
Shift Register (BIT)
Shift Register (WORD)
Bit Sequencer
CommunicationsRequest
80
110
80
90
90
90
66
120
205
120
128
131
46
48
46
71
71
71
46
87
68
87
64
45
+2.00N
+15.00N
+2.00N
–
–
–
+1.60N
+2.00N
+1.50N
+2.00N
+0.10N
–
13
13
13
27
27
27
9
15
15
15
15
Table
Array Move
INT
DINT
BIT
BYTE
WORD
279
280
354
277
279
85
87
87
87
85
+2.00N
+4.00N
+1.84N
+1.00N
+2.00N
21
21
21
21
21
Search Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
240
245
217
240
95
95
95
95
+1.98N
+5.36N
+1.88N
+1.98N
19
19
19
19
Search Not Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
239
244
217
239
95
95
95
95
+2.38N
+8.00N
+1.88N
+2.38N
19
19
19
19
Search Greater Than
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
241
250
219
241
96
95
95
96
+4.76N
+10.64N
+4.25N
+4.76N
19
19
19
19
SearchGreaterThan/Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
240
249
219
240
95
95
95
95
+4.76N
+10.65N
+4.25N
+4.76N
19
19
19
19
Search Less Than
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
241
250
219
241
95
96
95
95
+4.72N
+10.64N
+4.25N
+4.72N
19
19
19
19
Appendix B Instruction Timing
B-3
B
Table B-1. Instruction Timing - Continued
Function
Group
Table (cont.)
Function
SearchLessThan/Equal
INT
DINT
BYTE
WORD
B-4
Disabled
Increment
211
211
211
Size
240
250
218
240
95
95
95
95
+4.76N
+10.64N
+4.25N
+4.76N
19
19
19
90
88
45
45
–
–
9
9
Conversion
Convert to INT
Convert to BCD–4
Control
Call a Subroutine
DoI/O
PID – ISA Algorithm
PID – IND Algorithm
End Instruction
–
490
2290
2420
–
–
45
113
116
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
12
15
15
–
Service Request
# 6
#13
#14
#15
#16
77
1500
347
215
138
45
45
45
45
45
–
–
–
–
–
9
9
–
–
9
50
50
35
35
–
–
8
Nested MCR
Nested ENDMCR
Notes
Enabled
1. Time (in microseconds) is based on Release 3 of Logicmaster 90-30/90-20 software.
2. For table functions, increment is in units of length specified. For bit operation functions, L = the number of bits.
For Bit Position, N = the bit that is set. For data move functions, N = the number of bits or words.
3. Size is in bytes.
4. Enabled time for single length units of type %R, %AI, and %AQ.
5. JUMPs, LABELs, COMMENTs, and non-nested MCRs are included in the boolean timing spec, which is
18ms/1K logic.
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Appendix C Miniconverter Kit
section level 1 1
figure_ap level 1
table_ap level 1
C
This appendix describes the Miniconverter Kit for use with Series 90 PLCs.
The Miniconverter Kit (IC690ACC901) consists of an RS-422 (SNP) to RS-232 Miniconverter,
a 6 foot (2 meter) serial extension cable, and a 9-pin to 25-pin Converter Plug assembly. The
15-pin SNP port connector on the Miniconverter plugs directly into the serial port
connector on the Series 90-30 power supply, Series 90-70 CPU or Series 90-20 CPU. The
9-pin RS-232 port connector on the Miniconverter connects to an RS-232 compatible device.
a44985
RS-422
PORT
RS-232
PORT
Figure C-1. Series 90 SNP to RS-232 Miniconverter
When used with an IBM PC-AT, or compatible computer, one end of the extension cable
plugs into the Miniconverter’s 9-pin serial port connector, the other end plugs into the 9-pin
serial port of the computer. The Converter plug (supplied with kit) is required to convert
the 9-pin serial port connector on the Miniconverter to the 25-pin serial port connector on
the GE Fanuc Workmaster II computer, or an IBM PC-XT or PS/2 Personal Computer.
The GE Fanuc Workmaster computer requires an additional adapter (not supplied with kit - please
contact your local GE Fanuc PLC distributor) for use with the Miniconverter.
