Rising Stars Microsoft Switched on computing

Rising Stars Microsoft Switched on computing
FREE
UNITS
SWITCHEDON
Computing
TAKE YOUR FIRST EASY STEPS WITH
MICROSOFT
✔
Easy-to-follow mini projects for Key Stages 1 and 2
✔
For the new National Curriculum for computing
Recommended by
COMPUTING
AT SCHOOL
E D U C AT E E N G A G E E N C O U R A G E
•
•
In collaboration with BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT
COMPUTING
AT SCHOOL
E D U C AT E E N G A G E E N C O U R A G E
•
•
In collaboration with BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT
Microsoft has been supporting the education
community for over a decade and is committed
to helping every student and educator realise
their full potential. We are passionate about the
need to inspire and excite students of all ages
about computer science. We want to play our
part, working alongside others in the industry, to
ensure teachers are equipped to teach it and that
students are eager to learn about it. That’s why
we’re proud to support these resources, which
will make computer science approachable for all
primary school teachers and great fun for primaryage children right across the UK.
Computing at School (CAS) endorses this product
because it meets the aims of supporting the
teaching of computer science within computing
to all pupils of all ages. This book supports good
practice in teaching the computing curriculum,
which will help develop computational thinking.
It describes good pedagogical strategies and
offers progression throughout. Further
teaching resources are available through the
CAS Community website at
www.computingatschool.org.uk/primary
SWITCHEDON
Computing
Now you’ve tried these activities, get complete
coverage for the new Programme of Study for
computing from Switched on Computing
Switched on Computing will help you deliver
the new Programme of Study for computing
with creative units using the latest free
software in a format that is designed for
teachers of all levels of experience to pick up
and use. Visit www.switchedoncomputing.co.uk
to find out more and download a sample unit.
6 units for each year group covering:
•Programming
•Computational thinking
•Creativity
•Computer networks
•Communication and collaboration
•Productivity
Order now and get 25% off using code SOC2a
Order at www.risingstars-uk.com/computing or call 0800 091 1602.
Code valid until 31st May 2014
SWITCHEDON
Computing
Rising Stars UK Ltd.
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Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders and
obtain their permission for the use of copyright materials.
The authors and publisher will gladly receive information
enabling them to rectify any error or omission in subsequent
editions. All facts are correct at time of going to press. All
referenced websites were correct at the time this book went
to press.
Text, design and layout © Rising Stars UK Ltd.
The right of Claire Lotriet to be identified as the author of
this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the
Copyright, Design and Patents Act 1998.
Published 2014
Author: Claire Lotriet
Text design: Words & Pictures Ltd
Logo design: Words & Pictures Ltd/Burville-Riley
Partnership
Typesetting: Words & Pictures Ltd
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Project managers: Emma Davis and Hilary Beaton
Editor: Jennie Clifford
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be
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permission of Rising Stars UK Ltd.
British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data.
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Library.
ISBN: 978-1-78339-144-8
Printed by Newnorth Print Ltd, Bedford.
2
Contents
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Curriculum links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Planning – overview of units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Units for Key Stage 1
Unit 1: We are sharing
Creating a collage all about you . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Unit 2: We are cooking
Producing an interactive recipe book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Units for Lower Key Stage 2
Unit 3: We are tour guides
3D virtual tours and interactive maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Unit 4: We are botanists
Sorting and identifying plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Units for Upper Key Stage 2
Unit 5: We are film-makers
Researching and filming a documentary . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Unit 6: We are game designers
Creating and advertising a computer game . . . . . . . . . . 41
3
Introduction
OVERVIEW
Switched on Computing: Take Your First Easy Steps
with Microsoft has been written to help schools to
get started with computing at Key Stages 1 and 2.
Each unit has clear guidance for teachers and plenty
of creative ideas for bringing each project alive in the
classroom.
More information on the aims and purpose of the
curriculum for computing, and details of what must
be taught at each key stage, can be found at www.
gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculumin-england-computing-programmes-of-study.
Computing at School have produced a very useful
free guide for primary schools which explains the
programme of study and will help schools with their
planning. It provides useful background for schools
using the Switched on Computing resources. A
copy of the guide is provided on the accompanying
CD-ROM or can be downloaded from www.
computingatschool.org.uk.
WHAT DO YOU GET?
Switched on Computing comprises a Teacher’s
Guide covering all six units, each including
comprehensive, step-by-step instructions, ideas for
extension activities, and assessment guidance. There
is also an accompanying CD-ROM, which contains all
the Teacher’s Guide content in PDF, software demos
and other resources to help deliver each unit.
The Teacher’s Guide
1 About this unit
This section includes:
any software, hardware or apps that are needed
an introduction to the unit
need-to-know terminology
curriculum and subject links
learning expectations
other variations to try.
4
2 Getting ready
This section includes:
things to do
things you need
inclusion and safe and responsible use information
useful links.
Use this section to find out about the practicalities
of the unit and things you will need to prepare
beforehand.
3 Running the task
This section provides step-by-step guidance for
running the task. Use the extensions as options to
challenge more able children. Homework options are
also included.
4 Assessment guidance
This section suggests skills that should be achievable
by all, many or some children. You may wish to use
them in conjunction with your school’s assessment
policy.
5 Classroom ideas
This section provides various ways to bring the unit
alive, including ideas for classroom displays, relevant
weblinks, visits and books.
6 Taking it further
This section suggests ways in which you could
extend the unit, once it is finished.
The CD-ROM
The CD-ROM includes demos for software and
specific tools within the software. The demos do not
cover every aspect of each program, but may help
increase your confidence and allow you to explore
programs independently. It also contains downloads
of four of the free Microsoft programs needed for
some of our units: AutoCollage, Photosynth, Image
Composite Editor and Movie Maker 2.6. You will also
find some extra resources mentioned in some of the
units to help you deliver certain steps or tasks, such
as templates or examples.
5
6. We are game
designers:
Creating and
advertising a
computer game
5. We are
film-makers:
Researching
and filming a
documentary
4. We are
botanists: Sorting
and identifying
plants
3. We are tour
guides: 3D virtual
tours and
interactive maps








nglish
E
Developing positive attitudes
towards, and stamina for, writing
by writing for different purposes.
Reading aloud using intonation to
make meaning clear.
Learning how to use sentences
with different forms: commands.
D&T
Selecting and using ingredients.
Geography
Using digital/computer mapping
to locate countries.
Using fieldwork to observe/record
human and physical features in
the local area.
Science
Identifying a variety of living
things.
Classifying data to help in
answering questions.
English
Distinguishing between fact and
opinion.
Retrieving, recording and
presenting information from nonfiction.
Drawing on reading and research.
English
Considering how authors develop
characters and settings.


cience
S
Identifying, naming and labelling
parts of the human body.
Maths
1. We are sharing:
Creating a collage
all about you
2. We are
cooking:
Producing an
interactive recipe
book
Eng
National Curriculum (2014)
Unit
Curriculum links



Sci
PE




Art and
design


D&T


Geog
Subject links
His

Music


PSHE
RE
MFL
6
6. We are game
designers: Creating and
advertising a computer
game
5. We are film-makers:
Researching and filming a
documentary
Programming, game
design, testing and
refining, advertising
Image searching,
intellectual property,
hyperlinking, non-linear
presentations, testing and
refining
Research, organising
information, intellectual
property, video recording,
video editing
4. We are botanists:
Sorting and identifying
plants
nderstand computer networks, including the Internet; how they can provide
U
multiple services, such as the world wide web, and the opportunities they
offer for communication.
Use search technologies effectively, appreciate and be discerning in
evaluating digital content.
Use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly.
Select, use and combine a variety of software (including Internet services)
on a range of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting,
analysing, evaluating and presenting information.
Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals; solve
problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
Use logical reasoning to detect and correct errors in algorithms and
programs.
Use sequence in programs; work with various forms of input and output.
Be discerning in evaluating digital content.
nderstand the opportunities computer networks (including Internet services)
U
can offer for collaboration.
Use technology respectfully and responsibly.
Use and combine a variety of software (including Internet services) on a range
of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including collecting, evaluating
and presenting information.
Use technology safely and respectfully.
Use and combine a variety of software (including Internet services) on a range
of digital devices to accomplish given goals, including analysing information.
nderstand what algorithms are.
U
Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and
retrieve digital content.
Digital photography,
combining a variety of
media, writing for an
audience, intellectual
property
Digital photography, photo
editing, collaboration,
digital mapping
se technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and
U
retrieve digital content.
Computing programmes of study
Digital photography, photo
editing, presentation
Target skills
3. We are tour guides:
3D virtual tours and
interactive maps
1. We are sharing:
Creating a collage all
about you
2. We are cooking:
Producing an interactive
recipe book
Unit
Planning - overview of units
Kodu, Word
Movie Maker
2.6, Word,
OneNote
(app),
OneNote
PowerPoint
Photosynth,
Image
Composite
Editor, Bing
Maps
PowerPoint
AutoCollage,
Word,
PowerPoint
Suggested
software
Digital video
cameras,
microphones,
tablets,
tripods
Colour printer
Digital
cameras, USB
microphones/
in-built
computer
microphones,
tripods
Digital
cameras,
tripods
Digital
cameras,
scanners
Suggested
equipment
Unit 1: We are sharing
We are sharing: Creating a
collage all about you
Unit
1
1
About this unit
Software: AutoCollage, Word, PowerPoint
Hardware: Digital cameras, scanners
Outcome: A photo collage documenting different aspects of the children’s lives
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will think about what makes
them individuals, such as their hobbies, interests,
likes and dislikes. They will create, organise, store
and retrieve data in the form of digital images, and
will manipulate and combine them to create a collage
about themselves.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Algorithm
An algorithm is a set of instructions designed to
solve a problem or perform a specific task. Computer
programs use algorithms to carry out different
functions.
Face detection
his is a tool that can identify a face in a
T
photographic image.
ASSESSMENT
or a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
F
suggestions for progression, please see pages 11–12.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
se technology purposefully to create, organise,
U
store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.
Science PoS
Identify, name and label the basic parts of the
human body.
Suggested subject links
Art and design: This unit works well if the children
have the opportunity to create collages using
traditional, non-digital methods in art and design.
The children could think about the differences,
similarities, and pros and cons of both techniques.
Numeracy: The children have the opportunity to
explore how many images they want to include in
their collage, and how using different numbers of
images changes the size of each image.
Science: Use AutoCollage to categorise objects.
You could also do this in other subjects, such as
RE and history.
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
This unit will enable the children to:
understand similarities and differences between
themselves and their peers
use a digital camera to capture images
combine images
explore and experiment with the tools available
and identify how these can change their work.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Work in groups to photograph and label different
parts of the human body.
Create a visual report of a school trip or visit.
Take photos of different parts of the school or
classroom.
Source images on a particular topic on the
Internet.
Use photographs to summarise and document
work done as part of any topic.
7
Unit 1: We are sharing
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
Photographs of different faces
Microsoft AutoCollage download
Software in 60 Seconds: AutoCollage
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
If you plan to upload the collages to a school blog
or virtual learning environment, take precautions
to protect the children’s identities, such as not
linking names to images of individuals. Ultimately,
any decisions you make should be in line with your
school’s e-safety policy.
If the children bring in photos to scan or items
from home to photograph, ensure appropriate
permission has been sought.
INCLUSION
Using a digital camera requires well-developed
fine motor skills. Some children may benefit from
using a camera designed specifically for children,
together with a tripod to keep the camera steady.
Children with visual impairment may need
additional assistive technology (see www.
abilitynet.org.uk).
8
THINGS YOU NEED
A collage about yourself embedded into a
PowerPoint presentation or interactive whiteboard
file
Photographs of different faces (see CD-ROM)
Digital cameras
Scanners (if the children are going to be drawing
pictures as well as taking photographs)
Places, items and people for the children to take
photos of (possibly including items from home,
such as favourite games or toys)
Computers/laptops
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
AutoCollage is software that is free for teachers.
Install it from the accompanying Switched on
Computing CD-ROM.
PowerPoint is pay-for software or you can use the
free Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365; see http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/powerpoint/.
Word is pay-for software or you can use the free
Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365; see http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/word/.
Online tutorials
How to use AutoCollage: www.pil-network.com/
Resources/Tutorials/Details/c68263c6-44f0-4b7182dd-a61fb5c35f09
Useful hints and tips on creating larger
pictures in AutoCollage: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=4C34mQW0NpA
A PDF AutoCollage user manual: http://
mikemcsharry.files.wordpress.com/2009/11/
autocollage-user-manual.pdf
www.youtube.com/watch?v=HX_jppZ4yN4
shows you how to use interactive text boxes in
PowerPoint – useful for making notes on a live
presentation.
Information and ideas
General AutoCollage information and ideas from
Microsoft Partners in Learning: www.pil-network.
com/Resources/Tools/Details/1d1fb292-d2514d52-9fbd-9dd9cc45a076
Information about, and examples of, collages at
The Museum of Modern Art in New York: www.
moma.org/collection/theme.php?theme_id=10064
Examples of AutoCollages others have made:
www.flickr.com/groups/autocollage/
Running the task – We are sharing
xamples of collages at The Museum of
E
Modern Art in New York
Examples of AutoCollages others have
made
Show the children how to download their images
and save them in their folder.
Model how to take photos using one of the digital
cameras. The children will need a minimum of
seven images each for their photo collage. Allow
the children plenty of time to take photos.
Ask the children what sort of pictures they might
like to include in their collage, e.g. a piece of work
they are proud of or covers of books they like.
How to use AutoCollage
Explain that AutoCollage has a tool that detects
faces in photographs to make sure no faces are
covered up by another photograph. Demonstrate
WWW
Images of different faces
AutoCollage download
YOU WILL NEED
Display images of faces and ask the children
to suggest face detection rules. Test out the
children’s rules on various photographs of faces to
see if they work.
Establish that AutoCollage follows sets of
instructions called ‘algorithms’. What instructions
might AutoCollage be following to detect faces?
by creating a collage with face detection enabled
and point out the square frames that show the
program has detected a face.
Step 2: How does AutoCollage recognise faces?
Show the children some examples of collages and
introduce the task. Share an AutoCollage you have
made about yourself.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 1: Thinking about what makes you unique
Core steps
Challenge the children to draw faces
of two different people and think about
how they are similar and how they are
different.
HOME
The children could label photographs
of each other’s faces and make posters
that show what makes a face a face.
SCHOOL
Challenge the children to draw a selfportrait that could be scanned and
included in their collage.
HOME
The children could create their own
images using a paint program and insert
these into their collage.
SCHOOL
Extensions
Software: AutoCollage, Word, PowerPoint Hardware: Digital cameras, scanners Outcome: A photo collage documenting different aspects of the children’s lives
3
Unit 1: We are sharing
9
10
How to use AutoCollage
Show the children how to change the number of
photographs they want to include in their collage
Look at the collage that has been made. Make a
point of showing that you are not quite happy with
it yet and would like to include more/fewer photos.
In AutoCollage, model how to select a folder of
saved images and click on the ‘Create’ button.
Watch as AutoCollage moves and sorts the
images and turns them into a photo collage.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 3: Creating the collages
Allow time for the children to present their collages
to the rest of the class, talking about the different
images they used, and what the images mean to
them.
Allow the children time to experiment with
AutoCollage, creating collages using different
numbers of images. The children should save their
favourite version of the collage in their folder.
using the slider (the minimum is seven).
Challenge the children to write a short
description of their collage and the
pictures they have included.
HOME
Some children could add labels to their
collage. Insert the finished collage into
PowerPoint, and then place text boxes
over different parts of the image.
SCHOOL
Unit 1: We are sharing
Unit 1: We are sharing
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
decide what they want to include in their
collage
take photos of objects, people and places,
with support
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
Use technology purposefully to create,
organise, store, manipulate and retrieve
digital content
create a collage using AutoCollage.
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
take photos of objects, people and places
modify an AutoCollage by changing the
number of photos that are included.
Use technology purposefully to create,
organise, store, manipulate and retrieve
digital content
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
use a paint program to create their own
images to include in their collage
add labels to their collage.
Use technology purposefully to create,
organise, store, manipulate and retrieve
digital content
11
Unit 1: We are sharing
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
Posters and large images of collages by various
artists would provide further inspiration.
Provide a variety of materials and cuttings from
magazines with which the children can experiment
creating collages.
Printouts of the children’s collages would make a
fantastic display – you could leave them unnamed
and challenge people to guess who made each
collage. You could take this even further by
creating an exhibition of the collages and inviting
parents and carers in to view them.
WWW
WEBLINKS
VISITS
Find out if any art galleries close to you have
collages in their collections.
Bring the project to life by inviting a collage artist
to come into school and talk about their work.
BOOKS
Brereton, R. and Roberts, C. Cut And Paste: 21st
Century Collage. (Laurence King, 2011)
Lark Books. Masters: Collage. (Lark, 2010)
Oldham, T. All About Collage. (AMMO Books,
2012)
Plowman, R. The Collage Workbook. (Lark, 2012)
WikiHow has some ideas about how to make a
collage at www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Collage.
The website http://gomakesomething.com/
category/print/printcollage/ contains sheets of
images that can be downloaded, printed out
and used to make collages using traditional
techniques.
For a wide variety of photo collage techniques that
will intrigue and inspire, visit http://graphicalerts.
com/collage-artwork-collection/.
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
Use the collages as a basis for a class assembly
and share them with parents, carers and the rest
of the school.
Challenge the children to write about themselves,
then combine this with the collages to create a
class book.
Some children might like to write instructions to
explain how to use AutoCollage.
12
Create a class collage that includes a photo of
everybody in the class. The children could also
make photo collages for other classes in the
school as part of a bigger project.
Some children might like to document their work
in other projects by taking photos of the process
and creating a photo collage at the end.
Create photo collages of life at school and
laminate them to sell at a school fair.
Unit 2: We are cooking
We are cooking: Producing an
interactive recipe book
Unit
2
1
About this unit
Software: PowerPoint
Hardware: Digital cameras, USB microphones/in-built computer microphones, tripods
Outcome: An electronic recipe book containing text, photos and audio instructions
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will relate algorithms to
recipes. They will write a recipe for a healthy sandwich
and use this to create an electronic recipe book,
which will also include photos and audio instructions.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Algorithm
An algorithm is a set of instructions designed to
solve a problem or perform a specific task. Computer
programs use algorithms to carry out different
functions.
Program
A program is a series of instructions, written in code,
which controls the operation of a computer.
ASSESSMENT
For a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
suggestions for progression, please see pages 19-20.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
Understand what algorithms are.
Use technology purposefully to create, organise,
store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.
English PoS
Develop positive attitudes towards, and stamina
for, writing by writing for different purposes.
Read aloud what they have written with
appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.
Learn how to use sentences with different forms:
commands.
Design and technology PoS
Suggested subject links
Science: This unit works well if the children know
about healthy eating, and can use this knowledge
to inform their recipe choices.
Literacy: The work in this unit draws on the
children’s experience of, and familiarity with,
instructional writing.
Numeracy: There are opportunities to read
measurements from scales, convert between units
of measure, and explore simple scaling problems.
Geography: When designing their sandwich, the
children could get ideas for sandwich fillings by
investigating food from around the world.
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
This unit will enable the children to:
develop an understanding of algorithms
write instructions for others to follow
take photos to support written instructions
record audio to support written instructions
explore how various media can be combined
evaluate how successful a set of instructions is.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Recipes for other meals or dishes, including
seasonal dishes.
Instructions that explain how to carry out a
mathematical operation or solve a problem.
Instructions that explain the rules of a game or
sport the children are familiar with.
Instructions that explain how to make something
the children have already worked on in school,
such as a Christmas decoration or a model
aeroplane.
Fantasy instructions, such as how to make your
own version of ‘George’s Marvellous Medicine’
(based on the book by Roald Dahl) or your own
potion that does something magical.
Select from and use a wide range of materials and
components, including ingredients, according to
their characteristics.
13
Unit 2: We are cooking
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
PowerPoint recipe template, Office 365 guides and
resources
Software in 60 Seconds: PowerPoint
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
Make sure you are fully aware of any known
allergies when planning which ingredients to
provide.
Think carefully when selecting kitchen equipment
for the children to use, and carry out an
appropriate risk assessment.
If you plan to upload any work to a school blog or
virtual learning environment, take precautions to
protect the children’s identities, such as not linking
names to images of individuals. Ultimately, any
decisions you make should be in line with your
school’s e-safety policy.
INCLUSION
Using a digital camera requires well-developed
fine motor skills. Some children may benefit from
using a camera designed specifically for children,
together with a tripod to keep the camera steady.
Children with visual impairment may need
additional assistive technology (see www.
abilitynet.org.uk).
Some children may need additional support to
write the text for their recipe. If so, think about
setting up a PowerPoint template containing
sentence starters that they can edit.
14
THINGS YOU NEED
An example set of instructions
Various ingredients to make a sandwich
Equipment needed for sandwich-making
Digital cameras (and tripods, if necessary)
USB microphones/in-built computer microphones
When considering which ingredients to provide,
be aware that some children may be unable to
eat certain foods because of religious practices
followed at home.
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
PowerPoint is pay-for software or you can use the
free Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365; see http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/powerpoint/.
Online tutorials
PowerPoint training videos from Microsoft: www.
youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXPr7gfUMmKxj9Nhp
BCQtULSkfnS1tcXU
How to add pictures or clip art to a PowerPoint
presentation: www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_qIuCPXrQk
How to insert sound into a PowerPoint presentation:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNxJQa51D9A
Information and ideas
See how one teacher, Philip Bagge, got his class
to ‘program’ him to make a jam sandwich: www.
youtube.com/watch?v=leBEFaVHllE
What’s an algorithm?: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/
your-brain-can-solve-algorithms-david-j-malan
Cooking with kids – an interactive guide: www.
theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/interactive/2013/
jul/30/cooking-with-kids-interactive-recipes-videos
Sandwiches for kids – easy sandwich recipes:
www.parenting.com/tags/sandwiches
A selection of primary school recipes in
various formats, including PowerPoint: www.
foodafactoflife.org.uk/sheet.aspx?siteId=20&sectio
nId=82&contentId=276
A variety of film clips of children’s cookery TV
shows can be found at www.youtube.com/user/
CookingKidsShows.
Running the task – We are cooking
Software: PowerPoint
‘Programming’ a teacher to make a jam
sandwich
Share some examples of simple recipes on the
interactive whiteboard. Ask the children to share
any recipes they know.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 2: Programming the teacher
Explain that computers are also able to carry
out tasks by following sets of instructions called
‘algorithms’. We can tell a computer what we
want it to do, and a related algorithm will tell the
computer how to do it. Model how to carry out
some tasks within programs on the interactive
whiteboard, such as opening a document.
Share an example of some instructions that helped
you to carry out a task.
Step 1: What is an algorithm?
Establish some rules about how to write clear
instructions in recipes.
Collect sandwich-making tools and ingredients.
Ask your class to give you an algorithm for making
a sandwich. Each time an instruction is given to
you, repeat it back before carrying it out precisely.
Watch a clip of some children programming their
teacher to make a jam sandwich. Discuss whether
the children always gave their teacher the right
instructions.
Explain to the children that they are going to
become chefs and create algorithms that tell
someone how to make a healthy sandwich.
Tell the children you are going to write an
algorithm that shows how you get to school.
Model how to number each step and use
imperative verbs at the beginning of each
sentence. Challenge them to create their own
algorithms for getting to school.
Core steps
Challenge the children to ‘program’
a member of the family to carry out a
simple task at home and note down what
they told them to do.
HOME
The children could ‘program’ each other
to carry out simple tasks, such as putting
on shoes or sharpening a pencil.
SCHOOL
The children could write an algorithm
that explains how to play their favourite
playground game.
HOME
The children could create a variety
of algorithms for different everyday
classroom tasks, such as getting
changed for PE.
SCHOOL
Extensions
Hardware: Digital cameras, USB microphones/in-built computer microphones Outcome: An electronic recipe book containing text, photos and audio instructions
3
Unit 2: We are cooking
15
16
‘Sandwiches for kids’ website
Film clips of children’s cookery TV shows
Show the children how to use a digital camera to
take photos, including how to hold it steady (or
how to use a tripod, if you have them). Ensure that
all children have the opportunity to explore using
the cameras and get to grips with the different
functions.
Tell the children that today they will be working in
small groups to make a sandwich.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 4: Making sandwiches
Encourage children to make the poster ‘their own’
by experimenting with colours, font choices and
other formatting options. Children should also
name their work.
Share the ‘Sandwiches for kids’ website. Model
how to copy and paste text and images from the
website into a blank Word document. Ask the
children to select a recipe to make into a poster,
experimenting with colours, font choices and other
formatting options.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 3: Thinking about copyright
After each group has made their sandwich,
ensure that the children know what to do with
the photographs they have taken. This could be
an opportunity to get the children thinking about
good practice by showing them how to save their
photos in folders.
Split the class into groups of four or five (depending
on the size of your class and equipment available).
It may be worth allocating roles within each group,
such as cooks, photographer and note-takers. The
children should swap roles so everyone gets to
experience each one.
Together agree on a set of rules to follow when
using copyright material; for example, including
a statement that explains the work is not all their
own, or copying and pasting the Web address
from where the material was taken.
Share posters. Ask the children whether it is
acceptable to make it look as if the recipe was
theirs. Encourage the children to relate this to their
own work and how they would feel if someone
copied it, put their name to it and made it look like
their own. Explain that the person who created the
work owns the copyright to it.
The children could watch someone at
home preparing a simple meal, and then
create instructions on how to do it.
HOME
You could also watch a clip of a chef
cooking on TV to further familiarise pupils
with typical vocabulary used in recipes
and cooking.
The children could research sandwiches
from around the world and the different
breads that are used.
SCHOOL
The children could make posters
explaining the class copyright rules.
HOME
You could give the children time to edit
their work according to the new class
copyright rules.
SCHOOL
Unit 2: We are cooking
How to insert pictures and clip art into
PowerPoint
Demonstrate how to open the PowerPoint file they
have saved containing the text for their recipe.
Point out the space for images on each slide.
Remind the children that they took photographs
when they made their sandwiches. Suggest that
they include these photos in their recipe books.
Ask: Why is it useful to have photographs in recipe
books?
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 6: Adding images
Demonstrate how to open the PowerPoint recipe
template from the CD-ROM, which has all the
slides set up in the right order. Use the ‘Save as’
command to save it to an appropriate place. This
Explain to the children that they are going to
create a recipe book on the computer. Show the
children an example of a PowerPoint recipe book.
WWW
Selection of primary school recipes in
various formats
PowerPoint recipe template
YOU WILL NEED
Step 5: Creating text for the recipe book
Allow the children time to insert an appropriate
image on to each slide, giving them frequent
reminders to save their work.
Demonstrate where to find the ‘Insert picture’
button. Model how to navigate the menus to find
the folder of photos they saved previously and to
select the one they want to insert.
Model how to type text into the text box on the
title slide, and then how to move to the next slide
and type text into the text boxes there. Ask the
children to type their sandwich recipes into their
recipe books, referring to the notes they made
during the previous lesson’s sandwich-making
activity.
is a good opportunity to discuss the difference
between ‘Save’ and ‘Save as’. (‘Save’ saves over
the top of any work done and ‘Save as’ saves
work as a new file).
The children could explore the idea of
visual instructions and draw a series of
images that explain how to carry out a
task without any accompanying text.
HOME
Some children could explore different
image formatting options in PowerPoint,
such as frames and shadow effects.
SCHOOL
The children could draw a picture of their
sandwich and label its ingredients.
HOME
Some children could format the text in
their recipe books and explore different
fonts and sizes.
SCHOOL
Unit 2: We are cooking
17
18
How to insert sound into a PowerPoint
presentation
Discuss what worked well in each other’s recipe
books, and what could be improved. Ask the
children whether they prefer following an interactive
book or a traditional recipe book, and why.
Share the assessment statements, encouraging
the children to review what they have learned and
self-assess against them.
Arrange for the necessary equipment to be
available, as well as some computers displaying
some of the children’s recipe books. In small
groups, challenge the children to follow the
instructions in each other’s books to see whether
they work. Remind them they must do exactly
what the recipe book says, not what they think
they should be doing. Allow time for the children to
try out each other’s recipes.
Alternatively, the children could record sound
directly into PowerPoint. Instructions on how to do
this are provided on the Switched on Computing
CD-ROM.
Show the children how to embed their sound files
into their PowerPoint slideshow. The Switched on
Computing CD-ROM explains how to do this.
Model how to save the audio files to an
appropriate place. Allow the children time to
record and save audio files of the steps of their
recipe. Each step will need to be recorded
separately so they can be inserted into separate
slides.
Once the recipe books are complete, it is a great
opportunity for the children to evaluate their own
and each other’s work. Explain that they are going
to try to follow each other’s recipes.
Step 8: Testing each other’s algorithms
Demonstrate how to use a device such as a USB
microphone to record audio files. The children
should record themselves reading out the text
from each step of their recipe.
Tell the children they will be adding sound to their
recipe books. Ask: Why might it be useful to have
sound as well as text and images in your recipe
book?
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 7: Adding sound
Ask the children to create an advert
for their interactive book, persuading
readers that it is better than a traditional
recipe book.
HOME
Some children could refine their recipe
book based on the feedback they receive
and their self-assessment.
SCHOOL
Challenge the children to plan another
interactive instruction book that explains
how to carry out a familiar task, such as
playing a game or making a craft project.
HOME
Some children might want to write and
record a theme tune for their book that
can be inserted into the title page.
SCHOOL
Unit 2: We are cooking
Unit 2: We are cooking
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
understand that an algorithm is a series of
instructions designed to solve a problem
write instructions for a simple recipe in the
correct order
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
Understand what algorithms are
Use technology purposefully to create
digital content
take photos with support
record themselves speaking with support.
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
understand that computers work by following
algorithms
write their own instructions for a simple recipe
Understand what algorithms are
Use technology purposefully to create
digital content
take photos
record themselves reading their work.
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
consider different tasks computers have to
carry out
format their photos by exploring different
effects available
Understand what algorithms are
Use technology purposefully to organise,
store, manipulate and retrieve digital
content
explore different formatting options, such as
font size and colour, and background colour.
19
Unit 2: We are cooking
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
A kitchen role-play area in your classroom would
give the children the opportunity to ‘practise’ and
to talk about their cooking skills.
A display about healthy foods can be bought at
the local supermarket or on the local high street.
A fruit and vegetable tasting session would give
the children the opportunity to try fruits and
vegetables they might not have eaten before.
A display of recipes in the school dining area
could inspire other children during lunchtimes.
WWW
WEBLINKS
For free online games based around following
recipes, visit www.cookinggames.com/.
View a collection of online activities about healthy
eating at http://resources.woodlands-junior.kent.
sch.uk/revision/science/living/humanbody.html.
For food safety activities for Key Stage 1 go to
http://school.asda.com/teachers/foodsafety/ks1.
aspx.
VISITS
Arrange for a chef from a local restaurant or the
produce manager from a local supermarket to talk
about their experiences of working with food.
Invite parents, carers and other family members to
share and talk about their favourite dishes.
Visit a local supermarket, greengrocer or market
to explore the different foods available and their
prices. The children could be challenged to see
what they could buy with a given budget.
BOOKS
Butterworth, C. Lunchbox: The Story Of Your
Food. (Walker, 2013)
Edwards, G. The Disgusting Sandwich. (Alison
Green Books, 2013)
Herman, D. Carla’s Sandwich (Flashlight Press,
2004)
Lord, J. and Burroway, J. The Giant Jam
Sandwich. (Red Fox Picture Books, 2010)
Pelham, D. Sam’s Sandwich. (Penguin Books,
1991)
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
Invite parents and carers in to try out the
children’s recipe books and make some
sandwiches.
Set up a class café and invite other classes to
taste the children’s creations.
The children could film themselves making their
recipes in the style of TV chefs.
20
Explore, make and try traditional sandwiches from
different countries around the world.
Create recipe books for other healthy creations
such as fruit smoothies or milkshakes.
Investigate the cost of ingredients and compare
how much everyone’s sandwiches cost to make.
Unit 3: We are tour guides
We are tour guides: 3D virtual
tours and interactive maps
Unit
3
1
About this unit
Software: Photosynth, Image Composite Editor, Bing Maps
App: Use the Photosynth app on mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones
Hardware: Digital cameras, tripods Outcome: An electronic map that links to immersive 3D images of a local area
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will visit a local area and
take photographs of key places. They will ‘stitch’
these images together electronically to create
panoramic views. Finally, they will link these to
the corresponding location on an electronic map,
creating a virtual tour of the local area.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Synth
This is one type of 3D image that can be created in
Photosynth – you will need a Microsoft Live ID to do
this. A synth is good for capturing different sides of
an object. The photos overlap to reconstruct a 3D
model of the space.
Panorama
This is another type of 3D image, created in Image
Composite Editor and shared via Photosynth.
A panorama can be shot when you can capture
everything from a single location. Panoramas are
created by stitching together a set of photos taken
from the same spot with the same focal length.
Virtual
Simulated by a computer.
ASSESSMENT
For a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
suggestions for progression, please see pages 26–27.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
Understand the opportunities computer networks
can offer for collaboration.
Use technology respectfully and responsibly.
Use and combine a variety of software (including
Internet services) on a range of digital devices
to accomplish given goals, including collecting,
evaluating and presenting information.
Geography PoS
Use digital/computer mapping to locate countries.
Use fieldwork to observe and record the human
and physical features in the local area using a
range of methods including digital technologies.
Suggested subject links
Geography: There are strong geography links
throughout this unit, and it would work well as part
of a wider topic on the local area. The children
could make and use their own maps.
Numeracy: Using maps can be linked with topics
such as movement, direction, rotation and angles.
Maps also provide a real life context for the ideas
of scaling and ratio, and there is scope to link to
work involving coordinates.
Literacy: The children can explore and compare
written descriptions of their local area.
Art and design: Sketch work of the local area can
provide an interesting comparison to photography.
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
This unit will enable the children to:
develop their ability to take photographs on
location
explore ways in which several images can be
combined to create a new image
develop collaboration skills, including creating a
shared project
evaluate and review their own and each other’s
work.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Create a 3D virtual tour of the school instead of
the local area.
Use photographs taken on a school trip to create
3D images that record the day.
Put up an art exhibition of the children’s work and
create a 3D tour of it.
21
Unit 3: We are tour guides
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
Panoramic images
Software in 60 Seconds: Photosynth, Image
Composite Editor and Bing Maps
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
When on location, obtain permission before taking
photographs on private property, or of members of
the public.
INCLUSION
Some children may find it easier to take
photographs and keep the camera steady using a
tripod.
A visit to the local area will be the focus of the
project. When planning the visit, ensure that it is
accessible to all children, and make any necessary
adjustments for children with special needs.
22
THINGS YOU NEED
Digital cameras
Tripods (optional, but may be useful when taking
photographs on location)
Examples of various panoramic shots
Large prints of landscape photographs that can
be cut up and pieced back together like a jigsaw
puzzle
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
Photosynth is a free Web 2.0 tool. Download it
from http://photosynth.net/create.aspx or install it
from the Switched on Computing CD-ROM.
Image Composite Editor is free software.
Download it from http://research.microsoft.com/
en-us/um/redmond/groups/ivm/ice/ or install it
from the Switched on Computing CD-ROM.
Find Bing Maps at www.bing.com/maps/.
Online tutorials
How to use Photosynth to generate panoramic
images with 360° views: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=-cAf6m6YZU4
A short tutorial that explains how to view
Photosynth panoramas on Bing Maps: www.
youtube.com/watch?v=DmQdRX91xUk
Getting to grips with the terminology used in
Photosynth: www.pil-network.com/Resources/
Tutorials/Details/fefe0c58-2567-4f59-961044d4d8973015
How to make a myriorama (a moving panorama):
www.mediatinker.com/blog/upload/2007/04/
myriorama-tutorial.pdf
Information and ideas
The Photosynth website is good place to learn
more about the program and explore synths
created by others: http://photosynth.net
Photosynth information and ideas from Microsoft
Partners in Learning: www.pil-network.com/
Resources/Tools/Details/bfb692e8-fc57-4568b209-b5dc4f83389b
A TED talk from the co-creator of Photosynth:
www.ted.com/talks/blaise_aguera_y_arcas_
demos_photosynth.html
An introduction to Bing Maps: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=cIJ_8Ofvtd4
Running the task – We are tour guides
Software: Photosynth, ICE, Bing Maps Hardware: Digital cameras, tripods
hotosynth panoramas from around the
P
world
Bing Maps and ‘Streetside’, tool to explore
in 3D
Bing Maps
Display a ‘Streetside’ image of a location. Explain
that it is made up of lots of images of the same
location, and that computer software ‘stitches’
them together to make an image called a
‘panorama’.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 2: Planning the virtual tour
Introduce the term ‘tour guide’ to the children and
ask them if they know what a tour guide does.
Explain that they are going to become virtual tour
guides.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 1: Exploring 3D images
Split up the class into groups of about four and
share the postcode of the area you are going to
visit. Allow each group time to locate the area
on Bing Maps and to use the ‘Streetside’ tool to
decide where they would like to take photos for
their virtual 3D image.
Provide the children with photos that have been
cut up into smaller pieces and challenge them
to put them back together again. Ask if they can
come up with a set of instructions (an algorithm) to
make this work every time.
Explain that they are going to create some 3D
images so that people from all over the world can
pay a virtual visit to their local area.
Locate a place and model how to use the
‘Streetside’ tool to ‘step into’ that area.
Demonstrate how to use the mouse to turn and
move around within the image. Allow plenty of
time for the children to explore.
Display Bing Maps. Ask the children where they
would like to go on their virtual tour.
Core steps
Challenge the children to draw a
landscape using traditional methods.
HOME
The children could search for landscape
images online, print them, cut them up,
and challenge a partner to put them back
together.
SCHOOL
Challenge the children to research a
famous landmark they would like to visit,
and explain why they want to go there.
HOME
Provide the children with a range
of traditional maps and atlases and
challenge them to think about the
strengths and weaknesses of each.
SCHOOL
Extensions
App: Use the Photosynth app on mobile devices such as tablets and smart phones Outcome: An electronic map that links to immersive 3D images of a local area
3
Unit 3: We are tour guides
23
24
How to make a myriorama
Show the children how to create a panorama by
selecting a set of overlapping photos from a folder
and dragging them into the ICE main window.
Press the ‘Ctrl’ key and ‘A’ key at the same time to
select all the photos in a folder.
Demonstrate how to launch the Image Composite
Editor and Photosynth software and explain the
difference between a panorama and a synth.
Software in 60 Seconds: Creating a
panorama
YOU WILL NEED
Step 4: Creating the panoramas
The children may also need reminding that to
make their 360° panorama they need to take
a series of images from the same spot while
making a full turn. The more images, the better the
panorama will be. Before you go out on location
talk about the number of images it might be
practical for each child to take.
Before going out on location, ensure that the
children know how to use the digital cameras.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 3: Taking photos on location
To capture and share panoramas directly on
a smart phone or tablet device download the
Photosynth app from the relevant app store.
Click ‘Upload’ to complete the publishing process.
Then click to view the panorama in a web browser.
Show the children how to access the URL (Web
address) for their panorama under the ‘Share’
option.
Wait while ICE joins the photos together to
create a panorama. Publish to Web to upload to
www.photosynth.net and share with friends. In
Photosynth give the panorama an appropriate title.
You can also add tags to help people search for it.
This is a good opportunity to introduce the idea of
tagging and how searching online works.
Allow groups of children plenty of time to take a
series of images that will later be used to create
3D images. Once back at school, ensure that each
group’s photos are saved in an appropriate place.
A tripod might be useful to help children keep the
camera at the same height as they turn. Creating
a myriorama beforehand can give the children a
practical understanding of horizon lines and how
panoramas are made by fitting smaller photos
together.
Ask the children to decide on another
place for which they would like to create
a panorama, and explain why.
HOME
The children could create panoramas
or synths of the classroom to embed
in a class blog so they can access the
classroom’s visual resources (such as
posters) wherever they are.
SCHOOL
The children could draw the location
they photographed from memory, and
later compare this to the panorama they
create.
HOME
Some children could take photos of a
specific landmark from different angles in
order to create a synth, as opposed to a
panorama.
SCHOOL
Unit 3: We are tour guides
Bing Maps
Prior to the lesson, save the Bing Map where you
want the children to add their panoramas. Enter
the name of the local area or postcode you visited,
save the map and then click on ‘Share’ to get the
web address for your map. The children will need
this web address to access the map.
WWW
Software in 60 Seconds: Bing Maps
YOU WILL NEED
Step 5: Linking it all to Bing Maps
Zoom in and examine how well Image Composite
Editor has stitched the photos together.
Allow children time to explore each other’s
panoramas.
Demonstrate how to click on ‘My places’ and the
‘Add a pushpin’ button. The children should click
the location of where they took their photos to
insert the pushpin there. They are now able to give
their pushpin a name, add some notes and add
the URL (Web address) of their panorama. You will
need to sign in to save their pushpins to the map.
Encourage the children to think of other
information and media they could link to
their pushpin for a virtual visitor.
HOME
Some children may be able to add paths
to the map; for example, they could
draw a path to show the route they took
around the local area during their visit.
SCHOOL
Unit 3: We are tour guides
25
Unit 3: We are tour guides
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
use software to digitally combine a number of
images to make a 3D image
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including presenting information
locate different places on an electronic map
Use software (including Internet services) to
accomplish given goals, including collecting
information
explore locations using 3D images.
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
Use software (including Internet services) to
accomplish given goals, including analysing
information
consider how software can piece together
images electronically and compare it to doing
the same task manually
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including presenting information
evaluate how successfully their images have
combined to create a 3D image
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including evaluating information
add markers and links to different locations on
an electronic map.
Understand the opportunities computer
networks (including Internet services) can
offer for collaboration
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
review and alter their 3D image as a result of
their evaluation
draw paths and areas on an electronic map.
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including presenting and evaluating
information
Use software (including Internet services)
to accomplish given goals, including
presenting information
26
Unit 3: We are tour guides
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
Create an interactive display that links to the
children’s panoramas and synths by using QR
codes. Displaying the original photos alongside
a way to access the 3D versions provides an
interesting comparison of the two.
Use the panoramas as the basis for an assembly
on the local area, and take the rest of the school
on a virtual trip there.
Film video of the children using their panoramas
to talk about the local area and share them with
other children from around the world via Skype In
The Classroom.
Investigate how compasses are used, and arrange
for the children to try out orienteering.
WWW
WEBLINKS
Find out about Skype In The Classroom at https://
education.skype.com/.
The Living Maps Project aims to help children
develop essential questions about geographic
locations and learn from one another. Visit https://
education.skype.com/projects/1173-living-mapsproject.
MapZone resources from Ordnance Survey. Visit
http://mapzone.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/mapzone/
competitions.html.
For instructions on how to make a compass, visit
http://sciencewithkids.com/Experiments/Physicsexperiments/how-to-make-compass.html.
VISITS
A local town planner could pay a visit to the school
to discuss his/her work and experiences.
You could arrange for a cartographer to give a talk
about how maps are made.
A photographer might be willing to share some tips
on taking landscape photos.
BOOKS
Chancellor, D. Discover Science: Maps And
Mapping. (Kingfisher, 2010)
Denton, M. England: The Panoramas. (Constable,
2010)
Gaines, T. Digital Photo Madness! (Lark, 2012)
Hennessy, B. G. The Once Upon A Time Map
Book. (Candlewick Press, 2010)
Spilsbury, L. Our Local Area: Ways Into
Geography. (Franklin Watts, 2012)
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
Create a leaflet or written guide to the local area
and include QR codes to link to the children’s
panoramas and synths of related places. QR
(Quick Response) codes are a type of bar code
that can be scanned and read with a QR code
reader app on a mobile device. You can choose
to link a QR code to a variety of different media,
including Web addresses. QR codes can be
created for free on QR code generator websites
(such as http://qrcode.kaywa.com) and printed
out on a normal printer.
The children could create their own maps of part
of the local area, either by hand or using computer
software, and include QR codes to link to their
panoramas or synths of places on their maps.
You could arrange to run this project with another
class, elsewhere in the UK or overseas, and
compare the two locations through each other’s
3D images.
Construct 3D models of some of the places visited
using papier mâché or ‘junk modelling’ materials.
Create some large-scale floor maps and
investigate programming toys such as Floor
Robots to move around them along a given route.
Write and record an audio guide to accompany
the panoramas.
Create and build a landscape in Kodu (see Unit 6)
as an introduction to the software.
27
Unit 4: We are botanists
We are botanists: Sorting
and identifying plants
Unit
4
1
About this unit
Software: PowerPoint
Outcome: An interactive PowerPoint slideshow that uses hyperlinks to sort and identify plants
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will use algorithms to sort and
identify a group of plants based on their similarities
and differences. They will then present their work
in the form of a tree diagram. Finally, they will use
hyperlinks to recreate this tree diagram structure in
PowerPoint.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Algorithm
A set of instructions designed to solve a problem
or perform a specific task. Computer programs use
algorithms to carry out different functions.
Tree diagram
A diagram in which lines branch out from a single
starting point to show all the possible outcomes of an
event, depending on subsequent events or decisions.
A diagram that uses lines and a conventional set
of symbols to represent a sequence of steps or
operations.
Hyperlink
Text, images or other objects that open another page
or document when clicked.
ASSESSMENT
or a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
F
suggestions for progression, please see pages 32-33.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
Use technology safely and respectfully.
Use and combine a variety of software (including
Internet services) on a range of digital devices
to accomplish given goals, including analysing
information.
28
Science PoS
Identify and name a variety of living things (plants
and animals), in the local and wider environment,
using classification keys to assign them to groups.
Gather, record, classify and present data in a
variety of ways to help in answering questions.
Suggested subject links
Science: There are close links here, as the
children are comparing characteristics of plants.
This unit would work well as part of a wider topic
on plants and plant growth.
Numeracy: There are opportunities for the
children to relate the work in this unit to sorting
numbers and shapes based on their similarities
and differences.
Art and design: The children could use their
artistic skills to create their own images of plants
and flowers to embed in their PowerPoint file.
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
This unit will enable the children to:
develop their research skills to locate and save
images
consider how to acknowledge the work of others
in their own work
draw and construct tree diagrams to sort and
classify objects
use hyperlinks to create a non-linear PowerPoint
presentation.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Sort and classify a group of animals instead of
plants. Minibeasts work particularly well for this
sort of task.
Create a PowerPoint presentation that classifies
numbers or shapes. You could make a shapesorter activity for younger children, to help them
learn the names of shapes.
Use hyperlinks to create an electronic storybook in
which the reader can choose what happens next.
Unit 4: We are botanists
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
Branching tree diagram and PowerPoint slideshow
for sorting 2D shapes, Diagrams of groups, e.g.
types of food, Images of plants, Software in 60
Seconds: PowerPoint
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
The children will be using the Internet, and should
know what do if they encounter any material that
makes them feel uncomfortable. It is advisable to
have a discussion beforehand about this, and ask
the children to switch off the screen and tell an
adult if this happens.
The children will be using images sourced from
the Internet. They need to appreciate they don’t
own those images, and to think about ways of
acknowledging where they came from. (See
Step 2).
INCLUSION
Children with visual impairment may need
additional assistive technology (see www.
abilitynet.org.uk).
Children who find sequencing difficult may need
some assistance organising their slides. You
might consider providing them with a tree diagram
template or helping them to construct one as part
of a group.
THINGS YOU NEED
An example of a tree diagram
Examples of other electronic tree diagrams for the
children to try out (see Information and ideas)
A colour printer
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
PowerPoint is pay-for software or you can use the
free Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365; see http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/powerpoint/.
Online tutorials
PowerPoint training videos from Microsoft: www.
youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXPr7gfUMmKxj9Nhp
BCQtULSkfnS1tcXU
How to add pictures or clip art to a PowerPoint
presentation: www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_
qIuCPXrQk
Information and ideas
Create a minibeast sorting tree: www.iboard.co.uk/
iwb/Minibeast-Sorting-Tree-111
A range of sorting and classifying games can
be found at the following website: www.iboard.
co.uk/activities/path/handling-data_sorting-andclassifying/subject/maths
Sort a group of six minibeasts using the ‘Minibeast
Classification’ interactive branching tree: www.
crickweb.co.uk/ks2science.html
Search for Creative Commons images on Flickr:
http://johnjohnston.info/flickrCC/
Flow chart symbols: www.buzzle.com/articles/
flowchart-symbols.html
Plant cultures resources are available from Kew
Gardens: www.kew.org/plant-cultures/schools/
schools_landing.html
Plant-based learning resources can be found
on the United States Botanic Garden website,
including a plant family tree: www.usbg.gov/
classroom-resources-plant-based-learning
29
30
Running the task – We are botanists
inibeast classification
M
Range of sorting and classifying games
Explain to the children that they will be creating
their own tree diagram to sort and identify a group
of plants.
Give the children time to explore and use a range
of interactive sorting activities.
Display the example tree diagram from the CDROM. Explain that algorithms do not always have
to be a list of steps; they can also be diagrams.
Pick one of the shapes, and answer the questions
in the tree diagram to find out its name.
Creative Commons Flickr image search
Adding pictures to a PowerPoint file
Tell the children they will be searching for images
of plants. Demonstrate how to access the Creative
Commons image search on Flickr. Discuss the
WWW
oftware in 60 Seconds: creating
S
branching hyperlinks in Powerpoint
YOU WILL NEED
Give the children time to search for images of six
plants they know the names of, insert them into a
single slide in their PowerPoint file, and print the
slide out for later use.
Show the children how to open a PowerPoint file
and save it. Model how to search for an image,
save it and insert it into the first slide. Copy
and paste the name of the owner of the image
underneath it.
importance of crediting the creators of images you
use.
Step 2: Finding images for the branching tree diagrams
Recap what the children know about algorithms.
Explain to the children that they are going to
design algorithms to sort and identify plants.
WWW
Branching tree diagram example
YOU WILL NEED
Step 1: What is a branching tree diagram?
Core steps
Ask the children to create posters
explaining why it is important to credit
the work of others when using material
you have found online.
HOME
The children could take their own photos
of plants for use in their PowerPoint file.
SCHOOL
Challenge the children to construct a
list of yes/no questions and use them to
interview someone at home.
HOME
Give the children a selection of questions,
some of them yes/no questions, and
challenge them to identify the yes/no
questions.
SCHOOL
Extensions
Software: PowerPoint Hardware: Colour printer Outcome: An interactive PowerPoint slideshow that uses hyperlinks to sort and identify plants
3
Unit 4: We are botanists
Challenge the children to create tree diagrams
based on their six plants.
Explain that you need to add questions that split
the groups until each plant is left on its own.
Ask the children to suggest another two yes/
no questions to divide the two new groups of
images. Write each new question at the end of the
appropriate branch, and then draw another pair of
yes/no branches from it. Sort the images based on
the new questions.
PowerPoint tutorials
Explain that PowerPoint slideshows are usually
linear, which means each slide follows the last
one. In non-linear slideshows, the order the slides
are shown in depends on the options the user
chooses. Show the children the example of a nonlinear PowerPoint slideshow from the CD-ROM.
WWW
Non-linear PowerPoint example
Software in 60 Seconds: creating
branching hyperlinks in PowerPoint
YOU WILL NEED
Allow the children plenty of time to create their
slideshow, test their own and each other’s
slideshows, and provide feedback.
Follow the tree diagram to link the ‘yes’ and ‘no’
buttons in each slide to the correct following slide.
Demonstrate how to turn text into a hyperlink and
how to select the slide to which it should link.
Using one of the children’s tree diagrams, create a
slide for each question that includes the answers
‘yes’ and ‘no’ in separate text boxes. For each of
the six plants, create a slide containing an image
of the plant and its name.
Step 4: Building the PowerPoint slideshow
Show the children images of six plants. Ask them
to suggest a yes/no question that will divide the
group of images roughly in half. Write the chosen
question on the interactive whiteboard at the top,
in the centre. Draw two branches from it, one
labelled ‘yes’, and the other labelled ‘no’. Sort the
images into two groups based on the question,
and place them at the end of the appropriate
branch.
Example tree diagram
Selection of plant images
YOU WILL NEED
Step 3: Designing a tree diagram
Challenge the children to create another
tree diagram for any six objects of their
choice.
HOME
Give the children an image of a seventh
plant and ask them to incorporate it into
their current branching tree structure.
SCHOOL
Give the children a tree diagram that
sorts a group of unfamiliar objects
(e.g. unusual fruits or vegetables), and
challenge them to use it to identify the
objects.
HOME
Some children may want to investigate
creating flow charts using traditional
symbols (see Information and ideas).
SCHOOL
Unit 4: We are botanists
31
Unit 4: We are botanists
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
search for appropriate images online and save
them
Use technology safely and respectfully
understand that images they find on the
Internet do not belong to them
Use technology respectfully
create hyperlinks that link to another slide.
Use software to accomplish given goals
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
use search criteria and tools to find more
specific images online
Use technology safely and respectfully
acknowledge in their work that they do not
own the rights to the images they have used
Use technology respectfully
create a series of hyperlinked slides that mirror
the structure of a tree diagram.
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including analysing information
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
32
evaluate the success of their search criteria
and amend them accordingly when searching
online
Use software to accomplish given goals
acknowledge the source of each image they
use in their work
Use technology respectfully
alter a tree diagram they have constructed to
incorporate new objects.
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including analysing information
Unit 4: We are botanists
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
Create an interactive display of the tree diagrams
and the related plant images so other children can
try identifying the plants. You could hide the final
answers on the tree diagrams under flaps, so that
the children can check whether they got them
right.
Set up a garden centre role-play area containing
plants and flowers, real and/or fake, to give the
children the opportunity to become familiar with
their different characteristics.
Invite children from other classes to try out the
slideshows and give feedback to your class.
WWW
WEBLINKS
A variety of ideas for indoor and outdoor
gardening projects can be found at www.bbc.
co.uk/gardening/gardening_with_children/.
Find information about gardens to visit across the
country at http://kidsinthegarden.co.uk/gardensto-visit-with-children/.
There are ideas for school gardening projects,
organised on a month-by-month basis, at www.
gardeningwithchildren.co.uk/school-zone/.
A range of flower-based craft activities
can be found at www.notimeforflashcards.
com/2012/04/21-flower-crafts-for-kids.html.
VISITS
You could arrange a trip to a local garden centre to
investigate different types of plants and flowers.
Alternatively, an employee of a local garden centre,
or a gardener, could visit the school to share his/
her knowledge of plants and flowers.
The children could look for plants and flowers on a
trip to a local park or public garden.
BOOKS
Bergin, M. How To Draw Flowers And Plants.
(Book House, 2013)
Jennings, T. Plants (Wildlife Watchers). (QED
Publishing, 2010)
Kubica, J. Computational Fairy Tales.
(CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform,
2012)
Royal Horticultural Society, RHS Garden Projects.
(Dorling Kindersley, 2013)
Russell, T. and Cutler, C. The World Encyclopedia
Of Trees. (Armadillo Books, 2011)
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
The children could grow a variety of plants and
flowers in a dedicated school garden, or in pots in
appropriate places within the school grounds.
Any flowers grown at school could be pressed
and used to create beautiful artwork and cards.
The children could observe and sketch plants
and create images of them using paint or painting
software on a computer or tablet.
The children could design their own flowers or
plants, create models of them and write fact files
about their distinguishing features.
Investigate the ideal conditions a plant or flower
needs to grow. Record plant growth using digital
photography, which could then be used to create
a time-lapse video.
Set up a school garden centre where the children
can grow plants from seeds or cuttings.
The children could design maps of an ideal school
garden and decide which plants they would
include, and why.
33
Unit 5: We are film-makers
We are film-makers: Researching
and filming a documentary
Unit
5
1
About this unit
Software: Movie Maker 2.6, Word, OneNote App: OneNote
Hardware: Digital video cameras, microphones, tablets
Outcome: A short documentary film that discusses the issue of school uniforms
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will investigate the topic of
wearing uniforms to school. Using online searches,
they will consider the reliability of various sources
and how to credit them appropriately. They will
collate their evidence using OneNote, and will use
this as a basis for writing a short film script on the
topic. Finally, they will film, edit and share their short
documentaries.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Transition
A term used in film editing to describe the style in
which one scene moves onto the next.
Creative Commons
A licensing scheme in which the creator of an original
work allows others to use it without seeking further
permission, subject to a number of agreed conditions.
For further information, visit http://creativecommons.
org.
English PoS
Distinguish between statements of fact and
opinion.
Retrieve, record and present information from
non-fiction.
Note and develop initial ideas, drawing on reading
and research where necessary.
Suggested subject links
Literacy: Creating a documentary film on a topical
subject provides an excellent opportunity for the
children to extend discussion work on persuasive
texts as well as journalistic writing.
PSHE: This unit works well if the children have the
opportunity to explore the idea of human rights
and are able to engage in debate with their peers.
Numeracy: The children could use their datahandling skills to collect and analyse data on
others’ opinions of school uniforms.
Music: The children might enjoy using their
musical knowledge and skills to compose and
record title music for their films.
ASSESSMENT
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
For a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
suggestions for progression, please see pages 39–40.
This unit will enable the children to:
develop their research skills to select information
that is useful and reliable
organise and collate information appropriately
gain skills in recording video, such as using
different camera angles
gain skills in editing video, including inserting
appropriate transitions and segues.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
U
nderstand computer networks, including
the Internet; how they can provide multiple
services, such as the World Wide Web, and the
opportunities they offer for communication.
U
se search technologies effectively, appreciate
and be discerning in evaluating digital content.
U
se technology safely, respectfully and
responsibly.
S
elect, use and combine a variety of software
(including Internet services) on a range of digital
devices to accomplish given goals, including
34
collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting
information.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Rather than creating a film about school uniforms,
use another current issue that is meaningful to the
children and also elicits varying points of view,
such as the use of mobile phones in school.
Research and create films on topics from other
curriculum areas, such as a particular period or
event in history, or the life and work of a famous
person.
Unit 5: We are film-makers
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
Microsoft Movie Maker 2.6 download
Software in 60 Seconds: MovieMaker 2.6, Word,
OneNote and OneNote app
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
Before embarking on any online research, ensure
the children know what to do if they come across
anything that makes them feel uncomfortable in
any way – do not panic, and inform a member
of staff as soon as possible. Be open about any
potential issues in class discussions and plenaries,
and encourage the children to talk about their
experiences of being safe and responsible online.
If the children upload films they create to a school
blog or virtual learning environment, make sure
precautions are in place to protect their identities
and contact details. Ultimately, any decisions you
make should be in line with your school’s e-safety
policy. It is advisable to seek explicit parental
consent for any work involving video footage.
INCLUSION
Some children may find it difficult to hold the tablet
steady while filming. Setting up tripods may help
with this.
Some children may feel uncomfortable being
filmed. It may help to offer a role-play area where
they can practise these skills.
THINGS YOU NEED
Tablets running the OneNote app – or you can use
the free Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365
Film clips showing facts and opinions (see
Information and ideas)
Materials for storyboarding (e.g. paper and pencils)
You might consider having a selection of reports
and relevant documents available for the children
to use as resources when carrying out their
research.
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
Find out more about OneNote at http://office.
microsoft.com/en-gb/onenote/ and http://apps.
microsoft.com/windows/en-gb/app/onenote/
f022389f-f3a6-417e-ad23-704fbdf57117. The
OneNote app is a free download. Find it in the
relevant app store.
Movie Maker 2.6 is free software. Download it
from www.microsoft.com/en-gb/download/details.
aspx?id=34 or install it from the Switched on
Computing CD-ROM.
Word is pay-for software or you can use the free
Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365. See http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/word/.
Online tutorials
Tour of OneNote for Windows 8: www.youtube.
com/watch?v=hTOkeH5VZXQ
Getting started with Office 2013 – Using OneNote
2013: www.youtube.com/watch?v=-uUqO91_c0M
Getting started with Windows Movie Maker: http://
windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows-vista/
getting-started-with-windows-movie-maker
Information and ideas
Teaching the difference between fact and opinion:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/teachers/
literacy_7_11/text/newsid_1697000/1697456.stm
Links to past BBC Newsround stories about
school uniforms and dress codes: http://news.
bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/newsid_3820000/
newsid_3825700/3825767.stm
An American news report on the introduction of
a new uniform: www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OQTKQ2gNI
School Uniform – Good Or Bad? A short film about
the pros and cons of school uniform, including
interviews with students, teachers and MPs: www.
youtube.com/watch?v=dNvjAJTt2IM
35
36
Running the task – We are film-makers
Software: Movie Maker 2.6, Word, OneNote App: OneNote
BC Newsround stories
B
US news report
The documentary School Uniform – Good
Or Bad?
Watch some clips of films about school uniforms
and think about the different opinions they
present. Use the examples to come up with a
list of statements about what makes a good film
documentary.
Revise the difference between a fact and an
opinion. Explain that documentaries concentrate
on facts, and should aim for a balance of opinions.
our of OneNote for Windows 8
T
Getting started with Office 2013 – Using
OneNote 2013
Explain to the children that they are going to find
out some more about school uniforms. Introduce
the OneNote app.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Allow the children time to set up their notebooks,
organise the sections, and explore the tools.
Suggest having sections for facts and figures,
quotes, images and video clips.
Demonstrate how to use the ‘Insert’ menu to insert
a variety of media. Point out the drawing tool.
Demonstrate how to create and name a new
notebook. Show the children how to add sections
to the notebook to keep their research organised.
Step 2: Exploring OneNote and setting up the notebooks
Explain what a documentary is and tell the children
they will be creating a documentary about the
issue of whether they should have to wear school
uniforms.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 1: Thinking about opinion and fact
Core steps
Challenge the children to compare digital
notebooks and traditional scrapbooks,
and to think about the differences and
similarities between them.
HOME
Some children could share their OneNote
notebooks with each other, or with you.
SCHOOL
The children could interview friends and
family about their opinions of school
uniforms.
HOME
The children could have a class debate
about the pros and cons of school
uniforms.
SCHOOL
Extensions
Hardware: Digital video cameras, microphones, tripods, tablets Outcome: A short documentary film that discusses the issue of school uniforms
3
Unit 5: We are film-makers
The children should prepare some interview
questions before filming in order to get the best
out of their interviews.
Divide the class into groups of two or three
children, depending on the equipment you have
available. Encourage them to think about keeping
a balanced view when deciding who they might
like to interview. It would be wise to interview both
children and teachers, and some parents or carers
too, if that can be arranged.
Explain to the children that they will be recording
interviews to include in their documentaries.
Step 4: Filming interviews
Remind the children that it is also important
to acknowledge where any material has come
from because they do not own it. This is a good
opportunity to have a discussion about intellectual
property and Creative Commons licensing if the
children are not familiar with these ideas. Ask the
children to include in their notebooks details about
where they found each piece of information, such
Ask the children how they know whether a piece
of information they find on the Internet is reliable.
Establish that two ways to help with this are using
trusted sources they recognise, and trying to find
the same piece of information in a few different
places. Encourage the children to use these
checks when searching online.
Step 3: Collecting evidence
Allow the children time to film interviews with a
selection of people about their views on school
uniforms. They could record the interviews on
digital cameras or tablets. Ensure video files are
saved to an appropriate central location for easy
access when editing. Encourage the children to
experiment with different camera angles to see
what different effects they can create.
Allow time for the children to research the topic
of school uniforms online and populate their
notebooks with information and resources.
as its Web address or who created it.
Ask the children to write about their own
views of school uniforms and whether
they are for or against them.
HOME
Some children could use Skype to
interview children from another country
about their experiences of school
uniforms.
SCHOOL
The children could create leaflets about
the importance of crediting material
they find and use online. These could
be displayed around the school or in a
dedicated ICT suite.
HOME
Ask the children to share information and
update their notebooks with anything
they find interesting and did not already
have.
SCHOOL
Unit 5: We are film-makers
37
38
etting started with Windows Movie
G
Maker
They should evaluate each film in terms of its
content – is the film factual and unbiased? – as
well as in terms of its editing – do the clips and
images work well together? Have they been
sequenced in an appropriate order?
Ask the children what they might change the next
time they create a film.
Allow the children time to watch and review each
other’s films.
Encourage the children to use the storyboard they
created as a guide when putting together their
documentary.
Model how to import clips and images and how to
split and combine clips. Demonstrate how to add
a transition, such as a fade, by clicking on ‘Tools’
and then ‘Video Transitions’.
Show Movie Maker’s two editing views: the
storyboard (default) and the timeline. The
storyboard can be used to sequence the clips
by dragging and dropping. You can also edit any
transitions or effects. Note that audio clips can
only be seen in timeline view.
next.
When the children have finished editing their
films, show them how to save their Movie Maker
projects, and how to publish the films to a
computer or other device so that they can be
played back later.
Step 6: Presenting the films
Explain that Movie Maker enables users to create
and edit movies and slideshows by combining
video clips and images. Transitions control how
the movie moves from one clip or image to the
Using one group’s clips and images, model how
to plan the sequence in which you want them to
appear in as a storyboard.
WWW
YOU WILL NEED
Step 5: Storyboarding and editing
Write reviews of each other’s films based
on ‘two stars and a wish’.
HOME
Ask the children to suggest other topics
where making and editing films might be
useful.
SCHOOL
Ask the children to compile ending
credits for their film. Who did what? Who
would they like to thank?
HOME
Some children may want to record
narration. Show them how to use the
timeline view to add it to their film.
SCHOOL
Unit 5: We are film-makers
Unit 5: We are film-makers
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
find relevant information from the Internet
about a particular topic
Use search technologies effectively
capture the information they have found, and
organise it sensibly
Use and combine a variety of software
(including Internet services) to accomplish
given goals, including collecting information
record video of another person talking to the
camera
Use and combine a variety of software to
accomplish given goals, including collecting
information
arrange their film clips in a sequence on a
computer.
Use and combine a variety of software on a
range of digital devices to accomplish given
goals, including presenting information
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
plan how they are going to search for
information on the Internet and consider using
a range of tools
Use search technologies effectively
evaluate the usefulness of the information they
have found and be selective about information
they choose to save
Be discerning in evaluating digital content
plan how they will shoot and edit their video,
and record footage accordingly
Use and combine a variety of software on a
range of digital devices to accomplish given
goals, including presenting information
use transitions carefully to join clips when
editing their film.
Use and combine a variety of software on a
range of digital devices to accomplish given
goals, including analysing and presenting
information
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
consider possible bias and issues with
accuracy when selecting information from the
Internet
Be discerning in evaluating digital content
credit any sources of information they choose
to save
Use technology respectfully
plan and use different camera angles to create
different effects
Use software to accomplish given goals,
including presenting information
include text in transitions that act as segues to
the next clip.
Use and combine a variety of software on a
range of digital devices to accomplish given
goals, including analysing and presenting
information
39
Unit 5: We are film-makers
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
Set up a role-play area with props such as
microphones and video cameras for the children
to practise their interviewing technique.
The children could document the making of their
film by taking photographs and creating a ‘behind
the scenes’ display, which also features their
scripts.
Organise a ‘premiere’ and invite parents and
carers in to watch the documentaries. Use a
projector and whiteboard to create a cinema-style
experience.
WWW
WEBLINKS
For information on how to use green screen with
Windows Movie Maker, visit www.wikihow.com/
Use-Greenscreen-on-Windows-Movie-Maker.
Connect your classroom to the world with Skype.
Visit https://education.skype.com/.
VISITS
A local journalist could come in to talk about his/
her experiences and give advice on issues such as
creating a report and interviewing techniques.
You could use Skype to interview children from
other schools – both national and international –
about their thoughts on school uniforms.
As part of this unit, you could link up with other
local schools to find out about their school dress
codes.
BOOKS
Braun, E. Trust Me, Jack’s Beanstalk Stinks!: The
Story Of Jack And The Beanstalk as Told By The
Giant. (Picture Window Books, 2011)
Downing, T. Film Making (Master This). (Wayland,
2012)
Forward, T. The Wolf’s Story. (Walker Books,
2006)
Hawkins, C. and Hawkins, J. Fairytale News.
(Walker Books, 2005)
Scieszka, J. The True Story Of The Three Little
Pigs. (Puffin, 1991)
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
Investigate other issues that affect the children,
and begin to create a bank of topical short
documentaries.
Explore different ways of using video to support
and log learning throughout the curriculum. Short
films could be made of any number of events,
including assemblies, performances, trips and
specific lessons.
Use video to create ‘how to’ guides for any
subject – from how to use a particular calculation
strategy to how to make a paper aeroplane. The
children could make these videos for younger
children as part of an ongoing project.
40
Take video-editing skills even further; create films
that involve recording in front of a ‘green screen’
and inserting different backgrounds afterwards
using Movie Maker.
Design and produce posters and advertising for
the documentary films.
Write, film and edit short trailers for films based
on books and stories the children have read or
studied.
Unit 6: We are game designers
We are game designers:
Creating and advertising a
computer game
Unit
6
1
About this unit
Software: Kodu, Word
Outcome: A computer game set in another world, and a design for its packaging
INTRODUCTION
In this unit, the children will become familiar with
Kodu, a visual programming language made
specifically for creating games. They will have
the opportunity to run their own games studio –
designing and creating their own game aimed at
younger children – as well as designing packaging to
advertise it.
TRANSLATING THE COMPUTING POS
Programming
The process of developing and implementing a set
of instructions that enables a computer to carry out a
certain task.
Algorithm
A set of instructions designed to solve a problem
or perform a specific task. Computer programs use
algorithms to carry out different functions.
ASSESSMENT
For a detailed analysis of the assessment criteria and
suggestions for progression, please see pages 46–47.
CURRICULUM LINKS
Computing PoS
Design, write and debug programs that
accomplish specific goals; solve problems by
decomposing them into smaller parts.
Use sequence in programs; work with various
forms of input and output.
Use logical reasoning to detect and correct errors
in algorithms and programs.
Be discerning in evaluating digital content.
English PoS
In writing narratives, consider how authors have
developed characters and settings in what they
have read, listened to or seen performed.
Suggested subject links
Literacy: This unit works particularly well when
linked with work on stories set in imaginary or
fantasy worlds.
Art and design: The children can use their artistic
skills to further develop and explore the setting of
the game and the characters within it.
Design and technology: The children could build
3D models of their game’s landscape.
Numeracy: There are opportunities to make links
with work on direction, movement, logic and
sequencing.
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS
This unit will enable the children to:
consider their audience when planning to use
computer software to solve a problem
use computer software to build a 3D world
create a sequence of instructions that produces a
specific outcome
develop understanding through testing, evaluation
and refining their work.
VARIATIONS TO TRY
Change the context of the game to link it with
another area of the curriculum, such as geography
(e.g. create a world within Kodu that is modelled
on the landscape of an area the children have
been studying).
Create different types of games with Kodu, from
2D side-scrolling games to 3D racing games.
41
Unit 6: We are game designers
2
Getting ready
THINGS TO DO
Read the Core steps sections of Running the task.
Choose which software/tools are most accessible/
appropriate for use with your class.
Download your chosen software/tools (see Useful
links).
Look at appropriate software tutorials (see Useful
links).
Spend 60 minutes familiarising yourself with your
chosen software/tools.
Read the Extensions sections of Running the task.
Do you want to use any of the extras provided?
If the children are to go off site for this work, make
the necessary arrangements.
Ensure you have sufficient computers/laptops/
tablets booked in advance.
CD RESOURCES
Kodu in the classroom and videos, Kodu lesson
plans and getting started documents, Cover
design template, Kinect Adventures, Kinect Sport
Software in 60 Seconds: Kodu
SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE USE
When exploring Kodu games made by others,
assess their suitability beforehand. As with any
online exploration, make sure the children know
what to do if they come across any material that
makes them feel uncomfortable.
If the children upload the games they create for
others to see and play, make sure precautions
are in place to protect their identities and contact
details. Ultimately, any decisions you make should
be in line with your school’s e-safety policy.
INCLUSION
This project could be completed with the children
working collaboratively in teams or pairs.
Children with visual impairments may need
adjustments made to their computer (see www.
abilitynet.org.uk).
Kodu can be used with an Xbox controller as well
as a keyboard, and this may be a better option
for any children who struggle to use keyboards
effectively.
42
THINGS YOU NEED
Relevant resources and tutorials downloaded from
the Internet (see Useful links)
Computers running Kodu software
WWW USEFUL
LINKS
Software and tools
Kodu is free software. Download it from www.
kodugamelab.com.
Word is pay-for software or you can use the free
Web app in SkyDrive or Office 365; see http://
office.microsoft.com/en-gb/word/.
Online tutorials
Kodu classroom kit for educators: http://download.
microsoft.com/download/2/6/0/26005079-7F7A4D09-9FC4-F0EDB0CA8138/Kodu_Classroom_Kit.
zip
General introductory tutorials on installing and
getting started with Kodu: http://fuse.microsoft.
com/projects/kodu
‘Queen of Kodu’ video guides: www.youtube.com/
watch?v=YpO281wd9T4&list=PLDBB610D8324D
9C73
Information and ideas
Find out more about Kodu, and download related
teaching resources and tutorial videos: http://fuse.
microsoft.com/projects/kodu
Information about Kodu from Microsoft Partners in
Learning: www.pil-network.com/Resources/Tools/
Details/ca1b56f2-9382-4d0e-bc9c-ffa54632ba6f
Running the task – We are game designers
Allow the children time to ‘program’ each other to
move around the classroom and collect objects.
Discuss the sorts of commands you could give
(e.g. move forwards/backwards a certain number of
steps, turn left/right through a quarter/half turn).
Ask a volunteer to be a Kodu character. Blindfold
him/her and give other children objects, such as
beanbags, to place around the classroom. Can they
‘program’ their classmate to collect the objects?
odu tutorials
K
‘Queen of Kodu’ video guides
Watch the ‘Programming Kodu to eat Apples
Tutorial’. Ask the children to describe what Kodu
does with the apples. Show the children the code
WWW
Kodu lesson plans and getting started
documents
YOU WILL NEED
Allow time for the children to practise moving
Kodu around, adding objects to the world, altering
their appearance, and changing the code to make
Kodu behave differently when he encounters them.
Choose ‘Kodu’ from the toolbar and click in the
landscape to add an object. Choose an apple
tile from the object selection ring. Turn the apple
green by hovering over it so the colour palette
appears. Demonstrate how to edit the code to
change what Kodu does with the apple.
these actions are based on.
Step 2: Navigating Kodu and adding objects to a world
Tell the children that they will be running their own
computer games studio. They are going to use
Kodu to create a computer game for children in
Year 3 or Year 4. Show them an example of a Kodu
game and give them time to play it.
odu lesson plans and getting started
K
documents
YOU WILL NEED
Step 1: ‘Programming’ each other to move around a Kodu world
Core steps
Software: Kodu, Word Outcome: A computer game set in another world, and a design for its packaging
3
Challenge the children to create an
imaginary world for their game, making
notes about the world, the main
character, and the items the character
needs to collect or avoid.
HOME
Challenge some children to edit the code
so that if Kodu does not find any apples,
he continuously searches for more.
SCHOOL
Ask the children to write a series of
commands that would enable someone
who was blindfolded to get from one
room in their house to another.
HOME
The children could ‘program’ one another
to carry out conditional tasks (e.g. ‘If you
collect a green beanbag, throw it up in
the air’).
SCHOOL
Extensions
Unit 6: We are game designers
43
44
Kodu tutorials
‘Queen of Kodu’ video guides
Kodu tutorials
‘Queen of Kodu’ video guides
Put the cursor over the Kodu avatar, right-click
the mouse and select ‘program’. Demonstrate
The children now have to decide how Kodu will
move. Demonstrate how to load a game. Use the
‘Esc’ key to view the code, and then click on the
Kodu icon in the toolbar.
WWW
Kodu lesson plans and getting started
documents
YOU WILL NEED
Step 4: Moving characters
Explain to the children that they are going to
create a game world that will set the mood and
tone for their game. Relate this to familiar stories
set in imaginary worlds.
WWW
Kodu lesson plans and getting started
documents
YOU WILL NEED
Step 3: Creating a landscape
Give the children plenty of time to write sequences
of code that make Kodu move. Encourage them to
test out their codes regularly and edit them.
Once you have written the sequence, run the
game and see what happens. Ask the children
to suggest improvements or further sequences.
This is a good opportunity to discuss the idea of
continual testing and refinement.
how to create a sequence that will make Kodu
move towards a certain object when he sees it.
Your sequence might use general terms such as
‘forwards’ and ‘backwards’, or specific directions
such as ‘north’, ‘south’, etc.
Give the children plenty of time to explore and to
develop a detailed landscape for their game.
Draw children’s attention to the settings menu. It
contains powerful tools for adjusting landscape
features, e.g. you can add glass walls to the edges
of the world and experiment with lighting effects.
Show the children how to open an empty world in
Kodu. Demonstrate how to add and delete land
as well as give it colour and texture. Use different
brushes to create appropriate edges, and use the
smoothing tool to create hills and valleys. Use the
water tool to add islands and/or lakes.
Ask the children to reflect on their game
so far and think of two or three things
they would like to do when they work on
it next.
HOME
Some children may want to explore
moving their characters by using the
path feature (see Online tutorials).
SCHOOL
Ask the children to create two landscape
images – one peaceful and one
threatening. Ask them to consider how
landscapes can create different moods.
HOME
The children could paint a picture or
draw a map of their game world before
they begin creating it in Kodu.
SCHOOL
Unit 6: We are game designers
Explain that, as game designers, they also need
to design packaging for their game that will
encourage as many people as possible to buy it.
Show the children a selection of game packaging.
Ask: Why is packaging important? Why should
games studios concern themselves with
advertising their games? Ask the children to
evaluate cover designs, sorting them into those
they like and dislike, and sharing the reasons why.
Cover design template
YOU WILL NEED
Step 6: Advertising the games
It is valuable for the children not only to test out
their own games, but also to play and review
each other’s. Ask them to think about the kind of
feedback they would like to get from each other.
Ask: What would be useful? Is telling someone
their game is ‘good’ useful for them?
Kodu lesson plans and getting started
documents
YOU WILL NEED
Step 5: Testing and refining
Give the children time to develop their cover
design, including a short blurb giving an overview
of the game. Ask: Does it appeal to the younger
audience your game is aimed at? Does it reflect
the game well?
Demonstrate how to open the cover design
template in Word (from the CD-ROM) and save it
with an appropriate name in an appropriate place.
Remind them which age group the designs need
to appeal to.
It would be useful for the reviewer(s) to play
the refined game again to see if the issue they
highlighted has been resolved or improved.
Give the children time to act on any feedback they
receive in order to refine their game.
Allow time for each child to play several games
created by others. Encourage them to give each
other specific feedback about what works well and
what could be improved. Remind the children that
the more useful the feedback they give each other,
the better the product their games studio will
produce.
Ask the children to reflect on their gamedesigning experience so far and write
about what they would like to learn to do
next in Kodu.
HOME
Some children could write and record TV
or radio adverts for their games.
SCHOOL
Ask the children to create a name for
their game and write a blurb of about
100 words describing it to potential
customers.
HOME
Invite a group of younger children to test
out the games and give their feedback,
maybe using simple feedback sheets.
SCHOOL
Unit 6: We are game designers
45
Unit 6: We are game designers
4
Assessment guidance
Use this page to assess the children’s computing knowledge and skills. You may wish to use these
statements in conjunction with your own school policy for levelling work.
ALL CHILDREN SHOULD BE ABLE TO:
COMPUTING POS REFERENCE
explore existing Kodu worlds
Be discerning in evaluating digital content
access the programming mode of Kodu
Design programs that accomplish specific
goals
change the appearance of objects within their
game.
Work with various forms of input and output
MOST CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
create a landscape
Design and write programs that accomplish
specific goals
adjust simple code for a specific purpose
Design and write programs that accomplish
specific goals
refine their game based on their own
evaluation.
Debug programs that accomplish specific
goals
SOME CHILDREN WILL BE ABLE TO:
46
use paths to program their character’s
movements
Use sequence in programs
use a variety of setting tools to create a
landscape of a particular mood and tone
Design and write programs that accomplish
specific goals
refine their game based on feedback from
others.
Debug programs that accomplish specific
goals
Unit 6: We are game designers
5 Classroom ideas
Practical suggestions to bring this unit alive!
DISPLAYS AND ACTIVITIES
Screenshots of all the landscapes created by the
children would make a striking display and show
the versatility of the software.
Invite children from other classes to come and
play the games your class have created.
Upload the games to the Kodu Game Lab
Community website so people from around the
world can play them.
WWW
WEBLINKS
Don’t buy it! Discover advertising tricks at http://
pbskids.org/dontbuyit/advertisingtricks/.
Try the interactive advertising game at www.
funenglishgames.com/writinggames/advertising.
html.
Watch a persuasive advert for Key Stage 2 at
www.youtube.com/watch?v=8H_ttecXHkQ.
VISITS
Arrange an interview via Skype with a journalist
who works for a gaming magazine. Ask him/her
about the elements of a successful computer
game.
An employee from a games retailer may be able to
come in to talk about popular games.
Speaking to a game designer about the process
they go through when creating games could be
invaluable.
BOOKS
Abbott, T. The Hidden Stairs And The Magic
Carpet (The Secrets of Droon). (Scholastic, 1999)
Carroll, L. Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland.
(Usborne Publishing Ltd, 2013)
Kelly, J. F. Kodu For Kids: The Official Guide To
Creating Your Own Video Games. (QUE, 2013)
Tolkien, J.R.R. The Fellowship Of The Ring: The
Lord Of The Rings, Part 1. (HarperCollins, 2012)
6 Taking it further
When you’ve finished, you might want to extend the project in the following ways.
Explore other types of games that can be made
using Kodu.
The children could refine their games and begin
to explore more advanced ideas such as clones,
power up, health, and timers.
The children could write instructions for how to
play their games.
Design, write and produce TV commercials to
advertise the games.
Design poster advertisements for the games.
Write scripts for radio adverts and record them.
47
48
SWITCHEDON
Computing
TAKE YOUR FIRST EASY STEPS WITH
MICROSOFT
Switched on Computing: Take Your First Easy Steps with Microsoft has
been written to help schools to get started with computing at Key Stages
1 and 2. Each unit has clear guidance for teachers and plenty of creative
ideas for bringing each project alive in the classroom.
This free taster pack is part of the full Switched on Computing range
which gives schools all they need to deliver the national curriculum
from year 1 to year 6. For more information please visit
www.risingstars-uk.com/computing.
ALSO AVAILABLE:
www.risingstars-uk.com/computing
I S B N 978-1-78339-144-8
For more information, please call 0800 091 1602
www.risingstars-uk.com
9
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