Communication for Windows

Communication for Windows
Preface, Contents
Part I
Introduction
Part II
Connection to
SIMATIC S5
1
SIMATIC HMI
Communication for
Windows-based
Systems
User’s Manual
2
5
6
Part III Connection to
SIMATIC S7
7
8
Part IV Connection to
SIMATIC WinLC
9
10
Part V
Connection to
SIMATIC 505
13
Part VI Connection to
Allen Bradley SLC 500 /
PLC-5
14
15
A
Part VII Appendices
E
6AV6596–1MA05–1AB0
Release 01/99
Index
Safety Guidelines
!
!
This manual contains notices which you should observe to ensure your own personal safety, as
well as to protect the product and connected equipment. These notices are highlighted in the
manual by a warning triangle and are marked as follows according to the level of danger:
Warning
indicates that death, severe personal injury or substantial property damage can result if proper
precautions are not taken.
Caution
indicates that minor personal injury or property damage can result if proper precautions are not
taken.
Note
draws your attention to particularly important information on the product, handling the product,
or to a particular part of the documentation.
Qualified Personnel
Equipment may be commissioned and operated only by qualified personnel. Qualified personnel within the meaning of the safety notices in this manual are persons who are authorized to
commission, ground and identify equipment, systems and circuits in accordance with safety
engineering standards.
Correct Usage
Note the following:
!
Warning
The equipment may be used only for the applications stipulated in the catalog and in the technical description and only in conjunction with other equipment and components recommended
or approved by Siemens.
Startup must not take place until it is established that the machine, which is to accommodate
this component, is in conformity with the guideline 89/392/EEC.
Faultless and safe operation of the product presupposes proper transportation, proper storage,
erection and installation as well as careful operation and maintenance.
Trademarks
SIMATICR, ProTool/LiteR, ProToolR and ProTool/ProR are registered trademark of
Siemens AG.
Some of the other designations used in these documents are also registered trademarks; the
owner’s rights may be violated if they are used by third parties for their own purposes.
Impressum
Editor and Publisher: A&D PT1
Copyright E Siemens AG 1999 All rights reserved
Disclaimer of Liability
The reproduction, transmission or use of this document or its
contents is not permitted without express written authority.
Offenders will be liable for damages. All rights, including rights
created by patent grant or registration of a utility model or design,
are reserved.
We have checked the contents of this manual for agreement with
the hardware and software described. Since deviations cannot be
precluded entirely, we cannot guarantee full agreement. However,
the data in this manual are reviewed regularly and any necessary
corrections included in subsequent editions. Suggestions for improvement are welcomed.
Siemens AG,
Bereich Automatisierungs– und Antriebstechnik
Bedienen und Beobachten
Postfach 4848, D-90327 Nuernberg
Siemens Aktiengesellschaft
Technical data subject to change.
E Siemens AG 1999
Order No. 6AV6596–1MA05–1AB0
User’s Manual Communication for Windows–based Systems
Preface
Purpose
The Communication User’s Manual describes:
the structure and function of the individual user data areas,
the different types of connection between the operating unit and the PLC,
the actions that need to be carried out in the PLC program.
The description applies to operating units configured with ProTool/Pro.
Notation
History
The following notation is used throughout this manual:
VAR_23
Text that is displayed on the screen is printed in Courier
typeface. This includes: commands, file names, entries in
dialog boxes and system messages.
Tag
The names of dialog boxes and boxes and buttons in
dialog boxes are printed in italics.
File → Edit
Menu items are shown linked by arrows. The full path to
the menu item in question is always shown.
F1
The names of keys are printed in a different typeface.
Refer to the following table for information on the edition of the Communication User’s Guide.
Edition
Comments
07/98
1st version for Windows–based system
01/99
Addition of PROFIBUS-DP connection for SIMATIC S5 and
SIMATIC 505.
Addition of the driver WinLC (new register).
SIMATIC 505 with NITP and Allen Bradley DF1 have new
configuration parameters and support different data types than
previously.
MP270 now included.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
i
Preface
Further support
Please address technical questions to your local Siemens partners in the subsidiaries and branch offices responsible for your area. Refer to Appendix E of
this manual for a list of addresses.
SIMATIC Customer Support Hotline
Available worldwide around the clock:
Nuremberg
Johnson City
Singapore
Simatic Basic Hotline
Nuremberg
Johnson City
SIMATIC BASIC Hotline
SIMATIC BASIC Hotline
Singapore
SIMATIC BASIC Hotline
Local time: Mon-Fri 8:00 to
18:00
Local time: Mon-Fri 8:00 to
17:00
Local time: Mon-Fri 8:30 to
17:30
Tel.:
+49 (911) 895-7000
Tel.:
+1 423 461-2522
Tel.:
+65 740-7000
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7002
Fax:
+1 423 461-2231
Fax:
+65 740-7001
E-mail:
[email protected]
nbgm.siemens.de
E-mail:
[email protected]
sea.siemens.com
E-mail:
[email protected]
singnet.com.sg
SIMATIC Premium Hotline
(chargeable,
SIMATIC Card required)
ii
Times:
Mon-Fri 0:00 to
24:00
Tel.:
+49 (911) 895-7777
Fax:
+49 (911) 895-7001
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Preface
SIMATIC Customer Support Online Services
SIMATIC Customer Support offers you comprehensive additional information about
SIMATIC products through its Online Services as follows:
Up-to-date general information is provided
– on the internet at http://www.ad.siemens.de/simatic
– from the fax polling service on 08765-93 02 77 95 00
Up-to-date product information and downloads for practical use can be found
– on the internet at http://www.ad.siemens.de/support/
html–00/
– from the Bulletin Board System (BBS) in Nuremberg (SIMATIC Customer Support Mailbox) on +49 (911) 895-7100.
For calling up the mailbox, you should use a modem with up to
V.34 (28.8 kBaud) capability and set the parameters as follows: 8, N,
1, ANSI, or connect via ISDN (x.75, 64 kBit).
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
iii
Preface
Abbreviations
iv
The abbreviations used in the Communication User’s Guide have the following meaning:
AG
Programmable Logic Controller SIMATIC S5
AM
Alarm Message
AS511
Interface 511
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
CP
Communication Processor
CPU
Central Processing Unit
DB
Data Block (on PLC)
DP
Decentral Periphery
DHB
Data Handling Block
DW
Data Word (on PLC)
DX
Extended data block (on PLC)
EM
Event Message
EPROM
Erasable (by UV light) Programmable Read–Only
Memory
FB
Function Block
FW
Firmware
LED
Light Emitting Diode
MPI
Multipoint Interface (SIMATIC S7)
MW
Memory Word (on PLC)
OB
Organization Block
OP
Operator Panel
PC
Personal Computer
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller
PPI
Point–to–Point Interface (SIMATIC S7)
PU
Programming Unit
RAM
Random Access Memory (system memory)
SRAM
Static RAM (buffered)
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Contents
Part I
General Information
1
Types of Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-2
1.2
Which Connection for Which Operating Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-4
1.3
Conversion for Changing PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-6
Part II Connection to SIMATIC S5
2
3
4
5
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2.1
Supported Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-3
2.2
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-4
2.3
Error Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-6
AS511 Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-2
3.2
Configuring SIMATIC S5 for AS511 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-3
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
4.2
Configuring the Function Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
4.3
4.3.1
Configuration of PROFIBUS–DP for ProTool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other SIMATIC S5 PROFIBUS-DP Master Modules . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-7
4-9
4.4
Configuring the PROFIBUS–DP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-11
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-2
5.2
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-4
5.3
LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-9
5.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-10
5.5
Screen Number Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-12
5.6
Using PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-13
5.7
Coordination Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-14
5.8
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-15
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
i
Contents
Part III Connection to SIMATIC S7
6
7
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
6.2
Configuring SIMATIC S7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-3
6.3
6.3.1
6.3.2
Connection to S7–200, S7-300 and S7-400 via MPI . . . . . . . . . . . .
Addressing S7–300 using the MPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Addressing the S7–400 using the MPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-6
6-9
6-12
6.4
Connection to S7-200, S7-300 and S7-400 via PROFIBUS . . . . . .
6-14
6.5
Connection to S7-200 via the PPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-19
6.6
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-21
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1
7.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-2
7.2
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-4
7.3
LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-9
7.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-10
7.5
Screen Number Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-12
7.6
Using PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-13
7.7
Coordination Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-14
7.8
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-15
Part IV Connection to WinLC
8
9
ii
Communication Management for WinLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1
8.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2
8.2
Data Types Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-3
User Data Areas for WinLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
9.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-2
9.2
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
9.3
Trend Request and Transfer Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-9
9.4
Screen Number Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-11
9.5
Using PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-12
9.6
Coordination Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-13
9.7
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Contents
PartV Connection to SIMATIC 505
10
11
12
13
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-1
10.1
Supported Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-3
10.2
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-6
Connection Via NITP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-1
11.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-2
11.2
Configuring SIMATIC 505 for NITP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-3
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-1
12.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-2
12.2
Configuring SIMATIC 505 for PROFIBUS–DP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-5
12.3
Configuring the PROFIBUS–DP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12-7
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-1
13.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-2
13.2
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-4
13.3
LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-9
13.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-10
13.5
Screen Number Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-12
13.6
Using PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-13
13.7
Coordination Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-14
13.8
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13-16
Part VI Connection to Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
14
15
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5 . . . . . .
14-1
14.1
Basic Methods of Functioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-3
14.2
Configuring Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-4
14.3
Supported Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-5
14.4
Optimization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14-6
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-1
15.1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-2
15.2
Event and Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-4
15.3
LED Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-9
15.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-10
15.5
Screen Number Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-12
15.6
Using PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-13
15.7
Coordination Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-14
15.8
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15-15
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
iii
Contents
Appendix
A
System Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
A.1
Operating Unit System Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
A.2
Error Number of the FB DBHMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-13
B
PLC Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
C
Interface Area Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
D
SIMATIC HMI Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
E
Siemens Worldwide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-1
. . . . . . . . Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index-1
iv
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part I
General Information
Types of Connection
1
-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Types of Connection
1
This chapter provides an overview of the possible types of connection between the operating units on the one hand, and the various PLCs on the other.
The most important features of the individual types of connection are described briefly according to the PLC used.
Please refer to the corresponding chapters in Parts II and VI of this manual
for detailed information on each connection type, including specific notes on
connection configuration.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
1-1
Types of Connection
1.1
Overview
Function of the
operating units
Messages and tags are read in, displayed, stored and recorded on the operating units. The operating units can also be used to intervene in the process.
The term operating unit is used throughout this manual when describing settings which are relevant to the OP37/Pro, MP270 or PCs.
Data exchange
A condition for the operating and monitoring functions is the connection of
the operating unit to a PLC. The exchange of data between the operating unit
and the PLC is controlled by a connection-specific communication driver.
Each type of connection requires its own communication driver.
PLC
PLCs used may be:
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7,
SIMATIC WinLC
SIMATIC 505,
Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5.
Selecting the type
of connection
Criteria for selecting the type of connection between the operating unit and
PLC include:
the type of PLC,
the CPU on the PLC,
the type of operating unit,
the number of operating units per PLC,
the structure of and, if applicable, the bus system used by an existing
installation,
the work and expense involved in any additional components required.
1-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Types of Connection
Possible
connection types
The following connection types are supported at present:
SIMATIC S5
– AS511 connection
– PROFIBUS-DP connection
SIMATIC S7
– Multipoint interface (MPI) connection
– PROFIBUS-DP connection
SIMATIC WinLC
SIMATIC 505
– NITP protocol
– PROFIBUS-DP connection
Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
– DF1 protocol
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
1-3
Types of Connection
1.2
Which Connection for Which Operating Unit
Selection criteria
Table 1-1
Table 1-1 provides an overview of the various operating units. The decisive
factors in making the correct choice are the type of PLC used and the existing network configuration. Tables 1-2, 1-3, 1-4 and 1-5 indicate the connection possibilities in respect of the different PLCs.
Possible types of connection with operating units
PLC
Networks supported (protocol)
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 505
Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
PC
OP37/Pro
MP270
AS 511
x
x
x
PROFIBUS–DP
x
x
x
MPI (S7 protocol)
x
x
x
PPI
1)
1)
1)
PROFIBUS-DP (S7 protocol)
x
x
x
NITP
x
x
x
PROFIBUS–DP
x
x
x
DF1
x
x
x
1)
Only possible with connection to an S7–212
x
Possible
–
Not possible
Table 1-2
Connection possibilities of the SIMATIC S5 PLCs
SIMATIC S5
AS511
PROFIBUS–DP
S5-90U
x
–
S5-95U
x
–
S5-95U DP–Master
x
x
S5-100U (CPU 100, 102, 103)
x
–
S5-115U (CPU 941-945)
x
x
S5-135U2)
x
x
S5-155U (CPU 946-948)
x
x
2)
x
–
Only CPU 928A, version -3UA12 or later
Possible without qualification
Not possible
1-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Types of Connection
Table 1-3
Connection possibilities of the SIMATIC S7 PLCs
SIMATIC S7
PPI
MPI
PROFIBUS–
DP 1)
Internal
software
S7-200
x
x 2)
x
–
S7-300
–
x
x
–
S7-400
–
x
x
–
WinLC
–
–
–
x
1)
2)
x
–
All CPUs with the designation “–2DP”, CP or FM that support the S7 protocol
Not S7-212
Possible without qualification
Not possible
Table 1-4
Connection possibilities of the SIMATIC 505 PLCs
SIMATIC 505
505 Series
x
NITP
PROFIBUS–DP
x
x
Possible without qualification
Table 1-5
Connection possibilities of the Allen Bradley PLCs
Allen Bradley
DF1
SLC 500
x
PLC-5
x
x
Possible without qualification
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
1-5
Types of Connection
1.3
Conversion for Changing PLCs
Changing the PLC
If the PLC is changed in a configuration, ProTool cannot convert the data
formats used by the old PLC for the new one. For this reason, the connection
of the tags to the PLC are disconnected following a warning. If a tag is then
called, the symbolic name No PLC is specified in the field PLC. This does
not happen using ProTool when implementing a newer version of the PLC
driver or when changing to a PLC within the same PLC family.
When is the
connection to the
PLC
discontinued?
The connection of tags to the PLC is discontinued after changing the PLC as
listed below:
Old PLC
1-6
New PLC
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7–300/400;
SIMATIC S7–200;
WinAC;
External driver
SIMATIC S7–300/400
SIMATIC S7–200;
SIMATIC S5;
SIMATIC 505;
External driver
SIMATIC WinAC
SIMATIC S7–200;
SIMATIC S5;
SIMATIC 505;
External driver
SIMATIC S7–200
SIMATIC S7–300/400;
WinAC;
SIMATIC S5;
SIMATIC 505;
External driver
SIMATIC 505
SIMATIC S5;
SIMATIC S7–300/400;
SIMATIC S7–200;
WinAC;
External driver
Allen Bradley
SIMATIC S5;
SIMATIC S7–300/400;
SIMATIC S7–200;
WinAC;
External driver
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Types of Connection
Same unit family
ProTool retains connection of the tags to the PLC when the changing to a
PLC in the same unit family. If the old PLC uses data types which are not
relevant for the new PLC, these are identified as invalid data formats and can
be modified. This concerns the following PLCs:
Changing the CPU using the SIMATIC S5 when different data formats are
supported
Changing from Allen Bradley SLC 500 to PLC 5 and vice versa
Changing from SIMATIC S7–300/400 to WinAC and vice versa
Modifying data
formats
Call in the dialog box for the tag with a double click. The old, invalid data
format is displayed. Change the data format to a valid one.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
1-7
Types of Connection
1-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part II
Connection to
SIMATIC S5
Communication Management
for SIMATIC S5
2
AS511 Connection
3
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to
SIMATIC S5
4
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5
1-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
2
Communication Management
for SIMATIC S5
This chapter describes the basic communication between the operating unit
and PLC.
Supported AGs
The following AGs are supported when connection via the AS511 and PROFIBUS–DP is used:
PLC
Supported
operating units
AS511
PROFIBUS–DP
PLC 90U
x
–
PLC 95U
x
x
AG 95U DP–Master
x
x
AG 100U (CPU 100, CPU 102,
CPU 103)
x
–
AG 115U (CPU 941, CPU 942,
CPU 943, CPU 944, CPU 945)
x
x
AG 135U (CPU 922, CPU 928A,
CPU 928B)
x
x
AG 155U (CPU 945, CPU 946/947,
CPU 948)
x
x
The following operating units can be connected to the SIMATIC S5:
– PC
– OP37/Pro
– MP270
Installation
The drivers for connection to the the SIMATIC S5 are supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically. With ProTool, the parameters
for connection to the PLC must also be set. Please refer to the corresponding
chapter on connection types for information regarding which parameters are
necessary on the PLC side to connect the operating unit.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
2-1
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5
Function block
The function blocks FB158 and FB159 are necessary for connection to PROFIBUS–DP, and are supplied with ProTool. These function blocks are examples and support linear P-addressing. The function blocks can be adapted for
individual requirements at any time.
The function blocks are located in directory PROTOOL\PLCPROG\SIMATIC_S5. The function blocks to be implemented
are dependent on the AG. Table 2-1 lists the directories for the various AGs.
Copy all the files from the relevant directory in your STEP5 program.
Table 2-1
AG-dependent directories for function blocks
PLC
Directory
AG 95U DP–Master
AG95UDP
PLC 115U
AG115U\CPU941_4 for CPU 941 bis 944
AG115U\CPU945 for CPU 945
PLC 135U
AG135U
PLC 155U
AG155U
Behavior of
ProTool V5.1
ProTool V5.1 does not support exactly the same data formats as ProTool
V5.0x for some PLCs. However, it is still possible to used your configuration.
After calling in the configuration using ProTool V5.1, the configuration
window item object type Tags displays “invalid data format”. The
configuration can be edited but not created. This concerns the PLC
connection via PROFIBUS–DP.
Modifying data
formats
Call in the dialog box for the tag with a double click. The old, invalid data
format is displayed. Change the data format to a valid one.
2-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5
2.1
Supported Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 2-2
are available for use:
Table 2-2
Data types available
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Data block – word
DB DW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit
Data block – double word
DB DD
DF, DH, KC, KG, Bit
Extended data block – word1)
DX DW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit
Extended data block – double
word1)
DX DD
DF, DH, KC, KG, bit
Input word
EW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit2)
Input double word
ED
DF, DH, KC, KG, Bit2)
Output word
AW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit2)
Output double word
AD
DF, DH, KC, KG, Bit2)
Marker word
MW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit2)
Marker double word
MD
DF, DH, KC, KG, Bit2)
Timer
T
KT, KH, KM
Counter
Z
KZ, KH, KM
SMarkerWord1)
SW
KF, KH, KM, KY, KC, KT,
KZ, Bit
SMarkerDWord1)
SD
DF, DH, KC, KG, Bit
1)
This data format is not supported by all CPUs and is
not possible using PROFIBUS–DP
2) This data format is not supported by all CPUs
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
2-3
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5
2.2
Optimization
Acquisition cycle
and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area
pointers and for the tags are major factors in respect of the real update times
which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be
observed during configuration:
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary but as small as possible.
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The real update time is improved by setting up one large are area instead of several
small areas.
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a
furnace, for example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve
of an electric motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs
to transfer the user data areas at random times.
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating
unit, they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
Screens
The real updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles
are only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to
be updated quickly.
Trends
If the communication bit is set in the trend transfer area, as in the case of bittriggered trends, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is
set in that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the S5 program may only be set again after all the
bits have been reset by the operating unit.
2-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5
PLC jobs
If a number of PLC jobs need to be transferred to the operating unit in quick
succession, communication between the operating unit and AG may become
overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes
the job, for which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is
then immediately entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before
the operating unit executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient computer performance is available.
Read DB address
list cyclically
(AS511 only)
Reading the DB address list for each access to the AG is only necessary if,
for example, the user data areas are modified during the startup phase. For
subsequent operation, this function should be deactivated for performance
reasons.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
2-5
Communication Management for SIMATIC S5
2.3
Error Prevention
Data block
modification
Modification of the data block is not permitted when the system is in operation.
Neither is it permitted to compress the internal program memory of the AG
(PU function “Compress”, integrated FB COMPR) when an operating unit is
connected! The compressing process alters the absolute addresses of the
blocks in the program memory. Since the operating unit only reads the address list at startup, it does not detect subsequent changes to the addresses
and accesses the wrong memory areas.
If compression during normal operation cannot be avoided, the operating unit
must be switched off before compression takes place.
In areas subject to explosion hazard, always disconnect the operating unit
from the power supply before disconnecting connectors.
Operating unit
connected to SI2
of the CPU
2-6
If both CPU interfaces are used for communication via the AS511, the second
interface is operated with a lower priority. A possible configuration is, e.g.:
PU on SI1 and operating unit on SI2. In this case, error messages may occur
on the operating unit relating to a communication fault. In extreme cases,
such characteristics may occur on the CPU928B .
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
3
AS511 Connection
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC S5 with the AS511 connection.
Installation
The driver for connection to the the SIMATIC S5 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically.
Connection of the operating unit to the SIMATIC S5 is basically restricted to
the physical connection to the operating unit. Special function blocks for connection to the PLC are not required.
Connection
The operating unit is connected directly to the CPU. Please refer to Table 3-1
for information concerning the connection cable to be used. The CPU interface SI1 with the TTY physical characteristics should be used, preferably.
The CPU interface SI2 with the TTY physical characteristics can also be
used, if available. In the case of the SI2 interface, however, performance limitations must be taken into account.
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the
relevant equipment manual.
Table 3-1
Applicable connection cables
Operating unit
PC (COM1, COM2)
All CPUs
6ES5734-1BD20
OP37/Pro
6XV1440-2A_ _ _
MP270
6XV1440-2A_ _ _
’_’ = Length code
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
3-1
AS511 Connection
3.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
Display/Operation
User data areas
Application
program
Communication
Operating unit
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 3-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general data exchange between AG and operating unit is performed via
process values. To do this, tags are created in the configuration which relate
to an address in the AG. The operating unit reads the value from the specified
address and displays it. In the same way, an operator can enter a value on the
operating unit which is then written to the address in the AG.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 5.
3-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
AS511 Connection
3.2
Configuring SIMATIC S5 for AS511
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. Select the driver SIMATIC S5 AS511 and then define the parameters, indicated below, after clicking on the button Parameter. For any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 3-2
PLC parameters
Parameter
Explanation
CPU type
Select a SIMATIC S5 CPU.
Interface
Select the interface on the operating unit via which the connection
is to be established.
This is the interface IF1A when using the OP37/Pro and MP270.
This can be interface COM 1 or COM 2 in the case of a PC.
Type
Data bits
These parameters are specifically defined for connection type
AS511.
Parity
Stop bits
Baud rate
DB address
Select Read DB address list cyclically, the address list is read in
anew following each operating unit read/write access in the AG.
This is important during commissioning if modules are set up, modified or deleted in the PLC.
Note
The Read DB address list cyclically setting has a direct effect on
the performance and should, therefore, not be used when the system
is in operation.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
3-3
AS511 Connection
3-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC S5 via the PROFIBUS–DP.
Definition
PROFIBUS-DP is a Master-Slave field bus with up to 122 slaves. The PROFIBUS-DP network is normally operated by one master. This master polls all
the slaves cyclically. The master is, for example, an AG with a standard DP–
compatible connection module. Each operating unit is a slave and explicitly
assigned to a master AG.