The pinout of the Miniconverter is shown in the following two tables. The first table
shows the pinout for the RS-232 port. The direction of signal flow is with respect to the
Miniconverter.
Table C-1. Miniconverter RS-232 Port
Pin
2
3
5
7
8
GFK-0551C
Signal Name
SD - Send Data
RD - Receive Data
GND - Ground
CTS - Clear To Send
RTS - Request To Send
Direction
Output
Input
n/a
Input
Output
C-1
C
The pinouts were chosen to allow direct connection (using a straight through, or 1 to 1
cable (as provided with kit)) to the IBM PC-AT. Most IBM compatible computers
equipped with an RS-232 port will provide a pinout compatible with the one shown
above.
Table C-2 is the pinout for the Miniconverter’s RS-422 serial port. The direction of signal
flow is also with respect to the Miniconverter.
Table C-2. Miniconverter RS-422 Port
Pin
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Signal Name
SHLD - Shield
+5 VDC - Power
CTS(Ai) - Clear To Send
GND - Ground
RTS(B) - Request To Send
RT - Receive Termination
SD(A) - Send Data
SD(B) - Send Data
RD(Ai) - Receive Data
RD(Bi) - Receive Data
CTS(Bi) Clear To Send
RTS(A) - Request To Send
Direction
n/a
Input
Input
n/a
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
Input
Input
Output
System Configurations
The Miniconverter can be used in a point-to-point configuration as described above, or
in a multidrop configuration with the host device configured as the master and one or
more PLCs configured as slaves.
The multidrop configuration requires a straight through (1 to 1) cable from the
Miniconverter’s RS-422 port to the first slave PLCs SNP port. Other slaves will require a
daisy chain connection between slaves. A maximum of eight devices can be connected
in an RS-422 multidrop configuration. All of the devices must have a common ground.
If ground isolation is required, you can use the GE Fanuc Isolated Repeater/Converter
(IC655CCM590) in place of the Miniconverter.
When using the Miniconverter with a modem connection, it may be necessary to
jumper RTS to CTS (consult the user’s manual for your modem).
C-2
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
C
Cable Diagrams (Point-To-Point)
Use the following cable connections when connecting the Miniconverter to IBM PC and
compatible computers with hardware handshaking..
a44982
PIN
TXD
RXD
CTS
RTS
GND
PIN
2
3
7
8
2
3
7
8
5
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
GND
DCD
DSR
5
1
6
4
MINICONVERTER
RS–232 PORT
9–PIN
CONNECTOR
DTR
IBM PC–AT
9–PIN
CONNECTOR
Figure C-2. Miniconverter to PC-AT
PIN
PIN
2
3
7
8
5
3
2
4
5
7
8
6
20
TXD
RXD
CTS
RTS
GND
MINICONVERTER
RS–232 PORT
9–PIN
CONNECTOR
a44983
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
GND
DCD
DSR
DTR
WORKMASTER II,
IBM PC–XT, PS/2
25–PIN
CONNECTOR
Figure C-3. Miniconverter to Workmaster II, PC-XT, PS/2
a44984
TXD
RXD
CTS
RTS
GND
PIN
PIN
2
3
7
8
5
3
2
4
5
7
MINICONVERTER
RS–232 PORT
9–PIN
CONNECTOR
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
GND
WORKMASTER
9–PIN
CONNECTOR
Figure C-4. Miniconverter to 9-Pin Workmaster or PC-XT Computer
(Additional Adapter Required)
GFK-0551C
Appendix C Miniconverter Kit
C-3
C
Table C-3. Miniconverter Specifications
Mechanical
RS-422
15-pin D shell male for direct mounting to Series 90 serial port.
RS-232
9-pin D shell male for connection to RS-232 serial port of a
Workmaster II computer or PersonalComputer.
Electrical and General:
VoltageSupply
Typical Current
OperatingTemperature
Baud Rate
Conformance
GroundIsolation
C-4
+5 VDC (supplied by PLC power supply)
95 mA
0 to 70C (32 to 158F)
38.4K Baud maximum
EIA-422 (Balanced Line) or EIA-423 (Unbalanced Line)
Not provided
Series 90-20 Programmable Controller User’s Manual – August 1995
GFK-0551C
Index
Numbers
120 VAC In/120 VAC Out module
bleeder resistor calculations, 5-6
catalog number, IC692MAA541, 5-4
derating information, 5-12
field wiring diagram, 5-11
list of fuses, 5-11
location of fuses, 5-10
specifications,, 5-6
specifications, 120 VAC power supply,
5-9
specifications, high speed counter input
circuit, 5-7
specifications, high speed counter/Q1
output circuit, 5-8
specifications, input, 5-4
specifications, output, 5-5
wiring information, 5-4
A
Appendix
glossary of basic instructions and reference types, A-12
glossary of terms, A-1
instruction timing, B-1
miniconverter kit, C-1
Application program logic scan, 3-4
B
Bad user RAM, 4-7
Bits, transition, 3-7
C
Cable connections
hand-held programmer, 2-11
serial communications, 2-16
serial communications, multidrop, 2-17
work station interface, 2-16
Calculating sweep time, 3-3
Card, memory, 1-9
Checksum calculation, 3-4
Clock, elapsed time, 3-10
Clocks and timers, 3-10
GFK-0551C
COMMREQ function block
command block, 6-13
commands sent with, 6-10
data, sending, 6-12
description of, 6-12
example of, 6-14, 6-16
format, 6-12
Configuration
with hand-held programmer, 1-8
withLogicmaster90-30/20/Microsoftware, 1-10
Connections, field wiring, 1-6
Constant sweep time mode, 3-5
Contribution, sweep time, 3-3
Converter, mini, 1-18, C-1
Converter, RS-422/485 to RS-232, 1-17
CPU 211
catalog number, IC692CPU211, 1-3
features, 1-3
status indicators, 1-3
CPU module installation
attachment to base, 2-9
battery installation, 2-9
description of, 2-9
power-up verification, 2-10
CPU serial port, 1-5
Customer service, 2-2
D
Data structure, 3-6
DC In Relay Out/120 VAC PS module
catalog number, IC692MDR541, 5-13
derating information, 5-22
field wiring diagram, 5-21
isolated 24 VDC power supply, 5-19
list of fuses, 5-21
replacing fuses, 5-20
specifications, 24 VDC pos/neg input
circuits, 5-13
specifications,5/12/24VDC/Q1orhigh
speed counter output, 5-18
specifications, high speed counter input
circuit, 5-16
specifications, relay out circuits, 5-14
wiring information, 5-13
DC In Relay Out/240 VAC PS module
catalog number, IC692MDR741, 5-23
derating information, 5-30
Index-1
Index
field wiring diagram, 5-29
isolated 24 VDC power supply, 5-28
list of fuses, 5-31
location of fuses, 5-31
specifications, 24 VDC pos/neg input
circuits, 5-24
specifications,5/12/24VDC/Q1orhigh
speed counter output, 5-27
specifications, high speed counter input
circuit, 5-26
specifications, relay out circuits, 5-24
wiring information, 5-23
Default conditions, output modules, 3-13
Definition, positive and negative logic, 5-1
Diagnostic data, 3-13
Discrete memory reference definitions,
3-7
E
EEPROM
catalog numbers, 2-26
inserting, 2-26
insertion and removal, 2-26
part numbers, 2-26
removing, 2-26
Elapsed time clock, 3-10
EPROM catalog numbers, 2-26
F
Fault table display, hexadecimal dump, 4-6
Faults
actions, 4-2
additional information, 4-5
alarm processor, 4-1
classes of, 4-2
explanation and correction, 4-6
fault actions, table of, 4-2
fault table displays, 4-5
handling, 4-1
non-configurable, 4-5, 4-7
PLC fault table, 4-6
reference definitions, 4-3
references, 4-3
references, table of, 4-4
side effects, 4-5
system reaction to, 4-2
tables, 4-2, 4-3
Index-2
Features, system, 1-1
Field wiring planning, 2-8
Field wiring terminals, 1-6
Fuses, replacing, 5-20, 5-30
G
Ground conductors, 2-5
H
Hand-held programmer
cable, 2-11
cable, IC693ACC303, 1-9
configuration, 6-23
configuration screens, 2-12
description of, 1-8
features of, 1-9
functionality, 1-8
initial programming with, 2-12
memory card, 1-8
modes of operation, 1-9
Hardware packaging, 2-1
High speed counter
%Q data from CPU, 6-9
analog input data, %A, 6-8
application example, 6-29
basic features, 6-2
command/error code reference chart,
6-30
COMMREQ description, 6-12
COMMREQ function block format, 6-12
COMMREQ function, sending data,
6-12
configuration of, 6-4, 6-19
CPU interface, 6-6
data automatically sent by, 6-7
data automatically sent to, 6-7
data commands, 6-10
data sent to, via COMMREQ function,
6-7
data transfer, HSC/CPU, 6-6
error codes, 6-10
example, changing configuration, 6-16
example, sending data commands, 6-14
features of, 6-2
field wiring procedures, 6-5
operation, Type A counter, 6-5
output bits, %Q, 6-7
sending data commands to, 6-10
specifications, circuit, 6-4
GFK-0551C
Index
status bits, %I, 6-8
status codes, 6-9
terminal assignments, 6-30
timing, Type A counter, 6-6
Hotline, plc, 2-2
Housekeeping, 3-3
I/O scan sequence, 3-13
I/Ostructure, 3-13
I/O system for the Series 90–20 PLC, 3-12
IC640HWP301, 2-16
HSC configuration features
continuous counting, 6-20
count limits, 6-20
counter direction, 6-19
counter timebase, 6-20
default mode, 6-23
enable counter, 6-19
input filters, 6-19
location of preset points, 6-21
one-shot counting, 6-20
output fail mode, 6-22
output preset positions, 6-20
preload value, 6-22
programming of, 6-23
separation of preset points, 6-22
table of, 6-19
using the hand-held programmer, 6-23
IC640HWP306, 2-16
HSC configuration screens
count filter, 6-25
counter direction, 6-26
counter mode, 6-26
counter type, 6-25
enable HSC, 6-25
high limit, 6-27
I/Oscanner, 6-24
low limit, 6-27
off preset value, 6-28
on preset value, 6-27
output default, 6-25
preload filter, 6-26
preload value, 6-28
preload/strobe select, 6-26
time base value, 6-27
IEC definition, logic, 5-1
I
I/O power supply base module
description of, 1-6
high speed counter inputs, 1-6
input circuits, 1-6
mounting locations, 1-6
output circuits, 1-6
power supply, 1-6
removable terminal strips, 1-6
GFK-0551C
I/O power supply base modulePower supply, function of, 1-6
IC640HWP322, 2-16
IC640SWP306, 2-16
IC690ACC901, 1-18, C-1
IC690CBL701, 1-18
IC690CBL702, 1-18, 2-15
IC690CBL705, 1-18, 2-15
IC693ACC301, lithium battery, 1-4
IC693ACC305, EEPROM catalog number,
2-26
IC693ACC306, EPROM catalog number,
2-26
IC693PRG300, 1-8
Input circuits, description of, 1-6
Input scan, 3-3
Installation
CPU module, 2-9
EEPROM, 2-26
field wiring considerations, 2-8
grounding procedures, 2-6
grounding requirements, 2-5
I/O circuits, wiring to, 2-6
I/O connections, 2-8
I/O power supply base, 2-4
power supply connections, 2-5
programmer grounding, 2-6
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 converter, 2-19
terminal board, installation of, 2-7
terminal board, removal of, 2-8
wiring to terminal board, 2-7
L
LED indicators, 1-3
CPU status, 1-4
high speed counter status, 1-4
input status, 1-4
low battery, 1-4
matrix, 1-4
Index-3
Index
output status, 1-4
power, 1-4
user defined, 1-4
Password failure, 4-8
Passwords, 3-11
Logic program checksum calculation, 3-4
PLC
hotline, 2-2
technical support, 2-2
Logic solution, 3-4
PLC CPU software failure, 4-8
Logic, definition of, 5-1
negative logic, input points, 5-2
negative logic, output points, 5-3
positive logic, input points, 5-1
positive logic, output points, 5-2
PLC fault table, 4-6
Levels, privilege, 3-11
Logicmaster90-30/20/Micro,softwarerequirements, 1-17
PLC sweep, 3-1
software structure, 3-6
standard program sweep, 3-1
summary, 3-1
when in STOP mode, 3-6
when using Do I/O, 3-6
PLC system operation, 3-1
M
Power supply, 24 VDC, 1-6
Maintenance procedures
fuses, replacing, 2-27, 5-10, 5-20, 5-30
replacing a battery, 2-24
Power-down conditions, 3-10
Memory backup battery, 1-4
Power-up sequence, 3-7
Memory card, 1-9, 2-25
Power-up verification
description of, 2-10
error correction, 2-10
error detection, 2-10
power LED off, 2-10
power LED on, OK LED off, 2-11
power-up sequence, 2-10
Memory size, 1-15
Miniconverter kit, 1-18
Modes of operation, hhp, 1-9
N
Power-up and power-down sequence, 3-7
Privilege level change requests, 3-12
Privilege levels, 3-11
Notebook computer, 1-17
Program structure, 3-6
Null system configuration for run mode,
4-8
Program sweep, standard, 3-1
O
Operation hhp, modes of, 1-9
Operation of system, 3-1
Option, user PROM, 2-25
Output circuits, description of, 1-6
Output scan, 3-4
Override bits, 3-7
P
Packaging, hardware, 2-1
Index-4
Port, serial, CPU, 1-5
Programmer communications window,
3-4
Programming and configuration, 1-7
Programming the Series 90-20 PLC
addressing data, 1-15
bit operation functions, 1-13
contacts and coils, 1-11
control functions, 1-13
conversion functions, 1-13
data move functions, 1-14
hand-held programmer, 1-8
instructions, basic, 1-10
Logicmaster90-30/20/Microsoftware,
1-10
math functions, 1-12
relational functions, 1-12
table functions, 1-14
GFK-0551C
Index
timers and counters, 1-11
user references, 1-15
Programming, configuration, 6-23
PROM, user option, 2-25
Q
Quick guide to fault explanation and
correction, 4-6
Series 90-20 PLC
features, 1-1
models of, 1-2
product description, 1-2
specifications, 1-20
system components, 1-1
Specifications, general, 1-20
Standard program sweep variations, 3-5
Support, technical, 2-2
Sweep time calculation, 3-3
Sweep time contribution, 3-3
R
Sweep, program, 3-1
Symbol, %, 1-15
RAM memory backup battery, 1-4
System Communications Window, 3-5
Reference types, 1-15
System operation, 3-1
References, discrete memory, 3-7
References, user
discrete, 1-16
range and size, 1-15
register, 1-15
types, 1-15
Removable terminal strips, 1-6
RS–422 to RS–232 miniconverter, C-1
T
Technical support, PLC, 2-2
Timer, 3-10
constant sweep, 3-10
system security, 3-11
watchdog, 3-10
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232, converter,
IC690ACC900, 1-18
Timing, instruction, B-1
RS-422/RS-485 to RS-232 converter, 1-17
description of, 1-18
IC693CBL303 cable compatibility, 2-21
installation, 2-19
jumper configuration, 2-19
pin assignments, RS-232, 2-20
pin assignments,RS-422/485, 2-21
specifications for IC693CBL303, 2-22
wiring, 2-20
wiring for IC693CBL303, 2-22
Types of references, 1-15
Transition bits, 3-7
U
User PROM memory, catalog numbers,
2-26
User PROM memory, part numbers, 2-26
User PROM option, 2-25
User references, 1-15
S
Scan
input, 3-3
output, 3-4
Watchdog timer, 3-10
Window, programmer, 3-4
Security, system, 3-11
Window, system communications, 3-5
Sequence, power-down, 3-10
Wiring, field connections, 1-6
Sequence, power-up, 3-7
Serial port, CPU, 1-5
GFK-0551C
W
Wiring information
120 VAC In/120 VAC Out/120 VAC PS
module, 5-4
Index-5
Index
DC In Relay Out/120 VAC PS module,
5-13
DC In Relay Out/240 VAC PS module,
5-23
Workmaster II computer, 1-17
Index-6
GFK-0551C
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