ProTool Configuring Text
Contents
Preface
Introduction
SIMATIC HMI
ProTool
Configuring Text-based Systems
Installing and
configuring ProTool
Creating projects
Configuration
techniques
User’s Manual
Testing projects
Documenting and
managing projects
System limits
SIMATIC HMI
documentation
Abbreviations
Glossary, Index
6AV6594-1AA05-2AB0
Release 12/99
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
A
B
C
Trademarks
The registered trademarks of Siemens AG are listed in the Preface.
Some of the other designations used in these documents are also registered
trademarks; the owner’s rights may be violated if they are used be third parties
for their own purposes.
Copyright © Siemens AG 1999. All Rights Reserved.
Liability Disclaimer
Distribution or duplication of this document, commercial exploitation or
communication of its content is prohibited unless expressly authorised.
Violation of these conditions shall render the perpetrator liable for
compensation. All rights reserved in particular with respect to the
issue of patents or registration of trademarks.
The content of the printed document has been checked for consistency
with the hardware and software described. The possibility of inaccuracies
can nevertheless not be entirely eradicated as a result of which no
guarantee of absolute accuracy is offered. The information in this
document is regularly checked and any alterations found to be necessary
included in the subsequent revisions. All suggestions for improvements
gratefully received.
Siemens AG
Automatisierungs- und Antriebstechnik
Bedien- u. Beobachtungssysteme
Postfach 4848, D-90327 Nuremberg
Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
Copyright © Siemens AG 1999
Subject to alteration on the basis of technical modifications or advances.
Order No. 6AV6594-1AA05-2AB0
Contents
1
2
3
4
Preface ........................................................................................................
1-1
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.2
Guide to the Manual.......................................................................
History ......................................................................................
Notation ....................................................................................
1-2
1-3
1-4
1.2
Other Sources of Assistance ..........................................................
1-5
Introduction ................................................................................................
2-1
2.1
What is ProTool?............................................................................
2-2
2.2
What is supplied with ProTool ........................................................
2-4
2.3
Getting started: configuring text-based displays .............................
2-6
Installing and configuring ProTool............................................................
3-1
3.1
Installing ProTool............................................................................
3-2
3.2
3.2.1
3.2.2
Configuring ProTool .......................................................................
Configuring with ProTool integrated in STEP 7 ..........................
Example of an instance DB .......................................................
3-5
3-5
3-7
Creating projects ........................................................................................
4-1
4.1
Fundamental considerations when creating a project .....................
4-2
4.2
What does a ProTool project consist of? ........................................
4-4
4.3
Steps to be taken when creating a project ......................................
4-5
4.4
Example: How to create an OP5 project.........................................
4-6
4.5
Setting up area pointers .................................................................
4-7
4.6
Selecting a PLC driver ...................................................................
4-9
4.7
Which projects can you convert? ...................................................
4-10
4.8
Copying objects: Between projects and within a project ..................
4-11
4.9
4.9.1
4.9.2
Undoing and redoing actions..........................................................
Undoing the last action..............................................................
Redoing the last action..............................................................
4-13
4-14
4-14
4.10
4.10.1
Retrieving project information ........................................................
What is displayed in the "Cross-Reference" window? ................
4-16
4-16
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Contents
4.10.2
5
ii
What can you view under "Project Information"?.......................
4-17
Configuration techniques ..........................................................................
5-1
5.1
What are screens?.........................................................................
5-2
5.2
5.2.1
5.2.2
Configuring display elements .........................................................
What is static text?....................................................................
What are output fields? .............................................................
5-5
5-5
5-6
5.3
5.3.1
5.3.2
5.3.3
Configuring controls .......................................................................
What are input fields? ...............................................................
What are combined input/output fields? ....................................
What are function keys?............................................................
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8
5.4
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5-10
5-10
5-11
5-13
5.4.5
5.4.6
5.4.7
Using tags......................................................................................
What are tags?..........................................................................
Properties of tags......................................................................
Example: Scaling tags...............................................................
Example: How to set the acquisition cycle and the standard
clock pulse ................................................................................
What is a tag list? .....................................................................
What is address multiplexing?...................................................
Example: How to configure a multiplex tag................................
5.5
5.5.1
Creating headers and footers .........................................................
Creating headers and footers ....................................................
5-19
5-19
5.6
5.6.1
Creating text or graphic lists...........................................................
What are text or graphic lists?...................................................
5-20
5-20
5.7
5.7.1
Configuring a scheduler .................................................................
What is a scheduler?.................................................................
5-21
5-21
5.8
5.8.1
5.8.2
5.8.3
5.8.4
5.8.5
5.8.6
5.8.7
5.8.8
5.8.9
5.8.10
5.8.11
5.8.12
5.8.13
5.8.14
5.8.15
Configuring messages....................................................................
Reporting operating and process states.....................................
What goes into a message? ......................................................
What parameters do you set for messages?..............................
Acknowledging messages .........................................................
What settings are there for message classes?...........................
Example: How to configure alarm messages.............................
What are system messages? ....................................................
Example of displaying system messages ..................................
How to log messages on the printer?.........................................
Configuring printers for the operating unit..................................
Displaying messages on the operating unit................................
What is in the message buffer?.................................................
What communication areas are required for messages? ...........
Optional communication areas for messages ............................
How are messages initiated?.....................................................
5-23
5-23
5-24
5-25
5-26
5-26
5-27
5-28
5-29
5-30
5-31
5-31
5-32
5-34
5-34
5-35
5.9
5.9.1
Using functions ..............................................................................
What functions are used for ......................................................
5-37
5-37
5-14
5-15
5-16
5-17
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5.9.2
5.9.3
5.9.4
5.9.5
5.9.6
5.9.7
6
7
Events for triggering functions...................................................
Function parameters .................................................................
Combining multiple functions ....................................................
Function screens.......................................................................
Peculiarities with conversion functions ......................................
Example: changing the operating mode ....................................
5-38
5-39
5-42
5-43
5-43
5-44
5.10
5.10.1
5.10.2
5.10.3
5.10.4
5.10.5
Creating recipes.............................................................................
What is a recipe? ......................................................................
Configuring recipes ...................................................................
Transferring data records ..........................................................
Example: How to create a recipe...............................................
Example: How to transfer data records......................................
5-48
5-48
5-52
5-54
5-55
5-59
5.11
5.11.1
5.11.2
5.11.3
5.11.4
5.11.5
Operator guidance .........................................................................
Providing Help text....................................................................
What are dynamic attributes?....................................................
Evaluating key operation...........................................................
Driving light-emitting diodes......................................................
Assigning operator authorization ...............................................
5-62
5-62
5-62
5-63
5-63
5-64
5.12
5.12.1
5.12.2
5.12.3
5.12.4
5.12.5
5.12.6
5.12.7
Configuration in foreign languages.................................................
System requirements for foreign languages ..............................
User interface language and project languages .........................
Configurable languages ............................................................
Language dependent keyboard assignment...............................
Reference text ..........................................................................
Steps to creating a multilingual project ......................................
Cyrillic characters......................................................................
5-66
5-66
5-66
5-68
5-68
5-69
5-70
5-71
Testing projects ..........................................................................................
6-1
6.1
Testing projects ..............................................................................
6-2
6.2
Downloading the executable project file .........................................
6-3
6.3
Peculiarities of MPI transfers .........................................................
6-4
6.4
Status/Force Tag ............................................................................
6-5
Documenting and managing projects .......................................................
7-1
7.1
7.1.1
7.1.2
7.1.3
Documenting projects ....................................................................
Printing project data ..................................................................
Example: creating a customized report .....................................
Constraints with printing ............................................................
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-6
7.2
7.2.1
7.2.2
Managing projects..........................................................................
Project management with integrated operation..........................
Managing projects in stand-alone operation...............................
7-7
7-7
7-7
ProTool User’s Guide
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Contents
A
B
C
iv
System limits ..............................................................................................
A-1
A.1
OP7 and OP17 system limits .........................................................
A-2
SIMATIC HMI documentation .....................................................................
B-1
B.1
B.1.1
B.1.2
B.1.3
Documentation for ProTool.............................................................
ProTool for Windows-based systems.........................................
ProTool for graphical displays....................................................
ProTool for text-based displays .................................................
B-2
B-3
B-4
B-5
B.2
Overview of the SIMATIC HMI documentation ...............................
B-6
Abbreviations..............................................................................................
C-1
Glossary ......................................................................................................
D-1
Index............................................................................................................
I-1
ProTool User’s Guide
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Preface
1
Overview
This chapter explains how the manual is organized and where to find what
information.
Trademarks
The following names are registered trademarks of Siemens AG:
•
SIMATIC
•
SIMATIC HMI
•
HMI
•
ProTool/Pro
•
ProTool
•
ProTool/Lite
•
ProAgent
•
SIMATIC Multi Panel
•
MP270
•
SIMATIC Multifunctional Platform
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
1-1
Preface
1.1
Guide to the Manual
Contents
This manual provides all the information you require to
• install and configure ProTool/Lite
• configure your operating unit to suit your installation
• upload the executable project file to the system and test it
• manage your project
What you should already know about
This manual assumes that you already have general experience of working with
Windows® applications. The information given in this manual is therefore limited
to a description of the functions and routines provided by ProTool/Lite and which
are not involved in the standard operation of the operating system.
This manual also assumes that you have a basic familiarity with the configuration
of your PLC, e.g. SIMATIC S5 or SIMATIC S7.
Where to find what
The chapters of this manual are arranged by topic as follows:
• The Introduction explains the advantages of the ProTool/Lite configuration
software and demonstrates how easy it is to create an executable project file
for your operating unit using ProTool/Lite.
• The chapter Installing and configuring ProTool explains the requirements
your system must satisfy, how to integrate ProTool/Lite in STEP 7 and how to
install ProTool/Lite on your configuration computer.
• The chapter Creating projects shows you the basic considerations that are
worth making before creating a project and what a project consists of. It also
explains for what tasks you set up which data areas on the PLC and must
specify in ProTool/Lite as area pointers.
• The chapter Configuration techniques shows you how to configure
operating and display elements, how to implement a user prompt system on
your operating unit and report process statuses.
• The chapter Testing projects explains how to check the results of your work.
It shows how to compile your project into an executable project file and
upload it to the system.
1-2
ProTool User’s Guide
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Preface
• The chapter Documenting and managing projects introduces the Project
Manager. It shows you how to print out project data and how to use the
functions Backup and Restore to backup and restore your project data.
• Finally, the Appendix provides details of the system limitations and an
overview of the SIMATIC HMI documentation.
Other sources of information
1.1.1
•
You will find more examples and guidance together with reference material,
for example, on functions and PLC drivers in online Help.
•
For device-specific information, please refer to your equipment manual.
•
Detailed information about the ProTool/Pro RT visualization software is given in
the ProTool/Pro Runtime User’s Guide.
•
The fundamentals of communication between the operating unit and the PLC
are described in the Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Guide.
•
The ProTool/Pro ReadMe contains important notes on installation and
configuration; this also applies to ProTool/Pro RT ReadMe with regard to the
runtime system.
History
This manual describes the configuration of text-based displays with ProTool.
The various issues of the user’s guide correspond to the following versions of
ProTool:
Issue 06/95
Valid for ProTool/Lite versions up to and including version 1.01.
Issue 01/96
Extended functions and editorial revisions of the manual.
Valid for ProTool/Lite version 2.0 or higher.
Issue 09/96
Inclusion of OP7 and OP17.
Valid for ProTool/Lite version 2.5 or higher.
Issue 04/97
Extended functions and editorial revisions of the manual.
Valid for ProTool/Lite version 3.0 or higher.
Issue 07/98
Upgrades and inclusion of C7-633 and C7-634.
Software runs under Windows® 95 and WindowsNT ® 4.0 or
higher.
Valid for ProTool/Lite version 5.0 or higher.
Issue 12/99
Software runs under Windows® 95/98, Windows® 2000 and
WindowsNT® 4.0 or higher.
Valid for ProTool/Pro CS 5.2 or higher
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
1-3
Preface
1.1.2
Notation
There are a number of character formats used in this manual to assist reader
orientation.
1-4
Output
Words printed in Courier typeface represent input and
output data as it appears on the screen of the operating
unit.
F1
The names of keys are printed in bold type.
File → Edit
Menu items are printed in italics. Succeeding levels are
separated by arrows. The complete sequence of menu
items leading to the final menu item required is always
shown.
Messages dialog
box
The names of dialog boxes, tabs and buttons are printed
in italics.
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Preface
1.2
Other Sources of Assistance
SIMATIC Customer Support Hotline
Available worldwide around the clock:
Nuremberg
Johnson City
Singapore
SIMATIC Basic Hotline
Nuremberg
Johnson City
Singapore
SIMATIC BASIC Hotline SIMATIC BASIC Hotline SIMATIC BASIC Hotline
Local time:
Mon - Fri 7:00 to 17:00
Local time:
Mon - Fri 8:00 to 19:00
Local time:
Mon - Fri 8:30 to 17:30
Tel.:
+49 (911) 895-7000
Tel.:
+1 423 461-2522
Tel.:
+65 740-7000
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7002
Fax:
+1 423 461-2231
Fax:
+65 740-7001
E-mail:
simatic.support@
nbgm.siemens.de
E-mail:
simatic.hotline@
sea.siemens.com
E-mail:
simatic.hotline@
sae.siemens.com
SIMATIC Premium
Hotline
(chargeable,
available only with
SIMATIC Card)
Times:
Mon - Fri 0:00 to 24:00
Tel.:
+49 (911) 895-7777
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7001
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
1-5
Preface
SIMATIC Customer Support Online Services
SIMATIC Customer Support Online Services offer extensive additional information
about SIMATIC products as follows.
•
Up-to-date general information is available
− on the Internet at http://www.ad.siemens.de/simatic
− by fax polling on 08765–93 02 77 95 00
•
Up-to-date product information and downloads for practical use can be obtained
from
− the Internet at http://www.ad.siemens.de/support/html-00/
− the bulletin board system (BBS) in Nuremberg (SIMATIC Customer
Support Mailbox)
on +49 (911) 895–7100.
To call the mailbox, you should use a modem with a transmission rate of
up to V.34 (28.8 kbd) using the following settings: 8, N, 1, ANSI, or you
can connect via ISDN (x.75, 64 kbit).
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Introduction
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2
2-1
Introduction
2.1
What is ProTool?
Configuring text-based displays
ProTool/Lite is an innovative configuration software package for the text-based
displays of the SIMATIC HMI device family. You use the same configuration
software to configure all the devices in the family. Regardless of the device for
which you are creating your project, ProTool always presents you with the same,
familiar user interface.
Example of the structure:
ProTool/Lite
PC
PLC
OP17
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5
K6
K7
F8
K8
K9
K10
K11
K12
K13
K14
K15
K16
Example: a PC for configuration and an OP17 as the operating unit:
ProTool is easy to use
ProTool is a Windows application for Windows® 95, Windows ® 98 and Windows®
NT. The fully graphical user interface allows you to create object-oriented projects
easily by mouse click. No special programming knowledge is required.
ProTool is versatile
The editors provided in ProTool can be called simultaneously. You can also open
different projects, even those of different devices, simultaneously and transfer data
via the clipboard from one project to another.
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Introduction
ProTool can also be integrated in the SIMATIC STEP 7 configuration software.
Thus allowing you to select STEP 7 symbols and data blocks as tags in ProTool.
This not only saves you time and money but also eliminates the possibility of
errors made when entering the same data several times.
You will find more information on configuring ProTool with SIMATIC STEP 7 at
Configuring with ProTool integrated in STEP 7 (Chapter 3.2.1).
Offline configuration
With ProTool you create and edit your projects offline. The device need not yet be
available at this time. The configuration computer displays the configured process
data as it will subsequently be displayed on the device.
On completion of configuration you can download the executable project file from
the configuration computer to the device.
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Introduction
2.2
What is supplied with ProTool
PLC drivers
ProTool is shipped as standard with drivers for the following PLCs:
•
Siemens PLCs
− SIMATIC S5
− SIMATIC S7
− SIMATIC 500/505
•
PLCs of other manufacturers
− Allen Bradley DF1
− Allen-Bradley DH485
− GE Fanuc
− MITSUBISHI FX
− Modicon Modbus
− OMRON (Link/Multilink)
− Telemecanique TSX Adjust
− Telemecanique Uni-Telway
•
FREE SERIAL
Sample projects
ProTool is shipped with ready-made sample projects for different PLCs. The
examples are located in the ProTool directory under ..\SAMPLES. The directory
also contains the associated PLC programs. The sample project and PLC program
are matched to each other.
Standard projects and standard screens
Standard projects are supplied for almost every configurable operating unit.
Functions that are widely used are already configured in the standard projects.
Standard projects contain device-specific standard screens. These provide all the
functions you need for the basic operation of your operating unit.
If you select the Use Standard Project check box in the project assistant when you
start ProTool, ProTool automatically integrates in your new project the standard
project associated with your operating unit and the set PLC.
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ProTool User’s Guide
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Introduction
Utilities
There are a number of utilities and other useful files in the ProTool directory under
..\UTILITY. Utilities to be found there include the Backup/Restore utility ProSave
for OP7, OP17 and TD17.
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Release 12/99
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Introduction
2.3
Getting started: configuring text-based displays
If you are not all that familiar with the ProTool visualization software, we would
recommend you read this brief introduction and get started with ProTool/Pro with
the help of the example. The printed version is enclosed with this manual.
Requirements for working with the brief introduction
To do the exercises for ProTool in this brief introduction, you require
•
a PC as a configuration computer
•
the SIMATIC ProTool/Lite 5.2 software package
ProTool/Lite includes the ProTool/Lite configuration software and
ProTool/Pro RT runtime software.
•
an operating unit - for example, OP17.
Other documents on ProTool/Lite
You will find the electronic manuals on the installation CD under:
Docs\..\UsersManual_Text.pdf
You can find all the information contained in this manual in ProTool’s online Help.
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Installing and configuring ProTool
3
Overview
In this chapter you will learn
•
the requirements the configuration computer must meet and
•
how to install ProTool.
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
3-1
Installing and configuring ProTool
3.1
Installing ProTool
System requirements
The following table shows the recommended system requirements for running the
ProTool configuration software.
Configuration
Recommendation
CPU
Pentium 133 MHz
Main memory
64 MB
Free hard disk space
150 MB for ProTool
5 MB for each additional language
Drive
CD-ROM
Operating system
Microsoft Windows 95 with Service Pack 1
(Build 950a)
Microsoft Windows 95 OSR 2 (Build 950b)
Microsoft Windows 98
Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 with Service
Pack 3
Microsoft Windows 2000
Remark
Service Pack 1 must not be installed on a Windows 95 OSR 2 (Build 950b) or
higher.
Integration in STEP 7
If you have STEP 7 programming software as of V4 on your computer, you can
also install ProTool integrated in STEP 7.
This has the following advantages:
3-2
•
You manage ProTool projects using SIMATIC Manager (i.e. the same
management tool that you use for your STEP 7 projects).
•
You can select STEP 7 symbols and data blocks from the S7 symbol table as
tags. The data type and address are entered automatically.
•
ProTool lists all the PLCs in your STEP 7 project and, once a PLC has been
selected, determines the associated address parameters.
•
In STEP 7 you can configure ALARM_S messages and output them to the
operating unit.
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Installing and configuring ProTool
Selecting languages
The installation program prompts you for the options and languages to be installed.
If you wish to install several languages simultaneously, select the User defined
option when you are installing. You can then change the ProTool language later
without having to reinstall ProTool by opening Start Menu→ Simatic → ProTool CS
→ ProTool Setup. During installation you specify the language that you want to be
active after installation.
Installing ProTool from a CD-ROM
To install ProTool, proceed as follows:
1. Insert the installation CD in the CD-ROM drive. If the autorun function for your
CD-ROM drive is activated, the browser starts automatically when you insert
the CD.
Alternatively, select the CD-ROM drive in Explorer, and double-click
install.exe to start the installation program.
2. Select the installation language you want at Language.
3. Select Installation and install ProTool/Pro CS first, followed by ProTool/Pro RT.
When installing, follow the instructions on the screen.
Note:
Make sure when you are installing ProTool/Pro RT that you do not use blanks in
the path name if you choose to install ProTool/Pro RT under a different path
name from the one proposed.
4. If you have STEP 7 programming software as of V4 on your computer, you can
also install ProTool integrated in STEP 7.
ProTool checks in Setup whether STEP 7 is installed on your system. If STEP 7
is has been installed, you can choose whether ProTool should be installed in
Integrated or Stand-alone mode.
5. Install the license when prompted to do so. If you do not have a license when
you are installing ProTool/Pro Runtime, you can install it later.
The procedure for this is described in commissioning instructions, software
protection.
6. Reboot your PC so that all registrations can be performed.
Installing ProTool from a hard disk
In order to install ProTool from the hard disk, you first have to copy al the folders
and all their subfolders, including all their files in the main folder, from the CD to
the hard disk:
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Installing and configuring ProTool
Uninstalling ProTool
On the Windows start menu at Settings → Control Panel → Software, choose
ProTool and installed options from the and click Add/Remove.
Starting ProTool
After ProTool has been installed, you will find a folder on the Start menu called
Simatic, in which the following symbols are available:
ProTool Lite CS V5.20
ProTool Help
ProTool Lite CS
ProTool ReadMe
ProTool Setup
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Installing and configuring ProTool
3.2
Configuring ProTool
3.2.1
Configuring with ProTool integrated in STEP 7
Requirements
If the PLC you are using is a SIMATIC S7 and you have installed STEP 7
configuration software on your system, you can integrate ProTool in STEP 7.
Advantages of STEP 7 integration
As you are using the same database as STEP 7, you have the following
advantages:
•
You assign your symbolic name once only and can then use it everywhere.
Note
If you use an instance DB in the STEP 7 program, the corresponding instance
FB must also be defined in the symbol table in STEP 7. If this is not the case,
this DB is not offered for selection in ProTool.
•
When you configure variables and area pointers, you access the STEP 7
symbol table. Changes to the symbol table in STEP 7 are updated in ProTool
(refer to the figure at Properties of tags (Chapter 5.4.2)).
•
When the project is compiled, the data is synchronized.
•
In STEP 7 you can configure ALARM_S messages and output them to the
operating unit.
•
The communication parameters of the PLC are transferred directly to your
project.
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Installing and configuring ProTool
Example Driver Parameters dialog box for integrating STEP 7
Integrating ProTool projects
Projects created in ProTool on a stand-alone basis cannot be called directly using
SIMATIC Manager. To include projects like this in a STEP 7 project, they have to
be integrated.
To do this, choose the File → Integrate menu command in ProTool. In the STEP 7
configuration, give the ProTool project a different name to the original project.
Note
Conversely, projects created with ProTool on an integrated basis must on no
account be edited with ProTool on a stand-alone basis. If they were, the connection
to the STEP 7 symbol table would be lost.
Starting ProTool
Start ProTool directly under Windows. Choose File → New. This opens a dialog
box in which you select a STEP 7 project and create a ProTool project in it. You
then select the operating unit.
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Example of the New dialog box for integrating STEP 7
3.2.2
Example of an instance DB
In order to be able to access an instance DB in the symbol table of STEP 7 in
ProTool, the associated FB must be defined.
This is illustrated by the following example:
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4
Overview
In this chapter you are given an overview
•
of the project structure and
•
the procedure for creating a project.
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Fundamental considerations when creating a project
Objective
To operate and monitor a machine or process. To do this, you map the machine or
process on the operating unit as accurately as is necessary.
System configuration
Communication takes place between the operating unit and the machine or
process by means of tags via the PLC. The value of a tag is written to a memory
area (address) on the PLC, from where it is read by the operating unit.
The following diagram provides an overview of the fundamental structure:
Operating unit
Printer
Communication
by means of tags
PLC
Machine,
process
A typical structure
Before you begin
If you are creating a project for the first time, note the following recommendations:
•
Use the standard screens from the standard projects.
When creating a new project, you can select a standard project for your system
(operating unit and PLC) from the project assistant.
•
4-2
Under ...\ProTool\Samples you will also find the sample project
"Quickmix", which is implemented for various operating units and PLCs.
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•
Consider also whether you can use parts of existing projects. Message texts or
graphics, for example, are suitable for this.
•
In the case of operating units from a single device family, it is also possible to
copy entire project sections via the clipboard.
Note
The prerequisite for successful copying between projects is that the system limits
of the operating unit for which you want to use the copied sections must not be
exceeded.
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What does a ProTool project consist of?
When you open a new or an existing project, the project window opens.
What objects are there in ProTool?
In the project window, the object types you can configure appear on the left, and
the objects themselves appear on the right. The objects that you can configure
depend on the type of the operating unit.
The various objects are linked directly in ProTool with the tool required to edit
them.
What is displayed in the project window?
The project data of a ProTool project is stored in the form of objects. The objects
in a project are arranged in a tree structure.
The Project window displays object types that belong to the project and that you
can configure for the selected operating unit. The project window is comparable
with Windows® Explorer. The object types contain objects with properties that can
be set.
The project window is structured as follows:
• The title bar contains the project name.
• The left half of the screen displays object types that you can configure, and
the right half of the screen displays the objects contained in them.
Example of a project window with tags
Note
If you maximize the project window, tabs are displayed for the open windows along
the bottom border to enable you to change easily from one window to another.
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Steps to be taken when creating a project
To create a project, proceed as follows:
1. Create a new project (File → New or File → Open)
Choose File → New to create a new project. The project assistant guides you
through a number of selection dialogs.
2. Select a PLC
Select a driver for your PLC. Only those drivers with which the operating unit
can be run are displayed.
3. Use a standard project
Select a standard project in order to use it as a basis.
4. The project assistant allows you to enter information on the project in the
summary. If you click the Create button, the project window opens.
5. Define communication areas (System → Area Pointers).
To enable the operating unit and PLC to communicate with each other, you
have to define communication areas (Setting up area pointers (Chapter 4.5))
that are to be used by them both.
6. Create a project
This is the most involved part of the work. You can approach it in one of two
ways: Either you create all the individual parts first and then link them to form a
meaningful structure (the bottom → up approach), or you begin by designing a
structure and then fill it with the individual elements (the top → down
approach).
To do this, you basically have to perform the following steps:
− Create the user interface with display and controls.
− Configure tags in order to enable data interchange with the PLC.
− Configure messages in order to obtain information on the state of the
machine or process.
− Split the display on the operating unit (not on devices with a text-based
display).
In addition, you can configure additional objects, such as recipes,
depending on the operating unit.
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Example: How to create an OP5 project
To create a project for an OP5 and the SIMATIC S7-300/400 PLC, proceed as
follows:
1. Choose File → New or click
.
2. In the Select Device dialog box under Text-based Operator Panels, select an
OP5. Click the Continue button.
3. In the Select PLC dialog box, enter the name of the PLC. From the list below
this, select the driver you want to use for communication between the operating
unit and the PLC.
4. Click the Parameters button to set the driver parameters Click the Continue
button.
Note: You can also set the driver parameters at a later date.
5. In the Standard projects dialog box, select Use standard project. This puts you
on the standard project.
6. Choose the System → Area Pointers menu command to configure the Event
Messages communication area. Select this under Type and then click the Add
button.
7. Enter the following values in the Event Messages dialog box: DB: 70,
Length: 4. Confirm by clicking OK. You can then configure 64 event
messages.
Note: This data block must also be available in your PLC program.
8. Choose System → Screen/Keys to divide up the OP display.
9. Select Window/Window for Alarm/Event Mess. so that event messages and
alarm messages can be displayed simultaneously in screens.
10. Select the message area via Active and, holding down the mouse button,
position it in the screen layout. This completes the subdivision of the OP
display.
11. Proceed to configure the event messages. If you enter more than 64
messages, only messages 0000 to 0063 can be output on the operating unit.
12. Save your project with File → Save.
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4.5
Setting up area pointers
What are area pointers for?
A defined address area on the PLC for data interchange with the operating unit is
addressed by means of an area pointer.
Choose System → Area Pointers to set up area pointers.
What area pointers are available?
The number of area pointers available varies depending on the selected operating
unit.
For information on how large the area pointers should be when you create them,
and the structure they have to have, refer to the Communication User’s Manual.
The overview below lists the various area pointers and what they are used for. The
order in which they are listed corresponds to that in ProTool.
Area pointer
Explanation
Interface area
The interface area is the interface between the PLC
program and the operating unit. It contains data and
pointers to areas required for data interchange between
the PLC and the operating unit.
User version
The user version identifies the version of the project. A
version check is performed on the PLC by means of this
area pointer.
Screen number
The operating unit stores information on the current
screen in this data area. You can evaluate this
information in the PLC program in order to call another
screen, for example.
Data mailbox
The data mailbox is a data area on the PLC. It is used as
intermediate storage to download data records from the
operating unit to the PLC. The data mailbox contains only
the values of the tag. The addresses are not transferred.
Event messages
You can configure an event message for each bit in this
data area. The bits are assigned to the message numbers
in ascending order.
As soon as the PLC sets a bit in this data area, the
operating unit recognizes that the assigned event
message has "arrived". Conversely, the operating unit
interprets the message as "gone" after the bit is reset in
the PLC.
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Area pointer
Explanation
Alarm messages
You can configure an alarm message for each bit in this
data area. The bits are assigned to the message numbers
in ascending order.
As soon as the PLC sets a bit in this data area, the
operating unit recognizes that the assigned alarm
message has "arrived". Conversely, the operating unit
interprets the message as "gone" after the bit is reset in
the PLC.
PLC
acknowledgement
The PLC uses this area to indicate to the operating unit
which alarm messages have been acknowledged by the
PLC.
OP
acknowledgement
The operating unit uses this area pointer to indicate to
the PLC which alarm messages have been
acknowledged on the operating unit.
System keyboard
The operating unit transfers keystrokes of the system
keys via this data area. You can evaluate this information
in the PLC program in order to indicate incorrect
operation by means of a message, for example.
Function keyboard
The operating unit transfers keystrokes of the function
keys via this data area. You can evaluate this information
in the PLC program in order to indicate incorrect
operation by means of a message, for example.
LED assignment
The PLC can use this area pointer to drive the lightemitting diodes on the function keys of the operating unit.
Recipe number
The recipe number mailbox is a data area in the
SIMATIC S5. It is required for the transfer of data records
between the operating unit and the PLC.
The recipe number mailbox contains the recipe number
and the number of the data record to be transferred.
Recipe mailbox
The recipe mailbox is a data area in the SIMATIC S5. It
is used as intermediate storage to download data records
from the operating unit to the PLC. Not only the values of
tags but also their addresses are transferred to the recipe
mailbox.
Successive recipe
mailbox
The successive recipe mailbox is a data area on the
SIMATIC S5 for transferring data records. You only need
to create it when the recipe mailbox cannot
accommodate the largest data record to occur.
Note
There are no area pointers for the SIMATIC S7-NC.
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Selecting a PLC driver
Select the PLC driver with the project assistant in the Select PLC dialog box.
You can also define or later edit the parameters there if you select PLC Properties
in the project window.
Available PLC drivers
You can select the following drivers for devices with a text-based display:
•
SIMATIC S5 - AS511
•
SIMATIC S5 - FAP
•
SIMATIC S5 - L2-DP
•
SIMATIC S7-300/400
•
SIMATIC S7-200
•
SIMATIC S7-NC
•
SIMATIC 500/505
•
Allen-Bradley DF1
•
Allen-Bradley DH485
•
FREE SERIAL
•
GE Fanuc
•
MITSUBISHI FX
•
Modicon Modbus
•
OMRON Hostlink/Multilink
•
Telemecanique
Repercussions for tags
The address depends on the PLC you are using. The way in which the address of
a tag with a PLC connection is displayed depends on the PLC selected.
Select the available data types and data formats in the Tag dialog box under Type
or Format.
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Which projects can you convert?
You can convert a ProTool project that you created for an OPx5 operator panel
into a project for an OPx7.
You can convert the following projects:
Source:
4-10
Destination:
OP5
→
OP7
OP15C
→
OP17
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Copying objects: Between projects and within a project
Principle
You can cut or copy selected parts of your project and paste them via the
clipboard. For example you can copy text and fields from the alarm message
editor to the event message editor, or graphic elements from one screen to
another.
The prerequisite for successful copying between projects is that the system limits
of the destination project must not be exceeded.
Preparations for new projects
Before starting to copy objects from an existing project, you should without fail
carry out the following global settings in the new project. This will ensure that no
loss of data occurs during copying due to different settings.
•
Under the heading System → Screen / Keys make the subdivision of the
screen display the same as in the source project.
•
Make the name and driver of the PLC the same as in the source project.
Procedures
There are two ways of pasting objects from the clipboard to the destination project:
•
Menu command Edit → Paste
The object is pasted from the clipboard to the destination project. If there is
already an object of the same name in the destination project, the object is
pasted under a new name.
•
Menu command Edit → Paste Special
Only objects that are different are pasted. If there is already an identical object
of the same name in the destination project, this is used. If there is an object
that has the same name but is not identical, the object from the clipboard is
pasted under a new name. You can utilize this copying variant to make the
destination project the same as the source project, for instance.
Note
In the case of both Paste and Paste Special, ProTool always checks the underlying
objects (such as the limit value tags of a tag which has been copied) to ensure that
existing objects are reusable.
If there is already an object of the same name in the destination project, the object
to be pasted will be renamed if necessary. It is given the next available name in
the destination project.
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Example:
Tag VAR_4 will be renamed VAR_11 if tags VAR_1 through VAR_10 already exist
in the destination project.
What is copied?
You can copy the following via the clipboard:
•
All objects listed in the project window, such as screens, text or graphic lists,
tags etc.
•
Objects from screens (trends, fields, graphics etc.) in the screen editor.
•
Messages and objects from messages (message text, fields, info text etc.) in
the message editor.
An object is copied complete with its attributes and all cross-referenced objects.
Special situations encountered during copying are reported in the system message
window under Clipboard. This gives you information about any objects that have
not been copied or renamed, for example.
Special situation with screens
If the object to be copied refers to a screen that does not exist in the destination
project, the underlying screen is not copied; instead a blank screen is created as a
dummy if the destination project does not contain a screen that can be reused.
This ensures that you will not copy the complete source project by mistake along
with the start screen.
Afterward, when you paste the screen via the clipboard, the dummy screen in the
destination project will be automatically replaced by the proper screen.
What is not copied?
These objects are not copied:
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•
Objects that are unknown in the destination project (such as functions or
command buttons when copying from TP27 to OP27)
•
Area pointers
•
Global function key assignments
•
Character sets
•
In the case of multilingual projects, only the languages available in the
destination project are copied. No new languages will be created.
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4.9
Undoing and redoing actions
Purpose
During configuration, it may become necessary to cancel actions which have been
performed, or to reconstruct actions which have been discarded. The two
commands Undo and Redo in the Edit menu are used for this purpose.
•
Cancel (Undo)
The Undo command (key combination Ctrl-Z) cancels the last action
performed. If you keep selecting the command, you can cancel up to 30
successive modifications.
•
Restore (Redo)
The Redo command (key combination Ctrl-Y) revokes the last action canceled
thus restoring the status before the last Undo command was executed.
Principle
Each active editor (project window, screen editor, drivers for WS) has its own undo
history. Thus, for example, if three screens are opened at the same time, three
separate Undo Histories will be created. When a screen is closed, the actions
listed in the accompanying History are deleted. When the project is saved, all the
Undo Histories for the current project are deleted.
The last recorded action is displayed in abbreviated form in the menu. The Tooltips
contain more detailed texts for the Undo and Redo buttons and for the status bar.
Example:
•
•
Menu
Undo:
Redo:
VAR_5 edited
PIC_2 edited
Tooltip/Status bar
Undo:
Redo:
property edited of tag VAR_5
contents edited of screen PIC_2
Ctrl-Z
Ctrl-Y
Until the accompanying Undo History is deleted, deleted objects will continue to be
listed in the cross-reference (Chapter 4.10.1) as used objects. The status of these
objects is given in brackets after each object, e. g. PIC_5 (deleted).
General Information
The commands Undo and Redo only work with actions taken since the last time
the project was saved. If, for example, you move a screen object and then save
your project, you cannot later cancel this action.
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These are some of the rules that apply to Undo/Redo:
•
Settings in dialog boxes (properties of a field) can only be canceled in their
entirety. It is not possible to open the dialog box and discard individual entries.
•
With multilevel dialog boxes, only changes to the primary object are recorded.
Modifications to underlying objects, or creations or deletions cannot be
reversed.
Example (project window):
Editing tags → Editing limit tags.
Only the tag changes can be reversed here.
•
4.9.1
Undo/Redo is ProTool-specific. With a project integrated in STEP 7, the Undo
buffer cannot be accessed by a higher-level Step 7 Undo Manager.
Undoing the last action
To undo your last action in ProTool, choose one of the three following options:
•
Choose the Edit → Undo menu command.
The last action that can be undone (canceled) is shown in abbreviated form
after the menu command. A longer description is given in the status bar.
•
Click the Undo button in the toolbar.
This opens a Tooltip which shows you the last action that can be undone
(canceled). You are given the same information in the status bar.
•
Press the CTRL and Z keys simultaneously.
In contrast to the first two options, you are not given any feedback about which
action has been canceled.
If you keep executing the Undo command, you can successively cancel all the
recorded modifications.
4.9.2
Redoing the last action
To redo your last canceled action in ProTool, choose one of the three following
options:
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•
Choose the Edit → Redo menu command
The last canceled action is shown in abbreviated form after the menu
command. A longer description is given in the status bar.
•
Click the Redo button in the toolbar.
This opens a Tooltip which shows you the last canceled action. You are given
the same information in the status bar.
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•
Press the CTRL and Y keys simultaneously.
In contrast to the first two options, you are not given any feedback about which
action has been restored.
If you keep executing the Redo command, you can successively restore all the
recorded cancellations.
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4.10
Retrieving project information
The following tools are available to you for displaying or storing information on a
project.
4.10.1
•
Cross-references
•
Project information
What is displayed in the "Cross-Reference" window?
Usage
When you have to add to or modify a project and need to check where and how a
particular object is used in your project, you open the Cross-Reference window.
You select an object in this window, and all the references to this object in the
project are then displayed to you.
Example from a project
You open the Cross-Reference window by choosing the View → Cross-Reference
menu command. The active object is displayed with a red border around it.
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The selected object is at the uppermost level, and all the objects in which the
selected object is used appear under it. The cross-reference list also contains
object in the current undo history(Undo actions (Chapter 4.9)). The status of these
objects is shown in brackets behind the object concerned - for example, PIC_5
(deleted).
Tip
You can use the Cross-Reference window efficiently for troubleshooting.
4.10.2
What can you view under "Project Information"?
To obtain information about a project when projects change or are adapted, open
the Project Information dialog box. To do so, choose File → Project Information
from the menu.
The Project Information dialog box displays general project data and the memory
required by the project. Project information is spread according to subjects over
three tab controls:
• General
• Description
• Statistics
General
The General tab control shows information on the device type, project name, path
name of the stored project file and creator of the project. You fill in the Creator
field and all the other fields are updated automatically by ProTool upon saving the
project.
Description
The Description tab control contains an input field for the project description. Here
you can enter any information you like that are important for your project.
Statistics
The Statistics tab control shows when the project was created, modified, generated
and downloaded, the ProTool version last used to edit the project and the memory
required by the project after it has been downloaded to the flash memory on the
operating unit. The memory requirement is determined and displayed following
the first download operation.
Exception:
with text-based displays OP3, OP5 and OP15A/C, the memory requirement is
determined and displayed following initial compilation.
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Configuration techniques
5
Overview
In this chapter you will learn how to
•
create screens
•
configure controls and display elements
•
use tags
•
configure messages
After that we will show you, for example, how you
•
Using functions
•
create recipes
•
assign operator authorization
•
create multi-lingual projects
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5.1
What are screens?
Example
Screens are an image of the process. You can display processes on screens and
specify process values. The figure below shows an illustrated example of a mixing
unit for producing different juices. Ingredients are filled into a mixer from different
tanks and then mixed. The liquid levels in the tanks and in the mixer and also the
actual speed of the mixer are displayed. You can specify the required speed of the
mixer in an input field.
Configured screen for a mixing unit
Components of a screen
You can configure several screen entries for a screen. A screen entry has display
size. You can see the entry numbers on the left border of the screen editor. The
maximum number of screen entries for a screen depends on which device you are
using.
A screen can consist of static and dynamic components. Static components are
text, whereas dynamic components are fields which are linked to the PLC and
display values from the PLC memory. Dynamic components are also inputs made
by the operator on the operating unit and written to the PLC memory. The link to
the PLC is established by means of tags (refer to Using tags (Chapter 5.4.1)).
Depending on the operating unit you are using, fields can be used for input, output
and combined input/output.
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Screen editor
Screens are created with a separate editor in ProTool. The operating unit is
displayed when you call the screen editor. Open the screen editor by:
•
double-clicking on Screens in the left half of the project window to create a new
screen
•
double-clicking in the right half of the project window on an existing configured
screen to open the screen for editing.
Screens are stored under a symbolic name. You enter a name by choosing Edit →
Properties from the menu. This name has to be specified when you edit, reference
or delete the screen. In addition, screens are numbered automatically.
Start screen
Declare one screen in every project as a start screen. The start screen is the
screen that is displayed after the operating unit has started up.
To identify a screen as the start screen, select the screen and assign it as the start
screen by choosing Edit → Properties from the menu. On the General tab, select
the Start Screen check box.
Soft keys
Soft keys are function keys configured for specific screens (refer to What are
function keys? (Chapter 5.3.3)). When you configure a soft key, you assign
functions to it. You can point out the task of a soft key with a piece of explanatory
text.
You can use soft keys to open another screen, turn a motor on and off or display
the message buffer, for example.
Selecting screens
Every configured screen has to be integrated into the control process so that it can
be opened at runtime on the operating unit. You can select a screen in either one
of two ways:
•
Select Screen function
You an assign this function to an input field, a function key or a button,
for example. You specify the name of the screen as the parameter. This means
that a screen can be displayed by means of an input field or a function key.
With input fields and soft keys, the function can be used only locally on that
screen. Should you wish the function to be available on every screen, you have
to configure the function on a global function key on the operating unit (refer to
What are function keys? (Chapter 5.3.3)).
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•
5-4
Select Screen Directory
Include the screen in the screen directory. To do so, choose Edit → Properties
and click the Screen to Directory check box on the General tab. Enter text
specifically for that screen on the Title tab for display in the directory. This
means that you can select the screen on the operating unit by means of the
Screens → Edit standard screen.
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5.2
Configuring display elements
Purpose
You use display elements to monitor the machine or the system on the operating
unit. You can display current information, such as actual values from the PLC,
process and operating modes and malfunctions, on the operating unit as a
numerical value or in plain language.
Overview
There are essentially two types of display element available for the different tasks:
•
Static display elements
A static display element is text (What is static text? (Chapter 5.2.1)) which is not
linked to the PLC. Static display elements do not react to user inputs and
cannot be modified at runtime on the operating unit. Use static display
elements, for example, for explanations of controls and dynamic display
elements.
•
Dynamic display elements
Dynamic display elements are output fields (What are output fields?
(Chapter 5.2.2)) that are connected to the PLC by means of tags. They
visualize current values from the PLC in alphanumeric form. Output fields can
change their display spontaneously at runtime on the operating unit without the
operator intervening.
Use output fields for all tasks associated with monitoring the process, a
machine or the system.
Detailed descriptions of the different steps to configuration will be found in the
ProTool online Help.
5.2.1
What is static text?
Static text is text that is not linked to the PLC. It cannot be modified at runtime on
the operating unit. Use static text, for example, to label controls and output fields.
The relative importance of different text strings on a screen can be illustrated by
means of different character formats - for example, by means of flashing or
uppercase text.
You can configure static text separately for any language available on the
operating unit. You enter text strings directly into the screen editor.
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5.2.2
What are output fields?
Purpose
Output fields display current values from the PLC on the operating unit. The
values may be output optionally in numerical, alphanumeric or symbolic form.
Configure output fields by selecting the symbol illustrated or by choosing
Insert → Input/Output Field from the menu.
Numerical and alphanumeric output
Output fields for numerical or alphanumeric values show the value as a number or
as text. A numerical value, for example, is the number 80 as the actual value of a
temperature. An alphanumeric value, for example, is the text string Valve_12.
Symbolic output
Output fields for symbolic values do not display the true value but a text string
from a text list. For example, you can store the two states of a valve in a text list.
When the valve is open, the output field then points, for example, to the text string
OPEN.
By using output fields for symbolic values, you eliminate misinterpretations on the
part of the operator to a large extent, since a symbolic value often presents a state
more lucidly than an abstract numerical value, for instance.
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Configuring controls
Purpose
You use controls on the operating unit to intervene directly in the process. They
are used, for example, to specify setpoints, trigger functions, open screens (What
are screens? (Chapter 5.1)) and acknowledge messages. You can assign a
password level to controls in order to prevent manipulation by unauthorized
persons.
Overview
The following controls are available in ProTool for the different tasks:
•
Input fields (What are input fields? (Chapter 5.3.1))
•
Input/output fields (What are combined input/output fields? (Chapter 5.3.2))
•
Function keys (What are function keys? (Chapter 5.3.3))
Detailed descriptions of the different steps to configuration will be found in the
ProTool online Help.
5.3.1
What are input fields?
Purpose
In input fields you enter values on the operating unit that are transferred to the
PLC. The values may be input optionally in numerical, alphanumeric or symbolic
form. If you define limit values for the input field tag, you can reject inputs on the
operating unit that are outside the specified range of values.
You can prevent manipulation by unauthorized persons by assigning a password
level.
Create input fields by selecting the symbol illustrated or by choosing
Insert → Input/Output Field from the menu.
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Numerical and alphanumeric input
In input fields for numerical and alphanumeric values you enter the value one
character at a time on the operating unit. A numerical value, for example, is the
number 80 as the setpoint for a temperature. An alphanumeric value, for example,
is the text string Valve_12.
Symbolic input
In input fields for symbolic values you do not enter the value one character at a
time but select this value on the operating unit from a text list. During configuration
you assign symbolic text on the text list to every value of a tag. In this way,
for example, you can turn a motor on and off by means of the two entries ON and
OFF.
By using input fields for symbolic values, you prevent misinterpretations to a large
extent, since the operating unit accepts only the configured values on the text list.
5.3.2
What are combined input/output fields?
Combined input/output fields display current values from the PLC on the operating
unit. You can also enter values that are transferred to the PLC at the same time.
The values may be input and output optionally in numerical, alphanumeric or
symbolic form. During input, the value you want to be output is not updated on the
operating unit.
You can prevent manipulation by unauthorized persons by assigning a password
level. If you define limit values for the input/output field tag, you can reject inputs
on the operating unit that are outside the specified range of values.
Create combined input/output fields by selecting the symbol illustrated or
by choosing Insert → Input/Output Field from the menu.
5.3.3
What are function keys?
A function key is a key on the operating unit for configuring a function assignment.
You can assign one or more functions to any function key in ProTool. The functions
are triggered as soon as the key is pressed. The function key assignment may be
locally or globally significant. You can assign a password level to function keys in
order to prevent manipulation by unauthorized persons.
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Global assignment
Globally assigned function keys always trigger the same function, irrespective of
the current control situation. You can use them, for example, to open a screen,
display the current alarm message or print the contents of a screen.
By using globally assigned function keys, you cut your configuration effort
considerably since you do not have to assign individual functions to global keys on
every screen.
Assign function keys globally by choosing System → Screen/Keys from
the menu. To do this, click in the Screen/Keys dialog box on one of the
keys K1 through KX or F1 through FX. You can specify the functions you
have assigned to specific keys on the operating unit by means of labeling
strips (not OP3).
Local assignment
Locally assigned function keys trigger different actions on the operating unit
depending on the situation. A function key whose assignment may vary from
screen to screen is referred to as a soft key.
Assign soft keys locally in the screen editor. To do so, click in the screen
on one of the keys F1 through FX, which are arranged directly around the
operating unit screen.
You can also assign soft keys globally. A global assignment is active on all screens
to which you do not assign a screen-specific function. Use globally assigned soft
keys, for example, to change from any screen to the same system screen.
Note
Do not assign functions that have to be permanently available on the operating
unit to soft keys.
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5.4
Using tags
Overview
Since tags are the most important means of communication between the operating
unit and the PLC and for exchanging data, a detailed explanation is presented
here of what tags are and what types of tag are used in ProTool.
5.4.1
What are tags?
Definition
A tag has a symbolic name and a defined data type. The value of the tag changes
while the PLC program is being executed. Tags with a PLC link are referred to as
global tags. Tags without a PLC link are known as local tags.
•
Global tags
A tag with a PLC link occupies a defined memory address on the PLC, to which
read and write access is possible from both the operating unit and the PLC.
• Local tags
Local tags are not connected to the PLC. They are available only on the
operating unit. You create local tags, for example, so that the operator can
enter limit values on the operating unit.
Tag types
ProTool recognizes the following tag types (but these are not available on every
PLC):
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Data Type
Bit System Range of Values
BYTE
(OP7/17 only)
8 bit
0 through 255
INT
16 bit
- 32768 through 32767
UINT
16 bit
0 through 65535
LONG
32 bit
- 2147483648 through 2147483647
ULONG
32 bit
0 through 4294967295
FLOAT
32 bit
Upper limit value: ± 3.402823 e+38
Lower limit value: ± 1.175495 e-38
DOUBLE
(OP7/17 only)
64 bit
Approx. 12 valid digits
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5.4.2
Data Type
Bit System Range of Values
BOOL
–
true (1), false (0)
STRING
–
1 to 128 bytes
Array
tags
This tag type combines a random number of tags of the
same type to form a total, which can be handled as a
whole.
Properties of tags
To define a tag, set the properties of the tag.
The following figure shows an example of the Tag dialog box for the SIMATIC S7.
Tag Dialog Box for the SIMATIC S7
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Tag definition (Section A)
The available data types or data formats and the number of decimal places
depend on which PLC you selected. Refer to ProTool online Help for details.
Updating tags
The acquisition cycle determines the time interval in which the value of a tag is
updated on the operating unit.
System default setting: 1 s
The acquisition cycle is a multiple of the standard clock pulse, which you configure
for every PLC in the PLC dialog box. You globally modify the acquisition cycles for
all the tags of a project by setting the standard clock pulse.
Array tags
An array tag represents a number of tags of the same type with consecutive
memory addresses. If you wish to define an array tag, enter the number of
elements in the array in the Tag dialog box at Number Elements.
The system default setting is 1, in other words, the tag is not defined as an array.
The maximum number of elements in an array is 255.
Tip
You can use array tags for recipes, for instance.
Address (Section B)
The address determines the memory location of a global tag on the PLC. The
address therefore depends on the PLC you are using.
The display of the address depends on the PLC you selected. This section of the
Tag dialog box adjusts dynamically to the programmable address areas.
ProTool integrated in STEP 7 (Section C)
If you have installed ProTool in STEP 7 on an integrated basis, you can access the
STEP 7 symbol table directly in the Tag dialog box.
For performance reasons, ProTool does not automatically update the STEP 7
symbol table after every change. In order to make the latest changes to the
STEP 7 symbol table available in ProTool, update the display of the symbol table
in the Tag dialog box by clicking Update.
See the example in online Help with regard to the definition of an entity DB in the
symbol table.
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Setting a start value
You can set a start value for the tag at Options. When the project is downloaded,
the tag is assigned the start value. The start value is displayed only on the
operating unit and is not stored on the PLC.
Example:
If tags are used for scaling trends and bar graphs, the initial value may be the start
value of the scaling.
Remark
This is not useful for tags of the type STRING.
Setting limit values
An upper and a lower limit value can be configured at Limit values for tags.
If the tag value is outside the defined range, in other words, it is higher or lower
than the limit value concerned - this has the following effect on the input fields, for
example. If the operator enters a value outside the configured limit values, the
input is rejected.
Configuring tags with functions
You can assign functions to tags in input/output fields - for example, the Select
Screen function. The screen is selected as soon as the value of the tag changes.
Note
A function which you have configured for an internal tag (without PLC connection)
whose value is modified by another function is not executed.
5.4.3
Example: Scaling tags
The scaling of tags is configured as a function relating to a tag. The following
functions are available for this:
•
Scaling Linear 1 and Scaling Linear 2
•
Scaling Square 1 and Scaling Square 2.
If you configure no scaling, the tag value on the PLC corresponds to the tag value
on the operating unit.
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Linear scaling
Scaling can be configured for any tag in the form
y = a*x + b.
•
X = displayed value/input value
The Y value read from the PLC undergoes linear scaling before being displayed
on the operating unit as the X value. Inputs X on the operating unit undergo
scaling before being written to the PLC as the Y value.
•
X = displayed value/input value
The Y value read from the PLC undergoes linear scaling before being displayed
on the operating unit as the Y value. Inputs Y on the operating unit undergo
scaling before being written to the PLC as the X value.
Example
You have configured 3 as the value of a6 as the value of b. The value 21 is
transferred from the PLC. It is inserted in the conversion formula, thus: 21 = 3 * X
6. This produces a value of 5 for X. That value is displayed on the operating unit.
Square scaling
Scaling can be configured for any tag in the form:
y = a * x^2 + b * x + c.
•
X = displayed value/input value
The Y value read from the PLC undergoes square scaling before being
displayed on the operating unit as the X value. Inputs X on the operating unit
undergo scaling before being written to the PLC as the Y value.
•
Y = displayed value/input value
The X value read from the PLC undergoes square scaling before being
displayed on the operating unit as the Y value. Inputs Y on the operating unit
undergo scaling before being written to the PLC as the X value.
Example
You have configured a value of 2 for a, and a value of 3 for b and 6 for c. A value
of 71 is transferred from the PLC. It is inserted in the conversion formula, thus: 71
= 2 * X^2 + 3 * X + 6. This produces a value of 5 for X. That value is displayed on
the operating unit.
5.4.4
Example: How to set the acquisition cycle and the standard
clock pulse
System default setting: standard clock pulse 200 ms, acquisition cycle 1 s.
Set the standard clock pulse in the PLC dialog box. If you increase the standard
clock pulse to 600 ms, the acquisition cycle for all tags is increased to 3 s.
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Tip
In order not to overload communication between the PLC and the operating unit,
the times you set for the standard clock pulse should not be too short. This would
mean that other processes, such as the updating of trends or the execution of PLC
jobs, would take considerably longer.
5.4.5
What is a tag list?
Purpose
With each input field, you generally set in advance which tag is assigned to the
input field. With a tag list, this assignment is not static for the OP7 and OP17
devices, but can be influenced by the operator. You can choose from as many as
eight tags, which supply the input field with data at runtime.
Principle
The figure shows the principle of a tag list. When you configure the input field, in
addition to tag VAR_1 of the input field, also define an alternative tag, VAR_2 .
The alternative tag is an array tag. Use the configured value for the height of the
input field to set how many tags you want to assign to the input field. At runtime,
the value (6) entered in the input field will determine the index in the alternative
tag and supply the input field with the value saved under the associated address in
the PLC.
Alternative tag (VAR_2)
Input field
6
VAR_1
Value 1
Value 2
Value 3
Value 4
Value 5
Value 6
Value 7
Value 8
...
...
...
...
Height
of the field
...
Tag list (principle)
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5.4.6
What is address multiplexing?
Definition
With address multiplexing, the address parameters of a tag are modified as a
function of the value of the multiplex tag.
Purpose of address multiplexing
With address multiplexing, you can address a number of memory addresses in the
address area of the PLC (S7-CPU) with a single tag. You can read or write to the
addresses without having to define a tag for every single address, that is, it is a
very efficient method of processing data.
Principle of address multiplexing
The following figure illustrates the principle of address multiplexing with tags:
Multiplex tag
Tag
Value 1
Byte 1
Value 2
Byte 2
Value 3
Byte 3
Value n
Byte n
Address multiplexing with tags
Configuring a multiplex tag
You define the multiplex tag by pressing on the corresponding button next to
the address in the Tag dialog box.
Pay attention to the following when configuring multiplex tags:
•
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The multiplex tag must not be multiplexed.
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•
The type of multiplex tag must match the type of address parameter which the
multiplex tag is defining.
The following figure shows the result of the address multiplexing for tags:
Address multiplexing with tags
Note
If one of the multiplex tags is modified during operation, the multiplexed tag is not
modified until the next recording cycle. If you want immediate updating, configure
the Update Screen function for every multiplex tag.
5.4.7
Example: How to configure a multiplex tag
To multiplex an address, create the following tag, for example:
1. Select Paste → Object to configure a new tag.
2. In the Tag dialog box, enter Var_1 as the name for the new tag.
3. On the Address tab, select INT under Type and enter the address as :
DB
50
DBB
0
Click this button to open the Address Multiplexing dialog box.
4.
5. Activate address multiplexing.
6. Enter Multiplex_1 as the name of the new multiplex tag.
Click this button to define the multiplex tag.
7.
8. On the Address tab, select BYTE under Type and enter the address:
FW
20
The multiplex tag may assume values between 0 and 255, in other words you
can reference 256 different addresses with the tag Var_1.
Note:
If you want to make use of this maximum range of values, DB 50 in the
STEP 7 program has to be created with at least 128 data words.
9. Apply the settings by clicking OK.
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The name of the multiplex tag is displayed as the address of the tag Var_1:
DB
50
DBB [MULTIPLEX_1]
Variable_1
DB
DBB
50
[mux]
Byte 0
Byte 1
Byte 2
Multiplex_1
MW
20
Byte n
Example: configuring a multiplex tag
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5.5
Creating headers and footers
5.5.1
Creating headers and footers
Note
Headers/footers can only be configured for the OP5, OP7, OP15 and OP17 and
the corresponding complete units.
What objects can you use in headers and footers?
You can configure static text and output fields in headers and footers. Two lines
of 80 characters are available in all instances.
At Usage, you can choose between Date, time and Page number. This also sets
the Display and the Field length.
For what uses can you configure headers and footers?
You can set headers and footers for the following printouts from the operating unit.
Message Report
Messages for which you have configured Print are
output to the printer.
EM Chronological
The contents of the event buffer are printed in
chronological order of the messages.
EM Together
The contents of the event buffer are printed in message
number order.
AM Chronological
The contents of the alarm buffer are printed in
chronological order of the messages.
AM Together
The contents of the alarm buffer are printed in message
number order.
Overflow
When the buffer overflows, the messages are output to
the printer.
Print Screen
A screen that you have selected is printed.
Print Recipe
The recipe specified in the function parameter of the
function Print All Data Records is printed out complete
with all its data records.
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5.6
Creating text or graphic lists
5.6.1
What are text or graphic lists?
Purpose
Text is often more meaningful than an abstract value. For example, the pieces of
text full and empty present the state of a tank more lucidly than the
corresponding numerical values. Which is why ProTool gives you the opportunity
to configure text or graphic lists. These text lists are lists in which you assign a
text element from the list to each tag value.
Usage
With text or graphic lists, you can display texts in output fields and select texts for
input in input fields. To a large extent, this eliminates misinterpretations in the
display and operator errors during input.
A text or graphic list assigns a text to every value of a tag. At runtime, the tag
value determines which text is selected from the list and displayed, for example, in
an input/output field on the operating unit.
To create a new text or graphic list, double-click Text or graphic lists in the project
window.
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5.7
Configuring a scheduler
5.7.1
What is a scheduler?
Constraint
Note
Schedulers are available only for the OP15 and OP17 operating units.
Tasks of a scheduler
A scheduler defines a regularly recurring time at which a particular function is to be
executed.
The following types of scheduled times are available:
•
hourly
•
daily
•
weekly
•
annually
Scheduler dialog box
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The following table shows which time entries you can specify for which scheduler
types:
Scheduler type
Required time entries
hourly
Minute
daily
Hour, minute
weekly
Day of the week, hour, minute
annualy
Month, day, hour, minute
Functions linked to a scheduler
If you subsequently want to change or deactivate the scheduled time on the
operating unit, you can insert it in a screen entry. At a scheduled time, the
associated scheduler bit is set on the PLC (in the interface area) and the
configured function executed.
For example, you can configure print functions for a scheduler:
•
Events - Print Buffer
•
Alarms - Print Buffer
•
Print Screen
•
Print Data Record
Scheduler without functions
It is not essential to configure a function. If no function is configured, the scheduler
bit is set when the scheduler is executed, but of course no function is executed.
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5.8
Configuring messages
Overview
To display process and operating states or to acquire and log process data on the
operating unit that you obtain on the process from the PLC, configure messages.
Messages are initiated by the PLC and can be displayed on the operating unit.
5.8.1
Reporting operating and process states
What do you use to display operating and process states?
There are the following message types in ProTool:
•
Event messages display routine operating and process states and processes.
•
Alarm messages display critical or hazardous operating and process states
and require operating personnel to react by issuing an acknowledgement.
•
System messages display states and faults of the operating unit, the PLC or the
communications between them. They are issued by the operating unit or by the
PLC.
•
System messages on the S7-NC and S7-FM (OP7 and OP17 only) display
states and errors of the PLC or during communication.
For what purpose do you use messages?
The messaging system is responsible for the following tasks:
•
Reporting events or states that can occur on the system or in the process:
− A state is reported immediately following its occurrence.
− The messages are presented to the operator as a function of their
significance (priority).
•
Support in eliminating the cause of error conditions:
− Messages provide in-depth information on the causes of errors
(diagnostics).
− The process can be influenced as a result of the message.
•
Printout: the message events are output to a printer.
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5.8.2
What goes into a message?
A message consists of:
•
a message number
•
message text
•
a message tag
•
help text
The following messages are displayed on the operating unit but cannot be edited
in ProTool:
•
The message number cannot be modified in system messages, standard S7
diagnostic results (S7 system messages) and NC alarms. (only with OP7 and
OP17).
•
Message numbers of user defined S7 diagnostic results can be freely defined
in STEP 7 within certain limits.
•
The message number is assigned to Alarm_S messages in STEP 7.
Message number
The message number is used to reference a message. In ProTool, you have a free
choice of message number (within the range 0 to 2000) and message text.
Message text
Message text contains the description of a message. The length of the message
text depends on the operating unit. The number of characters per line is marked by
this character at the top border of the window during configuration.
By choosing Edit → Style from the menu, you can select from the following styles
for the message text, depending on the operating unit: flashing, underscore, italic,
and capitals (text-based displays only).
Tip
You can also configure operator instructions as a message.
Message tags
A message can contain output fields with tags. They are also referred to as
message tags.
By choosing Edit → Style from the menu, you can select from the following styles
for output fields, depending on the operating unit: flashing, underscore, italic.
Insert an output field by selecting the symbol illustrated.
Note
The values of message tags are updated in the message buffer when messages
are active or are cleared, but not when messages are acknowledged.
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Help text
Help text containing further details on a message can be configured for every
message. Help text is displayed for the operator in a separate window on the
operating unit by pressing the HELP key.
Enter Help text by selecting the symbol illustrated or by using the menu
command View → Help text.
5.8.3
What parameters do you set for messages?
You can configure the following parameters for messages:
•
priority
•
acknowledgement group
•
print
Priority
High-priority messages are displayed before low-priority messages on the
operating unit. The lowest priority is 1.
•
If several messages having the same priority are waiting to be displayed, the
most recent (last) is displayed.
•
If several unacknowledged alarm messages having the same priority are
waiting to be displayed, you can choose whether the most recent (last ) or the
oldest (first) should be displayed.
Configure the priority in the Attributes dialog box for every single message. Set the
sort criterion by choosing System → Messages → Settings from the menu.
Acknowledgement group
Alarm messages can be assigned to acknowledgement groups. Configure the
assignment to an acknowledgement group for every single message. If you
acknowledge an alarm message in one acknowledgement group, all the alarm
messages in that group are acknowledged simultaneously (group
acknowledgement).
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Print
If you select Print, the message event (active, cleared, acknowledged) is logged
automatically on the printer if you selected, at System → Messages → Settings,
Print on Message Event.
Configure printing in the Attributes dialog box for every single message.
5.8.4
Acknowledging messages
Principle
An alarm message can be acknowledged either by the operator on the operating
unit or by the PLC program. By acknowledging an alarm message, you confirm
that you have taken notice of it.
Assigning acknowledgement groups
You can assign several alarm messages to a single acknowledgement group when
you configure alarm messages. This means that when the first alarm message is
acknowledged – for example, the cause of the malfunction- all the other alarm
messages in the same acknowledgement group (consequential malfunctions) are
acknowledged together.
A blank field in the message editor Attributes window is equivalent to entering 0.
The value 0 results in individual acknowledgement, i.e. when an alarm message
is acknowledged, only that alarm message is acknowledged. If you acknowledge
an alarm message in one acknowledgement group, all the alarm messages in that
group are acknowledged simultaneously (group acknowledgement).
You can allocate the messages to one of 4 acknowledgement groups.
5.8.5
What settings are there for message classes?
You can configure the following parameters for message classes:
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•
acknowledgement
•
printout
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Acknowledgement
Alarm messages have to be acknowledged. Alarm messages are displayed until
they have been acknowledged.
Single acknowledgement: when you acknowledge a message only that particular
message is acknowledged.
Group acknowledgement: when you acknowledge a message belonging to an
acknowledgement group, all the queued messages of this group are acknowledged
as well.
Printout
Printing is enabled or disabled by selecting the Print attribute, or is enabled when
the message buffer overflows. The messages are printed on a printer attached to
the operating unit.
Configure Printout by choosing System → Messages → Settings from the menu.
5.8.6
Example: How to configure alarm messages
Example: set the alarm message area and configure an alarm message with a
SIMATIC 300/400 PLC
In this example, you will configure the alarm message area first and then an alarm
message.
1. Choose System → Area Pointers from the menu to create the alarm message
area. The Area Pointers dialog box is opened.
2. In the Type field, select the Alarm messages area pointer. Click the Add button.
3. The Alarm Messages dialog box is opened. Enter at Address:
DB:
DW:
Length:
PLC:
10
2
2
PLC_1
You have just created an alarm message area for 32 alarm messages.
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4. Confirm all settings by clicking OK. Exit from the Area Pointers dialog box
likewise by clicking OK.
5. Double-click the Alarm Messages window to open it. Position the cursor at
message No. 2.
6. Enter the following message: Motor temperature too high
7. Perform the following settings in the Attributes window:
Priority:
Acknowledgement:
Print:
1
1
ã
The figure shows the configured alarm message:
5.8.7
What are system messages?
System messages are always implemented on the operating unit and cannot be
configured in ProTool. They are displayed in a process window.
What is reported?
A system message consists of a message number and message text. The
message text may contain internal system tags that provide further details on the
cause of an error message.
System messages provide information on operating unit operating states. The
wealth of possible system messages ranges from notes to serious errors.
Note
You will find a list of system messages of the operating units, their causes and, if
possible, remedial action in an appendix to the Communication User’s Guide.
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Displaying system messages
Under System → Messages → System Messages, set the length of time the
system messages are to be displayed on the operating unit.
Note
The 0 setting means the display is static. The process window is not closed until
you press ESC.
On operating units OP7 and OP17 (and accordingly C7-633 and C7-634) you can
also activate display of the following system messages (example):
•
SIMATIC S7 (Minimal): The message numbers of the S7 system messages
(time stamped) are output. You can refer to the cause of the error in your S7
manual by means of the number.
•
SIMATIC S7 (Standard): In addition to minimal display, the message text of
the S7 system message is output and you can display it using the arrow keys.
•
SIMATIC S7-FM: The message text of FM system messages is output.
•
SIMATIC S7-NC: The message text of NC system messages is output.
Remark
The ..\PROTOOL\SYSMSG folder contains system messages for the S7-NC and
the S7-FM in several languages.
5.8.8
Example of displaying system messages
You will find examples of system messages and how they are displayed on the
operating unit in the following:
SIMATIC OP
The system messages of the operating unit are output.
316 Invalid Password Level
Some system messages expect confirmation or a decision by the operator for example:
557 Save data record?
0 Yes / 1 No
You decide on how you want to proceed by entering 0 (Yes) or 1 (No).
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SIMATIC S7 (Minimal)
The message numbers of the S7 system messages are output. You can refer to
the cause of the error in your S7 manual by means of the number.
MESSAGE S4303
07.03.98 15:16:34
SIMATIC S7 (Standard)
In addition to the minimal display, the message text of the S7 system message is
output. For this, select the corresponding message with the help of the arrow key.
MESSAGE S4303
07.03.98 15:16:34
If you press the RIGHT arrow key:
PLC_1:
STOP by operating Stop switch
SIMATIC S7-FM
The message text of FM system messages is output.
SIMATIC S7-NC
The message text of NC system messages is output.
5.8.9
How to log messages on the printer?
Enabling and disabling message logging
To output messages to the printer, open the Attributes - Message dialog box by
choosing menu item View → Message Attributes and select Print. The messages
are logged when their status changes (active, cleared, acknowledged).
By choosing System → Messages → Settings from the menu, you can select the
following settings for message logging:
•
Message event
Message logging is activated for all message events.
•
Buffer overflow
When the specified remaining buffer capacity is reached, all messages are
printed out irrespective of whether printing is enabled or not. The message
buffer is then deleted.
•
Off
Message logging is disabled.
You use the Message Log ON/OFF function to enable and disable automatic
printing of messages (refer to Functions).
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5.8.10
Configuring printers for the operating unit
Attach a printer to your operating unit for the printout of process states or process
data reports.
For this you can configure one or more printers.
•
In ProTool, some printers in the list box have already been defined.
Parameters have already been assigned to these printers.
•
You can add more new printers to the list box in ProTool. You have to enter
the specific control characters contained in the printer manuals concerned for
these printers.
Perform the settings for the printers and the interface parameters by choosing
System → Printer from the menu.
Tip
Use the Z_PRINTER standard screen belonging to the standard configuration.
5.8.11
Displaying messages on the operating unit
Messages are displayed in special output windows. You can still operate the
operating unit when messages are queued and displayed.
Set the display of messages on the operating unit by choosing System →
Messages → Settings from the menu.
Select Separate or Together:
•
Together
The display on the operating unit is split. Event messages are displayed in one
half and alarm messages in the other. If no event messages or alarm
messages are queued, the corresponding section remains empty.
•
Separate
Event messages and alarm messages are displayed separately from each
other on the operating unit. They are displayed according to priority:
− unacknowledged alarm messages
− event messages
− acknowledged alarm messages
− standby message
If, for example, at least one unacknowledged message is pending, no event
messages are displayed.
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Sort criterion for alarm messages
If several unacknowledged alarm messages of the same priority are queued,
select the sort criterion by choosing System → Messages → Settings from the
menu:
First
The first (oldest) alarm message is displayed first.
Last
The last (most recent) alarm message is displayed first.
If you configure the function Select Function Screen and screen name with the
value AM First/Last as a parameter, you can change the sort sequence in the
operating unit too.
Tip
This function has already been implemented on the System Settings standard
screen.
Standby message
The standby message is a special event message. The standby message is
event message number 0. It is displayed if no other message is pending on the
operating unit.
Note
The standby message can have only message text and output fields containing the
date and time.
5.8.12
What is in the message buffer?
Definition
A message buffer is a memory area with battery backup in the operating unit RAM
in which message events are stored in chronological order. It takes the form of a
FIFO buffer with a specified size and does not have to be explicitly configured.
The message buffer can store 256 alarm message events as well as 256 event
message events.
Data storage in message buffer
Every message event is stored with the following information:
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message number
•
event identification (A for Arrived, D for Departed, K for AcKnowledged)
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time stamp consisting of date and time
•
acknowledgement group QGR (with alarm messages only)
•
message text
•
value of the message tag at the time of arrival or departure
Example
Below is an example of output from the message buffer to the printer:
0010 D
11:58:08 27/03/98
QGR02
Boiler pressure too high: 7.9 bar
0029 K
11:40:47 27/03/98
Oil supply shut off
QGR00
0029 AK
11:38:09 27/03/98
Oil supply shut off.
QGR00
0010 K
11:35:18 27/03/98
QGR02
Boiler pressure too high: #### bar
0010 AK
11:34:26 27/03/98
QGR02
Boiler pressure too high: 12.7 bar
If a message contains process values, then those values that were available when
the message event arrived or departed are stored in the message buffer. In the
case of the Acknowledged message status, the operating unit does not acquire any
current process values.
Note
The last four characters cannot be displayed on the operating unit on the first line
of the message buffer on account of the message number being displayed. If a
message tag has been configured at this point, it is not displayed.
Behavior on overflow
Under System → Messages → Settings you can select whether an overflow
warning is to be output when the specified remaining buffer capacity is reached.
Before the messages are deleted, they are output to the printer. This applies to all
messages even if they are not marked with the attribute Print.
Using a standard screen
The following functions have already been implemented on the standard screen
known as Event Messages (Z_MESS_EVENT):
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•
Display event message buffer
•
Print event buffer
•
Delete event buffer
•
Output Overflow Warning
•
Display number of event messages
The following functions have already been implemented on the standard screen
known as Alarm Messages (Z_MESS_ALARM):
5.8.13
•
Display alarm message buffer
•
Print Alarms Buffer
•
Delete alarm buffer
•
Output Overflow Warning
•
Show number of alarm messages
What communication areas are required for messages?
For communication between the operating unit and the PLC functions properly,
choose System → Area Pointers from the menu and establish in your project an
assignment to the following communication areas: event messages and/or alarm
messages
These areas are imperative if you have configured event messages and alarm
messages.
They must be chosen at least large enough for a bit to be available for every
configured message. If the communication area is not made large enough, a
warning will be issued during compilation of the project.
If you wish, you can create the following communication areas:
5.8.14
•
PLC acknowledgement
•
OP acknowledgement
Optional communication areas for messages
If you want the acknowledgement to come from the PLC, you have to create the
following acknowledgement areas by choosing System → Area Pointers from the
system.
•
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The acknowledgement bit is set by the PLC program and thus causes
acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message to be displayed on the
operating unit.
The PLC Acknowledgement acknowledgement area
− has to be contiguous with the associated alarm message area
− has to have the same acquisition cycle as the alarm messages area
− can have the same length as the associated alarm area at most.
•
OP Acknowledgement
The operator acknowledges an alarm message on the operating unit and thus
sets the acknowledgement bit of this alarm message on the PLC. When he
does so, the entire acknowledgement area is transferred to the PLC.
The OP Acknowledgement acknowledgement area may have the same length
as the associated alarm message area at most.
5.8.15
How are messages initiated?
Message procedure:
The message procedure identified the transfer path of messages and thus also the
parameters of the messages. The message procedure in ProTool is the message
bit procedure.
With this message procedure, the operating unit detects the arrival, departure or
acknowledgement of a message by setting a bit in the address area, the bit being
assigned by choosing System → Area Pointers from the menu to the event/alarm
message area.
ALARM_S reference
A message is event-driven and is issued when a bit is set in the PLC. The setting,
resetting and acknowledging of the bit is known as a message event.
Active (K)
The message bit has been set and the message is
waiting to be displayed.
Cleared (G)
The message bit has been reset because the cause that
gave rise to the message no longer exists.
Acknowledge (Q)
With alarm messages only:
The operator (or the PLC) acknowledges the message to
confirm the noting of the message.
The message events have been acquired by the operating unit and time stamped.
The operating unit automatically enters all the message events in the message
buffer. In this way the message events can be viewed at a later time again.
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Communication areas for messages
The display of messages on the operating unit is initiated by the PLC by a bit
being set on it in a defined communication area.
You can see which communication areas for messages have to be created on the
PLC in the following figure:
Operating unit
Display
000x message
PLC
Adress area
Event message area
Alarm message area
Message buffer
Printer
Displaying messages
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5.9
Using functions
Overview
Functions are a central element of configuration with ProTool. This section
explains what functions are and how to use them in practice.
5.9.1
What functions are used for
Basic principle
In ProTool, you can link events (e. g. "Key pressed") with predefined functions. If
the event occurs during operation, the function executes a specific action on the
operating unit or the PLC.
For example, the "Select Screen" function on the operating unit opens a particular
configuration screen.
Event
Press key
Function:
Select Screen
A
B
Action:
Screen is switched
Triggering a function
Areas of application
In general, you can use functions to:
•
Set up the configuration process-specifically
(e.g. to switch from one screen to another)
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•
Control the process
(e.g. to set a bit in order to switch on a motor with it)
•
Use features of the operating unit
(e.g. to display or print out the message buffer)
•
Perform system settings online on the operating unit
(for example, change modes)
In most cases, you can configure the behavior of the functions precisely by means
of parameters. If you want to trigger several actions, you can also combine
different functions.
Configuration
You configure functions on the Functions tab in the properties dialog box of the
relevant object.
For some operating units you can also define global entry points by choosing the
System → Functions menu command.
5.9.2
Events for triggering functions
Necessity
The execution of a function is always linked to a specific event. The function is
only triggered when this event occurs.
The events that can be linked to a function depend on the type of the function.
Many functions are only effective with certain specific events.
Examples
Examples of events that can trigger functions are the events "press key" and
"release key". In the case of the former, the function is executed the moment a
particular function key is pressed; in the latter case, it is executed the moment the
function key is released again.
Object-linked functions
Functions and events are generally linked to a specific object. For example, a
function linked to the event "press key" is to be triggered when a specific key is
pressed, not just any key.
The following objects can be linked to functions, for example:
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•
Function keys, soft keys and buttons
•
Screen objects
•
Screens
•
Tags
Depending on the operating unit, it may not be possible to configure functions for
all these objects.
Tip
Functions with tags are triggered only if the Read Options Continuously tab is
selected or the tag is displayed on the screen.
Global functions
You can also link some functions to global, object-independent events. These can
be triggered in cases such as the following:
•
when a tag is initialized or upon system startup
•
when a value is entered
•
when a screen shot is printed (Print Screen)
•
when the message buffer overflows or is deleted
•
when a data record of a recipe is read or written
Depending on the operating unit, it may not be possible to configure all events.
You will find a detailed description of all the permissible events in the
ProTool online Help under the topic Configurable events.
5.9.3
Function parameters
Necessity
Many functions can only execute one particular action. For example, the Events
- Delete Buffer function empties the buffer for event messages.
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Function
predefined action
Function without input parameters
However, many functions can also work in various ways.
Input parameters
Imagine that you want to open another screen using a key on the operating unit. To
do this, you configure the Select Screen function. However, your project will
generally have several screens. Which of these screens should ProTool open?
You therefore have to give the function more information. This is done using
parameters. For the Select Screen function, you specify as a parameter the
name of the screen to be opened, for example.
Another example is the Language function. In this case, the parameter you specify
is the language to be set.
Input
parameters
Function
Action depending on
input parameter
Function with input parameters
Some functions require a single parameter; others require several.
Output parameters
Some functions write the result of their execution (i.e. the current status) to a tag.
You can then further evaluate the value of this tag, for example in order to display
a setting-dependent text on the operating unit.
An example is the Mode function. You specify a code for the operating mode as
the input parameter, and the function supplies the same code in a tag as the output
value. The value of the tag lets you display the current operating mode by means
of a text list, for example.
Note
Output parameters cannot be configured for all operating units.
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Input
parameters
Function
Action depending on
Input parameter
Output parameter
Evaluation
(optional)
Function with input and output parameters
Special case: program-controlled behavior
In the case described above, the behavior of the functions does not change during
runtime. However, in the case of some operating units and some functions, you
can also pass the value of a tag as an input parameter. The behavior of the
function can thus be controlled by the program.
General principle
The following figure illustrates the principle of how a function works:
Tag
Function
Tag
Constant
How a function works
An input parameter is specified for the function. This can be either constant or read
from a tag. The tag may be local or it may have a connection to the PLC. If there
is a connection to the PLC, the value is set by the process. The result of the
function is written to a tag, which itself can either be local or have a connection to
the PLC.
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5.9.4
Combining multiple functions
Multiple functions with one object
You can also assign an event several functions. The functions are then initiated
one after the other. You set the order in which this occurs in the Functions dialog
box during configuration. You can change the order of the functions by using the
Up and Down buttons.
Multiple functions with one object
Note
On the OP3, OP5 and OP15 operating units you can only configure a single
function for each object.
Sequence
The list of functions is processed from the top down.
Note
If an error occurs during the processing of a function list (e.g. a limit value is
exceeded), processing is aborted. The subsequent functions in the list are not
executed in this case.
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5.9.5
Function screens
Select Function Screen function
The Select Function Screen function accesses internal screens. These
screens are stored in the firmware of the operating units and cannot be changed in
the configuration. When a function screen is called, a screen is displayed in which
the operator can then execute the function.
The function screens are integrated in the configuration by means of the Select
Function Screen function. Some functions can be called both directly by
means of a function (individual function) and by means of a function screen. Other
functions are available only via function screens or only as individual functions.
In the case of an individual function, you specify a parameter. The function is then
executed directly with the set parameter. In function screens, the operator can
select a parameter and then execute the function.
If a function exists in the configuration as both an individual function and a
function screen, the current status of the function is displayed when the function
screen is called.
All the existing function screens are used with the supplied standard screens.
Example
A soft key is assigned the function Alarms - Display First/Last and the
parameter Last. If you press the key on the operating unit, the setting Last is
accepted.
Another soft key is assigned the function Function Screen and the parameter
Alarms - Display First/Last. If you press this key on the operating unit,
the function screen for setting the alarm message display is called.
It indicates the current status:
Message Display: Last
You can use the cursor keys on the operating unit to select a different setting and
then press the ENTER key to accept it.
5.9.6
Peculiarities with conversion functions
Problems
When conversion functions are applied to tags that use the same tag as a
parameter, incorrect calculations can result.
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Example
You have configured a screen with two tags, x and y: tag x for an input/output, tag
y for an output. Both are PLC tags.
Tag x has been assigned the Convert Value function as follows: y=10*x. The
function is to be executed when a value is entered.
Process
Let’s assume that x currently has a value of 1 on the PLC and the operating unit. If
a value of 2 is entered on the operating unit for x, an incorrect value of 10 appears
for y. The reason for this is as follows:
The function is executed when a value is entered. However, the new value x is not
yet on the PLC. The function thus takes the old value for x from the PLC.
Consequently, the result is incorrect.
Action
In order to get around this problem, set Value Output as the condition of
execution. The function is thus not triggered until the value changes on the PLC.
Note
The usage of this function with OP7/17 and the connection to a SIMATIC S5 can
lead to rounding errors, as with OP7/17, internal calculations are made with
Double values, which are then redisplayed as integer tags (refer to Tags).
5.9.7
Example: changing the operating mode
The following example using the Mode function illustrates How to configure
functions with a parameter.
Objective
You want to set the Online and Offline operating modes by means of two
function keys.
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Procedure:
1. Create and open the screen in which the switchover and display take place.
2. Click the function key that you want to use to switch on the Online operating
mode.
The Function Key dialog box appears.
3. Select the Functions tab.
4. Select the Display Selectable Functions check box.
The Select Function window appears.
5. Select the Mode function under the Switch function group.
6. Click the Add button.
The Parameters dialog box appears.
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7. Select the Operating Mode parameter from the list, and enter the value 0 in
the input field under the list. This parameter controls the behavior of the Mode
function, so the mode changes to online.
8. Click OK to close the Parameters dialog box.
The function then appears in the Selected Functions list.
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9. Click OK to close the Function Key dialog box.
The configuration of the function for switching on the Online operating mode
is thus complete.
10. Repeat steps 2 to 9 for the second function key. In step 7, however, you use the
parameter 1 this time.
At runtime, the operator can use both the configured function keys to set the
operating mode.
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5.10
Creating recipes
Overview
In this chapter you will learn
5.10.1
•
what recipes and data records are
•
how to configure recipes
•
how to transfer data records between the operating unit and the PLC.
What is a recipe?
Requirements
In order to be able to configure recipes, you require one of the following operating
units:
•
OP5, OP15
•
OP7, OP17
•
C7-623, C7-624
•
C7-633, C7-634
Purpose
The purpose of recipes is to transfer a group of related data to the PLC together
and synchronously.
Recipe and data record
The terms recipe and data record are defined below using the example of a filling
station for a fruit juice system:
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Fruit juice system
Grapefruit
Lemon
Nectar
Juice
Drink
Orange
Apple
Recipe and data record in a filing cabinet analogy
•
Recipe
Recipes correspond to the drawers of the filing cabinet shown (for example
Orange or Lemon). The reference value fields (tags) that belong to the recipe
are defined in the recipe. You use the recipe to define the data structure in your
ProTool project. You cannot change this structure subsequently on the
operating unit.
You can configure up to 99 recipes in ProTool.
•
Data record
Data records correspond to the filing cards in the drawers of the cabinet (Drink,
Juice and Nectar). A data record contains the values for a recipe. You create,
delete and modify data records on the operating unit.
You can configure up to 99 data records for a recipe.
Example of a recipe
The filling station above is used to produce orange drink, orange juice and orange
nectar. The mixing proportions for each of these are different. The ingredients are
always the same.
Let us assume that a recipe called Mixture is created, containing the following
data structure:
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Tag
Designation
Var_23
Name
Var_11
l orange
Var_7
l water
Var_19
kg sugar
Var_21
g flavor
The tag designations Name, l orange, g flavor etc., are known as entry
names. The entry names are displayed as well on the operating unit. Tag Var_11,
for example, can thus be identifed as the tag designating the mixture component
orange.
The data records contain the values for the different drink types. The data records
could be as follows, for example:
Orange drink
Orange juice
Orange nectar
Name
Drink
Name
Juice
Name
Nectar
l orange
90
l orange
95
l orange
70
l water
10
l water
5
l water
30
kg sugar
1,5
kg sugar
0,5
kg sugar
1,5
g flavor
200
g flavor
100
g flavor
400
Same tags in screens and the recipe
For each ingredient (orange, water, etc.) there is a separate screen in the above
example, containing a supply tank, valves, an overview of the quantities used and
other information. The screens contain input fields that allow you to set the various
supply quantities for the mixer. You can thus enter the mixing proportions screen
by screen. The mixer is then started. This process is repeated for each drink type.
If the tags of the input fields are formed into a recipe, you can store finished
mixtures for the different drink types by creating data records on the operating unit.
The figure below shows how to use the same tags in screens and in the recipe.
To produce a specific drink type, the corresponding data record is transferred to
the PLC. All tags are thus assigned the required values at the same time.
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Mixer
Scr_1
Var_23
Orange supply
Scr_2
Var_11
"Mixture" recipe
Water supply
Scr_3
Var_7
Var_23
Var_11
Var_7
Var_19
Var_21
name
l orange
l water
kg sugar
g aroma
Sugar supply
Scr_4
Var_19
Aroma supply
Scr_5
Var_21
Same tags in screens and the recipe
•
For how to configure a recipe, see Configuring recipes (Chapter 5.10.2).
•
For how to transfer data records, see Transferring data records
(Chapter 5.10.3).
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5.10.2
Configuring recipes
Identifying a recipe on the operating unit
You create a recipe in your project with a symbolic name. This name is only
relevant on the configuration computer, not on the operating unit. The recipe is
identified on the operating unit by means of the recipe number and recipe
heading set in the project.
You create the recipe heading in the recipe editor by choosing Edit → Properties.
In addition, ProTool automatically assigns a number to the recipe. You can also
change this number by choosing Edit → Properties.
Both the recipe number and recipe heading are visible on the operating unit and
enable you to select the recipe from the recipe directory.
Identifying a data record
You create a data record on the operating unit with a symbolic name. This name is
only relevant on the operating unit. In addition, the operating unit automatically
assigns a number to the data record. When a data record is transferred to the
PLC, only the recipe number and data record number are transferred with the data,
not the symbolic names.
Since the data record’s number is its unique identification attribute, you can create
several data records with the same name but not with the same data record
number.
The operating unit writes the data and number of the data record and of the
associated recipe to specified locations on the PLC:
SIMATIC S5
Numbers:
Recipe number mailbox
Data:
Recipe mailbox,
possibly successive recipe mailbox
SIMATIC S7
Numbers:
Data mailbox
Data:
To the addresses directly
You will find more information on the recipe number mailbox, recipe mailbox,
successive recipe mailbox and data mailbox in the Communication User’s Manual.
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Tags in recipes
Tags that you use in recipes must have an address on the PLC. Only these tags
will be transferred to the PLC when a data record is transferred. Tags without an
address are not transferred.
There is no point using the tag types Timer and Counter in recipes.
Note
Functions you have assigned to recipe tags are not executed in recipes.
Standard screen for recipes
The standard screen Z_RECORD is available so that you can create, edit, delete
and transfer data records on the operating unit. This screen is already integrated in
the standard project and can be displayed on the operating unit by means of a
function key.
Recipe entries
Recipes consist of individual entries. Each entry consists of a maximum of one
input field and an optional text. You can configure direct or symbolic entries for the
input field. By way of example, the figure below shows the Mixture recipe with its
entries.
In contrast to screens, the operating unit can display several entries for recipes at
the same time. The table shows how many lines and characters per line are
available with the different operating units.
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Operating unit
Lines
Characters per line
OP5
2
17
OP7
2
17
OP15A
1
36
OP15C
2
17 / 36
OP17
2
17 / 36
C7-623
2
17
C7-624
2
17
C7-633
2
17
C7-634
2
17 / 36
Recipe entries: number of available lines and characters per line
Note
When you download a new project to the operating unit, the configuration memory
is deleted, and with it all the data records created there.
5.10.3
Transferring data records
How to create data records and transfer them to the PLC is described in detail in
the manual of your operating unit.
Transferring data records when working on the operating unit (standard case)
The transfer of data records from the operating unit to the PLC and vice versa is
the standard case. The special cases are described in the Communication User’s
Manual. We recommend that you only transfer data records by using the operating
unit. To do this, use the standard screen Z_RECORD.
•
Creating data records
Data records can only be created on the operating unit and saved in the flash
memory there. The operating unit automatically creates a data record with the
number 1 for each recipe. All the values of the data record are preset with 0.
Copy this data record and save it by a different name in order to create other
data records.
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•
Synchronization during transfer
An essential feature of recipes is that the data is transferred with
synchronization and uncontrolled overwriting of the data is thus prevented. In
order to ensure coordinated operation when data records are transferred, bits
are set in the control and acknowledgment area of the interface area.
The interface area for the SIMATIC PLCs is described in the Communication
User’s Manual. You will find information for non-SIMATIC PLCs in the ProTool
online help system.
•
Functions
ProTool offers functions for:
− Transferring data records from the PLC to the operating unit
− Transferring data from the operating unit to the PLC
Assign a function like this to a function key. The parameters of the function
contain the recipe name and the data record number.
•
Transfer screen
A transfer screen is available on the operating unit for transferring data records.
This allows you to transfer data records in the following directions:
− From the operating unit to the PLC
− From the PLC to the operating unit
− From the operating unit to the operating unit (which corresponds to
copying a data record)
Transferring data records by means of a PLC program
You can transfer data records from the PLC to the operating unit and vice versa by
means of PLC jobs 69 and 70. However, the PLC job only writes to the tags or
reads from them. The data record cannot be saved in the flash memory or read
from the flash memory directly using a PLC job. You have to use the operating unit
for this.
5.10.4
Example: How to create a recipe
Task
In this example you create a recipe for the mixing station of a fruit juice system.
Different fruit juices are to be mixed using the same system. The ingredients are
the same; only the mixing proportions are different.
You begin by creating a recipe called Mixture and then a data record with the
name Juice. This data record contains the mixing proportions for orange juice.
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The example How to transfer data records shows you how to transfer the data
record to the PLC afterwards.
The task involves the following steps:
•
Creating a recipe
•
Transferring a project file to the operating unit
•
Creating a data record on the operating unit
Example system
You are going to create the example recipe for an OP7 linked to the SIMATIC S5
PLC via AS511. The PLC is the AG115U with the CPU 944.
Preparatory settings:
1. Open the standard project OP07_S5_S7.pdb. Save the project with a new
name (for example, QUICKMIX.PDB) by choosing File → Save As.
2. In the project window, select PLCs and double-click the entry in the right
column.
3. Select the SIMATIC S5-AS511 driver under Driver in the PLC dialog box.
4. To set the CPU type, click the Parameters button. Select the S5 115U
CPU944 CPU type. Close all the dialog boxes.
Creating a recipe:
1. Double-click Recipes in the project window. This opens the editor for recipes.
Create the recipe shown.
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Proceed as follows:
2. Enter the text Name and insert an input field for the data record name after it. In
the Input/Output Field dialog box, select Text and create the following text or
graphic list:
0
1
2
Drink
Nectar
Juice
3. Configure the new tag Var_23 of type KF for the input field. Set an address for
the tag on the PLC (for example DB 12, DW 0). Do not change the PLC that
is set. You can thus also use the tag in screens or messages.
4. Create four more tags - Var_11, Var_7, Var_19 and Var_21 - for the mixture
ingredients orange (in liters), water (in liters), sugar (in kilograms) and flavor (in
grams). These tags are also of the type KF.
Specify DB 12 for the address as well. Configure 1 decimal place for tag
Var_19 (sugar).
Additional settings:
In the following steps you specify the name of the recipe and set up the recipe
number mailbox and the recipe mailbox.
5. Choose the Edit → Properties menu command, and, on the General tab,
change the name of the recipe to Mixture.
6. Enter Mixture for the recipe on the Heading tab as well. The heading entered
here allows you to identify the recipe during runtime on the operating unit.
7. Close the dialog box.
8. Choose System → Area Pointers to set the interface area. Click the Add
button, and set the address:
Area: DB.DW
DB: 51
Length: 185
Set up the recipe number data area:
Area: DB.DW
DB: 13
DW: 0
Set up the recipe mailbox data area:
Area: DB.DW
DB: 14
DW: 0
Length: 29
Create the corresponding data areas on your PLC as well.
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Transferring a project file to the operating unit:
1. Choose File → Save to save your project.
2. Connect the OP7 to the configuration computer using the connecting cable.
3. Choose File → Compile to compile an executable project file.
4. Set the OP7 to download mode.
5. Download the compiled file to the OP7 by choosing File → Download.
6. After the transfer, the OP7 is on the message level and displays the system
message S5 unavailable.
7. Connect the OP7 to the PLC. The system message disappears.
Creating a data record on the operating unit:
1. On the OP7, change to the standard screen for data record editing by choosing
Data Records → Edit. Select the Mixture recipe from the recipe directory.
2. Press the ENTER key. The following appears on the display:
01 Data Record
Press the ENTER key again. The following appears:
01 Name Drink
The cursor is on 01.
3. Press the cursor key. The cursor jumps to Drink. Press the SHIFT key. The
and cursors allow you to scroll through the symbolic names. Scroll through
until Juice. Then press ENTER to save the first recipe entry.
4. Press ENTER to jump to other recipe entries. Then enter the following mixture
values for the ingredients orange, water, sugar and flavor:
02
03
04
05
Orange 95
Water 5
Sugar 0.5
Flavor 100
Press ENTER to save your entries in each case.
5. Once you have entered all the recipe entries, save the data record. To do this,
press the ESC key twice. The following query appears:
No. 1
Name: Data recordd
Save Data Record?
Y
The cursor is on 1. Since you have just edited the first data record, do not
change anything here. Press the cursor key. The cursor jumps to Data
Record.
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6. Define a name for the data record. To do this, overwrite the name Data
Record with DE01. Delete the rest of the letters by pressing the key
combination SHIFT + DEL. Press ENTER to save your entry.
7. Press the cursor key. The cursor jumps to the Yes field. Press the ENTER
key again. The following message appears:
No. 1
Name: DE01
Overwrite?
Y
Press ENTER to confirm. Data record 1 is saved. The following message
appears:
No. 1
Name: DE01
Data record saved
Press the ESC key. The OP7 displays the data record number with the new
name:
01
5.10.5
DE01
Example: How to transfer data records
Task
You want to transfer a data record from the OP7 to a SIMATIC S5. The PLC is the
AG115U with the CPU 944. The example How to create a recipe shows how to
configure the associated recipe and create data records on the operating unit.
Preparations on the PLC
Before you can transfer a data record from the operating unit to the PLC, you must
create the following data blocks on the PLC:
•
DB 12 for the tags in the recipe
•
DB 13 for the recipe number
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•
DB 14 for the recipe mailbox
•
DB 51 for the interface area
The following two function blocks are also required:
•
FB 51
FB 51 controls communication between the operating unit and the PLC.
•
FB 42
The synchronization between the operating unit and PLC takes place in data
word 64 of the interface area. FB 42 carries out this synchronization and then
distributes the data to the addresses.
The organization blocks OB1, OB20, OB21 and OB22 are thus structured as
follows:
•
OB 1
:L KY 51,0
:SPA FB 51
:T MW 100
:L KY 51,0
:SPA FB 42
:BE
•
OB 20/21/22
:L KF +1
:A DB 51
:T DW 64
:BE
Transferring a data record
You then transfer data record 1 of the "Mixture" recipe from the OP7 to the PLC.
1. Connect the OP7 to the PLC.
2. Change to the transfer screen on the OP7 by choosing Data Records →
Transfer. The recipe 01 Mixture is displayed.
3. Press the ENTER key. The following display appears:
Source: 00
Dest.: 00
PLC: 00 / 00
Accept
OP: 1
The cursor is on the Source field.
4. Enter the value 01 for Source, because the first data record is to be
transferred. Press the ENTER key to accept the entry.
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5. Press the cursor key twice. This takes you to the Accept field. You skip the
Destination field, because the value 00 indicates the desired transfer direction
OP → PLC.
6. Press the ENTER key to transfer the data record to the PLC. The following
display appears:
Source: 01
Dest.: 00
PLC: 01 / 01
Accept
OP: 1
7. Result: Function block FB 42 distributes the values to the specified addresses.
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5.11
Operator guidance
Purpose
In addition to the option of customizing the user interface of your operating unit to
make it easier for you to use, ProTool features other options for supporting and
prompting you on your operating unit as a function of the situation. This means
you can implement mechanisms and decision-making aids that can prevent
possible incorrect operations on the operating unit.
Overview
ProTool makes the following methods available for the implementation of operator
prompting:
5.11.1
•
Providing Help text (Chapter 5.11.1)
•
Applying dynamic attributes (What are dynamic attributes? (Chapter 5.11.2))
•
Evaluating key operation (Chapter 5.11.3)
•
Driving light-emitting diodes (Chapter 5.11.4)
Providing Help text
Help text provides additional information and operator instructions on screens,
input and output fields and messages to the operator at runtime. For example,
Help text may be in the form of the permissible range of values for an input field or
the cause and elimination of a malfunction in the case of an alarm message.
Configure information for objects on the Help Text tab.
Configured Help text is displayed in the language set on the operating unit by
pressing the Help key.
5.11.2
What are dynamic attributes?
Purpose
To draw the operator's attention on the operating unit to specific situations –
for example, specified limit values have been reached or exceeded – you can
configure the dynamic attribute Flashing for output fields. This enables you
activate or deactivate the flashing attribute for the displayed text according to the
value of a tag.
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Index tag
You can either link the dynamic attribute directly to the tag of an output field or you
can define a separate index tag for it. You can influence several output fields
simultaneously with a separate index tag.
5.11.3
Evaluating key operation
Purpose
Key operations on the operating unit can be downloaded to and evaluated on the
PLC. This means, for example, that you can issue a message that will draw the
operator’s attention to the incorrect operation of a key.
Requirements
For the PLC to be able to evaluate whether and, possibly, which key has been
operated on the operating unit, you have to create specific data areas on the PLC
and specify them in your project at System → Area Pointers. These are the two
data areas System keyboard assignment and Function keyboard assignment,
depending on which keys you wish to evaluate. You set the assignment of the
function keys to the bits in the function keyboard assignment when you configure
the function keys.
You will find a description of the keyboard assignments for the different operating
units in the Communication Manual.
5.11.4
Driving light-emitting diodes
Purpose
The light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the function keys of the operator panel can be
driven on the PLC. By means of a light-emitting or flashing LED, you can indicate
to the operator that, for example, the operating panel is expecting a certain
function key to be operated.
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Requirements
For the PLC to be able to drive the LEDs, you have to create the LED assignment
data area on the PLC and in your project by choosing System → Area Pointers
from the menu. Set the assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the LED
assignment when you configure the function keys.
You will find a description of the LED assignment and the LED functions for the
different operating units in the Communication Manual.
5.11.5
Assigning operator authorization
Purpose
ProTool allows you to use a password to prevent controls such as input fields and
function keys from being used by those unauthorized to do so. This means that
when you are creating your project you can restrict the use of functions that relate
to security to specific people or groups of operators. Important parameters and
settings can thus only be changed by authorized personnel.
The access protection that you configure allows you to guard against incorrect
usage and increase the security of the system or machine.
Password hierarchy
During the configuration phase you can assign operator authorization to specific
groups. At runtime, individuals can be allocated to one of these groups, as
appropriate, and they thus automatically receive the access rights of that group.
ProTool provides hierarchically organized password levels from level 0 to 9. If a
user is assigned password level 4, for example, this user is authorized to execute
the functions of password levels 0 to 4.
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•
Password level 0
Password level 0 is the default in ProTool. Use this lowest level in the hierarchy
for functions that have little or no effect on the operational sequence. These are
generally functions that do not required any input, such as the display of
messages. You do not have to enter a password on the operating unit in order
to execute functions with password level 0.
•
Password levels 1 to 8
Assign functions to password levels 1 to 8 according to their importance.
Before you execute these functions, the operating unit prompts you to enter a
password.
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•
Password level 9
The authorization to execute functions at password level 9 is granted only to
the System Administrator or service engineer. This provides access to all the
functions of the operating unit, including password administration.
You define the password of the System Administrator by choosing System →
Settings. The default setting is 100. You can change this setting on the
operating unit at runtime.
You can find more information on password administration in the equipment
manual for your operating unit.
Logging into and out of the operating unit
•
When you call a password-protected operation, the operating unit automatically
prompts you to enter an appropriate password.
In order to eliminate the possibility of those without authorization gaining
access, a password level greater than 0 should not remain active on the
operating unit for any length of time.
•
If you do not do anything on the operating unit for a configured period of time
(logout time), the operating unit automatically resets the current password level
to 0.
You set the logout time by choosing System → Settings.
The system preset is 5 minutes.
Note
To log into the operating unit, use the Z_PASSWORD standard screen in your
project.
Setting the password level on the operating unit
The following PLC jobs are available for setting a defined password level on the
operating unit:
•
PLC job 23 allows you to set any password level on the operating unit from the
PLC, for example in order to allow a defined user group to use the operating
unit.
•
PLC job 24 allows you to reset the password level to 0 from the PLC.
You will find a list of all the possible PLC jobs with job numbers and parameters in
the ProTool online help system.
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5.12
Configuration in foreign languages
Overview
This chapter shows you what you need to know in order to create a project with a
user interface in a foreign language.
You can create a monolingual or a multilingual project. In a multilingual project you
can decide:
5.12.1
•
whether to make several languages available on an OP and provide the user
with a key for switching between them
•
whether to download only one language to a specific OP
System requirements for foreign languages
With the exception of Russian, you can configure all foreign languages without
having to make changes to your Windows system configuration.
To be able to configure in Russian (OP7, OP15C, OP17 only), you have to enable
Russian language support under Windows 95 (Control Panel → Software →
Windows Setup → Language Support → Details). This is not necessary in
Windows NT.
Alternatively, of course, you can also install a Russian version of Windows.
Not all the characters of the ANSI character set can be displayed on the screen,
depending on the panel. You will find a table showing the characters for specific
devices in ProTool’s online Help under the topic "Character Maps".
5.12.2
User interface language and project languages
Basically, a distinction has to be made between two different display levels:
•
ProTool’s user interface language.
This is the language in which text is displayed on menus and dialog boxes in
ProTool. The user interface language is selected in ProTool’s Setup.
•
The project language for the operating units.
This is the language in which configured text appears on the operating unit. The
configuration can be created in all of the languages available on the
configuration computer under Windows.
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The following objects contain language dependent text:
− event messages
− alarm messages
− screens
− recipes
− text lists
− help texts
The two language levels are completely independent of each other. For example,
you can create French projects with an English ProTool, or English projects with a
French ProTool.
User interface language
-
up to
3 project
languages
Editing language
Language levels in ProTool
Up to three project languages per operating unit
You can store text for any project in as many project languages as you like. You
can even download up to three of these project languages simultaneously to an
operating unit. The operator can switch from one language to another.
To do this, you configure the function Language.
Editing language
The project language in which you edit text at any given time on the configuration
computer is the editing language.
The toolbar and the status bar show the current editing language setting.
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Reference language
One of the project languages can be used as the reference language. You can
create all the different pieces of text in the reference language first and then use it
as a basis for translations into other languages.
5.12.3
Configurable languages
You can configure text-based operating units in the following languages:
•
German
•
English
•
French
•
Italian
•
Spanish
In addition, you can use Russian for panels OP7, OP15C, OP17 and TD17.
Tip
If you make do without language dependent special characters, you can of course
enter text in a different language too. For example, you could select "English" as
the language in ProTool, but enter text in Flemish. However, all system messages
will continue to appear in English, since they cannot be edited in ProTool.
5.12.4
Language dependent keyboard assignment
Language dependence
The characters on a PC keyboard are language dependent. For example, no
German or French special characters are available on an English keyboard.
Further, the letters are arranged somewhat differently.
As soon as you change the editing language in ProTool, it modifies the assignment
of your keyboard to the layout of the foreign language concerned.
Auxiliary window with keyboard layout
In order to facilitate the assignment of the characters printed on your keyboard and
those actually entered, ProTool displays a window containing the new key layout
on the screen.
You can then see where differing keys are located and can enter them directly.
Alternatively, you can directly click the different letters and special characters on
the screen with the mouse.
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Example of language dependent keyboard with French as the editing language
The language dependent keyboard is hidden automatically as soon as you change
the editing language back to the current Windows language. You can also activate
and deactivate display of the language dependent keyboard by choosing View →
Keyboard.
5.12.5
Reference text
When you create a project for several languages, you normally configure all the
pieces of text in your native tongue first.
If you then change the editing language to enter text in a foreign language, all the
text fields appear blank again.
ProTool features a user-friendly reference text function so that you have a basis
for your translations. In dialog boxes, you can view the original text in the
reference language by clicking a special button. You can display an additional
window with reference text in the screen editors by means of the toolbar or by
choosing View → Reference Text.
Reference text
In the editor you can translate the pieces of text displayed in the window reference
text without having to change from one language to another to do so.
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5.12.6
Steps to creating a multilingual project
Scenarios
The basic approach is identical no matter whether:
•
you configure in a different language from that installed in ProTool.
(Example: you have ProTool in German and would like to create a French
project.)
•
you want to sell a project to several countries, in the language of the countries
concerned.
(Example: you are sending a machine to Germany, England and France. You
want all pieces of text to be displayed on the operating unit in the language of
the countries concerned.)
•
you supply a project to a multilingual country.
(Example: you are selling a machine to Switzerland. You want the operator to
be able to choose between German, French and Italian on the operating unit.)
In any case, you should always attempt to create and test the project in one
language first. This language then acts as your reference language for the
translations.
Steps
Configuring in foreign languages consists of the following specific work steps:
1. Comply with the requisite system requirements.
2. Define the languages you want to configure (choose System → Language
Assignment from the menu).
3. Select a language as the first editing language (choose Edit → Languages from
the menu). Create and test the complete project in this language first before
proceeding to translate all the pieces of text later together.
4. Setting up the character set (menu item System → Fonts)
5. Configure a language change (only when you want to offer several languages
simultaneously on one operating unit).
6. Translate the pieces of text. To translate them, change the editing language
(choose Edit → Languages). Select the language in which you created the
project as the reference language (likewise choose Edit → Languages from the
menu).
7. Select the languages to be downloaded to a specific operating unit (choose
System → Language Assignment from the menu). You can select a single
language but, alternatively, you can select up to three languages
simultaneously.
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8. Compiling the project.
9. Download the project to the operating unit.
Detailed descriptions of the different steps will be found in ProTool online Help.
Note
Avoid moving fields in event messages and alarm messages when you modify a
configuration that has been created in several languages. Since there is no
permanent assignment between the field and its position within the text, you
should move the pieces of text – if necessary – instead of the fields.
5.12.7
Cyrillic characters
If you have selected Russian by choosing Edit → Languages from the menu, you
can enter both Cyrillic and Latin characters on the keyboard:
•
All lowercase letters produce Cyrillic characters.
•
All uppercase letters produce Latin characters.
•
Digits and punctuation continue to be available.
You will find a table with a precise assignment of Latin and Cyrillic characters
under the keyword Character maps in the ProTool Online Help.
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Testing projects
6
Overview
In this chapter you will learn how to
•
create an executable project file
•
perform download settings
•
download the executable project file to the operating unit, and
•
test the project.
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6.1
Testing projects
Once you have completed your entire project or self-contained parts within it, the
test phase comes.
The following steps must be taken:
1. Compile the project - in other words, create a file from the project that can be
run on the operating unit.
2. Download the project - in other words, transfer the project to the operating unit.
You have to carry out some settings for this.
3. You test the project; If you find any errors, correct them and begin again with
step 1.
Note
If the PLC you are using is a SIMATIC S5 or S7, configure Status/Force in order to
test certain tags in the PLC program, for example.
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6.2
Downloading the executable project file
Basic procedure
To download the project file, you have to do the following:
1. Set the transfer mode.
2. Select an interface on the configuration computer.
3. Select a storage medium on the operating unit.
4. Download the project file.
Note for text-based displays
When a new project file is downloaded to the operating unit, the memory is
deleted, and with it all the data records on the operating unit.
Peculiarities
These deviations from the basic procedure are only to be carried out the first time:
•
Transfer mode: The first download is always a serial transfer.
•
Firmware:
Before a compiled project file can be downloaded to the operating unit for the
first time, the firmware of the operating unit is downloaded automatically. A
corresponding status message is issued.
Download not possible
If no connection to the operating unit can be established, a status message to this
effect is output. Check the physical connection between the operating unit and the
configuration computer.
Note
The project file must not be transferred directly from the configuration computer to
the module, but must first be loaded into the flash memory on the operating unit,
since the memory organization of the two storage media differs. If the project file
were to be downloaded directly to the module and then loaded into the flash
memory on an operating unit, error states can result.
In the DRAM the data are lost when the operating unit is switched off.
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6.3
Peculiarities of MPI transfers
Requirements
•
MPI download is possible with the following operating units:
all graphics displays and OP3, C7-633, C7-634, C7-623, C7-624.
•
An MPI module is required on the configuration computer.
•
The configuration computer and operating unit are connected physically to the
MPI network.
•
An MPI network can only be set up with a SIMATIC S7 PLC.
Setting the MPI address on the operating unit
If you have downloaded the compiled project file for the first time, and serially at
that, the operating unit has the configured MPI address.
To carry out an MPI transfer, the standard screen System Settings must be
configured in the project and the MPI transfer operating mode must be selected.
Multiple operating units in the MPI configuration
If you want to integrate multiple operating units in the MPI configuration, you can
only do it successively.
1. Connect the first operating unit physically.
2. Change to serial transfer mode, and download first the firmware and then the
compiled project file.
3. Then connect the next operating unit physically, and so on.
Reason
If you were to connect several operating units physically and then download the
project, this would lead to an address conflict. All the operating units would have
the same default MPI address, namely 1– which is not permissible in the MPI
configuration.
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6.4
Status/Force Tag
Purpose
At runtime you can have direct access to the connected PLC (SIMATIC S5 and
SIMATIC S7) from the operating unit to read and write values. This means you can
monitor and change the PLC operands easily on the operating unit without having
to connect a programming device or PC to the PLC as well.
This is very advantageous particularly during the testing and commissioning phase
of your project.
Requirements:
In order to be able to access values on the PLC directly at runtime, the following
requirements must be met:
•
The connected PLC must be a SIMATIC S5 or SIMATIC S7
•
You must have integrated the two standard screens Status Tag and/or Force
Tag in your project.
Standard screens
The programming device function STATUS VAR is called in the standard screen
Status Tag. This allows you to monitor PLC operands on the operating unit. Write
access is not possible in this screen.
The programming device function FORCE VAR is called in the standard screen
Force Tag. This allows you to monitor and change PLC operands on the operating
unit.
You will find detailed descriptions about working with the two standard screens in
the equipment manual for your operating unit.
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Documenting and managing projects
7
Overview
This chapter details the multiplicity of functions offered by ProTool for printing out,
documenting and managing and archiving your project data.
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7.1
Documenting projects
7.1.1
Printing project data
Print function
ProTool provides a comprehensive printout function that can be accessed via
menu item File → Print. It provides detailed lists for documenting all projectrelevant data such as screens, messages, tags, symbol tables, etc.
for ProTool/Lite
In this way it provides the facility for documenting your complete project. An up-todate printout can also be very helpful while you are configuring.
Tip
When configuring, as an alternative to the printout function, there is also the
convenient cross-reference function offered by ProTool (see Retrieving project
information (Chapter 4.10)).
Chapter
ProTool subdivides printouts into chapters arranged by subject according to object
types. For example, one chapter contains all the definitions on the subject of
screens, another contains a list of all the tags and yet another a list of all the
defined text or graphic lists.
You can print several chapters at once or just print single chapters.
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Reports
ProTool offers you the facility of customizing printouts to suit your individual
requirements.
•
You can limit a printout to single chapters or single pages.
•
You can set the order in which the chapters appear.
•
You can decide which data you want to output within a chapter.
•
You can set margins, define your own headers and footers and embed your
own graphic in the cover.
These definitions are stored in a report. Frequently required reports have been
defined in ProTool in advance. But you can also create your own reports, as you
wish. All reports are common to all projects.
Every time you want to print, you choose the report with which you would like your
output to conform.
7.1.2
Example: creating a customized report
Objective
You wish to print all the data in your project. Unlike the default setting, you do not
want the ProTool graphic but your company logo, which you have already used in
your project under the name of LOGO, to be printed on the cover. You want to leave
a margin for handwritten comments on the right side of the printout.
Perform the following steps:
1. Open the project from which you wish to print data.
2. Choose File → Print from the menu.
3. In the Print dialog box at Reports, choose the Complete report. You will now
see the individual chapters on the Contents list in the order in which they will
later be output.
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4. Click the Preview button. The print preview shows you how your printout will
look later. You want to replace the graphic on the first page (cover) with your
company logo. You want the right border to be much wider.
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5. Exit from the preview by clicking the Print button.
6. To perform the changes you require, click the Reports button. The Reports
dialog box is opened.
7. To modify the margin, click the Page button.
8. Enter the value you require for the right border at Right - for example, 3 for 3
cm. If you like, you can specify a piece of text here for the headers and footers
at the same time.
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9. Confirm your input by clicking OK. You a re now back in the Reports dialog box.
10. To modify the definition for the cover, select the entry Cover on the Contents
list and click the Parameters button.
11. In the Cover dialog box, select the graphic called LOGO with your company logo
at Graphic.
12. Click OK twice until you are back in the Print dialog box.
You have now modified the definitions for the report called Complete. The
changes will be available in future when you print other projects.
13. Finally, click the OK button to activate the printing process.
7.1.3
Constraints with printing
Printer drivers
Note the following constraints with certain printer drivers:
•
It may not be possible to print the configuration with CANON drivers. Printing
will be discontinued in this case.
•
With the Apple laser printer, the first line is not printed. This problem does not
occur with drivers for the HP LaserJet III, PostScript or PostScript printers.
ASCII character set
With some printers, it is not enough simply to set the ASCII character set in the
configuration. Make sure the ASCII character set is set on the printer too.
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Documenting and managing projects
7.2
Managing projects
7.2.1
Project management with integrated operation
If you integrated ProTool into STEP 7 when you installed it, use "SIMATIC
Manager" to manage your projects. You can then copy, move, back up and restore
your projects in the same way as you have been used to from STEP 7. For further
information refer to the documentation on SIMATIC Manager.
Note
ProTool’s Project Manager is not available to you in the event of integrated
operation. ProTool data can no longer be viewed independently in this event, since
the data is always linked to a STEP 7 project. It therefore has to be managed and
backed up using this application.
7.2.2
Managing projects in stand-alone operation
Project Manager
If you installed ProTool as a stand-alone version – in other words, if you are not
operating it under STEP 7 – there is a user-friendly Project Manager incorporated
into ProTool in place of the SIMATIC Manager. You can use it to manage your
projects in a user-friendly way.
Usage
With Project Manager, it is simple for you to:
•
back up projects, even on more than one floppy disk
•
restore projects that you have backed up
•
open projects
•
delete projects
Call
You start Project Manager by choosing File→ Project Manager from the menu.
When you call Project Manager for the first time, the Find dialog box is displayed
initially. Here you choose the drives and directories which have to be searched for
ProTool files. Only those projects that are located within these directories are
displayed by Project Manager.
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7-7
Documenting and managing projects
Find dialog box
After you have selected the appropriate directories, or when you call Project
Manager later again, the Project Manager window proper appears.
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Documenting and managing projects
Display
Project Manager
In the left segment of the Project Manager you will see a hierarchical structure of
all the projects located in the directories in which Project Manager searched. Here
you can select a project in order to open it, delete it or back it up.
In the center segment of the window you will find detailed information on the
project highlighted on the list.
With the help of the buttons in the right segment, you can add directories to the list
of directories in which you want Project Manager to search (Find button), you can
search the directories again (Update button) and you can have the list searched in
accordance with different project data, such as project name, device type, creation
date, etc. (Sort button).
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Documenting and managing projects
7-10
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System limits
A
Overview
In this chapter you are given a brief overview of the system limits of the OP7 and
OP17 operating units.
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A-1
System limits
A.1
OP7 and OP17 system limits
The following list of system limits helps you estimate whether your project is still
within the system limits of the operating unit.
A-2
•
Depending on the configuration size, up to 300 word tags can be configured for
each screen.
•
4 KB is reserved for tag lists. If this system limit is exceeded, a restart may be
triggered when the screen is selected.
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SIMATIC HMI documentation
B
Overview
The SIMATIC HMI documentation is made up of a combination of manuals,
instructions and online Help in keeping with the range of target groups. This
chapter provides a broad outline.
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B-1
SIMATIC HMI documentation
B.1
Documentation for ProTool
The SIMATIC HMI device family is a complete family of text displays, operator
panels, touch panels and Windows-based systems for efficient machine operation
and monitoring. The performance and convenience of the devices are finely tuned
to suit the individual demands made of them.
SIMATIC HMI operating units
The great advantage is that you configure all the devices with the same
configuration software.
B-2
•
ProTool for Windows-based systems (Chapter B.1.1)
•
ProTool for graphics displays (Chapter B.1.2)
•
ProTool for text-based displays (Chapter B.1.3)
ProTool User’s Guide
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SIMATIC HMI documentation
B.1.1
ProTool for Windows-based systems
The ProTool - Configuring Windows-Based Systems manual tells you how to
configure the following flat panel displays, PC-based operating units and touch
panels:
•
Systems with Windows® CE
− TP170A
− MP270
•
Systems with Windows® 95/98, Windows® 2000 or Windows® NT:
− OP37/Pro
− FI25
− FI45
− PC670
− PC670T
− Standard PC
Example: OP37/Pro
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B-3
SIMATIC HMI documentation
B.1.2
ProTool for graphical displays
The ProTool - Configuring Graphics Displays manual tells you how to configure
the following graphics-based operating units and touch panels:
•
Operator panel
− OP25
− OP27
− OP35
− OP37
•
Touch panels
− TP27
− TP37
•
C7 devices
− C7-626 (OP25 with integrated S7 CPU)
Example: TP37
B-4
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SIMATIC HMI documentation
B.1.3
ProTool for text-based displays
The ProTool - Configuring Text-Based Displays manual tells you how to
configure the following line-based operating units:
•
Operator panel
− OP3
− OP5
− OP7
− OP15A
− OP15C
− OP17
•
Text displays
− TD17
•
C7 devices
− C7-621 (OP3 with integrated S7 CPU)
− C7-623 (OP5 with integrated S7 CPU)
− C7-624 (OP15 with integrated S7 CPU)
− C7-633 (OP7 with integrated S7 CPU)
− C7-634 (OP17 with integrated S7 CPU)
Example: OP7
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B-5
SIMATIC HMI documentation
B.2
Overview of the SIMATIC HMI documentation
This manual is part of the SIMATIC HMI documentation. The table below shows
where to find what information.
Documentation
Target Group
Content
Getting Started
New users
This document leads you step by
step through the process of
configuring
Brief instructions
•
a screen using various objects,
•
a change of screen,
•
and a message
This document is available for
ProTool
Configuring Windowsbased systems
User’s Guide
Programmers
•
Text-based displays: OP3,
OP5, OP7, OP15, OP17
•
Graphics displays: OP25,
OP27, OP35, OP37, TP27,
TP37
•
Windows-based systems:
for example: TP170A, MP270,
OP37/Pro, FI25, FI45
Provides information about
working with the ProTool/Pro
configuration software. It contains
•
information about installation,
•
basic principles of configuring,
•
detailed description of
configurable objects and
functions.
This document applies to
Windows-based systems.
B-6
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SIMATIC HMI documentation
ProTool
Configuring Graphics
Displays
Programmers
User’s Guide
Provides information about
working with the ProTool
configuration software. It contains
•
information about installation,
•
basic principles of configuring,
•
detailed description of
configurable objects and
functions.
This document applies to graphicsbased display units.
ProTool
Configuring Text
Displays
Programmers
User’s Guide
Provides information about
working with the ProTool/Lite
configuration software. It contains
•
information about installation,
•
basic principles of configuring,
•
detailed description of
configurable objects and
functions.
This document applies to textbased display units.
ProTool
Programmers
Online Help
ProTool/Pro Runtime
User’s Guide
ProTool User’s Guide
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Commissioning
technicians,
users
Provides information on the
configuration computer during a
ProTool session. The online Help
contains
•
context-sensitive Help
•
detailed instructions and
examples
•
detailed information
•
all the information contained in
the User’s Guide
Describes how to install the
ProTool/Pro RT visualization
software and commissioning and
operation of the software on
Windows-based systems.
B-7
SIMATIC HMI documentation
Software Security
Commissioning
instructions
Example application
Commissioning
technicians,
users
The ProTool/Pro Runtime
visualization software is protected
against unauthorized use. These
instructions contain information
about installing, repairing and
uninstalling user authorization.
New users
ProTool is supplied with a number
of specimen configurations
together with the corresponding
PLC programs. This document
describes how to
Commissioning
instructions
TP170A
equipment manual
MP270
Equipment Manual
Commissioning
technicians,
users
load the examples onto the
operating unit and the PLC,
•
operate the examples and
•
extend the PLC connection for
the purposes of our application.
Describes the hardware and
general operation of the units. It
contains
•
instructions for installation and
commissioning,
•
a description of the units,
•
OP27/OP37
Equipment Manual
instructions for connecting PLC,
printer and configuration
computer,
•
OP25/OP35/OP45
Equipment Manual
descriptions of the various
operating modes,
•
instructions on operation,
•
descriptions of the standard
screens supplied and their
usage,
•
instructions on fitting options,
•
instructions on servicing and
fitting replacement parts.
OP37/Pro
Equipment Manual
TP27/TP37
Equipment Manual
OP7/OP17
Equipment Manual
OP5/OP15
Equipment Manual
TD17
Equipment Manual
OP3
equipment manual
B-8
•
Commissioning
technicians,
users,
programmers
Describes the hardware of the
OP3, its general operation and
how to connect it to the SIMATIC
S7.
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SIMATIC HMI documentation
Communication
Programmers
User’s Guide
Provides information about
connecting text-based and graphic
display units to the following PLCs:
•
SIMATIC S5,
•
SIMATIC S7,
•
SIMATIC 500/505,
•
Drivers for Other PLCs
This document describes
Communication for
Windows-based
Systems
User’s Guide
Programmers
•
the configuration and
parameters required for
connecting the units to the PLC
and the network,
•
the user data areas used for
exchanging data between the
operating unit and the PLC.
Provides information about
connecting Windows-based
systems to the following PLCs:
•
SIMATIC S5,
•
SIMATIC S7,
•
SIMATIC WinAC,
•
SIMATIC 505,
•
OPC,
•
Allen-Bradley,
•
Mitsubishi,
•
Telemecanique.
This document describes
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•
the configuration and
parameters required for
connecting the units to the PLC
and the network,
•
the user data areas used for
exchanging data between the
operating unit and the PLC.
B-9
SIMATIC HMI documentation
Other PLCs
Programmers
Online Help
Provides information about
connecting operating units to PLCs
such as
•
Allen-Bradley,
•
GE Fanuc
•
Mitsubishi,
•
Modicon,
•
Omron,
•
Telemecanique.
The relevant online Help is
installed at the same time as the
drivers are installed.
ProAgent for OP
Programmers
User’s Guide
ProAgent/Pro
User’s Guide
B-10
Programmers
Provides the following information
about the ProAgent options
package for OPs (process
diagnostics for OPs and TPs):
•
configuring installation-specific
process diagnosis,
•
locating process faults,
identifying the causes of and
eliminating faults,
•
adapting the ready-made
diagnosis screens supplied to
suit your own requirements.
Provides the following information
about the ProAgent /Pro options
package for (process diagnostics
for Windows systems):
•
configuring installation-specific
process diagnosis,
•
locating process faults,
identifying the causes of and
eliminating faults,
•
adapting the ready-made
diagnosis screens supplied to
suit your own requirements.
ProTool User’s Guide
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Abbreviations
C
Overview
The meanings of the abbreviations used in this documentation are as follows:
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
CPU
Central Processing Unit
FM
Function module
HMI
Human Machine Interface
LED
Light-emitting diode
MPI
Multipoint Interface (SIMATIC S7)
OLE
Object Linking and Embedding
OP
Operator panel
PC
Personal Computer
PLC
Programmable logic controller
PPI
Point to Point Interface (SIMATIC S7)
PU
Programming unit
RAM
Random access memory: memory with random access (working
memory)
TD
Text-based display
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Abbreviations
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Glossary
A
Acknowledge
By acknowledging an alarm message, you confirm that you have taken notice of it.
Thereafter the message is no longer displayed on the operating unit. You can
acknowledge alarm messages on the operating unit or you can have then
acknowledged by the PLC.
If you assign alarm messages to acknowledgement groups, you can acknowledge
several messages simultaneously.
Acknowledgement groups
You can assign several alarm messages to an acknowledgement group when you
are configuring. When the first message is acknowledged, all the other messages
in the same acknowledgement group are acknowledged simultaneously. This
means, for example, that you can acknowledge alarm messages referring to the
cause of a malfunction and to all consequential malfunctions together (group
acknowledgement).
Acquisition cycle
The acquisition cycle determines the time interval in which the value of a tag is
updated by the PLC. With a zero acquisition time, the tag is updated only when
screens, messages and recipes containing that tag are displayed on the operating
unit.
The acquisition cycle is a multiple of the standard clock pulse.
Address multiplexing
With address multiplexing, the address parameters of a tag are modified as a
function of the value of a multiplex tag. In this way you can address a number of
memory locations in the address area of the PLC (S7 CPU) with a single tag
without having to define a tag for each address.
Alarm message
Alarm messages provide information on the operating unit on malfunctions of the
machine or system connected to the PLC. Message text may include current
samples.
Since alarm messages display extraordinary operating states, they have to be
acknowledged.
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D-1
Glossary
Alarm messages (area pointer)
You can configure an alarm message for each bit in this data area. The bits are
assigned to message numbers in ascending order.
As soon as the PLC sets a bit in this data area, the operating unit recognizes the
assigned alarm message as having "arrived“. Conversely, the message is
interpreted by the operating unit as having "departed" when the bit is reset on the
PLC.
Area pointers
An area pointer is a memory area defined by the user on the PLC. The area is
used for exchanging data between the PLC and the operating unit.
Synonym: user data area
B
Backup
You use the "Backup" function to archive projects created on your operating unit.
Archived data can be read back in by means of the "Restore" function.
Baud rate
The baud rate is a criterion for the speed with which data are transferred. The baud
rate is specified in bits per second.
C
Clipboard
The Clipboard is a memory area on the configuration computer and is accessed by
ProTool when you cut, copy and paste objects.
Compile
Compile means you create an executable file from your project. You can download
the file to the operating unit. During the compilation process, a consistency check
is performed on the project.
Coordination
This data area can be used by the PLC to query the status of the operating unit,
for example
•
D-2
Startup of the operating unit
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Glossary
•
Current operating mode
•
Ready for communication
CPU
CPU is the abbreviation for central processing unit.
Cross-reference
Cross-references provide information on which objects refer to each other in the
project. If, for example, you wish to delete a variable, you will learn via the crossreference the points at which the variable is used in your project.
D
Data mailbox
The data mailbox is a data area on the PLC. It is used as intermediate storage to
transfer data records from the operating unit to the PLC. The data mailbox
contains only the values of the tag. The addresses are not downloaded.
Data record
A data record is a recipe to which data have been assigned. A recipe may consist
of several data records. When a data record is downloaded, all the assigned data
are passed to the PLC together in a synchronized manner.
Date/time (area pointer)
The operating unit writes the data and time to this data area by means of a PLC
job. These data can be evaluated by the PLC program.
Download
You use the "Download" function to transfer an executable project file to the
operating unit. Before you can do so, connect the operating unit to the
configuration computer by means of a standard cable.
Duration of display
The duration of display determines whether and how long a system message is
displayed on the operating unit.
Dynamic attributes
Dynamic attributes enable and disable flashing in an output field as a function of
the state of a bit of an index tag.
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D-3
Glossary
E
Editing language
The editing language is the language in which you create text for your project.
Event message
Event messages provide information on the operating unit on operating states of
the machine or system connected to the PLC. Message text may include current
samples.
Event messages (area pointer)
You can configure an event message for each bit in this data area. The bits are
assigned to message numbers in ascending order.
As soon as the PLC sets a bit in this data area, the operating unit recognizes the
assigned event message as having "arrived“. Conversely, the message is
interpreted by the operating unit as having "departed" when the bit is reset on the
PLC.
Event
Functions are triggered upon the occurrence of defined events - for example, upon
pressing or releasing a key. Events can be configured as a function of an object.
Export
You can export configured messages and screens as a text file to translate them
into a different language with an external editor, for example.
Using the ProTool's import function, you can reimport the text file into your project.
F
Flash memory
A flash memory is a programmable memory that can be erased and then rewritten.
Footer
A footer is the bottom line of a page in a printed report. It appears on every page
of the report and contains freely configurable information such as the project
name, number of pages, date and time, for example.
Function key
A function key is a key on the operating unit for configuring a function assignment.
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Glossary
A function key with a global function assignment always triggers the same
function irrespective of the screen that is currently open.
A function key with a local function assignment (soft key) can trigger a different
function on every screen.
Function keyboard (area pointer)
The operating unit transfers function key operations via this data area. You can
evaluate this information in the PLC program in order to draw attention to an
incorrect operation by means of a message, for example.
G
Global function
Global functions are not assigned to any particular objects but are linked to
specific events. If, for example, you configure the Set Bit function as a global
function with the condition Enter Value, a bit is set every time a value is entered.
Irrespective of the field selected.
Global tag
Global tags (process variables) establish the connection to the PLC. You have a
set address on the PLC. The operating unit reads and writes to and from that
address.
Group acknowledgement
You can assign any alarm message to an acknowledgement group when you are
configuring. When the alarm message is acknowledged, all the other messages in
the same acknowledgement group are acknowledged simultaneously too.
H
Header
A header is the top line of any printed report. It appears on every page of the
report and contains freely configurable information such as the project name,
number of pages, date and time, for example.
Help text
Refer to Help text.
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D-5
Glossary
I
Import
You reimport text files back into your project that you exported with ProTool’s
export function in order, for example to translate then into another language with
an external editor.
Input field
An input field is where you enter values on the operating unit that are transferred
to the PLC.
Interface area
The interface area is the interface between PLC program and operating unit. It
contains data and pointers to areas required for exchanging data between the PLC
and the operating unit.
J
Job mailbox
The PLC uses this data area to pass PLC jobs to the operating unit to initiate
specific functions for example, display a screen.
L
LED assignment
This area pointer can be used by the PLC to drive the light-emitting diodes on the
function keys of the operating unit.
Limit value
You can set for tags an upper and a lower limit value that is determined by a
constant or by a tag. When the specified limit value has been exceeded, you can
reject all invalid input in an input field on the operating unit, for example.
Local tag
Local tags are not connected to the PLC. They are available only on the operating
unit.
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Glossary
Log off time
With the configurable logoff time you set the time after which the password level is
reset to zero if the operating unit is not operated within that time.
M
Message arrival
The arrival of a message denotes the time at which the message is initiated by the
PLC or operating unit.
Message buffer
A message buffer is a memory area on the operating unit in which message events
are stored in chronological order when they arrive. Event messages and alarm
messages are stored in separate message buffers.
Message departure
The departure of a message indicates the time at which a message is withdrawn
by the PLC.
Message event
Message events are the:
•
Message arrival
•
Acknowledgement of a message
•
Message departure
Message events are stored in chronological order in the message archive on the
operating unit.
Message logging
With message logging, messages are output to the printer in addition to being
displayed on the operating unit.
Multiplex tag
A multiplex tag is a tag that is selected at runtime as a function of the value of an
index tag.
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D-7
Glossary
O
Object type
The object type specifies whether values or symbols can be entered in or output to
an object on the operating unit.
Object
An object is an integral part of a screen or a message. Depending on the object
type, objects are used to display or enter text and values on the operating unit.
OP Acknowledgement
This area pointer is used by the operating unit to inform the PLC which alarm
messages have been acknowledged on the operating unit.
Operator panel
An operator panel (OP) is a configurable operating unit for operating and
monitoring machines and systems.
Output field
An output field displays current values from the PLC on the operating unit.
Overflow warning
The overflow warning is a message that is output to the operating unit as soon as
the configured size of the remaining buffer is reached or exceeded.
P
Password level
You can specifically restrict the privileges of operating the operating unit to certain
users or groups of users. To do this, you assign hierarchically ascending password
levels to individual functions, function keys and input fields.
The password level is linked to the password. It entitles you execute functions at
that or a lower password level on the operating unit.
Password
A password is a string of characters that you have to enter on the operating unit
before you are able to execute a protected function. A defined password level is
assigned to every password.
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Glossary
PLC Acknowledgement
This area pointer is used by the PLC to inform the operating unit which alarm
messages have been acknowledged by the PLC.
PLC job
You can trigger functions on the operating unit by means of PLC jobs by the PLC
program - for example, Display Screen.
PLC
PLC is the abbreviation for programmable logic control.
Print Screen
Print Screen prints a copy of the contents of the operating unit screen. Open
windows are not printed.
R
Recipe mailbox
The recipe mailbox is a data area on the SIMATIC S5. It is used as intermediate
storage to transfer data records from the operating unit to the PLC. Not only the
values of tags but also their addresses are transferred to the recipe mailbox.
Recipe number (area pointer)
The recipe number mailbox is a data area on the SIMATIC S5. It is required for
transferring data records between the operating unit and the PLC.
The recipe number mailbox contains the recipe number and the number of the
data record that has to be transferred.
Recipe
A recipe is a compilation of tags to form a fixed data structure. The configured data
structure can be assigned data on the operating unit and is the referred to as a
data record. The use of recipes ensures that when a data record is downloaded, all
the data assigned to it are passed together in a synchronized manner to the PLC.
Reference language
With multi-lingual projects, the reference language (reference text) serves as a
basis for translations into other languages.
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Glossary
Reference text
With multi-lingual projects, the reference text serves as a basis for translations into
other languages. Reference texts cannot be edited.
Remaining buffer
The remaining buffer is the configurable size of the message buffer at which an
overflow warning is issued when it is exceeded.
Restore
With the "Restore“ function you read data back in which you had previously
archived using the "Backup“ function.
S
Screen number (area pointer)
In this data area the operating unit stores information on the current screen. You
can evaluate this information in the PLC program to call another screen,
for example.
Screen
A screen is a group of logically related process data that can be displayed
collectively on the operating unit and modified individually. Screens consist of
individual screen entries.
A screen entry has display size. It can consist of static text as well as input and
output fields.
Soft key
A soft key is a function key with a locally assigned function on the operating unit.
Depending on the current screen, a soft key can trigger different functions.
Standard clock pulse
The standard clock pulse of the operating unit is the basic factor for the update
rate, which you can set by means of the acquisition cycle of the tag. You globally
modify the acquisition cycle for all the tags of a project by modifying the standard
clock pulse.
Standard screens
Standard screens contain preconfigured functions which you require for basic
operation of your operating unit.
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Glossary
standby message
The standby message is the event message numbered 0. It is displayed on the
operating unit when no event message is waiting. No bit is assigned to the standby
message in the user data area for event messages.
Start value
The initial value is the value with which a tag preset following downloading of a
new project or following deletion of the buffer. You can configure the start value.
Successive recipe mailbox
The successive recipe mailbox is a data area on the SIMATIC S5 for transferring
data records. You have to create it only when the recipe mailbox cannot
accommodate the largest data record to occur.
Supervisor
The supervisor is the user who is entitled to execute functions at the highest
password level. He therefore has access to all the functions of the operating unit.
System keyboard (area pointer)
The operating unit transfers system key operations via this data area. You can
evaluate this information in the PLC program in order to draw attention to an
incorrect operation by means of a message, for example.
System keys are all operating unit keys that cannot be configured as function keys.
A detailed description of the system keys you can evaluate on the different
operating units is provided in the Communication User’s Guide.
System
The system is the hardware platform for the executable project file. It includes the
•
programmable logic control
•
operating unit
•
printer
T
Tag
A tag is a defined memory address to and from which values are written and read,
respectively. This can be done by the PLC or by means of the operating unit. A
distinction is made between global tags (process tags) and local tags, depending
on whether a tag is linked to the PLC or not.
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Glossary
Text list
A text list assigns text to every value of a tag. This means, for example, that you
can display the assigned text on the operating unit in an output field instead of a
value.
Text or graphic list
Refer to Text list.
U
Update time
The update time is the sum of the polling time, download time and processing
time.
User data area
A user data area is a memory area defined by the user on the PLC. It is used to
exchange data between the PLC and the operating unit.
Synonym: area pointer
User version
The user version identifies the version of a project. A version check is performed
on the PLC by means of this area pointer.
D-12
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Index
A
Abbreviations C-1
Access protection configuration
overview 5-64
Acknowledge messages 5-26
Acknowledgment 5-26
Acquisition cycle 5-14
Action
canceling 4-13
Address multiplexing 5-16
Alarm message area configuration 5-27
Alternative tag 5-15
ANSI C-1
Area pointers 5-34
ASCII C-1
C
Canceling 4-13; 4-14
Chapter Summary 1-2
Clipboard 4-11
copy 4-11
Combined input/output field
Overview 5-8
Combining multiple functions 5-42
Communication areas for messages 5-34
optional 5-34
Complete devices B-2
Configuration software 2-2
Configuring color change
overview 5-62
Configuring controls 5-7
Configuring display elements 5-5
Configuring user prompts 5-62
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Conventions
typefaces 1-4
Converting a project 4-10
Copy 4-11
CPU C-1
Creating a project 4-5
Creating headers and footers 5-19
Cross-reference (overview) 4-16
Cyrillic characters 5-71
D
Data record
create 5-54
definition 5-48
identifying 5-52
transfer (example) 5-59
transferring 5-54
Delivery package of ProTool 2-4
Device type 4-17
Direct transfer
data records 5-54
Discarding 4-14
Display
actual values 5-6
Display actual values 5-6
Displaying messages on the operating unit
5-31
Documentation B-6
Download 6-4
MPI 6-4
Downloading the project file 6-3
Drive LED
overview 5-63
Driving light-emitting diodes
I-1
Index
overview 5-63
Driving the LED
overview 5-63
Dynamic attributes
overview 5-62
Dynamizing attributes
overview 5-62
G
E
H
EM C-1
Enter alphanumeric values 5-7; 5-8
Enter numerical values 5-7; 5-8
Enter setpoints 5-7; 5-8
Enter symbolical values 5-7; 5-8
Enter values 5-7; 5-8
Entries
recipe 5-52
Evaluate
key operation (overview) 5-63
Evaluating key operation
overview 5-63
Events for triggering functions 5-38
Example
changing the operating mode 5-44
creating a customized printout 7-3
Help information 5-24
HMI C-1
HMI Documentation B-6
Hotline 1-5
Getting Started 2-6
Global function key 5-8
Graphic lists 5-20
Graphics displays B-2
Guide to the Manual 1-2
I
Indirect transfer
data records 5-54
Information on project 4-17
Input field
Overview 5-7; 5-8
Input/output field
Overview 5-8
Installing ProTool 3-2
Instance DB 3-5
Instance DB (ProTool integrated) 3-7
F
Fields 5-2
Fixed window 5-2
Flashing
fields (overview) 5-62
LED (Overview) 5-63
FM C-1
Force Tag 6-5
Foreign languages
system requirements 5-66
Function key 5-8
evaluating key operation (overview) 563
Function parameters 5-39
I-2
K
Keyboard assignment
language-dependency 5-68
L
Language-dependency
keyboard assignment 5-68
Languages
configurable 5-68
creating a multilingual project 5-70
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Index
LED C-1
Limitations 7-6
Local function key 5-8
Logging messages 5-30
Logging off from the operating unit
overview 5-64
Logout 5-64
Operator Panel B-2
Other Sources of Assistance 1-5
Output alphanumeric values 5-6
Output field
overview 5-6
Output numerical values 5-6
Output values 5-6
M
P
Managing projects in stand-alone operation
7-7
Memory requirement 4-17
Message acknowledgement 5-26
Message buffer 5-32
Message display on the operating unit 5-31
Message number 5-24
Message text 5-24
Messages
alarm message area configuration 5-27
communication areas 5-34
overflow 5-23
properties 5-25
structure 5-24
MPI C-1
MPI download 6-4
Multiplex tag 5-17
Password hierarchy 5-64
Password level 5-64
PC C-1
Peculiarities with conversion functions 543
PLC 4-9; C-1
driver selection 4-9
PPI C-1
Printer configuration 5-31
Printing 7-6
example 7-3
project data 7-2
Printing messages 5-25; 5-26
Priority of messages 5-25
Process state reporting 5-23
Project 4-5; 4-6; 4-10; 6-2
converting 4-10
creating OP5 (example) 4-6
creation 4-5
fundamentals of creating 4-2
test 6-2
Project Information 4-17
Project information (overview) 4-16
Project management with integrated
operation 7-7
ProTool
delivery package 2-4
device family B-2
overview 2-2
ProTool device overview B-2
ProTool for graphical displays B-4
ProTool for text-based displays B-5
ProTool for Windows-based systems B-3
ProTool integrated in STEP 7 3-5
N
Notation 1-4
O
Object types in the project window 4-4
Objects in the project window 4-4
OLE C-1
OP C-1
Operation state reporting 5-23
Operator authorization assignment
overview 5-64
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
I-3
Index
ProTool version 4-17
ProTool/Lite 2-2
Provide information text
overview 5-62
Providing Help text
overview 5-62
PU C-1
R
RAM C-1
Recipe
configuring 5-52
configuring (example) 5-55
data record 5-48
entries 5-52
example 5-48
identifying 5-52
overview 5-48
standard screens 5-52
tags 5-52
Redo 4-13; 4-14
Reference text 5-69
Restoring 4-13; 4-14
Revoking 4-14
Russian
Cyrillic characters 5-71
Russian projects
system requirements 5-66
S
Scheduler 5-21
Screen editor 5-2
Screens
components of a screen 5-2
example 5-2
overview 5-2
select screen 5-2
Security through password protection 5-64
Selecting function screens 5-43
Setting up area pointers 4-7
Settings for message classes 5-26
I-4
SIMATIC HMI device family B-2
SIMATIC HMI Documentation B-6
SM C-1
Soft key 5-8
Standard clock pulse 5-14
Standard screens
recipe 5-52
Start screen 5-2
Static text
overview 5-5
Status Tag 6-5
Style 5-24
Superuser 5-64
Support 1-5
Symbol table
updating 3-5
Symbol table (ProTool integrated) 3-7
System key
evaluating key operation (overview) 563
System limits A-2
System messages 5-28
System messages (example) 5-29
System requirements
for foreign languages 5-66
T
Tag
Status/Force 6-5
Tag list 5-15
Tags 5-10; 5-11; 5-13
definition 5-10
limit values 5-11
properties 5-11
recipe 5-52
scaling 5-13
start value 5-11
TD C-1
Text
static 5-5
Text displays B-2
Text lists 5-20
Text or graphic lists 5-20
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
Index
Text-based displays B-2
Touch Panel B-2
Transfer
data records (example) 5-59
Transferring
data records 5-54
Transferring the project file 6-3
V
Version 4-17
W
What functions are used for 5-37
Windows-based systems B-2
U
Undo 4-13; 4-14
undo buffer 4-16
User prompting 5-62
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
I-5
Index
I-6
ProTool User’s Guide
Release 12/99
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