Hardware
requirements
The following hardware components are required in order to integrate the
operating units into an existing PROFIBUS–DP network:
OP37/Pro, or
MP270 or
PC with communication processor CP5611 or CP5511
In the AG:
IM308C or
CP5431
For each unit (operating unit or AG):
Bus connector PROFIBUS–DP or
a different component approved for this installation (except FSK bus terminal, refer to Configuration in SIMATIC HMI Catalog ST80.1).
Software
requirements
The following software components are also required for the PROFIBUS-DP
connection:
Configuration software ProTool/Pro from Version 5.1
COM PROFIBUS 3.X
Installation
The driver for connection to the SIMATIC S5 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically.
For connection of the operating unit to the SIMATIC S5, both the physical
connection and a function block in the PLC are required. The function block
is supplied with ProTool/Pro.
Other bus masters
In special cases, it is possible to connect another AG with a standard DP–
compatible master module to a PROFIBUS-DP network. The operating units
can then be distributed between both masters.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-1
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
System limits
4-2
Within a network established via the PROFIBUS-DP, a maximum of 120 of
the 122 slaves may be an operating unit. These values are theoretical limits.
The real limits are determined by the memory capacity and performance capability of the PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data areas
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 4-1
Communication structure of the PROFIBUS-DP connection
Task of the tags
The general data exchange between AG and operating unit is performed via
process values. To do this, tags are created in the configuration which relate
to an address in the AG. The operating unit reads the value from the specified
address and displays it. In the same way, an operator can enter a value on the
operating unit which is then written to the address in the AG.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-3
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 5.
Tasks of the
function block
The operating unit and AG communicate via a PROFIBUS–DP master module. The function blocks FB158 and FB159 must be installed in the STEP5
application program. The task of the function blocks is to coordinate the data
exchange and to monitor the connection to the operating unit. The FB158 is
responsible for recording the process, the FB159 reads the data in and out of
the memory.
Interface settings
The interface is setup as follows using Windows Settings→ Control Panel →
Set PU/PC interface:
4-4
Access point of the application
DPSONLINE
Module configuration used
PROFIBUS–DP slave
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4.2
Configuring the Function Block
Addressing the
function block
The function blocks supplied with ProTool are examples and supports linear
P–addressing. The function blocks can be adapted for individual applications
at any time.
The following table explains which modifications are necessary for the respective types of addressing when both function blocks supplied, FB158 and
FB159, are used.
Type of addressing
Modifications
Linear P–range
Not necessary
Linear Q–range
The P–addresses must be changed to Q–addresses
in both FB158 and FB159.
P–page frame
Before calling the FB158, the page frame number
must be entered in the periphery byte 255.
Q–page frame
Before calling the FB158, the page frame number
must be entered in the periphery byte 255.
The P–addresses must be changed to Q–addresses
in both FB158 and FB159.
The following table indicates the permissible address range, according to the
type of addressing, for all PLCc except S5 95U.
Type of addressing
Permissible address range
Linear P–range
128 to 255
Linear Q–range1)
0 to 255
P–page frame
192 to 254
Q–page frame1)
0 to 254
1)
Only possible using S5 115U with CPU 945, S5 135U and S5 155U.
In the case of AG 95U, the permissible address range is between 64 and 191.
Since the address 127 physically lies within a range different from address
128, a block may not be set up with overlapping ranges. This results in the
address ranges 64 to 127 and 128 to 191.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-5
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
Calling in FB158
The FB158 must be called in the cyclic program, e.g. OB1, with the following parameters:
PERA:
Periphery start address. It must correspond with the configuration in
COM–PROFIBUS.
BLEN:
Block length. (Not with AG 95U, with which only ‘tiny’ is possible.)
0: tiny
1: small
2: middle
3: big
The block length must correspond to the configuration in ProTool
(PLC → Parameter).
CADB:
A free DB is used by the FB158 as working memory. The first 10 words
of the DB are used by the FB158 to buffer data temporarily. This DB can
be used by the user from the 11th data word.
After calling in the FB158, the number of any error which may have occurred
appears in AKKU 1. This error must be analyzed in the STEP5 program because the error number is reset the next time an FB is called.
Multiple calling of
the FB158
When using several units, the FB must be called in once for each unit.
Note
The performance is increased considerably when the FB158 is called in from
a time-controlled OB.
4-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4.3
Configuration of PROFIBUS–DP for ProTool
Parameter
When defining a new project, the project assistant requests the specification
of a PLC. Select the driver SIMATIC S5 DP V5.1 and then define the
parameters, indicated below, after clicking on the button Parameter. For any
subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 4-1
PLC parameters
Parameter
Explanation
OP address
PROFIBUS–DP address of the operating unit.
Value range 3 to 126
Interface
Select the interface on the operating unit via which the connection
is to be established. When using a PC, this is DP/MPI, and with the
OP37/Pro and MP270, IF1B.
In the case of the OP37/Pro, ASPC2 must also be activated in the
BIOS. In the mask Integrated Peripherals, set the OP37/Pro BIOS
entry ASPC2 to Enabled.
Baud rate
The baud rate at which communication takes place over the network. The baud rate must be set identically for all the units in the
network.
The following baud rates are possible:
– 93.75 kBit/s
– 187.5 kBit/s
– 500 kBit/s
– 1.5 MBit/s (default)
– 3 MBit/s
– 6 MBit/s
– 12 MBit/s
Set
configuration
Used to define the I/O area implemented for the communication
area between the operating unit and AG. The size of the I/O area
influences the performance.
The set configuration must be realized according to Class B (realization of the basic DP slave complying to EN 50170). There are
four different set configurations from which to choose:
– Class B tiny
– Class B small
– Class B middle
– Class B big
Table 4-2 indicates the assignment of the I/O area.
The settings in ProTool/Pro must correspond to configuration specifications
of the connection module IM308C.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-7
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
Set configuration
The assignment of the I/O area is explicitly defined with the four different
settings. Table 4-2 provides details of the I/O area assignment.
Table 4-2
Assignment of the I/O area for Class B
Class
Inputs (Byte)
Outputs (Byte)
Class B tiny
32
22
Class B small
42
22
Class B middle
64
32
Class B big
122
64
In order to download large quantities of data, it is recommended to set a large
I/O area. This ensures the screen displays on the operating unit are updated
more quickly because the data is retrieved in one cycle.
4-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4.3.1
Other SIMATIC S5 PROFIBUS-DP Master Modules
Condition
The operating units can use PROFIBUS-DP to communicate with all the
master modules which support PROFIBUS-DP complying to DIN E 19245,
Part 3.
Notes on
configuration
Please refer to the relevant module description for information on configuring other PROFIBUS–DP master modules. Observe the following performance data when connecting the operating unit to a PROFIBUS–DP network:
Configure the operating unit as a PROFIBUS–DP slave, complying to
DIN E 19245, Part 3.
The address scope (block size) of the I/O area must be defined for each
operating unit.
Enter the corresponding manufacturer ID of the unit (refer to Table 4-4).
The modes “SYNC” and “FREEZE” are not supported by the operating
unit.
User–configured data is not possible.
Only use one of the following operating unit baud rates (disregard any
other setting possibilities in the configuration software):
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
93.75 KBit/s,
187.5 KBit/s,
500 KBit/s,
1.5 MBit/s,
3 MBit/s.
6 MBit/s.
12 MBit/s.
A time of 3 ms must be set as the “Min. slave-interval” for all operating
units.
Configure the operating unit periphery address area as a combined I/O
area with byte consistency. The combined I/O areas have the following
Identifications:
Class
Identification
Class B tiny
0x3F, 0x35, 0x19
Class B small
0x3F, 0x35, 0x1F, 0x13
Class B middle
0x3F, 0x3F, 0x1F
Class B big
0x3F, 0x3F, 0x3F, 0x3F, 0x1F, 0x1F, 0x1F, 0x19
There are no other consistency requirements.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-9
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
CP 5430 TF and
CP 5431 FMS
The configuration user interface PROFIBUS–NCM is required to configure
the communication processors CP 5430 TF (from version 2) and CP 5431
FMS (from version 1). The notes on configuration on Page 4-9 apply. Only
the special features for the CP 5430/5431 are described here.
Please refer to the relevant module description for information on configuration of the communication processors using PROFIBUS–NCM.
We recommend setting the following parameters according to Table 4-3:
Table 4-3
Parameters recommended for PROFIBUS–NCM
Parameter
Setting
Bus parameter data
Apply “calculated parameters”
DP operating mode
Free running
Trigger monitoring
“Yes” applicable for operating unit
Polling cycle time
Min. 5 ms; as small as possible
Largest min. slave interval
3 ms
Only linear P–area is permissible for the type of addressing.
FB-SYNCHRON must be called in the start-up organization modules OB 20,
OB 21 and OB 22:
Example call for SIMATIC S5–115U:
:SPA FB 249
Call in HTB SYNCHRON
NAME :SYNCHRON
4-10
SSNR :KY 0.8
Interface no. (page frame no.)
BLGR :KY 0.5
Block size
PAFE :MB 255
HTB error messages
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4.4
Configuring the PROFIBUS–DP Network
Connection
module IM308C
The configuration packet COM PROFIBUS is required in order to configure
the IM308C. GSD files for operating unit slaves are supplied with ProTool/
Pro. These GSD files are located in directory \PROTOOL\PLCPROG\GSD.
Different GSD files are required for the different operating units. Table 4-4
indicates the assignment.
Table 4-4
Assignment of GSD files and operating units
GSD file
Manufacturer ID
To 12 MBaud
SIEM8076.GSD
0x8076
PC
SIEM8077.GSD
0x8077
OP37/Pro
SIEM8078.GSD
0x8078
MP270
If the GSD files in the COM PROFIBUS directory
\PROTOOL\PLCPROG\GSD are older than those supplied with ProTool/Pro,
or the COM PROFIBUS still does not support a new operating unit, copy the
files from ProTool to COM PROFIBUS. Then restart COM PROFIBUS and
select Read GSD files.
If a COM PROFIBUS configuration was created previously with an older file
but the new GSD files are required for use, the configuration must be recreated.
Parameters
In order that the IM308C and operating unit can communicate with each
other, the following parameters must be set in COM PROFIBUS:
Station type: HMI
Station number: 3...126
The value entered here must correspond with the OP address specified in
the operating unit configuration.
Set configuration:
The set configuration is defined by selecting the class and the symbolic
name of the name. The following set configurations can be set:
– Class B tiny
– Class B small
– Class B middle
– Class B big
Address ID:
The address ID is automatically assigned by the set configuration and
must not be modified.
I and O address:
The address must correspond to the FB configuration (refer to
Chapter 4.2).
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
4-11
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC S5
4-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating
unit.
These data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various
user data areas.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-1
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.1
Overview
Definition
User data areas can be located in data blocks and memory areas in the PLC.
User data areas include messages and trends. Set up user data areas both in
the configuration, using menu item System → Area Pointer, and in the PLC.
Function range
The user data areas available depend on the operating unit used. Table 5-1
summarizes the range of functions available on the individual operating
units.
Table 5-1
Applicable user data areas
User data area
PC
OP37/Pro
MP270
Event messages
X
X
X
Alarm messages
X
X
X
Aknowledgement area
X
X
X
LED assignment
–
X
X
Trend request area
X
X
X
Trend transfer areas
X
X
X
Screen number
X
X
X
PLC jobs
X
X
X
Coordination area
X
X
X
Date and time
X
X
X
Table 5-2 indicates who is reading (R) and who is writing (W) in respect of
access to the individual data areas.
Table 5-2
Use of data areas
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Event messages
Configured event messages
R
W
Alarm messages
Configured alarm messages
R
W
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement from the PLC
R
W
Operating unit
acknowledgement
Message from the operating
unit to the PLC indicating an
alarm message has been
acknowledged
W
R
LED assignment area
LED triggeed by the PLC
R
W
(for OP and MP only)
5-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Table 5-2
Use of data areas, continued
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with
“switch buffer”
R/W
R/W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to
which screen is currently open
W
R
PLC jobs
Triggering of functions on the
operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Coordination area
Operating unit status polled by
the PLC program
W
R
Date and time
Transfer of date and time from
the operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-3
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.2
Event and Alarm Messages
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined
by the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event message
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
Motor switched on
PLC in manual mode
Alarm message
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
Valve not opening
Motor temperature too high
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operating status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
operator input on the operating unit
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering
messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the
PLC. The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that
the relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
5-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Message areas
Table 5-3 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages, the number of alarm message acknowledgement areas (PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC) and the total length of all the respective areas for the various operating units.
Table 5-3
Unit
Assignment of
message bit and
message number
Operating unit message areas
Event message area
Alarm messages area/
Alarm message acknowledgement area
Number Length (words)
Number Overall length per
per type type (words)
PC
8
125
8
125
OP37/Pro
8
125
8
125
MP270
8
125
8
125
A message can be configured for each bit in the message area configured.
The bits are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
Assume that the following event message area has been configured for the
SIMATIC S5 PLC:
DB 60
Address 43
Length 5 (in words)
Figure 5-1 shows the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area.
The assignment is performed automatically on the operating unit.
Figure 5-1
Assignment of message bit and message number
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-5
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Acknowledgement
areas
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself,
the relevant acknowledgement areas must be set up in the PLC. These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration.
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. In this case,
the area pointer “OP acknowledgement” must be set.
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In
this case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration
under Area Pointers.
Figure 5-2 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are
shown in Figures 5-4 and 5-5.
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement
area
PLC!Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
area
Operating Unit!PLC
Figure 5-2
Assignment of
acknowledgement
bit to message
number
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in
the acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the
acknowledgement area is the same length as the associated alarm messages
area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of
the associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages
and acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
5-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Alarm message no. 1
Alarm message no. 49
Figure 5-3
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function as pressing the “ACK” key. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the
alarm message area again. Figure 5-4 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
must have precisely the same polling time and
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 5-4
Acknowledgement area
OperatingUnit → PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to
time. If the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in
the acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the
alarm message has been acknowledged. Figure 5-5 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than
the associated alarm messages area.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-7
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Figure 5-5
Acknowledgement
area size
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit →
PLC must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. They
can, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is not required for
all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement need not
be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 5-6 illustrates such a
case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 5-6
Reduced–size alarm messages
acknowledgement area
Reduced–size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0
in ascending order.
5-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.3
LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP) and Multi Panel (MP) have function keys with
Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it
is possible to indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Condition
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as area pointers.
Data areas
The LED assignment can be divided into separate data areas, as illustrated in
the following table.
Data areas
LED assignment
OP37/Pro
MP270
Max. number
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
16
16
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined
when the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number
within the assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two consecutive bits that control a
total of four different LED statuses (see Table 5-4):
Table 5-4
LED flashing frequency
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
LED function
5-9
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas
Trends
A trend is a graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of the
value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered
trends
The operating unit reads in the trend values cyclically, according to the time
interval defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for
continuous progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered
trends
By setting a trigger bit, the operating unit reads in either a trend value or the
trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration. Bit-triggered trends are
normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid variation. An example of this is the injection pressure for plastic mouldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas
have to be specified in the configuration (under Area Pointers) and set up on
the PLC. The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via
those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
– Trend request area
– Trend transfer area 1
– Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in
Buffer 2. If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer
1. This prevents the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being
read by the operating unit.
5-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Data area division
The individual areas, namely trend request area and trend transfer areas 1 and
2, can be divided into separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (Table 5-5).
Table 5-5
Division of data areas
Data areas
Request
Trend request area
Transfer
1
2
Max. number per type
8
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
8
8
8
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the operating unit sets the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the screen, the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the
trend request area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
Trend transfer
area 1
This area serves to trigger trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire
buffer, according to the configuration. It then resets the trend bit and the
trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
Word 1
Word 2
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the
trend communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer
area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-11
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.5
Screen Number Area
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open
on the unit in the screen number area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the AG which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Condition
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the configuration as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one AG and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the AG spontaneously, i.e. the
transfer is always initiated when a change is registered on the operating unit.
Therefore, it is not necessary to configure a polling time.
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated
below.
15
0
Word 1
Current screen type
Word 2
Current screen number
Word 3
Reserved
Word 4
Reserved
Word 5
Reserved
Entry
5-12
Assignment
Current screen type
1
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.6
Using PLC Jobs
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC. These functions include:
– Displaying screens
– Setting date and time
A PLC job is identified by its job number. Depending on the PLC job in
question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
Job mailbox
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating actions on the operating unit.
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data
words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. The parameters of
the job must be entered in the succeeding words (maximum of 3).
15
0
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit
analyzes the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero
again. For this reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first
and then the job number.
The PLC jobs possible are listed in the Appendix B together with their job
numbers and parameters.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-13
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5.7
Coordination Area
The coordination area is two data words long. It serves to realize the following functions:
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the coordination area.
In order to use the coordination area, both data words must be specified,
whereby the first data word is used. The second data word is reserved. Figure
5-7 illustrates the structure of the first data word.
Bit assignment in
coordination area
Word 1
DL n +0
15
– – – – – –
DR n +0
8 7
2 1 0
– – – – – – – X X X
Startup bit
Operating mode
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 5-7
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start–up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to
poll this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating
unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
5-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered
by PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/
Time where they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 5-8 illustrates
the structure of the data area. All data is in BCD format.
DL
DW 15
n+0
n+1
DR
8 7
0
Reserved
Hour (0...23)
Minute (0...59)
Second (0 – 59)
n+2
Reserved
n+3
Reserved
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1...31)
Month (1 – 12)
n+5
Year (0...99)
Reserved
Figure 5-8
Time
Transferring date
and time
Date
5.8
Structure of data area Time and Date
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
5-15
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S5
5-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part III Connection to
SIMATIC S7
Communication Management for
SIMATIC S7
6
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7
5-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6
Communication Management
for SIMATIC S7
This chapter describes communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC S7. All the network configurations are explained in which the operating unit can be integrated.
General
information
With the PLC system SIMATIC S7, operating units can be connected via different network configurations. The network configuration depends on the
CPU being used. The following network configurations are possible:
PLC
Adjustable in ProTool/Pro
Protocol
profile
Modules
SIMATIC S7–300/400
CPU,
Communication-compatible
FM
MPI,
DP1),
Standard1),
Universal1)
SIMATIC S7–200
CPU
PPI2),
MPI1),
DP1),
Standard1),
Universal1)
1) CPU with PROFIBUS–DP interface only
2) Not MP270
Supported
operating units
The following operating units can be connected to the SIMATIC S7:
– PC
– OP37/Pro
– MP270
Installation
The driver for connecting to the SIMATIC S7 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically.
Connection of the operating unit to the SIMATIC S7 is basically restricted to
the physical connection. Special function blocks for connection to the PLC
are not required.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-1
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
Display/Operation
User data areas
Application
program
Communication
Operating unit
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 6-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between SIMATIC S7 and operating unit is
performed via the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the S7. The operating unit reads
the value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the
address in the S7.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 7.
6-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.2
Configuring SIMATIC S7
Network
configuration
The operating units communicate with the S7–300/400 via the S7 protocol.
Connection can be established via the MPI or the PROFIBUS interface of the
CPU. The simplest network configuration consists of one CPU and one operating unit. A more complex configuration might consist of a CPU and several
operating units, for example. Figure 6-2 shows the various possible network
configurations.
Figure 6-2
S7 network configurations
The following components are permissible in order to connect the OP37/Pro
or PC to the SIMATIC S7:
SINEC L2 bus terminal RS485
Order no.: 6GK1500–0A_006
SINEC L2 bus connector (even)
Order no.: 6GK1500–0EA00
SINEC L2 bus connector
(curved)1)
Order no.: 6ES7972–0B20–0XA0
SINEC L2 FO bus terminal
Order no.: 6GK1500–1A_00
Cable
Order no.: 6ES7901–0_ _ _0–0AA0
1)
When using the curved bus connector, memory cards can no longer be
removed or inserted.
’_’ = Length code
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-3
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
For connection of a PC to the SIMATIC S7 requires the additional use of a
Communication Processor (CP). The following table lists the permissible
CPs.
Communication
processor
Supported data
types
Windows 95
Windows NT
CP5611
X
X
CP5411
X
X
CP5412
X
X
CP5511
X
–
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 6-1
are available for use:
Table 6-1
Data types available
Data types supported for S7–300/400
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Data block
DB
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING,
TIMER, COUNTER
Memory
M
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING,
TIMER, COUNTER
Input
E
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Peripheral input
PE
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Output
A
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Peripheral output
PA
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Timer
T
Timer
Counter
Z
Counter
Data types supported for S7–200
Tag
6-4
V
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Table 6-1
Data types available, continued
Data types supported for S7–200
Input
E
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Output
A
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Memory
M
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, STRING
Timer
T
TIMER
Counter
Z
COUNTER
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-5
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.3
Connection to S7–200, S7-300 and S7-400 via MPI
Configuration
When connection is made via the MPI, the operating unit is connected to the
MPI interface on the S7-300/400. Several operating units can be connected to
an S7 and several S7 PLCs to an operating unit.
The SIMATIC S7–200 PLC should be configured in the network as a passive
node. It is connected by means of the DP connector. The possible baud rate
settings are 9.6 and 19.2 kBaud.
Figure 6-3 illustrates a possible network configuration. The numbers 1, 2
etc. are examples of addresses. The addresses of the S7 nodes are assigned
using STEP 7 hardware or network configuration.
Figure 6-3
Communication
peer
Connecting the operating unit to SIMATIC S7
Using the MPI connection, each communication-compatible module in the
S7 is a communication peer for the operating unit. This involves:
– every CPU
– communication-compatible function modules (FMs), such as the FM356.
Modules that are communication-compatible are shown shaded in Figure 6-3.
Number of
connectable
operating units
With connection via an MPI, the operating unit is connected to the MPI interface of the S7–300/400. Several operating units can be connected to an S7
and several S7 PLCs to an operating unit. An operating unit can communicate with a maximum of 8 communication peers (e.g. CPUs or FMs) at the
same time. In the case of S7–200, four communication peers are possible.
Similarly, a maximum number of connections to operating units is defined
for each communication–compatible module. For example, three operating
units can be connected simultaneously to a CPU314 and thirty–one to a
CPU414–1. For details of the maximum number of connections that a module
may have at a time, refer to the documentation for the module concerned.
6-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Configure the
operating unit
In order that the operating unit can communicate and exchange data with a
CPU or an FM, it must be correctly configured. To do this, define the address
of the operating unit in the ProTool/Pro configuration and specify the parameters for the connections with the communication peers.
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. First of all, select the driver SIMATIC S7 200 or
SIMATIC S7 300/400 and then define the following parameters in the
box which appears after clicking button Parameter. For any subsequent
parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Parameters
The parameters are divided into three groups.
– Use OP Parameters to enter the parameters for the operating unit in the
network configuration. This is done only once. Any alteration to the
operating unit parameters applies to all communication peers.
– Use Network Parameters to enter the parameters for the network to
which the operating unit is linked. By clicking the More button, it is
possible to set the HSA and the number of masters in the network.
After having installed “STEP 7 integrated” in ProTool/Pro and connected the operating unit to the network, the network parameters are
assumed. Click the More button to display the global network parameters.
– Use Peer Parameters to enter the address details of the S7 module
with which the operating unit is to exchange data. A symbolic name
has to be defined for each communication peer.
The individual parameters are explained in Table 6-2.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-7
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Table 6-2
Configuration parameters
Group
Parameter
Explanation
Operating unit
parameters
Address
MPI address of the operating unit
Interface
Interface on the operating unit via
which the operating unit is connected to the PPI network.
Network parameters
Profile
The protocol profile used in the network configuration. Enter MPI here.
Baud rate
The baud rate at which communication takes place over the network.
Address
MPI address of the S7 module
(CPU, FM or CP) to which the operating unit is connected.
Slot
Number of the slot containing the S7
module with which the operating
unit exchanges data.
Rack
Number of the rack containing the
S7 module with which the operating
unit exchanges data.
Cyclical
operation
If cyclical operation is activated, the
PLC optimizes data transfer between
the operating unit and PLC. This
achieves a better performance.
Peer parameters
Limitations:
Where several operating units are
running in parallel operation, cyclical operation should be deactivated.
More button
6-8
HSA
Highest Station Address; this must
be identical throughout the whole
network configuration.
Master
Number of masters in the network.
This information is only required for
PROFIBUS networks and is necessary in order that the bus parameters
can be calculated correctly.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.3.1
Addressing S7–300 using the MPI
MPI address
Each communication–compatible module in the S7–300 has a unique MPI
address which may only be assigned once within the network configuration.
Only one CPU may be used in each rack. Figure 6-4 illustrates direct connection of the operating unit to the MPI interface of the CPU.
1
2
3
4
5
6
2
Slot
number
11
Rack 0
4
1
7
0
Figure 6-4
Peer address
...
Network configuration with S7–300 and operating unit – one rack
With regard to the addressing, it is important to differentiate between peers
with an own MPI address and peers without an own MPI address.
– In the case of peers with their own MPI address, only the MPI address
need be specified. Slot and rack details are not relevant.
– In the case of peers without their own MPI address, the MPI address of
the peer via which communication is to be performed must be specified. In addition, the slot number and the rack number of peers without
MPI addresses must be specified.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-9
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Example:
CPU address
In order that the operating unit can communicate with the CPU illustrated in
Figure 6-4, the following parameters must be specified for the communication peer S7–CPU:
Example based on Figure 6-4
Own MPI address
No own MPI address
Address
2
2
Slot number
0
2
Rack
0
0
The above values are also specified as the default values in ProTool/Pro.
FM address
The operating unit can only communicate with FM modules which have an
MPI address. That covers all FMs that are connected to the K bus.
FMs that do not have an MPI address are connected to the P bus. These include the FM350s, for example. The data from these FMs can be visualized
on the operating unit by means of the I/O pattern of the CPU.
Example based on Figure 6-4
6-10
Own MPI Address
No Own MPI Address
Address
4
2
Slot number
0
5
Rack
0
0
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Number of racks
An S7–300 can be comprised of a maximum of four racks. The operating unit
can communicate with any communication–compatible module in those
racks. Figure 6-5 illustrates a configuration involving multiple racks and the
allocation of addresses.
1
2
3
4
5
6
...
Slot
number
11
Rack 3
6
Rack 2
Rack 1
5
2
Rack 0
4
1
7
0
Figure 6-5
Example:
FM address
Network configuration with S7–300 and operating units – four racks
In order that the operating unit can communicate with the shaded FM shown
in Figure 6-5, the following parameters must be specified for the communication peer:
Example based on Figure 6-5
Own MPI address
No own MPI address
Address
6
2
Slot number
0
5
Rack
0
3
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-11
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.3.2
Addressing the S7–400 using the MPI
MPI address
Only modules which have an MPI connector have such an MPI address. The
MPI address must be unique within the network configuration. Modules that
do not have an MPI connector are addressed indirectly by means of
– the MPI address of the module to which the operating unit is connected,
– the slot and rack in which the module is installed,
– to the operating unit with which it should communicate.
Figure 6-6 illustrates a simple network configuration with one rack.
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
Slot number
11
Rack 0
8
1
7
0
Figure 6-6
Example:
CPU address
...
Network configuration with S7–400 and operating unit – one rack
In order that the operating unit can communicate with the shaded CPU shown
in Figure 6-6, the following parameters must be specified for the communication peer:
Example based on Figure 6-6
6-12
Own MPI address
No own MPI address
Address
6
6
Slot number
0
2
Rack
0
0
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Example:
FM address
In order that the operating unit can communicate with the shaded FM shown
in Figure 6-6, the following parameters must be specified for the communication peer:
Example based on Figure 6-6
Operating unit to
FM
Own MPI address
No own MPI address
Address
8
6
Slot number
0
5
Rack
0
0
The operating unit can only communicate with FM modules connected to the
K bus. These include the FM453, for example.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-13
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.4
Connection to S7-200, S7-300 and S7-400 via PROFIBUS
Configuration
Within a PROFIBUS network, an operating unit can be connected to all S7
modules that have an integrated PROFIBUS or PROFIBUS–DP interface and
support the S7 driver. Several operating units can be connected to an S7 and
several S7 PLCs to an operating unit.
Figure 6-7 illustrates one possible network configuration. The numbers 1,
2, etc. are examples of addresses. The addresses of the S7 nodes are assigned
using STEP 7 hardware or network configuration.
The PLC SIMATIC S7-200 should be configured as a passive node in the
network configuration. The S7-200 is connected via the DP connector.
S7Ć300
S7Ć400
8
5
PROFIBUS
S7 protocol
6
PROFIBUS
DP
1
4
3
S7Ć200
Figure 6-7
Communication
peer
Connecting the operating unit to the SIMATIC S7 via PROFIBUS
As in the case of the MPI interface, the operating unit can exchange data with
any communication–compatible S7 module via PROFIBUS and
PROFIBUS–DP. This involves:
– any CPU that supports the S7 driver,
such as CPU 413–2DP, CPU 414–2DP,
CPU 315–2DP, version 315–2AF01–0AB0 or later
– communication-compatible function modules (FMs)
– communication processors (CPs), such as the CP342–5DP.
The modules with which the operating unit can communicate are illustrated,
shaded, in Figure 6-7.
6-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Configure the
operating unit
In order that the operating unit can communicate and exchange data with a
CPU or an FM, it must be correctly configured. To do this, define the address
of the operating unit in the ProTool/Pro configuration and specify the parameters for the connections with the communication peers.
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. First of all, select the protocol SIMATIC S7 300/400 and then define
the following parameters after clicking on the button Parameter. For any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Parameters
The parameters are divided into three groups.
– Use OP Parameters to enter the parameters for the operating unit in the
network configuration. This is done only once. Any alteration to the
operating unit parameters applies to all communication peers.
– Use Network Parameters to enter the parameters for the network to
which the operating unit is linked. By clicking the More button, it is
possible to set the HSA and the number of masters in the network.
After having installed “STEP 7 integrated” in ProTool/Pro and connected the operating unit to the network, the network parameters are
assumed. Click the More button to display the global network parameters.
– Use Peer Parameters to enter the address details of the S7 module
with which the operating unit is to exchange data. A symbolic name
has to be defined for each communication peer.
The individual parameters are explained in Table 6-3.
Table 6-3
Configuration parameters
Group
Parameter
Explanation
Operating unit
parameters
Address
PROFIBUS address of the operating unit.
Interface
Interface on the operating unit via
which the unit is connected to the
PROFIBUS network.
Profile
The protocol profile used in the
network configuration. Enter DP,
Standard or Universal here. This
setting must be identical
throughout the whole network
configuration.
Baud rate
The baud rate at which communication takes place over the network.
Network
parameters
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-15
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Table 6-3
Configuration parameters, continued
Group
Parameter
Explanation
Peer parameters
Address
PROFIBUS address of the S7 module (CPU, FM or CP) to which
the operating unit is connected.
Slot
Number of the slot containing the
S7 module with which the operating unit exchanges data.
Rack
Number of the rack containing the
S7 module with which the operating unit exchanges data.
Cyclical
operation
If cyclical operation is activated,
the PLC optimizes data transfer
between the operating unit and
PLC. This achieves a better performance.
Limitations:
Where several operating units are
running in parallel operation, cyclical operation should be deactivated.
More button
6-16
HSA
Highest Station Address; this must
be identical throughout the whole
network configuration.
Master
Number of masters in the network.
This information is only required
for PROFIBUS networks and is
necessary in order that the bus parameters can be calculated correctly.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Addressing using
S7–300
A communication–compatible S7 module is addressed by means of the following parameters:
Address:
PROFIBUS address of the CP.
Slot:
Slot number of the S7 module
Rack:
Rack in which the S7 module is located
1
2
3
4
5
6
...
11
Slot
number
Rack 0
8
3
Figure 6-8
Network configuration with S7–300 and operating unit,
PROFIBUS–DP profile
The CPU illustrated in Figure 6-8 is addressed as follows:
Address:
8
Slot:
2
Rack:
0
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-17
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Addressing using
S7–400
A communication–compatible S7 module is addressed by means of the following parameters:
Address:
PROFIBUS address of the CP or
the DP interface of the CPU
Slot:
Slot number of the S7 module
Rack:
Rack in which the S7 module is located
Figure 6-9
Network configuration with S7–400 and operating unit –
PROFIBUS–DP profile
The CPU illustrated in Figure 6-9 is addressed as follows:
Address:
5
Slot:
2
Rack:
0
The FM is addressed as follows:
Address:
5
Slot:
5
Rack:
0
6-18
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.5
Connection to S7-200 via the PPI
Concept
The PPI concerns a point-to-point connection in which the operating unit is
the master and the S7–200 the slave.
Configuration
In the case of connection to S7–200, the operating unit is connected to the
PPI interface of the S7–200. The operating unit is connected via the serial
connector of the CPU. Figure 6-10 illustrates one possible network configuration. The numbers 1, 2 and 3 are examples of addresses.
A maximum of one S7–200 can be connected to an operating unit. However,
several operating units can be connected to one S7–200. In such cases, as far
as the S7–200 is concerned, only one link is possible at any one time.
Figure 6-10
Configure the
operating unit
Connecting the operating unit to the SIMATIC S7–200
In order that the operating unit can communicate and exchange data via a
CPU, the operating unit must be correctly configured. To do this, define the
address of the operating unit in the ProTool/Pro configuration and specify the
parameters for the connections with the communication peers.
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. First of all, select the protocol SIMATIC S7 200 and then specify the
following parameters after clicking on the button Parameter. For any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-19
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Parameters
The parameters are divided into three groups.
– Use OP Parameters to enter the parameters for the operating unit in the
network configuration. This is done only once. Any alteration to the
operating unit parameters applies to all communication peers.
– Use Network Parameters to enter the parameters for the network to
which the operating unit is linked. By clicking the More button, it is
possible to set the HSA and the number of masters in the network.
– Use Peer Parameters to enter the address details of the S7 module
with which the operating unit is to exchange data. A symbolic name
has to be defined for each communication peer.
The individual parameters are explained below in Table 6-4.
Table 6-4
Configuration parameters
Group
6-20
Parameter
Explanation
Operating unit
parameters
Address
Operating unit PPI address
Interface
Interface on the operating unit via
which the unit is connected to the
PPI network.
Network
parameters
Profile
The protocol profile used in the network configuration. Enter PPI here.
Baud rate
The baud rate (9600 or 19200 Baud)
at which communication takes place
across the network.
Peer parameters
Address
PPI address of the S7 module to
which the operating unit is connected.
More button
HSA
Highest Station Address; this must
be identical throughout the whole
network configuration.
Master
Number of masters in the network.
This information is only required for
PROFIBUS networks and is necessary in order that the bus parameters
can be calculated correctly.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
6.6
Optimization
Acquisition cycle
and update time
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area
pointers and for the tags are major factors in respect of the real update times
which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be
observed during configuration:
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary but as small as possible.
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The real update time is improved by setting up one large are area instead of several
small areas.
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a
furnace, for example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve
of an electric motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs to
transfer the user data areas at random times.
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating unit,
they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
Screens
In the case of screens, the real update time which can be achieved is dependent on:
the number of data areas used,
the type and volume of data to be displayed,
the distribution of data within a particular data area.
In the interests of achieving rapid update times, the following points should
be observed during configuration:
Use only one data block for the tags of a particular screen.
Store the items of data to be used as closely as possible to one another in
the DB.
only configure short acquisition cycles for those objects which actually
need to be updated quickly.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
6-21
Communication Management for SIMATIC S7
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set
in that area. It resets the bit afterwards. If the S7 program immediately sets
the bit again, the operating unit spends all its time updating the trends. It is
then virtually impossible to operate the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded
as a result.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes
the job, for which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is
then immediately entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before
the operating unit executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient computer performance is available.
6-22
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating
unit.
These data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various
user data areas.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-1
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.1
Overview
Definition
User data areas can be located in data blocks and memory areas in the PLC.
User data areas include messages and trends. Set up user data areas both in
the configuration, using menu item System → Area Pointer and in the PLC.
Function range
The user data areas available is dependent on the operating unit used. Table
7-1 summarizes the range of functions available on the individual operating
units.
Table 7-1
Applicable user data areas
User data area
PC
MP270
OP37/Pro
Event messages
X
X
X
Alarm messages
X
X
X
Aknowledgement area
X
X
X
LED assignment
–
X
X
Trend request area
X
X
X
Trend transfer areas
X
X
X
Screen number
X
X
X
PLC jobs
X
X
X
Coordination area
X
X
X
Date and time
X
X
X
Table 7-2 indicates who is reading (R) and who is writing (W) in respect of
access to the individual data areas.
Table 7-2
Use of data areas
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Event messages
Configured event messages
R
W
Alarm messages
Configured alarm messages
R
W
PLC
acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement from the PLC
R
W
Operating unit
acknowledgement
Message from the operating
unit to the PLC indicating an
alarm message has been
acknowledged
W
R
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
(for OP and MP only)
7-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Table 7-2
Use of data areas, continued
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with
“switch buffer”
R/W
R/W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to
which screen is currently open
W
R
PLC jobs
Triggering of functions on the
operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Coordination area
Operating unit status polled by
the PLC program
W
R
Date and time
Transfer of date and time from
the operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-3
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.2
Event and Alarm Messages
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined
by the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event message
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
Motor switched on
PLC in manual mode
Alarm message
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
Valve not opening
Motor temperature too high
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
operator input on the operating unit,
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering
messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the
PLC. The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that
the relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
7-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Message areas
Table 7-3 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages, the number of alarm message acknowledgement areas (PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC) and the total length of the respective
areas for the various operating units.
Table 7-3
Unit
Assignment of
message bit and
message number
Operating unit message areas
Event message area
Alarm messages area/
Alarm message acknowledgement area
Number Length (words)
Number Overall length per
per type type (words)
PC
8
125
8
125
OP37/Pro
8
125
8
125
MP270
8
125
8
125
A message can be configured for each bit in the message area configured.
The bits are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
Assume that the following event message area has been configured for the
SIMATIC S7 PLC:
DB 60
Length 5 (in words)
Address 42
Figure 7-1 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area.
The assignment is performed automatically on the operating unit.
Figure 7-1
Assignment of message bit and message number
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-5
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Acknowledgement
areas
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself,
the relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration.
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. In this case,
the area pointer “OP acknowledgement” must be set.
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In
this case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration
under Area Pointers.
Figure 7-2 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are
shown in Figures 7-4 and 7-5.
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement
area
PLC!Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
area
Operating unit!PLC
Figure 7-2
Assignment of
acknowledgement
bit to message
number
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in
the acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of
the associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages
and acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
7-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Alarm message no. 1
Alarm message no. 49
Figure 7-3
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function as pressing the “ACK” key. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the
alarm message area again. Figure 7-4 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
must have precisely the same polling time and
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 7-4
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing via the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to
time. If the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in
the acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the
alarm message has been acknowledged. Figure 7-5 illustrates the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than
the associated alarm messages area.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-7
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Figure 7-5
Acknowledgement
area size
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit →
PLC must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. They
can, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is not required for
all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement need not
be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 7-6 illustrates such a
case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 7-6
Reduced–size alarm messages
acknowledgement area
Reduced–size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0
in ascending order.
7-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.3
LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP) and Multi Panel (MP) have function keys with
Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it
is possible to indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Condition
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as area pointers.
Data areas
The LED assignment can be divided into separate data areas, as illustrated in
the following table.
Data areas
LED assignment
OP37/Pro
MP270
Max. number
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
16
16
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined
when the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number
within the assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two consecutive bits that control a
total of four different LED statuses (see Table 7-4):
Table 7-4
LED flashing frequency
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
LED function
7-9
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of
the value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered
trends
The operating unit reads in the trend values cyclically, according to the time
interval defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for
continuous progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered
trends
By setting a trigger bit, the operating unit reads in either a trend value or the
entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration. Bit-triggered trends
are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid variation. An
example of this is the injection pressure for plastic mouldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas
have to be specified in the configuration (under Area Pointers) and set up on
the PLC. The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via
those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
– Trend request area
– Trend transfer area 1
– Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in
Buffer 2. If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer
1. This prevents the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being
read by the operating unit.
7-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Data area division
The individual areas, namely trend request area and trend transfer areas 1 and
2, can be divided into separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (Table 7-5).
Table 7-5
Division of data areas
Data areas
Request
Trend request area
Transfer
1
2
Max. number per type
8
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
8
8
8
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit
sets the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the
screen, the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request
area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
Trend transfer
area 1
This area serves to trigger trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire
buffer, according to the configuration. It then resets resets the trend bit and
the trend communication bit .
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the
trend communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer
area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-11
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.5
Screen Number Area
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open
on the unit in the screen number area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Condition
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the configuration as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the
transfer is always initiated when a change is registered on the operating unit.
Therefore, it is not necessary to configure a polling time.
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated
below.
15
0
Word 1
Current screen type
Word 2
Current screen number
Word 3
Reserved
Word 4
Reserved
Word 5
Reserved
Entry
7-12
Assignment
Current screen type
1
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.6
Using PLC Jobs
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC. These functions include:
– Displaying screens
– Setting date and time
A PLC job is identified by its job number. Depending on the PLC job in
question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
Job mailbox
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating actions on the operating unit.
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data
words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. The parameters of
the job must be entered in the succeeding words (maximum of 3).
Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+2
Parameter 1
n+4
Parameter 2
n+6
Parameter 3
Figure 7-7
Structure of the job mailbox data area
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit
analyzes the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero
again. For this reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first
and then the job number.
The PLC jobs possible are listed in the Appendix B together with their job
numbers and parameters.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-13
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.7
Coordination Area
The coordination area is two data words long. It serves to realize the following functions:
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the coordination area.
In order to use the coordination area, both data words must be specified,
whereby the first data word is used. The second data word is reserved. Figure
7-8 illustrates the structure of Byte 1 in the first data word.
Bit assignment in
coordination area
1 bytes
2 1 0
7
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
Operating mode
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 7-8
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start–up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to
poll this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating
unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
7-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
7.8
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC
Transferring date
and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered
by PLC jobs 40 and 41. Both can be used to write the date and time to the
data area Date/Time where they can be analyzed by the PLC program.
The jobs differ in respect of the format in which the information is stored.
PLC job 40 writes in the format S7 DATE_AND_TIME, and PLC job 41 uses
the same format as the operating unit. Both formats are in BCD code.
S7
DATE_AND_TIME
format (BCD
format)
The format used by PLC job 40 has the following structure:
Byte
7
0
Year (1995...2083)
n+1
Month (01 - 12)
n+2
Day (1...31)
n+3
Hour (0...23)
n+4
Minute (0...59)
n+5
Second (0...59)
n+6
Reserved
Reserved
n+7
Reserved
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
Figure 7-9
Operating unit
format (BCD
format)
4 3
n+0
Structure of data area Date/Time in S7 DATE_AND_TIME format
The format used by PLC job 40 has the following structure:
Byte
n+0
7
0
Reserved
n+1
Hour (0...23)
n+2
Minute (0...59)
n+3
Second (0...59)
n+4
Reserved
n+5
Reserved
n+6
Reserved
n+7
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
n+8
Day (1...31)
n+9
Month (1...12)
n+10
Year (0...99)
n+11
Reserved
Figure 7-10
Structure of data area Date/Time in operating unit format
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7-15
User Data Areas for SIMATIC S7
Differences of the
S7 format as
compared to the
operating unit
format
The S7 DATE_AND_TIME format differs from the operating mode format in
the following ways:
Different sequence of entries
Details of 1/10, 1/100 and 1/1000 seconds integrated in the format
Memory requirements reduced from 12 to 8 bytes
7-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part IV Connection to WinLC
Communication Management for
WinLC
8
User Data Areas for
WinLC
9
7-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for WinLC
8
General
information
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC WinLC (Windows Logical Controller). WinLC belongs to the basic
WinAC packet (Windows Automation Center). WinLC is a PC–based
automation system and belongs to the S7 automation system product range
(S7–300 and S7–400). It supports the decentalized periphery using
PROFIBUS–DP. A system condition for using WinLC is Microsoft Windows
NT Version 4.0 or later.
Condition
WinLC and ProTool/Pro RT must be installed on the PC.
Supported
operating units
The following operating units can be connected to the SIMATIC WinLC:
Installation
The driver for connection to the WinLC is supplied with the configuration
software and runtime, and installed automatically.
– PC with Windows NT V4.0 or later
A condition for its use is that WinLC has been installed and configured according to the Windows Logical Controller (WinLC) user guide. Connection
of the operating unit to the WinLC only involves setting the PLC. The PLC is
set either when starting a new project by using the assistant or in the project
window under item object type PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
8-1
Communication Management for WinLC
8.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PC
WinLC
Tags
Process values
User data areas
Application
program
Display/Operation
internal
communication
ProTool/Pro RT
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 8-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general exchange of data between SIMATIC S7 and operating unit is
performed via the process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the S7. The operating unit reads
the value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can enter a value on the operating unit, which is then written to the
address in the S7.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 9.
8-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for WinLC
8.2
Data Types Available
Supported data
types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 8-1
are available for use:
Table 8-1
Data types available
Data types supported for WinLC
Data type
Addressed by
Format
Data block
DB, M
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, TIMER,
COUNTER
Memory
M
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL, TIMER,
COUNTER
Input
E
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL
Peripheral input
PE
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL
Output
A
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL
Peripheral output
PA
CHAR, BYTE, INT,
WORD, DINT, DWORD,
REAL, BOOL
Timer
T
Timer
Counter
Z
Counter
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
8-3
Communication Management for WinLC
8-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
9
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating
unit.
These data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various
user data areas.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-1
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.1
Overview
Definition
User data areas can be located in data blocks and memory areas in the PLC.
User data areas include messages and trends. Set up user data areas both in
the configuration, using menu item System → Area Pointer and in the PLC.
Function range
The user data areas available is dependent on the operating unit used. Table
9-1 summarizes the range of functions available on the individual operating
units.
Table 9-1
Applicable user data areas
User data area
PC
Event messages
X
Alarm messages
X
Aknowledgement area
X
LED assignment
–
Trend request area
X
Trend transfer areas
X
Screen number
X
PLC jobs
X
Coordination area
X
Date and time
X
Table 9-2 indicates who is reading (R) and who is writing (W) in respect of
access to the individual data areas.
Table 9-2
Use of data areas
Data area
9-2
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Event messages
Configured event messages
R
W
Alarm messages
Configured alarm messages
R
W
PLC acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement from the PLC
R
W
OP acknowledgement
Message from the operating
unit to the PLC indicating an
alarm message has been
acknowledged
W
R
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
Table 9-2
Use of data areas, continued
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with
“switch buffer”
R/W
R/W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to
which screen is currently open
W
R
PLC jobs
Triggering of functions on the
operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Coordination area
Operating unit status polled by
the PLC program
W
R
Date and time
Transfer of date and time from
the operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-3
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.2
Event and Alarm Messages
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined
by the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event message
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
Motor switched on
PLC in manual mode
Alarm message
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
Valve not opening
Motor temperature too high
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
operator input on the operating unit
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering
messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the
PLC. The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that
the relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
9-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
Message areas
Table 9-3 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages, the number of alarm message acknowledgement areas (PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC) and the total length of the respective
areas for the various operating units.
Table 9-3
Unit
Operating unit message areas
Event message area
Alarm messages area/
Alarm message acknowledgement area
Number Length (words)
Number Overall length per
per type type (words)
PC
Assignment of
message bit and
message number
8
125
8
125
A message can be configured for each bit in the message area configured.
The bits are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
Assume that the following event message area has been configured for the
WinLC:
DB 60
Length 5 (in words)
Address 42
Figure 9-1 illustrates the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area.
The assignment is performed automatically on the operating unit.
Figure 9-1
Assignment of message bit and message number
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-5
User Data Areas for WinLC
Acknowledgement
areas
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself,
the relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration.
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. In this case,
the area pointer “OP acknowledgement” must be set.
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In
this case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration
under Area Pointers.
Figure 9-2 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm message and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are
shown in Figures 9-4 and 9-5.
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement
area
PLC!Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
area
Operating unit!PLC
Figure 9-2
Assignment of
acknowledgement
bit to message
number
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in
the acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the
acknowledgement area is the same length as the associated alarm messages
area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of
the associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages
and acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
9-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
Alarm message no. 1
Alarm message no. 49
Figure 9-3
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function as pressing the “ACK” key. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the
alarm message area again. Figure 9-4 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC→ Operating Unit
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
must have precisely the same polling time and
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 9-4
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of processing by the
operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard to
time. If the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit in
the acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the
alarm message has been acknowledged. Figure 9-5 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than
the associated alarm messages area.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-7
User Data Areas for WinLC
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Figure 9-5
Acknowledgement
area size
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit →
PLC must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. They
can, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is not required for
all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement need not
be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 9-6 illustrates such a
case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 9-6
Reduced–size alarm messages
acknowledgement area
Reduced–size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0
in ascending order.
9-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.3
Trend Request and Transfer Areas
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of
the value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered
trends
The operating unit reads in the trend values cyclically, according to the time
interval defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for
continuous progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered
trends
By setting a trigger bit, the operating unit reads in either a trend value or the
entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration. Bit-triggered trends
are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid variation. An
example of this is the injection pressure for plastic mouldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas
have to be specified in the configuration (under Area Pointers) and set up on
the PLC. The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via
those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
– Trend request area
– Trend transfer area 1
– Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in
Buffer 2. If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer
1. This prevents the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being
read by the operating unit.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-9
User Data Areas for WinLC
Data area division
The individual areas, namely trend request area and trend transfer areas 1 and
2, can be divided into separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (Table 9-4).
Table 9-4
Division of data areas
Data areas
Request
Trend request area
Transfer
1
2
Max. number per type
8
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
8
8
8
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit
sets the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the
screen, the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request
area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
Trend transfer
area 1
This area serves to trigger trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire
buffer, according to the configuration. It then resets resets the trend bit and
the trend communication bit .
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the
trend communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer
area 2
9-10
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.4
Screen Number Area
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open
on the unit in the screen number area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Condition
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the configuration as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the
transfer is always initiated when a change is registered on the operating unit.
Therefore, it is not necessary to configure a polling time.
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated
below.
15
0
Word 1
Current screen type
Word 2
Current screen number
Word 3
Reserved
Word 4
Reserved
Word 5
Reserved
Entry
Assignment
Current screen type
1
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-11
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.5
Using PLC Jobs
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC. These functions include:
– Displaying screens
– Setting date and time
A PLC job is identified by its job number. Depending on the PLC job in
question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
Job mailbox
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating actions on the operating unit.
The job mailbox is set up under Area pointer and has a length of four data
words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. The parameters of
the job must be entered in the succeeding words (maximum of 3).
Word
n+0
Left byte (LB)
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
n+2
Parameter 1
n+4
Parameter 2
n+6
Parameter 3
Figure 9-7
Structure of the job mailbox data area
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit
analyzes the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero
again. For this reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first
and then the job number.
The PLC jobs possible are listed in the Appendix B together with their job
numbers and parameters.
9-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.6
Coordination Area
The coordination area is two data words long. It serves to realize the following functions:
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the coordination area.
In order to use the coordination area, both data words must be specified,
whereby the first data word is used. The second data word is reserved.
Figure 9-8 illustrates the structure of Byte 1 in the first data word.
Bit assignment in
coordination area
1 bytes
2 1 0
7
– – – – – X X X
Startup bit
Operating mode
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 9-8
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start–up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to
poll this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating
unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-13
User Data Areas for WinLC
9.7
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC
Transferring date
and time
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered
by PLC jobs 40 and 41. Both can be used to write the date and time to the
data area Date/Time where they can be analyzed by the PLC program.
The jobs differ in respect of the format in which the information is stored.
PLC job 40 writes in the format S7 DATE_AND_TIME, and PLC job 41 uses
the same format as the operating unit. Both formats are in BCD code.
S7
DATE_AND_TIME
format
(BCD format)
The format used by PLC job 40 has the following structure:
Byte
7
n+1
Month (01 - 12)
n+2
Day (1...31)
n+3
Hour (0...23)
n+4
Minute (0...59)
n+5
Second (0...59)
n+6
1/10 seconds (0...9)
1/100 Seconds (0...9)
n+7
1/1000 second (0...9)
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
Structure of data area Date/Time in S7 DATE_AND_TIME format
The format used by PLC job 40 has the following structure:
Byte
n+0
7
0
Reserved
n+1
Hour (0...23)
n+2
Minute (0...59)
n+3
Second (0...59)
n+4
Reserved
n+5
Reserved
n+6
Reserved
n+7
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
n+8
Day (1...31)
n+9
Month (1...12)
n+10
Year (0...99)
n+11
Reserved
Figure 9-10
9-14
0
Year (1995...2083)
Figure 9-9
Operating unit
format
(BCD format)
4 3
n+0
Structure of data area Date/Time in operating unit format
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for WinLC
Differences of the
S7 format as
compared to the
operating unit
format
The S7 DATE_AND_TIME format differs from the operating mode format in
the following ways:
Different sequence of entries
Details of 1/10, 1/100 and 1/1000 seconds integrated in the format
Memory requirements reduced from 12 to 8 bytes
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
9-15
User Data Areas for WinLC
9-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part V
Connection to
SIMATIC 505
Communication Management for
SIMATIC 505
10
Connection Via NITP
11
PROFIBUS–DP Connection
12
User Data Areas for
SIMATIC 505
13
9-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for
SIMATIC 505
10
This chapter describes communication between the operating unit and the
PLC. The communication driver for serial connection to the SIMATIC 505
PLC is used. The connection is a point-to-point connection which is operated
via the internal PLC protocol NITP.
Supported
operating units
The following operating units can be connected to the SIMATIC 505:
– PC
– OP37/Pro
– MP270
Known restrictions
An RS422 connection to the SIMATIC 575–VME is not currently supported.
When the CPU 560–2120 and CPU 560–2820 series are used and the special
functions CPUs 565–2120 and 565–2820 are implemented, access to the S
Memory data types (special user data types) is not possible. The standard
data types can be used as normal.
Installation
The driver for connection to the SIMATIC 505 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically. With ProTool, the parameters for
connection to the PLC must also be set. Please refer to the corresponding
chapter on connection types for information regarding which parameters are
necessary on the PLC side to connect the operating unit.
Program for
controlling the DP
driver
A PLC program is necessary which controls the driver in order to connect a
PROFIBUS–DP. An example program is supplied with ProTool (written in
LADDER) which can be adapted for individual requirements. The example
program supports linear P–addressing. The example program is located in the
directory PROTOOL\PLCPROG\SIMATIC_505.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
10-1
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
Compatibility of
ProTool V5.0 and
V5.1
ProTool V5.1 does not support exactly the same data formats as ProTool
V5.0x for some SIMATIC 505. However, it is still possible to used your configuration. After calling in the configuration using ProTool V5.1, the configuration window item object type Tags displays “invalid data format”. The configuration can be edited but not created.
Call in the dialog box for the tag with a double click. The old, invalid data
format is displayed. Change the data format to a valid one.
10-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
10.1
Supported Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the user data types listed in Table
6-1 are available for use. The condition for this is that those data areas have
also been set up in TISOFT for the CPU.
Table 10-1
Permissible data areas for the operating unit
User data type
Addressed by
Format
Discrete Input
X
Bit
Discrete Output
Y
Bit
Control Relay
C
Bit
Tag Memory
V1)
Word Input
WX1)
Word Output
WY1)
Constant Memory
K1)
Status Word Memory
STW1)
Bit
+/–
/ INT
INT
+/– DOUBLE
DOUBLE
REAL
ASCII
Timer/Counter Preset
TCP1)
Timer/Counter Current
TCC1)
+/– INT
INT
Analog Alarm
Process Loop
Special Function
1) When connected to the PROFIBUS–DP, only this user data type
is supported in the example program.
Analog Alarm, Process Loop and Special Function are general terms for a
number of special user data types. If these collective terms are selected in the
dialog box Tag, an additional selection list appears in which the actual user
data types can be set (refer to Tables 10-2 to 10-4).
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
10-3
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
Table 10-2
Analog Alarm
User data type
10-4
Addressed by
Format
Analog Alarm/Alarm Acknowledge Flags
AACK
+/–INT, INT
Analog Alarm Deadband
AADB
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Most Significant Word of Analog Alarm
C–flags
ACFH
+/–INT, INT
Least Significant Word of Analog Alarm
C–flags
ACFL
+/–INT, INT
Analog Alarm Error
AERR
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm High Alarm Limit
AHA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm High–High Alarm Limit
AHHA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Low Alarm Limit
ALA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Low–Low Alarm Limit
ALLA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Orange Deviation Alarm
Limit
AODA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Process Tag
APV
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Process Tag High Limit
APVH
REAL
Analog Alarm Process Tag Low Limit
APVL
REAL
Analog Alarm Rate of Change Alarm
Limit
ARCA
REAL
Analog Alarm Setpoint
ASP
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm SP High Limit
ASPH
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm SP Low Limit
ASPL
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Analog Alarm Sample Rate
ATS
REAL
Analog Alarm Flags
AVF
+/–INT, INT
Analog Alarm Yellow Deviation Alarm
Limit
AYDA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Alarm Peak Elapsed Time
APET
+/–INT, INT
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
Table 10-3
Process Loop
User data type
Addressed by
Format
Loop Alarm/Alarm Acknowledge Flags
LACK
+/–INT, INT
Loop Alarm Deadband
LADB
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Most Significant Word of Loop C–flags
LCFH
+/–INT, INT
Least Significant Word of Loop C–flags
LCFL
+/–INT, INT
Loop Error
LERR
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Alarm High Limit
LHA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Alarm High–High Limit
LHHA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Gain
LKC
REAL
Loop Derivative Gain Limiting Coefficient LKD
REAL
Loop Low Alarm Limit
LLA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Low–Low Alarm Limit
LLLA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Output
LMN
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Bias
LMX
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Orange Deviation Limit
LODA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Process Tag
LPV
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop PV High Limit
LPVH
REAL
Loop PV Low Limit
LPVL
REAL
Loop Rate of Change Alarm Limit
LRCA
REAL
Loop Ramp/Soak Flags
LRSF
+/–INT, INT
Loop Ramp/Soak Step Number
LRSN
+/–INT, INT
Loop Setpoint
LSP
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Setpoint High Point
LSPH
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Setpoint Low Limit
LSPL
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Rate
LTD
REAL
Loop Reset
LTI
REAL
Loop Sample Rate
LTS
REAL
Loop V–flags
LVF
+/–INT, INT
Loop Yellow Deviation Alarm Limit
LYDA
+/–INT, INT, REAL
Loop Peak Elapsed Time
LPET
+/–INT, INT
Table 10-4
Special Function
User data type
Addressed by
Format
SF Program Peak Elapsed Time
PPET
+/–INT, INT
SF Subroutine Peak Elapsed Time
SPET
+/–INT, INT
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
10-5
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
10.2
Optimization
Acquisition cycle
and update times
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area
pointers and for the tags are major factors in respect of the real update times
which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be
observed during configuration:
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary but as small as possible.
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several smaller areas.
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a
furnace, for example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve
of an electric motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs
to transfer the user data areas at random times.
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating
unit, they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
Screens
The real updating rate which can be achieved is dependent on the type and
quantity of data to be displayed.
In order to achieve short updating times, ensure that short acquisition cycles
are only defined in the configuration for those objects which actually need to
be updated quickly.
Trends
If, in the case of bit–triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bits afterwards.
The communication bit in the PLC program may only be set again after all
the bits have been reset by the operating unit.
10-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes
the job, for which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is
then immediately entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before
the operating unit executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient computer performance is available.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
10-7
Communication Management for SIMATIC 505
10-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
11
Connection Via NITP
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC 505 using a serial connection via NITP.
Installation
The driver for connection to the SIMATIC 505 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically.
Connection of the operating unit to the SIMATIC 505 is basically restricted
to the physical connection. Special function blocks for connection to the PLC
are not required.
Connection
No additional communication modules are required in order to connect the
operating unit to the SIMATIC 505. Communication can be performed via
one of the standard ports provided in the system. This is the COM port in the
case of a PC and the IF1 interface with an OP37/Pro and MP270. On the PLC
side, the operating unit should be connected to the CPU programming interface (RS232 or RS422). Please refer to Table 11-1 for information on which
cable to use.
Details of which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in the
relevant equipment manual.
Table 11-1
Applicable connection cables
SIMATIC 505
V.24, 9–pin
All operating units
(except PC)
RS422, 9–pole*)
V.24, 25–pole
RS422, 9–pin**)
6XV1 440–2K_ _ _
6VX1 440–2L_ _ _
–
–
–
–
6XV1 440–2M_ _ _
6XV1 440–1M_ _ _
SIMATIC 505
standard cable
Commercial
V24/RS422
converter
Commercial
V24/RS422
converter
V.24, 15–pin
All operating units
(except PC)
RS422, 9–pin
PC (COM1, COM2) SIMATIC 505
standard cable
PPX 260 109–0001
PPX 260 109–0001
’_’ = Length code
*) for SIMATIC 505 (PLC 535, PLC 545 – 1101, PLC 565T)
**) for SIMATIC 505 (PLC 545 – 1102, PLC 555)
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
11-1
Connection Via NITP
11.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
Display/Operation
User data areas
Application
program
Communication
Operating unit
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 11-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general data exchanged between SIMATIC 505 and operating unit is performed by means of process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the
configuration which point to an address in the SIMATIC 505. The operating
unit reads the value from the specified address and displays it. In the same
way, the operator can enter a value on the operating unit which is then written to the address in the SIMATIC 505.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 13.
11-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Connection Via NITP
11.2
Configuring SIMATIC 505 for NITP
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. First of all, select the protocol SIMATIC 505 V5.1 and then
define the following parameters after clicking on the button Parameter. For
any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project
window.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 11-2
PLC parameters
Parameter
Explanation
Interface
The operating unit interface to which the SIMATIC 505 is
connected must be set here.
When using a PC, this can be COM1 or COM2. In the case of
OP37/Pro and MP270, this can be interface IF1A or IF1B,
depending on the physics implemented.
Also, in the case of the OP37/Pro, the interface actually used must
be set in the BIOS. If the interface IF1A is used with RS232, no
modification is necessary. If the interface IF1B is used with RS422,
select the mask Integrated Peripherals in the BIOS. Select the entry
Serial 1 and set the physics to RS422/RS485 (IF1B) .
Interface type
Select either RS232 or RS422.
Data bits
Set 7 here.
Parity
Set ODD here.
Stop bits
Set 1 here.
Baud rate
Set the transmission rate between operating unit and SIMATIC 505
here. The communication can be set to a baud rate of 19200, 9600,
4800, 2400, 1200, 600 or 300 baud.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
11-3
Connection Via NITP
11-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
12
This chapter describes the communication between the operating unit and
SIMATIC 505 via the PROFIBUS–DP.
Definition
PROFIBUS-DP is a Master-Slave field bus with up to 122 slaves. The PROFIBUS-DP network is normally operated by one master. This master polls all
the slaves cyclically. The master is, for example, an AG with a standard DP–
compatible connection module. Each operating unit is a slave and explicitly
assigned to a master AG.
Hardware
requirements
The following hardware components are required in order to integrate the
operating units in an existing PROFIBUS–DP network:
OP37/Pro, or
MP270 or
PC with communication processor CP5611 or CP5511
In the PLC:
CP5434–DP (Annex Card)
For each unit (operating unit or AG):
Bus connector PROFIBUS–DP or
a different component approved for this installation (except FSK bus terminal, refer to Configuration in SIMATIC HMI Catalog ST80.1).
Software
requirements
The following software components are also required for the PROFIBUS-DP
connection:
Configuration software ProTool/Pro from Version 5.1.
Specific configuration software for standard DP-compatible configuration
of the connection module.
Installation
The driver for connection to the SIMATIC 505 is supplied with the configuration software and installed automatically. A PLC program capable of controlling the driver is required for the connection to PROFIBUS–DP.
For connection of the operating unit to the SIMATIC 505, both the physical
connection and a function block in the PLC are required. The function block
is supplied with ProTool/Pro.
System limits
Within a network established via the PROFIBUS-DP, a maximum of 120 of
the 122 slaves may be an operating unit. These values are theoretical limits.
The real limits are determined by the memory capacity and performance capability of the PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
12-1
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
12.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
User data areas
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 12-1
Communication structure of the PROFIBUS-DP connection
Task of the tags
12-2
The general data exchange between PLC and operating unit is performed via
process values. To do this, tags must be specified in the configuration which
point to an address in the PLC. The operating unit reads the value from the
specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can enter a
value on the operating unit, which is then written to the address in the PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 13.
Program for
controlling the DP
driver
A PLC program is necessary which controls the driver in order to connect a
PROFIBUS–DP. An example program is supplied with ProTool (written in
LADDER) which can be adapted for individual requirements. The example
program supports linear P–addressing. The example program is located in the
directory PROTOOL\PLCPROG\SIMATIC_505.
The example program is designed for the CPU 545 and CPU 555 which are
connected to the PROFIBUS–DP network via the CP 5434–DP (annex card).
The following settings are defined in the example program and must be set
identically in the configuration:
Program
ProTool
COM Profibus
TISOFT
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Parameter
Value
Operating unit
PC
Protocol
SIMATIC 505 DP V5.1
OP address
3
Interface
DP/MPI
Baud rate
1500 Baud
Block length
Class B middle
Master station type
505–CP5434–DP
Type of addressing
Linear
Slave address
3
Station type
HMI PT/Pro PC
Set configuration
Class B middle
Configured to
E–address
P000–P048
Configured to
A–address
P000–P016
I/O address
0100 for WX32 and
WY16
Area for data exchange
V900–V1020
12-3
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
Interface settings
12-4
The interface is setup as follows using Windows Settings→ Control Panel →
Set PU/PC interface:
Access point of the application
DPSONLINE
Module configuration used
PROFIBUS-DP slave
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
12.2
Configuring SIMATIC 505 for PROFIBUS–DP
Parameter
When defining a new project, the project assistant requests the specification
of a PLC. First of all, select the protocol SIMATIC 500/505 DP V5.1
and then define the following parameters after clicking on the button Parameter. For any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the
project window.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 12-1
PLC parameters
Parameter
Explanation
OP address
PROFIBUS–DP address of the operating unit.
Value range 3 to 126
Interface
Select the interface on the operating unit via which connection to the
PLC is to be established. When using a PC, this is DP/MPI, and
with the OP37/Pro and MP270, IF1B.
In the case of the OP37/Pro, ASPC2 must also be activated in the
BIOS. In the mask Integrated Peripherals, set the OP37/Pro BIOS
entry ASPC2 to Enabled.
Baud rate
The baud rate at which communication takes place over the network.
The baud rate must be set identically for all the units in the network.
The following baud rates are possible:
– 93.75 kBit/s
– 187.5 kBit/s
– 500 kBit/s
– 1.5 MBit/s (default)
– 12 MBit/s
Set
configuration
Used to define the I/O area implemented for the communication area
between the operating unit and PLC. The size of the I/O area influences the performance.
The set configuration must be realized according to Class B (basic
DP slave complying to EN 50170). There are four different set configurations from which to choose:
– Class B tiny
– Class B small
– Class B middle
– Class B big
Table 12-2 indicates the assignment of the I/O area.
The settings in ProTool/Pro must correspond to configuration specifications
of the connection module CP5434–DP.
Set configuration
The assignment of the I/O area is explicitly defined with the four different
settings. Table 12-2 provides details of the I/O area assignment.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
12-5
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
Table 12-2
Assignment of the I/O area for Class B
Class
Inputs (Byte)
Outputs (Byte)
Class B tiny
32
22
Class B small
42
22
Class B middle
64
32
Class B big
128
64
In order to download large quantities of data, it is recommended to set a large
I/O area. This ensures the screen displays on the operating unit are updated
more quickly because the data is retrieved in one cycle.
12-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
12.3
Configuring the PROFIBUS–DP Network
Connection
module
CP5434–DP
The configuration packet COM PROFIBUS is required in order to configure
the CP5434–DP. GSD files for operating unit slaves are supplied with ProTool/Pro. These GSD files are located in directory
\PROTOOL\PLCPROG\GSD.
Different GSD files are required for the different operating units. Table 12-3
indicates the assignment.
Table 12-3
Assignment of GSD files and operating units
GSD file
Manufacturer ID
To 12 MBaud
SIEM8076.GSD
0x8076
PC
SIEM8077.GSD
0x8077
OP37/Pro
SIEM8078.GSD
0x8078
MP270
If the GSD files in the COM PROFIBUS directory
\PROTOCOL\PLCPROG\GSD are older than those supplied with
ProTool/Pro, or the COM PROFIBUS still does not support a new operating
unit, copy the files from ProTool to COM PROFIBUS. Then restart COM
PROFIBUS and select Read GSD files.
If a COM PROFIBUS configuration was created previously with an older file
but the new GSD files are required for use, the configuration must be re–
created.
Parameters
In order that the CP5434–DP and operating unit can communicate with each
other, the following parameters must be set in COM PROFIBUS:
Station type: HMI
Station number: 3...126
The value entered here must correspond with the OP address specified in
the operating unit configuration.
Set configuration:
The set configuration is defined by selecting the class and the symbolic
name of the name. The following set configurations can be set:
– Class B tiny
– Class B small
– Class B middle
– Class B big
Address ID:
The address ID is automatically assigned by the set configuration and
must not be modified.
I and O address:
The address must correspond to that stored in the PLC program.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
12-7
PROFIBUS–DP Connection to SIMATIC 505
Integrating COM
PROFIBUS
configuration in
TISOFT
The TISOFT documentation provides detailed information on how to integrate the COM PROFIBUS configuration in the TISOFT program. The basic
steps are explained here briefly:
1. Generate a binary file in COM PROFIBUS using Export.
2. Install the binary file in the TISOFT program using MERGE.
3. Set the CPU to ONLINE PLC Mode.
4. Define the I/O addresses in TISOFT.
5. Download the program to the CPU using UPDATE.
12-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating
unit.
These data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various
user data areas.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-1
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.1
Overview
Definition
User data areas can be located in data blocks and memory areas in the PLC.
User data areas include messages and trends. Set up user data areas both in
the configuration, using menu item System → Area Pointer and in the PLC.
Function range
The user data areas available are dependent on the operating unit used. Table
13-1 summarizes the range of functions available on the individual operating
units.
Table 13-1
Applicable user data areas
User data area
PC
OP37/Pro
MP270
Event messages
X
X
X
Alarm messages
X
X
X
Aknowledgement area
X
X
X
LED assignment
–
X
X
Trend request area
X
X
X
Trend transfer areas
X
X
X
Screen number
X
X
X
PLC jobs
X
X
X
Coordination area
X
X
X
Date and time
X
X
X
Table 13-2 indicates who is reading (R) and who is writing (W) in respect of
access to the individual data areas.
Table 13-2
Use of data areas
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Event messages
Configured event messages
R
W
Alarm messages
Configured alarm messages
R
W
PLC acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement from the PLC
R
W
Operating unit acknowledgement
Message from the operating
unit to the PLC indicating an
alarm message has been
acknowledged
W
R
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
(for OP and MP only)
13-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Table 13-2
Use of data areas, continued
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with
“switch buffer”
R/W
R/W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to
which screen is currently open
W
R
PLC jobs
Triggering of functions on the
operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Coordination area
Operating unit status polled by
the PLC program
W
R
Date and time
Transfer of date and time from
the operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-3
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.2
Event and Alarm Messages
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined
by the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event message
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
Motor switched on
PLC in manual mode
Alarm message
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
Valve not opening
Motor temperature too high
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
operator input on the operating unit
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering
messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the
PLC. The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that
the relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
13-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Message areas
Table 13-3 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages, the number of alarm message acknowledgement areas (PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC) and the total length of the respective
areas for the various operating units.
Table 13-3
Unit
Operating unit message areas
Event message area
Alarm messages area/
Alarm message acknowledgement area
Number Length (words)
Number Overall length per
per type type (words)
PC
8
125
8
125
OP37/Pro
8
125
8
125
MP270
8
125
8
125
The length of a contiguous area may not exceed 64 words.
Assignment of
message bit and
message number
A message can be configured for each bit in the message area configured.
The bits are assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
Let us assume that the following event message area has been configured for
the SIMATIC 500/505 PLC:
Length 5 (in words)
V 43
Figure 13-1 shows the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area.
The assignment is performed automatically on the operating unit.
Figure 13-1
Assignment of message bit and message number
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-5
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Acknowledgement
areas
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself,
the relevant acknowledgement areas must also be set up in the PLC. These
acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration.
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. In this case,
the area pointer “OP acknowledgement” must be set.
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In
this case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration
under Area Pointers.
Figure 13-2 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm
message and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are
shown in Figures 13-4 and 13-5.
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement
area
PLC!Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
area
Operating unit!PLC
Figure 13-2
Assignment of
acknowledgement
bit to
message number
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in
the acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of
the associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages
and acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
13-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Alarm message no. 16
Alarm message no. 64
Figure 13-3
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 16
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 64
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function as pressing the “ACK” key. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the
alarm message area again. Figure 13-4 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
must have precisely the same polling time and
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 13-4
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of the processing via
the operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard
to time. If the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit
in the acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the
alarm message has been acknowledged. Figure 13-5 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC can must be no longer
than the associated alarm messages area.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-7
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit→ PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating uni
Figure 13-5
Acknowledgement
area size
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit →
PLC must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. They
can, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is not required for
all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement need not
be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 5-6 illustrates such a
case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Reduced–size alarm message
acknowledgement area
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 13-6
Reduced–size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 1
in ascending order.
13-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.3
LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP) and Multi Panel (MP) have function keys with
Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it
is possible to indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Condition
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as area pointers.
Data areas
The LED assignment can be divided into separate data areas, as illustrated in
the following table.
Data areas
LED assignment
OP37/Pro
MP270
Max. number
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
16
16
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined
when the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number
within the assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two consecutive bits that control a
total of four different LED statuses (see Table 13-4):
Table 13-4
LED flashing frequency
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
LED function
13-9
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of
the value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered
trends
The operating unit reads in the trend values cyclically, according to the time
interval defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for
continuous progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered
trends
By setting a trigger bit, the operating unit reads in either a trend value or the
entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration. Bit-triggered trends
are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid variation. An
example of this is the injection pressure for plastic mouldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas
have to be specified in the configuration (under Area Pointers) and set up on
the PLC. The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via
those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
– Trend request area
– Trend transfer area 1
– Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in
Buffer 2. If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer
1. This prevents the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being
read by the operating unit.
13-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Data area division
The individual areas, namely trend request area and trend transfer areas 1 and
2, can be divided into separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (Table 13-5).
Table 13-5
Division of data areas
Data areas
Request
Trend request area
Transfer
1
2
Max. number per type
8
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
8
8
8
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit
sets the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the
screen, the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request
area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
Trend transfer
area 1
This area serves to trigger trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire
buffer, according to the configuration. It then resets the trend bit and the
trend communication bit.
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
1 2 3 4
5
6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Word 1
Word 2
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the
trend communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer
area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-11
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.5
Screen Number Area
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open
on the unit in the screen number area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Condition
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the configuration as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the
transfer is always initiated when a change is registered on the operating unit.
Therefore, it is not necessary to configure a polling time.
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated
below.
Entry
13-12
Assignment
Current screen type
1
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.6
Using PLC Jobs
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC. These functions include:
– Displaying screens
– Setting date and time
A PLC job is identified by its job number. Depending on the PLC job in
question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
Job mailbox
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating actions on the operating unit.
The job mailbox is set up under Area pointer and has a length of four data
words.
1
16
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. The parameters of
the job must be entered in the succeeding words (maximum of 3).
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit
analyzes the PLC job. The operating unit then sets this data word to zero
again. For this reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first
and then the job number.
The PLC jobs possible are listed in the Appendix B together with their job
numbers and parameters.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-13
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13.7
Coordination Area
The coordination area is two data words long. It serves to realize the following functions:
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the coordination area.
In order to use the coordination area, both data words must be specified,
whereby the first data word is used. The second data word is reserved.
Figure 13-7 illustrates the structure of the first first data word.
Bit assignment in
coordination area
Word 1
DL n +0
1
– – – – – –
DR n +0
8 9
14 15 16
– – – – – – – X X X
Startup bit
Operating mode
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 13-7
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start-up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to
poll this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating
unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
13-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered
by PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/
Time where they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 13-8 illustrates the structure of the data area. All data is in BCD format.
DL
DW
n+0
1
n+1
DR
8 9
16
Reserved
Hour (0...23)
Minute (0...59)
Second (0 – 59)
n+2
Reserved
n+3
Reserved
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1...31)
Month (1 – 12)
n+5
Year (0...99)
Reserved
Figure 13-8
Time
Transferring date
and time
Date
13.8
Structure of data area Time and Date
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
13-15
User Data Areas for SIMATIC 505
13-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Part VI Connection to
Allen Bradley SLC 500 /
PLC-5
Communication Management for
Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
14
User Data Areas for
Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
15
13-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for
Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC-5
14
This chapter describes communication between the operating unit and the
PLC. In the case of Allen–Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 PLCs, connection is
made by means of the internal PLC driver. This is a point-to-point connection.
Supported
operating units
The following operating units can be connected to Allen-Bradley SLC 500 /
PLC–5:
– PC
– OP37/Pro
– MP270
Installation
The driver for connection to the Allen Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 is supplied
with the configuration software and installed automatically.
Connecting the operating unit to the Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 primarily involves making the physical connection to the operating unit. Special
function blocks for connection to the PLC are not required.
Note
The company Allen-Bradley offers a wide range of communication adapters
for integration of “DF1–subscribers” for networks DH–485, DH and DH+.
These connections have not been tested by Siemens AG and, therefore, not
been approved for release.
Connection
The operating unit must be connected to the DF1 interface on the CPU
(RS232). Please refer to Table 14-1 for information concerning the connection cable to be used.
Details regarding which interface to use on the operating unit are provided in
the relevant equipment manual.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
14-1
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
Table 14-1
Applicable connection cables
SLC 500
PLC–5
RS232, 9–pin
All operating units
RS232, 25–pin
RS422, 25–pin
6VX1 440–2K_ _ _
6XV1 440–2L_ _ _
–
–
–
6XV1 440–2V_ _ _
Allen-Bradley standard
cable 1747 CP3
Allen-Bradley standard
cable 1747 CP10
–
(except PC)
RS232, 15–pin
All operating units
(except PC)
RS422, 9–pin
PC (COM1, COM2)
’_’ = Length code
Behavior of
ProTool V5.1
ProTool V5.1 does not support exactly the same data formats as ProTool
V5.0x for some PLCs. However, it is still possible to used your configuration.
After calling in the configuration using ProTool V5.1, the configuration window item object type Tags displays “invalid data format”. The configuration
can be edited but not generated. This concerns the following PLCs:
SIMATIC 505
Allen-Bradley
SIMATIC S5–DP
Modifying data
formats
14-2
Call in the dialog box for the tag with a double click. The old, invalid data
format is displayed. Change the data format to a valid one.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
14.1
Basic Methods of Functioning
PLC
Tags
Process values
Display/Operation
User data areas
Application
program
Communication
Operating unit
Messages
User
guidance
Coordination
area
Figure 14-1
Communication structure
Task of the tags
The general data exchanged between Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5 and
operating unit is performed by means of process values. To do this, tags are
created in the configuration which point to an address in the Allen-Bradley
SLC 500 / PLC–5. The operating unit reads the value from the specified address and displays it. In the same way, the operator can enter a value on the
operating unit which is then written to the address in the Allen-Bradley
SLC 500 / PLC–5.
User data areas
User data areas are used for the exchange of special data and must only be set
up when the data concerned is used.
User data areas are required for:
– Messages,
– Trends,
– PLC jobs,
– Controlling LEDs,
– Life bit monitoring.
A detailed description of the user data areas is provided in Chapter 15.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
14-3
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
14.2
Configuring Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5
When creating a new project, the project assistant requests the definition of
the PLC. First of all, select the protocol
ALLEN–BRADLEY DF1 SLC500 or ALLEN–BRADLEY DF1 PLC–5 and
then define the following parameters after clicking on the button Parameter.
For any subsequent parameter modifications, select the item PLC in the project window.
Define the following parameters for the PLC:
Table 14-2
PLC parameters
Parameter
Explanation
Interface
Define the operating unit interface which is connected to the AllenBradley SLC 500 / PLC–5.
When using a PC, this can be COM1 or COM2. In the case of
OP37/Pro and MP270, this can be interface IF1A or IF1B, depending on the physics implemented.
Also, in the case of the OP37/Pro, the interface actually used must
be set in the BIOS. If the interface IF1A is used with RS232, no
modification is necessary. If the interface IF1B is used with RS422,
select the mask Integrated Peripherals in the BIOS. Select the
entry Serial 1 and set the physics to RS422/RS485 (IF1B) .
Interface type
Select either RS232 or RS422.
Data bits
Set 8 here.
Parity
Set NONE or EVEN here.
Stop bits
Set 1 or 2 here.
Baud rate
The transmission rate from the operating unit and Allen-Bradley
SLC 500 / PLC–5 is set here. The communication can be set to a
baud rate of 19200, 9600, 4800, 2400, 1200, 600 or 300 baud.
Note
BCC is used for troubleshooting with Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5. To
do this, set the PLC SLC 500 Configuration Channel 0 to operating mode
SYSTEM. Configure the driver DF1 FULL–DUPLEX as follows:
– NO HANDSHAKING in Control Line and
– AUTO–DETECT in Embedded Responses.
14-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
14.3
Supported Data Types
When configuring tags and area pointers, the data types listed in Table 14-3
are available for use.
Table 14-3
Data types available
Data type
Display in
ProTool/Pro
Addressed by
Format
ASCII
A
ASCII
Binary
B
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Counter
C
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
BCD (only PLC–5)
D
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT,
BCD4, BCD8
Float
F
REAL
Digital Input
I
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Data Register (Integer)
N
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT,
SIGNED LONG,
UNSIGNED LONG,
REAL
Digital Output
O
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Control
R
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Status
S
BIT,
UNSIGNED INT
Timer
T
BIT, SIGNED INT,
UNSIGNED INT
In ProTool/Pro the data format UNSIGNED INT is abbreviated as UINT,
UNSIGNED LONG as ULONG, SIGNED INT as INT and SIGNED LONG
as LONG.
Note
Input/output modules with 8 or 16 ports occupy a complete word in the PLC.
An input/output module with 24 or 32 ports occupies two words. If non–
available bits are assigned in the operating unit, the unit issues an error message. For this reason, ensure during configuration of input/output modules
with 8 or 24 ports that only those bits are assigned which are assigned to a
port.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
14-5
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
14.4
Optimization
Acquisition cycle
and update times
The acquisition cycles defined in the configuration software for the area
pointer for the tags are major factors in respect of the real update times
which are achieved. The update time is the acquisition cycle plus transmission time plus processing time.
In order to achieve optimum update times, the following points should be
observed during configuration:
When setting up the individual data areas, make them as large as necessary but as small as possible.
Define data areas that belong together as contiguous areas. The effective
update time is improved by setting one single large area rather than several smaller areas.
Setting acquisition cycles which are too short unnecessarily impairs overall performance. Set the acquisition cycle to correspond to the modification time of the process values. The rate of change of temperature of a
furnace, for example, is considerably slower than the acceleration curve
of an electric motor.
Guideline value for the acquisition cycle: Approx. 1 second.
If necessary, dispense with cyclic transmission of user data areas (acquisition cycle = 0) in order to improve the update time. Instead, use PLC jobs
to transfer the user data areas at random times.
Store the tags for a message or a screen in a contiguous data area.
In order that changes on the PLC are reliably detected by the operating
unit, they must occur during the actual acquisition cycle at least.
Screens
In the case of screens, the real update time which can be achieved is dependent on:
the number of data areas used,
the type and volume of data to be displayed,
the distribution of data within a particular data area.
In the interests of achieving rapid update times, the following points should
be observed during configuration:
Use only one data block for the tags of a particular screen.
Store the items of data to be used as closely as possible to one another in
the DB.
Only configure short acquisition cycles for those objects which actually
need to be updated quickly.
14-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
Trends
If, in the case of bit-triggered trends, the communication bit is set in the trend
transfer area, the operating unit always updates all the trends whose bit is set in
that area. It resets the bit afterwards. If the PLC program immediately sets the
bit again, the OP spends all its time updating the trends. It is then virtually impossible to operate the operating unit.
PLC jobs
If large numbers of PLC jobs are sent to the operating unit in quick succession,
communication between the operating unit and PLC may become overloaded.
If the operating unit enters the value 0 in the first data word of the job mailbox, it signifies that the operating unit has accepted the job. It then processes
the job, for which it requires a certain amount of time. If a new PLC job is
then immediately entered in the job mailbox, it may take some time before
the operating unit executes the next PLC job. The next PLC job is only accepted when sufficient computer performance is available.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
14-7
Communication Management for Allen-Bradley
14-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for
Allen-Bradley SLC 500 / PLC–5
15
User data areas are used for data exchange between the PLC and operating
unit.
These data areas are written to and read by the operating unit and the application program alternately during the process of communication. By analyzing
the data stored there, the PLC and operating unit reciprocally initiate predefined actions.
This chapter describes the function, layout and special features of the various
user data areas.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-1
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.1
Overview
Definition
User data areas can be located in data blocks and memory areas in the PLC.
User data areas include messages and trends. Set up user data areas both in
the configuration, using menu item System→ Area Pointer and in the PLC.
Function range
The user data areas available depend on the operating unit used. Table 15-1
summarizes the range of functions available on the individual operating
units.
Table 15-1
Applicable user data areas
User data area
PC
OP37/Pro
MP270
Event messages
X
X
X
Alarm messages
X
X
X
Aknowledgement area
X
X
X
LED assignment
–
X
X
Trend request area
X
X
X
Trend transfer areas
X
X
X
Screen number
X
X
X
PLC jobs
X
X
X
Coordination area
X
X
X
Date and time
X
X
X
Table 15-2 indicates who is reading (R) and who is writing (W) in respect of
access to the individual data areas.
Table 15-2
Use of data areas
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Event messages
Configured event messages
R
W
Alarm messages
Configured alarm messages
R
W
PLC acknowledgement
Alarm message acknowledgement from the PLC
R
W
Operating unit
acknowledgement
Message from the operating
unit to the PLC indicating an
alarm message has been
acknowledged
W
R
LED assignment
LED triggered by the PLC
R
W
(for OP and MP only)
15-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Table 15-2
Use of data areas, continued
Data area
Necessary for
Operating
unit
PLC
Trend request
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
W
R
Trend transfer 1
Configured trends with “Triggering via bit” or configured
history trends
R/W
R/W
Trend transfer area 2
Configured history trend with
“switch buffer”
R/W
R/W
Screen number
Evaluation by the PLC as to
which screen is currently open
W
R
PLC jobs
Triggering of functions on the
operating unit by PLC program
R/W
R/W
Coordination area
Operating unit status polled by
the PLC program
W
R
Date and time
Transfer of date and time from
the operating unit to the PLC
W
R
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-3
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.2
Event and Alarm Messages
Definition
Messages consist of a static text and/or tags. The text and tags can be defined
by the user.
Messages are subdivided into event messages and alarm messages. The programmer defines the event message and alarm message.
Event message
An event message indicates a status, e.g.
Motor switched on
PLC in manual mode
Alarm message
An alarm message indicates an operational fault, e.g.
Valve not opening
Motor temperature too high
Acknowledgement
Since alarm messages indicate an abnormal operational status, they must be
acknowledged. They can be acknowledged either by
operator input on the operating unit
setting a bit in the PLC acknowledgement area.
Triggering
messages
A message is triggered by setting a bit in one of the message areas on the
PLC. The location of the message areas is defined by means of the configuration software. The corresponding area must also be set up in the PLC.
As soon as the bit in the PLC event/alarm message area has been set and that
area has been transferred to the operating unit, the operating unit detects that
the relevant message has “arrived”.
Conversely, when the same bit is reset on the PLC by the operating unit, the
message is registered as having “departed”.
15-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Message areas
Table 15-3 indicates the number of message areas for event and alarm messages, the number of alarm message acknowledgement areas (PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit → PLC) and the total length of the respective
areas for the various operating units.
Table 15-3
Unit
Operating unit message areas
Event message area
Alarm messages area/
Alarm message area
Number Length (words)
Number Overall length per
per type type (words)
PC
8
125
8
125
OP37/Pro
8
125
8
125
MP270
8
125
8
125
The length of a contiguous area may not exceed 64 words.
Assignment of
message bit and
message number
A message can be configured for each bit in the message area. The bits are
assigned to the message numbers in ascending order.
Example:
The following event messages are configured for the PLC Allen-Bradley
SLC 500 / PLC-5:
N7
Element 8
Length 5 words
Figure 15-1 shows the assignment of all 80 (5 x 16) message numbers to the
individual bit numbers in the PLC event message area.
The assignment is performed automatically on the operating unit.
Figure 15-1
Assignment of message bit and message number
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-5
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Acknowledgement
areas
If the PLC should be informed of an alarm message acknowledgement on the
operating unit or the acknowledgement should be initiated on the PLC itself,
the relevant acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration. These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration.
Acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC:
This area is used to inform the PLC when an alarm message has been acknowledged by means of operator input on the operating unit. In this case,
the area pointer “OP acknowledgement” must be set.
Acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit:
This area is used when an alarm message is acknowledged by the PLC. In
this case, the area pointer “PLC acknowledgement” must be set.
These acknowledgement areas must also be specified in the configuration
under Area Pointers.
Figure 15-2 illustrates a schematic diagram of the of the individual alarm
message and acknowledgement areas. The acknowledgement sequences are
shown in Figures 15-4 and 15-5.
ACK
Internal processing /
link
Acknowledgement
area
PLC!Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
area
Operating unit!PLC
Figure 15-2
Assignment of
acknowledgement
bit to
message number
Alarm message and acknowledgement areas
Each alarm message is assigned a message number. The message number is
assigned the same bit number in the alarm messages area as that assigned in
the acknowledgement area. Under normal circumstances, the acknowledgement area is the same length as the associated alarm messages area.
If the length of an acknowledgement area is not equal to the overall length of
the associated alarm messages area, and there are succeeding alarm messages
and acknowledgement areas, the following assignment applies:
15-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Alarm message no. 1
Alarm message no. 49
Figure 15-3
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 1
Acknowledgement bit for alarm message no. 49
Assignment of acknowledgement bit and message number
A bit set in this area by the PLC initiates the acknowledgement of the corresponding alarm message in the operating unit, thus fulfilling the same function as pressing the “ACK” key. Reset the bit before setting the bit in the
alarm message area again. Figure 15-4 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
must follow on immediately from the associated alarm messages area,
must have precisely the same polling time and
may not be any longer than the associated alarm messages area.
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
PLC → Operating Unit
Acknowledgement
via PLC
Figure 15-4
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit
When a bit is set in the alarm message area, the operating unit resets the associated bit in the acknowledgement area. As a result of the processing via
the operating unit, the two processes indicate a slight difference with regard
to time. If the alarm message is acknowledged on the operating unit, the bit
in the acknowledgement area is set. In this way, the PLC can detect that the
alarm message has been acknowledged. Figure 15-5 shows the signal diagram.
The acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC must be no longer than
the associated alarm messages area.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-7
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Alarm messages area
Acknowledgement area
Operating Unit → PLC
Acknowledgement
via operating unit
Figure 15-5
Acknowledgement
area size
Signal diagram for acknowledgement area Operating Unit → PLC
The acknowledgement areas PLC → Operating Unit and Operating Unit →
PLC must not be any longer than the associated alarm message areas. They
can, however, be smaller if acknowledgement by the PLC is not required for
all alarm messages. This is also valid when the acknowledgement need not
be detected in the PLC for all alarm messages. Figure 15-6 illustrates such a
case.
Alarm messages area
Alarm messages
that can be
acknowledged
Alarm messages
that cannot be
acknowledged
Figure 15-6
Reduced–size alarm messages
acknowledgement area
Reduced–size acknowledgement area
Note
Place important alarm messages in the alarm messages area starting at Bit 0
in ascending order.
15-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.3
LED Assignment
Application
The Operator Panel (OP) and Multi Panel (MP) have function keys with
Light–Emitting Diodes (LEDs) integrated in them. These LEDs can be controlled from the PLC. This means, for example, that in specific situations, it
is possible to indicate to the operator which key should be pressed by switching on an LED.
Condition
In order to control LEDs, corresponding data areas, so-called LED assignments,
must be set up in the PLC and defined in the configuration as area pointers.
Data areas
The LED assignment can be divided into separate data areas, as illustrated in
the following table.
Data areas
LED assignment
OP37/Pro
MP270
Max. number
8
8
Overall length of all data areas (words)
16
16
The assignment of the individual LEDs to the bits in the data areas is defined
when the function keys are configured. This involves specifying a bit number
within the assignment area for each LED.
The bit number (n) identifies the first of two consecutive bits that control a
total of four different LED statuses (see Table 15-4):
Table 15-4
LED flashing frequency
Bit n + 1
Bit n
0
0
Off
0
1
Flashes
1
0
Flashes
1
1
Permanently on
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
LED function
15-9
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.4
Trend Request and Transfer Areas
Trends
A trend is the graphical representation of a value from the PLC. Reading of
the value can be time-triggered or bit-triggered, depending on the configuration.
Time-triggered
trends
The operating unit reads in the trend values cyclically, according to the time
interval defined in the configuration. Time-triggered trends are suitable for
continuous progressions such as the operating temperature of a motor.
Bit-triggered
trends
By setting a trigger bit, the operating unit reads in either a trend value or the
entire trend buffer. This is specified in the configuration. Bit-triggered trends
are normally used to display values of an area subject to rapid variation. An
example of this is the injection pressure for plastic mouldings.
In order to be able to activate bit-triggered trends, corresponding data areas
have to be specified in the configuration (under Area Pointers) and set up on
the PLC. The operating unit and the PLC communicate with one another via
those areas.
The following areas are available for trends:
– Trend request area
– Trend transfer area 1
– Trend transfer area 2 (required with switch buffer only)
Assign a trend to a bit in the configuration. This ensures the bit assignment is
unique for all areas.
Switch buffer
The switch buffer is a second buffer for the same trend and can be set up during the configuration.
While the operating unit reads the value from Buffer 1, the PLC writes it in
Buffer 2. If the operating unit reads from Buffer 2, the PLC writes to Buffer
1. This prevents the trend value being overwritten by the PLC when being
read by the operating unit.
15-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Data area division
The individual areas, namely trend request area and trend transfer areas 1 and
2, can be divided into separate data areas with a predefined maximum number and length (Table 15-5).
Table 15-5
Division of data areas
Data areas
Request
Trend request area
Transfer
1
2
Max. number per type
8
8
8
Overall length of all data areas
(words)
8
8
8
If a screen with one or more trends is opened on the operating unit, the unit
sets the corresponding bits in the trend request area. After deselection of the
screen, the operating unit resets the corresponding bits in the trend request
area.
The trend request area can be used by the PLC to ascertain which trend is
currently being displayed on the operating unit. Trends can also be triggered
without analysis of the trend request area.
Trend transfer
area 1
This area serves to trigger trends. In the PLC program, set the bit assigned to
the trend in the trend transfer area and the trend communication bit. The operating unit detects triggering and reads in either a trend value or the entire
buffer, according to the configuration. It then resets resets the trend bit and
the trend communication bit .
Trend transfer area(s)
Bit number
15 14 13 12 11 10 9
8 7
6
5 4
3
2
1
0
Word 1
Word 2
Trend communication bit
The trend transfer area must not be altered by the PLC program until the
trend communication bit has been reset.
Trend transfer
area 2
Trend transfer area 2 is necessary for trends that are configured with a switch
buffer. Its layout is precisely the same as that of trend transfer area 1.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-11
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.5
Screen Number Area
Application
The operating units store information concerning the screen currently open
on the unit in the screen number area.
This enables the transfer of data regarding the current operating unit display
content to the PLC which, in turn, can trigger certain reactions; e.g. call in a
different screen.
Condition
If the screen number area should be used, it must be specified in the configuration as an Area Pointer. It can only be stored in one PLC and only once.
The screen number area is downloaded to the PLC spontaneously, i.e. the
transfer is always initiated when a change is registered on the operating unit.
Therefore, it is not necessary to configure a polling time.
Structure
The screen number area is a data area with a fixed length of data words.
The structure of the screen number area in the PLC memory is illustrated
below.
15
0
Word 1
Current screen type
Word 2
Current screen number
Word 3
Reserved
Word 4
Reserved
Word 5
Reserved
Entry
15-12
Assignment
Current screen type
1
Current screen number
1 to 65535
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.6
Using PLC Jobs
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC. These functions include:
– Displaying screens
– Setting date and time
A PLC job is identified by its job number. Depending on the PLC job in
question, up to three parameters can then be specified.
Job mailbox
The job mailbox can be used to send PLC jobs to the operating unit, thus initiating actions on the operating unit.
The job mailbox is set up under Area Pointer and has a length of four data
words.
The first word of the job mailbox contains the job number. The parameters of
the job must be entered in the succeeding words (maximum of 3).
15
0
If the first word of the job mailbox is not equal to zero, the operating unit
analyzes the PLC job. Afterwards, the unit sets this data word to zero again.
For this reason, the parameters must be entered in the job mailbox first and
then the job number.
The PLC jobs possible are listed in the Appendix B together with their job
numbers and parameters.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-13
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15.7
Coordination Area
The coordination area is two data words long. It serves to realize the following functions:
Detection of operating unit startup by the PLC program,
Detection of the current operating unit operating mode by the PLC program,
Detection by the PLC program that the operating unit is ready to communicate.
Note
Each time the coordination area is updated by the operating unit, the entire
coordination area is written.
Therefore, the PLC program must not execute any modifications in the coordination area.
In order to use the coordination area, both words must be specified but only
the first word is actually used. The second word is reserved.
Figure 15-7 illustrates the structure of Word 1.
Bit assignment in
coordination area
Word 1
High Byte
15
– – – – – –
Low Byte
2 1 0
8 7
– – – – – – – X X X
Startup bit
Operating mode
– = Reserved
X = Assigned
Figure 15-7
Life bit
Significance of the bits in the coordination area
Startup bit
The startup bit is set to 0 for a short time during the start–up routine by the
operating unit. After the startup routine has been completed, the bit is set
permanently to 1.
Operating mode
As soon as the operating unit has been switched offline by the operator, the
operating mode bit is set to 1. When the operating unit is working in normal
operation, the operating mode bit is set to 0. The PLC program can be used to
poll this bit and thus establish the current operating mode of the operating
unit.
Life bit
The life bit is inverted by the operating unit at intervals of one second. The
PLC program can be used to poll this bit to check whether connection to the
operating unit still exists.
15-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
Transferring Date and Time to the PLC
Transfer of date and time from the operating unit to the PLC can be triggered
by PLC job 41. PLC job 41 writes the date and time to the data area Date/
Time where they can be analyzed by the PLC program. Figure 15-8 illustrates the structure of the data area. All data is in BCD format.
High Byte
Word 15
n+0
n+1
Low Byte
8 7
0
Reserved
Hour (0...23)
Minute (0...59)
Second (0 – 59)
n+2
Reserved
n+3
Reserved
Weekday (1...7, 1=Sun)
n+4
Day (1...31)
Month (1 – 12)
n+5
Year (0...99)
Reserved
Figure 15-8
Time
Transferring date
and time
Date
15.8
Structure of data area Time and Date
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
15-15
User Data Areas for Allen-Bradley
15-16
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
A
PLC Jobs
B
Interface Area Assignment
C
Siemens Worldwide
D
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
E
Part VII Appendix
Index
O-18
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
A.1
A
Operating Unit System Messages
Message number
Operating unit system messages can be divided into various categories.
The information concerning the category to which a system message belongs
is included in the message number:
Message number
Message text
01
02
03
06
07
08
11
12
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Printer
Scripts
Scale
Win32 functions
Win32 functions
Archives
Offline function
Trends
System information
Channels and connections: S7
Channels and connections: AS511
S7 diagnostics
Miscellaneous
Tags and area pointers
PLC coordination
PLC jobs
PLC channels
Views
Authorization
Status / Control
Passwords
Messages
PLC connection
The message category enables the identification of a general area in which
the cause of the fault is to be found.
A table is provided below containing a selection of system messages, when
they occur and, where possible, how the cause of the error can be eliminated.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
A-1
System Messages
Note
System messages are displayed in the language selected in the configuration.
Procedure in the
case of “internal
errors”
Adopt the following procedure for all system messages referring to “internal
errors”:
a) Switch the operating unit off, set the PLC to the STOP status and then
start up both units again.
b) Download the configuration again and then restart the PLC and operating
unit.|
c) If the fault occurs again, please contact your nearest Siemens representative. When doing so, please quote the number of the error that has occurred and any tags referred to in the message.
System message
parameters
Number
10000
The system messages may contain parameters which are not decoded for the
user but which are relevant in respect of the cause of an error since they provide a reference to the source code from ProTool/Pro Runtime. These parameters are issued according to the text “Error code:”.
Effect/Cause
Remedy
The print job could not be started or was terminated for an
unknown reason.
Configure the printer again.
The printer is incorrectly configured.
Or: There are no rights for a network printer available.
Initiate the assignment of rights for a
network printer.
10001
No printer has been installed or no standard printer configured.
Install a printer and/or mark one as
standard printer.
10002
The intermediate buffer for printing graphics is full. Up to
two graphics can be buffered.
Do not issue print jobs so quickly in
succession.
10003
Graphics can be buffered again.
–
10004
The intermediate buffer for printing lines in text mode
(e.g. messages) is full. Up to 1000 lines can be buffered.
Do not issue print jobs so quickly in
succession.
10005
Lines of text can be buffered again.
–
20010
A fault has occurred in the script line specified.
Execution of the script function was, therefore, terminated.
Select the specified script line in the
configuration.
In this case, it is advisable to check any previous system
messages too.
Check Tags, whether the types used are
permissible.
Check Functions, whether the number
and types of parameter are correct.
A-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
Number
20011
Effect/Cause
Remedy
An error has occurred in a script called in by the script
specified. Execution of the script function has, therefore,
been terminated in the subscript.
Select the scripts from the configuration which were directly or indirectly
called in via the specified script.
In this case, it is advisable to check any previous system
messages too.
Check Tags, whether the types used are
permissible.
Check Functions, whether the number
and types of parameter are correct.
20012
Inconsistent configuration data is present. Therefore, the
script could not be created.
Compile the configuration again.
20013
VBScript.dll is not correctly installed. Therefore, no scripts Re-install ProTool/Pro RT.
can be executed.
20014
A value is returned by the script function which is not
written in any configured return tag.
Select the specified script in the configuration.
Check whether the script name has
been assigned a value.
20015
Too many scripts have been triggered in quick succession.
If more than 20 scripts are queued to be processed, any
subsequent scripts are rejected.
In this case, the script indicated in the message is not
executed.
Check where the scripts are being triggered from.
Extend the times, e.g. the polling time
of the tags, which trigger the scripts.
30010
The tag could not accept the function result, e.g. in the
case of exceeding the value range.
Check the tag type of the function parameter.
30011
A function could not be executed because the function was
assigned an invalid value or type in the parameter.
Check the parameter value and tag type
of the invalid parameter.
If a tag is used as a parameter, check its
value.
40010
The function could not be executed since the parameters
could not be converted to a common tag type.
Check the parameter types in the configuration.
40011
The function could not be executed since the parameters
could not be converted to a common tag type.
Check the parameter types in the configuration.
50000
The operating unit receives data faster than it is capable of –
processing. Therfore, no further data is received until the
data currently available has been processed. Data exchange
then resumes.
50001
Data exchange has been resumed.
60000
This message is generated by the function “Display system –
messages”. The text to be displayed is transferred to the
function as a parameter.
60010
The file could not be copied in the direction defined because Restart the function or check the paths
either one of the two files is currently open or the source/tar- of the source/target files.
get path is not available.
Using Windows NT with NTFS: The
It is possible that the Windows NT user has no access rights user executing ProTool/Pro RT must
be granted access rights for the files.
to one of the two files.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
–
A-3
System Messages
Number
60011
Effect/Cause
Remedy
An attempt was made to copy a file to itself.
Check the path of the source-/target
file.
It is possible that the Windows NT user has no access rights
Using Windows NT with NTFS: The
to one of the two file.
user executing ProTool/Pro RT must
be granted access rights for the files.
70010
The application could not be started because it could not be Check whether the application exists in
the specified path or close other apfound in the path specified or insufficient memory space
plications.
was available.
70011
The system time could not be modified This may be due to
the following:
70012
–
an impermissible time was transferred in the PLC job,
–
the Windows NT user has no user rights to modify the
system time.
Check the time which is to be set.
Under Windows NT: The user executing ProTool/Pro RT must be assigned
the rights to modify the system time
from Windows NT (administration/
user manager, guidelines).
An error occurred when executing the function “Exit Runtime” with the option “Exit also Windows”.
Terminate all applications currently
running.
Windows and ProTool/Pro RT are not terminated.
Then terminate Windows.
A possible cause is that other applications cannot be terminated.
70013
The system time could not be modified because an invalid Check the time which is to be set.
value was entered. Incorrect separators may have been used.
70014
The system time could not be modified This may be due to
the following:
–
an impermissible time was transferred
–
the Windows NT user has no user rights to modify the
system time,
–
Windows rejects the setting request.
Check the time which is to be set.
Under Windows NT: The user executing ProTool/Pro RT must be assigned
the rights to modify the system time
from Windows NT (administration/
user manager, guidelines).
70015
The system time could not be read because Windows rejects –
the reading function.
70016
An attempt was made to select a screen by means of a func- Check the screen number in the function or job. This is not possible because the screen number tion or job with the screen numbers
specified does not exist.
configured.
Or: a screen could not be generated due to insufficient system memory.
Refer the number to a screen, if necessary.
80001
–
Store the file or table by executing a
‘move’ or ‘copy’ function.
80002
A line is missing in the specified archive.
–
80003
The copying process for archiving was not successful.
–
In this case, it is advisable to check any subsequent system
messages, too.
80005
A-4
The copying process for archiving was not successful. If an –
automatic trigger is used for archiving, data may have been
lost.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
80006
Since archiving is not possible, this causes a permanent loss In the case of databases, check whether
of the functionality.
the corresponding data source exists
and start up the system again.
80008
Since archiving is not possible, this causes a permanent loss Restart the system when the full funcof the functionality.
tionality is required.
80010
Since the path was incorrectly entered in ProTool, this
causes a permanent loss of the functionality.
Configure the path for the respective
archive again and restart the system
when the full functionality is required.
80011
Target archives are open.
You have two minutes in which to
close the target archive, then a new attempt is made.
80012
Archive values are stored in a buffer. If the values are read to Archive less values.
the buffer faster than they can be physically written (e.g.
Or increase the recording interval.
using a hard disk), overloading may occur and recording is
then stopped.
80013
The overload status no longer applies. Archiving resumes
the recording of all values.
–
80014
The same action was triggered twice in quick succession.
Since the process is already in operation, the action is only
carried out once.
–
110000
The operating mode status has been changed. The operating –
mode is now offline.
110001
The operating mode status has been changed. The operating –
mode is now online.
110002
The operating mode status has not been changed.
Check the connection to the PLCs.
Check whether the address area for the
area pointer “Coordination” in the PLC
is available.
120000
The trend is not displayed because an incorrect axis to the
trend, or incorrect trend, has been configured.
Change the configuration.
120001
The trend is not displayed because an incorrect axis to the
trend, or incorrect trend, has been configured.
Change the configuration.
120002
The trend is not displayed because the tag assigned tries to
access an invalid PLC address.
Check whether the data area for the tag
exists in the PLC, the configured address is correct or the value range for
the tag is correct.
130000
The action was not executed.
Close other applications.
Delete files no longer required from the
hard disk.
130001
The action was not executed.
Delete files no longer required from the
hard disk.
130002
The action was not executed.
Close other applications.
Delete files no longer required from the
hard disk.
140000
Online connection to the PLC has been successfully established.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
–
A-5
System Messages
Effect/Cause
Remedy
140001
Online connection to the PLC has been disconnected.
–
140003
No tag updating or writing is executed.
Check the connection and whether the
PLC is switched on.
Number
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
140004
No tag updating or writing is executed because the access
point or the subrack configuration is incorrect.
Check the connection and whether the
PLC is switched on.
Check the access point or the subrack
configuration (MPI, PPI, PROFIBUS)
in the Control Panel with “Set PG/PC
interface”.
Restart the system.
140005
No tag updating or writing is executed because the address
of the operating unit is incorrect (possibly too high).
Use a different operating unit address.
Check the connection and whether the
PLC is switched on.
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
140006
No tag updating or writing is executed because the baud rate Select a different baud rate in ProTool/
is incorrect.
Pro (according to subrack, profile,
communication peer, etc.).
140007
No tag updating or writing is executed because the bus pro- Check the user defined bus profile.
file is incorrect (see %1).
Check the connection and whether the
The following parameters could not be entered in the regis- PLC is switched on.
try:
Check the parameter definitions in the
1:
Tslot
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC inter2:
Tqui
face”.
3:
Tset
4:
MinTsdr
Restart the system.
5:
MaxTsdr
6:
Trdy
7:
Tid1
8:
Tid2
9:
Gap Factor
10: Retry Limit
140008
No tag updating or writing is executed because the configu- Check the connection and whether the
ration data is incorrect:
PLC is switched on.
The following parameters could not be entered in the registry:
0:
General errors
1:
Incorrect version
2:
Profile cannot be entered in the registry.
3:
Sub–network type cannot be entered in the registry.
4:
Target rotation time cannot be entered in the registry.
5:
Highest addresse (HSA) incorrect.
A-6
Check the parameter definitions in the
Control Panel using “Set PU/PC interface”.
Restart the system.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
Effect/Cause
Remedy
140009
No tag updating or writing is executed because the module
for the S7 communication was not found.
Re-install the module in the Control
Panel using “Set PG/PC interface”.
140010
No S7 communication peer could be found because the
PLC is switched off.
Switch the PLC on.
Number
DP/T:
DP/T: The option “Is not active as the only master” is set in If only one master is connected to the
the Control Panel under “Set PG/PC interface”.
network, deactivate the option “Is not
active as the only master” in “Set
PG/PC interface”.
If the network has more than one master, switch this master on. Do not
modify any settings here, otherwise a
bus fault may occur.
140011
No tag updating or writing is executed because communica- Check the connection and that the
tion is interrupted.
communication peer is switched on.
140012
There is an initialization problem (e.g. when ProTool/Pro
RT has been terminated in the Task Manager).
Restart the operating unit.
Or start ProTool/Pro RT first and then
Or: another application (e.g. STEP7, WINCC) is active with the other applications.
different bus parameters and the driver cannot be started
with the new bus parameters (e.g. baud rate).
140013
The MPI cable is not plugged in and, thus, there is no power Check the connections.
supply.
140014
–
In the configuration modify the operating unit address.
140015
Incorrect baud rate
Correct the incorrect parameters.
Or: incorrect bus parameter (e.g. HSA)
Or: OP address > HSA
Or: incorrect interrupt vector (interrupt does not arrive at the
driver)
140016
–
Change the interrupt number.
140017
–
Change the interrupt number.
150000
No more data is read or written.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the
PLC is operational, the correct interface is used.
This can have various causes:
The cable is defective.
The PLC does not respond, is defective, etc.
Connection made to the wrong interface.
The system is overloaded.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
150001
Connection is re-established because the cause of the inter- –
ruption has been eliminated.
160000
No more data is read or written.
This can have various causes:
The cable is defective.
The PLC does not respond, is defective, etc.
Connection made to the wrong interfacet.
The system is overloaded.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Check that the cable is plugged in, the
PLC is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
A-7
System Messages
Number
Effect/Cause
Remedy
160001
Connection is re-established because the cause of the inter- –
ruption has been eliminated.
170000 1)
S7 diagnostics messages are not displayed because it is not
possible to logon to the S7 diagnostics with this unit. The
service program is not supported.
170001 1)
The S7 diagnostics buffer cannot be displayed because com- Switch the PLC online.
munication with the PLC has been switched off.
170002 1)
The S7 diagnostics buffer cannot be displayed because read- –
ing in the diagnostics buffer (SZL) was terminated due to an
error.
170003 1)
The display of an S7 diagnostics message is not possible.
An internal error %2 has been reported.
–
170004 1)
The display of an S7 diagnostics message is not possible.
An internal error with error class %2, error number %3 has
been reported.
–
170007 1)
It is not possible to read in the S7 diagnostics buffer (SZL)
because it was terminated with an internal error with error
class %2 and error code %3.
–
180000
A component/OCX receives configuration data with a version identification which is not supported.
Install a newer component.
190000
It is possible that the tag will not be updated.
–
190001
The tag is updated following an error status after the cause
of the last error state has been eliminated (return to normal
operation).
–
190002
The tag is not updated because communication to the PLC
has been switched off.
Switch on communication via the
function “Set Online”.
190004
The tag is not updated because the configured address is not Check the configuration.
available for this tag .
190005
The tag is not updated because the configured PLC type
does not exist for this tag .
Check the configuration.
190006
The tag is not updated because it is not possible to map the
PLC type in the tag type.
Check the configuration.
190007
The tag values are not modified because the connection to
the PLC has been terminated or the tag is offline.
Switch online or re-establish connection to the PLC.
190008
The threshold values configured for the tag have been violated, e.g. by
– an entered value,
– a function,
– a script.
Observe the configured or current
threshold value of the tag.
190009
An attempt has been made to assign a value to a tag which is Observe the value range for the tag
outside the value range permitted for this type.
type.
–
E.g. a value of 260 entered for a byte tag or a value of –3 for
a signless word tag.
190010
The tag is described with values too often (e.g. in a loop
triggered by a script).
Increase the time interval between the
multi–writing tasks.
Values are lost because the maximum of 100 event have
been stored in the buffer.
A-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
Number
190011
Effect/Cause
Remedy
There are two causes for this message:
–
The value entered could not be written to the configured Ensure that the value entered is within
PLC tag because it was either above or below the value the value range of the PLC tags.
range.
The input is rejected and the original value is reset.
–
Connection to the PLC has been interrupted.
Check the connection to the PLC.
190012
190100
It is not possible to convert a value from a source format to a Check the value range or type of the
variable.
target format, e.g.:
–
A value should be assigned to a counter which is outside the valid, PLC-dependent value range.
–
A tag of the type Integer should be assigned a value of
the type String.
The area pointer is not updated because the configured address for this area pointer is not available.
Check the configuration.
Type:
1 Event messages
2 Alarm messages
3 PLC acknowledgment
4 Operating unit acknowledgment
5 LED assignment
6 Trend request
7 Trend transfer 1
8 Trend transfer 2
No.: is the consecutive number displayed in ProTool/Pro.
190101
The area pointer is not updated because it is not possible to –
map the PLC type in the area pointer type.
Parameter type and no.:
See message 190100
190102
The area pointer is updated following an error status after
–
the cause of the last error state has been eliminated (return to
normal operation).
Parameter type and no.:
See message 190100
200000
Coordination is not executed because the address configured Change the address or set up the adin the PLC does not exist/has not been set up.
dress in the PLC.
200001
Coordination is not executed because the address configured Change the address or set up the adin the PLC cannot be written.
dress in the PLC in an area which can
be written.
200002
Coordination is not executed at present because the address – (Internal error)
format of the area pointer does not match the internal storage format.
200003
Coordination can be executed again because the last error
status has been eliminated (return to normal operation).
–
200004
It is possible that coordination is not executed.
–
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
A-9
System Messages
Number
200005
Effect/Cause
Remedy
No more data is read or written.
Check that the cable is connected and
the PLC is in order.
This can have various causes:
– The cable is defective.
– The PLC does not respond, is defective, etc.
– The system is overloaded.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
210000
Jobs are not processed because the address configured in the Change the address or set up the adPLC does not exist/has not been set up.
dress in the PLC.
210001
Jobs are not processed because the address configured in the Change the address or set up the adPLC cannot be written to/read from.
dress in the PLC in an area which can
be written to/read from.
210002
Jobs are not executed because the address format of the area
pointer does not match the internal storage format.
(Internal error)
210003
The job mailbox is processed again because the last error
status has been eliminated (return to normal operation).
–
210004
It is possible that the job mailbox is not processed.
–
210005
A PLC job was triggered by an impermissible number.
Check the PLC program.
210006
A fault occurred while attempting to execute the PLC job.
The PLC job is, therefore, not executed.
Check the parameter types in the PLC
job.
Observe the subsequent/previous system message, if appropriate.
Compile the configuration again.
220000 2)
See footnote
See footnote
220001
The tag is not downloaded because the associated channel/
the unit does not support downloading the data type bool/
bit.
Change the configuration.
220002
The tag is not downloaded because the associated channel/
the unit does not support downloading the data type byte.
Change the configuration.
220003
The associated driver could not be uploaded. It is possible
that the driver is not installed.
Install the driver by re–installing ProTool/Pro RT.
220004
Communication is terminated and no update is executed
because the cable is not connected or is defect etc.
Check the connection.
220005
Communication is running.
–
230000
The value entered could not be accepted. The entered value Enter a permissible value.
is rejected and the previous value is specified again.
Either the value range has been exceeded or impermissible
characters were entered.
230002
Since the current password level is inadequate or the pass- Activate an adequate password level
word dialog box was closed with ESC, the entry is rejected using Login.
and the previous value is specified again.
230003
Changeover to the specified screen is not executed because Configure the screen.
the screen is not available/configured. The current screen
Check the selection function.
remains selected.
240000 3)
Runtime is operating in Demo mode.
Load the license.
There is either no Stopcopy license or it is defect.
A-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
Number
240001
3)
240002
3)
Effect/Cause
Remedy
Runtime is operating in Demo mode.
Load an adequate license / powerpack.
Too many tags are configured for the installed version.
240003
Runtime is operating with a time-limited standby authoriza- Restore the full authorization.
tion.
Authorization cannot be executed.
Restart ProTool/Pro RT or reinstall it.
ProTool/Pro RT is running in Demo mode.
240004
Error during reading the the standby authorization.
ProTool/Pro RT is running in Demo mode.
Restart Sie ProTool/Pro RT, install the
authorization or repair the authorization (see Commissioning Instructions
Software Protection).
250000
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control is not updated Check the set address and then check
because the address configured for this tag is not available. that the address has been set up in the
PLC.
250001
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control is not updated Check the set address.
because the PLC type configured for this tag is not available.
250002
The tag in the specified line in Status/Control is not updated Check the set address.
because it is not possible to map the PLC type in the tag
type.
260001
A password has been entered which is unknown to the sys- Enter a known password in the passtem. Therefore, the lowest password level has been set. This word input field (with corresponding
level).
corresponds to the status following Logout.
260002
A password has been entered whose assigned level does not Modify the password level in the password input field or enter a password
permit execution of the function.
with a sufficiently high level.
The password level currently set is displayed for information purposes.
270000
A tag is not displayed in the message because it attempts to Check whether the data area for the tag
access an invalid address in the PLC.
exists in the PLC, the configured address is correct or the value range for
the tag is correct.
270001
There is a unit–dependent limit as to how many messages
–
may be queued simultaneously in order to be displayed (see
GHB). This limit has been exceeded.
The display no longer contains all the messages.
However, all the messages are recorded in the message
buffer.
280000
Connection is re-established because the cause of the inter- –
ruption has been eliminated.
280001
No more data is read or written.
This can have various causes:
The cable is defective.
The PLC does not respond, is defective, etc.
Connection made to the wrong interface.
The system is overloaded.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Check that the cable is plugged in, the
PLC is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
A-11
System Messages
Number
280002
Effect/Cause
Remedy
A connection is used which requires a function module in
the PLC.
–
The function block has replied. Communication can now
proceed.
280003
A connection is used which requires a function module in
the PLC.
The function block does not replied.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the
PLC is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
The remedy is dependent on the error
code:
1: The function block must set the
COM bit in the response container.
2: The function block may not set
ERROR bit in the response container
3: The function block must respond
within the specified time (timeout)
4: Establish an online connection to
the PLC
280004
The online connection to the PLC has been interrupted.
There is no data exchange at present.
Check the PLC parameters in ProTool
Pro: baud rate, block length, station address.
Check that the cable is plugged in, the
PLC is operational, the correct interface is used.
Reboot the system if the system message is displayed continuously.
1)
The optional parameter %1 at the start of the message may contain an identification for the S7 connection when several
S7s are in parallel operation and are connected to diagnostics equipment.
2) A WinCC channel provides the message texts via an interface. This text is issued via this message. ProTool/Pro RT has
no influence on this text.
3) The specified text comes from the component resources.
A-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
System Messages
A.2
Error Number of the FB DBHMI
Method of storing
The FB stores errors which have occurred in Accumulator 1 each time the
function block is called in.
Procedure in the
case of “internal
errors”
Adopt the following procedure for all system messages referring to “internal
errors”:
a) Switch the operating unit off, set the PLC to the STOP status and then
start up both units again.
b) Download the configuration again and restart the operating unit and PLC.
c) If the fault occurs again, please contact your nearest Siemens representative. When doing so, please quote the number of the error that has occurred and any tags referred to in the message.
Description
Cause / Remedy
01
COM bit not set
Connection interrupted, e.g. cable not plugged in,
runtime is not running, IM/CP stopped.
02
Error bit set
Runtime has set error bit.
03
Internal error
04
Internal error
05
Internal error
06
Internal error
07
Invalid block length
When calling in the FB, a value was entered for
the block length greater than 3.
08
Response block exceeds peripheral end address
The last byte of the response block is outside the
peripheral address area.
Message
Address of IM/CP + Number of Outputs (dependent on block length selected) > 255.
09
Request block exceeds peripheral end address
The last byte of the request block is outside the
peripheral address area.
Address of IM/CP + Number of Inputs (dependent
on block length selected) > 255.
10
Invalid periphery start address
21
Internal error
22
Address exceeds permissible address area
An address should be read which is greater than
255. This is not possible with this FB.
23
Writing in timer not permitted
It is required to write directly in a timer. This is not
possible with this FB.
24
Internal error
25
Writing in counter not permitted
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Only with AG 95-DP: The FB only supports periphery addresses 64 to 127.
It is required to write directly in a counter. This is
not possible with this FB.
A-13
System Messages
Message
Description
Cause / Remedy
26
Internal error
27
Internal error
30
DB does not exist
The DB to be read from or written to does not exist in the PLC.
31
DB too short
The data word to be read or written does not exist
in the PLC in the DB specified.
F1
Internal error
A-14
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
B
PLC Jobs
This section of the Appendix contains a list of all PLC jobs and their relevant
parameters.
Description
PLC jobs can be used to initiate functions on the operating unit from the
PLC, such as:
– displaying screens
– setting date and time
– altering general settings
A PLC job consists of 4 data words. The first data word contains the job
number. Data words 2 to 4 are used to transfer up to three parameters depending on the function in question. The basic structure of a PLC job is shown in
Figure B-1.
Address
Word 1
Right byte (RB)
0
Job no.
Word 2
Parameter 1
Word 3
Parameter 2
Word 4
Parameter 3
Figure B-1
List
Left byte (LB)
Structure of a PLC job
All PLC jobs that are possible on the various operating units are listed below
together with their parameters. The No. column indicates the PLC job number. In general, PLC jobs can only be initiated by the PLC when the operating unit is in online mode.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
B-1
PLC Jobs
No.
Function
14
Set Time (BCD format)
15
23
24
Parameter 1
LB:
RB:
–
Hours (0..23)
Parameter 2
LB:
RB:
Minutes
Seconds
Parameter 3
–
Parameter 1
LB:
RB:
–
Day of week (1..7: Sun
day...Saturday)
Parameter 2
LB:
RB:
Day of month (1..31)
Month
(1..12)
Parameter 3
LB:
Year
Set password level
0..9
0 = Lowest password level
9 = Highest password level
Parameter 2, 3
–
Password logout
Parameter 1, 2, 3
40
OP37/Pro
MP270
–
(0..59)
(0..59)
Set Date (BCD format)
Parameter 1
PC
–
Transfer date/time to PLC
(Format: S7 DATE_AND_TIME)
There should be at least 5 seconds between two jobs or else the operating unit will become overloaded.
Parameter 1, 2, 3
41
–
Date/Time for PLC dowmload (in OP/MP format )
There should be at least 5 seconds between two jobs or else the operating unit will become overloaded.
Parameter 1, 2, 3
42
43
44
–
Get LED area from PLC
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.:
Parameter 2, 3
–
1..8
Get event message area from PLC
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.:
Parameter 2, 3
–
1..4 with PC
1..8 with OP37/Pro, MP270
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement area from the
PLC
This PLC job is used to retrieve both the alarm message area and the
acknowledgement area PLC → Operating Unit from the PLC. If no
acknowledgement area has been set up, only the alarm message area is
retrieved.
B-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PLC Jobs
No.
49
Function
Parameter 1
Area pointer no.:
Parameter 2, 3
–
50
51
MP270
–
Clear alarm buffer
Parameter 1, 2, 3
OP37/Pro
1..4 with PC
1..8 with OP37/Pro, MP270
Clear event buffer
Parameter 1, 2, 3
PC
–
Select screen
Parameter 1
Screen number
Parameter 2
–
Parameter 3
–
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
B-3
PLC Jobs
B-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
C
This appendix details the interface assignment for all plug-in connecting
cables. They can also be ordered separately from Siemens.
Note
Siemens offers no guarantee for cables soldered by the user.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
C-1
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit <–> SIMATIC S5 (TTY)
AS511
PU Interface on CPUs
6XV1440 – 2A...
Connector 1: 15–pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
TTY, active
Connector 2: 15–pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
TTY, passive
Connector 1
Connector 2
Operating Unit
PLC
PE
1
1
PE
PE
8
8
PE
R20 mA
13
+RxD
9
– RxD
2
6
+TxD
15
7
– TxD
Casing shield
Casing shield
GND
*
T20 mA
11
9
+RxD
+TxD
6
2
– RxD
GND
12
– TxD
*
7
For TTY cables with special lengths > 10 m, 2 Zener diodes (12 V) must be
soldered in the 15–pin connector for the operating unit (TTY active):
BZX 55 C12 ser. no. 30095128
Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2; shielded; max. length 1000 m
C-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit RS422 <–> SIMATIC 505 RS422
6 XV1440 – 1M... (PLC 545 / CPU 1102, 555)
Secured by screws
Connector 2: 9–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Connector 1: 9–pin Sub D plug
RS422
Connector 1
Operating Unit
RS422
Connector 2
SIMATIC 505
+
–
TxD+
3
9 DI+
+
TxD–
8
2 DI–
–
+
RxD+
4
3 DO+
–
RxD–
9
8 DO–
GND
5
5 GND_RS422
Shielding connected to casing with large contact area
Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2; shielded; max. length 300 m
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
C-3
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit <–> SIMATIC 505
6 XV1440 – 2K...
Connector 1: 15–pin Sub D plug
Connector 2: 9–pin Sub D socket connector
Secured by screws
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover
V.24
V.24
Connector 1
Connector 2
Operating Unit
Casing shield
SIMATIC 505
PE
1
1
DCD
PE
8
6
DSR
4
DTR
CTS
5
RxD
3
3
TxD
TxD
4
2
RxD
GND
12
5
GND
RTS
10
7
RTS
8
CTS
Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2; shielded; max. length 15 m
C-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit <–> SIMATIC 505
6 XV1440 – 2L...
Connector 1: 15–pin Sub D plug
Secured by slide
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Solid metal cover
V.24
Connector 1
Operating Unit
1
PE
Casing shield
Connector 2: 25–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable outlet at Pin 1
V.24
Connector 2
SIMATIC 505
25
PE
Casing shield
8
RxD
3
2 TxD
TxD
4
3 RxD
RTS
10
4 RTS
CTS
5
5 CTS
GND
12
7 GND
6 DSR
20 DTR
8 DCD
Shielding connected to casing with large contact area
Cable: 5 x 0.14 mm2 shielded; max. length 15 m
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
C-5
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit RS422 <–> SIMATIC 505 RS422
6 XV1440 – 2M... (PLC 525, 545 / CPU 1101, 565T)
Secured by screws
Connector 2: 9–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Cable outlet at Pin 1
Connector 1: 9–pin Sub D plug
RS422
Connector 1
Operating Unit
RS422
Connector 2
SIMATIC 505
+
–
TxD+
3
5 DI+
+
TxD–
8
8 DI–
–
+
RxD+
4
1 DO+
–
RxD–
9
7 DO–
GND
5
6 GND_RS422
3 GND_RS485
Shielding connected to casing with large contact area
Cable: 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2; shielded; max. length 300 m
C-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit <–> SIMATIC 505 RS 232-C
Connector 1: 9–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 1
Operating Unit
DTR
TXD/CTS
RXD/RTS
DSR/DCD
Connector 2: 9–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 2
SIMATIC 505
1
1
2
2
RXD/RTS
3
3
TXD/CTS
DCD
4
4
DTR
SIG. GND
5
5
SIG. GND
DTR
6
6
DSR
7
7
8
8
9
9
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
C-7
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
Operating Unit <–> Allen Bradley PLC-5/RS422
6 XV1440 – 2V...
Connector 1: 9–pin Sub D plug
Connector 2: 25–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 1
Operating Unit
Connector 2
Allen Bradley PLC-5
+
–
3
16
– RxD
+
– TxD 8
3
+RxD
–
4
14
+TxD
– RxD 9
2
– TxD
GND
7
GND
+TxD
+
–
+RxD
5
Cable 3 x 2 x 0.14 mm2; shielding contacts joined; max. length 60 m
Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
C-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
PC <–> Allen Bradley PLC-5
Allen Bradley Standard Cable
Connector 1: 9–pin IBM AT socket connector
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 1
PC
Connector 2: 25–pin PLC processor plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 2
Allen Bradley PLC-5
2
RxD
2
GND
5
TxD
3
DTR
4
4
RTS
DSR
6
5
CTS
RTS
7
6
DSR
CTS
8
8
DCD
20
DTR
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
7
3
C-9
Interface Area Assignment
Plug–in Connecting Cable:
PC <–> Allen Bradley SLC 500
Connector 1: 9–pin Sub D plug
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 1
PC
DCD
Secured by screws
Cable feed–out to rear
Connector 2
Allen Bradley SLC 500
1
1
DCD
2
2
RxD
3
3
TxD
4
4
DTR
COM
5
5
COM
DSR
6
6
DSR
RTS
7
7
RTS
CTS
8
8
CTS
9
9
NC
RxD
TxD
DTR
C-10
Connector 2: 9–pin Sub D plug
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Interface Area Assignment
Adapter for PROFIBUS–DP Extension
6 XV1440 – 2T...
Connector 1
Operating Unit
Connector 2
Bus connector
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
Cable: 9 x 5 mm2; shielded; max. length 32 cm
Shielding connected at both ends to casing with large contact area
Installation of multiple OP15s one under another (e.g. 3x6 = 18 units at intervals of 3 cm)
6XV1440–2TE10 cannot be used.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
C-11
Interface Area Assignment
C-12
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
SIMATIC HMI Documentation
D
Target groups
This manual is part of the SIMATIC HMI documentation. The documentation
is aimed at the following target groups:
Newcomers
Users
Configurers
Programmers
Commissioning engineers
How the documentation is organized
The SIMATIC HMI documentation consists of the following components:
User’s Guides / User’s Manuals for:
– Configuration software
– Runtime software
– Communication between PLCs and operating units
Equipment Manuals for the following operating units:
– MP (Multi Panel)
– OP (Operator Panel)
– TP (Touch Panel)
– TD (Text Display)
– PP (Push Button Panel)
Online Help on the configuration software
Start–up Guides
First Steps
Overview of complete documentation
The following table provides an overview of the SIMATIC HMI documentation and shows you when you require the different documents.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
D-1
Documentation
Target Group
Content
First Steps with ProTool
Newcomers
This documentation guides you step by step through the
configuration of
Product Brief
a screen with various objects
changing from one screen to another
a message.
This documentation is available for:
OP3, OP5, OP7, OP15, OP17
OP25, OP27, OP35, OP37, TP27, TP37
Windows-based systems
ProTool
Configuring
Windows-based Systems
Configurers
Provides information on working with the ProTool/Pro configuration software. It contains
information on installation
basic principles of configuration
a detailed description of configurable objects and func-
User’s Guide
tions.
This documentation is valid for Windows-based systems.
ProTool
Configuring
Graphics Displays
Configurers
Provides information on working with the ProTool configuration software. It contains
information on installation
basic principles of configuration
a detailed description of configurable objects and func-
User’s Guide
tions.
This documentation is valid for graphic display operating
units.
ProTool
Configuring
Text-based Displays
Configurers
Provides information on working with the ProTool/Lite configuration software. It contains
information on installation
basic principles of configuration
a detailed description of configurable objects and func-
User’s Guide
tions.
This documentation is valid for text-based display operating
units.
ProTool
Online Help
ProTool/Pro Runtime
User’s Guide
Configurers
Provides information on the configuration computer while
working with ProTool. Online Help contains
context-sensitive help
detailed instructions and examples
detailed information
all the information from the user guide.
Commissioning en- Provides information on working with ProTool/Pro Runtime
gineers,
software. It contains
Users
installation of the ProTool/Pro Runtime visualization
software
commissioning and running the software on
Windows-based systems.
Copy Protection
Start–up Guide
D-2
Commissioning en- The ProTool/Pro Runtime visualization software is a copygineers,
right product. This manual contains information on the instalUsers
lation, repair and uninstallation of authorizations.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Documentation
Target Group
Content
Application Example
Newcomers
ProTool is supplied with example configurations and the
corresponding PLC programs. This documentation describes
how you
Start–up Guide
load the examplesonto the operating unit and PLC
run the examples and
upgrade the connection to the PLC to suit your own specific application.
MP270
Equipment Manual
Commissioning en- Describes the hardware and the general operation of Multi
gineers,
Panel MP270. It contains
Users
installation and commissioning instructions
a description of the equipment
operating instructions
instructions for connecting the PLC, printer and programming computer,
maintenance instructions.
OP37/Pro
Equipment Manual
Commissioning en- Describes the hardware, installation and inclusion of upgineers,
grades and options for the OP37/Pro.
Users
TP27, TP37
Equipment Manual
Commissioning en- Describes the hardware and general operation.
gineers,
It contains
Users
installation and commissioning instructions
OP27, OP37
Equipment Manual
OP25, OP35, OP45
Equipment Manual
OP7, OP17
Equipment Manual
OP5, OP15
Equipment Manual
Equipment Manual
PP7, PP17
connecting the PLC, printer and programming computer
operating modes
operation
description of the standard screens supplied with the operating unit and how to use them
fitting options
maintenance and fitting of spare parts.
TD17
Equipment Manual
OP3
operating unit description
Commissioning en- Describes the hardware of the OP3, its general operation and
gineers,
the connection to the SIMATIC S7.
Users,
Programmers
Equipment Manual
Commissioning en- Describes the hardware, installation and commissioning of
gineers,
push-button panels PP7 and PP17.
Users
Communication
Programmers
User’s Manual
Provides information on connecting text-based and graphics
displays to the following PLCs:
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 500/505
drivers for other PLCs
This documentation describes the
configuration and parameters required for connecting the
devices to the PLC and the network
user data areas used for exchanging data between operationg unit and PLC.
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
D-3
Documentation
Target Group
Content
Communication for
Windows-based Systems
Programmers
Provides information on connecting Windows-based systems
to the following PLCs:
User’s Manual
SIMATIC S5
SIMATIC S7
SIMATIC 505
Allen Bradley PLC 5/SLC 500
This documentation describes the
configuration and parameters required for connecting
devices to the PLC and the network
user data areas used for exchanging data between operating unit and PLC.
Other PLCs
Programmers
Online Help
Provides information on connecting devices to PLCs, such
as:
Mitsubishi
Allen Bradley
Telemecanique
Modicon
Omron
SIMATIC WinLC
When the drives are installed, the relevant Online Help is
installed at the same time.
ProAgent for OP
User’s Manual
Configurers
Provides the following information about the ProAgent optional package (process diagnosis) for OPs
configuring system-specific process diagnosis
detecting, locating the cause of and eliminating process
errors,
customizing standard diagnostic screens supplied with
the software.
D-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
E
Siemens Worldwide
In this Appendix
In this appendix you will find a list of:
All cities in the Federal Republic of Germany with Siemens Sales Offices
and
All European and non-European Siemens Companies and Representatives
Siemens Sales
Offices in the
Federal Republic
of Germany
The following table lists all Siemens Sales Offices in the Federal Republic of
Germany.
Aachen
Kassel
Augsburg
Kempten/Allg.
Bayreuth
Kiel
Berlin
Laatzen
Bielefeld
Leipzig
Bonn
Lingen
Bremen
Magdeburg
Brunswick
Mainz
Chemnitz
Mannheim
Coblenz
Munich
Cologne
Münster/Westf.
Constance
Nuremberg
Darmstadt
Osnabrück
Dortmund
Regensburg
Dresden
Rostock
Duisburg
Saarbrücken
Düsseldorf
Siegen
Erfurt
Stuttgart
Essen
Ulm
Frankfurt am Main
Wetzlar
Freiburg
Wilhelmshaven
Hamburg
Wuppertal
Heilbronn
Würzburg
Karlsruhe
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
E-1
Siemens Worldwide
European
Companies and
Representatives
The following table lists all European Siemens Companies and
Representatives.
Austria
Finland
Siemens AG Österreich
Siemens Oy
Bregenz
Espoo, Helsinki
Graz
France
Innsbruck
Siemens S.A.
Linz
Siemens N. V.
Antwerp
Great Britain
Bosnia-Herzegovina
Siemens plc
Salzburg
Vienna
Belgium
Siemens S.A.
Brussels
Liège
Generalexport Predstavnistvo Sarajevo
Sarajevo
Bulgaria
Siemens AG, Bulgaria Representative
Sofia
Croatia
Siemens d. o. o.
Zagreb
Cyprus
GEVO Ltd.
or
Jolali Ltd.
Nicosia
Czech Republic
Siemens AG
Haguenau
Lille, Seclin
Lyon, Caluire-et-Cuire
Marseille
Metz
Paris, Saint-Denis
Strasbourg
Toulouse
Birmingham, Walsall
Bristol, Clevedon
Congleton
Edinburgh
Glasgow
Leeds
Liverpool
London, Sunbury-on-Thames
Manchester
Newcastle
Greece
Siemens A.E.
Athens, Amaroussio
Thessaloniki
Hungaria
Brno
Mladá Boleslav
Prague
Siemens Kft
Denmark
Reykjavik
Siemens A/S
Copenhagen, Ballerup
Budapest
Iceland
Smith & Norland H/F
Ireland
Siemens Ltd.
Dublin
E-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Siemens Worldwide
Italy
Romania
Siemens S.p.A.
Siemens birou de consultatii tehnice
Bari
Bukarest
Bologna
Russia
Brescia
Siemens AG
Casoria
or
Florence
Mosmatic
Genoa
Moscow
Milan
Siemens AG
Padua
Ekaterinburg
Rome
Turin
Luxemburg
Siemens S.A.
Luxemburg
Malta
J. R. Darmanin & Co. Ltd.
Valletta
Netherlands
Siemens Nederland N.V.
The Hague
Rijswijk
Norway
Siemens A/S
Bergen
Oslo
Stavanger
Trondheim
Poland
Siemens GmbH
Gdansk-Letnica
Katowice
Warsaw
Portugal
Siemens S.A.
Slovak Republic
Siemens AG
Bratislava
Slovenia
Siemens d. o. o.
Ljubljana
Spain
Siemens S.A.
Barcelona
Bilbao
Gijón
Granada
La Coruña
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
León
Madrid
Málaga
Murcia
Palma de Mallorca
Pamplona
Sevilla
Valencia
Valladolid
Vigo
Zaragoza
Albufeira
Sweden
Coímbra
Siemens AB
Lisbon, Amadora
Matosinhos
Porto
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Göteborg
Jönköping
Malmö
Sundsvall
Upplands Väsby, Stockholm
E-3
Siemens Worldwide
Switzerland
Turkey
Siemens-Albis AG
SIMKO
Basel
Bern
Zürich
Siemens-Albis S.A.
Renens, Lausanne
Adana
Ankara
Bursa
Istanbul
Izmir
Samsun
Ukraine
Siemens AG
Kiev
Non-European
Companies and
Representatives
The following table lists all non-European Siemens Companies and
Representatives of Siemens AG.
Africa
The following table lists all Siemens Companies and Representatives of
Siemens AG in Africa.
Algeria
Morocco
Siemens Bureau d’Alger
SETEL
Alger
Société Electrotechnique et de Télécommunications S.A.
Angola
Casablanca
TECNIDATA
Mozambique
Luanda
Siemens Liaison Office
Bophuthatswana
Maputo
Siemens Ltd.
Namibia
Mafekeng
Siemens (Pty.) Ltd.
Egypt
Windhoek
Siemens Technical Office
Nigeria
Cairo-Mohandessin
Electro Technologies Nigeria Ltd. (ELTEC)
Siemens Technical Office
Lagos
Alexandria
EGEMAC S.A.E.
Cairo-Mattaria
Rwanda
Etablissement Rwandais
Kigali
Ethiopia
Sambia
Addis Electrical Engineering Ltd.
Electrical Maintenance Lusaka Ltd.
Addis Abeba
Lusaka
Ivory Coast
Simbabwe
Siemens AG
Electro Technologies Corporation (Pvt.) Ltd. (ETC)
Abidjan
Harare
Libya
Siemens AG, Branch Libya
Tripoli
E-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Siemens Worldwide
South Africa
Swaziland
Siemens Ltd.
Siemens (Pty.) Ltd.
Cape Town
Mbabane
Durban
Tanzania
Johannesburg
Tanzania Electrical Services Ltd.
Middelburg
Dar-es-Salaam
Newcastle
Tunesia
Port Elizabeth
Sitelec S.A.
Pretoria
Tunis
Sudan
Zaire
National Electrical & Commercial Company (NECC)
Khartoum
America
SOFAMATEL S.P.R.L.
Kinshasa
The following table lists all Siemens Companies and Representatives of
Siemens AG in America.
Argentina
Canada
Siemens S.A.
Siemens Electric Ltd.
Buenos Aires
Montreal, Québec
Toronto
Còrdoba
Chile
Mendoza
INGELSAC
Rosario
Santiago de Chile
Bahía Blanca
Bolivia
Colombia
Sociedad Comercial é Industrial Hansa Ltda.
Siemens S.A.
La Paz
Belém
Belo Horizonte
Costa Rica
Brasilia
Siemens S.A.
Campinas
Panama
San José
Brazil
Siemens S.A.
Curitiba
Fortaleza
Pôrto Alegre
Recife
Rio de Janeiro
Salvador de Bahia
São Paulo
Vitória
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Barranquilla
Bogotá
Cali
Medellín
Cuba
Respresentación
Consult iva EUMEDA
La Habana
Ecuador
Siemens S.A.
Quito
E-5
Siemens Worldwide
El Salvador
Paraguay
Siemens S.A.
Rieder & Cia. S.A.C.I.
San Salvador
Asunción
Guatemala
Peru
Siemens S.A.
Siemsa
Ciudad de Guatemala
Lima
Honduras
United States of America
Representaciones Electroindustriales S de R.L. Relectro
Siemens Industrial Automation Inc.
Tegucigalpa
Alpharetta, GA
Automation Division
Mexico
Numeric Motion Control
Siemens S.A. de CV
Elk Grove Village, Illinois
Culiacán
Uruguay
Gómez Palacio
Conatel S.A.
Guadalajara
Montevideo
León
Venezuela
México, D.F.
Monterrey
Puebla
Nicaragua
Siemens S.A.
Caracas
Valencia
Siemens S.A.
Managua
Asia
The following table lists all Siemens Companies and Representatives of
Siemens AG in Asia.
Bahrain
India
Transitec Gulf
Siemens Limited
Manama
Bangladesh
Siemens Bangladesh Ltd.
Dhaka
Brunei
Brunei Darussalam
Hong Kong
Siemens Ltd.
Hong Kong
Ahmedabad
Bangalore
Bombay
Calcutta
Madras
New Delhi
Secúnderabad
Indonesia
P.T. Siemens Indonesia, P.T. Siemens Dian-Grana
Elektrika, Representative Siemens AG
Jakarta
E-6
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Siemens Worldwide
Iraq
People’s Republic of China
Samhiry Bros. Co. Limited
Siemens AG Representation
or
Baghdad
Beijing
Guangzhou
Shanghai
Iran
Philippine Islands
Siemens S.S.K.
Maschinen & Technik Inc. (MATEC)
Teheran
Manila
Japan
Qatar
Siemens K.K.
Trags Electrical Engineering and Air Conditioning Co.
Tokyo
Doha
Korea
Saudi Arabia
Siemens Ltd.
Arabia Electric Ltd. (Equipment)
Changwon
Seoul
Ulsan
Al-Khobar
Jeddah
Riyadh
Kuwait
Singapore
National & German Electrical and Electronic Services
Co. (NGEECO)
Siemens (Pte.) Ltd.
Siemens AG (Iraq Branch)
Kuwait, Arabia
Singapore
Sri Lanka
Lebanon
Dimo Limited
Ets. F.A. Kettaneh S.A.
Colombo
Beirut
Syria
Malaysia
Siemens AG, Branch (A.S.T.E.)
Siemens Electrical Engineering Sdn. Bhd.
Damascus
Kuala Lumpur
Taiwan
Nepal
Siemens Ltd., TELEUNION Engineering Ltd.
Amatya Enterprises (Pvt.) Ltd.
or
Kathmandu
TAI Engineering Co., Ltd.
Waleed Associates
Taichung
Taipei
Muscat
Thailand
Pakistan
Berti Jucker Co. Ltd.
Siemens Pakistan Engineering Co., Ltd.
Bangkok
Oman
Islamabad
Karachi
Lahore
Peshawar
Quetta
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
E-7
Siemens Worldwide
United Arab Emirates
Vietnam
Electro Mechanical Co.
OAV Representative Office
or
Hanoi
Siemens Resident Engineers
Yemen (Arab. Republic)
Abu Dhabi
Tihama Tractors & Engineering Co., Ltd.
Scientechnic
or
or
Siemens Resident Engineers
Siemens Resident Engineers
Sanaa
Dubai
Australia
The following table lists all Siemens Companies and Representatives of
Siemens AG in Australia
Australia
New Zealand
Siemens Ltd.
Siemens Ltd.
Auckland
Wellington
E-8
Adelaide
Brisbane
Melbourne
Perth
Sydney
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Index
A
Acknowledgement
Allen Bradley, 15-4
SIMATIC 505, 13-4
SIMATIC S5, 5-4
SIMATIC S7, 7-4
WinLC, 9-4
Acknowledgement areas
Allen Bradley, 15-6, 15-7
SIMATIC 505, 13-6, 13-7
SIMATIC S5, 5-6, 5-7
SIMATIC S7, 7-6, 7-7
WinLC, 9-6, 9-7
Acknowledgement bit
Allen Bradley, 15-6
SIMATIC 505, 13-6
SIMATIC S5, 5-6
Address
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Address ID, Operating unit, 4-11, 12-7
Addressing
SIMATIC S7–300, 6-9, 6-17
SIMATIC S7–400, 6-12, 6-18
Alarm message acknowledgement area
SIMATIC 505, 13-5
SIMATIC S5, 5-5
SIMATIC S7, 7-5
WinLC, 9-5
Alarm message area
Allen Bradley, 15-5
SIMATIC S5, 5-5
SIMATIC S7, 7-5
WinLC, 9-5
Alarm messages
Allen Bradley, 15-2, 15-4
SIMATIC 505, 13-2, 13-4
SIMATIC S5, 5-2, 5-4
SIMATIC S7, 7-2, 7-4
WinLC, 9-2, 9-4
Analog Alarm, 10-4
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
AS511, 3-1
Configuration, 3-3
Connection, 3-1
Installation, 3-1
AS511 connection, 3-1
SIMATIC S5, 3-1
B
Baud rate
SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
PROFIBUS–DP, 12-5
SIMATIC S5
AS511, 3-3
PROFIBUS–DP, 4-7
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Bit–triggered trends
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
WinLC, 9-9
C
Category, system message, A-1
Changing the PLC, 1-6
Class B big, 4-8, 12-6
Class B middle, 4-8, 12-6
Class B small, 4-8, 12-6
Class B tiny, 4-8, 12-6
Clear alarm buffer, B-3
Clear event buffer, B-3
Communication driver, 1-2
Communication Management, SIMATIC S5,
2-1
Index-1
Index
Communication management
Allen–Bradley, 14-1
SIMATIC 505, 10-1, 11-1
SIMATIC S7, 6-1, 8-1
Communication peer
SIMATIC S7, 6-6, 6-7, 6-14, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Communication structure
Allen Bradley, 14-3
SIMATIC 505, 11-2
PROFIBUS–DP, 12-2
SIMATIC S5
AS511, 3-2
PROFIBUS–DP, 4-3
SIMATIC S7, 6-2
WinLC, 8-2
Communication via tags
Allen Bradley, 14-3
SIMATIC 505, 11-2, 12-2
SIMATIC S5, 3-2, 4-3
SIMATIC S7, 6-2, 8-2
Compressing the program memory, SIMATIC
S5, 2-6
Configuration, PROFIBUS–DP master modules,
4-9
Connecting PROFIBUS–DP, SIMATIC 505,
12-1
Connection
Allen Bradley, 14-1
SIMATIC 505, 11-1
Connection possibilities
Allen Bradley, 1-5
SIMATIC 505, 1-5
SIMATIC S5, 1-4
SIMATIC S7, 1-5
Connection types
Selection criteria, 1-2, 1-4
supported, 1-3
Connection via MPI, SIMATIC S7, 6-6
Connection via PPI, SIMATIC S7–200, 6-19
Connection via PROFIBUS–DP, SIMATIC S7,
6-14
Conversion of data formats, 1-6
Coordination area
Allen Bradley, 15-3, 15-14
SIMATIC 505, 13-3, 13-14
SIMATIC S5, 5-3, 5-14
SIMATIC S7, 7-3, 7-14
WinLC, 9-3, 9-13
CP 5430 TF, 4-10
CP 5431 FMS, 4-10
Index-2
CP5434–DP
Configuration, 12-7
Set configuration, 12-7
Station number, 12-7
Station type, 12-7
CPU type, SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
Cyclical operation, SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
D
Data area, division
Allen Bradley, 15-11
SIMATIC 505, 13-11
SIMATIC S5, 5-11
SIMATIC S7, 7-11
WinLC, 9-10
Data areas, Screen number area, 5-12, 7-12,
9-11, 13-12, 15-12
Data bits
SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
Data exchange, 1-2
Data types
Allen Bradley, 14-5
SIMATIC 505, 10-3
SIMATIC S5, 2-3
SIMATIC S7, 6-4
WinLC, 8-3
Date and time
Allen Bradley, 15-3, 15-15
SIMATIC 505, 13-3, 13-15
SIMATIC S5, 5-3, 5-15
SIMATIC S7, 7-3, 7-15
WinLC, 9-3, 9-14
DB address, SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
DB address list optimization, SIMATIC S5, 2-5
Documentation, D-1
Download date/time, B-2
E
Error number, Function block, A-13
Error Prevention, SIMATIC S5, 2-6
Event message area
Allen Bradley, 15-5
SIMATIC 505, 13-5
SIMATIC S5, 5-5
SIMATIC S7, 7-5
WinLC, 9-5
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Index
Event messages
Allen Bradley, 15-2, 15-4
SIMATIC 505, 13-2, 13-4
SIMATIC S5, 5-2, 5-4
SIMATIC S7, 7-2, 7-4
WinLC, 9-2, 9-4
Example program for DP, SIMATIC 505 and
PROFIBUS–DP, 10-1, 12-3
F
FM
SIMATIC S7–300, 6-10
SIMATIC S7–400, 6-13
Function, Operating unit, 1-2
Function block
Error number, A-13
SIMATIC S5 and PROFIBUS–DP, 2-2
Function range
Allen Bradley, 15-2
SIMATIC 505, 13-2
SIMATIC S5, 5-2
SIMATIC S7, 7-2
WinLC, 9-2
G
Get event message area, B-2
Get LED area, B-2
GSD files, 4-11
H
Hardware requirements, PROFIBUS–DP connection, 4-1, 12-1
HSA
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
I
I and O address, Operating unit, 4-11, 12-7
IM 308C, Configuration, 4-11
IM308C
Set configuration, 4-11
Station number, 4-11
Station type, 4-11
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Installation
Allen Bradley, 14-1
SIMATIC 505, 10-1, 11-1, 12-1
SIMATIC S5, 4-1
SIMATIC S7, 6-1, 8-1
Interface
SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
PROFIBUS–DP, 12-5
SIMATIC S5
AS511, 3-3
PROFIBUS–DP, 4-7
Interface type, SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
J
Job mailbox
Allen Bradley, 15-13
SIMATIC 505, 13-13
SIMATIC S5, 5-13
SIMATIC S7, 7-13
WinLC, 9-12
L
LED status, SIMATIC 505, 13-9
LED assignment
Allen Bradley, 15-2, 15-9
SIMATIC 505, 13-2, 13-9
SIMATIC S5, 5-9
SIMATIC S7, 7-2, 7-9
LED assignment area, SIMATIC S5, 5-2, 5-9
LED status, SIMATIC S7, 7-9
LED statuses
Allen Bradley, 15-9
SIMATIC S5, 5-9
Life bit
Allen Bradley, 15-14
SIMATIC 505, 13-14
SIMATIC S5, 5-14
SIMATIC S7, 7-14
WinLC, 9-13
List, System messages, A-1
Literature, D-1
Index-3
Index
M
Master
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Master module, 4-1
Master–Slave field bus, 4-1, 12-1
Message areas
Allen Bradley, 15-5
SIMATIC 505, 13-5
SIMATIC S5, 5-5
SIMATIC S7, 7-5
WinLC, 9-5
Message bit
Allen Bradley, 15-5
SIMATIC 505, 13-5
SIMATIC S5, 5-5
SIMATIC S7, 7-5, 7-6
WinLC, 9-5, 9-6
Message number, A-1
Allen Bradley, 15-5, 15-6
SIMATIC 505, 13-5, 13-6
SIMATIC S5, 5-5, 5-6
SIMATIC S7, 7-5, 7-6
WinLC, 9-5, 9-6
Method of storing, Errors, A-13
MPI address
SIMATIC S7–300, 6-9
SIMATIC S7–400, 6-12
MPI connection, SIMATIC S7, 6-6
N
Network configuration
SIMATIC S7, 6-1, 6-3, 6-6, 6-14
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-19
Network parameters, SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Nework parameter, SIMATIC S7, 6-7, 6-15
Number of racks, SIMATIC S7–300, 6-11
O
OP, Definition, 1-2
OP acknowledgement, WinLC, 9-2
OP address
SIMATIC 505, PROFIBUS–DP, 12-5
SIMATIC S5, PROFIBUS–DP, 4-7
Index-4
Operating mode
Allen Bradley, 15-14
SIMATIC 505, 13-14
SIMATIC S5, 5-14
SIMATIC S7, 7-14
WinLC, 9-13
Operating unit, Function, 1-2
Operating unit acknowledgement
Allen Bradley, 15-2
SIMATIC 505, 13-2
SIMATIC S5, 5-2
SIMATIC S7, 7-2
Operating unit address
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Operating unit configuration
SIMATIC S7, 6-7, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-19
Operating unit interface
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Operating unit parameter
SIMATIC S7, 6-7, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
Operating units, SIMATIC S7, 6-6
Optimization
Allen Bradley, 14-6
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-21
Optimize screens
Allen Bradley, 14-6
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-21
Overview, Types of connection, 1-2
P
Parity
SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
Password logout, B-2
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Index
Performance
Allen Bradley, 14-6
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-21
PLC acknowledgement
Allen Bradley, 15-2
SIMATIC 505, 13-2
SIMATIC S5, 5-2
SIMATIC S7, 7-2
WinLC, 9-2
PLC job
Clear alarm buffer, B-3
Clear event buffer, B-3
Get event message area, B-2
Get LED area, B-2
Password logout, B-2
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement area, B-2
Select screen, B-3
Set Date, B-2
Set password level, B-2
Set Time, B-2
Transfer date/time, B-2
WinLC, 9-3
PLC job optimization
Allen Bradley, 14-7
SIMATIC 505, 10-7
SIMATIC S5, 2-5
SIMATIC S7, 6-22
PLC jobs, B-1
Allen Bradley, 15-3, 15-13
Download date/time, B-2
SIMATIC 505, 13-3, 13-13
SIMATIC S5, 5-3, 5-13
SIMATIC S7, 7-3, 7-13
WinLC, 9-12
PLCs, Types, 1-2
Polling cycle
Allen Bradley, 14-6
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-21
Polling time, PROFIBUS–DP, 4-10
PPI connection, SIMATIC S7–200, 6-19
Process Loop, 10-5
PROFIBUS NCM, 4-10
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
PROFIBUS–DP, 4-1, 12-1
Address ID, 4-11, 12-7
Configure SIMATIC 505, 12-5
Configure SIMATIC S5, 4-7
I and O address, 4-11, 12-7
I/O area assignment, 4-7, 12-5
Parameters, 4-11, 12-7
PROFIBUS–DP connection
SIMATIC S5, 4-1
SIMATIC S7, 6-14
PROFIBUS–DP master modules, 4-9
Profile
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-15
SIMATIC S7–200, 6-20
R
Rack
SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
SIMATIC S7–300, 6-11
Restrictions, SIMATIC 505, 10-1
Retrieve alarm message area and acknowledgement area, B-2
S
Screen number
Allen Bradley, 15-3, 15-12
SIMATIC 505, 13-3, 13-12
SIMATIC S5, 5-3, 5-12
SIMATIC S7, 7-3, 7-12
WinLC, 9-3, 9-11
Screen number area
Allen Bradley, 15-12
SIMATIC 505, 13-12
SIMATIC S5, 5-12
SIMATIC S7, 7-12
WinLC, 9-11
Select, Kopplungsart, 1-4
Select screen, B-3
Selecting the connector types, 1-4
Selecting the type of connection, 1-2
Selection, Connection type, 1-2
Set configuration, 4-11, 12-7
SIMATIC 505, PROFIBUS–DP, 12-5
SIMATIC S5, PROFIBUS–DP, 4-7
Index-5
Index
Set Date, B-2
Set password level, B-2
Set Time, B-2
SIMATIC 505
Analog Alarm, 10-4
Process Loop, 10-5
Special Function, 10-5
User Data Type, 10-3
SIMATIC HMI documentation, D-1
SIMATIC S5, 2-1
Connection with AS511, 3-1
Installation using AS511, 3-1
Slot, SIMATIC S7, 6-8, 6-16
Special Function, 10-5
Startup bit
Allen Bradley, 15-14
SIMATIC 505, 13-14
SIMATIC S5, 5-14
SIMATIC S7, 7-14
WinLC, 9-13
Station number, 4-11, 12-7
Station type, 4-11, 12-7
Stop bits
SIMATIC 505, 11-3, 14-4
SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
Structure of the documentation, D-1
Supported AGs, SIMATIC S5, 2-1
Supported networks, 1-4
Supported operating units
Allen Bradley, 14-1
SIMATIC S5, 2-1, 10-1
SIMATIC S7, 6-1
WinLC, 8-1
Switch buffer
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
WinLC, 9-9
System limits, PROFIBUS–DP connection, 4-2,
12-1
System Messages, Operating units, A-1
System messages, List, A-1
Index-6
T
Tags
Allen Bradley, 14-3
SIMATIC 505, 11-2, 12-2
SIMATIC S5, 3-2, 4-3
SIMATIC S7, 6-2, 8-2
Target groups, D-1
Time–triggered trends
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
Time-triggered trends, WinLC, 9-9
TISOFT, Integrate configuration, 12-8
Transfer date/time, B-2
Trend optimization
Allen Bradley, 14-7
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-22
Trend request
Allen Bradley, 15-3
SIMATIC 505, 13-3
SIMATIC S5, 5-3
SIMATIC S7, 7-3
WinLC, 9-2
Trend request area
Allen Bradley, 15-10, 15-11
SIMATIC 505, 13-10, 13-11
SIMATIC S5, 5-10, 5-11
SIMATIC S7, 7-10, 7-11
WinLC, 9-9, 9-10
Trend transfer
Allen Bradley, 15-3
SIMATIC 505, 13-3
SIMATIC S5, 5-3
SIMATIC S7, 7-3
WinLC, 9-3
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Index
Trend transfer area
Allen Bradley, 15-10, 15-11
SIMATIC 505, 13-10, 13-11
SIMATIC S5, 5-10, 5-11
SIMATIC S7, 7-10, 7-11
WinLC, 9-10
Trends
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
WinLC, 9-9
Trends, bit–triggered
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
WinLC, 9-9
Trends, time–triggered
Allen Bradley, 15-10
SIMATIC 505, 13-10
SIMATIC S5, 5-10
SIMATIC S7, 7-10
WinLC, 9-9
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Triggering messages
Allen Bradley, 15-4
SIMATIC 505, 13-4
SIMATIC S5, 5-4
SIMATIC S7, 7-4
WinLC, 9-4
Type, SIMATIC S5, AS511, 3-3
Types of connection, Overview, 1-2
U
Update time
Allen Bradley, 14-6
SIMATIC 505, 10-6
SIMATIC S5, 2-4
SIMATIC S7, 6-21
User Data Areas
SIMATIC 505, 13-1
WinLC, 9-1
User data areas
Allen Bradley, 15-1
SIMATIC S5, 5-1
SIMATIC S7, 7-1
User Data Type, 10-3
Index-7
Index
Index-8
Communication for Windows-based Systems User’s Manual
Release 01/99
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement