DOEPFER REGELWERK User manual

DOEPFER REGELWERK User manual
1 Foreword
• You will have received your REGELWERK
with software version 1.xx (where xx is the
current revision number of the version 1
software). This software has been checked
by Doepfer and by our beta-testers, and is
believed to be practically bug-free.
• All rights reserved. No part of this manual
can be reproduced, duplicated or modified in
any form, including electronic means, without
the express written permission of DOEPFER
Musikelektronik GmbH.
• But in any new software of such complexity,
we know that it‘s possible that hidden bugs
may still exist. If you find one, we would be
grateful if you could let us know the exact
details. We will try to remove the bug as
quickly as possible.
DOEPFER Musikelektronik GmbH
Geigerstr.13
D-82166 Gräfelfing
GERMANY
Tel.: 089/89809510
Fax.:089/89809511
Internet: http://www.doepfer.de
• To update your device at the current state
you then had to contact your local dealer.
• This offer only applies to software faults. It
doesn‘t apply to updates which improve upon
the facilities in your current software, as
detailed in this manual.
Preliminary English language edition, May
1998
1) first edition 13.10.00
• Actual upgrades of the software will regularly
be available to buy.
During 1998, we will be expanding our internet
software information and update service on the
web
site
we
started
in
1997:
http://www.doepfer.de
• To update the software, it‘s necessary to
open up the REGELWERK to change the
EPROM. Users carry this out at their own
risk: problems caused by incorrect insertion
of an EPROM are not covered under
guarantee. Please read the instructions in
chapter 3 carefully.
• Since May 1998 we provide a software
update information and downloading service
on
our
web
sites:
• Throughout this manual, reference is made to
various products which have registered
trademarks, without necessarily indicating
they are registered. The absence of the â
mark shouldn‘t be taken to imply that the
product name can be freely used by anyone.
Nor should it imply any right to use material
that is legally protected by a registered trade
name or mark, or protected by patent.
http://www.doepfer.de
on
www.doepfer.de/pub/download.htm
you will be able to inform and download the
latest version, and re-program your EPROM.
• But for this, the customer must be able to
burn an EPROM.
• Please also take note that DOEPFER
Musikelektronik GmbH offers no warranty
and accepts no legal responsibility for
damage caused by or consequential on the
use of this equipment, its hardware or its
software, or this manual. We categorically
deny responsibility.
We also reserve the
right to alter software and/or the contents of
this manual without notice.
 Copyright 1998/2000
DOEPFER Musikelektronik GmbH
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
• Further for the actual english manual you can
look on
www.doepfer.de/seq/rwme_0_3.htm
• The main site for REGELWERK is
www.doepfer.de/rw_e.htm
Here you can find all important links to other
sites belonging to REGELWERK.
• If you have questions or you found bugs or
you have suggestions please contact
[email protected]
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
2 Registration form
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH Geigerstr. 13 D-82166 Gräfelfing
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
Registration Regelwerk
Geigerstr.13
82166 Gräfelfing
Germany
Belongs: Registration of REGELWERK
Date:
Name
First name, Name
Company
If you use the device in
studio/comany
Steet, Postcode, City
Adress
Please, if possible, this is
1
very important
Only, if you own the device
direct from our company.
Otherwise the name of the
distributor
Email-Adress:
Number of customer
Number of the bill
Version:
Version:
Which expander or midi
devices do you use or do you
want to control with
REGELWERK ?
Look on the versionnumber
in the display if you start the
device.
Also, this information we
badly need so that we could
made in future the right
preset for REGELWERK. If
the space is to little, please
use the back.
- a new software version ? a new manual ? new preset ?
We want to inform you current:
Please fill this form and send it to us.
1
Now we have a mailinglist for REGELWERK. If you're interested to get the hottest and brand new
infos, then please send us this form with your email adress and we put you on the list.
You will only get REGELWERK infos, no other publicity, and you could delete your name from the list
every time you want.
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
Which expander or midi devices do you use or do you want to control with REGELWERK ?
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
3 How do I use this manual ?
• You are omniscient and so you dont’t have to read this manual.
Congratulations! But then please apply for our next translation job!
Otherwise:
• You have unpack your device and you want to know, if it works in your bath and what happens, if you
do this:
Please look to ‘General and safety notes’ page 10
• Now you want to begin at last, but then you remark all the jacks on the rear of the unit.
Chapter ‘Making connections’ page 12
• You know something about midi and you want to brush up your knowledge.
Chapter ‘MIDI 1.0 Specification:’ page 42 and ‘Bibliography’ page 45
• You want to get info about the priciples of REGELWERK
Chapter ‘What is
REGELWERK ?’ page 15
• After understanding the principles you’re now asking, how can I do all these thinks? Which menus
should I use therefore?
Chapter ‘
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
Short Operating instructions’ page 21
• Although your’re now a real ‘REGELWERK-Freak’ you have many questions and problems...
Chapter ‘Troubleshooting’ page 37 and ‘Appendices’ page 36
• No one will inform you about updates, new versions of the manual and new presets ?
You forget the ‘Registration form’ page 3
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
4 Contents
1 FOREWORD
1
2 REGISTRATION FORM
3
3 HOW DO I USE THIS MANUAL ?
5
4 CONTENTS
7
5 GENERAL AND SAFETY NOTES
10
5.1 PRODUCT LIABILITY AND GUARANTEE
5.2 INTENDED USE
5.3 CORRECT VOLTAGE
5.4 OPENING THE CASE
5.5 VOIDING THE WARRANTY
5.6 OPERATING ENVIRONMENT
5.7 CARE IN OPERATION
5.8 MOVING THE REGELWERK
5.9 INSTALLATION AND REMOVAL OF PARTS
5.10 SHIPPING
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
6 MAKING CONNECTIONS
12
6.1 POWER SUPPLY
6.1.1 VERSION WITH EXTERNAL TRANSFORMER
6.1.2 VERSION WITH INTERNAL 230V MAINS SUPPLY
6.2 MIDI CONNECTIONS
6.2.1 MIDI IN CONNECTION
6.2.2 MIDI OUT CONNECTION
6.3 SYNC INPUT / OUTPUT
6.4 CV/GATE CONNECTION
(NOT AVAILABLE)
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
7 FRONT PANEL CONTROLS
14
8 WHAT IS REGELWERK ?
15
8.1 FADER/ SEQUENCER MODE
8.2 MIDI FADER MODE
8.2.1 FADER EVENTS
15
15
15
!
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
8.2.1.1 Fader position and actual value
8.2.1.2 Selecting a fader
8.2.1.3 Entering a Fader event
8.2.1.3.1 Fader events
8.2.1.3.2 Fader parameters
8.2.2 KEY / SWITCH EVENTS
8.2.2.1 Key status
8.2.2.1.1 Demute function
8.2.2.1.2 Mute function
8.2.2.2 Key event input
8.2.2.2.1 Key ON Event
8.2.2.2.2 Key OFF event
8.2.2.2.3 Key ON / OFF parameters
8.2.3 MIDI MODES
8.2.3.1 Normal
8.2.3.2 Velocity Overdub One/All
8.2.3.3 Velocity Multiplication One / All
8.2.3.4 Update
8.2.3.5 Hook On
8.2.3.6 Overdub
8.2.4 PRESET
8.2.4.1 Presets / memories
8.3 SEQUENCER
8.3.1 STEP
8.3.2 STEP EVENT
8.3.2.1 Step duration
8.3.2.2 Step status
8.3.3 TRACK
8.3.3.1 Global track parameters
8.3.3.2 Track select buttons
8.3.4 PATTERN
8.3.4.1 Pattern locations / memories
16
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
18
18
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
20
20
9 SHORT OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
21
9.1 SWITCHING ON
9.2 MENU STRUCTURE
9.3 MENU OVERVIEW
9.4 MENUS IN DETAIL
9.4.1 STEP LEFT / DECREMENT
9.4.2 STEP RIGHT / INCREMENT
9.4.3 FADER EDIT
9.4.4 FADER PARAMETERS
9.4.5 KEY ON EDIT
9.4.6 KEY OFF EDIT
9.4.7 KEY PARAM.
9.4.8 FADER MODE
9.4.9 SPECIAL FUNCTIONS
9.4.10 STRING EDIT
9.4.11 EDIT TOOLS
9.4.12 SNAPTOOLS
9.4.13 PRESET / PATTERN TOOLS
9.4.14 SYNC MENU
9.4.15 SEQUENCER PARAMETERS
9.4.16 SEQUENCER MODE
#
21
21
21
25
25
25
25
27
29
29
30
30
30
31
32
32
32
33
34
35
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
"
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
10 APPENDICES
36
10.1 LCD READOUTS DURING THE RECEPTION OF MIDI SYSEX DATA:
10.2 COMPLETE INITIALISATION
11 TROUBLESHOOTING
36
36
37
11.1 CONNECTION PROBLEMS
11.2 RECEPTION PROBLEMS
11.3 THE START / STOP / CONTINUE BUTTONS ‘DON'T WORK'.
11.4 CHANGES MADE TO A PATTERN ARE NOT STORED IN MEMORY
11.5 PROBLEMS EDITING PARAMETERS WITHIN MENUS
11.6 INDIVIDUAL BUTTONS HAVE SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT RESPONSES
12 APPENDICES
37
37
37
38
38
38
39
12.1 APPENDIX A - PRESET TRACK PATTERNS
12.2 APPENDIX B – USER SETTINGS AND CONFIGURATION EXAMPLES
13 MIDI 1.0 SPECIFICATION:
39
41
42
13.1 CHANNEL VOICE MESSAGES
13.2 CHANNEL MODE MESSAGES (SEE ALSO CONTROL CHANGE, ABOVE)
13.3 SYSTEM COMMON MESSAGES
13.4 SYSTEM REAL-TIME MESSAGES
42
42
43
43
14 BIBLIOGRAPHY
45
15 FAULT REPORT AND SUGGESTION FORM
47
%
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
$
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
5 General and safety
notes
5.6
• This equipment must only be used indoors, in
a dry environment.
• Never use this equipment in damp conditions,
or where there is easily inflammable material.
• Don‘t position this equipment in close
proximity to radiation sources (e.g. monitors,
power supplies, computers), as they can
cause data corruption.
• Don‘t store this equipment at temperatures
above +50 or below -10 degrees Celsius. In
use, a minimum temperature of 10 degrees
Celsius is recommended.
• Don‘t position this equipment in direct
sunlight, or close to a heat source.
Product liability and
guarantee
5.1
• Please follow the following advice exactly, to
ensure that the REGELWERK gives you many
years of trouble-free use.
• Since these notes also give details of the
product liability and guarantee, it‘s essential
to read them thoroughly and follow any
instructions.
• Any claim for repair or replacement will be
void if any one of the following points is not
adhered to.
• Failure to comply with all the advice will void
the normal guarantee.
5.7
This equipment is designed to be used only for
the purpose and in the way described in this
instruction manual. For safety reasons, this
product must not be used for any other purpose
or in any other way. If you‘re not sure exactly
what the intended use is, please consult an
expert before using it.
5.8
Correct voltage
Opening the case
5.9 Installation and removal of
parts
Before opening the case it is essential to
disconnect the equipment from the mains
voltage supply. Remove the mains plug from the
wall socket.
5.5
• To install or remove a part, (e.g. EPROMs
after a software update) or optional extra (e.g.
disconnect
the
CV/Gate
options)
equipment from the mains supply.
• Individual parts, sections, or whole circuit
boards must only be connected and powered
up inside the REGELWERK‘s case.
• It‘s particularly dangerous to use tools in or
near a piece of equipment which has its case
open and/or mains supply wiring exposed.
Even after disconnecting the mains, you
should allow some time for the power supply
capacitors to discharge, as otherwise they
can still give a serious electric shock.
Voiding the warranty
• Any modification not approved by the
manufacturer will automatically void the
warranty.
• Any work undertaken on the equipment by a
third party will also void the warranty. Even
outside the guarantee period, work must only
be carried out by a qualified technician, to
relevant safety standards.
• Any modification or work must only be carried
out by the manufacturer, or a manufacturerapproved company, if the guarantee and
Doepfer‘s liability are to remain in force.
