5000-6.2.10, Pyramid Integrator, Installation Manual

5000-6.2.10, Pyramid Integrator, Installation Manual
Pyramid Integrator
Installation Manual
Important User Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this
publication, those responsible for the application and use of this control
equipment must satisfy themselves that all necessary steps have been taken
to assure that each application and use meets all performance and safety
requirements, including any applicable laws, regulations, codes and
standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples shown in
this guide are intended solely for purposes of example. Since there are
many variables and requirements associated with any particular
installation, Allen-Bradley does not assume responsibility or liability
(to include intellectual property liability) for actual use based upon the
examples shown in this publication.
Allen-Bradley publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation, and Maintenance of Solid State Control (available from your
local Allen-Bradley office), describes some important differences between
solid-state equipment and electromechanical devices that should be taken
into consideration when applying products such as those described in this
publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole or
in part, without written permission of Allen-Bradley Company, Inc., is
prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety
considerations:
ATTENTION: Identifies information about practices or
circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property
damage or economic loss.
Attention statements help you to:
identify a hazard
avoid the hazard
recognize the consequences
Important: Identifies information that is critical for successful application
and understanding of the product.
Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes
Additional Information
In general, we improved the format and added greater detail to this manual.
The table below lists specific changes we made:
We have:
To chapter/appendix:
added and updated drawings for the chassis, I/O scanner (RS5),
power supply module, Color CVIM module, CVIM2 module, User
Interface box (2801N26), I/O interface box (2801N27) and
camera (2801YE)
1
updated the Rack Mount the Components" and Mount the Fan
Assembly" procedures
2
updated the drawing for grounding the components
3
updated the installation procedures for:
• power supply
• RS (added steps for RS5)
• Replace a MicroVAX Information Processor"
We have also combined the installation procedures for RM and KA
module into one procedure
4
replaced information on industrial disk 5710ID4 and ID5 with
5710ID6 and ID7
5
added the information on configuring the extendedlocal I/O
adapter module
7
updated these procedures:
• Connecting Remote I/O to the RS"
• Connecting the Extendedlocal I/O link"
• Connecting to a PanelView Operator Terminal"
9
updated the power supply information
10
updated the procedure on Checking the PI modules" and added
new information for RS5
11
combined the chapters on MicroVAX Information Processor and
MicroVAX Information Processor EE or EP into one chapter and
added the Verify and Format Disk for 5730CPU1)" section
12
updated the installing and removing PI modules sections
A
added dimensions information for the new user interface box
(2801N26), I/O interface box (2801N27) and camera (2801YE)
B
added flowcharts for RS5
D
To help you find new or updated information in this release of the manual, we
have included change bars as shown to the left of this paragraph.
i
Table of Contents
Summary of Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i
Additional Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i
Using this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
Manual Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pyramid Integrator Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Should Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terms and Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
iii
iii
iv
v
v
Preparing for Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Prepare for Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unpack the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identify the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Weights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
11
11
12
12
13
110
110
Mounting the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Mount the System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Mounting Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the PI Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Tools and Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rack Mount the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Panel Mount the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mount the Fan Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mount the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mounting a Black and White Monitor (2801N6,N9,N20) . . . . . . .
Mounting the I/O Board 1771JMB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
21
21
21
22
22
25
28
210
211
211
212
ii
Table of Contents
Grounding the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To Ground the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Grounding Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Necessary Tools and Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ground the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
31
31
31
31
32
34
Installing the Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use this Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help to Prevent Electrostatic Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Battery Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather the Module Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RM/KA Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RS Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vision Processor Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MicroVAX Information Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EI Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OSI Carrierband/Broadband Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the PI OSI Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OSI Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
41
41
41
44
45
48
415
418
420
421
424
426
431
432
Installing the Peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install a Programming Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Industrial Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the 4Port Distribution Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Program Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
51
51
52
59
59
510
Installing the Vision Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Vision System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the I/O Interface Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the User Interface Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the Camera to the CVIM Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect the I/O Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connect to Remote I/O Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
61
61
61
62
63
65
66
67
67
Table of Contents
iii
Installing 1771 I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What You Should Have Completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set I/O Chassis Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set the I/O Chassis Configuration Jumper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set I/O Adapter Module Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configure the ExtendedLocal I/O Adapter Module . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set 1771AM1, AM2 I/O Chassis/Adapter Switches . . . . . . . . . . .
Install Keying Bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing and Wiring I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting Shielded Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting I/O Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
71
71
71
72
73
73
77
710
711
712
717
719
719
Installing Nonstandard I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Direct Communication Module Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting PLC Interface Module Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting 1785 PLC5 Processor Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting RediPANEL Pushbutton Module Switches . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting RediPANEL Keypad Module Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
81
81
83
84
86
86
86
Connecting the I/O Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Remote I/O Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the ExtendedLocal I/O Link on the RS5 Modules . . . .
Connecting to a 1771AM1, AM2 I/O Chassis with Integral
Power Supply and Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a 1785 PLC5 Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a Direct Communication Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a RediPANEL Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a PLC Interface Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting to a PanelView Operator Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91
91
95
97
97
98
98
99
910
910
iv
Table of Contents
Connecting ac Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What You Will Be Doing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather ac Wiring Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disable Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Industrial Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fan Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting I/O Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
101
101
102
102
103
104
104
Checking the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
111
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disable All Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Perform Standalone Hardware Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check the PI Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check Vision Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check Peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
111
111
111
112
113
117
118
119
1111
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
Chapter Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gather Your Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Up and Test MicroVAX Information Processor Hardware . . . .
Verify and Format Disk (for 5730CPU1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting the Industrial Disk (for 5731CPU1, CPU2) . . . . . . . . .
Set Hardware Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What to do Next . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
121
121
121
1212
1216
1217
1218
Installing and Removing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A1
What's in this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a Memory Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing a PI Module in the Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a PI Module from the Chassis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Filler Plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Wire a Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A1
A1
A5
A8
A10
A11
Mounting Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B1
What's in this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B1
Table of Contents
v
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module . . . . . . . . . .
C1
What's in this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Switch Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C1
C2
C3
C4
Start Up and Configure the Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D1
What's in this Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D1
Figures/Tables
Figure 9.4
Make ExtendedLocal I/O Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 7.A
Switch Settings for Available Starting Extendedlocal I/O
rack Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Table 7.B
ExtendedLocal I/O Adapter Switch Settings, First I/O
Group Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
78
79
Preface
Using this Manual
Manual Objectives
Read this manual to learn how to install the Pyramid Integrator
hardware.
Pyramid Integrator
Documentation
Use this manual with the Pyramid Integrator Design Manual
(5000-6.2.10).
We assume that you are familiar with:
basic cabling
wiring
grounding procedures
programmable controllers
For more information, see the Programmable Controller Wiring and
Grounding Guidelines (1770-4.1).
iii
Preface
Using this Manual
Who Should Use this Manual
iv
Use this manual if you are installing any of the following hardware:
Modules:
Cat. no.:
power supply
resource manager
remote scanner
logic processor
5120P1/B
5130RM1,RM2
5150RS2, RS5
5250LP1/B, LP2/B, LP3/B, LP4/B
MicroVAX Information Processor module EP
5731CPU1
MicroVAX Information Processor module EE
5731CPU2
MicroVAX Information Processor module
5730CPU1
EthernetTM
5820EI/A
interface module
vision processor
5370CVIM, CVIM2, CVIMC
DH/DH+TM interface module (KA module)
5130KA
OSI interface module
carrierband
broadband
5820CC
5820CBA, CBB, CBC
Chassis:
Cat. no.:
4slot chassis
5110A4/B
8slot chassis
5110A8/B
fan assembly
5110FAN8
Peripherals:
Cat. no.:
4port distribution panel
5710DPI
159 Mbyte industrial disk
5730ID3
209, 418, or 480 Mbyte industrial disk
5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7
program loader
5710PL/B
Vision components:
Cat. no.:
user interface box
2801N22, N26
I/O interface box
2801N21, N27
rack mount color monitor
2801N8
black and white monitor
2801N6,N9, N20
camera
2801YB, YC, YD, YE
I/O board
1771JMB
Other components:
Cat. no.:
I/O chassis
1771A1A2,A4, A1B, A2B, A3B, A4B
I/O power supply
1771P2,P4,P7
Preface
Using this Manual
Related Publications
For additional information on topics related to the PI system, see
these publications:
Publication:
Catalog No. /
Publication No.:
AllenBradley Data Highway Cable Layout Manual
17706.2.1
Pyramid Integrator System Design Manual
50006.2.1
CVIM User Manual
5370ND001
CVIM Communications Manual
5370ND002
CVIM QuickStart SelfTraining Guide
5370ND003
INTERCHANGE Software for PI MicroVAX Documentation Set
5730DTLD
Pyramid Integrator OSI Interface Software User's Manual
58206.5.1
INTERCHANGE Software for VMS Documentation Set
5830VDOC
INTERCHANGE Software for HPUX (Ethernet) Documentation Set
5840HPUD
PLC5/250 Programming Software Documentation Set
6200N8.002
AllenBradley MAP Station Manager Software User's Manual
66306.5.2
If your system includes a 1785 PLC-5 programmable controller, see
PLC-5 Family Programmable Controllers Hardware Installation
Manual (1785-6.6.1).
Terms and Conventions
In this manual, we use the following terms and conventions:
We refer to the:
As the:
Data Highway link
DH link
Data Highway Plus link
DH+ link
Resource manager module
RM
Logic processor module
LP
Remote scanner 5150RS2 and RS5 modules
RS. Unless noted otherwise, RS
denotes both modules.
Ethernet interface module
EI
Configurable vision input module
CVIM module or vision processor
Data Highway/Data Highway Plus interface module
KA module
Open Systems Interconnect module
OSI interface module or Cx module
MicroVAX Information Processor, MicroVAX Information
Processor EP, and MicroVAX Information Processor EE
MicroVAX information processors
MicroVAX Information Processor with expanded
processor (16 Mbytes)
MicroVAX information processor EP
MicroVAX Information Processor with expanded
processor (32 Mbytes)
MicroVAX information processor EE
Pyramid Integrator system
PI system
v
Preface
Using this Manual
When we refer to words of memory in PI modules, we mean 16-bit words
unless otherwise stated.
In addition, you may encounter words in different typefaces. We use these
conventions to help differentiate descriptive information from information
that you enter while programming your PI system.
Words or commands that you enter appear in boldface. For example:
TEST 50
Messages or prompts on the screen look like this:
PV_SCS_FMT_CHN (0=SCSIA \ 1 = SCSIB)?
“Enter” means –– type in the information and then press the
[Return] key.
vi
Chapter
1
Preparing for Installation
Chapter Objectives
This chapter lists the tasks that must be completed before you install
the hardware.
To Prepare for Installation
To prepare for installation, complete the following:
gather the documentation from your system designer
make sure the hardware is available
unpack the hardware
identify the hardware
Gather the Documentation
While designing your system, your system designer completes
documentation that describes what to install and how. Gather the
documentation from your system designer. You will use this
documentation with the procedures in this manual to install the hardware.
If you are installing I/O, make sure you have the installation information
for each type of I/O you are installing.
You may have only some of the documentation below because you may
not be installing some of the components.
Get this information from your system designer:
In chapter:
To:
list of the components you will install
1
identify components
the position of the components
2
mount components
the points to ground
3
ground components
the PI modules you install, switch settings,
and connections
4 and
appendix A
install modules
other PI components you will install (industrial disk)
5
install peripherals
vision system information
6
install vision components
standard 1771 I/O
7
install standard 1771 I/O
nonstandard 1771 I/O
8
install nonstandard 1771 I/O
I/O points to wire
9
wire I/O link
ac wiring diagrams
10
connect ac power
1-1
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Hardware Availability
Using the list of hardware supplied by your system designer, make sure all
the listed hardware is available.
Check the invoice to make sure that the catalog numbers on the boxes
match the hardware that’s on your hardware list.
Unpack the Hardware
If the hardware is:
Then:
not available
check with your system designer to see if something has changed.
available
continue to the next section.
Some of the PI modules are packaged in bags to help protect them from
electrostatic damage. When you see this bag, provide a static-safe
environment when:
taking the module out of the bag
setting jumpers inside the module
placing the side panel on the module
As a minimum, we recommend the 3M Type 8005 Portable Field Service
Grounding Kit or its equivalent for providing a static safe environment.
ATTENTION: If you perform operations on a module
improperly, you may cause an electrostatic discharge, which can
damage the module. Perform internal operations, such as setting
the jumpers, only in a static safe environment.
For further information, see the application data, Guarding Against ESD
Application Note (ICCG-4.3).
1-2
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Identify the Hardware
After you unpack the hardware, use the figures below to help identify
the components.
Figure 1.1
Chassis
4slot chassis (5110A4/B)
8slot chassis (5110A8/B)
19775
Figure 1.2
Fan Assembly
Fan Status
Cable
100/200
Vac
220 Gnd L2/N L1
Vac
Fuse
15A 250V
Slow Blow
Fan Status
Fan assembly (5110FAN8)
16725
1-3
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.3
Modules
Remote/Local
Scanner
Pass/Fail
Scanner Range
Error
Battery Low
CH1
CH2
1
SH CH1
2
1
SH CH2
2
CH3
CH4
1
SH CH3
2
1
SH CH4
2
CH5
CH5
Power supply
(5120P1/B)
1-4
RM
(5130RM1, RM2)
RS2
(5150RS2)
RS5
(5150RS5)
LP
(5250LP1/B, LP2/B,
LP3/B, -LP4/B)
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.4
Modules (continued)
KA module
(5130KA)
EI module
(5820EI)
Filler Plate
(5110FP)
CVIM module
(5370CVIM)
Color CVIM module
(5370CVIMC)
CVIM2 module
(5370CVIM2)
17185b
1-5
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.5
Modules (continued)
MicroVAX Information
Processor (5730CPU1)
1-6
MicroVAX Information
Processor EP (5731CPU1)
MicroVAX Information
Processor EE (5731CPU2)
17185a
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.6
Modules (continued)
The cat. no. 5820CC
is used on an 802.4
carrierband network
OSI Interface
Carrierband module
(5820CC)
OSI Interface
Broadband module
(5820CBx)
18395
1-7
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.7
Vision Components
Camera
(2801YB)
Camera
(2801YC)
Camera
(2801YE)
Camera
(2801YD)
I/O board
(1771JMB)
I/O interface box
(2801N27)
User interface box
(2801N26) for
CVIM2 only
I/O interface box
(2801N21)
Rack mount color monitor
(2801NB)
1-8
User interface box
(2801N22)
Black & white monitor
9" and 12"
(2801N9, N6, N20)
18784
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Figure 1.8
Industrial Disk
159 / 209, 418, or 480 Mbyte industrial disk
(5730ID3 / 5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7)
18541
Figure 1.9
4Port Distribution Panel
4port distribution panel (5710DPI)
17186
Figure 1.10
Program Loader
Program loader (5710PL/B)
17188
1-9
Chapter 1
Preparing for Installation
Module Weights
What to do Next
1-10
Here are the weights of the PI modules, the fan assembly, industrial disks,
and the 4- and 8-slot chassis:
Module:
Pounds:
Kilograms:
RM
4 lbs, 4.0 oz
1.92 kg
LP
3 lbs, 13.5 oz
1.74 kg
RS2
3 lbs, 11.0 oz
1.67 kg
RS5
2 lbs, 15.6 oz
1.35 kg
MicroVAX Information Processor EP
8 lbs, 6.5 oz
3.81 kg
MicroVAX Information Processor EE
8 lbs, 6.5 oz
3.81 kg
MicroVAX Information Processor
9 lbs, 6.0 oz
4.24 kg
Ethernet Interface module
5 lbs, 3.0 oz
2.35 kg
CVIM module
3.70 lbs
1.68 kg
Color CVIM module
3.70 lbs
1.68 kg
CVIM2 module
7.97 lbs
3.62 kg
KA module
3 lbs, 11.0 oz
1.67 kg
OSI carrierband interface module
7 lbs
3.17 kg
OSI broadband interface module
8 lbs
3.62 kg
power supply
9 lbs, 10.0 oz
4.38 kg
fan assembly
11 lbs, 5.0 oz
5.12 kg
4slot chassis
5 lbs, 8.0 oz
2.5 kg
8slot chassis
12 lbs, 1.0 oz
5.48 kg
industrial disk (5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7)
58 lbs
26.24 kg
industrial disk (5730ID3)
63 lbs, 12 oz
28.95 kg
Go to chapter 2 to mount the components.
Chapter
2
Mounting the Components
Chapter Objectives
Read this chapter to learn how to mount various system components.
To Mount the System
Components
To mount the system components, complete the tasks below:
gather the mounting documentation
gather the PI components
gather the tools and supplies
rack mount the components and/or
panel mount the components
If your system includes the hardware below, also complete these tasks:
mount the fan assembly
mount the camera
mount the black and white monitor
Gather the Mounting
Documentation
Gather the mounting documentation. Check this documentation and
determine the:
components you are mounting
method of mounting to use (panel or rack)
position of the components
Gather the PI Components
Gather the PI components you will mount. If you are mounting any of the
following components, see either the rack or panel mounting procedure:
4-slot chassis
8-slot chassis
industrial disk
4-port distribution panel
I/O board for vision
I/O chassis and power supply
rack mount color monitor
If you are mounting the following hardware, go to page 2-8.
fan assembly
camera
black and white monitor
I/O interface box
user interface box
2-1
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
Gather the Tools and Supplies
Gather these tools and supplies you will need:
#10-32 screws, lock washers, flat washers and screw driver set, if you
are rack mounting
#10-32 screws, lock washers, flat washers, and drill and tapping
equipment if you are panel mounting
wrench set, if applicable
wire brush
tape measure
marker or grease pencil
copper ground bus
two spacers, for use between the ground bus and panel
Rack Mount the Components
To:
Then:
Panel mount the components
go to page 25.
Rack mount the components
continue reading.
After you have gathered the equipment, mounting documentation, and
tools, you are ready to mount the components.
Follow these steps to rack mount the components.
1.
Prepare each component.
For the 4- and 8-slot chassis, remove the brackets from the back of
the chassis, and install them on the front of the chassis for
rack mounting.
If you are using fan assembly, attach the fan assembly to the bottom
of the chassis and then mount the chassis to the rack or panel.
Remove brackets
Install brackets
19778
2-2
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
2.
Prepare the rack.
Mark the position of each component you will mount. Make sure the
holes line up with the holes of the mounting brackets.
Planned position of
component on rack
#1032
Nominal
hole size
3.
13220
Mount a copper ground bus on the rack:
a.
Drill two clearance holes for #10-32 mounting screws in the
bus. Drill and tap a #10-32 hole for each component you will
attach to the rack.
Drilled clearance
holes for mounting
Drilled and
tapped holes
Distance on rack
17171
b.
Prepare a mounting location for the bus as indicated by the
mounting diagram and as you did in step 2.
2-3
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
c.
Attach the ground bus to the rack using the two drilled
mounting holes. One connection is shown below.
Star washer
Rack
Copper
ground
bus
#1032
screw
Star washer
4.
13235
Repeat this procedure for each component you mount:
a.
Position the component on the spot you have prepared for it on
the rack.
b.
Attach the component using #10-32 screws and lock washers.
Do not tighten the screws yet (you will tighten the screws after
you ground the components).
Rack
Mounting bracket
Star
washers
2-4
#1032 screw
19779
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
Panel Mount the Components
With the equipment, mounting documentation, and tools you are ready to
mount the components.
Follow these steps to panel mount the components.
1.
Prepare the panel:
a.
Remove the panel from its enclosure and lay the panel flat, with
its front facing up.
b.
Using the mounting worksheet from your system designer, mark
the location of the component on the panel for each component
you will mount.
Planned positions
of components
16731
2-5
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
2.
Prepare to attach the component to the panel: drill and tap a #10-32
hole through the panel at each point where component will attach.
3.
Mount a copper ground bus on the panel:
a.
Drill two clearance holes for #10-32 inch mounting screws in
the bus. Drill and tap a #10-32 hole for each component you
will mount on the panel.
Drilled clearance holes
for mounting
Drilled and
tapped holes
13234
b.
Connect the ground bus to the panel using the mounting holes,
as shown below.
Panel
Ground bus
Screw
Conductive
metal spacer
13230
Nut
2-6
Start washer
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
4.
Return the panel to its enclosure:
a.
Scrape paint and other nonconductive finishes from the shoulder
studs on the back wall of the enclosure. Scrape clear an area at
least as large as the washer to be used.
b.
Attach the panel to the back wall of the enclosure as
shown here:
Back wall of
enclosure
Panel
Nut
Shoulder bolt on back
wall of enclosure
Star washer
5.
13871
Repeat this procedure for each component you mount:
a.
Position the component on the screws you have prepared for it
on the panel.
b.
Attach the component to the panel as shown below. Do not
tighten the nuts yet (you will tighten the nuts after you have
completed grounding the component).
Mounting bracket
Back panel
Flat
washer
Tapped hole
Star
washer
Scrape paint
Bolt
#1032 screw
If the mounting bracket is coated with
a nonconductive material (anodized,
painted, etc.), scrape the material
around the mounting hole.
Flat
washer
16732
2-7
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
Mount the Fan Assembly
To mount the fan assembly, follow the steps below:
1.
Remove the four screws in the bottom of the 8-slot chassis with a
phillips screwdriver.
16733
2.
Remove the fan drawer and air filter from the fan cover.
a. Loosen the two screws
on the fan drawer and slide
the fan from the cover.
b. Loosen the two screws on
bottom of the drawer and slide
the air filter from the fan cover.
2-8
19780
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
3.
Attach the fan cover to the bottom of chassis:
a.
Place the fan cover under the chassis. Make sure the screw holes
line up.
b.
Place the four screws into the holes and tighten them.
19781
4.
Install the fan drawer:
a. Slide the fan drawer into the fan
cover. Make sure the fan drawer
engages the rear edge of the fan cover.
b. Tighten the two captive screws.
19782
2-9
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
5.
Install the filter:
a. Make sure the air flow arrows on
the front of the filter are pointing up.
b. Align the filter with the two clips
at the bottom of assembly and slide
filter into the assembly.
19783
Mount the Camera
To mount a camera, follow the steps below.
1.
Mount the camera on your own mounting bracket.
a.
Design your bracket so that it:
does not cover any connectors
allows you to adjust the lens
holds the camera steady
attaches to the mounting holes on the camera
2.
2-10
b.
Mount the bracket in the indicated position in the
mounting documentation.
c.
Attach the bracket to the camera.
Attach the optional camera enclosure, if your configuration has it.
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
Mounting a Black and White
Monitor (2801N6,N9,N20)
Mounting the I/O Board
1771JMB
Check the mounting documentation to see how you should mount the black
and white monitor.
If mounting:
Make sure:
on a table or shelf
• the connectors are accessible so you can connect the cables to the
monitor
• the table or shelf can hold the weight of the monitor
place the monitor in the position indicated by the mounting documentation.
on a shelf that
slides out of a rack
• to attach the slides and shelf to the rack by following the
documentation for the slides
• to place the monitor on the slides
a color monitor
you follow the rack mounting procedure at the beginning of this chapter.
To mount the I/O board, attach the:
I/O interface box to I/O board and attach to mounting surface
user interface box to I/O board and attach to mounting surface
Attach I/O Interface Box
Attach the I/O interface box to the I/O board by following the steps below.
1.
Locate the 50-pin connector on the side of the I/O board.
49
13
KEY
11 S L O T
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
16903
2.
Plug the I/O interface box’s 50-pin connector to the I/O board’s
50-pin connector.
C
V
I
M
R
S
/
2
3
2
49
13
KEY
11 S L O T
1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
16904
3.
Secure the I/O interface box and the I/O board to the mounting
surface using two screws.
2-11
Chapter 2
Mounting the Components
Attach the User Interface Box
To attach the user interface box, follow the steps below:
1.
Align the flange of the user interface with the two standoffs on the
bottom of the I/O board.
POWER
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
BLUE
LIGHT
PEN
GREEN
SYNC
RED
INPUT
16906
2.
What to do Next
2-12
Secure the user interface and I/O board to the mounting surface using
two screws.
After you have mounted the components, go to chapter 3 to ground
the system.
Chapter
3
Grounding the Components
Chapter Objectives
Read this chapter to learn how to ground the components.
To Ground the Components
To ground the components, complete the following:
gather the grounding documentation from your system designer
gather the necessary tools and supplies
ground the components
Gather the Grounding
Documentation
Gather and check the grounding documentation to locate the point of each
component that you are to ground.
Important: The 4- and 8-slot chassis have a grounding stud located on the
top left front of each chassis. Use the grounding stud to ground the chassis.
Gather the Necessary Tools
and Supplies
Gather the following tools you will use to ground the chassis and camera:
8 AWG stranded wire or equivalent tinned braided cable (the exact wire
should be indicated on the grounding documentation from your
system designer)
screw driver set
a wire cutter/stripper
a quantity of #10-32 screws and ring terminals
3-1
Chapter 3
Grounding the Components
Ground the Components
Follow the grounding documentation and the steps below to ground
the components.
1.
Prepare and connect grounding conductors to the components.
a.
Determine which mounting point on the chassis you are going to
use to ground the components (some chassis have grounding
lugs; for other chassis, you have to use a mounting screw).
b.
Construct an equipment-grounding conductor for each
component. Make each one long enough to connect directly to
the ground bus. Keep the length to a minimum. Use the
specified wire and ring lugs.
c.
Connect one end of each conductor to each component and
leave the other end loose, as shown below.
Star
washer
Chassis
ground stud
Using the mounting bracket for
chassis without grounding studs
for example, on the industrial disk.
Cup washer
#10 keps
nut
Using
grounding lug
Ring terminal
Star
washer
Mounting bracket
Mounting
screw
Flat
washer
Ring
terminal
#10 hex
nut
19784
d.
3-2
Tighten all mounting nuts or screws on the components.
Chapter 3
Grounding the Components
2.
Prepare and connect grounding conductors to the ground bus:
a.
Construct an equipment-grounding conductor long enough to
extend from the ground bus to an enclosure wall. Use 8 AWG
stranded wire or equivalent tinned braided cable copper wire
(the exact AWG should be in the grounding documentation from
the system designer) and ring terminals.
b.
Construct a grounding-electrode conductor long enough to
extend from the bus to your grounding electrode system (earth
ground potential). Use 8 AWG copper wire (the exact AWG
should be in the grounding documentation from the system
designer) and ring terminals.
c.
Connect the loose equipment-grounding conductors from step 1
and the two new conductors to the ground bus as shown below.
You can connect the conductors to the bus in any order.
Ground bus mounting
Ground bus
New
wires
Tapped hole
Star washer
From component
13271
Screw
3.
Connect the equipment-grounding conductor and
grounding-electrode conductor.
a.
Connect the equipment-grounding conductor to an enclosure
wall, as shown below.
b.
Scrape paint and other non-conductive finishes from both sides
of the enclosure wall, at the point where the grounding
conductor will attach. Be sure to scrape clear an area at least the
size of the ring terminal to be used.
3-3
Chapter 3
Grounding the Components
Important: Make sure the scraped surface of the enclosure
wall is in contact with the total surface area of the ring terminal.
Enclosure wall
Scrape paint
Bolt
Ground
lug
Nut
Scrape paint on enclosure wall
and use a star washer.
Star
washer
c.
Equipmentgrounding
conductor
10020
Connect the grounding electrode conductor to your grounding
electrode system (earth ground potential). We recommend a
direct earth ground for maximum protection.
ATTENTION: Do not use an indirect earth ground,
such as a water pipe, building structure, or power distribution
system, otherwise your components may experience grounding
problems.
What to do Next
3-4
After you have grounded the components, go to chapter 4 to continue
installing your system.
Chapter
4
Installing the Modules
Chapter Objectives
This chapter shows you how to install each module and is divided into
sections that cover the installation tasks for each module.
How to Use this Chapter
Use this chapter with the completed module worksheets from the PI
Design Manual (5000-6.2.1) to perform various installation tasks for each
module. The worksheets contain specific settings and connections for each
module. This chapter describes how to make those settings and
connections. Also, it guides you to additional connection information for
the module.
After you have used the worksheets to install the modules, we suggest you
keep them with the system for future reference.
To install a PI module in a chassis, see appendix A.
Help to Prevent Electrostatic
Damage
When you:
remove the modules from the protective bags
set the jumpers or switches inside a module
change memory boards
Do so in a static-safe environment. As a minimum, we recommend the 3M
Type 8005 Portable Field Service Grounding Kit or its equivalent for
providing a static-safe environment.
ATTENTION: If you perform operations on a module
improperly, you may cause an electrostatic discharge, which can
damage the module. Perform internal operations, such as setting
the jumpers, only in a static-safe environment.
Lithium Battery Information
PI modules that come with a lithium battery are:
MicroVAX Information Processor
LP
RM
RS
OSI interface module
4-1
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Disposing of a Lithium Battery
ATTENTION: Do not incinerate or dispose of lithium batteries
in general trash collection. Explosion or violent rupture
is possible.
Follow these guidelines when you dispose of the module’s battery.
Important: Check your state and local regulations that deal with the
disposal of lithium batteries.
Do not:
Because the battery:
dispose of lithium batteries whose combined
weight is greater than or equal to 1/2 gram
in general trash collection
could become dangerous
incinerate or expose the battery to high
temperatures
could explode
solder the battery or leads
could explode
open, puncture, or crush the battery
could explode and toxic, corrosive, and
flammable chemicals could be exposed
charge the battery
could explode or the cell might overheat and
cause burns
short positive or negative terminals together
will heat up
ship on passenger aircraft
could become dangerous
ship while connected to equipment
could become dangerous
Batteries should be collected for disposal in a manner to prevent short
circuiting, compacting, or destruction of case integrity and hermetic seal.
For disposal, batteries must be packaged and shipped, in accordance with
transportation regulations, to a proper disposal site. The U.S. Department
of Transportation authorizes shipment of “lithium batteries for disposal” by
motor vehicle only in regulation 173.1015 of CFR49 (effective Jan. 5,
1983). For additional detailed information, contact:
U.S. Department of Transportation
Research and Special Programs Administration
400 Seventh Street., S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Although the United States Environmental Protection Agency at this time
has no regulations specific to lithium batteries, the material contained in
the battery may be considered toxic, reactive, or corrosive. The person
disposing of the material is responsible for any hazard created in doing so.
State and local regulations may exist regarding the disposal of
these materials.
4-2
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Emergencies
Emergencies can occur due to the battery’s makeup.
Major components of the cell are:
And these components are:
lithium metal
highly reactive in water, flammable, and can create
toxic fumes when burned.
inorganic electrolyte thionyl chloride
(SOCI2)
fast evaporating, corrosive, has a pungent odor, reacts
violently to water, causes burns on contact, and
produces toxic and corrosive fumes and chemicals
upon decomposition.
Storing Lithium Batteries
To avoid hazardous situations, follow the guidelines below:
store in a cool, dry environment; typically 20 to 25° C (68 to 77° F) and
40 to 60% relative humidity
replace the batteries at least every two years
do not store used batteries longer than three months before disposal
use a first-in/first-out system for handling the batteries
clearly mark the contents of the storage area
do not smoke in the storage area
regularly monitor the temperature and humidity of the storage area
storage area should be well-ventilated and fire-protected; it should have
a system that automatically detects fires, extinguishes fires, and
activates an alarm signal
Personnel Protection
Safety equipment should be available and personnel should be equipped
with self-contained breathing apparatus, safety shields, safety goggles, and
protective clothing when they have to handle overheated or
leaking batteries.
Overheated Battery
When a lithium battery is overheated, explosion or violent rupture is
possible. Attempt to eliminate any external source of heat. If connected to
equipment, un-power the equipment. After cooling, remove the battery to
a well-ventilated fire-protected area.
4-3
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Leaking Battery
If the hermetic seal of the case is broken, ventilate the area. Using tongs,
scoop, or shovel, remove the leaking battery to a well-ventilated
fire-protected area.
Fire
ATTENTION: Do not use water or carbon dioxide (CO2) fire
extinguishers on the fire. Lithium is reactive with
these substances.
As described for overheated batteries, explosion or violent rupture is
possible. If a cell is ruptured, the exposed lithium is combustible and is
reactive in water. If lithium is burning, use a Class D Powder fire
extinguisher or smother with a graphite powder, such as Lith-X, or an
appropriate metal fire extinguishing powder, applied with a long-handled
tool. Avoid exposure to toxic fumes from burning lithium.
Gather the Module
Documentation
Gather the module documentation and check to see which modules you are
installing. See Table 4.A for which page you should go to for
the procedures.
Table 4.A
Installing PI Modules
If you are installing this module:
4-4
See page:
power supply (5120P1/B)
45
RM (5130RM1,RM2)
KA module (5130KA)
48
RS (5150RS2, RS5)
415
LP (5250LP1,LP2,LP3,LP4)
418
vision processor (5370CVIM, CVIM2, CVIMC)
420
MicroVAX Information Processor module
(5730CPU1, 5731CPU1, CPU2)
421
EI module (5820EI)
424
OSI carrierband interface module (5820CC)
426
OSI broadband interface module (5820CBx)
426
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
ATTENTION: If you have any empty slots in the chassis,
install filler plates (5110-FP) in them. Otherwise, the modules
could be damaged. To install filler plates, see appendix A.
Many of the connections you make to the modules are made to connectors
that you wire. If you do not know how to wire these connectors, see
appendix A.
Important: Save the packing material in case you have to ship a module.
To install the power supply, complete the following tasks:
set the power supply operating voltage
install the power supply in the chassis
make connections to the power supply
Set the Operating Voltage Switch (115 or 230V ac)
Follow the steps below to set the operating voltage.
Important: You do not have to remove any covers to set the
operating voltage.
For 5120P1/B
(Bottom view)
(Front)
1. Locate the red voltage selector switch
inside the bottom of the power supply.
230V
Power Supply
2. Set the switch to either 230V or 115V.
The switch is factory set at 230V ac.
115V
17204
Install the Power Supply in the Chassis
The installation procedure for the power supply is similar to other PI
modules, see “Installing a PI Module in the Chassis” in appendix A to
install the power supply in the chassis.
4-5
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Connect the Fan Assembly/External Power Source
If you have a fan assembly or are connecting the power supply to an
external power source, make this connection. If you don’t have to make
this connection, go to the next section. To make this connection, follow
the steps below.
1.
Determine which fan assembly and/or power source connections you
are making.
If you have this configuration:
Make this connection:
With this cable:
Go to this step:
PI chassis with MicroVAX Information Processor
and no vision processor
power supply to fan assembly
cat no. 5120CP1
2.
PI chassis with a MicroVAX Information Processor
and at least one vision processor
power supply to fan assembly and
external power source
cat no. 5120CP2
3.
• PI chassis with more than two vision processors
power supply to external power source
cat no. 5120CP3
4.
• At least one vision processor, PLC5/250
controller and no MicroVAX
Information Processor
2.
Connect the 5120-CP1 cable to the fan chassis and the power supply.
a. Gather the fan status cable that
came with the fan assembly.
b. Connect the rightangle connector
of the fan status cable to the port
labeled FAN CHASSIS on the
power supply.
5120CP1
c. Route the fan status cable away
from the Interlock Relay and Line
Voltage connectors.
d. Connect the straight end of the
cable to the port labeled FAN
STATUS CABLE on the fan chassis.
19785
4-6
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
3.
Connect the 5120-CP2 cable to the fan chassis, the power supply
and a 24V external power supply.
a. Connect the spade lugs to
an external 24V power supply.
Connect triple red to +.
5120CP2
b. Connect the rightangle
connector of the 5120CP2
cable to the port labeled FAN
CHASSIS on the power supply.
c. Route the cable away from
the Interlock Relay and Line
Voltage connectors.
Connect triple
black to -.
Connect single red
to + sense or +.
d. Connect the straight end of
the cable to the port labeled
FAN STATUS CABLE on the
fan chassis.
Connect single black
to - sense or -.
19786
4.
Connect the 5120-CP3 cable to a 24V external power supply.
a. Connect the spade lugs
to an external 24V power
supply.
Connect triple red to +.
5120CP3
Connect triple
black to -.
Connect single red
to + sense or +.
b. Connect the rightangle
connector of the 5120CP3
cable to the port labled
FAN CHASSIS on the
power supply.
c. Route the cable away
from the Interlock Relay
and Line Voltage
connectors.
19787
Connect single black
to - sense or -.
Connect to Interlock Relay
See chapter 9 to connect the interlock relay.
Connect to Line Voltage
See chapter 10 to connect ac power.
4-7
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
RM/KA Module
To install the RM/KA module, use the worksheets as guides and complete
the following:
set the RM/KA module switches and jumpers
install the module in the chassis
install the battery (RM only)
set the KA module address
make connections to the module
set the keyswitch (RM only)
Set the RM/KA Module Switches and Jumpers
Set the RM/KA module switches and jumpers to configure:
switch bank 1 (communication parameters)
switch bank 2 (station address)
jumpers 9 and 10 (termination resistor)
jumpers 5-8 (channel 1 interface)
ATTENTION: If you perform operations on a module
improperly, you may cause an electrostatic discharge, which can
damage the module. Perform internal operations, such as setting
the jumpers, only in static-safe environment.
Channel 1 is factory set to RS-232. You do not have to remove the
memory board unless you are changing the channel 1 interface.
4-8
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Follow the steps below to set the jumpers and switches.
Set Switch Bank
1.
Set switch bank 1 as shown on the worksheet for the RM/KA module.
Switch bank 1 (communication channel)
Top of RM/KA module
(Front)
SB1
Up (away from board)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Down (toward board)
8
17078
SB1
2.
Set switch bank 2 as shown on the worksheet for the RM/KA module.
Switch bank 2 (station address)
Top of RM/KA module
(Front)
SB2
Up (away from board)
1
2
3
4
5
SB2
6
7
8
Down (toward board)
17079
4-9
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Set Jumpers 9 and 10
Set jumpers 9 and 10 as shown on the worksheet for the RM/KA module.
Jumpers JP9 and JP10 (termination resistor)
Bottom of RM/KA module
(Front)
CH2
CH3
1
2
3
1
JP9
2
3
17080
JP10
Set Jumpers 5 through 8
Set jumpers 5 through 8 as shown on the worksheet for the RM/KA
module.
Module
Jumpers JP5 to JP8 (channel 1 interface)
Memory module
(Front)
CH1
1
2
3
JP5
JP6 JP7
JP8
17081
4-10
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Install the RM/KA Module
Install the RM/KA module as shown in appendix A.
Install the Battery (RM only)
1.
Unscrew the battery holder from the module.
2.
Insert the battery (that came with the module) into the holder as
shown below.
+ (positive)
- (negative)
16913
3.
Screw the battery holder (with battery inserted in holder) into the
module. Make sure you do not overtighten the battery holder.
When you first install the RM, it powers up with a red fault LED
illuminated. You have to clear memory with 6200 software or
INTERCHANGE software or re-download a previously saved PLC-5/250
configuration to clear this LED. You must clear this LED before you can
use the PLC-5/250 processor.
4-11
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Set the KA Module Address
Follow the steps on the next page to set the KA module address. The
address must start at 1 for the first interface module and be consecutive for
the other interface modules up to 4.
KA module
1
1. Locate the pushwheel on the front panel of the
KA module.
2. Set the pushwheel as indicated on the worksheet.
Setting the pushwheel:
To:
Push the:
decrease the number
top button
increase the number
bottom button
17973
Connect the RM/KA Module
The table below lists what you can connect to the RM/KA module:
You can connect the module to:
Using channel:
RM
KA module
programming terminal
2A
2A
RS232, RS422, RS423 devices (terminal or modem)
1
1
DH link
2B or 3
2B or 3
DH+ link
2B or 3
3B or 3
Check the appropriate worksheet for the RM/KA module to see which
connections to make. To connect a programming terminal, see chapter 5.
To connect an RS-232, RS-422 or RS-423 device to channel 1, follow
these steps.
1.
4-12
Depending upon the type of device you are connecting, use the pin
assignments in Table 4.B through Table 4.D to construct a cable.
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Table 4.B
RS232 Pin Assignments1
Pin:
Input to RM or KA/output from
RM or KA module:
Description:
1
not applicable
chassis ground
2
output
transmitted data
3
input
received data
4
output
request to send
5
input
clear to send
6
input
data set ready
7
na
signal ground
8
input
received line signal detector
20
output
data terminal ready
1Complies with the RS232 standard as a DTE typeD interface.
Table 4.C
RS422 Pin Assignments1
Pin:
Input to RM or KA/output from
RM or KA module
Description:
1
na
chassis ground
2
output
transmitted data
14
output
transmitted data 1
3
input
received data
16
input
received data 1
4
output
request to send
19
output
request to send 1
5
input
clear to send
13
input
clear to send 1
6
input
data set ready
22
input
data set ready 1
7
na
8
input
received line signal detector
10
input
received line signal detector 1
20
output
data terminal ready
23
output
data terminal ready 1
signal ground
1Compatible with RS422 equipment as long as a pointtopoint connection is used.
4-13
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Table 4.D
RS423 Pin Assignments1
Pin:
Input to RM or KA/output from
RM or KA module:
Description:
1
na
chassis ground
2
output
transmitted data
3
input
received data
4
output
request to send
5
input
clear to send
6
input
data set ready
7
na
signal ground
8
input
14
not applicable
16
na
20
output
received line signal detector
send common
receive common
data terminal ready
1Compatible with RS423 standard for the signals used.
2.
Connect the device as shown below.
RM
KA module
To connect computer to KA CH1:
To connect computer to RM CH1:
Programming
terminal
a. Attach the usersupplied cable to
the device.
b. Locate the port labeled CH1 on
the module.
c. Attach the cable from the device to
the port.
d. Secure the connector.
16748
4-14
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
To connect to DH or DH+ link, follow the steps below.
RM
KA module
1. Locate the connectors labeled CH 2B and/or CH3.
2. (Option) Unplug the 3pin connector and wire using
Twinaxial cable (cat. no. 1770CD).
3. Reattach the wired connector to the port.
Blue 1
Shield 2
Clear 3
16749
Set the Keyswitch (RM only)
Set keyswitch in the position indicated on the worksheet.
RS Module
To install the RS, use the worksheets as guides and complete the following:
configure the termination resistors (RS2 only)
install the RS in the chassis
install the battery
set the RS module address
connect the RS to I/O
Configure the Termination Resistor (RS2 only)
This section tells you when to use:
internal 150-Ohm termination resistors for RS2 (Figure 4.1)
external 82-Ohm termination resistors (supplied with 5150-RS2)
Use Table 4.E to configure your termination resistors for RS2.
4-15
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Table 4.E
Configure Termination Resistors for the RS2
If the transmission rate is:
And the scanner is physically located: Then put the internal 150Ohm
terminationresistor jumper in the:
57.6k bit/s or 115k bit/s
middle of remote I/O link
out position
end of remote I/O link
in position
middle of remote I/O link
out position
end of remote I/O link
out position, and attach 82Ohm termination
resistor between pins 2 and 3
230k bit/s
Figure 4.1
RS2 Internal 150Ohm Termination Resistors
RS2 (internal 150Ohm termination resistor)
Module
Memory module
(Front)
Termination
Resistor
CH
JMPR
IN
OUT
1
E1
3 2 1
3 2 1
2
E2
3 2 1
3 2 1
17085
Install the RS
Install the module as shown in appendix A.
4-16
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Install the Battery
To install the RS battery, see “Install the Battery” section on page 4-11
for instruction.
Set the RS Module Address
Follow the steps below to set the RS module address. For RS2, the address
must start at 1 for the first RS and be consecutive for the other RS modules
up to 4.
For RS5, the address can be spread among the RS modules, or all four
addresses may be used on one RS5. The addresses must be consecutive.
RS5
1
4
1. Locate the pushwheel on the front panel of the RS.
2. Set the pushwheel as indicated on the worksheet.
Setting the pushwheel:
To:
Push the:
decrease the number
top button
increase the number
bottom button
19788
Connect I/O
To connect remote I/O to the ports labeled CH 1 to CH 4, and local I/O to
CH5, see chapter 7.
The RS5 pushwheels:
Is equivalent to:
14
four RS2 modules' pushwheels.
11
one RS2 module's pushwheel.
4-17
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
LP Module
To install the LP, use the worksheet as a guide and complete the following:
install the LP
install the battery
set the LP module address
make connections to the module
Install the LP
See appendix A to install the module in the chassis.
Install the Battery
To install the LP battery, see “Install the Battery” section on page 4-11
for instructions.
Set the LP Address
Follow the steps below to set the LP module address. The address must
start at 1 for the first LP and be consecutive for the other LP modules up
to 4.
LP
1
1. Locate the pushwheel on the front panel of the LP.
2. Set the pushwheel as indicated on the worksheet.
Setting the pushwheel:
To:
Push the:
decrease the number
top button
increase the number
bottom button
16751
4-18
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Connect Processor Input Interrupts
Check the worksheet to see if you have to make this connection. If you do
not have to make this connection, go to the next section. If you have to
make this connection, use:
14-28 AWG wire
strip .276” (7mm) insulation from the wire
Follow the steps belows to connect the Processor Input Interrupts.
LP
1. Remove the connector on the port labeled
PROCESSOR INPUT INTERRUPTS and wire it
as shown on the worksheet.
2. Plug the wired connector into the port labeled
PROCESSOR INPUT INTERRUPTS.
3. Connect the other end of the wire as shown in
the worksheet or the wiring diagrams from your
system designer.
16752
4-19
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Vision Processor Modules
To install the CVIM module, CVIM2 module and Color CVIM module,
use Worksheet 2.2 as a guide and complete the following:
set the switch for camera power
install the vision processor module in the chassis
set the module address
make connections to the module
Set Switch for Camera Power
Before you install the module, set the switch for camera power. It is
factory set for +/– 12 volts. If you are using an external power supply for
the camera, set the switch to +24 volts as shown below.
Back of a CVIM module
+24
±12
±12 factory setting
If using external power
supply for camera, put
switch in +24 position.
17087
Install the CVIM Module
See appendix A to install the module in the chassis.
4-20
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Set the Module Address
Follow the steps below to set the module address.
1
1. Locate the pushwheel on the front panel
of the CVIM module.
2. Set the pushwheel as indicated on
Worksheet 2.2.
Setting the pushwheel:
To:
Push the:
decrease the number
top button
increase the number
bottom button
16753
There are other connections to make to the vision processor modules. To
continue installing the vision components, see chapter 6.
MicroVAX Information
Processors
Important: If you have a RM with firmware revision A04 or earlier and
you’re replacing a MicroVAX Processor, go to the section “Replace a
MicroVAX Processor” on page 4-24.
To install the MicroVAX Information Processor, use the appropriate
worksheet as a guide and complete the following:
install the processor in the chassis
install the battery
set the keyswitch
connect Ethernet and make other connections to the module
replace the module (if applicable)
Install the Processor
See appendix A to install the processor in the chassis.
4-21
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Install the Battery
To install the MicroVAX Information Processor battery, see “Install the
Battery” section on page 4-11 for instruction.
Set the Keyswitch
Set the keyswitch as indicated on the processor’s worksheet.
MicroVAX Information
Processor EP or EE
MicroVAX Information Processor
C o n s o le
Run
Boot
Select:
To:
CONSOLE
halt module and use diagnostic
console monitor
RUN
normally operate the module
BOOT
reset the module
16754
4-22
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Connect Ethernet
To connect the processor to Ethernet, follow these steps:
MicroVAX processor EE or EP
MicroVAX Information Processor
1. Run the Ethernet cable to the processor as indicated
in your system designer wiring diagrams.
2. Locate the port on the processor labeled ENET CH #
(for MicroVAX Information Processor EE or EP) or
ENET CH A (for MicroVAX Information Processor)
and attach the Ethernet cable to the port.
3. Secure the connector.
16755
ATTENTION: The Ethernet connection must be secure while
the PI system is controlling equipment; otherwise, the
MicroVAX Information Processor may shut down the system’s
power supply.
If the system power shuts down, follow these steps:
1.
Make sure the Ethernet connection is secure.
2.
Cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and
turning it on again.
Make Connections to the Processor
To make the following connections to the processor, see chapter 5.
the 4-port distribution panel
the program loader
an industrial disk
4-23
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Replace a MicroVAX Information Processor
If you have a RM with firmware revision A04 or less and you are replacing
a 5730-CPU1 processor with either a MicroVAX Information Processor EE
or EP, or an EI module, follow the steps below.
EI Module
1.
Save the program image with the original module installed.
2.
Power the system down.
3.
Remove the module you are replacing.
4.
Restore power.
5.
Clear memory using 6200 series software.
6.
Power the system down.
7.
Install the new processor.
8.
Restore power.
9.
Restore the saved image to the PI system.
Important: If you have a RM with firmware revision A04 or earlier and
you’re replacing a 5730-CPU1 processor with an EI module, go to the
above section “Replace a MicroVAX Information Processor.”
To install the EI module, complete the following:
install the EI module in the chassis
connect Ethernet and make other connections to the module
check jumper settings
replace the module (if applicable)
Install the EI Module
See appendix A to install the module in the chassis.
4-24
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Connect Ethernet
To connect the module to the Ethernet, follow the steps below.
1. Run the Ethernet cable to the processor as indicated in your
system designer wiring diagrams.
2. Locate the connector on the EI module labeled ENET and
attach the Ethernet cable to the connector.
3. Secure the connector.
18543
Important: If you’re not using a powered transceiver, make sure the
Ethernet connection is secure before cycling power.
ATTENTION: The Ethernet connection must be secure while
the PI system is controlling equipment; otherwise, the EI
module may shut down the system’s power supply.
If the system power shuts down, follow these steps:
1.
Make sure Ethernet connection is secure.
2.
Cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and
turning it on again.
Ethernet Heartbeat
The EI module requires the IEEE 802.3 SQE (Signal Quality Error) test
(also known as Ethernet heartbeat). Make sure your Ethernet transceiver is
set with the SQE test enabled. For more information about the SQE test,
see the documentation that came with your transceiver.
4-25
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
ATTENTION: Do not use a transceiver that has a disabled
SQE test to connect an EI module to an Ethernet network
because it could disrupt network activity.
Check Jumper Settings
The jumpers on the EI module are factory set. Make sure the jumpers are
set as shown below.
Top of EI module
(Front)
1
OSI Carrierband/Broadband
Interface Module
2
JP3
3
1
2
JP2
3
1
2
JP1
3
1
2
JP0
3
18544
To install the OSI interface module, use the worksheets as guides and
complete the following:
set the switches
install the module in the chassis
install the battery
set the pushwheel
make connections to the module
Set the OSI Interface Switches
Set the OSI interface module’s switches for:
operating modes (switch 1)
communication defaults (switch 2)
ATTENTION: If you perform operations on a module
improperly, you may cause an electrostatic discharge, which can
damage the module. Perform internal operations, such as setting
the jumpers, only in static-safe environment.
4-26
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Follow these steps to set the switches.
Important: Set the switches before you put the module in the chassis and
power up.
Set Switch Bank
1.
Set switch 1 as shown on the worksheet.
Switch 1 (operating modes)
Top of OSI Interface module
(Front)
Up (away from board)
Down (toward board)
1
2
3
4
18414
2.
Set switch 2 as shown on the worksheet.
Switch 2 (use defaults)
Top of OSI Interface module
(Front)
Up (away from board)
Down (toward board)
1
2
3
4
18415
Important: Leave switches 3 and 4 in the up position.
Install the OSI Interface Module
Install the module as shown in appendix A.
Install the Battery
To install the OSI interface module battery, see page 4-11.
4-27
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Set the OSI Interface Module Pushwheel Address
Follow the steps below to set the OSI interface module’s pushwheel
address. If you have more than one OSI interface module in the same
chassis, set the pushwheels sequentially; make sure you set the first OSI
interface module’s pushwheel to 1.
1
1. Locate the pushwheel on the front panel of the
carrierband or broadband Interface modules
2. Set the pushwheel as indicated on the worksheet.
Setting the pushwheel:
To:
Push the:
decrease the number
top button
increase the number
bottom button
18385
Connect the OSI Interface Module
The table below lists what you can connect to the OSI interface module.
You can connect the module to:
Using connector/port:
AB MAP Station Manager
(communicates locally as well as through the network)
carrierband or broadband
PLC3 controller
PI system
Thirdparty device
Check the worksheet to see which connections to make. To connect to a
programming terminal running A-B MAP Station Manager software, see
chapter 5. To connect an RS-232 device, follow the steps below and see
Figure 4.2.
4-28
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
1.
Using the pin-outs in the table below, construct a cable depending
upon the type of device you are connecting. The OSI interface
module’s RS-232 port is configured as a DCE port.
RS232C
Pin:
Signal:
1
reserved. The reserved signals are for future use and shouldn't be wired to.
The OSI Interface's RS232 port does not supply a shield connection.
2
TXD
3
RXD
4
reserved
5
signal ground
6
reserved
7
reserved
8
reserved
9
reserved
Figure 4.2
Pin Assignments for the 9Pin RS232 Connector
9
8
7
6
RS232 port
5
4
3
2
1
18394
Carrierband
module
2.
Broadband
module
If you want to use a shielded RS-232 cable, wire the shield:
at the other end of the cable or
via an RS-232 connector with a metal hood
4-29
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
3.
Connect the device as shown below.
Programming terminal
Carrierband
module
Broadband
module
18391
To connect to carrierband/broadband, follow the steps below.
Carrierband
module
Broadband
module
1. Run the MAP cable to the module.
2. Locate the connector on the module
labeled BROADBAND or CARRIERBAND
and attach the MAP cable to the connector.
3. Secure the connector.
For more information on broadband or carrierband cabling specifications,
call General Motors Photographic (313) 422-2900 and ask for:
MAP/TOP Broadband Specification
MAP/TOP Carrierband Specification
4-30
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Important: These are not A-B publications.
Configuring the PI OSI
Interface Module
This section shows you how to configure the OSI interface module.
You need:
a programming terminal that has already been configured as an A-B
MAP Station Manager
a RM that has been configured using the information in chapter 3
PI OSI interface module software (cat. no. 5820-OS)
Allen-Bradley MAP Station Manager Software User’s
Manual (6630-6.5.2)
Pyramid Integrator OSI Interface Software User’s Manual (5820-6.5.1)
Figure 4.3
OSI Interface Module Communication Ports
The cat. no. 5820CC is
used for on an 802.4
carrierband network.
RS232
Broadband
Interface
Carrierband
Interface
Carrierband
module
Broadband
module
18390
4-31
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Broadband versions of the OSI interface module transmit and receive on
the following frequency channel pairs:
OSI Interface
Cat. no.:
MAP channel:
Transmit channel:
Transmit frequency:
Receive channel:
Receive frequency:
5820CBA
A
3'/4'
59.75 - 71.75 MHz
P/Q
252 - 264 MHz
5820CBB
B
4A'/5'
71.75 - 83.75 MHz
R/S
264 - 276 MHz
5820CBC
C
6'/FM1
83.75 - 95.75 MHz
T/U
276 - 288 MHz
To install the OSI interface module, complete the following:
make sure slot time is consistent with other nodes on the 802.4 network.
A-B defaults to 80 decimal (50 HEX)
perform system load
check default settings
specify switch settings (see chapter 7 of the PI Design Manual
(5000-6.2.1) for more information.)
Slot Time
The default slot time is 80 decimal (50 HEX). To change slot times:
use the local interface capability of A-B MAP Station Manager
see A-B MAP Station Manager Software User’s Manual
see PI OSI Interface Software User’s Manual
System Load
See both the A-B MAP Station Manager Software User’s Manual and the
PI OSI Interface Software User’s Manual for information on
system loading.
Configurable Parameters
All OSI-related configurable parameters have factory-default settings that
work for most networks. If you need to change any of these default
settings, see:
A-B MAP Station Manager Software User’s Manual
PI OSI Interface Software User’s Manual
4-32
Chapter 4
Installing the Modules
Specify Switch Settings on the OSI Carrierband/Broadband
Interface Module
Switch:
Position:
Description:
up
if there is a valid image in nonvolatile memory, the OSI interface module will enter fully operational
mode after:
• a power cycle, regardless of the mode preceding the power cycle
• you enter a reset command from the AB MAP Station Manager, regardless of the mode
preceding the reset
• you enter a change mode to Fully Operational from the AB MAP Station Manager
if there is not a valid image in nonvolatile memory, the OSI interface module will not enter fully
operational mode but will enter Partially Operational mode.
down
the OSI interface module will enter partially operational mode after:
• a power cycle, regardless of the mode preceding the power cycle
• you enter a reset command from the AB MAP Station Manager, regardless of the mode
preceding the reset
• you enter a change mode to Partially Operational from the AB MAP Station Manager
up
the OSI interface module uses user defaults, if available, at powerup or reset (see the PI OSI Interface
Software User's Manual for a list of user defaults). If user defaults aren't available, the interface will
use AB communication defaults.
down
the OSI interface module uses AB communication defaults at powerup or reset.
3
preset at AB
reserved (do not change)
4
preset at AB
reserved (do not change)
1
2
Important: Keep switches 3 and 4 in the up position; otherwise, the PI system stays in a power cycle.
4-33
Chapter
5
Installing the Peripherals
Chapter Objectives
This chapter describes how to install the following peripherals:
programming terminal
209, 418, or 480 Mbyte industrial disk (5710-ID4, -ID5, -ID6, -ID7)
159Mbyte industrial disk (5730-ID3)
4-port distribution panel (5710-DPI)
program loader (5710-PL/B)
Where to Begin
The table below lists the page numbers for installation procedures.
To complete installation of:
See page:
programming terminal
51
industrial disk
52
4port distribution panel
59
program loader
59
If you are installing an industrial disk and/or a distribution panel, make
sure you have mounted and grounded these components as shown in
chapters 2 and 3.
Important: Save the packing material in case you have to ship a disk.
Install a Programming
Terminal
If you are connecting a programming terminal to the RM, follow
these steps.
1.
Install a DH+ Interface Board (cat. nos. 1784-KT,-KTK1) in the
programming terminal.
2.
Use the appropriate interconnect cable to connect the interface board
to the terminal as shown below. For more information on
interconnect cables, see appendix C.
5-1
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
To connect a programming terminal to RM/KA module, follow these steps.
Programming terminal
RM
16773
Install the Industrial Disk
To install the industrial disk, perform the following tasks:
set the operating voltage
set the address (for 5710-ID4, -ID5 only)
wire an out-of-temperature shutdown warning device (optional)
wire the industrial disk for ac power
connect the industrial disk to the MicroVAX Information Processors
connect the industrial disk to second industrial disk (optional)
connect a terminator on the last disk
5-2
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Remove the Front Panel
To set the operating voltage and wire the disk you have to access the inside
of the industrial disk’s chassis. To access the inside of the industrial disk’s
chassis, remove the front panel as shown below.
Industrial disk
Unscrew the four
captive screws
and remove the
front panel.
16758
Set the Operating Voltage and SCSI Address
The operating voltage is factory set to 230V ac and can be changed to
115V ac.
To set the:
On:
See:
operating voltage
5730ID3, 5710ID6, 1-ID7
Figure 5.1
operating voltage and address
5710ID4, ID5
Figure 5.2
Figure 5.1
Set Operating Voltage on a 159Mbyte Industrial Disk
1. Locate the operating voltage switch.
2. Set the switch to the operating voltage of your
system (the switch is shipped set to 230V ac and
can be changed to 115V ac).
16759
5-3
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Figure 5.2
Set Operating Voltage and Address on a 209Mbyte or 418Mbyte
Industrial Disk
5710ID5
5710ID4
0
or
0
1
1. Locate the operating voltage switch.
2. Set the switch to either 230V or 115V.
The switch is factory set at 230V ac.
3. Set ID4 address to 0.
ID5 address to 0 and 1.
Important: Set each disk to a unique address.
18537
ATTENTION: The 5710-ID6 has SCSI bus address preset to 0
and 1. The 5710-ID7 has SCSI bus address preset to 2 and 3.
These values are not configurable.
Wire an OutofTemperature Warning Device
If you are not going to wire this device, you can skip this section. Check
the disk information from your system designer. It should tell you if you
are going to make this connection and if so, what device you are going
to connect.
Important: For industrial disk cat. no. 5730-ID3, this function is not
available on early revisions with part numbers 532029301 and 532029302.
If the disk’s external environment temperature falls below 0°C or exceeds
60°C and remains so, you have no less than 9 minutes to orderly shut down
the system. After 9 minutes, the disk shuts itself down and data may
be lost.
5-4
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
The signal is an open collector output capable of sinking 48ma. The signal
is low true when:
the disk’s external environment temperature is below 0°C or above 60°C
the processor that controls the disk drive’s environment has faulted
Follow the steps below to wire a warning device.
1. Locate the terminal strip labeled N.C.,
OT WARNING L, OT WARNING RET on
the front of the disk.
2. Wire the terminal strip as indicated below:
Wire terminal:
To:
1
no connection
2
OT WARNING L
3
OT WARNING RET
3. Connect the other end of the wires to the
appropriate device.
16760
Wire the Disk for ac Power
The disk connects to ac power. The input ranges for the disk are:
90 to 132V ac or 180 to 264V ac
47 to 63 Hz
Follow these steps to wire the disk for ac power. Do not connect the other
end of the cable to ac power yet. You will make that connection in
chapter 9.
1. Locate the terminal block labeled L1, L2/N,
GND on the front of the disk.
2. Wire the terminal strip as indicated below:
Wire terminal:
To:
L1
L1
L2/N
L2 Neutral
GND
Equip GND*
* Do not wire if you used a chassis ground.
16761
5-5
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Reattach the Front Panel
You can now re-attach the front panel of the disk as shown below.
Place the panel over the
front of the chassis and
tighten the thumbscrews.
16762
Connect the MicroVAX Information Processors
Connect the disk to the MicroVAX Information Processor as shown in
Figure 5.3 or Figure 5.4. Connect either a one meter cable (5710-SDC) or
a two meter cable (5710-SSA).
Figure 5.3
Connecting a 159Mbyte Industrial Disk
Industrial disk (5730ID3)
MicroVAX Information Processor
1. Attach the one end of the cable (5730IDC) to the port
labeled DISK BUS IN on the disk.
2. Attach the other end of the cable to the port labeled
HARD DISK on the MicroVAX Information Processor.
16763
5-6
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Figure 5.4
Connecting a 209Mbyte, 418Mbyte or a 480Mbyte Industrial Disk
Industrial disk (5710-ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7)
MicroVAX
Information
Processor EE
or EP
Terminator
1. Attach the one end of the cable to the port labeled DISK BUS IN
on the first disk.
2. Attach the other end of the cable to the port labeled SCSI PORT
on the MicroVAX Information Processor EE or EP.
3. If you are only connecting one disk, a terminator (5710SSC)
must be placed in the port labeled DISK BUS OUT.
18535
Connect Second Disk
Check your documentation to see if you are to connect a second disk.
If you are:
Then:
Connecting a second disk
follow the steps below.
Not connecting a second disk
go to the next appropriate section.
Connect either a one meter cable (5710-SDC) or a two meter
cable (5710-SSA).
5-7
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Industrial disk (5730ID3)
1. Attach the one end of the cable
(5730IDC) to the port labeled
DISK BUS OUT on the first disk
Do this if you are
connecting a
159Mbyte industrial
disk to the MicoVAX
Information Processor
2. Attach the other end of the cable to the port
labeled DISK BUS IN on the second disk.
3. Secure the connectors.
16764
Industrial disk (5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7)
1. Attach the one end of the cable to
the port labeled DISK BUS OUT
on the first disk.
Do this
if you are
connecting a
209Mbyte,
418Mbyte, or a
480Mbyte
industrial disk to
the MicoVAX
Information
Processor
2. Attach the other end of the cable
to the port labeled DISK BUS IN
on the second disk.
3. Secure the connectors.
4. Then attach the terminator
(5710SSC) to the port labeled
DISK BUS OUT on the second disk.
Terminator
18536
5-8
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
Install the 4Port
Distribution Panel
To connect the 4-port distribution panel, follow the steps below.
1.
Route the cable from the back of the distribution panel to the
information processor.
2.
Using the following pin-outs table to construct a cable for the device
that will connect to the panel.
Port 0
Pin
Install the Program Loader
Pin
Signal
Port 2
Pin
Signal
Port 3
Pin
Signal
2
TXD0
2
TXD1
2
TXD2
2
TXD3
3
RXD0
3
RXD1
3
RXD2
3
RXD3
4
RTS21
7
SIG GND
5
CTS21
6
DSR2
7
SIG GND
8
DCD21
20
DTR2
22
RI1
7
1
Signal
Port 1
SIG GND
7
SIG GND
5731CPU1 and 5731CPU2 do not support line signals.
3.
Connect the cable to the MicroVAX Information Processor’s port
labeled Comm Port (5731-CPU-1, CPU-2) or Serial CH A
(5730-CPU1).
4.
Connect the device to the distribution panel.
a.
Attach one end of the cable you made to the appropriate
connector on the distribution panel (port 3 is the console port).
b.
Attach the other end of the cable to the device.
The program loader connects to the MicroVAX Information Processor.
Connect the program loader before you boot the system. To connect the
program loader, follow the steps below.
1.
Plug in the program loader.
2.
Run the cable with the 50-pin, D-shell connector from the program
loader to the MicroVAX Information Processor.
3.
Connect the 50-pin, D-shell connector to the port labeled LOADER
on the MicroVAX Information Processor.
For more information on the program loader, see the Program Loader
Installation Data (5000-2.93).
5-9
Chapter 5
Installing the Peripherals
What to do Next
After you have completed installing the peripherals,
If you are installing:
5-10
Go to chapter:
vision components
6
I/O
7
Chapter
6
Installing the Vision Components
Chapter Objectives
This chapter shows you how to install your vision components. If you are
not installing a vision system, go to the next chapter.
Installing the Vision System
To complete the installation of your vision components, you connect the:
I/O interface box
user interface box
camera to the CVIM module
I/O board
CVIM module to a remote I/O link (optional)
Before You Begin
Make sure you have mounted and grounded the following components as
shown in chapters 3 and 4:
monitor (2801-N6,-N8,-N9,-N20)
I/O board (1771-JMB)
I/O interface box (2801-N21)
user interface box (2801-N22)
6-1
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Connect the I/O Interface Box
To connect the I/O interface box (2801-N21) to the CVIM module, follow
these steps:
CVIM module
1. Connect the cable (2801NC17) to the CVIM port
labeled MODULE I/O.
2. Run the cable to the CVIM as indicated in the
wiring documentation.
3. Connect the cable to the port labeled CVIM on the
I/O Interface box.
I/O interface box
16774
6-2
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Connect the User
Interface Box
To connect the user interface box (2801-N22) to the:
CVIM module
color monitor (2801-N8) or black and white monitor
(2801-N6, -N9,-N20)
light pen (2801-N7)
CVIM Module
To connect the CVIM module, follow these steps:
1. Connect the cable (2801NC18) to the CVIM port
labeled USER INTERFACE.
2. Route the cable to the user interface as indicated
in the wiring documentation.
3. Connect the cable to the port labeled INPUT on the
user interface.
User interface
POWER
BLUE
LIGHT
PEN
GREEN
SYNC
RED
INPUT
16775
6-3
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Color Monitor
To connect the color monitor, follow the steps below.
Color monitor
1. Connect each of the four colorcoded cables into its
port on the monitor (connect the white cable to the port
labeled SYNC).
2. Route the cables to the user interface.
3. Connect the other end of each cable into
corresponding port on the user interface.
POWER
BLUE
LIGHT
PEN
GREEN
SYNC
RED
INPUT
User interface
16776
Black and White Monitor
To connect the black and white monitor, follow the steps below:
Black and white monitor
1. Plug the cable into the monitor's port
labeled VIDEO IN.
VIDEO
IN
2. Route the cable to the user interface.
3. Plug the other end of the cable into the
user interface's port labeled GREEN.
User interface
POWER
BLUE
LIGHT
PEN
GREEN
SYNC
RED
INPUT
16901
6-4
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Light Pen
To connect the light pen, connect the light pen’s cable to the user
interface’s port labeled LIGHT PEN as shown below.
Light pen
User interface
POWER LIGHT
BLUE
PEN
GREEN
SYNC
INPUT
RED
16902
Connect the Camera to the
CVIM Module
To connect the camera to the CVIM module, follow the steps below.
Follow this procedure for each camera you connect to the CVIM module.
CVIM module
1. Connect the cable to the module.
If connecting
camera:
Use one of these cable:
2801YB
2801NC5, NC6, NC7
2801YC
2801NC13, NC14, NC15, NC16
2801YD
2801NC15, NC16, NC17
2. Route the cable from the VISION
PROCESSOR to the camera as
described in the wiring information.
Camera
Back of
camera A
3. Connect the cable to
the camera.
16779
6-5
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Connect the I/O Board
You can connect up to 16 I/O modules to the I/O board (1771-JMB).
Check your vision documentation to see which connections you have to
make and follow the steps below.
1.
Gather the I/O modules you are to install.
49
13
KEY
11 SLOT
1
0
1
2
3
4
2 connectors for
trigger inputs
2.
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
14 connectors for
general outputs
12
13
14
15
16899
Attach each I/O module to the I/O board.
1. Push the I/O module into its
connectors (see your system
designer vision information).
2. Using a phillips screwdriver,
secure the connection by
tightening the module's screw.
DIMENSIONS
( (MILLIMETERS)
INCHES
16900
3.
6-6
Wire the terminal strip as indicated in your system designer vision
documentation.
Chapter 6
Installing the Vision Components
Connect to Remote I/O Link
If you have to make this connection, use the steps below to attach the cable
to the module using Belden 9463 cable.
1. Remove the male connector for the port labeled RIO
and wire it as shown below:
Shield
Blue2
Clear 1
2. Plug the wired connector into the processor's
female connector labeled RIO.
3. Route the cable to the adapter as shown in the
wiring documentation.
4. Attach the other end of the cable to the adapter.
16781
What to do Next
After completing the installation of your vision components,
If you are:
Go to chapter:
Installing I/O
7
Not installing I/O
8
6-7
Chapter
7
Installing 1771 I/O
Chapter Objectives
This chapter guides you in installing your I/O. It shows you how to:
set the I/O chassis switches
set the I/O chassis configuration jumper
set the I/O adapter module switches
install keying bands and wiring arms
install I/O modules
connect wiring arms
connect your I/O to the RS module
If you are not installing I/O modules, go to the next chapter.
What You Should Have
Completed
Make sure you have mounted and grounded your I/O chassis and power
supply as shown in chapters 2 and 3 of this manual.
Before You Begin
Gather the I/O information from the system designer (including the
worksheet). This information should contain:
switch settings for the I/O chassis and modules
the names of the I/O modules to install and where to install them
(chassis, rack)
the I/O to wire
identification for each I/O
the I/O channel connections to make
You may also need the specific publication for each type of I/O module
you are installing.
7-1
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Set I/O Chassis Switches
On the 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, -A3B1, -A4B chassis set the backplane
switches to determine:
last state (switch 1)
processor restart lockout (switch 2)
type of addressing (switches 5 and 6)
Set these switches before you install the adapter module.
1.
Locate the eight switches located on the left side of the
chassis backplane.
2.
Using the worksheet, set the I/O chassis switch assembly as indicated
with a ball-point pen (Figure 7.1). Do not use a pencil because the tip
can break off and jam or short the switch.
Figure 7.1
Set Switches on the I/O Chassis
On (toward board)
Off (away from board)
On
Off
Last State
Outputs of this I/O chassis remain in their last state when a fault is
detected by this I/O adapter. 1
Outputs of this I/O chassis are turned off when a fault is
detected by this I/O adapter.
1
2
Processor Restart Lockout
3
On
The I/O chassis can be restarted from
the processor.
Off
The processor is locked out from
restarting the I/O chassis after a fault.
Always On
4
5
6
7
8
Always On
Addressing
Off
Off
On
Off
Off
On
1/2slot 2, 3
On
On
Not allowed
2slot
1slot
2
1
ATTENTION: If you set this switch to the ON position, when a fault is detected, outputs connected to this
chassis remain in their last state to allow machine motion to continue. We recommend that you set switch 1 to the
OFF position to deenergize outputs wired to this chassis when a fault is detected.
2
The 1771AS adapter does not support 1slot or 1/2slot addressing. When you use this adapter, set switches 5
and 6 to the OFF position.
3
The 1771ASB series A adapter does not support 1/2slot addressing.
16191
7-2
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Set the I/O Chassis
Configuration Jumper
Set the configuration jumper to indicate which type of power supply the
chassis will use.
1.
Locate the chassis jumper on the backplane.
2.
Set the jumper (Figure 7.2). It is factory set to Y for a power-supply
module that you install in the chassis. If you are using a power
supply that is not installed inside the chassis, set the jumper to N.
Figure 7.2
Set the Configuration Jumper
Y N
Using power supply
module in this
chassis?
Y N
Set Y when you
install a power supply
module in the chassis
Set I/O Adapter Module
Switches
Y N
Set N when you
use an external
power supply
Important: You cannot power
a single I/O chassis with both a
power supply module and an
external power supply.
17075
On the adapter you install in the 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, -A3B1, -A4B
chassis, set the switches as shown in Figure 7.3 or Figure 7.4.
1.
Locate switch assembly 1 (SW-1) and switch assembly 2 (SW-2).
See Figure 7.3.
7-3
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Figure 7.3
Switch Settings for 1771AS, ASB/A, ASB/B Adapter
+
x
Off (away from board)
On (toward board)
SW1
1
2
SW2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
Starting
I/O Group
I/O Rack Number
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
2
3
4
Always Off
0
2
4
6
Data Transmission Rate
On
57.6k bits/s (10,000 cableft max)
Off
115.2k bits/s (5,000 cableft max)
16192
Figure 7.4
Switch Settings for 1771ASB/C Adapter
+
x
Off (away from board)
On (toward board)
SW1
1
2
3
4
SW2
5
6
7
1
8
2
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
4
5
6
Always Off
Link Response always off for unrestricted
Starting
I/O Group
I/O Rack Number
3
0
2
4
6
Scan on for all but last 4 slots
off for all slots
Always Off
Data Transmission Rate
7-4
on
off
57.6k bits/s (10,000 cableft max)
off
off
off
on
115.2k bits/s (5,000 cableft max)
230k bits/s (2,500 cableft max)
16192
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
2.
Set switches 1 through 6 of switch assembly SW-1 to the desired I/O
rack number.
I/O rack number,
(octal)
Switch
1
2
3
4
5
6
0
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
1
ON
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
2
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
3
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
4
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
5
ON
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
6
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
7
ON
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
10
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
11
ON
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
12
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
13
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
14
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
15
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
16
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
17
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
20
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
21
ON
OFF
ON
ON
ON
OFF
22
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
23
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
24
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
ON
25
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
26
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
27
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
30
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
31
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
32
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
33
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
34
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
35
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
36
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
37
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
7-5
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
3.
Set the number of the starting I/O group in the chassis (SW1).
Starting I/O group
number:
7
Switch:
0
on
on
2
on
off
4
off
on
6
off
off
8
4.
Set the data transmission rate on the adapters as shown in Figure 7.3
or Figure 7.4.
5.
For 1771-ASB/C, select the scan mode as shown Figure 7.4 (SW2).
If you set the switch to on, all but the last four slots will be
scanned. Do this if you’re not using the last four slots in the
chassis to minimize scan time.
If you set the switch to off, all slots will be scanned.
6.
7-6
For 1771-ASB/C, set link response off for unrestricted (SW2).
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Configure the
ExtendedLocal I/O
Adapter Module
To configure the extended-local I/O adapter module (cat. no. 1771-ALX),
you must:
define the starting I/O rack number and available first I/O group for the
extended-local I/O adapter by setting the switches on switch
assembly SW1
specify the types of I/O modules being used in the extended-local I/O
racks by setting the configuration plug
Set Switch Assembly 1
To set switch assembly SW1, do the following:
1.
Locate switch assembly SW1 on the extended-local I/O
adapter module.
SW1
Off (away from board)
On (toward board)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
SW2 Not Used
8
First I/O
Group Number
I/O Rack Number
2.
Set switches to define the I/O rack address. Use Table 7.A
7-7
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Table 7.A
Switch Settings for Available Starting Extendedlocal I/O rack Numbers
Set switch:
Set switch:
To select rack:
1
2
3
4
5
6
To select rack:
1
2
3
4
5
6
00
on
on
on
on
on
on
40
off
on
on
on
on
on
01
on
on
on
on
on
off
41
off
on
on
on
on
off
02
on
on
on
on
off
on
42
off
on
on
on
off
on
03
on
on
on
on
off
off
43
off
on
on
on
off
off
04
on
on
on
off
on
on
44
off
on
on
off
on
on
05
on
on
on
off
on
off
45
off
on
on
off
on
off
06
on
on
on
off
off
on
46
off
on
on
off
off
on
07
on
on
on
off
off
off
47
off
on
on
off
off
off
10
on
on
off
on
on
on
50
off
on
off
on
on
on
11
on
on
off
on
on
off
51
off
on
off
on
on
off
12
on
on
off
on
off
on
52
off
on
off
on
off
on
13
on
on
off
on
off
off
53
off
on
off
on
off
off
14
on
on
off
off
on
on
54
off
on
off
off
on
on
15
on
on
off
off
on
off
55
off
on
off
off
on
off
16
on
on
off
off
off
on
56
off
on
off
off
off
on
17
on
on
off
off
off
off
57
off
on
off
off
off
off
20
on
off
on
on
on
on
60
off
off
on
on
on
on
21
on
off
on
on
on
off
61
off
off
on
on
on
off
22
on
off
on
on
off
on
62
off
off
on
on
off
on
23
on
off
on
on
off
off
63
off
off
on
on
off
off
24
on
off
on
off
on
on
64
off
off
on
off
on
on
25
on
off
on
off
on
off
65
off
off
on
off
on
off
26
on
off
on
off
off
on
66
off
off
on
off
off
on
27
on
off
on
off
off
off
67
off
off
on
off
off
off
30
on
off
off
on
on
on
70
off
off
off
on
on
on
31
on
off
off
on
on
off
71
off
off
off
on
on
off
32
on
off
off
on
off
off
72
off
off
off
on
off
on
33
on
off
off
on
off
off
73
off
off
off
on
off
off
34
on
off
off
off
on
on
74
off
off
off
off
on
on
35
on
off
off
off
on
off
75
off
off
off
off
on
off
36
on
off
off
off
off
on
76
off
off
off
off
off
on
37
on
off
off
off
off
off
77
off
off
off
off
off
off
7-8
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
3.
Set switches to define the first I/O group number. Use Table 7.B
Table 7.B
ExtendedLocal I/O Adapter Switch Settings, First I/O
Group Number
Set switch:
For First I/O Group Number:
7
8
0
on
on
2
on
off
4
off
on
6
off
off
Set the Configuration Plug
Use the configuration plug to specify whether you want to use 32-point
modules or 1771-IX and -IY modules in the chassis with the
extended-local I/O adapter module. If you are not using either one, the
plug may by left in either position.
1.
Lay the module on its
right side.
The configuration plugs
are visible on the lower
rear of the module.
2.
Configuration Plug
Do not place a jumper
on this set of pins.
Set the configuration
plug as shown below
according to your
application.
17341
If you are using:
But not:
Set configuration plug:
32-point I/O modules
and any address
method
1771-IX or 1771-IY
on the 2 lower pins
1771-IX and 1771-IY
modules and any
addressing method
32-point I/O modules
on the 2 upper pins
7-9
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Set 1771AM1, AM2 I/O
Chassis/Adapter Switches
On the 1771-AM1, -AM2 I/O chassis with integral power supply and
adapter set the switches as shown in Figure 7.5.
Figure 7.5
Switch Settings on the I/O Chassis with Integral Power Supply and Adapter
(1771AM1,AM2)
SW1
1
Starting
I/O Group
2
on
on
off
off
3
4
I/O Rack
Number
on
off
on
off
0
2
4
6
5
6
7
Data Transmission Rate
8
9
On
57.6k bit/s (10,000 ft. max.)
Off
115.2k bit/s (5,000 ft. max.)
10 11 12
Last State
Always
On
On
Outputs of this I/O chassis remain in their last state
when a fault is detected by this I/O adapter.
Off
Output of this I/O chassis are turned Off when a fault is
detected by this I/O adapter.
SW2
Processor Restart Lockout
On
1
2
Off
The I/O chassis can be
restarted from the processor
3
The processor is locked out
from restarting the I/O
chassis after a fault.
4
5
6
Always
On
Off (away from board)
On (toward board)
7-10
Addressing
On
1/2slot
Off
1slot (select this always for 1771AM1)
12211I
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Install Keying Bands
To install keying bands, you need the:
installation documentation for the specific 1771 I/O module you
are using
I/O documentation from the system designer (including Worksheet 3.9)
that indicates the position of each module
ATTENTION: A module inserted into a wrong slot could be
damaged by improper voltages connected through the wiring
arm. Use keying bands to help prevent damage to the module.
Follow the steps below to key the I/O modules:
1.
Locate the module’s location (chassis and rack) in the I/O information
from your system designer.
2.
Locate the keying information in the installation data sheet of the I/O
module you are installing.
3.
Using long nose pliers, insert keys for each I/O module into the
backplane sockets of the I/O chassis at the module’s location.
4.
Position the keys between the numbers at the right of the connectors
as indicated in the module’s documentation (Figure 7.6).
Figure 7.6
Install Keying Bands
I/O chassis
backplane
connector
Keying bands
(cat. no. 1771RK)
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
Use these numbers
as a guide.
12062
7-11
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Installing and Wiring
I/O Modules
Install the I/O modules, including wiring between wiring arms and various
input and output devices. If you follow this procedure carefully, you can
minimize wiring errors. You must place each I/O module correctly, and
make every I/O connection at the proper wiring-arm terminal.
Color-coded labels identify the various types of I/O modules. Also, other
labels allow you to write in the address of each I/O terminal.
Insulation color is useful for identifying various groupings of wires. For
example, the Bulletin 1790 Assembled Systems, optionally available from
A-B Quality and Productivity Systems Division, typically have red ac
wires and blue dc wires. However, follow all local electrical codes.
Several I/O modules require shielded-cable connections. We give you
shielded-cable-connection instructions (page 7-17), which supplement the
general instructions in this section.
This installation procedure is necessarily general in nature. Many types of
I/O modules are available, and the connections vary according to module
type. The specific wiring required for each type of I/O module is in the
separate installation data publication for that specific module type.
Therefore, see Figure 7.7 and the appropriate installation data publication
during execution of the following steps.
ATTENTION: Do not force a module into a backplane
connector; if you cannot seat a module with firm pressure,
check the alignment and keying. Forcing a module can damage
the backplane connector or the module.
7-12
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Figure 7.7
1771I/O Hardware Components
Remote I/O
adapter module
Wiring arm
Module locking latch
Backplane connectors
Module extraction tab
Wiring arm
Wiring arm
locing tab
I/O module
16193
7-13
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Install Modules
Open locking latch and insert each I/O module into the slot keyed for it.
Firmly press to seat each module into its backplane connector. After you
install all the modules, secure them with the module locking latch.
Install Wiring Arms
See the corresponding product data publication for the proper wiring arm
for each module. Snap each wiring arm onto the horizontal bar at the
lower front edge of the I/O chassis as shown in Figure 7.8. Typically, it is
necessary to start one corner of the C-shaped bracket over the horizontal
bar first, then slip the remainder over the bar with a twisting motion.
Figure 7.8
Snapping Wiring Arm into Chassis
Wiring arm
Remove
Horizontal bar
Install
17643
Swing each arm up to connect on the front edge of its module as shown in
Figure 7.9. Push each arm in until it is held in place by its locking tab.
7-14
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Figure 7.9
Wiring Arms Installed
Locking tab holds
wiring arm when
in position
17797
Connect I/O Lines
Use a flat-head screwdriver to remove the terminal cover from each wiring
arm to expose the terminals (if a terminal requires shielded-cable
connection, see page 7-17). Connect the wires between the I/O devices
and the wiring arm terminals.
Trim the length of the wire to approximately 3/4 of an inch above
its terminal.
Strip approximately 3/8 of an inch insulation from the end of the wire.
Bend the end of the wire to the right, and place the bare copper wire
under the pressure plate of the terminal screw (optionally, you can use a
spade lug).
Tighten the screw, and check that the wire is firmly in place.
7-15
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Test Connections
Determine that each I/O line is correctly connected between its I/O
terminal and its input or output device. Test for continuity. A simple
continuity test may be accomplished by temporarily jumping an I/O
terminal to ground; then checking for very low resistance to ground at the
other end of the I/O wire where it connects to its input or output device.
This test does not check for I/O components being shorted together or to
ground. Provide wire-number labels at all wire connections, including
those at any optional user-supplied terminal strips. Use the logical I/O
addresses (link/chassis/module-slot/terminal) as wire numbers.
Connect Power Lines
ATTENTION: Do not turn on power to any input or output
circuit at this time. To avoid exposing personnel to electric
shock hazards, all input and output devices must remain
de-energized until power is required during the
check-out procedure.
Connect the various user-supplied power and “common” (ground) wires.
Distribute these wires among the wiring arms in such a way that no single
wire exceeds its rated current.
ATTENTION: Calculate the maximum possible current in each
power and common wire. Do not exceed the rated current for
any particular wire size permitted by the local electrical code.
Overheated wires and damaged insulation may result from
over-loading.
Tie Wrap
Use tie wraps to gather the wires at each wiring arm. Neatly bundle wires
in a way that will allow the arms to pivot from vertical to horizontal.
7-16
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Replace Covers
Snap the terminal covers back onto the wiring arms (Figure 7.10). There is
a blank label on each terminal cover and beside the terminal status
indicators on each I/O module. Write terminal designation information on
these labels; it will be useful during system start-up and troubleshooting.
Figure 7.10
Terminal Covers in Place Over Wiring Arms
Wiring arm
Terminal
cover
18147
Connecting Shielded Cables
Some I/O modules require shielded-cable connections to help reduce the
effects of electrical noise coupling. Unless specified otherwise, the
recommended cable is Belden 8761. The individual installation data sheet
for each module specifies which connections require shielded-cable and
gives exact wiring connections. In general, however, cable installation
practices must follow these outlined here.
Avoid breaking shields at junction boxes. Many types of connectors for
shielded conductors are available from various manufacturers. If you do
break a shield at a junction box:
connect only category-2 conductors in the junction box
do not strip the shield back any further than necessary to make
a connection
connect the shields of the two cable segments to ensure continuity along
the entire length of the cable
7-17
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Unless otherwise specified, connect each cable shield to earth ground at the
I/O-chassis end as we describe here. Always connect the shield to ground
at one end of the cable only (never ground any cable shield at both ends).
A shield grounded at both ends forms a ground loop which could cause
faulty operation.
Ground each shield at the end specified in the appropriate publication for
the product. Never connect a shield to the common side of a logic circuit
(this would introduce noise into the logic circuit). Connect each shield
directly to a chassis ground.
Since each I/O chassis must be connected to earth ground, any connection
to a properly mounted I/O chassis is also a connection to ground.
To properly connect a shielded cable at a wiring arm and connect the shield
to ground at the I/O chassis, execute the following procedure:
1.
At the cable end which is to connect to the wiring arm, strip off 3 ft
of the outer jacket to expose the foil.
2.
Strip off the exposed foil. It may be necessary to insulate the bare
drain wire with tape or shrink- tubing along areas where it might
otherwise come into contact with wiring arm terminals.
3.
Trim both insulated wires to 2-inch lengths. Then strip
approximately 3/8-inch of insulation from the end of each wire. The
shield strand (drain wire) is left at its full 3-ft length (Figure 7.11).
Figure 7.11
Shielded Wire Striped and Ready for Installation
3 ft
Drain wire
Blue
Clear
Twinaxial cable
2"
7-18
3/8"
18007
4.
Connect the insulated wires at the wiring arm terminals specified in
the I/O module product data publication. Fold back the bare drain
wire as you route the cable. The insulated wires connect to the user
device at the other end of the cable.
5.
Connect the bare drain wire to ground. Route it from the wiring arm
to the I/O chassis stud or an I/O chassis ground bus. A lug can be
used. In applications where many shielded cables are connected at a
single I/O chassis it may be necessary to mount a ground bus directly
below the I/O chassis for a ground connection for these drain wires as
in Figure 7.12.
Chapter 7
Installing 1771 I/O
Figure 7.12
An I/O Chassis Ground Bus Providing Ground Connection for Several Drain Wires
I/O chassis
To central
ground bus
I/O chassis ground bus
Connecting I/O Power Supplies
16194
Install each power supply for each I/O chassis as described in the
installation data sheet shipped with each power supply.
ATTENTION: If you use separate ac power sources for the
power supply and all input devices connected to the I/O chassis,
and if power is lost at the input devices while the power supply
continues to operate, incorrect input data could be stored
in memory.
What to do Next
If you are:
Go to chapter:
installing nonstandard I/O
8
connecting the I/O link
9
7-19
Chapter
8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Chapter Objectives
This chapter describes how to install non-standard I/O, in particular, how
to make hardware selections to specify the I/O addressing. To install this
non-standard I/O, follow the general procedures described in this chapter
and the publication for the specific adapter. This chapter covers:
setting Direct Communication Module switches
setting PLC interface module switches
setting 1785 PLC-5 processor switches
setting RediPANEL switches
Conventions
In this chapter, we show and describe switches as being on or off. Printed
on the actual switch assemblies are the words ON and OFF or the word
OPEN. OPEN corresponds to OFF. In some cases, the switch has a
toggling lever that you push down toward the board or lift up away from
the board. In those cases, we may describe the switches as being up
or down.
An I/O chassis contains an I/O adapter and I/O modules. In a broader
sense, we sometimes use the term I/O chassis to include hardware such as
Bulletin 2705 RediPANEL modules with built-in I/O interfaces. We do
this because the built-in I/O interface communicates with the I/O scanner
over the I/O link in the same way that an I/O adapter in an I/O chassis (in
the narrow sense) does.
Setting Direct Communication
Module Switches
To install a direct communication module (cat. no. 1771-DCM), set the
switches of switch-bank 0 as described in publication 1771-6.5.27. Set the
switches of switch-bank 1 as described here. Set switches 1 through 6 to
select the I/O rack number and set switches 7 and 8 to select the starting
I/O group as shown in Figure 8.1.
8-1
Chapter 8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Figure 8.1
Direct Communication Module Switches
Off (away from board)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
On (toward board)
8
Starting
I/O Group
I/O Rack
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
8-2
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
0
2
4
6
12212I
Chapter 8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Setting PLC Interface
Module Switches
To install a PLC interface module (3500-NA1), set the switches as
described here; set the jumpers as described in publication 1352-5.0.2.
Switch assemblies SW3, SW6, and SW7 are located across the bottom of
the module (Figure 8.2).
Figure 8.2
Setting PLC Interface Module Switches
SW3
SW6
SW7
Off (away from board)
On (toward board)
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
Always Off
Data Transmission Rate
57.6k bits/s (10,000 cableft max.)
115.2k bits/s (5,000 cableft max.)
On
Off
Starting
I/O Group
I/O Rack
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
0
2
4
6
12213I
8-3
Chapter 8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Setting 1785 PLC5
Processor Switches
To install a 1785 PLC-5 processor in adapter mode, set the switches in
switch assembly SW2 as described here; set all other switches, including
the I/O chassis backplane switches as described in the 1785 PLC-5
Installation Manual (1785-6.6.1).
Use switch assembly SW2 to set the I/O rack number and the number of
words to communicate. These switches are accessible from the bottom of
the module. Always set switch 1 to up (Figure 8.3).
Number of Words
Switch 2 determines the number of 16-bit words the scanner will write to
the PLC-5 processor and the number of words read from the PLC-5
processor. Set switch 2 as follows:
If switch 2 is set as:
Then the scanner writes and reads:
down
four words to and from the PLC5 processor.
up
eight words to and from the PLC5 processor.
I/O Rack Number
When a 1785 PLC-5 processor is used as an I/O adapter for the PLC-5/250
RS, it must be assigned an I/O rack number through which it is addressed
from the scanner. Switches 4 through 8 determine the I/O rack number
through which the 1785 PLC-5 controller is addressed by the scanner.
Starting I/O Number
Switch 3 determines the starting I/O group number. If the number of
words is 8, the starting I/O group must be number 0.
8-4
Chapter 8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Figure 8.3
PLC5/12, 5/15, 5/25 Processor Module Switches
Bottom View of Module
12345678
SW2
Off (away from board)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
On (toward board)
8
Always Off
Number of Words
4
8
I/O Rack
Number
on
off
Starting I/O Group
0
4
on
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
12272I
8-5
Chapter 8
Installing Nonstandard I/O
Setting RediPANEL
Pushbutton Module Switches
To install a 2705 RediPANEL push-button module, set the switches of
switch assembly SW2 as described in publication 2705-800. Set the
switches of switch assembly SW1 as shown in Figure 8.4.
Figure 8.4
Setting RediPANEL Module Switches
Off (away from board)
SW1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
On (toward board)
8
Starting
I/O Group
I/O Rack
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
on
on
off
off
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
off
on
on
off
off
on
off
on
off
0
2
4
6
12214I
Setting RediPANEL Keypad
Module Switches
To install a 2705 RediPANEL keypad module, set the switches of switch
assemblies SW2 and SW3 as described in publication 2705-801. Set the
switches of switch assembly SW1 as shown in Figure 8.4.
What to do Next
After you finish installing all of your I/O modules, proceed to chapter 9 to
connect the I/O link cabling.
8-6
Chapter
9
Connecting the I/O Link
Chapter Objectives
This chapter describes how to connect an I/O chassis to the RS.
Connecting the Remote
I/O Link
The Medium
In an I/O link, the RS and the I/O adapters communicate with one another
through 1770-CD twinaxial cable which provides a physical bus medium.
You can use the twinaxial cable to form the bus connection between them
in either a daisy-chain or a trunkline/dropline configuration. This chapter
describes how to connect a daisy-chain configuration. See publication
1770-6.2.1 for information on how to construct a
trunkline/dropline configuration.
For each I/O link of the scanner module, you can individually select to
have a data-transmission rate of 57.6k bit/s, 115.2k bit/s, or 230k bit/s. At
each I/O adapter, you must select the same rate as you select for the link at
the RS.
A higher transmission rate provides a faster I/O update. However, the
higher the rate of transmission, the shorter the maximum cable length.
If the data transmission rate is:
Then the maximum cable length is:
57.6k bit/s
10,000 ft.
115.2k bit/s
5,000 ft.
230.4k bit/s
2,500 ft.
Cabling Configuration
A general cabling configuration is shown in Figure 9.1. The cable has a
signal conductor with blue insulation, a signal conductor with clear
insulation, and a bare shield drain wire. Observe the color code
convention used in the following figures to provide the proper signal
polarity. At each end device, connect a termination resistor.
For a transmission rate of:
Connect an:
57.6k bit/s
150Ohm termination resistor
115.2k bit/s
150Ohm termination resistor
230.4k bit/s
82Ohm termination resistor
9-1
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
For RS, always ground one and only one end of the shield.
Figure 9.1
General Cabling Configuration
End
device
150 Ω
or
82 Ω
Middle
device(s)
End
device
Blue
Blue
Blue
Blue
Shield
Shield
Shield
Shield
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
150 Ω
or
82 Ω
Twinaxial cable (cat. no. 1770CD)
See the table in previous section for the maximum length.
16507
Connecting Remote I/O to the RS
Follow the steps below to connect your remote I/O link cable to the RS.
1.
Locate the I/O channel connection on the I/O wiring information.
2.
Wire the I/O channel as shown in the wiring documentation.
RS5
a. Remove the male connectors for ports labeled
CH 1, CH 2, CH31 and CH41.
b. Wire these connectors using Twinaxial Cable
(cat. no. 1770CD).
Shield
c. According to the I/O documentation from your
system designer, attach wired connectors to the
appropriate female connectors.
d. Connect the other end of the cable to the
remote I/O adapter module or processor module
in the remote system.
Blue 1
e. If there ia a 1771AS, ASB module at the end
of the remote I/O link, connect a terminator (cat.
no. 1770XT) between the terminals on the
adapter module.
Clear 2
1
9-2
This applies to RS5 only.
19789
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Connecting to 1771ASB Adapter
Figure 9.2 shows the terminal identification label which indicates the
proper connections for each 1771-ASB I/O adapter module in an I/O link.
This label is on the side of the module. Make the connections at the screw
terminals on the wiring arm on the front of each I/O adapter module.
Figure 9.2
I/O Adapter Module Terminal Identification Label
Terminal
Identification
Cat. No. 1771-ASB
1
Line 1
2
Shield
3
Line 2
4
No connection
5
No connection
6
No connection
7
No connection
8
No connection
9
No connection
10
No connection
11
IN
12
RET
Cable
Reset
10910
Figure 9.3 shows an I/O link connections to a 1771-ASB adapter both as a
middle device and as an end device on a link. The blue-insulation
conductor corresponds to line 1. The clear-insulation conductor
corresponds to line 2. At each adapter, connect the shield drain wire of
each cable segment to give the shield continuity. However, never ground
the shield at an adapter. At an adapter connected as an end device on a
link, connect a terminator (cat. no. 1770-XT) between the terminals.
9-3
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Figure 9.3
Connections to 1771ASB Adapter
I/O adapter module
wiring arm
I/O adapter module
wiring arm
Twinaxial cable
(cat. no. 1770CD)
To
scanner
Optional usersupplied
pushbutton for I/O
chassis restart
Blue
Terminator
(cat. no. 1770XT)
1
Blue
Blue
1
Shield
2
Shield
Shield
2
Clear
3
Clear
Clear
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
Optional usersupplied
pushbutton for I/O
chassis restart
ÉÉ
ÉÉ
6
7
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
16509
You can optionally connect a normally-open momentary-contact switch
between terminals 11 and 12 at each adapter. Such a reset switch would be
particularly useful if processor-restart lockout is selected. If a fault is
detected at the I/O chassis, you can use the reset switch to reset the adapter
in an attempt to restart the I/O chassis.
9-4
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Connecting the
ExtendedLocal I/O Link on
the RS5 Modules
To connect the extended-local I/O link:
make sure you have the correct cable length
make the extended-local I/O connection
Make Sure you have the Correct Cable Length
Use the extended-local I/O cables. These cables have a single-end
connector on one end and a dual-end connector on the other. The
maximum cable length for an extended-local I/O system is 30.5 cable-m
(100 cable-ft). Connect extended-local I/O adapters using any of these
cables (Table 9.A):
Table 9.A
Standard ExtendedLocal I/O Cables
Cable Length:
Catalog Number:
1 m (3.3 ft)
1771CX1
2 m (6.6 ft)
1771CX2
5 m (16.5 ft)
1771CX5
0.15 m (0.5 ft)
5110MXC4
Important: You cannot connect or splice extended-local I/O cables to
form a custom cable length. For example, if you have a distance of four
meters between two extended-local I/O adapters or between a processor
and an extended-local I/O adapter, you cannot connect two 2 m cables
together. You would have to use the 5 m cable and have the extra meter
as slack.
If you do need a custom cable, these are available (Table 9.B):
Table 9.B
Custom ExtendedLocal I/O Cables
Cable Length:
Catalog Number:
7 m (23 ft)
1771CX7
10 m (32.9 ft)
1771CX10
15 m (49.3 ft)
1771CX15
20 m (65.7 ft)
1771CX20
25 m (82.1 ft)
1771CX25
30 m (98.6 ft)
1771CX30
9-5
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Make ExtendedLocal I/O Connections
Important: Follow these considerations when making extended-local
I/O connections:
do not apply power to an I/O rack containing a extended-local I/O
adapter module until all extended-local I/O cables are installed
and connected
make extended-local I/O connections according to Figure 9.4
ATTENTION: Turn off power to the extended-local I/O
adapter module before connecting or disconnecting
extended-local I/O cables to prevent the possibility of
corrupting the data.
Figure 9.4
Make ExtendedLocal I/O Connections
1. Connect the singleend connector to channel 5
of the RS5.
RS5 module
2. Route the cable to the first local I/O and adapter.
3. Connect the dualend connector to the local
I/O adapter module. Be sure to screwin the
retaining screws tightly.
4.
If the adapter:
Then:
is not the last one
on the link
1. Connect the singleend of a
local I/O network cable to the
exposed end connector on the
adapter module. Press and
hold the clips and snap to the
mating connector.
2. Route the cable to the next
adapter and connect the
dualend connector to it.
is the last one on
the link
Terminate the link by installing the
local I/O terminator (1771CXT) to
the exposed end of the dualend
connector on the last adapter
module. The system will not run
without it. The terminator is included
with the processor.
18586
9-6
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Connecting to a 1771AM1,
AM2 I/O Chassis with Integral
Power Supply and Adapter
Figure 9.5 shows I/O link connections to a 1771-AM1, -AM2 chassis both
as a middle device and as an end device on a link. The blue-insulation
conductor connects to the top terminal. The clear-insulation conductor
connects to the bottom terminal. At each 1771-AM1, -AM2, connect the
shield drain wire of each cable segment to give the shield continuity.
However, never ground the shield at a 1771-AM1, -AM2. At a
1771-AM1, -AM2 connected as an end device on a link, connect a
150-Ohm 1/4-Watt termination resistor across the signal lines.
Figure 9.5
Connections to a 1771AM1, AM2 Adapter/Chassis
1771AM1, AM2
adapter/chassis
To
scanner
1771AM1, AM2
adapter/chassis
Blue
Blue
Blue
Shield
Shield
Shield
Clear
Clear
Clear
150 Ω
16511
Connecting to a 1785 PLC5
Controller
Figure 9.6 shows I/O link connections to a 1785 PLC-5 controller both as a
middle device and as an end device on a link. Connection is to the remote
I/O terminals. The blue-insulation conductor connects to the line-1
terminal. The clear-insulation conductor connects to the line 2 terminal.
At each 1785 PLC-5 controller, connect the shield drain wire of each cable
segment to give the shield continuity. However, never ground the shield at
a PLC-5 controller. At a 1785 PLC-5 controller connected as a middle
device on a link, set switch 1 of switch assembly SW3 to the up position to
disconnect the internal termination resistor. At a 1785 PLC-5 controller
connected as an end device on a link, set switch 1 of switch assembly SW3
to the down position to connect the internal termination resistor
(Figure 9.6).
Figure 9.6
Connections to 1785 PLC5 Controller
1785 PLC5 controller
To
scanner
Blue
Shield
Clear
1
SH
2
1785 PLC5 controller
Blue
Blue
Shield
Shield
Clear
Clear
When connected as a middle device, set
switch 1 of SW3 to the UP position to
disconnect the internal termination resistor.
1
SH
2
When connected as an end device, set
switch 1 of SW3 to the DOWN position to
connect the internal termination resistor.
16510
9-7
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Connecting to a Direct
Communication Module
Figure 9.7 shows I/O link connections to a direct communication module
(1771-DCM) both as a middle device and as an end device on a link. The
clear-insulation conductor connects to the top terminal. The
blue-insulation conductor connects to the bottom terminal. At each direct
communication module, connect the shield drain wire of each cable
segment to give the shield continuity. However, never ground the shield at
a direct communication module. At a direct communication module
connected as an end device on a link, connect a 150-Ohm 1/4-Watt
termination resistor across the signal lines.
Figure 9.7
Connections to Direct Communication Module
Direct communication module
Direct communication module
Blue
Blue
Shield
Shield
Clear
Clear
Blue
To
scanner
Shield
Clear
150 Ω
16514
ATTENTION: Do not disconnect the connector on a middle
device when the system is operating because that would cause
discontinuity in the link and remove the termination.
The connection between terminals is inside the module.
Connecting to a RediPANEL
Module
9-8
Figure 9.8 shows I/O link connections to a 2705 RediPANEL module both
as a middle device and as an end device on a link. The blue-insulation
conductor connects to the top terminal. The clear-insulation conductor
connects to the bottom terminal. At each RediPANEL module, connect the
shield drain wire of each cable segment to give the shield continuity.
However, never ground the shield at a RediPANEL module. At a
RediPANEL module connected as an end device on a link, connect a
150-Ohm 1/4-Watt termination resistor across the signal lines.
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Figure 9.8
Connections to RediPANEL Module
Bulletin 2705
RediPANEL Module
To
Scanner
Bulletin 2705
RediPANEL Module
Blue
Blue
Blue
Shield
Shield
Shield
Clear
Clear
Clear
150 Ω
16511
Connecting to a PLC
Interface Module
Figure 9.9 shows I/O link connections to a PLC interface module (cat. no.
3500-NA1) both as a middle device and as an end device on a link.
Connection is to the X4 terminal strip. Terminals 1, 2, 9, and 10 are
connected internally for line 1 (blue-insulation conductor). Terminals 3, 4,
7, and 8 are connected internally for the shield. Terminals 5 and 6 are
connected internally for line 2 (clear-insulated conductor). At each PLC
interface module, connect the shield drain wire of each cable segment to
give the shield continuity. However, never ground the shield at a PLC
interface module. At a PLC interface module connected as an end device
on a link, connect a 150-Ohm 1/4-Watt termination resistor across the
signal lines.
Figure 9.9
Connections to PLC Interface Module
3500-NA1
PLC
Interface
Module
X4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
3500-NA1
PLC
Interface
Module
Blue
Shield
Clear
Clear
Shield
Blue
X4
1
2
150 Ω
3
4
5
Clear
6
Shield
7
8
Blue
9
10
To
Scanner
16512
9-9
Chapter 9
Connecting the I/O Link
Connecting to a PanelView
Operator Terminal
Figure 9.10 shows I/O link connections to PanelView Operator terminal
(2711 series) both as a middle device and as an end device on a link.
Terminal 1 connected internally for line 1 (blue-insulation conductor). The
middle terminal is connected internally for the shield. Terminal 3 is
connected internally for line 2 ( clear-insulated conductor). At each
PanelView Operator terminal, connect the shield drain wire of each cable
segment to give the shield continuity. However, never ground the shield at
a PanelView Operator terminal. At a PanelView Operator terminal
connected as an end device on a link, connect a 150-Ohm 1/4-Watt
termination resistor across the signal lines.
Figure 9.10
Connections to PanelView Operator Terminal
Clear
Blue
Shield
150 Ω
To
Scanner
PanelView
Operator
terminal
PanelView
Operator
terminal
Clear
sh 1
Shield
2
Blue
Clear
sh 1
Shield
Blue
2
16614
ATTENTION: Do not disconnect the connector on a middle
device when the system is operating because that would cause
discontinuity in the link and remove the termination. The
connection between terminals is inside the module.
What to do Next
9-10
After you have finished connecting the I/O link cabling, proceed to
chapter 10 to provide power to the I/O sub-system.
Chapter
10
Connecting ac Power
Chapter Objectives
This chapter shows you how to make ac connections to the components.
What You Will Be Doing
If you have the following components in your system, you have to connect
ac power to them.
Component:
Cat. no.:
power supply
5120P1/B
industrial disk
5730ID3, 5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7
fan chassis
5110FAN8
I/O power supply
1771P2,P4,P7
program loader
5710PL/B
You may also be wiring an:
isolation transformer
master control relay
ATTENTION: Avoid ground loops. Make sure all
grounds are at the same potential. Otherwise you could
damage the equipment.
The following sections show you how to connect ac power to the
above components.
Gather ac Wiring Documentation
Gather the ac wiring documentation to determine which components you
have to connect to ac power.
10-1
Chapter 10
Connecting ac Power
Disable Inputs and Outputs
To disable inputs and outputs, follow these steps:
ATTENTION: Disable outputs and inputs before connecting ac
power. If you do not, you may cause machine operation, which
could cause damage to machinery and personal injury.
Power Supply
1.
Pull down the wiring arm of each I/O module.
2.
Disconnect each RS connector.
3.
Put the keyswitch of the RM in Program Mode.
You connect the power supply to the:
devices you want disabled by the power interlock relay
ac line voltage
If you are not sure how to wire the supplied connectors of the power
supply, see appendix A.
Power Interlock Relay (Optional)
You can wire various devices to the power interlock relay. Check the
power supply documentation from your system designer to determine
which device you will be connecting (the maximum for this connection is
250V ac at 1 A).
To connect the power interlock relay, follow the steps below:
1. Wire the Interlock Relay connector as shown.
N/O
N/C
COM
2. Attach the wired connector to the female connector labeled
Interlock Relay on the power supply.
3. Attach the other end of the cable as shown in the wiring
documentation from your system designer.
10-2
19790
Chapter 10
Connecting ac Power
Connect ac Line Voltage
You connect the power supply to ac line voltage. The input ranges for the
power supply are:
85 to 132V ac for 115V ac
170 to 264V ac for 220V ac
47 to 63 Hz
To connect ac power to the power supply, follow the steps below:
Important: If you are grounding the ground wire to the chassis, do not
connect the top wire.
1. Wire the Line Voltage connector as shown.
2. Plug the connector into the female
connector labeled EQPT/GND L2/N L1.
3. Connect the other end of the cable to AC
power as shown in the wiring
documentation from your system designer.
EQPT/GND
L1
L2/N
19791
Industrial Disk
To wire ac power to the industrial disk, follow the steps below:
1.
If you have not already done so, wire the terminal block for ac power
as shown in chapter 5 of this manual.
ATTENTION: Make sure the ac selector switch is set to the
appropriate voltage. Otherwise you may damage
the equipment.
2.
Attach the other end of the wires to ac power as shown in your
system design wiring diagram.
10-3
Chapter 10
Connecting ac Power
Fan Assembly
You connect the fan assembly to ac power. The input ranges for the fan
assembly are:
85 to 132Vac for 110/120V ac
170 to 264Vac for 220V ac
47 to 63 Hz
To connect the fan assembly to ac power, follow the steps below.
100/120 AC
EQPT/GND
200V AC
1. Use a 1/8" (3.1mm) wide blade, insulated handled
screwdriver to set the voltage switch to the
operating voltage of your system (it is shipped set
to 200V ac and can be changed to 100/120V ac).
L1
2. Wire the line voltage
connector as shown.
L2/N
Connecting I/O Power Supplies
10-4
3. Attach the wired connector to the female
connector labeled GND L2/N L1 on the
fan chassis.
4. Attach the other end of the wires to ac power
as shown in your system designer
wiring diagrams.
Install each power supply for each I/O chassis as described in the
publication shipped with each power supply.
16797
Chapter
11
Checking the Hardware
Chapter Objectives
This chapter outlines how to check your hardware, after you have installed
it. For system startup and integration, see appendix D.
Checking the Hardware
To check your hardware installation:
disable all inputs and outputs
perform standalone hardware checks of
- ac power
- machine input/output devices
check the PI modules in the chassis
check the I/O modules
check the vision components
check the peripherals
Disable All Inputs and
Outputs
Before performing any checks, disable all inputs and outputs to avoid
machine operation.
ATTENTION: Disable outputs and inputs before connecting ac
power. If you do not, you may cause machine operation, which
could cause damage to machinery and personal injury.
1.
Pull all swing arms down.
2.
Disconnect any device that might cause machine motion to occur
when it is energized.
11-1
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
Perform Standalone
Hardware Check
The first checks you make are:
ac power
machine input/output devices
ac Power
Test each component receiving ac power. For each component receiving
ac power, perform the following steps.
1.
Measure the ac line voltage using a volt meter and make sure it
corresponds to the power supply or component. Verify the
incoming power.
2.
Check the wiring of the:
main disconnect switch or circuit breaker
master control relay
emergency stop switches
3.
Check power cable connections. Make sure connections are correct
and secure.
Machine Input/Output Devices
Test each machine input/output device. For each device, use a volt meter
to make sure the devices are receiving the necessary power.
11-2
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
Check the PI Modules
Follow the steps below to test the modules in the chassis.
1.
Make sure you have disabled your outputs as described in the
beginning of this chapter.
2.
Turn the RM key to Program.
3.
Turn off the power from the power supply.
Turn off the
power supply.
4.
Apply ac power to the PI chassis only.
5.
Turn on the power from the power supply.
6.
And check the indicators of each module.
19792
11-3
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
If you
have a:
Check the LED
labeled:
It should be:
If it is not:
power
supply
DC OK
GREEN
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• check fuses on the front of the power supply.
• check ac wiring.
• remove the module and make sure the voltageselector switch is set
to the correct operating voltage.
OVER TEMP
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turn it back on.
• make sure the fan is operating.
• check the fan filter installation. Arrows on the filter should be pointing
upwards.
• make sure there are no obstructions on the top or bottom of
the chassis.
• make sure the power connector is secure.
• make sure the filler plates are installed.
FAN STATUS
GREEN
make sure:
• nothing is blocking the air flow on top of the chassis
• the filter is inserted with the arrows pointing upwards
• the filler plates are installed and secure
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
EXECUTE
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• at initial power up, clear memory or redownload program.
OUTPUTS
OFF
FAULT
OFF
FORCES
OFF
CH 1
Flashing GREEN
(if connected)
CH 2
Flashing GREEN (if
configured as DH+ link)
CH 3
Flashing GREEN (if
configured as DH+ link)
MEM ERR1
OFF
make sure the memory module is connected properly see appendix A.
BATT LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
CH 1
Flashing GREEN
(if connected)
• make sure the connection is secure.
• see RS5 on page 115.
CH 2
Flashing GREEN
(if connected)
MEM ERR 1
OFF
make sure the memory module is connected properly see appendix A.
BATT LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
RM
RS2
1MEM ERR will be on at initial power up until memory is cleared or downloaded.
11-4
• make sure the connection is secure.
• make sure there are no duplicate nodes.
• make sure the blue and clear wires are not swapped.
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
If you
have a:
Check the LED
labeled:
It should be:
If it is not:
RS5
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
CH 1
• GREEN (if configured
and connected)
• make sure the connection is secure.
• make sure there are no duplicate or overlapping rack
numbers assigned.
• make sure that the rack is configured for a rack address in the range
defined by the scanner pushwheels.
CH 2
• Flashing GREEN (if
configured but some
adapters faulted or
disconnected)
CH 3
• Flashing RED (if
configured but all
adapters faulted or
disconnected)
CH 4
• OFF (if not configured)
CH 5
LP
CVIM
module
MicroVAX
Information
Processor
module EP
or EE
ERROR
OFF
• note flashing error code.
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
BATT LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the pushwheel number is correct.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
MEM ERR 1
OFF
make sure the memory module is connected properly see appendix A.
BATT LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
TRIGGER 1
OFF
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
supply
TRIGGER 2
OFF
MEMORY
OFF
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
ENET
Flashing GREEN (If
connected and
communicating on the
Ethernet network)
make sure the connection to the Ethernet network is secure.
PROCESSOR
OFF 2
BACKPLANE
OFF 2
ERROR
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
• it will blink the error code. Call support services.
BATTERY LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
11-5
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
If you
have a:
Check the LED
labeled:
It should be:
If it is not:
1MEM ERR will be on at initial power up until memory is cleared or downloaded.
2These LEDs light after INTERCHANGE software has been loaded.
MicroVAX
Information
Processor
module
KA module
OSI
Interface
Module
11-6
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
ENET CH A
Flashing GREEN (If
connected and
communicating on the
Ethernet network)
make sure the connection to the Ethernet network is secure.
PROCESSOR
OFF 2
BACKPLANE
OFF 2
ENET CH B
OFF
ERROR
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
• it will blink the error code. Call support services.
BATTERY LOW
OFF
make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turn it back on.
MEM ERR 1
OFF
make sure the memory module is connected properly see appendix A.
CH 1
Flashing GREEN
(if connected)
make sure the connection is secure.
CH 2
Flashing GREEN (if
configured as DH+ link)
CH 3
Flashing GREEN (if
configured as DH+ link)
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
• if cycling power doesn't work, replace the OSI Interface module.
MODE
GREEN
download the program image using AB MAP Station Manager.
ACTIVITY
Flashing GREEN (If MAP interface is passing a message.)
MEM ERR
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure you turn on the power to the power supply.
• if cycling power doesn't work, replace the OSI Interface module.
BATT LOW
OFF
• make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
• the lithium battery is weak and should be replaced.
COMM STATUS
GREEN
• if the LED is OFF, check 802.4 cable connections. Or check slot time.
• if the LED is flashing RED, reset the module through the RS232 local
interface or through a power cycle.
• if the LED is RED, reset the module through the RS232 local
interface or through a power cycle.
• if resetting the module doesn't work, contact your local AB sales
office.
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
If you
have a:
Check the LED
labeled:
It should be:
If it is not:
1MEM ERR will be on at initial power up until memory is cleared or downloaded.
2These LEDs light after INTERCHANGE software has been loaded.
Ethernet
Interface
module
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
BACKPLANE
OFF3
ENET
Flashing GREEN or off (If
connected and
communicating on the
Ethernet network)
make sure the connection to the Ethernet network is secure.
ERROR CODE
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply and then
turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see appendix A.
• it will blink the error code. Call support services.
3 This LED lights after Network INTERCHANGE software has been loaded.
RM or KA Module on the Communication Link
Channel:
With this protocol:
LED should be:
CH 1
Master
Flashing GREEN
(when communication
is occurring)
Slave
DF 1 (if another device is sending you messages and
you are replying)
Check I/O
DF 1 (If no other device is sending you messages)
OFF
Inactive
OFF
CH 2 and
DH link (and there's no other activity on the network)
GREEN
CH 3
DH link (and no messages are being sent to you on
the network)
OFF
DH link (and you are replying to messages from
another device on the network)
Flashing GREEN
Inactive
OFF
DH+ link
Flashing GREEN
If your configuration has I/O, your next step is to check it. To check I/O,
follow the steps below.
1.
Check the keying bands of each I/O module. Make sure they are
installed correctly. See chapter 7 in this manual if you’re unsure
about installing keying bands.
2.
Check the location and chassis positioning of each I/O module. Make
sure it is in its proper location (chassis, rack, and slot).
3.
Check the ac wiring on the I/O power supply.
11-7
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
4.
Check Vision Components
To make sure you have wired each I/O correctly, perform a continuity
test for each I/O wired.
To test the vision components, follow the steps below:
1.
Apply power to each vision device and make sure the PASS/FAIL
indicators are GREEN.
If the indicators are not green:
remove power
make sure the connections are correct and secure
re-apply power and re-check indicators
2.
Check the monitor’s screen. A message similar to the one shown
below should be displayed.
ALLEN-BRADLEY
Configurable Vision Input Module
Bulletin 5370-CVIM
Series xxx Revision X
Copyright 1993 Allen-Bradley Company
Phase I Diagnostics Completed Status = OK
Phase II Diagnostics Completed Status = OK
System Initialization Completed Status = OK
Power-up Completed
17214
If the display is not similar to the one shown above:
remove power
make sure the connections are correct and secure (see chapter 6)
re-apply power and re-check the monitor’s screen
11-8
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
Check Peripherals
To test the industrial disk (5710-ID4, -ID5, -ID6, -ID7), follow the
steps below:
1.
Apply power to the industrial disk.
2.
Check the indicators.
The indicator labeled:
Should be:
If it is not:
CABLE PRESENT
ON (If connected to the MicroVAX
Information Processor module)
make sure the cable is secure at the industrial disk
and the MicroVAX Information Processor.
DRIVE #1 DATA ACCESS
OFF
the MicroVAX Information Processor is accessing
the disk. This is normal.
DRIVE #2 DATA ACCESS2
OFF
the MicroVAX Information Processor is accessing
the disk. This is normal.
DISK POWER
ON
make sure the power connection is correct
and secure.
PROCESSOR FAULT
OFF
cycle power. If it does not go OFF, the processor
that controls the disk drive's environment has
faulted. Call support services.
HEATER ON1
OFF
wait a few minutes. It should go OFF (if performing
a cold start, this LED may stay ON for a half hour).
COOLER ON1
OFF
wait a few minutes. It should go OFF (if performing
a hot start, this LED may stay ON for up to an hour
and a half).
1Either the HEATER ON or COOLER ON LED could be on at startup (depending on the internal temperature of the disk). If both LEDs are ON, call support services.
2The DRIVE #2 DATA ACCESS indicator is only present on 5710ID5; it is not present on 5710ID4.
present at all for 5710ID6 and ID7.
DRIVE #1 data access and DRIVE #2 data access are not
11-9
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
To test the industrial disk (5710-ID3), follow the steps below:
1.
Apply power to the industrial disk.
2.
Check the indicators.
The indicator labeled:
Should be:
If it is not:
CABLE PRESENT
ON (If connected to the MicroVAX
Information Processor module)
make sure the cable is secure at the industrial disk
and the MicroVAX Information Processor.
DATA ACCESS
OFF
the MicroVAX Information Processor is accessing
the disk. This is normal.
DISK POWER OK
ON
make sure the power connection is correct
and secure.
PROCESSOR FAULT
OFF
cycle power. If it does not go OFF, the processor
that controls the disk drive's environment has
faulted. Call support services.
ENV POWER OK
ON
disconnect power from the disk and check the
fuses on the disk's power supply. If necessary,
replace the 250V, 5 amp and/or 7 amp
slowblow fuses.
HEATER ON1
OFF
wait a few minutes. It should go OFF (if performing
a cold start, this LED may stay ON for a half hour).
COOLER ON1
OFF
wait a few minutes. It should go OFF (if performing
a hot start, this LED may stay ON for a half hour).
1Either the HEATER ON or COOLER ON LED could be on at startup (depending on the internal temperature of the disk). If both LEDs are ON, call support services.
To test other peripherals you have installed, follow the steps below:
11-10
1.
Apply power to each peripheral and make sure the power indicators
are on.
2.
If the power indicators are off, remove power and make sure the
connections are correct and secure. Re-apply power and re-check
the indicators.
Chapter 11
Checking the Hardware
What to do Next
After you have successfully tested all of the installed hardware, you can
begin system startup and integration.
For information on system startup and integration, see the
following publications:
Module:
Documentation:
Pub. no./Cat.no.:
CVIM module
CVIM User Manual
5370ND.001
MicroVAX Information
Processors
INTERCHANGE Software (BPI version)
Documentation Set
5730DTLD
Ethernet Interface
module
INTERCHANGE Software (EI version for VAX)
Documentation Set
5730VDOC
INTERCHANGE Software (EI version for HPUX)
Documentation Set
5730HPUD
RM
PLC5/250 Programming Software Documentation Set
6200N8.002
LP
PLC5/250 Programming Software Documentation Set
6200N8.002
RS
PLC5/250 Programming Software Documentation Set
6200N8.002
KA
PLC5/250 Programming Software Documentation Set
6200N8.002
OSI interface module
AllenBradley MAP Station Manager Software
User's Manual
66306.5.2
11-11
Chapter
12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Chapter Objectives
This chapter shows you how to start up and test the MicroVAX
Information Processor hardware and set hardware defaults. To configure
the hardware, you must complete the following tasks:
start up and test the hardware
format the industrial disk
set hardware defaults
Gather Your Equipment
You need the:
MicroVAX Information Processor
terminal or workstation (VT220, VT240 or compatible, VT320, VT340
or compatible)
program loader
documentation that came with the above hardware
MicroVAX Information Processor, or EP or EE worksheets
communications wiring, labeling diagram
industrial disk
Start Up and Test
MicroVAX Information
Processor Hardware
Starting up and testing MicroVAX Information Processor
hardware requires:
checking module indicator lights
setting up the terminal and connecting it to the processor module
running power-up diagnostic self-tests
running system exerciser tests
formatting industrial disk
configuring defaults
12-1
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Checking Module Indicator Lights
Use the following table to check the module indicator lights.
Check the LED labeled: 1 It should be:
If it is not:
PASS/FAIL
GREEN
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply
and then turning it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly, see appendix A.
ENET A2 or ENET
Flashing GREEN make sure the Ethernet connection is secure.
(If connected and
communicating on
Ethernet)
PROCESSOR
OFF 1
BACKPLANE
OFF 1
ERROR
OFF
• cycle power by turning off the power from the power supply
and then turn it back on.
• make sure the module is seated properly see
appendix A.
• note the blinking error code; count the flashes between
pauses and be prepared to give that information to
support services.
BATTERY LOW
OFF
Make sure the battery is inserted correctly in the battery holder.
1 These LEDs light after Interchange software has been loaded.
2 ENET A is for the MicroVAX Information Processor and ENET is for the MicroVAX Information Processor EP or EE.
Connecting the Program Loader
If you are using the program loader (series A or B), you should have
already connected it to the module. Make sure you have rebooted the
system at least once since the program loader was connected, or the
MicroVAX Information Processor will not recognize that the program
loader is connected. See the Program Loader Installation Data
(5000-2.93) for more information.
Setting Up the Terminal
To set up the console terminal, complete the following steps:
1.
Attach the terminal to port 3 (OPA0) on the distribution panel.
2.
Set the terminal to:
9600 baud
transmit = receive
8 bits
no parity
1 stop bit
no local echo
12-2
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Changing Modes and Booting the Hardware
ENET
Console Run Boot
Use the keyswitch on the MicroVAX Information Processor to change the
operating mode of the MicroVAX Information Processor. The three
modes are:
Console
Run
Boot
To switch mode, turn the keyswitch to that mode position.
Table 12.A
MicroVAX Information Processor Module Keyswitch
To:
Use this
position/mode:
The keyswitch:
run selftests and system utilities, and configure
hardware defaults
Console
stays in Console position
until you turn it. The key
cannot be removed from
the switch.
boot or reboot the processor. The processor
comes up either running VMS or in console
mode (where the prompt is >>>), depending on
how the default recovery is set. For more
information, see the Setting Default Recovery
section later in this chapter.
Boot
automatically returns to
the Run position.
operate normally
Run
stays in Run position until
you turn it. The key can be
removed from the switch.
Run Powerup Diagnostic Selftest
Each time the MicroVAX Information Processor is powered up, it runs a
series of self-tests. The test results are displayed and then you see the
Console prompt. Once the Console prompt is displayed, you can run
self-tests on individual devices or call up the system configuration table to
look at test results.
ATTENTION: Do not power down the MicroVAX Information
Processor before the power-up self-test is completed. If the
power-up sequence is interrupted, the hardware defaults in the
non-volatile random-access memory may become corrupted.
12-3
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
See Power-up Self-test
To see the power-up self-test display, power up the system.
1.
Make sure the terminal is set up and connected to port 3 on the
distribution panel.
2.
Power up the MicroVAX Information Processor and the terminal. If
they are already on, reboot them by turning the module’s keyswitch to
Boot. You should see a similar display like this one:
KA42-IN V1.0
F_..E...D...C...B...A...9...8...7...6...5...4_..3_..2...1...
There should be a _ after the F, 4, and 3.
12-4
If you see:
It means:
...
device tested successfully or has a soft error.
?..
device has a hard error. To find out more information, use
TEST 50 to see the system configuration display.
_..
device not installed or not tested.
*..
device installed but its ROM is destroyed.
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
3.
Look at the self-test error summary that is displayed after the
self-tests are complete. The summary displays all of the hard and soft
errors found during the tests.
If the system detects
this during powerup:
Next to the devices where the error occurred, you
will see:
Hard error
??
Also, the system will not be able to boot automatically.
Soft error
?
KA42-IN V1.0
F_..E...D...C...B...A...9...8?..7...6...5...4_..3_..2...1...
?
??
E
8
0040
00F0
0000.0005
0000.0300
Table 12.B tells you what each test number represents.
12-5
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Table 12.B
Test Numbers and Device Mnemonics
This test
number:
Represents this device:
And this
mnemonic:
F
not used
--
E
time of year clock
CLK
D
nonvolatile RAM
NVR
C
DZ controller (serial line controller)
DZ
B
memory
MEM
A
memory management unit
MM
9
floating point unit
FP
8
interval timer
IT
7
disk controller (and disk drives)
HDC,1 SCSIA2
6
tape controller (and program loader)
TPC,1 SCSIB2
5
interrupt controller and Ethernet ID ROM
SYS
4
not used
--
3
not used
--
2
dual port RAM
BPI
1
Ethernet
NI
1 MicroVax Information Processor (cat. no. 5730CPU1) only
2 MicroVax Information Processor EP or EE (cat. no. 5731CPU1, CPU2) only
If an error summary is displayed, you should look at the system
configuration table. This table displays error codes that help you
determine whether or not to replace the module or a device. The table also
displays the MicroVAX Information Processor’s Ethernet address. For
more information, see page 12-7.
Run Self-test on Individual Devices
To test individual devices, follow this procedure:
1.
Make sure you are at the console prompt:
>>>
2.
Enter the TEST command and the number of the device you want to
test. For example, to self-test the floating point unit (FP), you would
enter: TEST 9
You can also run self-tests on a range of devices by entering the first
and last number of the range. For example, to test devices C through
7, you would enter: TEST C 7
To test all devices, enter: TEST F 1
12-6
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
See Table 12.B for test numbers to use for testing the devices.
3.
View the results of the self test.
If the test was:
You will see the selftest number followed by:
Successful
...
For example, a successful selftest of the floating
point unit looks like this:
9...
Not successful
?.. and the message 84 FAIL.
For example, an unsuccessful selftest of the
floating point unit looks like this:
9?..
84 FAIL
To find out what the error is, display the system configuration table.
For more information, go to the next section.
Display SelfTest Error Codes in System Configuration Table
To see the error codes for all tested devices, bring up the system
configuration table. This table gets updated every time the MicroVAX
Information Processor is powered up or a self-test is run.
1.
At the console prompt, enter: TEST 50
You will see the system configuration table looks similar to this:
KA42-IN V2.1
ID 00-00-BC-01-01-C7
CLK
0000.0001
NVR
0000.0001
DZ
0000.4001 V0.1
00000001 00000001 00000001 00004001 0000000 00000000
MEM
0002.0001
00200000 000000002
MM
0000.0001
FP
0000.0001
IT
0000.0001
SCSI-A
2828.0001
1000.0001 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05
SCSI-B
1C1C.0001
1000.0001 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05 FFFFFF05
SYS
0000.0001
BPI
0000.0005 V0.7
NI
0000.0001
12-7
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
2.
Use the error codes in Table 12.C to trouble-shoot the MicroVAX
Information Processor’s hardware. For more information, see the
VAXstation 3100 and MicroVAX 3100 Maintenance Guide or call
your service representative.
Important: Before you replace any hardware, be sure to check the
cabling and wiring. Also make sure the modules, disk drives, and
program loader are properly connected and powered-up.
Table 12.C
Hardware Selftest Error Codes
If this device:
Displays this selftest
error code:
Then:
CLK
0000.0001
the device is good.
0000.0005
set the system time.
<>0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the device is good.
0000.0005
set system time after replacing the module battery.
<>0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001 or 0000.4001
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001 or
<>0000.4001
replace the module.
00XX.0001 (and
X=number of Mbytes
of memory)
the device is good.
<>00XX.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001
replace the module.
NVR
DZ
MEM
MM
FP
IT
12-8
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
If this device:
Displays this selftest
error code:
Then:
HDC 1
7770.0001
0 disks are connected to the module and the device is good.
7710.0001
1 disk is connected to the module and the device is good (DUA1).
7110.0001
2 disks are connected to the module and the device is good (DUA0).
7ABC.WXYZ
where:
if either X or Y is:
2, 4, 6, 8, A, C, E
there is a fatal error. Replace disk or call AB representative.
if either X or Y is:
5,F
check to see if disk is formatted. If the disk is formatted, it indicates a
controller error. Call AB representative.
if either X or Y is:
3,9
it is a warning. Try again.
7777.7777
check that drive has power and cables are properly connected,
replace the specified disk.
0000.0001
the tape controller and the program loader are good.
0000.4001
the tape controller is good and the program loader is not connected.
WXYZ.0001
and WX=YZ
and WX<>YZ
then the module is communicating with the program loader.
WXYZ.ABCD
and CD>01
replace the module.
TPC 1
and B is:
disconnect the program loader cable (turn off program loader, unplug
data cable, then unplug power cable. See Appendix B for more
information) and run the selftest again (TEST 6).
• if you don't see 0000.4001, replace the cable and run the
selftest again.
• if you see 0000.4001, reconnect the cable, power down the
system and power up the system again. Run the selftest again.
You should then see 1212.0001. If you don't see 1212.0001, run
the system exerciser.
1
2
3
check that program loader has power and cables are properly
connected then:
replace the module.
replace the program loader.
replace both.
1
check that program loader has power and cables are properly
connected then:
retest TPC.
3
retest the program loader.
4
replace the module and the program loader.
5
the controller doesn't recognize the program loader. Follow the
procedure above for when WX<>YZ.
6
retest TPC and the program loader. Follow the procedure above for
when WX<>YZ.
7
replace the program loader.
and A is:
1
A = drive DUA1
B = drive DUA0
X = control status for DUA1
Y = control status for DUA0
MicroVAX Information Processor (cat. no. 5730CPU1) only.
12-9
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
If this device:
Displays this selftest
error code:
Then:
DUALP 1
0000.0005 or 0000.0001
the device is okay.
<> 0000.0005 or
<>0000.0001
replace the module.
FFFFFF03
SCSI bus controller is connected to module and device is good.
00000001
disk drive is connected to module and device is good.
01000001
tape drive is connected to the module and device is good.
FFFFFF05
device is offline or not installed at this address. The SCSI ID may be
set incorrectly or the cabling may be disconnected. Check the cabling
and SCSI ID, then retest.
FFFFFFFF
device not tested - possible SCSI bus controller error
FFFFFF03
SCSI bus controller is connected to module and device is good.
00000001
disk drive is connected to module and device is good.
01000001
tape drive is connected to the module and device is good.
FFFFFF05
device is offline or not installed at this address.
FFFFFFFF
device not tested - possible SCSI bus controller error.
0000.0001
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the device is okay.
<>0000.0001
replace the module.
0000.0001
the Ethernet port and cable are good.
>0000.0001 < 0000.7001
replace the module.
>= 0000.7001
install both Tconnector terminators from the service kit and run the
test again. If you see 0000.0001, then replace the cable. If you do not
see 0000.0001, replace the module.
SCSIA 2
SCSIB 2
SYS
BPI 2
NI
1
2
MicroVAX Information Processor (cat. no. 5730CPU1) only.
MicroVAX Information Processor EP or EE (cat. nos. 5731CPU1, CPU2) only.
3.
Record the Ethernet address. It is on the second line of the system
configuration display table. For example:
ID 00-00-BC-01-01-C7
Run System Exerciser
You can use the system exerciser to:
test interaction between MicroVAX Information Processor devices
help determine the cause of intermittent problems
give more information about errors associated with the SCSI PORT
or LOADER
12-10
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
The MicroVAX Information Processor tests each device individually
during the first pass and displays error codes for each device tested. Then
it tests all the devices together and displays another set of error codes.
This procedure should take about 11 minutes.
To run the system exerciser:
1.
Be sure you are at the console prompt.
2.
Enter : TEST 0
3.
The system begins testing individual devices. Watch the screen for
the first set of error codes.
Important: The following is only a sample test 0.
4.
KA42-IN V2.1
C
0080
B
0010
7
0090
01
DZ
MEM
SCSI-A
6
00A0
SCSI-B
2
1
00A1
00C0
BPI
NI
CU
0000.001 14
0010.0001
6000.0001
3200.0001
6000.0001
2200.0001
3200.0001
7200.0001
0000.0001
0000.0001
1005 0
5
22 0002
00:00:35
0 00:01:12
0 00:02:23
15
0
00:02:56
0
0
00:03:06
00:04:01
1
9
0002
The system then tests the devices together. When testing is complete,
the final error codes are displayed. Use Table 12.D to interpret
the results.
Important: Before you replace any hardware, be sure to check the
cabling and wiring. Also make sure the modules, disk drives, and
program loader are properly connected and powered-up.
12-11
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Table 12.D
System Exerciser Display Codes
If this device:
Displays this system exerciser
error code:
DZ
0000.0001 or 0000.4001
--
the device is good.
<> 0000.0001 or <>0000.4001
--
replace the module.
MEM
XXXX.0001
And:
XXXX is number of pages of
memory tested
<>XXXX.0001
HDC1
TPC 1
SCSIA 2
SCSIB
BPI
2
2
NI
1
2
Then:
--
replace the module.
XXXX.0001
no hard drives are connected
the module is good.
<>XXXX.0001
no hard drives are connected
replace the module
<>XXXX.0001
one or two drives are
connected and code
XXXX.0001 is displayed when
no hard drives are connected
one or both of the hard drives needs to be
replaced. Test each configured to module
separately to determine which (or both)
is bad.
8000.0001
the program loader
is connected
the program loader and module are good.
<>8000.0001
the program loader
is connected
replace the program loader.
XXXX.XXXX
a program loader is not
connected
the module is good.
XXXX.0001
--
the device is good.
<>XXXX.0001
--
replace the module.
XXXX.0001
--
the device is good.
<>XXXX.0001
--
replace the module.
0000.0001
--
the dual port is good.
<>0000.0001
--
replace the module.
0000.0001
--
the Ethernet port and cable are good.
<>0000.0001
--
replace the module.
MicroVAX Information Processor (cat. no. 5730CPU1) only.
MicroVAX Information Processor EP or EE (cat. nos. 5731CPU1, CPU2) only.
Verify and Format Disk
(for 5730CPU1)
We recommend that you verify the industrial disk in your configuration
before you format or begin installing software on it. The verification
procedure will tell you if:
the disk has been formatted
the disk is in good condition
12-12
the device is good.
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Verify Disk
The names of the disks you have are:
DUA0 = disk 1
DUA1 = disk 2
To verify a disk, follow this procedure.
1.
Make sure you are at the console prompt, then enter: TEST 71
2.
You see:
VSmsv QUE–unitno (0–1)?
3.
Enter 0 to verify disk DUA0 or 1 to verify disk DUA1.
If you see:
VSmsv_STS_Siz . . . . . RD54
VSmsv_QUE_RUsure (DUA0 1/0) ?
then the disk has already been formatted.
If you see:
VSmsv_STS_Siz . . . . . ??
VSmsv_RES_Err #2
84 FAIL
>>>>
then the disk has not been formatted or a problem has occurred. Go
to the formatting procedure in the next section.
4.
To make sure the formatted disk is in good operating condition,
enter 1.
If you see a display similar to this:
VSmsv_STS_RDing . . . . . OK
VSmsv_STS_OBBcnt = 14
VSmsv_NBBcnt – 0
12-13
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
VSmsv_RES_Succ
>>>
then the disk is in good operating condition. Go to the Setting
Defaults section, to continue starting up the MicroVax Information
Processor hardware.
If you see a display similar to this:
VSmsv_STS_NBBcnt = X
and X is Greater than 50, then replace the disk.
Format Disk
To format a disk, follow the procedure below.
Important: The formatting procedure erases the entire disk. If you have
information on the disk that you want to save, copy it to another disk
before beginning this procedure.
1.
Be sure you are at the console prompt, then enter: TEST 70
2.
You see:
KA630–IN RDRXfmt
VSfmt_QUE_unitno (0–2)?
Enter: 0 to format Disk 0 or 1 to format Disk 1.
If you see:
VSfmt_STS–Siz
then everything is working normally.
If you see:
VSfmt_RES–ERR #1
then you typed an incorrect number. Start over by entering TEST 70
again. If the message continues to appear, call your service
representative.
12-14
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
3.
When you see:
VSmsv_STS_Siz . . . . . RD54
the formatter program is determining the type of disk it is formatting.
If you see:
VSmsv_STS_Siz . . . . . ??
or
VSmsv_RES_Err #2
84 FAIL
>>>>
then replace the disk.
4.
When you see:
VSfmt_QUE_SerNBR (0–999999999)?
enter the serial number of the disk (it should be on the packing slip).
If you do not have a serial number, assign a unique number to it.
Record the number on your MicroVax Information Processor
worksheet.
5.
When you see:
VSfmt_QUE_RUsure (DUA0 1/0) ?
enter: 1 to continue the formatting procedure.
While the disk is formatting, these messages gradually appear:
VSfmt_STS_rdMBB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ??
VSfmt_STS_FMTing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OK
VSfmt_STS_ChkPass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .OK
VSfmt_STS BBRvec : = n
VSfmt_RES_Succ
The actual formatting takes about 45 minutes. When you see the last
line of the display, the procedure is complete and the disk is ready to
be used. Return to the previous section and verify the disk.
12-15
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
To discontinue the formatting procedure enter: 0. You will see
this message:
VSfmt_RES_Abtd
84 FAIL
>>>
You will have to begin the formatting procedure over if you wish to
format the disk.
Formatting the Industrial Disk
(for 5731CPU1, CPU2)
To format an industrial disk, complete the following procedure.
Important: The formatting procedure erases the entire disk. If you have
information on the disk that you want to save, copy it to another disk
before beginning this procedure.
1.
Be sure you are at the console prompt, then enter: TEST 75
2.
You see:
PV_SCS_FMT_CHN (0=SCSIA \ 1=SCSIB)?
To format the disk, enter: 0
3.
You see:
PV_SCS_FMT_ID (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7)?
Enter the address of the disk drive you want to format.
4.
You see:
PV_SCS_FMT_RUsure (1/0) ?
To continue the formatting procedure, enter: 1
While the disk is formatting, this message displays:
PV_SCS_FMTing....
The actual formatting takes about 40 minutes. When you see the
following messages, the procedure is complete and the disk is ready
to be used:
PV_SCS_FMT_BBrepl=0
PV_SCS_FMT_SUCC
>>>
12-16
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
To discontinue the formatting procedure, enter: 0
You will see this message:
PV_SCS_FMTex
>>>
You will have to initiate the formatting procedure again if you wish
to format the disk.
Set Hardware Defaults
After you have determined that the MicroVAX Information Processor
hardware is working correctly and the disk(s) you are using are formatted,
you will set two system defaults:
default boot device
default recovery mode
Set Default Boot Device
The default boot device holds the VMS software that the MicroVAX
Information Processor uses.
If you are using:
To use this device as the default:
Set default device to:
MicroVAX Information
Processor (cat.
(cat no.
no
5730CPU1)
disk 0 (in port)
DUA0
disk 1 (out port)
DUA1
remote disk on the network (if MicroVAX
is booting off a cluster)
ESA0
program loader tape drive
MUA0
disk 0
DKA0
disk 1
DKA100
remote disk on the network (if MicroVAX
Processor is booting off a cluster)
ESA0
program loader tape drive
MKB100
MicroVAX Information
Processor EP or EE
(cat. no. 5731CPU1,
CPU2)
To set the default boot device:
1.
Make sure you are at the console prompt, then enter: TEST 51
2.
When you see:
. . . .
?
>>>
type the name of the boot device and press [ENTER]. For example:
DKA0 [ENTER]
12-17
Chapter 12
Configuring Hardware for the MicroVAX
Information Processors
Set Default Recovery
ENET
Console Run Boot
The setting you choose determines what happens when you boot the
MicroVAX Information Processor by turning the module’s keyswitch to
the Boot position.
The MicroVAX Information Processor module comes set to default
setting 2. We recommend you set the MicroVAX Information Processor to
setting 1 so the MicroVAX Information Processor will always reboot the
hardware and come up running VMS.
Set default
to:
So when the system software
goes down, the MicroVAX
Information Processor:
So when powering up after losing power,
the MicroVAX Information Processor:
1
reboots hardware and software to
VMS level
reboots hardware and software to VMS level
2
reboots hardware and comes up
in console mode
reboots hardware and software to VMS level
3
reboots hardware and comes up
in console mode
reboots hardware and comes up in
console mode
To set the default recovery:
1.
Make sure you are at the console prompt, then enter: TEST 53
2.
When you see:
2
?
>>>
type the number of the desired default recovery procedure and press
[ENTER].
To keep the same default, press [ENTER].
What to do Next
12-18
Now that you have configured the MicroVAX Information Processor
module hardware, see INTERCHANGE Software for PI MicroVAX
Documentation Set (5730-DTLD) to install and configure the MicroVAX
Information Processor software (or INTERCHANGE software). You will
also find information on starting up VMS operating software and securing
VMS license PAKs.
Appendix
A
Installing and Removing a Module
What's in this Appendix
This appendix shows you how to:
change a memory module
install a PI module in the chassis
remove a PI module from the chassis
install filler plates
wire the connectors that come with some of the modules
Changing a Memory Module
The following modules have a memory module:
RM
RS2
LP
If you are changing a memory module, do so in a static safe environment
and follow the procedure below.
ATTENTION: If you perform operations on a module
improperly, you may cause an electrostatic discharge, which can
damage the module. Perform internal operations, such as
installing the memory module, only in a static safe environment.
As a minimum, we recommend the 3M Type 8005 Portable
Field Service Grounding Kit or its equivalent for providing a
static-safe environment.
Important: Turn the power supply off before removing module from the
chassis. Otherwise, you might destroy the memory.
Newer revisions of the RM, RS2 and LP have their memory module
attached with screws. Before you replace memory module, remove the
screws and detach the ribbon cable connector, then replace the
memory module.
A-1
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
Removing a Memory Module
To remove a memory module, follow the steps below:
1.
Release the locks to open the module.
17220
2.
Slide the thumb tab to the right, then lift gently.
16789
A-2
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
3.
Pull the thumb tab slightly further right, then insert your fingers
under the left edge of the memory board and lift.
Flip the memory board over to expose the connector.
17221
4.
Push out the locking tabs to separate the connectors and pull the
memory board from the module.
Module
Memory Board
16791
You can now install a new memory board.
A-3
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
Installing a Memory Module
To install a memory module, follow the steps below.
1.
Connect the ribbon connectors. Make sure the locking tabs are “in”.
Memory Board
Module
17222
2.
Flip the memory board over, align the battery holder with the battery
hole on the front panel and slide the memory board into place.
17223
A-4
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
3.
Close the locks.
17224
Installing a PI Module in
the Chassis
To install a module in the chassis, follow the steps below:
1.
Check the module worksheet to determine which slot to install
the module.
4slot chassis (5110A4/B)
8slot chassis (5110A8/B)
19775
A-5
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
2.
Turn off the power supply.
Turn off the
power supply.
3.
19792
Insert the module into the chassis.
Important: Make sure the module is firmly seated in the
chassis backplane before you secure the module in the chassis
using the thumbscrews.
a. Hold the module upright, with
its front panel facing toward you.
b. Align the module 's board on the module card guides and slides the
module into the chassis until:
it seats firmly
its faceplate is flush with the other modules
(The power supply is not flush with the other modules.)
19793
A-6
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
4.
Secure the module in the chassis.
Tighten the thumbscrews.
19794
5.
Turn on the power supply.
Turn on the
power supply.
19792
A-7
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
Removing a PI Module from
the Chassis
To remove a module from the chassis, follow the steps below.
1.
Turn off the power supply.
Turn off the
power supply.
2.
19792
Remove the module from the chassis.
a. Loosen the captive thumbscrews (pull the
thumbscrews toward you to make sure they
are not screwed into the chassis).
b. Pull the ejecting tabs toward you.
c. Slide the module out of the chassis.
Ejecting tabs
19796
3.
A-8
If you are replacing a module, insert the new module into the chassis.
If you are not replacing the module, install a filler plate. See
page A-10.
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
4.
Turn on the power supply.
Turn on the
power supply.
19792
A-9
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
Installing Filler Plates
To protect the chassis and maintain air flow through the chassis, you must
install filler plates (5110-FP) in all empty module slots. Filler plates also
aid in cooling the chassis when a fan chassis is connected to the chassis.
ATTENTION: Install filler plates in empty slots. If you do not,
air will not flow properly through the chassis and noise
immunity will be reduced.
Follow the steps below to install filler plates.
1.
Check the module documentation to locate the empty slot or slots.
2.
Attach the filler plate to the empty slot.
a. Place the filler plate over
the empty slot.
b. Tighten the thumbscrews.
19792
A-10
Appendix A
Installing and Removing a Module
How to Wire a Connector
Many of the connections you will make to a module are made to
connectors which you attach to another connector on the module.
To wire one of these connectors, follow the steps below:
1.
Strip about 9 mm (1/4 to 3/8 in) insulation from the end of the wire.
3/8 in
(9 mm)
16801
2.
Insert the wire into the connector as shown below.
Place tool here
This side plugs
into connector
on module
Place tool here
OR
Insert wire here
Insert wire here
16856
A-11
Appendix
B
Mounting Dimensions
What's in this Appendix
This appendix contains the dimensions for PI products that you can mount.
Figure B.1
Dimensions: 8SlotChassis (5110A8/B) and Fan Assembly (5110FAN8)
481 mm2
(19 in)
(fits in standard 19 in rack)
465 mm
(18.31 in)
311 mm
(12.25 in)
Side view
406 mm1
(16 in)
Front view
256 mm
(10.08 in)
406 mm overall depth
(16 in)
(allow for installing and
removing modules and cables)
146 mm
(5.75 in)
427 mm
(16.85 in)
1
235 mm
(9.26 in)
Allow 6" above and below each chassis or each chassis and fan assembly
2 If chassis is installed with other PI chassis, allow 6" between chassis. Otherwise, allow
4" left and right of the chassis.
3 If using program loader, position chassis within 6" of program loader so the data cable
can be connected to the MicroVAX Information processor.
19772
B-1
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.2
Dimensions of the 4Slot Chassis (5110A4/B)
309 mm2
(12.13 in)
292 mm
(11.50 in)
311 mm
(12.25 in)
Side view
406 mm1
(16 in)
Front View
1
Allow 6" above and below each chassis.
If chassis is installed with other PI chassis, allow 6"
between chassis. Otherwise, allow 4" left and right of
the chassis.
2
256 mm
(10.08 in)
406 mm overall depth
(16 in)
(allow for installing and
removing modules and cables)
19773
Figure B.3
Dimensions of the 4Port Distribution Panel (5710DPI)
0.8 mm
(0.03 R)
465 mm
(18.33
in)
88 mm
(3.47 in)
13 mm
(0.5 in)
B-2
45 mm
(1.75 in)
Allow at least 3 inches of depth for
connectors and cables
22 mm
(0.86 in)
17067
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.4
Dimensions of the Industrial Disk (5710ID4, ID5, ID6, ID7 and 5730ID3)
Top view
245 mm
(9.66 in)
447 mm
(17.58 in)
419 mm
(16.49 in)
295 mm
(11.63 in)
465 mm
(18.33 in)
Front view
17086
B-3
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.5
Dimensions of the User Interface Box (2801N22)
10 mm
(0.38 in)
70 mm
(2.75 in)
5 mm
(0.19 in)
68 mm
(2.69 in)
4 mm (0.152 in)
DIA. HOLES
77 mm
(3.03 in)
14 mm
(0.56 in)
35 mm
(1.38 in)
17016
B-4
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.6
Dimensions of the User Interface Box (2801N26) -- for CVIM2 only
7 mm
(0.26 in)
66 mm
(2.61 in)
76 mm
(3.00 in)
89 mm
(3.50 in)
6 mm
(0.25 in)
14 mm
(0.56 in)
9 mm
(0.35 in)
33 mm
(1.31 in)
79 mm
(3.12 in)
19902
B-5
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.7
Dimensions of the I/O Interface Box (2801N21)
4 mm
(0.16 in)
4 mm (0.166 in)
DIA. HOLES
21 mm
(0.81 in)
86 mm
(3.38 in)
76 mm
(3 in)
5 mm
(0.19 in)
24 mm
(0.94 in)
48 mm
(1.88 in)
13 mm
(0.5 in)
B-6
17020
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.8
Dimensions of the I/O Interface Box (2801N27)
5 mm
(0.19 in)
83 mm
(3.28 in)
76 mm
(3.0 in)
13 mm
(0.5 in)
65 mm
(2.56 in)
86 mm
(3.38
in)
16 mm
(0.63 in)
54 mm
(2.13 in)
94 mm
(3.69 in)
19903
B-7
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.9
Dimensions of I/O Board (1771JMB)
6 mm
(0.25 in)
343 mm
(13.5 in)
89 mm
(3.5 in)
76 mm
(3 in)
356 mm
(14 in)
16 mm (0.63 in)
Ref. Comp. Ht.
2 mm
(0.06 in)
37 mm
(1.44 in)
19 mm
(0.75 in)
6 mm
(0.25 in)
368 mm
(14.47 in)
Nonmetallic
threaded spacer (#440)
Metallic standoff
with clearance for #6
hardware (4 places)
Figure B.10
Dimensions of the 12" Black and White Monitor
Front view
Rear view
284 mm
(11.2 in)
231 mm
(9.1 in)
304 mm
(11.9 in)
B-8
Allow 343 mm (13.5 in) depth
17083
17092
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.11
Dimensions of 9" Black and White Monitor
Rear view
Front view
220 mm
(8.66 in)
165 mm
(6.5 in)
220 mm
(8.66 in)
Allow 254 mm (10 in) depth
17084
B-9
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.12
Dimensions of the Rack Mount Color Monitor (2801N8)
448 mm
(17.62 in)
464 mm
(18.25 in)
(8) Mtg. holes plus (10) studs
and cutout used for panel Mtg.
(Mtg. with #10 hardware).
19 mm
(0.75 in)
19 mm
(0.75 in)
483 mm
(19 in)
465 mm
(18.31 in)
38 mm
(1.5 in)
89 mm
(3.5 in)
310 mm
(12.22 in)
57 mm
(2.25 in)
89 mm
(3.5 in)
(8) Mtg. are used for
standard 19 inch
(482 mm) rack Mtg.
#10 hardware
9 mm
(0.34 in)
B-10
18520
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.13
Dimensions of the Camera (2801YB)
43.2 mm
(1.7 in)
154.4 mm
(6.1 in)
37 mm
(1.46 in)
Side view
Front view
19117
Figure B.14
Dimensions of the Camera (2801YC)
129.5 mm
(5.10 in)
50.3 mm
(1.98 in)
60.2 mm
(2.37 in)
54.6 mm
(2.15 in)
Dust cap
17082
Figure B.15
Dimensions of the Camera (2801YD)
45.9 mm
(1.81 in)
6.9 mm
(0.27 in)
73 mm
(3.08 in)
60.1 mm
(2.56 in)
39 mm
(1.54 in)
Front view
Side view
19118
B-11
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.16
Dimensions of the Camera (2801YE)
21 mm
(0.83 in)
42 mm
(1.65 in)
148 mm
(5.83 in)
130 mm
(5.12 in)
32 mm
(1.26 in)
16 mm
(0.63 in)
52 mm
(2.06 in)
Front view
Side view
19900
Figure B.17
Mounting Dimensions of 1771A3B1 12Slot I/O Chassis with
Power Supply
46mm
(1.8")
115mm
(4.53")
A 1771PS7 power supply cannot be mounted on the
side of the 1771A3B I/O chassis. See the installation
data for the 1771PS7 power supply for more
information on mounting the supply to the I/O chassis.
293mm
(11.53")
315mm
(12.41")
1 cable-foot
484mm
(19")
465mm
(18.31")
9mm
(.34")
Depth is 183mm (7.2")
26mm
(1.02")
178mm
(7.01")
339mm
(13.53")
Front
Use .25" dia.
mounting bolts
(4 places)
130mm
(5.10")
Clearance depth is 221mm (8.7")
B-12
12452I
Appendix B
Mounting Dimensions
Figure B.18
(Continued from Figure B.17) Mounting Dimensions of 1771A3B 12slot
I/O Chassis with Power Supply
Use .25" dia
mounting bolts
(4 places)
315mm
(12.41")
591mm
(23.25")
337mm
(13.25")
16-slot
464mm
(18.25")
210mm
(8.25")
1771P1
1771P2
1771P7
1771PS7
Power Supply
91mm
(3.6")
12-slot
8-slot
4-slot
254mm
(10")
483mm
(19.01")
229mm
(9.01")
610mm
(24.01")
356mm
(14.01")
16-slot 1771-A4B
12-slot 1771-A3B1
8-slot 1771-A2B
4-slot 1771-A1B
Clearance depth is 204mm (8 in) for 8 I/O connection points per module.
12451I
B-13
Appendix
C
Cable Connections for the RM and
KA Module
What's in this Appendix
This appendix contains information on:
example switch settings for 1770-KF2 and 1785-KE communication
interface modules
cable connection diagrams for ports 2A or 2B of the RM and
KA module
cable pinouts for serial communications
cable diagrams for various Allen-Bradley cables
C-1
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Switch Settings
Figure C.1 shows an example of how to configure the switch settings for a
1770-KF2 or a 1785-KE communication interface module.
Figure C.1
Example switch settings for 1770KF2 or 1785KE
SW8
RS232
SW1
Full duplex
BCC None
(Parity)
SW8
Off
(0)
SW1
Side view
SW2
Address
SW3
Address
SW2
SW3
SW4
Address
SW5
57600
bit/s
SW6
9600
bit/s
SW4
SW5
SW6
SW7
DH+
SW7
On
(1)
17091
Switch:
Function:
SW1
asynchronous link features
SW2, SW3, SW4
station address
SW5
DH baud rate
SW6
asynchronous link baud rate
SW7
DH+ network
SW8
RS232C or RS422 selection
For more information about the different possible switch settings, see the
documentation for your communication interface module.
C-2
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Cable Connections
The following diagrams show cable connections for communication via
ports 2A and 2B of the resource manager and KA module.
Important: The maximum cable length for DH/DH+ is 10,000 ft using a
57.6k bit/s transmission rate and 5,000 ft using a 115.2k bit/s
transmission rate.
9Pin Serial Port
T53
T70
6121
IBM AT
6160T60
Compaq Portable 2
Compaq Portable 286
Compaq Deskpro 286
Compaq Deskpro 386
Terminal
cable #1
Terminal
Terminal
1770KF2
1784CAK
1784CP5
1785KE
Series B
cable #4
PLC5/250 processor
1770CD
PLC5/250 processor
modem
phone line
PLC5/250 processor
Terminal
1784CP5
1770KF2
cable #4
cable #6
modem
modem
phone line
To Channel 1 of
RM or KA
cable #6
modem
CH 1 terminal connection
Terminal
cable #7
To Channel 1 of
RM or KA
C-3
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
25Pin Serial Port
T47
IBM XT
6123
6124
IBM PS/2 Model 30
IBM PS/2 Model 60
Terminal
cable #2
Terminal
1784CP5
1770KF2
1784CXK
1785KE
Series B
cable #6
Terminal
PLC5/250 processor
1770CD
PLC5/250 processor
modem
phone line
PLC5/250
1784CP5
Terminal
1770KF2
cable #4
cable #6
modem
modem
phone line
To Channel 1 of
RM or KA
cable #6
modem
CH 1 terminal connection
Terminal
Cable Pinouts
cable #8
The following diagrams show the cable pinouts you can use for
communications on the ports of the resource manager and the KA module.
Figure C.6 shows the cable pinouts for port 2A and 2B.
C-4
To Channel 1 of
RM or KA
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.2
CH 1 Terminal Connection
Cable #7
Cable #8
25SKT
IBM XT
RXD 2
GND 5
25SKT
CH 1 RM or
KA
2
7
TXD 2
GND 7
25SKT
CH 1 RM or
KA
3
7
TXD 3
3
RXD 3
2
DCD 1
DTR 4
DSR 6
4 RTS
5 CTS
RTS 4
CTS 5
4 RTS
5 CTS
RTS 7
CTS 8
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
DSR 6
DCD 8
DTR 20
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
9SKT
IBM AT
Figure C.3
Cable Pinouts Between a Computer and a Modem
Cable #3
Cable #4
Cable #5
9SKT
IBM AT
25SKT
1770KF2
25SKT
IBM XT
25SKT
1770KF2
9SKT
Computer
25SKT
1770KF2
RXD 2
GND 5
2
7
TXD 2
GND 7
3
7
TXD 2
GND 7
3
7
TXD 3
3
RXD 3
2
RXD 3
2
DCD 1
DTR 4
DSR 6
4 RTS
5 CTS
RTS 4
CTS 5
4 RTS
5 CTS
RTS 4
CTS 5
4 RTS
5 CTS
RTS 7
CTS 8
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
DSR 6
DCD 8
DTR 20
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
DSR 6
DCD 8
DTR 9
6 DSR
8 DCD
20 DTR
Cable pinouts between a computer and a modem
Cable #6
Cable #8
Cable #7
9SKT
IBM AT
25pin
Modem
9SKT
Computer
25pin
Modem
25pin
25SKT
Computer or CH 1 (RM/KA) Modem
DCD 1
RXD 2
TXD 3
DTR 4
GND 5
DSR 6
RTS 7
CTS 8
RNG 9
CASE
8
3
2
20
7
6
4
5
22
1
RNG
TXT
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
DCD
DTR
22
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
CHS
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
DSR
GND
DCD
DTR
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
C-5
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.4
Interconnect Cable (cat. no. 1784CAK)
1771KF/KG to IBMPC/AT
15-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin Male
9
1
15
8
9-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin Female
5
1
9
6
9.5ft.
1771-KF/KG
1
IBM-PC/AT
1
4
6
2
2
7
5
3
3
13
4
7
5
6
8
8
D-sub 9-pin
(IBM-PC/AT)
11
D-sub 15-pin
(1771-KF/KG)
17088
C-6
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.5
Interconnect Cable (cat. no. 1784CYK)
1771KF/KG to 6120COA/COX, IBMPC, XT
15-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin Male
9 Skt D-shell
Connector
Pin Female
114”
(289.6cm)
Shielded Cable
24 AWG
8
15
1
6
1
9
5
9
1771-KF/KG
PC–XT
D-sub 15-pin
(1771-KF/KG)
1
3
7
2
13
D-sub 9-Skt
(PC-XT)
RED
BLK
WHT
BLK
2
7
3
4
4
5
5
6
8
11
12727
C-7
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.6
Interconnect Cable (cat. no. 1784CXK)
I1771KF/KG to IBMPC/XT
15-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin M ale
25-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin Fem ale
114”
(289.6cm )
Shielded Cable
24 AW G
8
15
1
9
1771-KF/KG
1
14
13
25
PC–XT
D-sub 15-pin
(1771-KF/KG)
1
D-sub 9-skt
(6120-COD)
RED
3
7
2
13
2
BLK
W HT
BLK
7
3
4
4
5
5
6
8
11
12726
C-8
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.7
Interconnect Cable (cat. no. 1784CP5)
Processor/Terminal Interconnect Cable
9-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin M ale
15-pin D-shell
Connector
Pin Female
6
1
1
9
9
5
8
15
10.5ft.
Processor
Term inal
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
Clear
7
Clear
2
8
3
9
4
5
BLU
10
BLU
11
6
12
7
13
8
14
9
15
Processor
(9-pin Conn.)
Term inal
(15-skt Conn.)
17089
C-9
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Figure C.8
Interconnect Cable (cat. no. 1784CP)
Processor/Terminal Interconnect Cable
Industrial
Terminal End
+
4 1
–
22
43
62
126
+ 2
–0
4+1
–
Resource
M anager
1
5
9
1
6
21
62
61
60
1
37
2
36
3
35
4
34
5
33
6
7
8
3
2
1
9
Resource
M anager
Industrial
Term inal End
16860
C-10
Appendix C
Cable Connections for the RM and KA Module
Null Modem Cables
Figure C.9, Figure C.10, and Figure C.11 show null-modem cable pinouts
for port 1.
Figure C.9
NullModem Cables for FullDuplex Modem Option
Option 1 uses DSR/DTR
Option 2 bypasses DSR/DTR
RM or KA module
SHIELD 1
TxD
2
RxD
3
RTS
4
CTS
5
DSR
6
SIGNAL 7
GND
RM or KA module
SHIELD 1
TxD
2
RxD
3
RTS
4
CTS
5
DSR
6
DCD
8
DTR
20
SHIELD
RxD
TxD
RTS
CTS
DSR
DCD
DTR
SIGNAL 7
GND
SIGNAL
GND
DCD
8
DTR
20
SHIELD
RxD
TxD
DCD
DTR
SIGNAL
GND
RTS
CTS
DSR
Figure C.10
NullModem Cables for HalfDuplex Modem Option
Option 1 uses DSR/DTR
RM or KA module
SHIELD 1
TxD
2
RxD
3
RTS
4
CTS
5
DSR
6
SIGNAL 7
GND
DCD
8
DTR
20
Option 2 bypasses DSR/DTR
SHIELD
RXD
TXD
DCD
DTR
SIGNAL
GND
RTS
CTS
DSR
RM or KA module
SHIELD 1
TxD
2
RxD
3
RTS
4
CTS
5
SIGNAL 7
GND
DCD
8
DSR
DTR
6
20
SHIELD
RxD
TxD
DCD
SIGNAL
GND
RTS
CTS
DTR
DSR
Figure C.11
NullModem Cables for No Handshaking
RM or KA module
SHIELD 1
TxD
2
RxD
3
SIGNAL 7
GND
SHIELD
RxD
TxD
SIGNAL
GND
C-11
Appendix
D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
What's in this Appendix
This appendix provides flowcharts that outline the scope for starting up
and configuring:
To start up:
See page:
programming terminal
D2
PLC5/250 system status
D2
KA module
D2
communication module status
D2
RS status
D3
LP status
D4
MicroVAX hardware
D5
MicroVAX software
D6
Ethernet Interface software
D7
OSI software
D8
Following each flowchart is a reference to the appropriate documentation
for detailed information.
D-1
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Start Up and Configure Programming Terminal
Configure Communication Module Status
B
Start up and
configure
programming
terminal
Configure
privilege
classes
A
Configure
Resource
Manager
Configure 5/250 System Status
A
Using channel 1?
Configure
5/250 system
status
YES
Configure
channel 1
NO
Using channel
2A/2B?
B
YES
Configure
channel 2
NO
YES
Using channel
3?
Configure
channel 3
NO
YES
Configure
KA module?
NO
Configure Remote
Scanner?
NO
2
For more information, see PLC-5/250 Programming
Software Configuration and Maintenance (5000-6.4.7).
D-2
Start up and
configure µVAX
hardware
YES
1
Configure
Remote
Scanner
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Start Up and Configure Remote/Local Scanner Module Status
1
Using Channel 1?
YES
A
Configure
Channel 1
Test and
integrate with
I/O
NO
YES
Using Channel 2?
Configure
Channel 2
Are RM &
RS part of
PLC5/250?
NO
Using Channel 3?1
YES
NO
Configure
Channel 3
2
NO
YES
Using Channel
4?1
YES
3
Configure
Logic
Processor
Start up and
configure µVAX
hardware
Configure
Channel 4
NO
YES
Using Channel
5?1
NO
YES
More
Remote/Local
Scanners to
configure?
NO
A
Configure
Channel 5
NO
1
This applies to RS5 only.
For more information, see PLC-5/250 Programming
Software Configuration and Maintenance (5000-6.4.7).
D-3
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Start Up and Configure Logic Processor Module Status
3
Configure
Main Program
execution
A
Load program
processor will
run
Configure PIIs
Completed
PLC5/250
Configure STIs
Configure IBPs
1-4
Other modules
to start up?
NO
You are done
YES
YES
More Logic
Processors to
configure?
NO
2
Start Up and
Configure µVAX
Hardware
Test and
integrate ladder
logic programs
A
For more information, see PLC-5/250 Programming Software Configuration and
Maintenance (5000-6.4.7).
D-4
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Start Up & Configure MicroVAX Information Processor Hardware
2
Connect Program
Loader to MicroVAX
Information Processor
Connect terminal to
MicroVAX Information
Processor
Start up and test
hardware
Set hardware
defaults
4
Start Up and Configure
MicroVAX Information
Processor Software
For more information, see PI Data Table Library Installation and Configuration
Manual (5000-6.6.1).
D-5
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Install MicroVAX Information Processor Software
4
Is MicroVAX Information
Processor Software
standalone processor?
NO
Access software
from network
YES
Load system
software
Load optional
software
Load INTERCHANGE
software
Check module
indicators
Completed MicroVAX
Information Processor
Configure OSI?
YES
5
NO
You are done
For more information, see PI Data Table Library Installation and Configuration
Manual (5000-6.6.1).
D-6
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Install Ethernet Interface Software
6
Choose name and
IP address for
Ethernet Interface
Choose a machine
as a bootserver
Is your
bootserver a
VAX ?
Is your
bootserver
an HP?
NO
YES
Is ULTRIX
connection
software
installed?
YES
NO
Install ULTRIX
connection
software
YES
Is
Network
INTERCHANGE
software installed?
YES
Is
bootserver
software
installed?
NO
Install Network
INTERCHANGE
software
Is your
bootserver
an HP?
Configure Network
INTERCHANGE
software
Check module
indicators
Check module
indicators
NO
Install Network
INTERCHANGE
software
YES
Configure bootserver
software
Insert and power
up Ethernet
Interface
Install bootserver
software
YES
Configure ULTRIX
connection
Start Network
INTERCHANGE
software
NO
You are done
For more information on system startup and integration, see:
• INTERCHANGE Software for VMS Documentation Set
(5830-VDOC)
• INTERCHANGE Software for HP-UX (Ethernet)
Documentation Set (5840-HPUD)
You are done
D-7
Appendix D
Start Up and Configure the Modules
Start up OSI Software
5
Has the OSI
Interface software
been loaded?
NO
Load the OSI
software
(cat. no. 5820OS)
NO
Go fully
operational
YES
Is the mode
LED green?
YES
Configure
Ethernet Interface?
YES
6
NO
You are done
18284I
For more information, see MAP Station Manager Software User Manual (6630-6.5.2).
D-8
Index
Numbers
1771IX, 79
1771IY, 79
4-port distribution panel, 19
connection
MicroVAX Information Processor, 59
other devices, 59
dimensions, B2
pin-outs, 59
802.4 token-passing network, 17
lithium, exposed, 44
overheated battery, 43
personnel protection, 43
storing, 43
Belden 9463, 67
black and white monitor
connection, user interface box, 64
dimensions, B8, B9
booting, hardware, 123
broadband, 432
cabling specifications, 430
setting switches, 426
A
A-B MAP Station Manager. See MAP
Station Manager, 428
ac
power, 103
power connection, 101
fan assembly, 104
industrial disk, 103
power supply, 103
adapter, module, switches, 73, 710
adapter configuration
extendedlocal I/O, 77
setting configuration plug, 79
attentions, 426, 716, 719
ac selector switch, 103
air flow, A10
connecting ac power, 102, 111
discontinuity in the link, 98
earth grounds, 34
electrostatic discharge, 12
filler plates, 45
grounding, 101
lithium battery, 42
fire extinguisher, 44
performing internal operations, A1
powering down MicroVAX Information
Processor, 123
setting switches, chassis, 72
B
backplane, setting chassis configuration
jumper, 73
battery
disposal of, 42
emergencies, 43
fire, 44
leaking, 44
C
cable
See also I/O link
Belden 9463, 67
connecting the fan assembly, 46
connections, C3
daisy-chain configuration, 91
DH/DH+ length, C3
interconnect cable, C6, C7, C8,
C9, C10
length, 91
null-modem, pinouts, C11
pinouts, C4
trunkline/dropline configuration, 91
Cables, extendedlocal I/O, 95
camera
connection, CVIM module, 65
dimensions, B11
carrierband
cabling specifications, 430
connecting the module, 428, 430
setting switches, 426
catalog numbers,
17, 44
iv, 14, 15, 16,
change modes and boot MicroVAX
Information Processor, 123
boot mode, 123
console mode, 123
run mode, 123
chassis, 13
configuration jumper, 73
dimensions, B1
mounting, 22
mounting dimensions, B12, B13
setting switches, 72
checking the hardware, 111
I–2
Index
Color CVIM module, illustration, 15
color monitor
connection, user interface box, 64
dimensions, B10
communication
interface module, C2
pinouts, C4
user interface box, 63
CVIM2 module, illustration, 15
D
daisy-chain configuration, 91
conductors, grounding, 32
Data Highway/Data Highway Interface Plus
Module. See KA module, v
Configurable Vision Input Module. See
CVIM module, v
data transmission rate, PLC interface
module, 83
configuring
direct communication module, 81
MicroVAX Information Processor, 121
OSI interface module, 431
PLC interface module, 83
DH+ Interface Board (1784-KT,-KTK1),
51
Connecting, remote I/O link, 91
connecting
ac power, 101
black and white monitor, 64
camera, 65
carrierband, 430
color monitor, 64
device with an OSI interface module,
430
fan assembly, 46
I/O, 417
I/O board, 66
I/O interface box, 62
I/O link, 91
industrial terminal, 412
light pen, 65
PIIs, 419
power interlock relay, 102
program loader, 59, 122
remote I/O link, 67
RS-232 device, OSI interface module,
428
RS-232, RS-422, RS-423, 412
user interface box, 63
conventions, v
switches, 81
CVIM module, v
check LEDs, 115
checking components, 118
completing installation of components,
61
connection
camera, 65
remote I/O Link, 67
I/O interface box, 62
illustration, 15
installation, 420
module address, 421
mounting the camera, 210
switch for camera power, 420
dimensions, B1
1771-A3B 12-slot I/O chassis with power
supply, B13
1771-A3B 16-slot I/O chassis with power
supply, B13
1771-A3B1 12-slot I/O chassis with
power supply, B12
1771-A3B1 16-slot I/O chassis with
power supply, B12
4-port distribution panel, B2
4-slot chassis, B2, B12, B13
8-slot chassis, B1, B12, B13
black and white monitor (12"), B8
black and white monitor (9"), B9
camera, B11
color monitor, B10
fan assembly, B1
I/O board, B8
I/O interface box, B6
industrial disk, B3
user interface box, B4
direct communication module switches,
82
disposal of, lithium battery, 42
E
EI module
check LEDs, 117
illustration, 15
installing, 424
jumper settings, checking, 426
replacing, 424
start up and configure, D1
electrostatic damage, 41
electrostatic discharge, 12
emergencies, lithium battery, 43
error codes, 126, 127, 128
errors, 125
Ethernet address, 1210
Index
Ethernet heartbeat, 425
Ethernet Interface module. See EI module,
15
extendedlocal I/O
cable lengths, 95
installing link, 77
link termination, 96
making connections, 95
F
fan assembly, 13
ac input ranges, 104
connecting, 46
connection, ac power, 104
dimensions, B1
mounting, 28
filler plates
illustration, 15
installation, 45
installing, A10
format
industrial disk (for 5730CPU1), 1212
industrial disk (for 5731CPU1, CPU2),
1216
full duplex, C11
G
grounding, 31, 101
conductors, 32
PI components, 31
static-safe environment, A1
tools, 31
wires, 33
H
half duplex, C11
hardware, checking, 111
I
I/O, 81, 86
board
connection, 66
dimensions, B8
chassis, configuration jumper, 73
checking, 117
connecting, 417
group, 76
group number, 77
installation, 71
I–3
installation tools, 71
installing, 71
interface box, 211
connection to CVIM module, 62
dimensions, B6
keying bands, 711
link, 91
configuration, 91
medium, 91
to a 1771-AM1, -AM2, 97
to a 1771-ASB adapter, 93
to a 1785 PLC-5 controller, 97
to a direct communication module,
98
to a PanelView Operator terminal,
910
to a PLC interface module, 99
to a RediPANEL module, 98
power supply, 104
rack, 77
remote, 61
connection, 67
standard 1771, 71
important information
chassis, grounding stud, 31
formatting procedure, 1216
grounding, 103
lithium batteries, 42
memory board (DH/DH+), 48
non Allen-Bradley publications, 431
OSI interface module, switches, 427
powering up modules, 427
replacing EI module, 424
replacing MicroVAX Information
Processor, 424
scraping, 34
seating, A6
indicator lights, checking, 111
industrial disk, 19, 103, 121
ac power, wiring, 55
check LEDs, 119, 1110
completing installation, 52
connection
ac power, 103
MicroVAX Information Processor, 56
second disk, 57
dimensions, B3
operating voltage, 53
industrial terminal, connection, 51
installing
1771 I/O, 71
connecting cables, 717
CVIM module, 420
EI, 424
LP, 418
I–4
Index
memory module, A4
MicroVAX Information Processor, 421
module in the chassis, A1, A5
non-standard I/O, 81
OSI interface, 432
peripherals, 51
prepare for, 11
RS, 415
interface box, dimensions, B6
K
KA module, iv, v
address, 412
cable pinouts for ports, C4
check LEDs, 116, 117
connections, 412
illustration, 15
installation, 48
ports 2A and 2B, C3
setting switches and jumpers, 48
keying bands, 711, 117
L
LEDs, checking, 111
light pen, connection, user interface box,
65
lithium battery
disposal of, 42
emergencies, 43
exposed, 44
fire, 44
leaking, 44
overheated battery, 43
personnel protection, 43
storing, 43
local scanner. See RS5, 14
logic processor, v
logic processor. See LP, 14
LP
battery holder, 418
changing a memory module, A1
check LEDs, 115
disposal of battery, 41
illustration, 14
installing, 418
module address, 418
processor input interrupts, 419
start up and configure, D1
M
MAP, 17, 430
MAP Station Manager, 428, 433
MicroVAX Information Processor
battery holder, 422
change modes and boot module, 123
check LEDs, 115, 116
checking, module indicator lights, 122
configuring hardware, 121
connection
industrial disk, 56
program loader, 59
disposal of battery, 41
Ethernet address, 1210
Ethernet connection, 423
hardware, 121
hardware defaults, 1217
illustration, 16
individual device self-test, 126
installation, 421
keyswitch, 422, 123
modes, 123
power-up self-test, 124
replacing, 421, 424
run power-up diagnostics, 123
set up console terminal for, 122
setting default recovery, 1218
start up and configure, D1
start up and configure software, D6
start up and test, 121
system configuration table, 127
system exerciser, 1210
MicroVAX Information Processor module,
abbreviations, v
modems
cable pinouts, C5
full duplex, C11
half duplex, C11
modes, changing, 123
modules, 14, 15, 16, 17
checking, 113
memory, A2, A4
packing material, 45
weights, 110
monitor. See either black and white monitor
or color monitor, 64
mounting, 21
black and white monitor
(2801-N8,-N9,-N20), 211
camera, 210
chassis, 22
fan assembly, 28
I/O board (1771-JMB), 211
I/O interface box (2801-N22), 211
panel mount, 25
rack mounting, 22
tools, 22
Index
user interface box (2801-N21), 211
N
no handshaking, null-modem cables, C11
nonstandard I/O, installing, 81
null-modem cables
no handshaking, C11
pinouts, C11
O
Open Systems Interconnect (OSI) Interface
Module or Cx. See OSI interface
module, v
OSI interface module
(Cx), v
battery holder, 427
cabling specifications
(broadband/carrierband port), 430
check LEDs, 116
communication defaults, 426
communication ports, (illustration), 431
configurable parameters, 432
connecting a device, 430
connecting the module, 428
disposal of battery, 41
documentation, 431
illustration, 17
installing, 427, 432
modes, 433
operating modes, 426
RS-232 port, 429
setting switches, 426
setting the pushwheel address, 428
slot times, 432
specifying switch settings, 433
start up and configure, D1
software, D8
system load, 432
OTW. See overtemperature warning (OTW),
wiring, 54
P
panel mounting, 25
peripherals
check LEDs, 1110
installation, 51
pin assignments, RS-232 connector, OSI
interface module, 429
PLC interface module, 83
PLC-5/250 processor, start up and
configure, D1
I–5
power interlock relay, 102
power supply, 14, 102
connection
ac power, 103
power interlock relay, 102
connection to fan assembly, 46
I/O, 104
installation, 45
operating voltage, 45
outside chassis, 73
specifications, 45
processor input interrupts (PII), 419
program loader, 19
connecting, 122
connection, MicroVAX Information
Processor, 59
R
rack mounting, 22
RediPANEL Keypad
module switches, 86
push-button switches, 86
related publications,
v
remote I/O, CVIM module link connection,
61, 67
Remote I/O link, connecting, 91
remote scanner, v
remote scanner. See RS2, 14
remote/local scanner. See RS, 14
removing
memory module from the chassis, A2
module from the chassis, A1, A8
replacing
EI module, 424
MicroVAX Information Processor, 421,
424
resource manager, v
resource manager. See RM, 14
RM
battery holder, 411
cable pinouts for ports, C4
changing a memory module, A1
check LEDs, 114, 117
connections, 412
DH/DH+, 415
industrial terminal, IBM AT or XT
compatible, 51
port 2A and 2B pinouts, C4
RS-232, RS-422, RS-423 devices,
412
disposal of battery, 41
I–6
Index
illustration, 14
installation, 48
keyswitch, 415
ports 2A and 2B, C3
setting switches and jumpers, 48
RS, 91
150-Ohm termination resistor, 92
battery holder, 417
connecting I/O link cable, 92
disposal of battery, 41
grounding, 92
illustration, 14
installing, 415
module address, 417
start up and configure, D1
termination resistors, 415
RS-232, 48, 412
pin assignments, 413
OSI interface module, 429
RS-422, 412
pin assignments, 413
RS-423, 412
pin assignments, 414
RS2
changing a memory module, A1
check LEDs, 114
RS5, check LEDs, 115
run
MicroVAX Information Processor,
self-test, 126, 127
power-up diagnostic self-test, 123
self-test on individual devices, 126
MicroVAX Information Processor, start up
and configure, D6
OSI interface module, start up and
configure, D8
specifications, power supply, 45
start up and test MicroVAX Information
Processor, 121
configure defaults, 121
perform power-up diagnostics, 121
run system exerciser, 121
set up terminal, 121
verify industrial disk, 121
static-safe environment, 12, 41
storing, lithium battery, 43
switch assemblies, SW1, extendedlocal
I/O, 77
switch settings, C2
extended-local I/O adapter module, 77
switches
conventions, 81
direct communication module switches,
82
PLC interface module, 83
RediPANEL, 86
RediPANEL Keypad module, 86
settings, 1770-KF2, 1785-KE, C2
system exerciser display codes, table of,
1212
T
scanner. See RS, 14
table
hardware self-test error codes, 128
system exerciser display codes, 1212
test device numbers, 126
test numbers, device mnemonics, 126
self-test error codes, table of, 128
terminating link, extendedlocal I/O, 96
serial port
25-pin, C4
9-pin, C3
termination resistors, 98
150-Ohm, 92
extendedlocal I/O, 96
set
default boot device, 1217
default recovery, 1218
hardware defaults, 1217
pushwheel address, OSI interface
module, 428
switches, OSI interface module, 426
transformers, 101
set up, console terminal, MicroVAX
Information Processor, 122
user interface box
connection
black and white monitor, 64
color monitor, 64
S
software
MAP Station Manager, 428, 433
transmission rate, C3
trunkline/dropline configuration, 91
U
Index
CVIM module, 63
light pen, 65
dimensions, B4
V
verify
industrial disk, 121
industrial disk (for 5730CPU1), 1212
vision components
camera, 18
completing installation, 61
I/O board, 18
monitor, 18
user interface box, 18
W
wiring, 103
ac, 101
industrial disk, 55
module connectors, A11
terminal strip, 66
warning device, 55
I–7
AllenBradley, a Rockwell Automation Business, has been helping its customers improve pro
ductivity and quality for more than 90 years. We design, manufacture and support a broad range
of automation products worldwide. They include logic processors, power and motion control
devices, operator interfaces, sensors and a variety of software. Rockwell is one of the worlds
leading technology companies.
Worldwide representation.
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Publication 5000-6.2.10 - April 1994
Supersedes Publication 5000-6.2.10 - June 1992
PN 955114-75
Copyright 1994 AllenBradley Company, Inc. Printed in USA
Publication 5000-6.2.10 - April 1994
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