Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT) CMSS530(A) and

Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT) CMSS530(A) and
Machine Condition
Transmitter™ (MCT)
CMSS530(A) and CMSS590(A)
SKF Condition Monitoring
User Manual Part No. 31871000-EN
Revision A
User Manual
Copyright  2002
by SKF Condition Monitoring, Inc.
All rights reserved.
4141 Ruffin Road, San Diego, CA 92123-1841 USA
Telephone: (858) 496-3400, Fax: (858) 496-3531
Customer Service: 1-800-523-7514
SKF Condition Monitoring Area Centers
North and South America
4141 Ruffin Road
San Diego, California 92123 USA
Telephone (858) 496-3400
FAX (858) 496-3531
Asia, Pacific
No. 1 Changi South Lane
Level 2M
Singapore 486070
Telephone 65-68767591
FAX 65-68767708
Visit us at our web site
www.skfreliability.com
SKF Condition Monitoring
Service Policy, Warranty,
Disclaimer, and Limitation
of Remedies
EXCEPT FOR THE LIMITED
WARRANTY DESCRIBED BELOW,
THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES,
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED
TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE; ALL SUCH
WARRANTIES ARE EXPRESSLY
AND SPECIFICALLY
DISCLAIMED.
The MACHINE CONDITION
TRANSMITTER is guaranteed free of
defects in material and workmanship.
Electronic components are guaranteed
for a period of twelve (12) months,
mechanical components, transducers,
and cable assemblies are guaranteed for
a period of ninety (90) days. The
warranty period begins on the date the
system is shipped from the SKF
Condition Monitoring factory.
This warranty does not extend to units
that have been misused, altered, or
repaired without manufacturer’s
authorization. Defects or failures
experienced during the warranty period
will be corrected at no charge at the
manufacturer’s facility. If, upon
examination, it is found that the defect
is not within the scope of this warranty,
an estimate of repair charges and a
request for authorization to proceed
with repair will be submitted, along
with a statement of the reasons the
repairs are not considered to be covered
by the warranty.
This warranty does not extend to
system components such as
transducers, drivers, and cable
assemblies manufactured by others.
Warranty for these components will be
their manufacturer’s standard.
Manufacturer’s liability under this
warranty is limited to repair or
replacement of any defective
instrument at the discretion of the
manufacturer.
In the event that any of the above
limitations are held unenforceable, our
liability to you shall not exceed the
license fee you paid, regardless of the
form of any claim. Because of the
extreme diversity of ways that the
product can be used, you are advised to
test the product thoroughly for your
purposes before relying on it.
Contents
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
The MCT Transmitter
The MCT Monitor
Identification Label
Full Scale Range
Powering the MCT
Transducer
Output
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition
Transmitter
MCT Typical Installation
Opening the Case
Setting Monitor Alarms
Interfacing the MCT with Other
Monitoring Systems
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration measured in Velocity
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration
Measurements
1
1-1
1-3
1-4
1-6
1-12
1-15
1-17
1-19
2
2-1
2-2
2-4
2-10
A
A-1
A-3
Index
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
TOC - 1
1
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
SKF Reliability Systems’ Machine Condition Transmitter
(MCT) modules are compact rail-mounted devices that
convert part of a wide-band input signal to a signal
proportional to machine vibration.
The MCT Transmitter
There are two MCT versions, CMSS530 is a 4-20 mA
velocity transmitter, and CMSS590 is an enveloped
acceleration transmitter. Each is factory configured for use
with a low-impedance accelerometer. The velocity
transmitter can also be configured for use with a lowimpedance velocity sensor, or electro-mechanical velocity
sensor. The sensor input signal is processed to determine
its overall vibration level in terms of either velocity (RMS
or Peak) or enveloped acceleration. Output is a standard 420 mA current proportional to this level, within a specified
full range such as 0-1 IPS RMS for velocity, or 0-10 gE for
enveloped acceleration. The 4-20 mA output is suitable for
a direct connection to a Programmable Logic Controller
(PLC) or Distributed Control System (DCS). A BNC
connector on the front of the unit provides access to the
buffered transducer signal for use with portable monitoring
equipment, such as the SKF Reliability Systems’
MicrologTM.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1-1
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
The MCT Transmitter
Figure 1 - 1.
The MCT – Transmitter.
Figure 1 - 2.
The MCT – Transmitter/Monitor.
1-2
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
The MCT Monitor
The MCT Monitor
CMSS530-
Velocity Transmitter without
Monitor
CMSS530A
Velocity Transmitter with
Monitor
CMSS590-
Enveloped Acceleration
Transmitter without Monitor
CMSS90A
Enveloped Acceleration
Transmitter with Monitor
Table 1 - 1.
MCT Module Configurations.
MCT modules can be ordered as stand alone Monitors by
adding the suffix "A" to the basic model number (i.e.,
CMSS530A and CMSS590A). When ordered as a stand
alone monitor, the unit includes an alarm module front
panel and an output relay that can be jumper configured for
either latching or non-latching operation. The ALERT or
DANGER LED will turn "ON" and the corresponding
relay will actuate whenever overall vibration levels exceed
the corresponding setpoint for more than a preset delay
time (jumper selectable). The alarm module has a front
panel accessible BNC connector and associated selector
switch for reading the analog current vibration level (CV)
or alarm setpoints (A or D) with a standard digital
voltmeter. The alarm module also provides a transducer
OK relay contact, and a trip multiply function (Tx). Trip
multiply allows the alarm levels to be temporarily
increased by a factor of two or three to avoid false alarms,
for example, during the start-up phase of a machine.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1-3
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
The MCT Monitor
Figure 1 - 3.
MCT Transmitter General Pin Assignment.
Figure 1 - 4.
MCT Transmitter / Monitor General Pin Assignment.
1-4
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Identification Label
Figure 1 - 5.
MCT Transmitter / Monitor Top and Bottom Pluggable Terminals.
Both monitors and transmitters mount on
standard DIN rail.
For more information concerning the
alarm settings, reference Setting Monitor
Alarms in Chapter 2.
Identification Label
An identification label on the right side of the module
provides information about the module type including a
unique model number identifying data of the module’s
basic configuration, such as the factory configured sensor
type, the measurement method and the installed filter
characteristics.
For example:
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1-5
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Identification Label
Standard Units
Each enveloped acceleration transmitter
provides three band-pass filters.
Reference Table 2-1 for details.
1-6
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Special Units
The unique serial number identifies individual transmitters
and is used for warranty, quality control, and service
purposes. The label also has the CSA and CE approval
marks.
Full Scale Range
Preset Options
The MCT comes factory with the most common full scale
range. Other ranges may be implemented by installing
jumpers as shown in Tables 1-2 and 1-3.
See Opening the Case in Chapter 2 for
information on gaining access to jumpers.
Changing ranges by jumper selection only
will introduce an additional error of .5%
typical, 2% max. For greater accuracy,
the system range must be re-calibrated.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1-7
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Full Scale:
Range:
English
Metric
Jumper
01
.5 IPS
12.5 mm/sec
E2
02*
1.0 IPS
25 mm/sec
E3
03
1.5 IPS
37.5 mm/sec
E2 and E3
04
2.0 IPS
50 mm/sec
E3 and E4
05
2.5 IPS
62.5 mm/sec
E2 and E3 and E4
Table 1 - 2.
MCT VEL.
Full scale option for all velocity
transmitter units is factory preset to 02,
for 0 to 1.0 IPS or to 25.0 mm/sec if not
otherwise specified in the model number.
Range:
Full
Scale:
Jumper
01*
10 gE
E8
02
30 gE
E9
03
80 gE
E10
Table 1 - 3.
MCT ENV.
Full scale option for all enveloped
acceleration transmitter units is factory
preset to 10 gE. The Filter option is set to
Filter 3 (500 Hz to 10 Hz), unless
otherwise specified in the model number.
In the tables above, * indicates the
factory preset range.
1-8
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Jumper Locations
Setting
Jumper
Configuration
E2
E3
E4
Range Settings
E2
0 to 0.5 IPS or 12.5 mm/sec
Option: 01
E2
E3
E4
E3
0 to 1.0 IPS or 25.0 mm/sec /*factory preset
Option: 02
E2
E3
E4
E2 and E3
0 to 1.5 IPS or 37.5 mm/sec
Option: 03
E2
E3
E4
E3 and E4
0 to 2.0 IPS or 50.0 mm/sec
Option: 04
E2
E3
E4
E1
E5
E3 and E4 and E5
0 to 2.5 IPS or 62.5 mm/sec
Option: 05
Special Filters
Remove to install Filter 1
Remove to install Filter 2
Table 1 - 4.
MCT Velocity Options.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1-9
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Figure 1 - 6.
MCT Velocity Peak Detection Jumper Locations.
1 - 10
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Figure 1 - 7.
MCT Velocity RMS Detection Jumper Locations.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1 - 11
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Full Scale Range
Setting
E1*
E2
E5
E3*
E6*
E4
E7
E8*
E9
E10
Jumper
Configuration
Constant Current Source
Provides constant current /
*factory preset
No current supply, uses buffered output as signal input
Selectable Filterbands
ENV Filter #4 (5 kHz to 40 kHz)
ENV Filter #3 (500 Hz to 10 kHz)/
*factory preset
*factory preset
ENV Filter #2 (50 Hz to 1.0 kHz)
Range Settings
Range 1 (0 to 10 gE) /
Range 2 (0 to 30 gE)
Range 3 (0 to 80 gE)
*factory preset
Table 1 - 5.
MCT Enveloped Acceleration Options.
1 - 12
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Powering the MCT
Figure 1 - 8.
MCT Enveloped Acceleration Jumper Locations.
Powering the MCT
The MCT requires externally supplied dc power. The
selected power supply should have a nominal output of +24
Vdc and be capable of supplying minimum currents noted
in Table 1-4:
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1 - 13
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Powering the MCT
Model
Number
Minimum Power
Supply/Unit
CMSS530-
55 mA
CMSS530A
110 mA
CMSS590-
75 mA
CMSS590A
125 mA
Table 1 - 6.
MCT Minimum Currents.
A regulated power supply dedicated to the vibration
monitoring system is recommended. It is also
recommended that connections between the power-supply
and the transmitter/monitors be made with shielded twisted
instrument cable. The cable shield should float at the
transmitter/monitor, and connect to ground at the power
supply / system common end only. The MCT regulates dc
power internally to prevent a fault on the output of one
channel from affecting other channels. When power is first
applied to a transmitter/monitor after connecting the
transducer, a delay of approximately 30 seconds will occur
before the OK LED turns "ON".
Power Supply Distribution
If more than one MCT module is installed, terminal blocks
for power and ground must be used. From these terminal
blocks, 24 Vdc power is distributed to each individual
module. It is recommended to use individual fuse
terminals for each positive supply line so a power failure in
a single MCT module will not affect the other modules.
1 - 14
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Powering the MCT
Figure 1 - 9.
Typical Power Wiring Configuration.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1 - 15
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Transducer
Grounding
When experiencing interference on the output signals due
to common ground connections, it is recommended to
connect the +24 V GND at the power distribution terminals
to the protective ground (PE).
For CE-approved systems, it is
recommended to use shielded twisted pair
cables for all signal connections. Except
for the sensor signal (for example,
accelerometer), all shields must be
connected to PE.
Transducer
The velocity transmitter unit is factory configured for use
with one of three transducer types. The specific type is
identified by four digits (for example, 100A) immediately
following the basic model number on the side label. This
number is the transducer sensitivity in either mV/g or
mV/IPS (see Table 1-5 below).
Type I.D.
Transducer Type
Sensitivity
100A
low-impedance, constant current
powered accelerometer
mV/g
100V
low-impedance, constant current
powered velocity sensor
mV/IPS
500E
self-generating, electro-mechanical
velocity sensor
mV/IPS
Table 1 - 7.
Identifying Transducer Type and Sensitivity.
For example: 100A indicates the transducer is a 100 mV/g
low-impedance accelerometer. Other sensitivities are
available by special order.
1 - 16
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Transducer
The enveloped acceleration transmitter unit always uses a
100 mV/g low-impedance, constant current powered
accelerometer.
Transducer Cable
The MCT provides power for the transducer via a nominal
4.4 mA constant current source. This is generally enough
current to allow operation with transducer cables extending
up to about 100 ft. Longer cables may be used, depending
on the sensor and cable specifications. However, it is
strongly recommended that the transmitter/monitor be
mounted as close as practical to the associated transducer.
This will prevent signal distortion associated with current
drive limitations, and will minimize interference from
external electro-magnetic noise sources (EMI). A well
shielded, properly installed transducer cable is necessary to
obtain reliable operation. Shielded twisted pair cables
designed and pre-fitted with the proper transducer
connector or sensors with integral cable, which are sold for
this specific purpose, are recommended. The cable shield
should be open at the transmitter end and connected to
ground through the sensor casing. Alternatively, the cable
shield could be open at the transmitter end, and connected
to common xdcr- terminal at the transmitter/monitor input
only.
Transducer OK Circuit
The MCT incorporates a transducer OK circuit. This
feature continuously monitors the transducer bias and
signal voltage. If this voltage exceeds preset limits, the 420 mA output current is reduced to less than 2 mA
(typically 0 mA) to allow detection of the fault condition at
the associated PLC or DCS system. A green OK LED on
the front of the unit (normally "ON" in an OK condition)
turns "OFF" to provide a local indication of the fault
condition. For low-impedance, constant current powered
transducers, this circuit will effectively detect open,
shorted, or reversed transducer connections. When a
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1 - 17
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Output
detected fault is remedied, a delay of approximately 30
seconds occurs before the unit returns to the OK condition
and the OK LED turns back "ON". A detected fault will
also disable the ALERT and DANGER alarms / relays
until the fault is removed and an OK condition exists.
When configured for use with an electromechanical transducer (E), the OK circuit
will only detect an open circuit condition
of the transducer / cable.
Output
4-20 mA Output
The primary output of the transmitter/monitor is the 4-20
mA current output, which is scaled proportional to the full
scale range of the unit. For example, if the range is 0 - 1
IPS peak, then 4 mA indicates a reading of 0.00 IPS, and
20 mA indicates a reading of 1.00 IPS peak. This output is
intended to drive a maximum resistive load of 500 Ohms
with respect to system common at the PLC / DCS input. A
precision 0.25 watt, 250 Ohm resistor is the recommended
load. This will convert the 4-20 mA current reading to a 1
to 5 Vdc reading for the PLC / DCS. For example, if the
range is 0 to 0.5 IPS, then 1 Vdc indicates a reading of 0
IPS, and 5 Vdc indicates a reading of 0.5 IPS. A short to
ground (common) on this output will not cause damage.
The relationship of the measured vibration parameter to the
output current is displayed in the following equation:
Units of Vibration =
Measured Current - 4 mA
× Full Scale Value
16 mA
Example
Measured Current = 12 mA; Full Scale = 1 IPS
Converted Output Reading =
1 - 18
12 mA - 4mA
× 1 IPS = 0.5 IPS
16 mA
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
Output
The relationship of the measured vibration parameter to the
output voltage, when using a 250 Ohm resistor, is displayed
in the following equation:
Units of Vibration =
FullScaleValue
× (Measured Voltage − 1)
4V
Example:
Measured Voltage = 3V; Full Scale 0.5 IPS
Converted Output Reading =
0.5 IPS
× (3V − 1) = 0.25 IPS
4V
Buffered Output
The MCT provides access to the buffered transducer signal
using a BNC connector on the front of the unit and on a
screw terminal at the top of the unit. These buffered
outputs have the same sensitivities, units, and bias voltages
as the transducer itself (i.e., mV/g for an accelerometer or
mV/IPS for a velocity transducer). This output can be
connected to portable monitoring equipment or analyzers
(i.e., SKF Reliability Systems’ MicrologTM), or can be used
to check the bias output voltage (BOV) of low-impedance
transducers using a digital voltmeter. The buffered output
is unfiltered.
For electro-mechanical velocity
transducers only: The buffered output
sensitivity is scaled to 100 mV/IPS,
regardless of the actual input sensitivity.
For example, a 145 mV/IPS transducer
will have a scaled buffered output
sensitivity of 100 mV/IPS.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
1 - 19
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
User Manual
1 - 20
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2
Installing the Machine Condition
Transmitter
MCT Typical Installation
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2-1
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Opening the Case
Opening the Case
Opening the MCT case is best done with a small flat-blade
screwdriver. On transmitters (1inch / 26 mm wide units),
insert the tip of the screwdriver between the right side
cover (as viewed from the front of the unit) and the DIN
rail mounting foot at the back of the unit, as shown in
Figure 2-1, and gently leverage the blade to begin
separating the cover from the rest of the unit. Carefully
work your way around to the front of the unit to complete
removal of the cover, exposing the circuit board
components.
Figure 2 - 1.
Blade Insertion Point on Transmitter.
On Monitors (1.6 inch / 41 mm wide units), you must first
carefully separate the two halves of the unit at the center
(see Figure 2-2). The sides do not need to be removed.
This is done by working the screwdriver around the middle
of the unit in the same general manner described above.
2-2
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Opening the Case
Figure 2 - 2.
Transmitter/Monitor Separated at Center.
As the two sides start to separate, you will see that a short
ribbon cable inside holds them together. To remove this
cable, carefully pull it away from the left hand side of the
unit (as viewed from the front). The cable stays with the
right hand side permanently.
Important - When reinstalling this cable, make sure it is
properly connected to the mating connector, and that the
bend in the cable goes towards the front panel side of the
unit.
If the unit is closed with the bend towards the back, the
ribbon cable can be damaged.
Also, make sure the ribbon cable connector does not catch
on the relays when pressing the unit back together.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2-3
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
MCT Enveloped Acceleration Filter Selection
The enveloped acceleration transmitter is delivered with
three standard band-pass filters. Table 2-1 shows the
available filters for each unit.
Filter Band
Number
(Microlog)
BandPass
Filter
Frequencies
(Hz)
Fmax
Setting for
Microlog
When
Compared(
Hz)
Old MCM
Filter
Range for
Reference
Jumper
Setting
2
50 to 1,000
100
-44
E4 and E7
3
500 to
10,000
1,000
-66
E3 and E6
4
5,000 to
40,000
10,000
-88
E2 and E5
Table 2 - 1.
Integrated Enveloped Acceleration Filter Settings.
The factory preset for the enveloped
acceleration transmitter module is Filter 3
(500 to 10,000Hz).
Use the following guideline to define the proper band-pass
for the application.
The low frequency roll-off of the band-pass filter to
eliminate rotational components is:
Fmin > = 10 x RPM / 60
Setting Monitor Alarms
This section applies only to the Monitor
units (CMSS530A and CMSS590A).
2-4
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
For a brief overview of vibration severity
levels, reference the General Severity
Level Guidelines appendix.
Figure 2 - 3.
MCT Front View With Monitor Options Explained.
Alert and Danger Alarm Setpoint Adjustment
ALERT and DANGER alarm setpoints can be
independently set in the field by turning the front panel
selector switch to the associated position (A or D) and
adjusting the associated front panel potentiometer until the
correct dc voltage is measured at BNC connector located
directly above the selector switch. Adjusting the setpoint
requires the use of a digital voltmeter, knowledge of the
transmitter's full scale range, and the desired setpoint as a
percentage of the full scale range. The voltage measured at
the BNC will vary between 0 Vdc and 5 Vdc,
corresponding to 0 to full scale. For example, 2.5 Vdc
represents 50% of full scale, 3.75 Vdc represents 75% of
full scale. To calculate the required setpoint voltage, use
the equation, 5(.xx) where .xx is the desired percentage
expressed as a decimal fraction of the full scale range. For
example, 5(.60) = 3.00 Vdc for a setpoint of 60% of the full
scale range. Turning the potentiometer clockwise increases
the setpoint voltage.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2-5
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
Figure 2 - 4.
Setting Alarm Levels.
2-6
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
Alert and Danger Alarm Delays Adjustment
Setting
Jumper
The Alert and Danger alarm delays can be independently
set by internal jumper selection to .1, 1, 3, 6, or 10 seconds.
The purpose of the delay is to reduce nuisance alarms
caused by external electrical noise and/or transient
vibration events. Both the Alert and Danger delays are
factory set to the 3-second position. To change the delay,
open the unit and move the delay jumpers to the proper
position.
Configuration
Alert Time Delay
E1
E2
E3*
E4
E5
0.1 sec
1 sec
3 sec /
6 sec
10 sec
E6
E7
E8*
E9
E10
0.1 sec
1 sec
3 sec /
6 sec
10 sec
*factory preset
Danger Time Delay
E11*
E12*
E13*
*factory preset
Latching / Non-latching Alarms
Open: Alert Non-latching / *factory preset
Closed: Alert Latching
Open: Danger Non-latching / *factory preset
Closed: Danger Latching
Open: factor 2x
Closed: factor 3x
Trip Multiply factor
/*factory preset
Table 2 - 2.
Monitor Jumper Options.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2-7
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
Figure 2 - 5.
Monitor Jumper Locations.
Latching / Non-latching Alarms
The Alert and Danger alarms are factory set for nonlatching operation. This means that whenever the vibration
level drops below the associated setpoint for more than
about 1 second, the associated relay will de-energize and
the alarm LED will turn off. The alarms can also be set for
latching operation by installing shunts on jumpers E1 and
E2 on the Alarm module circuit board. Latched alarms
may be reset by closing the RESET (RST) and COMMON
(COM) contacts at the top of the unit. This may be done
with an external switch, dry contact relay, or by shorting
the terminals together by hand.
2-8
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Setting Monitor Alarms
Important - Do not apply voltage to either the RST or
COM terminals.
If several monitors are mounted together,
the RST terminals may be daisy-chained
together and switched to COM (system
common) as a group.
Trip Multiply
The alarm module provides a trip multiply feature. This
feature allows the user to temporarily double (standard) or
triple (jumper selectable) the normal setpoints during
periods of normal high vibration, such as start-ups. To
actuate the trip multiply feature, the Tx terminal at the top
of the alarm module must be closed to the adjacent COM
terminal. This may be done with an external switch, dry
contact relay, or by shorting the terminals together by hand.
Important - Do not apply voltage to either the Tx or COM
terminals.
If several monitors are mounted together,
the Tx terminals may be daisy-chained
together and switched to COM (system
common) as a group.
Alarm Relays
The ALERT, DANGER and OK relays are independent,
single-pole-double throw relays. NO, ARM, and NC
contacts are available through a plugable screw connector
at the bottom of the monitor. OK relay contacts are
available on fixed screw terminals at the bottom front of
the alarm module. Relay contacts are rated 5 Amps at 30
Vdc or 125 Vac, resistive load. This rating includes any
inrush current the load draws. For loads that are not purely
resistive, the contact switching capability needs to be
considered carefully in terms of this inrush current and
rated accordingly.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
2-9
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Interfacing the MCT with Other Monitoring Systems
The user is reminded to take care when
applying relays.
The factory intended purpose of providing relay contacts is
to operate relatively low power alarm annunciators, act as a
dry or low dc voltage contact closure input to other
systems, or act to actuate an appropriately sized slave relay
for larger loads such as shutting down a motor. Relays are
socketed and can be replaced.
Rated Amps
Voltage
5A
30 Vdc
5A
125 Vac
2.5A
250 Vac
Table 2 - 3.
Relay Contacts Rating.
Interfacing the MCT with Other Monitoring Systems
The MCT CMSS530 and CMSS590 modules interface with
equipment used for process control and data analysis.
Interfacing to Process Control Systems
Interface options for process control systems are the static
output 4-20 mA dc and the low power change-over relay
contacts. The maximum load resistance of all connected
instruments in the current loop is 500 Ohms.
Reference the section 4-20 mA Output in Chapter 1 for
more information.
Interfacing to SKF Reliability Systems
Products
Consider the following interface options:
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Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Interfacing the MCT with Other Monitoring Systems
•
Use SKF Reliability Systems equipment to analyze
MCT module readings.
•
Use MCT modules as a front end to on-line condition
monitoring equipment.
Figure 2-6 shows a combination of the above mentioned
interface options.
Figure 2 - 6.
MCT CMSS530/590 Interfacing.
Analyzing MCT Readings
Unlike other SKF Reliability Systems’ analyzing products
that use digital signal processing (i.e., Microlog, Multilog
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
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Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Interfacing the MCT with Other Monitoring Systems
CMMA320 and Monitor Interface Module (MIM)
CMMA162), MCT modules use analog signal processing
techniques, so be careful when comparing results with
digital instruments. For enveloped acceleration (gE)
applications, the filter ranges in the Microlog and Multilog
are equal, but the filter range of the enveloper circuitry in
the Vib Pen Plus is fixed between 5 kHz and 10 kHz to
obtain a general bandwidth where low frequency
influences, due to hand held operation, are eliminated.
Detection methods of the Microlog and Multilog are, in
general, based upon detecting a maximum and minimum
peak value within the whole time period of the
measurement. From this peak-to-peak value, the zero peak
value is calculated. The RMS value is always derived from
the calculated spectrum and is not a true RMS conversion
on the dynamic time signal (unlike the MCT modules).
Furthermore, MCT modules use averaging methods to
prevent unwanted fluctuations. The number of averages for
the Multilog and Microlog are free selectable. It is advised
to select 4 to 8 averages to create a comparable total
measurement time period.
Guidelines for using the Microlog as an analysis instrument
in combination with the MCT modules are provided:
Peak-to-Peak Measurements with the Microlog
(Acceleration and Enveloped Acceleration)
The buffered vibration output is used as an input signal to
the Microlog. The selected enveloped acceleration filter
setting for the Microlog must be equal to the filter choice
on the enveloped acceleration transmitter. The maximum
frequency must be set at twice the value of the selected low
corner cut off frequency of the enveloped acceleration filter
(for example, filter 500 Hz to 10 kHz results in a maximum
analyzing frequency of 1 kHz).
Peak to Peak readings on the Microlog can be compared to
the Peak reading of the MCT module. This difference of
detection method is based upon the fact that the Microlog
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Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
Interfacing the MCT with Other Monitoring Systems
has an AC coupled signal processing path, while the MCT
modules use a dc coupling.
RMS Measurements with the Microlog (Acceleration
and Velocity)
The buffered vibration output is used as an input to the
Microlog. The Microlog’s frequency settings must be
equal to the filter bandwidth settings of the (Velocity) MCT
CMSS530 module. The detection method must be set to
RMS.
Important - The MCT VEL module uses an analog filter
and integrator which measure continuously.
The Multilog and Microlog calculate the RMS value from
the spectrum, which is not continuously processed. This
discontinuity, which is minimized by selecting the Hanning
window, may cause low frequency problems which result
in ski-slopes after integration. These possible ski-slope
effects may have large influences on the RMS overall
velocity reading.
Peak Detection in Velocity
The MCT velocity modules with peak detection provide a
true peak reading, in contrary to the older MCM modules,
which provided a "pseudo" peak, derived from the RMS
reading. True peak detection typically results in higher
values when data is collected at the same measurement
location over the same frequency range. The data can be
trended and analyzed, nonetheless. If the user is more
familiar with the Calculated Peak (RMS x 1.414), specify
the RMS detection when ordering. Select an approximate
1.4 times higher full scale value to get the same results.
For example, the older MCM has a full scale of 1 IPS and
peak (pseudo) detection. An MCT velocity module with a
full scale of 1.5 IPS and RMS detection will deliver the
same results.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
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Installing the Machine Condition Transmitter
User Notes
User Notes
2 - 14
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
Appendix
General Severity Level Guidelines
When considering severity levels, be aware that standards
can only provide general guidelines to determine initial
alarm settings. Such guidelines should never substitute
experience and good judgement. The most reliable method
of determining alarm settings is to trend vibration readings
over time, establish baseline values and alarm settings
above baseline values.
Vibration measured in Velocity
For vibration velocity, ISO standards, such as ISO 10816,
First Edition 1995, or VDI 2056 guidelines, are generally
accepted. ISO 10816 with the title ‘Mechanical vibration –
Evaluation of machine vibration by measurements on nonrotating parts’ consists of six parts. Part 1 (10816-1)
determines general guidelines and is followed by the
additional parts of ISO 10816, for example Part 2 (108162) for land-based steam turbines and generators in excess of
50 MW with normal operating speeds of 1500 RPM, 1800
RPM, 3000 RPM and 3600 RPM.
The following severity chart is in accordance with the ISO
10816-2 guidelines. For exceptions to this guideline and
for more information, reference the ISO 10816-2
document.
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
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A-1
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration measured in Velocity
ISO 10816-2
Speed (RPM)
Velocity
mm/sec RMS
Steam Turbines and Generators
1500 or 1800
3000 or 3600
Damage
occurs
11.8
10.0
8.5
7.5
Restricted
Operation
Unrestricted
Operation
5.3
3.8
2.8
1.4
0.0
Newly
Commissioned
Machinery
Table A - 1.
Vibration Severity Chart ISO 10816-2.
Industrial machines with nominal power above 15 kW and
nominal speeds between 120 RPM and 15000 RPM when
measured in position are covered by ISO 10816-3.
The machines are separated into 4 different groups:
Group 1: Large machinery and electrical machines with
shaft height greater than 315 mm that are normally
equipped with sleeve bearings.
Group 2: Medium-size machines and electrical machines
with shaft height between 160 mm and 315 mm that are
normally equipped with rolling element bearings and
operate at speeds above 600 RPM.
Group 3: Pumps with multivane impellers and separate
drivers with rated power above 15 kW. Machines of this
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Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
group may be equipped with sleeve or rolling element
bearings.
Group 4: Pumps with multivane impellers and with
integrated drivers that are equipped with sleeve or rolling
element bearings.
ISO 10816-3
Rated Power
Machinery Group
2&4
15 kW – 300 kW
Machinery Group
1&3
Group 1: 300 kW – 50 MW
Group 3: above 15 kW
Velocity
mm/sec
RMS
Damage
11.0
7.1
4.5
3.5
2.8
2.3
1.4
0.7
0.0
Foundation
occurs
Restricted
Operation
Unrestricted
Operation
Newly
Rigid
Commissioned
Flexible
Rigid
Table A - 2.
Vibration Severity Chart ISO 10816-3.
Machinery
Flexible
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
Severity levels for machine vibration and bearing defect
detection by means of the enveloping technique are needed
to classify the machine condition according to standards
and practical guidelines.
For enveloped acceleration in all forms, severity levels are
related to speed and bearing size. The bearing size is
generally related to the load capabilities of the machine.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
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General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
The higher the speed, the higher the energy generated by
impacts as elements roll over bearing damage.
The relation: Maximum shaft speed times shaft diameter
has a maximum, depending on the bearing technology.
Notice that for bigger bearings the speed is limited, and
therefore, the severity levels are also limited. Carefully
select the severity levels for enveloped acceleration using
machine knowledge. Sensor location and sensor
installation is important for successful machine monitoring.
The boundaries between different states of severity
conditions are less defined. Comparative and relative
judgement methods are preferred above absolute judgement
and the application of standards.
For creating a comparative measurement, the process
control system is able to create a trend of the vibration
signal. This signal can be compared against a ‘baseline’
overall measurement of that measurement point, with the
knowledge that the machine is running under normal
conditions.
In many cases, periodic measurements have been
performed on equipment before a permanent monitor (such
as the MCT system) is installed. The knowledge of those
measurements and the machine behavior provides a good
indication of effective alarm level settings.
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Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
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General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
Danger Setting (gE)
To be used with CMSS793, 797 accelerometers
CMVA55, CMVA320, filter 3, fmax=30,000 CPM, pk-pk reading.
3600
3000
1800
1500
RPM
1200
900
600
400
10
3.30
200
1
100
0.33
Alert Setting (gE)
(Scale is 1/3 of Danger Scale)
33.3
100
0.03
0.1
10
100
1000
Shaft Diameter (mm)
Figure A - 1.
Enveloped Acceleration Alarm Guidelines (Fmax = 60,000 CPM).
To utilize the above chart, the following parameters must
be known:
•
Bearing bore diameter in mm (indicates load)
•
Shaft speed in RPM
Assumptions for using the above chart are necessary as
deviations from standardized data collection greatly affect
enveloped acceleration readings. Assumptions are as
follows:
•
Filter 3 = 500-10,000 Hz
•
Fmax = 60,000 CPM / 1,000 Hz
A scaling factor is required for other
Fmax values. A scaling equation is
provided in Part II.
•
Sensor = CMSS793 or CMSS797 or MCD probe
•
Detection = Peak to Peak
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
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A-5
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
Perform measurements with the machine operating under
normal conditions. For example, when the rotor and the
main bearings have reached their normal steady operating
temperatures and with the machine running under its
normal rated condition (at rated voltage, flow, pressure, and
load).
To obtain the most accurate readings, enveloped
acceleration measurements require probe placement in the
maximum load zone, or as close as possible to the
maximum load zone within the measured bearing or gear
box.
Example
Bearing bore diameter:
100 mm
Shaft speed:
1800 RPM
Fmax:
60,000 CPM
Use the chart in Figure A-1 to determine this enveloped
acceleration measurement’s alert and danger alarm settings:
A-6
•
Locate 100 mm on the shaft diameter axis.
•
Follow the vertical line representing 100 mm to the
point where it intersects the 1800 RPM running speed
line. This is your reference point.
•
From your reference point, follow the horizontal lines
left to the danger settings axis to determine your
initial danger alarm setting (7.5 gE).
•
From your reference point, follow the horizontal lines
right to the alert settings axis to determine your initial
alert alarm setting (2.5 gE).
•
Use the Scaling Factor chart (Figure A-2).
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
1.40
Scaling Factor
1.20
1.00
0.80
0.60
0.40
0.20
0.00
0
500
1000
1500
2000
Fmax (Hz)
Figure A - 2.
Scaling Factor for Fmax Compensation for Enveloped Acceleration
Measurements.
The definition for an alarm condition for the enveloped
acceleration transmitter module also depends on the
application. Alarms can be a warning that a certain
condition has occurred and that further analysis is required.
Based upon those results, a decision must be made on
further required actions. The MCT is then used as a
monitoring device.
The alarm condition can also be used to take direct action.
In this case the MCT module is fulfilling a protective task
together with the process control / relay system.
The software CMSW5000 ‘Atlas For
Windows’ features a calculator for
enveloped acceleration alarm settings and
is based on identical assumptions.
Mechanical Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
A-7
General Severity Level Guidelines
Vibration Enveloped Acceleration Measurements
For more information please visit our
website www.skfcm.com, select News
and download Revolution 6, Number 2
with the complete article, "General Alarm
Guidelines for Enveloped Acceleration
Measurements."
A-8
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
D
dc power 1-8
Index
E
EMI 1-12
F
Filter
Enveloped Acceleration 2-5
Filters
Velocity 2-4
Full scale 1-5
4
G
4-20 mA 1-1
4-20 mA Output 1-13
Grounding 1-11
A
Alarm Delays 2-8
Alarm Relays 2-10
Alarm Setpoints 2-6
B
band-pass filters 2-5
BNC connector 1-3, 1-14, 2-6
BOV 1-14
Buffered Output 1-14
C
CMSS530 1-1
CMSS590 1-1
COM terminal 2-9
corner frequency 2-4
Machine Condition Transmitter (MCT)
User Manual
H
High-pass filters 2-4
I
Installation Precautions 2-4
ISO A-1
J
Jumper Locations 1-6
L
Latching / Non-latching Alarms 2-9
Low-pass filters 2-4
Index - 1
M
Microlog 1-1, 1-14
P
Peak Detection 2-13
Power Supply Distribution 1-9
Preset Options 1-5
R
RMS 1-1
RST terminals 2-9
T
Transducer Cable 1-12
Transducer OK Circuit 1-12
Trip multiply 1-3
Trip Multiply 2-9
Typical Power Wiring
Configuration 1-10
V
Vibration
Enveloped Acceleration A-3
Velocity A-1
Index - 2
Machine Condtion Transmitter (MCM)
User Manual
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