'
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
Moving the REGELWERK
In moving this equipment, don‘t turn it upside
down, and take care not to drop it. Make sure
that it is put down in a safe place, where it can‘t
slide, fall, or be knocked onto the floor. If these
precautions aren‘t taken, the equipment could be
damaged, and someone could even be injured.
This equipment must only be run using the
voltage specified on the rear panel. It needs a
specialised low voltage transformer, as
explained elsewhere in this manual.
5.4
Care in operation
• Make sure that liquid or foreign objects don‘t
get into the equipment. If this does happen,
then immediately disconnect the mains
supply, and take the equipment to a
technician to be checked, cleaned, and if
necessary repaired.
• Don‘t put anything heavy on this equipment.
• All cables should be regularly checked for
faults, and replaced if faulty. If in doubt,
consult a technician.
5.2 Intended use
5.3
Operating environment
&
)
(
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
• For software updates which you carry out
yourself, you need to find the relevant
EPROM on the main circuit-board (the one
with the MIDI / SYNC connections) and
exchange it with the new software EPROM.
5.10
Shipping
If you need to send your REGELWERK
anywhere, you must use the original packing. To
return it for exchange, repair (whether under
warranty or not), update or checking, it must be
sent in its original packing, or Doepfer will not
accept the delivery. Make sure that you keep
the
original
packing
materials
and
documentation in a safe place, in case they‘re
ever needed.
• Before removing the old EPROM make sure
to take a note of which end has a notch in it.
The new EPROM must be inserted the same
way round. Usually, the notch is also marked
on the socket – but make sure anyway.
Sticker with
version number
Notch
• To remove an EPROM to make the
exchange, we recommend ideally using a
specialised IC tool, or if that isn‘t available,
levering gently with two small screwdrivers,
one at each end of the EPROM. Of course, if
you can only find one screwdriver, lever each
end in turn very gradually. Too much force,
or too much haste, and you could either
damage the casing on the IC, or bend one or
more of the pins.
• On the new EPROM, check that the legs are
all at the correct angle in relation to each
other and the IC casing. As long as they are,
the EPROM will be easy to insert into its
socket without any undue effort, and you‘ll
avoid the possibility of bending or snapping
one of the legs, or even, at worst, damaging
the IC socket.
• Before re-assembling the case, check again
very carefully that
− the EPROM is inserted the right way round (if
not, it‘ll certainly be destroyed as soon you
switch the REGELWERK back on)
− no plug or connector has been loosened or
totally disconnected.
• Now you are going to be able to use the
REGELWERK again
⇒ but only after re-assembling and re-fixing the
case.
+
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
*
+
*
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
rear.
6.2 MIDI connections
6 Making connections
6.2.1 MIDI IN connection
All the connectors described in this section are
to be found at the rear of the REGELWERK.
• MIDI inputs MIDI IN1 and MIDI IN2 are used
for
controlling
and
synchronising
REGELWERK from a source of external realtime MIDI messages, for remote control of
various functions and effects over MIDI (fader
parameters / special menus etc.), and for the
reception of MIDI SysEx dumps.
6.1 Power supply
6.1.1 Version with external
transformer
• The MIDI inputs have a very limited MIDI
merge capability, in that MIDI data present at
the IN can be relayed to the OUT socket.
• This version of REGELWERK doesn‘t have an
internal power supply, but is provided with an
external power transformer.
The power
supply input socket is labelled '9V DC‘ and is
positioned to the right of the four MIDI
sockets and SYNC socket.
• This limited merge function is only really
useful for internal processing purposes in the
REGELWERK, because the presence of large
amounts of MIDI data can otherwise badly
affect timing.
• REGELWERK is switched on by inserting the
9V plug in this socket, and connecting the
mains transformer's plug to the mains supply.
There is no on/off switch.
• If the data which is being sent to
REGELWERK to control it via the MIDI IN
also needs to be sent completely unchanged
to another piece of equipment, it's advisable
to use a MIDI THRU box with the necessary
number of outputs.
• Included in the REGELWERK package for
European buyers is a 230V approved
transformer for connecting to the mains.
• If the data also needs to be merged with
other data before being sent to another piece
of MIDI equipment, then an external merge
box needs to be used, such as the
• For other countries' voltages or mains
sockets, you'll need to buy the appropriate
mains transformer and plug for your country.
• For safety reasons, only use a transformer
and/or plug which has an accredited safety
mark in your country. The transformer output
voltage needs to be about 9V (acceptable
tolerance from 7 to 12V) and capable of
delivering at least 500 mA. Polarity needs to
be as follows:- the outer ring is earth /
ground, the inner +7...12V. If the polarity is
reversed, the REGELWERK won't work, but a
protection diode should prevent it from being
damaged.
⇒
6.2.2 MIDI OUT connection
MIDI outputs MIDI OUT1 & OUT2 send MIDI
data and realtime messages from the
REGELWERK to the rest of your MIDI set-up.
6.3 SYNC Input / Output
Version with internal 230V
mains supply
6.1.2
• For control and synchronisation with a typical
'SYNC' square wave signal.
(not available)
• In the EU, REGELWERK can't be supplied in
the 230V internal power supply version.
Export orders for countries with a different
mains supply from 230V will only be supplied
in the external power supply version.
• Depending on the mode chosen, it can be
either an output or an input.
• In normal use, the REGELWERK SYNC
socket is configured as an output,
transmitting a square wave sync signal. The
other equipment connected by the SYNC lead
will need to be configured to receive sync –
• For anyone else…. REGELWERK (without the
external power supply) is simply connected to
a 230V mains supply, and switched on at the
.
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
DOEPFER MMR4/4
,
/
-
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
so the REGELWERK will be the master.
− The relationship between note numbers and
voltage output is:- note number 36 = 0 Volts;
note number 100 = 5 Volts.
The REGELWERK can also be set to receive
• a SYNC signal at this socket (which is now
functioning as an input). In this case, the
other equipment has to be set to send SYNC
pulses.
− Notes outside of this range – either below
(note numbers 0-35) or above (note numbers
101 - 127) are folded back to the bottom and
top octaves respectively., and so overlap the
response to note numbers 36-100.
• The SYNC signal is simply a bog-standard
square wave, with a range from 0 to 5V.
Pin 3:
Clock signal
0-5 Volts
• The eight GATE outputs put out their
respective gate signals whenever there is an
event programmed at the particular step
position on their track.
Pin 1
Start (+5 Volts)
Stop (0Volts)
− For Gate Off, the level drops to 0 Volts, and
for Gate On rises to 5 Volts.
That means that a normal LFO from an
analogue synth module can be used as a clock
source. That way, it's possible to relax the tight
tempo of the REGELWERK SYNC signal and
produce a syncopated groove.
− Note that in connecting the SYNC socket on
the REGELWERK with another piece of
equipment, nothing will happen if both units
are set to input or both to output.
6.4 CV/Gate connection
• In the current software version, the 16 minijack sockets on the rear of the REGELWERK
are designed purely for sequencer work
− 8 x CV for pitch control
− 8 x Gate
⇒ The CV/Gate option runs simultaneously and
parallel to the MIDI output. Both can function
at the same time. In effect it is doubling the
number of voices that the REGELWERK can
control, with the proviso that the CVs put out
convey exactly the same information as the
MIDI pitch and note-on/off data.
• The eight CV outputs are dedicated to
sequencer note information, with output 1
responding to track 1, output 2 to track 2, and
so on up to output 8 responding to track 8.
The respective CVs cover a range from 0 to
approximately 5V.
− The response of the CVs is designed to be
exactly one volt to the octave, so that they're
ideal for pitch control.
2
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
0
3
1
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
7 Front panel controls
24 Fader Select
buttons with LEDs
for the Faders and
Edit Mode.
16 numbe
LEDs, for
/ Pattern s
Tools Men
4 Bank buttons with
LEDs for Presets /
Snapshots in the
Preset and Snap.
Tools menus
In the Tools and
Sequencer menus
the buttons have
different functions.
Or 16
buttons fo
Gate On/
also as i
Paramete
4 Bank buttons with
LEDs for Patterns in
the Pattern Tools
menu
LCD readout
(2x16)
24 buttons with
LEDs for Key On /
Off functions and /
or, in Sequencer
mode, two sets of
eight buttons (9-16,
17-24)
with a
special function in
Seq.- Menus
8
buttons
with
LEDs for global
Realtime Functions
and / or userdefined tasks.
Alpha Dial
8
buttons
with
LEDs for Track
Select function in
Sequencer menus
5
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
24 slider controls,
or faders
4
7
16 buttons
without LEDs
for menu
selection
8
buttons
with
LEDs for Track
On/Off function in
Sequencer menus
6
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
• REGELWERK's main roles are as a MIDI
fader box and a pattern sequencer:
8 What is REGELWERK ?
8.1 Fader/ sequencer mode
• REGELWERK is a complex piece of
equipment designed to produce MIDI events.
• REGELWERK provides an easy way of
generating almost any kind of MIDI event.
It can, for instance, alter or originate
− MIDI note events,
− controller events,
− polyphonic aftertouch,
− monophonic aftertouch,
− program changes, or
− pitch bend.
⇒ In principle, both modes are autonomous,
and work simultaneously.
• To access one or other of the modes, the
buttons at the extreme right of the 16 menu
access buttons (bottom right of the
REGELWERK) are used.
− In Fader Mode all 24 faders are configured to
control fader events.
− The lower 24 (Key On-Off) buttons control
Key On-Off events and/or the Mute function.
− The upper 24 buttons select one fader at a
time.
− In Sequencer Mode faders 9 - 24 control the
pitch or velocity of Steps 1-16 in a similar
fashion to an analogue sequencer.
− The lower buttons 9-24 control Track Select
and/or Track On functions. The upper
buttons 9 - 24 control Gate On / Off for Steps
1 - 16.
• Each MIDI event is defined by bytes showing
what type of event it is, what MIDI channel it
refers to, and one or two values which define
the amount of effect the event has.
− For instance with note events, one byte
defines the pitch (note number), and the
other defines the loudness (velocity).
− For controller messages, the controller
number and the amount will be specified.
− Polyphonic aftertouch is defined in the same
way as a note value, and is connected with a
particular note number.
− Monophonic aftertouch produces a value like
monophonic velocity.
− Program change simply produces a program
change number.
− Pitch bend messages are theoretically
composed of two numbers, but in practice
one of them is always 0.
8.2 MIDI Fader Mode
• Press the Fader Mode button.
• In Fader Mode the display works like a little
MIDI monitor, showing (in words or
abbreviations) which MIDI events the current
fader is controlling and/or transmitting.
• Pressing any of the Fader Select buttons
selects the chosen fader, displays its current
value / setting, and enables it to send MIDI
data.
• You can also select a fader by using the
alpha dial.
• REGELWERK produces no sounds of its own,
but serves solely as a complex controller for
any MIDI event processing equipment –
synths, samplers, sequencers, etc. - or as a
master clock for any equipment with a SYNC
input.
• REGELWERK's guts are its array of front
panel controls, such as the two rows of 24
buttons, the 24 faders, and so on, which,
within certain limits can control almost any
MIDI event you wish.
• REGELWERK additionally offers some of the
potential afforded by a software MIDI
sequencer. You can't compare it exactly,
because it has a much reduced and limited
range of functions, but REGELWERK gains
some of its special appeal exactly from this
slimming-down – by offering many dedicated
physical controls, and enabling immediate
real-time access to a wide range of MIDI
control.
• The closest parallel to the REGELWERK's
Sequencer mode is probably the drum edit
page in a software sequencer.
8.2.1 Fader events
9
• Each of the REGELWERK's 24 faders can
have a sentence of three values associated
with it – or in String Mode a sentence of up to
30 values (with even more in future software
updates).
• These packets of data are then sent out over
MIDI whenever the user performs the
associated action – like moving a relevant
fader. The values chosen to be affected by a
fader's position can be inserted practically
anywhere in the MIDI data string.
• The range of values for the fader position can
go from 0 (right at the bottom of the fader's
travel) to 127 (right at the top) with a normal
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
8
;
:
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
resolution of 1 per step.
• This depends on the resolution which has
been selected for the REGELWERK faders
and the various possible resolutions of the
individual elements within the data string.
• The actual value produced by the fader
position isn't strictly linked to the value in the
data string, and is affected and governed by a
wide variety of factors, so what at first might
seem a rigid assignment system can actually
be altered in any number of ways.
messages are taking place can cause
problems, with events missed, hanging notes,
and other malfunctions. Be on the look-out
for this, and if it's a problem, take steps to
avoid editing when a specific message is
being transmitted.
8.2.1.3 Entering a Fader event
• This principally takes place in the Fader Edit
menu.
− When the Fader Edit button is pressed, all
the 24 LEDs in the upper row go out except
for one - the fader which is currently in edit
mode.
• Selecting another fader to edit is simple: just
press another of the fader select buttons in
the upper row.
• Repeated presses of the Fader Edit button
take you through all of the various pages
within the Fader Edit menu. The process is
circular: keep pressing and you will cycle
through the pages.
8.2.1.1 Fader position and actual value
• In addition, the value shown by the position of
the fader and the stored value of the variable
in a data string don't have to be identical at
all.
• So it's quite possible that the fader position
and the actual value can be different, if a
stored value has been accessed from a
preset or downloaded using the MIDI Update
function.
• In this case, the individual faders' LEDs have
a special function in Fader Mode: they blink
whenever the two values (stored value and
fader position value) are not identical.
− To make life easier, the LED which is blinking
shows you whether the stored value is higher
or lower than the fader position value. The
speed of blinking also tells you the relative
proximity of the two values:
− slow blink = far apart,
− fast blink = closer.
− When both values are identical, the LEDs
blink so fast they're permanently on!
− The other LEDs which don't blink show Mute
Status – which is explained later.
8.2.1.3.1 Fader events
• A fader event consists of four data bytes,
which are programmed in this menu by
entering four values.
These are
− MIDI channel
− MIDI event
− the first data byte is the MIDI event, which
according to the type of event is followed by a
description.
− the second data byte is as a rule the value
associated with the event, and is thus related
to the fader position (real or stored).
• As well as the standard MIDI events, which
follow normal MIDI rules,
REGELWERK
gives you the possibility of defining any type
of data string as a Fader event, and
transmitting it.
− The maximum length of this data string is, in
the current software version, 30 bytes, but is
likely to be longer in future software updates.
− The response of these LEDs is a useful
general indicator, but shouldn't be relied on
as 100% accurate!
8.2.1.2 Selecting a fader
• In Fader Mode, moving a particular fader or
pressing its dedicated button brings up the
data onto the LCD, and enables the user to
look at the values, and monitor the
transmission of the current event.
• The same applies in principle to the individual
Edit / Parameter Menus, except that the LCD
readout is here designed to assist editing the
selected data or parameter.
− This is also shown by one of the fader select
LEDs lighting up (with all the others off).
• The function of all the faders and buttons is
similar in both Fader Mode and Edit /
Parameter menu modes.
− Editing data while the relevant MIDI
8.2.1.3.2 Fader parameters
• Besides the definition of the fader events
themselves, further parameters are needed
to control the interaction between the
programmed events and the faders
themselves, and any messages entering at
the MIDI IN socket, and finally the messages
being output from the MIDI OUT socket.
>
• By default, the range of values is such that
the response of the fader goes from value 0
(fader right down at the bottom) up to value
127 (fader right at the top). These minimum
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
<
?
=
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
and maximum values can be changed to
whatever you want within this scale, so that
the response of the fader will also be
changed to any range within the maximum 0127 scale.
whose status is shown simply by the LED
above each of the buttons:
− LED on = Demute: the fader is activated, and
can produce MIDI events,
− LED off = Mute: the fader is muted, and
moving it doesn't transmit any MIDI events.
• A system also has to be evolved to decide
between the real and virtual position of the
fader, and determine which of them is sent
out with the MIDI event.
This problem
obviously becomes crucial whenever the
actual position of the fader diverges from the
virtual position at all.
− The ideal solution for this is to have
motorised faders, which automatically adjust
to the programmed value and so avoid the
problem, but for obvious cost reasons that's
out of the question for REGELWERK.
− Instead, the user him/herself needs to act as
the motor for any fader whose actual position
differs from its virtual position, and move it till
it's in the right place!
− Naturally, it's nearly always best for the
events generated during this adjustment
process not to be sent out via MIDI.
8.2.2.1.1 Demute function
• When the switch is changed from Mute to
Demute status (LED lights up) it will depend
on its position whether a Demute value and
previously defined Key Off event / string is
sent with the Demute value and/or Key Off
event.
• In muted mode (LED off) the relevant
fader's MIDI events are muted, and not
output via MIDI.
− Internally, though, the fader movements are
still recognised and dealt with.
These
messages aren't internally muted – they are
simply prevented from being transmitted via
MIDI OUT.
• Various strategies exist to deal with this, each
of which has its advantages and
disadvantages, but there should be one
effective way of achieving it for practically
every eventuality.
8.2.2.1.2 Mute function
• When the switch is changed from Demute to
Mute status (LED first on, then off) it will
depend on its position whether a Mute value
and previously defined Key On event / string
is sent with the Mute value and/or Key On
event.
• In Mute Mode (LED off) output of Fader
events from the relevant fader is enabled.
• In addition each fader has the option of
processing any MIDI events which are sent to
the chosen MIDI IN socket, and which fit the
criteria in the relevant MIDI data sentence
(not string), and either re-transmit them, or
use them to control or transform fader
events.
-> see MIDI modes
8.2.2.2 Key event input
• In principle, the menus and functions are
similar to those for Fader events.
8.2.2 Key / switch events
8.2.2.2.1 Key ON Event
• Each of the REGELWERK's
24 buttons
underneath the faders can have a sentence
of 2 x 3 values associated with it – or in String
Mode a sentence of up to 2 x 30 values (with
even more in future software updates).
• These packets of data are then sent out over
MIDI whenever the user performs the
associated action – like pressing the relevant
button. The values chosen to be affected by
a button-push can be inserted practically
anywhere in the MIDI data string, and will
produce an ON/OFF message.
• This event refers to the process of switching
from Mute to Demute status (and the LED
thus coming on) -> ON event.
8.2.2.2.2 Key OFF event
• This event refers to the process of switching
from Demute to Mute status (and the LED
thus turning off) -> OFF event.
8.2.2.2.3 Key ON / OFF parameters
• These events have certain parameters
common to both, which determine their
behaviour and that of the relevant button.
8.2.2.1 Key status
• The default function of these buttons is as
REGELWERK's Mute / Demute function,
A
• So for instance with the button in Demute
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
@
C
B
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
status, a Fader event for a particular fader
can be sent with your choice of any number
from 0 to 127 as the Demute value.?? With
the Demute value set to 'NO', on the other
hand, no Fader event is transmitted.
8.2.3.2 Velocity Overdub One/All
• The incoming MIDI event received at the
chosen MIDI input has a new velocity (MIDI
data byte 2) imposed ('overdubbed') on it.
• The new event that is created is then output
on the chosen MIDI output/s.
• In All mode, the event's MIDI data byte 1 is
ignored, and the overdubbed value is
imposed on all 128 events of this data type
on this MIDI channel.
− In One mode, one chosen MIDI event has, for
instance, a new velocity imposed on it. This is
mainly for the first group of controllers, sent
from an external sequencer or master
keyboard, etc..
− All mode is more suited to the second group,
Note Events, so that, for instance, velocity
can be imparted to all the notes on a certain
channel - if, e.g., the originating keyboard
doesn't transmit velocity messages.
• Thre are two clearly-defined ways in which
the REGELWERK responds to a buttonpress:
− With Momentary Switch mode selected, a
button-press changes from Demute to Mute,
and releasing it again changes back from
Mute to Demute.
− With Toggle Switch mode selected, the fader
switches ('toggles') between Mute and
Demute status and remains the same until
another button-press.
8.2.3 MIDI modes
• Each fader is fundamentally a MIDI data
source.
− First of all, it's important to specify which MIDI
OUT socket it will transmit MIDI events to.
• A fader can also receive MIDI data, though.
− i.e., incoming MIDI data can interact with the
fader and change or modify the fader's
properties (by changing the programmed
values, switching off an element of fader
control, etc.)
• For this function to work, the respective
incoming MIDI event must match the settings
of the particular fader event, and /or must be
input via the correct MIDI IN socket. ??
− For any chosen incoming MIDI event, first of
all a check is made to see if any fader is set
to receive its MIDI mode.
− For each input message, all 24 faders have
to be systematically checked for MIDI events.
− In Momentary mode, only Note On / Off, and
Controller Events are taken note of.
− The search starts at fader 1 and goes
through to fader 24. As soon as a match is
found, the search is called off, and the
programmed function adjusted accordingly.
Events which match in all respects except
MIDI mode aren't recognised (v1.0).
− Thus the intended events should be
positioned as early as possible in the fader
sequence, for quicker search results, and
other events kept as far away as possible (to
avoid the worst case scenario of 24 faders
having to be searched before the correct one
is found).
8.2.3.3 Velocity Multiplication One / All
• This is like velocity overdub, except that
instead of replacing the old velocity value, it
multiplies it by the fader velocity value.
− This comes into its own when the velocity of
the incoming MIDI data is generally
satisfactory, but just too loud.
-> Useful when layering sounds.
− In software version 1.xx this only works to
decrease velocity (a fader set at half-way
halves it).
8.2.3.4 Update
• The actual fader values can be changed from
an external MIDI source.
− For total recall, or for simultaneous control
over another computer / controller or
REGELWERK with a fader page or the like,
so that the data changed in the external
controller is also changed in the receiving
REGELWERK.
-> Update
8.2.3.5 Hook On
• Faders set to 'hook on' in the Special
Functions menu send no data at all until they
are told to.
• They remain in this state until a MIDI IN
message with right MIDI event is sensed and
'caught'. See Catch mode.
− The threshold for this is adjustable in the
Special Function menu.
• As soon as the relevant criteria are met, the
particular fader is released, and can send
events again. This is indicated by a rapid
flashing of the relevant LED.
8.2.3.1 Normal
• Normal fader mode, with the data ouput on
the chosen MIDI OUT/s.
F
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
D
G
E
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− The fader is effectively muted until an
incoming MIDI message is received which
matches the current position or the value
programmed (as part of the Threshold).
8.3.2.1 Step duration
• As well as defining the order of the note
events, Steps are responsible for setting the
exact duration of a note. (N.B.: Note events
have two events within them – Note On, at
the start of the step, and Note Off, at the
end.)
8.2.3.6 Overdub
• This mode also has to be expressly enabled
in the Special Function mode.
8.3.2.2 Step status
• Besides this, each MIDI note event has
another important criterion – maybe the most
important part of
the REGELWERK
sequencer's appeal – namely whether a
programmed MIDI event is actually
transmitted or not.
− For each step there's a dedicated LED
(labelled Sequencer Step), which indicates
whether the programmed event will be sent
(LED on) or not (LED off) when the sequence
reaches that step.
− To enable instant muting and un-muting of
each step, there are dedicated buttons for
switching on and off the programmed event
for each of the 16 steps. These buttons
'toggle' between the two states, so that, for
instance, an enabled step (LED on) is
switched off by a button-push, and vice versa.
• When it has been enabled, all relevant
messages received at MIDI IN are merged
(wherever possible) and transmitted at the
selected MIDI OUT.
• This applies as soon as the specified fader
generates the specified event. Before then,
MIDI IN messages aren't forwarded to the
MIDI OUT: only the messages generated by
the fader are transmitted.
8.2.4 Preset
• A Preset consists of the positions for all 24
faders, button values & parameters, and all
relevant text and MIDI strings.
− The Step LEDs have some other special
functions as well – principally showing which
step in turn in a sequence has been reached.
8.2.4.1 Presets / memories
− REGELWERK has 64 non-volatile preset
memories.
8.3.3 TRACK
8.3 Sequencer
• In the next organisation level up, 16 Steps
together form a Track.
⇒ The sequencer page is accessed by pressing
the Sequ. Mode / Sequ. Param. buttons.
8.3.3.1 Global track parameters
− A Track has a set of global parameters which
apply to all the steps within it. They are:− MIDI channel,
− base note number / velocity
− Step Time / Gate Time
− End Step.
All 16 steps in a track share the same common
parameters.
It's not possible to change a
parameter for any individual step. On the other
hand, each track can have different global
parameters from any of the other tracks.
The sequencer function is always available in
parallel to the fader page.
8.3.1 STEP
• The smallest organisational unit in the
REGELWERK sequencer is called a step, and
defines a MIDI event.
8.3.2 Step event
− In REGELWERK's case this is always a Note
Event.
− A MIDI note event includes information about
pitch (note number) and loudness (velocity).
8.3.3.2 Track select buttons
J
• Each track has its own Track Select button,
and associated LED.
Pushing a button
instantly selects the chosen track, indicated
by the Select LED lighting up. All track
editing operations apply to the track whose
LED is on.
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
H
K
I
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
8.3.4 PATTERN
• A complete set-up for all eight tracks (that is,
8 x 16 step sequences and their associated
parameters) constitutes a Pattern.
8.3.4.1 Pattern locations / memories
− REGELWERK provides
pattern locations.
64
non-volatile
M
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
L
O
N
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
of buttons near the alpha-dial are numbered
from 1-8 (upper left to right) and 9-16 (lower
left to right).
9 Short Operating
instructions
The various parameter groups' menu headings
are as follows:• See chapter 5, Front Panel Controls, to the
lower right corner, to the right of the alphadial.
− ‘16 buttons dedicated to menu selection'.
9.1 Switching on
• Once power is applied to the REGELWERK,
the display will show the following message:-
• The top row of buttons (1-8) except for 1 & 2,
(Dec. / Inc.), all relate to the specific track
selected.
REGELWERK V x.xx
DOEPFER (c) 210397
−
(1) Step Left / decrement Dec -1/<
To move one place to the left, or reduce a
value by 1, and also, in some menus, to
specify something within a menu.
V x.xx shows the current version's software
release number, where x.xx stands for whatever
version / release number has been reached.
The actual date of the release will also be shown
in the day / month / year format, so that, for
instance, 210397 is March 23, 1997.
−
(2) Step Right / increment Inc +1/>
As 1, except right instead of left, and
increase instead of reduce.
• at the same time, on power-up REGELWERK
automatically loads Preset 1 and Pattern 1.
− (3) Fader Edit
⇒ Preset and Pattern 1 are the default data.
MIDI channel:
− The MIDI channel of the particular event
9.2 Menu structure
MIDI event:
• The 16 buttons near the alpha-dial are the
main tools to access the REGELWERK menu
structure.
− The type of MIDI event
• These buttons don't have indicator LEDs, but
instead, generally, the relevant parameters
are displayed in the second line of the LCD
screen, in words.
First MIDI data byte in words:
• In most menus related parameters can be
found one after the other, in so-called
parameter groups. To access them, you
simply keep pressing the menu button again
until your chosen item is reached. Individual
parameters are accessed one after the other,
and keeping on pressing gets you back to the
beginning again.
Second MIDI data byte in words:
9.3
− The first MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever event
has been programmed - translated into words
− The second MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever
event has been programmed – translated into
words
String editor:|__,__,__,__>
Template / editor for data strings (max. around
30 bytes in the current software version)
Menu overview
• Here's an overview of the various menus /
parameter groups in the current version of
REGELWERK.
⇒ In later software versions the menus may be
enlarged by the addition of further related
parameters.
• For the purposes of this manual, the two rows
R
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
P
S
Q
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− (4) Fader Param.
First MIDI data byte in words:
LowerVal.:
− The first MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever event
has been programmed - translated into words
− The lower value programmed for the fader
Second MIDI data byte in words:
UpperValue:
− The second MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever
event has been programmed – translated into
words
− The higher value programmed for the fader
ActMode:
String editor:|__,__,__,__>
The response mode of the fader – Immediate,
Relative or 'Catch'.
Template / editor for data strings (max. around
30 bytes in the current software version)
− (6) Key Off Edit
Threshold:
The same menus and functions as in Fader Edit,
but now concerning the operation of the 24
on/off buttons, and their relation to Key Off
function.
The threshold specified for the 'Catch' response
mode if chosen in ActMode menu
MIDI Input Mode:
Configuring what is sent to MIDI outputs 1 and/or
2, and how this is affected by what comes in at
MIDI inputs 1 and/or 2.
MidiChannel:
MasterSlave:
MidiEvent:
− The MIDI channel for these MIDI events
− The type of MIDI events programmed
Programming whether each fader acts as a
master or slave.
First MIDI data byte in words:
LearnMode:
− The first MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever event
has been programmed - translated into words
'Learning' from MIDI events at the MIDI Inputs,
without having to go into the individual edit
menu.
Second MIDI data byte in words:
− The second MIDI data byte – i.e. whatever
event or value has been programmed –
translated into words
− (5) Key On Edit
The same menus and functions as in Fader Edit,
but now concerning the operation of the 24
on/off buttons, and their relation to Key On
function.
String editor:|__,__,__,__>
Template / editor for data strings (max. around
30 bytes in the current software version)
MidiChannel:
− The MIDI channel for these MIDI events
MidiEvent:
− The type of MIDI events programmed
U
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
T
U
T
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− (7) Key Param.
− (10) String Edit
MuteValue:
faderXXX Edit Name
− The data value which enables Mute
NoName! Make? > OK
DemuteValue::
Editing page for giving faders names (eg VCF1
cutoff).
− The data value which enables Unmute
SwitchMode:
EditString: Pres
− Selecting which of the two modes
(momentary or toggling) the switches are set
for.
EditString: Start
EditString: Stop
− (8) Fader Mode
EditString: Cont
To switch from sequencer or edit mode into
fader mode, and switch the LCD readout to a
sort of MIDI event monitor
EditString: Rew.
EditString: Forw.
− (9) Special Function
Editing page for data strings for a given function
or button.
HookMode: Off / On
− (11) Edit Tools
Enable / disable 'hook mode'
COPY Event type / value between two locations
Threshold
Set the threshold for 'hook mode'.
Copying function, for duplicating the most
important data and pasting wherever required.
Overdup: Off / On
− (12) Snap Tools
Enable / disable 'overdub' mode
Get SnapShot
Store Snap:
MIDILock: Off / In1 / 2 / 1 and 2
Enable / disable either or both MIDI inputs
Delete Snap:
Snapshot function management page
Sample / Sek.:
Global 'refresh' rate for all faders (from 8 to 24
samples per second).
X
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
V
Y
W
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
• The eight buttons with LEDs, for
global real-time control (from left to
right):
(13)Preset / Pattern Tools
Get Preset / Pattern
See chapter 5, Front Panel Controls
diagram, page 14,
to the lower left,
underneath the REGELWERK name.
Store Preset / Pattern
SysEx Preset / Pattern
Init Preset <OK>
−
Init Pattern <OK>
Preset / pattern management page
(17) START button
(no LCD readout):
for starting REGELWERK from zero on the
chosen track, and simultaneously sending a
MIDI START realtime message – and, if
programmed, a START string (StringEdit:
Start).
− (18) STOP button (no LCD readout):
− For
stopping
REGELWERK,
and
simultaneously sending a MIDI STOP
realtime message – and, if programmed, a
STOP string (StringEdit Stop).
− (14) Sequencer Sync
SYNC – INTERN / EXT.
MIDI / Sync synchronisation
− On the first button-push, the STOP button
LED blinks. This shows a sort of 'pause'
mode, which can then be turned into STOP or
CONTINUE by pushing the relevant button.
− (15) Sequencer Parameters
− On the second push, the STOP button LED
stops flashing, and stays on. Simultaneously,
the REGELWERK's internal buffer is cleared,
and an All Notes Off message is sent on all
16 channels to MIDI OUT.
Midi Channel
Note Number
Step Time
Gate Time
−
(19)Cont. (continue) button
−
(20) Tempo button
−
(21) REWIND (no LCD readout):
End Step
Track parameters, global for each of the eight
tracks.
− (16) Sequencer Mode
(no LCD
readout): for starting REGELWERK from the
current
position
in
a
sequence,
simultaneously sending out a MIDI realtime
CONTINUE message, and, if programmed,
sending out a CONT string (StringEdit: Cont).
(with LCD readout):
for setting the internal tempo of the
REGELWERK in bpm (50 - 255 bpm). (The
tempo value is stored with the pattern).
NoteNr (StepNr)
for sending, if programmed, a REW string.
(StringEdit: Rew.)
Veloc. (StepNr)
Note number / velocity for each of the 16 steps
in a track, which can be programmed with the
alpha-dial (with selection via Gate On / Off
buttons) and / or directly via the sequence faders
9-24 (16 steps in total).
−
(22) FORWARD (no LCD readout):
for sending, if programmed, a Forw. string
(StringEdit: Forw.)
−
(23) Snapshot
function: for taking a
'snapshot' of current settings:
− Sending out a full MIDI dump with all current
settings. When the button is pressed, the
LED blinks, to indicate that the snapshot is
ready to be saved to your chosen location
(using StoreSnap from the Snap Tools
menu).
[
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
Z
]
\
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− A saved Snapshot can be re-loaded by going
to
‘GET SNAPSHOT: (in the Snap Tools
menu) and entering the correct location.
− n.b.: This is NOT the way to save a
Snapshot: if the LED isn't flashing, the
Snapshot won't be saved.
−
− Select the type of event:
MidiEvent: shown in abbreviations
Note off
NoteOf
Note event
NoteEv
Polyphonic aftertouch
PolAft
Controller
Contrl
Program change
PrgChn
Monophonic aftertouch
MonAft
Pitch bend
PitBen
String
String
(24) ENTER/OK
button: for functions
which require confirmation. To show that
confirmation is necessary, the OK button's
LED flashes.
⇒ Buttons (17)-(24) and their relative functions
can be enabled from anywhere in the
REGELWERK's editing pages.
Displaying
and editing Tempo simply overwrites the
current LCD message.
− (25) Alpha dial.
− To increase a value, turn clockwise.
decrease a value, turn anti-clockwise.
• String is a special case, in which a userprogrammed string instead of a simple fader
event is dealt with and output via MIDI.
• In the String menu, the editing values for
MIDI data bytes 1 and 2 have a special
function, for String control parameters.
To
• Besides this, there are also special ('meta')
events.
9.4
− These aren't necessarily related to the MIDI
function of the faders, but can be used, for
instance, to program the REGELWERK for
real-time control.
− For instance, various sequencer parameters
can be controlled directly without having to go
through a series of menus or use the alphadial.
Menus in detail
9.4.1 Step Left / decrement
Moves one place to the left; also used in some
menus; and/or decreases a value by one.
9.4.2 Step Right / increment
Moves one place to the right; also used in some
menus; and/or increases a value by one.
9.4.3 Fader Edit
MidiEvent: special (meta) events
Extensions
Extens
'Place holders' for expansions
• For editing the MIDI events associated with
each fader. The fader is selected by pressing
the relevant Fader Select button (above the
faders) .
Track patterns
TrkPat
Pattern selection for sequencer by using faders.
See appendix 10.1
Sub-menus:
(selected by
pressing the Fader Edit button)
repeatedly
Track end
TrkEnd
Selects the last ('reset') step of a sequence track
using the faders (in the range from 1-16)
MidiChannel:
− Select the MIDI channel for the fader event.
Track velocity
TrkVel
Selects the global Track Velocity for a sequence
by using the faders.
Track note
TrkNot
Selects the global base note for a sequence by
using the faders.
_
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
^
a
`
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
Step velocity
StpVel
Selects individual step velocity by using the
faders (changing the MIDI channel changes the
instrument playing this step).
First MIDI data byte in words, plus Note Off
note: , Note Number: , Pol Aft Number: ,
Contrl Number: , Prg Chn Number: , Mon Aft
Number: , Pitch Be Val.1: , String-Xpos: .
Range 0..127.
Step note
StpNot
Selects individual step note number by using the
faders (changing the MIDI channel changes the
instrument playing this step
..............:Sld
This is the location where the fader's actual
value is entered. 'Sld' is short for 'slider'.
No status
NoStat
Selects no event to be sent – if for instance the
fader is being used just as a master controller.
If the ‘String’ event type shows this display:
⇒ To some extent, the parameters which are
controllable by meta-events can also be
controlled by other means (in the sequencer
menus).
Using meta-events for control has the main
advantage that almost all fader control
features and functions can also be controlled
by meta-events.
The disadvantage is that if meta-events are
being used, the faders can only be used for
sequencer, not Fader events.
then the desired variable value for the fader
should be input. This can go from 0-127.
String-Xpos:
For
MidiEvent: Extens, TrkPat, TrkRun, TrkVel,
TrkNot, StpVel, StpNot
there's also a display
TrackNumber:
For
since for sequencer fader events it's necessary
to specify which track is being referred to.
MidiEvent: StpVel, StpNot
there's also a display for
StepNumber
Second MIDI data byte in words:
NoteOfVeloci: , NotenVelocit: ,
PolAftVeloci: , ContrlValue: , No sec. Byte:.
since it's essential, when dealing with a fader as
controller, to know which step number is being
programmed.
With regard to the adjustment range as above,
normally the Sld (slider) value will be set here.
For
When this value is irrelevant or invalid for a
particular type of event, the following message
appears:
MidiEvent: Extens, TrkPat, TrkRun, TrkVel,
TrkNot
No sec.Byte , PitchBeVal.2: , String......: .
there's also a display for
‘Not used Par.:’
since for sequencer fader events the MIDI
channel is selected in the Sequencer Parameter
menu.
d
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
b
e
c
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
In the String- Editor window, a template
appears, which starts off looking like this:-
⇒ To enter strings in the editor, it is advisable
first of all to write the string out on paper, and
then to enter it carefully, with reference to
your notes. Otherwise it's very easy to lose
one's place. The current software version
doesn't have any insert or delete function, so
it can be extremely time-consuming to
correct a mistake in a string.
000|__,__,__,__>
XXX<,aa,bb,cc,dd>
− At any one time you can see the hex-strings
for four bytes, in hexadecimal notation.
− Position XXX = aa, XXX+1 = bb, XXX+2 =
cc, XXX+3 = dd.
− Use the </> (Inc/Dec.) buttons to scroll
backwards and forwards within the template.
The symbols </> appear, to show if there are
further positions available to the left or right.
When the end is reached, the symbol ‘|’
replaces < or >.
− The byte in position 'aa' is always the one
which can be edited.
9.4.4 Fader Parameters
As well as the basic fader event information,
some further parameters often need to be set.
LowerVal: 0-127
UpperVal: 0-127
⇒ At present the maximum length is 30 bytes.
(In future software versions it could be higher)
• The standard fader response goes from a
minimum value of 0 (with the fader right
down) to a maximum value of 127 (with the
fader right up).
• In all cases, to enter a string, the length must
first be defined.
• These values can be changed if required, to
produce
any
other
fader
response
characteristic you might want – reversed, if
you feel like it.
− Any positions which lie outside this defined
length are shown as either _ or 00.
For example:
If the string is going to be three bytes long :
⇒ These related values 0,127 are accessed
separately, so that no conversion is needed,
and the proces is actually faster. There's no
need to change the default value of either,
unless you have a specific need to.
− Scroll to position 3
− Turn the alpha dial until
‘ ..; ’
appears. The OK LED should blink.
Actmode:Immediate/Relative/Catch
− Press OK.
• This determines the way the actual fader
position relates to the value output by it....
• ... and / or the difference between the fader
position and the actual value.
− This causes you to leave the fader edit menu,
and you need to re-enter to produce the
correct string!
− Immediate: -> The fader position = value.
− The value that has been chosen for editing
can now be scrolled to, using the </> buttons,
and when it is in the 'aa' position, it can be
edited using the alpha dial.
− Relative: -> The fader position is added to
the existing value to create the output value.
− Catch:
-> A new value is only output once
the fader has been moved so that it goes
through ('catches') the existing value.
• Some bytes which aren't part of standard
MIDI are reserved for internal REGELWERK
functions, and are shown by the symbols ‘..;’
or ‘>>‘.
Threshold:
• The first MIDI data byte 'XX' is entered into
the incomplete string, to set the fader value.
Window / capture area for Catch mode.
g
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
f
i
h
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
from Fader Event mode, not by pressing the
Fader Parameter button again.
MIDI Input-Mode: (n.b.: not directly visible in
the display)
• Each fader can be programmed to send MIDI
data to different combinations of MIDI Out ->
O12 = Output 1 & 2,
O1 = Output 1,
O2 = Output 2,
XXX = no value output.
I1/2> VelOvpOne> O(1)(2)
• Velocity Overdub (one fader)
− A MIDI Event input at a MIDI overwrites its
velocity (MIDI data byte 2) on the first fader
event which matches it.
− This new value is output instead of the
original (fader) value from the selected MIDI
Out socket/s.
• A fader can also act as a MIDI data receiver incoming MIDI data are altered or 'worked on'
by the fader, and/or themselves change the
fader response – altering the output value,
switching the fader on, etc..
I1/2> VelOvpAll> O(1)(2)
• For these functions to work, the incoming
MIDI event must match the event the fader is
programmed for, and must be input at the
specified MIDI input - I1 (Input 1) or I2 (Input
2) - both inputs can't work simultaneously in
this mode.
• Velocity Overdub All
− the same as ‘one’ (see above) except that
MIDI data byte 1 is ignored, so that the
velocity message affects all 128 possible
events of this type on this MIDI channel.
• When a MIDI event arrives at one of the
inputs, REGELWERK scans to see if any of
the faders is programmed to the MIDI mode.
− Even with just one MIDI event input, all 24
faders are scanned (momentarily for NoteOn /Off, and Controller Events).
− Scanning begins at fader 1 and proceeds
towards fader 24. If a match is found, the
relevant MIDI message is sent to that fader,
and the scan stops. In the current version of
software, therefore, you can't send the one
message to several different faders at once.
I1/2>VelMulOne>O(1)(2)
I1/2>VelMulAll>O(1)(2)
• Velocity Multiply One/All
− Lke Overdub (see above), except that the old
velocity value isn't overwritten Instead the
fader velocity value and new MIDI value are
'multiplied' together – they interact.
⇒ Bearing the scanning system in mind, it's best
(fastest) to use the faders as close as
possible to the left-hand side (low numbers)
for receiving data – and definitely worth
avoiding sending irrelevant data which
doesn't match any of the faders' settings. In
this worst case scenario, all 24 faders will be
abortively scanned – a serious and unnecessary drain on processing ability.
I1/2> UpdateFad> O(1)(2)
• The actual fader value can be changed by
remote control – used for the Regelwerk's
version of Total Recall, etc.
• Generally, the following algorithm shows the
logical path from left to right:
I1/2> HookOnFad> O(1)(2)
− from input I (1/2) (from MIDI In1 or 2)
via data processing
to destination O(1)(2) (to MIDI Out 1
and/or 2).
• Hook Mode: If this mode is activated (as
shown in the Special Funct. menu) any fader
set to it doesn't send any data out at all, until
a matching MIDI event present at a MIDI In
hits its actual value.
n
n
• (The threshold for this 'hook' can be set in
Special Funct.) As soon as these criteria are
met, the fader is released, and can send
data. This is shown by fast blinking on the
relevant LED.
FaderEvent>O(1)(2)
• Normal fader mode, with data output on MIDI
Out 1, 2 or both.
n.b. The following modes' status can be
accessed by moving the alpha dial clockwise
l
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
j
m
k
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
recognise and store SysEx strings.
I1/2> Ovdup/Fad> O(1)(2)
• For all three of the above sections in this
menu, the OK LED blinks.
− By pressing OK, the cursor is able to be reset
to the beginning of the string, so that in Learn
mode only the required data is recorded –
and it's not, e.g., added to the end of another
string.
• Overdub Mode: This mode also needs to be
set in the Special Funct. menu.
• Until this mode is cancelled, the output on
this fader is taken over by the MIDI input
assigned to it.
− As soon as the relevant fader is used to
generate an event, it takes back control of
what is sent to the MIDI output, and MIDI In
data is ignored until this mode is reset.
9.4.5 Key On Edit
• This is a sub-set of functions virtually identical
to the ‘Fader Edit’ menu, except that these
are related solely to Key On events.
The following modes are accessed by
pressing the Fader Parameter button.
MIDI channel:
Master/Slave- Mode:
MIDI Event: (n.b. not Meta Events)
• Slider = Master: self-explanatory: this fader is
working as a master fader.
First MIDI data byte
• Slave/Master: fader no. X works as a slave
to master fader no. X.
Second MIDI date byte
− The Master/Slave system
works by
multiplication. If the master value is 100%,
the slave value is as it stands. If the master
value is less than 100%, the value of the
slave reduces proportionally.
String:
• When a Key On event occurs, a switch signal
is sent, which, depending on the setting in the
Key Parameter menu, can either be
momentary, or toggled (i.e. it stays in that
state until the next switch).
− The condition of the LED for each button will
act as a reliable indicator of the status of the
button in all modes when there is a...
• Key On- Event: Before the button-press the
LED is on, and after the button-press it's off,
showing that the control is now in mute mode
– that is, not sending any fader events at all.
Learn - Mode:
• The process of fader editing for each fader
can be undertaken not just by hand, but also
by MIDI events, chains or strings input at the
relevant MIDI in socket. This is called Learn
Mode.
− What happens is that MIDI data (events or
strings) are simply stored in the relevant
memory.
− Learn Mode has to be explicitly switched on
and off.
9.4.6 Key Off Edit
• In principal identical to the Key On functions,
except that the momentary switching
produces a 'release' function, and the
function of the toggle switching is reversed.
Event:
MIDI channel:
Only the first MIDI event received is stored in the
relevant memory location.
MIDI Event: (n.b. not Meta Events)
First MIDI data byte
Ev>Str:
A succession of MIDI events is stored in the
relevant memory location, until it's full (currently
a maximum of about 30 bytes).
Second MIDI data byte
String:
• When a Key Off (i.e. Note Off) event occurs,
a switch signal is sent, which, depending on
Sx>Str:
The same as Ev>Str, except that it will only
q
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
o
r
p
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
the setting in the Key Parameter menu, can
be either momentary, or toggled (i.e. it stays
in that state until the next switch).
− The condition of the LED for each button
willact as a reliable indicator of the status of
the button in all modes when there is a...
• Key Off Event: Before the button-press the
LED is off, and after the button-press it's on,
showing that the control is now in un-mute
mode – that is, sending fader events as
normal.
the MIDI events programmed in Key On Edit
and Key Off Edit modes are also transmitted.
• By pressing and/or releasing a button, it's
possible, if you've configured it like this, to
send a maximum of two complete MIDI
events.
− One is transmitted by the relevant fader with
a pre-programmed (De-)Mute value.
− The other Event is directly associated with the
Key On / Off function.
9.4.8 Fader Mode
9.4.7 Key Param.
• In fader mode the display turns into a sort of
mini-MIDI monitor, indicating in words or
abbreviations the MIDI events associated
with the relvant fader, or transmitted by it.
MuteValue: (0..127 / Send NO Muteval)
DemuteValue: (0..127 / Send NO Demuteval)
Data is shown as follows. On the top line of the
display: fader name, then the actual fader
position in brackets, then the variable value:-
SwitchM: Toggle / Momentary
• These three parameters control the
behaviour of the relevant button and any
functions triggered by it, in relation to
programmed MIDI events (controlled via the
Key On/Off Edit page).
faderXXX[Pos]Val
Contrl
, 1 ,Val
• The main distinction is between Toggle (held
till next button-press) and Momentary (on/off,
like a keyboard key).
And on the bottom line (see above):programmed MIDI Event, then the first MIDI data
byte, then the second MIDI data byte.
− Toggle = Each button-press alternately
triggers Key On and/or Key Off functions.
Releasing the button has no effect.
• Pressing a fader select button causes the
current reading/s of the fader to be called up
in the LCD, and the actual value to be
transmitted.
− Momentary = Pressing the button triggers
Key On, and releasing it triggers Key Off.
⇒ Faders can also be selected by using the
alpha-dial.
• The Key On function is closely linked to the
switching on of Mute status.
− The associated LED goes out, and the
relevant fader automatically sends a final
Fader Event, not with the fader position, but
with the Mute value (or with nothing at all if
No Mute Value has been programmed).
− From that moment, the fader is muted, and
won't transmit any more fader events until the
mute status is changed.
9.4.9 Special Functions
HookMode:Off/On
• All faders which are programmed in hook
mode are indicated by the 'fader select' LEDs
– the top row of LEDs.
− The OK LED blinks when hook mode is
entered.
− Pressing the OK button confirms hook mode.
When it is no longer required, it has to be
turned off with the HookMode:Off function.
• The Key Off function is closely linked to the
switching off of Mute status.
− The associated LED comes on, and the
relevant fader automatically sends a fader
event, not with the fader position, but with the
Demute value (or with nothing at all if No
Demute Value has been programmed).
− From that moment, the fader is un-muted,
and will transmit fader events as normal until
the mute status is changed.
Threshold:
Threshold value for hook mode.
• Through the Key On and Key Off functions,
t
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
s
v
u
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
⇒ Because of frequent difficulties in the past
with MIDI instruments which couldn't cope
with the highest theoretically possible speeds
of MIDI data transmission, it was decided to
limit the maximum resolution to these
amounts, and to allow a lower sample rate to
be chosen if necessary.
Overdup: Off/On
Same system as for hook mode, but this time for
overdub mode.
MIDILock: Off / In1 / In2 / In12
• To relieve the REGELWERK of un-necessary
processing of MIDI information that isn't
relevant to it, it's possible to switch the MIDI
inputs on and off independently.
− MIDI real-time data will be received and
processed. All other MIDI events present at
the inputs will be ignored.
− That means, for instance, that it's possible to
synchronise the REGELWERK sequencer to
an external MIDI clock, without burdening the
REGELWERK's processor with all the other
MIDI data on this channel.
9.4.10 String Edit
• If a fader hasn't been specifically labelled by
the user, the software automatically calls it
FADERXXX (where XXX stands for the
number of the fader).
− The advantage of this: no hassle having to
label a fader, and no need to use up memory
for a name when saving the preset.
− The disadvantage: just by looking, it's
impossible to tell what the fader is
programmed to do.
• So it's also possible to enter a user-chosen
label for each fader (in current software, up to
eight letters long).
Sample/Sek.: 24 - 8
• This is where the scanning / sample-persecond rate for the faders can be altered.
− The rate applies globally, to all faders.
− There could theoretically be a maximum of
24 x 24 fader events per second -> 576 fader
events (and if each had three bytes, that
would approach 50% of the maximum
possible MIDI data flow rate).
When no name has been given to a fader, this
default message comes up in the LCD:
faderXXXEditName
NoName! Make?> OK
• Now to label a fader, the default mode must
be switched off by responding to the question
NoName Make?> OK ,
and giving the anonymous fader a label.
⇒ Once you press OK to confirm this question,
you automatically leave the page, and have to
re-enter it.
Then the LCD shows:
ABCDEFG EditName
ABCDEFG Delete?
ABCDEFG is the default name, which can now
be edited with the aid of the cursor keys and
alpha dial.
y
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
w
z
x
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
• Should you ever want to return to the default
name (for instance to save memory), you
need to confirm
all the possible combinations of compatible
source and destination event types.
− Using the fader select buttons 1-24, choose
the respective source and destination faders.
− The data entry point always swaps between
source and destination faders.
‘Delete?’
− by pressing OK, and thus deleting the user
name once more.
9.4.12 SnapTools
• Also in this menu, it's possible to enter a
string which is transmitted if any of the
following events occur:-
GetSnapShot:
StoreSnap:
EditString:Pres
DeleteSnap:
•
EditString:Start
EditString:Stop
EditString:Cont
EditString:Rew.
−
•
EditString:Forw.
−
− a preset is called up
− the Start button is pressed (or a real-time
start message is received)
− the Stop button is pressed (or a real-time
stop message is received)
− the Cont button is pressed (or a real-time
continue message is received)
− the <<- rewind button is pressed
− the ->> fast forward button is pressed
−
Select the preset number by using either the
alpha-dial or a combination of the eight top
left hand buttons (labelled Preset/Snap Bank
/ Pattern Bank) and the 16 right-hand top
buttons. To select, e.g., snapshot 17, press
Bank 2, number 1.
A maximum of 128 snapshots are available.
Snapshots, like Event Strings, are stored in a
dynamically managed memory location.
That means that the maximum number of
snapshots available does depend on how
much space is left in this location.
The amount of memory used up is shown by
a percentage readout.
PresSnapMem: XXX%
⇒ If there's not enough space left, memory can
be re-used by using the individual delete
function.
• These settings are available for each of the
presets, and are ideal for, e.g., MMC (MIDI
machine control).
9.4.13 Preset / Pattern Tools
9.4.11 Edit Tools
• To select the 64 Presets & 64 Patterns you
use the same 8 bank buttons as for the
snapshots, again in combination with the 16
Preset/ Pattern buttons. The first four bank
buttons are for presets, and the second four
for patterns.
For the time being, a fairly limited 'copy and
paste' type of editing is all that's available .
Copy: Event type x from source fader a
to
• All the functions work in an identical way to
the snapshot functions.
Event type x at destination fader b
• 64 Presets / 64 Patterns (all fully compatible
with the Doepfer Schaltwerk).
Types of event can be:
FaderEvt,
- Fader Event
KeyOnEvt,
- Key On Event
KeyOffEvt,
- Key Off Event
FaderStr,
- Fader String
KeyOnStr,
- Key On String
KeyOffstr
- Key Off String
− Using the alpha dial you can scroll through
}
Select as with snapshots (Preset/Pattern Bank),
using the GetPreset page:-
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
{
~
|
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
⇒ In the ‘Delete Preset’ function, the actual
preset itself isn't deleted first time round: just
the dynamic memory containing the string,
name, etc.. If there's still not enough space,
then the rest of the memory for this preset
can be cleared.
GetPreset / Pattern:
StorePreset / Pattern:
• Presets / Patterns accessed by the GetPreset
function are (unlike in the SCHALTWERK)
not automatically sync-ed to a master track.
− The time it takes to access a preset from
memory depends, among other things, on
how full the dynamic memory is.
− It's normally better to stop any ongoing
sequence to load a new preset. It's quicker,
and because of the lack of synchronisation,
there's no advantage in having the sequence
running. Stopping it avoids any chance of
problems with notes hanging, etc.
• The Preset itself remains intact.
InitPreset?<OK>
InitPattern?<OK>
• Use this function to set the preset or pattern
in the edit buffer to its default values.
⇒ The individual presets / patterns remain
intact.
SysEx Preset / Pattern:
• Transmit a preset / pattern via SysEx.
• The SysEx format of REGELWERK patterns
is
compatible
with
the
Doepfer
SCHALTWERK.
− A SCHALTWERK connected via MIDI could
therefore read REGELWERK patterns, and
store them in its memory locations and retransmit them to the REGELWERK.
9.4.14 Sync Menu
• In general, REGELWERK's tempo
controlled by its own internal clock:SYNC- INTERN / EXT.
Mode: Intern
• REGELWERK SysEx strings are in two
sections.
− The first block contains all the static
parameters – the fader events and
parameters for al the 24 faders and buttons.
(This block is the same size as a pattern
memory.)
− The second block, which is of variable length,
contains all the dynamicly variable data in a
preset – the faders themselves, key strings,
and user-defined fader names / labels.
• REGELWERK can also be controlled by an
external MIDI Clock
− at MIDI input socket 1:Mode: Ext. MCL1
− or at MIDI input socket 2:-
• REGELWERK reacts automatically to any
SysEx string received.
− When receiving the dynamically variable part
of the SysEx string, it is possible that an error
message will be generated, if the available
storage space in the dynamic memory
location isn't sufficient for the amount of data
being transmitted.
Mode: Ext. MCL2
− or by an external DIN sync signal:Mode: Din Sync
− received at the DIN sync socket.
⇒ In this case, enough memory must be freed
up in this section (by deleting old and
unwanted strings and snapshots) and the
SysEx transmission then repeated.
• In internal sync mode, the REGELWERK
sends Realtime MIDI Messages:− Start ($FA),
− Continue ($FB) ,
− Stop ($FC) , and also
− MIDIClock ($F8)
− from both MIDI output sockets.
• At the DIN sync socket, a synchronised
€
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
is

€

User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
square-wave signal is transmitted.
switched off, and will need to be re-entered if
required on power-up.
• In external MIDI sync modes, the
REGELWERK tempo is controlled by MIDI
Realtime Messages at MIDI In 1 and / or MIDI
In 2.
• At the DIN sync socket, a synchronised
square-wave signal is again transmitted.
9.4.15 Sequencer Parameters
Editing Track Parameters :
• In external DIN Sync Mode the DIN sync
socket turns into an input, and the
REGELWERK is controlled by any squarewave signal or start / stop messages received
at the socket.
MIDI Channel,
Note Number,
Step Time
• Further sync parameters can be altered when
using MIDI clock sync, to change the
response of the REGELWERK to Continue
commands.
Gate Time
End Step.
Setting the mode to the following:-
− A Track is chosen for editing by pressing one
of the Track Select buttons.
− Tracks are turned on and off with the Track
On buttons.
− Gate On / Off is controlled by the Sequencer
Step buttons.
Mode: Start; Cont
− makes REGELWERK tracks reset to the first
step after a Start message (or in normal
cycling mode)
− A Continue message starts the sequence
from the last step reached.
− The MIDI Channel page is used to select the
MIDI channel for each track.
− The Note Number page defines a note offset
for the track as a whole, adding the
programmed number of semi-tones to all the
notes of a track. This is always a positive
offest – negative offsets aren't possible.
Setting the mode to the following:Mode: Start = Cont
− means that all tracks will start afresh from
step one, whether a Start or a Continue
message is received.
− The Step Time page sets the number of MIDI
clocks or DIN sync pulses between each
event in the track. The result is wholenumber division of MIDI clock and / or the
internal tempo.
− The Gate Time page enables you to adjust
the relative length of the notes (and spaces,
of course).
• As standard, MIDI Realtime messages are
transmitted from both MIDI Out 1 and MIDI
Out 2.
There may be some MIDI
configurations, though, where this could be
undesirable,
or
cause
problems.
Accordingly, REGELWERK gives you the
option of sending Realtime Messages just
from one or other of the MIDI Outs, or from
neither.
• Gate Time is the time between identical
repeated events – like two Note Ons.
Step Time is shown in the display like this:-:
Mode: Mcl1
Step Time:006 = 1/16
sends Realtime Messages out only from MIDI
Out 1;
− The '006' means that 6 MIDI Clock pulses
must elapse before the next event is
produced, and / or a track moves to the next
step.
− The reference to the musical terminology
'1/16' stems from the fact that, as there are
96 MIDI clocks in a beat, each clock is 1/96.
Six clocks are therefore 1/16 (6/96).
− The End Step page is used to select the last
step in a track. After reaching this step, the
track jumps back ('resets') to the first step in
Mcl2 sends only from MIDI Out 2;
Mcl1 & Mcl2 sends from both MIDI Outs (the
default setting at power-up);
No Mcl-Out sends no Realtime Messages from
either of the two MIDI Outs.
⇒ All Sync Menu settings are only stored in
volatile memory, so will be lost when power is
‚
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH

„
ƒ
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
the track and continues playing from there.
9.4.16 Sequencer Mode
− A Track is chosen for editing by pressing one
of the Track Select buttons.
− Tracks are turned on and off with the Track
On buttons.
− Gate On / Off is controlled by the Sequencer
Step buttons.
• In addition faders 9 - 24 are dedicated to
steps 1 - 16, and are used to set note number
and note velocity.
− In Sequencer Mode, the normal Fader Mode
output from faders 9-24 is switched off, and
only faders 1-8 retain their usual fader mode
function.
• Which function is being dealt with can be
seen from the LCD, and is switchable from
one function to the other by the menu
buttons.
• In Sequencer Mode, the sixteen dedicated
faders (9-24) behave like the sliders or knobs
on a quantised analogue sequencer.
− That is, once the fader is moved, the
respective parameter will immediately jump to
the value (note number or velocity) the fader
is outputting .
⇒ That means that editing with a fader is
'destructive': the old value can no longer be
recalled once a fader has been moved. As
soon as a new fader position registers, the
old value is over-written.
• The old value remains intact, so long as it is
not deliberately over-written, and if you want
to make a small adjustment to it, relative to its
current position, select it with its respective
gate button and adjust it using the alpha dial.
• Which of the eight Tracks' data is being
adjusted is controlled by the Track Select
buttons.
†
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
…
ˆ
‡
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
because..
− you want to erase all a previous owner's data
− there's been a crash or electrical fault of
some description, and REGELWERK contains
some spurious data in its memory which it
can't process.
10 Appendices
• To perform a hard reset, hold down the Start
button while switching on power to the unit.
10.1 LCD readouts during the
reception of MIDI SysEx data:
The following message appears:-
• If a SysEx Pattern is successfully received by
REGELWERK without any errors, and is
written into the relevant pattern memory, the
following message appears in the LCD
readout:-
INIT MENUE! <OK>
FORMAT PRESET RAM
• After pressing the OK button (note that in this
mode, unlike others, the LED doesn't blink),
the next message appears:-
Receive Pat.: xxx
Format total RAM
• If a SysEx dump has a problem, and
produces an error, this message appears:-
and the entire set of memory locations is erased
and initialised.
MIDI Receive Error
SysEx Dump
• This can take quite a few seconds, as each of
the 128 locations is re-set in turn ..
− The cause of an error like this can either be a
problem with the actual MIDI dump format, or
too large an amount of data for REGELWERK
to handle. When sending a SysEx dump,
short pauses should be inserted between the
packets of MIDI information.
Init Ram 1-128
• and then REGELWERK returns to its usual
mode of operation.
− Errors are most likely to happen if the
sequencer is running at a high tempo, with
short step times, large numbers of
simultaneous events, and a SysEx dump all
happening at the same time. With further
stress placed on the system by having to
process large amounts of data at the MIDI
Inputs, the internal buffer could sometimes
overflow, and cause errors.
⇒ This process irrevocably deletes all the user
data in the REGELWERK's memory locations.
It's recommended only for service purposes,
or as a quick way to return REGELWERK to
its factory settings. It's vital to remember to
use a MIDI SysEx dump to save all data that
you might regret losing.
• These messages are only temporarily
displayed. As soon as a new event occurs,
the message will be over-written.
• FOR CONTROL PURPOSES:
− a Preset Dump is sandwiched between two
SysEx strings. The entire first string is
composed of 1035 bytes.
−
If that's not the case, something's gone
wrong with the dump!
10.2
Complete Initialisation
• REGELWERK can be completely initialised
(hard reset).
− This might be necessary or desirable
‹
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
‰
Œ
Š
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− The receiving instrument is not actually set to
receive MIDI data.
− The receiving instrument is set to a different
MIDI channel from the one on which
REGELWERK is transmitting the data.
− The receiving instrument has been effectively
muted by a previous MIDI message (for
instance turning the MIDI volume to 0), etc..
11 Troubleshooting
• If any problems do come up with your
REGELWERK use the following check-list for
fault-finding.
• It often happens that what look like faults are
actually a product of the operating system
design, which can be avoided or worked
around by knowing the REGELWERK
thoroughly.
• If despite careful analysis of what's
happening, the problem can't be overcome,
then there may be a fault in the hard- or software.
• Please in that case approach us or your local
distributor. We will do whatever we can to
help solve the problem as quickly as possible.
.
• MIDI data is being received by the
REGELWERK, but is not being re-transmitted
properly.
− A different MIDI channel has been selected
for the chosen REGELWERK function.
− The chosen REGELWERK
function isn't
activated, and is set to ‘OFF’, or is set to
respond to the wrong MIDI input.
• MIDI Events received at the MIDI Ins are
altered before being transmitted at the MIDI
Outs.
− The MIDI Inputs don't have any built-in merge
function – so incoming data isn't merged with
the REGELWERK's internal MIDI data, and
thus isn't available at the output/s. If all that's
needed is to have the data input to the
REGELWERK also available to other devices,
then a MIDI Thru box placed before the
REGELWERK will do the trick.
− If you want this and other MIDI data to be
merged before being sent to the relevant
instrument, then an external MIDI merge box
like the
11.1 Connection problems
• REGELWERK is not receiving or transmitting
any MIDI data.
− Check that the MIDI cables between
REGELWERK and other MIDI equipment are
correctly connected.
− Check that proper MIDI-compatible cables
are being used. Problems may arise from
using hi-fi or other non-standard cables.
− Check that there isn't a fault with the MIDI
cables, by substituting cables between
different pieces of equipment.
Common
problems are invisible internal breaks in one
of the conductors, or, in the case of homemade cables, dry or defective solder
connections in the plugs.
⇒ DOEPFER MMR4/4
is needed.
11.3 The Start / Stop / Continue
buttons ‘don't work'.
• REGELWERK is not receiving or transmitting
any DIN sync data.
− Specialist MIDI cables shouldn't be used for
DIN sync, because although the sockets are
identical in appearance, the pin allocation is
different, and pure MIDI cables won't
necessarily work for DIN sync.
− Also check the DIN sync settings on the
various instruments: if both are set to the
same mode (input, or output) then no
communication is possible. One has to be
configured as an output, one as an input.
• Perhaps all steps are muted, so that although
the sequencer is running, no data is being
transmitted.
• Perhaps the end step on the selected Track
is set to step 1, so there's no movement from
the Sequencer Step LEDs, and, even with the
Track switched on, no sound, because the
sequence stops moving.
• Perhaps some parameters (for instance Step
Time, Gate Time, MIDI channel, Note or
Velocity values) are set to extremes, which
can't be recognised by some MIDI
equipment.
11.2 Reception problems
• Data is being received by the MIDI
instrument, but it's not turning into the music
you're expecting!
Ž
• Electrical storms, power cuts and surges, and
so on, can corrupt the non-volatile memory
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH



User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
locations in the REGELWERK and produce
bizarre data in the Presets. Preset 1, the
default start-up preset, is particularly prone to
this, and problems will naturally follow. This
is loaded automatically at the start, and if it's
been
corrupted,
will
send
spurious
information and quite probably crash the
REGELWERK.
− If a problem is suspected, it's advisable to
check and correct corrupted data BEFORE
starting a sequence. Running a sequence
with corrupted or bizarre parameters is
asking for trouble!
− In this case, if the REGELWERK crashes, a
hard reset (initialisation) may well be the only
answer.
!!! First save the uncorrupted
presets via a SysEx dump.
• The Step LEDs (showing the sequence
running) aren't responding 100% accurately,
or as expected; for instance, interference
patterns may sometimes occur.
− This is again caused by deliberate software
design policy, which gives indicators and
displays a lower priority than the processing
of 'higher level' events, such as real-time
control: MIDI data output, reception and
transmission, sequencer tempo, and anything
that is crucial to the tightness and accuracy of
the musical output.
11.6 Individual buttons have
slightly different responses
• Due to the large quantity of buttons used in
the REGELWERK, and the variability of mass
production, it's possible that different buttons
will have slightly different
response
characteristics. This will be particularly
noticeable if two buttons that are next to each
other behave differently.
− We hope you'll agree that it's not a serious
problem, as long as the difference is only
slight, and that it's the right decision to use
these reasonably-priced buttons considering
the large cost implications of any alternative.
11.4 Changes made to a pattern
are not stored in memory
• Perhaps you've forgotten that REGELWERK
has to be explicitly told to store pattern data
along with the other data in a preset.
11.5 Problems editing
parameters within menus
• Editing parameters with the alpha dial and
buttons is slow and laborious.
− While editing values with the sequencer
running, it's possible that the editing process
can become a little sporadic and slow to
respond, because the internal processor
gives priority to the sequence, and only deals
with editing functions when there is
processing power available. This is going to
be particularly noticeable with very fast or
complex sequences.
“
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
‘
”
’
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
12 Appendices
12.1 Appendix A - Preset track patterns
Step
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
10:
11:
12:
13:
14:
15:
16:
17:
18:
19:
20:
21:
22:
23:
24:
25:
26:
27:
28:
29:
30:
31:
32:
33:
34:
35:
36:
37:
38:
39:
40:
41:
42:
44:
45:
46:
47:
48:
49:
50:
51:
52:
53:
54:
55:
1234
X___
X___
X___
X_X_
X__X
X___
X___
X___
X___
X___
X___
__XX
X___
X___
X___
X___
X__X
____
X___
____
X___
X__X
X___
X_X_
X_X_
XXXX
X___
X__X
X___
__XX
____
____
XXXX
XX__
__X_
____
____
____
____
__X_
___X
____
X___
XXXX
X_X_
____
X_X_
X_XX
X_XX
X___
_X_X
____
X_X_
X_X_
XXX_
5678
____
__X_
___X
_X__
____
___X
X___
X___
___X
___X
____
__XX
__X_
__X_
__X_
____
X__X
____
____
____
__X_
__X_
__X_
___X
____
__XX
XX__
_X__
_XX_
__XX
X___
X___
____
____
__X_
X_X_
X_X_
X__X
X__X
__X_
____
____
____
XXXX
X_X_
X___
X_X_
X_XX
X_X_
__X_
_X_X
X___
X_X_
__XX
____
1111 111
9012 3456
X_X_ ____
X___ ____
X___ ____
X___ ___X
X_X_ ____
X_X_ ____
X___ X___
X_X_ X___
X___ _X__
X_X_ ___X
____ ____
__XX __XX
X___ __X_
____ ____
X___ X___
X___ X___
X__X X__X
_X__ ____
X___ ____
____ __X_
__X_ __X_
_X__ ____
____ ____
X_X_ __X_
_XXX __X_
_XX_ __X_
X__X _X__
XX__ X___
_X__ ____
XXXX ____
____ X___
X_XX XXXX
____ ____
____ ____
__X_ __XX
____ X___
____ X___
_X__ X___
_X__ X___
__X_ __X_
____ X___
____ X_X_
____ X_X_
XXXX XXXX
____ ____
X___ X___
X_X_ X___
X_XX X_XX
X_X_ X_X_
X_X_ X_X_
_X_X _X_X
X___ ____
X_X_ ____
__X_ ____
_XX_ ____
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
A-7
A-8
A-11
A-12
A-13
A-16
B-3
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-9
B-13
B-14
B-16
C-3
C-4
C-5
C-6
C-7
C-8
C-9
C-10
C-11
C-14
A-1
A-13
A-14
A-16
B-12
C-1
C-1
C-3
C-3
C-9
C-11
C-14
C-15
A-5
A-13
A-14
B-4
B-6
B-7
B-8
B-10
B-15
C-2
C-6
C-7
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD2
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
BD1
SD1
SD1
SD1
SD1
SD3
SD3
SD3
SD3
SD3
SD1
SD1
SD2
SD2
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
CCH
Rock 8Beat1
Rock 8Beat2
Rock 8Beat3
Rock 8Beat4
Rock16Beat1
Rock16Beat2
Disco 1
Disco 2
Funky 1
Funky 2
RockFillIn1
RockFillIn3
Bossanova1
Mambo
Merengue
Rumba
Samba 1
SwingFillIn
LatinFillIn
SambaFillIn
Oldies R&B
Reggae 1
Reggae 2
Rap
HipHop
ElectricFunc
Metal 1
Metal 2
RocVar.1
ElectricFill
Rock 8Beat1
RockFillIn1
RockFillIn2
RockFillIn3
Marching
Oldies
Oldies
Oldies R&B
Oldies R&B
Metal
RockVar1
ElectricFil
MetalFillIn
Rock16Beat1
RockFillIn1
RockFillIn2
Bossanova 2
Merengue
Rumba
Beguine
Samba 2
Latin Break
Oldies 2
Rap
HipHop
—
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
•
˜
–
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
56: ____ ____ ____ __XX
57: XXX_ XX__ XXX_ __X_
C-8 CCH
C-11 CCH
ElectricFun
RockVar.1
Using preset track patterns
• Among the MIDI Event parameters in the
Fader Edit menu is one called ‘TrkPat’. This
is short for ‘Track Pattern’ – ready-made
rhythm tracks or sequences for a track.
− By moving the relevant fader, these patterns
are instantly transferred into the chosen
Track, ready for action.
− Although the patterns are designed principally
for drum tracks, they can often work just as
well as the basis of a pitched note sequence.
• In the table on the previous page, all the
originally available Track Patterns are listed.
They can be accessed simply by setting the
fader to any of the numbers from 0: - 57: .
− An ‘X’ means that a Gate has been
programmed, and a ‘_’ means that there's no
Gate – i.e. the step for that pattern is silent.
− Each pattern has been given a very basic
name, along with the drum sound (BD = Base
Drum, SD = Snare etc.) with which it was
programmed. It's surprising how similar the
individual tracks for totally different rhythms
can be – it's often how the constituent parts
are combined that makes rhythms unique.
• You might like to try controlling TrkPat events
not just on one Track and with one fader at a
time, but with more than one.
− The results can be interesting: instant
craziness.
⇒ Please note that when saving Patterns it's
only the gate information which is stored, not
the settings of the ‘TrkPat’ fader/s.
− If a really good combination emerges, which
is too good to lose on switching off, then the
only thing to do is to write the settings down.
• Up till the time of compilign the table, only 58
(0...57)
Track
Patterns
have
been
programmed. The rest of the locations (up to
127) may well be full of random code, which
can occasionally produce amusing or useful
results by pure chance.
⇒ If any of these patterns happens to be really
good, it's worth saving them on paper, so that
you can still recall them even if another
software version is loaded into the
REGELWERK, and the original random
patterns are over-written.
• We'll fill spare locations in future with any
good patterns sent in by REGELWERK users.
š
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
™
œ
›
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
12.2 Appendix B – User settings and configuration examples
• In future, this space will be reserved for settings, tips and suggestions sent in by users.
⇒ This is where we need the help of all REGELWERK users!
Possible material:
− REGELWERK settings for use with a particular synthesizer,
− or settings which are more geared to sequencing functions,
− or a combination of both ?!
• Please let other users share the benefits of your experience exploring REGELWERK.
− Whenever resources allow, patches submitted will be made available on our internet page for
download by any user.
− Please send any written information by post, fax, or email – however's best for you.
− Please send Patches and/or SysEx Dumps by post on floppy disk, or via email.
⇒ We'll organise free software updates for all the most helpful and successful contributions.
ž
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH

Ÿ
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
13 MIDI 1.0 Specification:
Status
Data byte(s)
D7----D0 D7----D0
Description
13.1 Channel Voice Messages
• 1000cccc
0nnnnnnn
Note Off event.
0vvvvvvv
− This message is sent when a note is released (ended).
− (nnnnnnn) is the note number.
− (vvvvvvv) is the velocity.
• 1001cccc
0nnnnnnn
0vvvvvvv
Note On event.
− This message is sent when a note is depressed (start).
− (nnnnnnn) is the note number.
− (vvvvvvv) is the velocity.
• 1010cccc
0nnnnnnn Polyphonic Key
0vvvvvvv Pressure(Aftert.)
− This message is sent when the pressure (velocity) of a previously triggered note changes.
− (nnnnnnn) is the note number.
− (vvvvvvv) is the new velocity.
• 1011cccc
0ccccccc
Control Change.
0vvvvvvv
− This message is sent when a controller value changes. Controllers include devices such as pedals
and levers. Certain controller numbers are reserved for specific purposes. See Channel Mode
Messages.
− (ccccccc) is the controller number.
− (vvvvvvv) is the new value.
• 1100cccc 0ppppppp
Program Change.
− This message is sent when the patch number changes.
− (ppppppp) is the new program number.
• 1101nnnn 0ccccccc ChannelPressure(Aftert)
− This message is sent when the channel pressure changes. Some velocity-sensing keyboards do
not support polyphonic after-touch. Use this message to send the single greatest velocity (of all the
currently depressed keys).
− (ccccccc) is the pressure value.
• 1110nnnn
0lllllll
Pitch Wheel Change.
0mmmmmmm
− This message is sent to indicate a change in the pitch wheel. The pitch wheel is measured by a
fourteen bit value. Center (no pitch change) is 2000H. Sensitivity is a function of the transmitter.
− (llllll) are the least significant 7 bits.
− (mmmmmm) are the most significant 7 bits.
13.2 Channel Mode Messages (See also Control Change, above)
• 1011nnnn 0ccccccc Channel Mode
¢
Messages.
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
¡
¤
£
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− 0vvvvvvv This the same code as the Control Change (above), but implements Mode control by
using reserved controller numbers.
− The numbers are:
− Local Control.
When Local Control is Off, all devices on a given channel will respond only to data received over MIDI.
Played data, etc. will be ignored. Local Control On restores the functions of the normal controllers.
− c = 122, v = 0: Local Control Off
c = 122, v = 127: Local Control On
− All Notes Off.
When an All Notes Off is received, all oscillators will turn off.
− c = 123, v = 0: All Notes Of
− c = 124, v = 0: Omni Mode Off
− c = 125, v = 0: Omni Mode On
− c = 126, v = M: Mono Mode On (Poly Off) where M is the number of channels (Omni Off) or 0
(Omni On)
− c = 127, v = 0: Poly Mode On (Mono Off) (Note: These four messages also cause All Notes Off)
13.3 System Common Messages
• 11110000
0iiiiiii
System Exclusive.
0ddddddd
− This message makes up for all that MIDI doesn't support.
− (iiiiiii) is a seven bit Manufacturer's I.D. code. If the
− 0ddddddd synthesizer recognizes the I.D. code as 11110111
its own, it will listen to the rest of
the message (ddddddd). Otherwise, the message will be ignored. System Exclusive is used to
send bulk dumps such as patch parameters and other non-spec data. (Note: Real-Time messages
ONLY may be interleaved with a System Exclusive.)
• 11110010
0lllllll
Song Position Pointer.
0mmmmmmm
− This is an internal 14 bit register that holds the number of MIDI beats (1 beat= six MIDI clocks)
since the start of the song. l is the LSB, m the MSB.
• 11110011 0sssssss
Song Select.
− The Song Select specifies which sequence or song is to be played.
• 11110100
Undefined.
• 11110101
Undefined.
• 11110110
Tune Request.
− Upon receiving a Tune Request, all analog sythesizers should tune their oscillators.
• 11110111
End of Exclusive.
− Used to terminate a System Exclusive dump (see above).
13.4 System Real-Time Messages
• 11111000
Timing Clock.
− Sent 24 times per quarter note when synchronization is required.
• 11111001
Undefined.
• 11111010
Start.
¦
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
¥
¨
§
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
− Start the current sequence playing. (This message will be followed with Timing Clocks).
• 11111011
Continue
− Continue at the point the sequence was Stopped.
• 11111100
Stop.
− Stop the current sequence.
• 11111101
Undefined.
11111110
Active Sensing.
− Use of this message is optional. When initially sent, the receiver will expect to receive another
Active Sensing message each 300ms (max), or it will be assume that the connection has been
terminated.
At termination, the receiver will turn off all voices and return to normal
(nonactive sensing) operation.
•
11111111
Reset.
− Reset all receivers in the system to power-up status. This should be used sparingly, preferably
under manual control. In particular, it should not be sent on power-up.
•
Other information:
To get your copy of the 1.0 spec, send a $2 check to:
International MIDI Association
5316 West 57th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90056
(415) 321-MIDI
Make your checks payable to the IMA. BYW, the 1.0 spec is technically
identical to the .06 spec, but the description has been re-written.
Since the spec has been officially approved, there shouldn't be any
problem with posting this summary of the .06 spec:
[This document is Dave Oppenheim's current version of the MIDI file
specification, as sent to those who have participated in its
development. The consensus seems to be to submit this to the MIDI
Manufacturers' Association as version 1.0. I apologize for any loss of
clarity that might have occurred in the conversion from a Microsoft Word
document to this pure text file. I have removed some of the discussion
about recent changes to the specification in order to keep the file size
reasonable.--Doug Wyatt]
ª
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
©
ª
©
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
14 Bibliography
•
Articles
Michael Cxelperger: <Introducing Standard MIDI Files>. Electronic Musican,
April 1989, p.50ff
The most-up-to-date printed specs for General MIDI, MIDI, and the MIDI
file format can also be obtained for a few dollars from:
International MIDI Association
23634 Emelita Street
Woodland Hills, California 91367 USA
•
Books
MIDI Programmer's Handbook / Steve De Furia & Joe Scacciaferro,
M&T Books
ISBN 1-55851-068-0
Computer music in C / Phil Winsor & Gene DeLisa.
Publisher: Blue Ridge Summit, PA : TAB Books (Windcrest label), c1991.
Subjects: Computer sound processing.
Computer composition.
C (Computer program language)
MIDI programming
ISBN: 0-8306-3637-4 (p) : $22.95
There is also a C source disk for the PC available for $25.
Mind over MIDI / edited by Dominic Milano, from the pages of Keyboard magazine.
Publisher: Milwaukee, WI : H. Leonard Books, c1987.
Series Name: The Keyboard magazine basic library
Other Series Names: Keyboard synthesizer library.
Subjects: MIDI (Standard)
Computer sound processing.
ISBN: 0-88188-551-7 (pbk.) : $12.95
The book consists mostly of reprints of KEYBOARD magazine articles from the early-mid '80s plus
several appendixes containing the MIDI 1.0 specification, a list of references, a glossary, etc.
MIDI and sound book for the Atari ST / Bernd Enders and Wolfgang Klemme.
Publisher: Redwood City, Calif. : M & T Pub., c1989.
Subjects: Computer music--Instruction and study.
Computer sound processing.
MIDI (Standard)
Atari ST computers--Programming.
ISBN: 1-55851-042-7 : $17.95
Atari ST Introduction to MIDI Programming / Len Dorfman and Dennis Young
ISBN 0-916439-77-1
Bantam Books, Inc. 666 5th Avenue
New York, New York
10103 USA
Music through MIDI : using MIDI to create your own electronic music system / Michael Boom.
Publisher: Redmond, Wash. : Microsoft Press, c1987.
Subjects: MIDI (Standard)
Subjects: Musical instruments, Electronic.
Subjects: Electronic music--Instruction and study.
Subjects: Computer sound processing.
ISBN: 1-55615-026-1 (pbk.) : $19.95
¬
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
«
®
­
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
The MIDI drummer : by a drummer for a drummer / David Crigger.
Publisher: Newbury Park, CA : Alexander Pub., c1987.
Subjects: Electronic percussion instruments--Instruction and study.
MIDI (Standard)
MIDI for musicians / by Craig Anderton.
Publisher: New York : Amsco Publications, c1986.
Subjects: MIDI (Standard)
Computer sound processing.
ISBN: 0-8256-1050-8 (pbk.)
ISBN: 0-8256-2214-X (pbk. : cover)
The MIDI manual / David Miles Huber.
Publisher: Carmel, Ind., USA : Howard W. Sams, c1991.
ISBN: 0-672-22757-6, 250pp.
The MIDI programmer's handbook / Steve De Furia and Joe Scacciaferro, Ferro Technologies.
Publisher: Redwood City, Calif. : M&T Pub., c1989.
ISBN: 1-55851-068-0, 250 pp. Paperback. $24.95 Mix Bookshelf part # 3539C
*** This book is now out of print ***
C Programming for MIDI / Jim Conger.
Publisher: Redwood City, Calif. : M&T Books, 1989.
501 Galveston Drive Redwood City, CA 94063
Subjects: MIDI, C, sequencing
This book shows how to use the basic features of an MPU-401 interface.
Includes a disk with MS-DOS code.
MIDI sequencing in C / Jim Conger.
Publisher: Redwood City, Calif. : M&T Books, 1989. 501 Galveston Drive Redwood City, CA 94063
Subjects: MIDI (Standard)
C (Computer program language)
Sequential processing (Computer science)
ISBN: 1-55851-045-1 (book) : $24.95
ISBN: 1-55851-047-8 (disk) : $20.00
ISBN: 1-55851-046-X (set) : $39.95 This book continues where the previous one lefts off.
⇒ This bibliography is subjective, and not guaranteed 100% accurate !
°
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
¯
²
±
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
15 Fault report and suggestion form
Please return this form to: DOEPFER Musikelektronik GmbH
Geigerstr. 13 D-82166 Graefelfing
GERMANY
Tel: +49 89 89809510
Fax: +49 89 89809511
email: [email protected]
Name:..........................................................................
Firm:............................................................................
Address:......................................................................................................................................................
....................................................................................................................................................................
..........
Customer number:....................................
Date of
purchase:......................................
Serial number:..........................................
Errors / suggested improvements in the user manual:
REGELWERK faults / suggested improvements:
´
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
³
¶
µ
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
For notes:
¸
Doepfer Musikelektronik GmbH
·
º
¹
User manual V1.0
REGELWERK V1.2
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement