µC/USB-Host User`s Manual

µC/USB-Host User`s Manual
μC/ USB Host
TM
Universal Serial Bus Host Stack
User’s Manual
V3.41
Micrium
1290 Weston Road, Suite 306
Weston, FL 33326
USA
www.micrium.com
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600-uC-USB-Host-001
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
1-1
1-1-1
1-1-2
1-1-3
1-2
1-2-1
1-2-2
1-2-3
1-3
1-3-1
1-3-2
1-4
1-4-1
1-4-2
1-4-3
About USB .............................................................................................. 8
Introduction ............................................................................................ 8
Bus Topology ......................................................................................... 8
USB Host ................................................................................................ 9
USB Device ............................................................................................ 9
Data Flow Model .................................................................................. 10
Endpoint ............................................................................................... 10
Pipes ..................................................................................................... 11
Transfer Types ..................................................................................... 11
Physical Interface and Power Management ....................................... 14
Speed ................................................................................................... 14
Power Distribution ............................................................................... 15
Device Structure and Enumeration ..................................................... 15
USB Device Structure .......................................................................... 15
Device States ....................................................................................... 17
Enumeration ......................................................................................... 18
Chapter 2
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-4-1
2-4-2
2-4-3
2-4-4
2-5
Getting Started ..................................................................................... 20
Prerequisites ........................................................................................ 21
Downloading the Source Code Files ................................................... 22
Installing the files ................................................................................. 23
Building the Sample Application ......................................................... 25
Understanding Micrium Examples ...................................................... 25
Including USB Host Stack Source Code ............................................ 27
Copying and Modifying Template Files .............................................. 28
Modifying the Application Configuration File ..................................... 32
Running the Sample Application ......................................................... 33
3
Chapter 3
3-1
3-1-1
3-1-2
3-2
3-3
3-3-1
3-3-2
3-4
Architecture .......................................................................................... 38
USB Host Stack Overview ................................................................... 39
USB Host Stack Modules .................................................................... 40
USB Host Stack Dependencies ........................................................... 43
Sending and Receiving Data ............................................................... 44
Task Model ........................................................................................... 44
Hub Task .............................................................................................. 44
Asynchronous Task ............................................................................. 46
Enumeration Process ........................................................................... 46
Chapter 4
4-1
4-1-1
4-1-2
4-1-3
4-2
4-2-1
4-2-2
4-3
4-3-1
4-3-2
4-4
4-4-1
4-4-2
4-4-3
Configuration ........................................................................................ 48
Static Stack Configuration ................................................................... 48
USB Host Configuration ...................................................................... 49
USB Classes Configuration ................................................................. 52
Debug Configuration ............................................................................ 53
Application Specific Configuration ..................................................... 54
Task Priorities ...................................................................................... 55
Task Stack Sizes .................................................................................. 55
Host Controller Driver Configuration ................................................... 56
Host Controller Configuration Structure ............................................. 56
Host Controller Initialization ................................................................ 58
Configuration Examples ...................................................................... 62
Single Host Controller and Unique Device ......................................... 63
Single Host Controller and Multiple Devices ...................................... 64
Multi-Host Controllers and Multiple Devices ...................................... 67
Chapter 5
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-3-1
5-3-2
5-3-3
5-3-4
5-4
5-5
Host Driver Guide ................................................................................. 72
Host Driver Model ................................................................................ 73
Host Driver API ..................................................................................... 73
Interrupt Handling ................................................................................ 77
Single USB ISR Vector with ISR Handler Argument ........................... 78
Single USB ISR Vector ......................................................................... 78
Multiple USB ISR Vectors with ISR Handler Arguments .................... 79
Multiple USB ISR Vectors .................................................................... 79
Host Controller Driver Configuration ................................................... 80
Memory Allocation ............................................................................... 80
4
5-6
5-7
5-7-1
5-7-2
5-7-3
CPU and Board Support ...................................................................... 81
USB Host Controller Driver Functional Model .................................... 82
Root Hub Interactions .......................................................................... 82
Endpoint Opening ................................................................................ 83
URB Submit .......................................................................................... 84
Chapter 6
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-3-1
6-3-2
6-3-3
6-4
6-4-1
6-4-2
6-4-3
Communication Device Class ............................................................. 90
Overview ............................................................................................... 91
Class Implementation .......................................................................... 94
Configuration and Initialization ............................................................ 95
General Configuration .......................................................................... 95
Class Initialization ................................................................................ 95
Device Connection and Disconnection Handling ............................... 96
Abstract Control Model (ACM) Subclass ............................................ 98
Configuration and Initialization ............................................................ 98
Connection and Disconnection Handling ........................................... 99
Demo Application ............................................................................... 101
Chapter 7
7-1
7-1-1
7-1-2
7-1-3
7-2
7-3
7-3-1
7-3-2
7-4
7-5
Future Technology Devices International Class ............................... 104
Overview ............................................................................................. 105
Endpoints ........................................................................................... 105
Class Requests .................................................................................. 106
Serial status ........................................................................................ 107
Class Implementation ........................................................................ 107
Configuration and Initialization .......................................................... 108
General Configuration ........................................................................ 108
Class Initialization .............................................................................. 108
Demo Application ............................................................................... 109
Demo Application Configuration ....................................................... 112
Chapter 8
8-1
8-1-1
8-2
8-3
8-3-1
8-3-2
Human Interface Device Class .......................................................... 114
Overview ............................................................................................. 115
Report ................................................................................................. 115
Class Implementation ........................................................................ 120
Configuration and Initialization .......................................................... 121
General Configuration ........................................................................ 121
Class Initialization .............................................................................. 122
5
8-3-3
8-4
8-4-1
Device Connection and Disconnection Handling ............................. 123
Demo Application ............................................................................... 125
Demo Application Configuration ....................................................... 126
Chapter 9
9-1
9-1-1
9-1-2
9-1-3
9-1-4
9-2
9-3
9-3-1
9-3-2
9-3-3
9-4
9-4-1
Mass Storage Class ........................................................................... 127
Overview ............................................................................................. 128
Mass Storage Class Protocol ............................................................ 128
Endpoints ........................................................................................... 129
Mass Storage Class Requests .......................................................... 129
Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) ......................................... 130
Class Implementation ........................................................................ 130
Configuration and Initialization .......................................................... 132
General Configuration ........................................................................ 132
Class Initialization .............................................................................. 132
Device Connection and Disconnection Handling ............................. 133
Demo Application ............................................................................... 134
Demo Application Configuration ....................................................... 137
Chapter 10
10-1
10-2
10-2-1
10-2-2
10-2-3
10-2-4
Porting μC/USB-Host to your Kernel ................................................ 139
Overview ............................................................................................. 139
Porting the Stack to your Kernel ....................................................... 140
Task Creation ..................................................................................... 140
Semaphore ......................................................................................... 141
Mutex .................................................................................................. 142
Message Queue ................................................................................. 143
Appendix A
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
Core API Reference ........................................................................... 145
Host Functions ................................................................................... 146
Host Controller Functions .................................................................. 151
Class Management Functions ........................................................... 158
Kernel Abstraction Functions ............................................................ 160
Appendix B
B-1
B-2
CDC API Reference ............................................................................ 179
CDC Functions ................................................................................... 180
ACM Functions ................................................................................... 184
6
Appendix C
C-1
FTDI API Reference ........................................................................... 205
FTDI Functions ................................................................................... 206
Appendix D
D-1
HID API Reference ............................................................................. 231
HID Functions ..................................................................................... 232
Appendix E
E-1
E-2
MSC API Reference ........................................................................... 253
MSC Functions ................................................................................... 254
File System MSC Driver Functions .................................................... 256
Appendix F
F-1
F-2
F-3
Host Controller Driver API Reference ............................................... 259
Host Driver Functions ........................................................................ 260
Root Hub Driver Functions ................................................................ 278
Host Driver BSP Functions ................................................................ 292
Appendix G
G-1
G-2
G-3
G-4
G-5
G-6
G-7
G-8
G-9
G-10
G-11
G-12
G-13
G-14
Error Codes ........................................................................................ 295
Generic Error Codes .......................................................................... 296
Device Error Codes ............................................................................ 296
Configuration Error Codes ................................................................. 296
Interface Error Codes ........................................................................ 297
Endpoint Error Codes ........................................................................ 297
URB Error Codes ............................................................................... 297
Descriptor Error Codes ...................................................................... 298
Host Controller Error Codes .............................................................. 298
Kernel Layer Error Codes .................................................................. 298
Class Error Codes .............................................................................. 299
HUB Class Error Codes ..................................................................... 299
Human Interface Device (HID) Class Error Codes ............................ 299
Mass Storage Class (MSC) Error Codes ........................................... 300
future technology devices international (ftdi) class Error Codes ..... 300
7
Chapter
1
About USB
This chapter presents a quick introduction to USB. The first section in this chapter
introduces the basic concepts of the USB specification Revision 2.0. The second section
explores the data flow model. The third section gives details about the device operation.
Lastly, the fourth section describes USB device logical organization.
The full protocol is described extensively in the USB Specification Revision 2.0 at
http://www.usb.org.
1-1 INTRODUCTION
The Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard maintained by the USB Implementers
Forum (USB-IF) for serial bus communication. The USB specification contains all the
information about the protocol such as the electrical signaling, the physical dimension of
the connector, the protocol layer, and other important aspects. USB provides several
benefits compared to other communication interfaces such as ease of use, low cost, low
power consumption and, fast and reliable data transfer.
1-1-1 BUS TOPOLOGY
USB can connect a series of devices using a tiered star topology. The key elements in USB
topology are the host, hubs, and devices, as illustrated in Figure 1-1. Each node in the
illustration represents a USB hub or a USB device. At the top level of the graph is the root
hub, which is part of the host. There is only one host in the system. The specification allows
up to seven tiers and a maximum of five non-root hubs in any path between the host and a
device. Each tier must contain at least one hub except for the last tier where only devices
are present. Each USB device in the system has a unique address assigned by the host
through a process called enumeration (see section 1-4-3 on page 18 for more details on
enumeration).
8
Chapter 1
The host learns about the device capabilities during enumeration, which allows the host
operating system to load a specific driver for a particular USB device. The maximum
number of peripherals that can be attached to a host is 127, including the root hub.
Figure 1-1 Bus topology
1-1-2 USB HOST
The USB host communicates with the devices using a USB host controller. The host is
responsible for detecting and enumerating devices, managing bus access, performing error
checking, providing and managing power, and exchanging data with the devices.
1-1-3 USB DEVICE
A USB device implements one or more USB functions where a function provides one
specific capability to the system. Examples of USB functions are keyboards, webcam,
speakers, or a mouse. The requirements of the USB functions are described in the USB class
specification. For example, keyboards and mice are implemented using the Human
Interface Device (HID) specification.
USB devices must also respond to requests from the host. For example, on power up, or
when a device is connected to the host, the host queries the device capabilities during
enumeration, using standard requests.
9
Data Flow Model
1-2 DATA FLOW MODEL
This section defines the elements involved in the transmission of data across USB.
1-2-1 ENDPOINT
Endpoints function as the point of origin or the point of reception for data. An endpoint is a
logical entity identified using an endpoint address. The endpoint address of a device is
fixed, and is assigned when the device is designed, as opposed to the device address,
which is assigned by the host dynamically during enumeration. An endpoint address
consists of an endpoint number field (0 to 15), and a direction bit that indicates if the
endpoint sends data to the host (IN) or receives data from the host (OUT). The maximum
number of endpoints allowed on a single device is 32.
Endpoints contain configurable characteristics that define the behavior of a USB device:
■
Bus access requirements
■
Bandwidth requirement
■
Error handling
■
Maximum packet size that the endpoint is able to send or receive
■
Transfer type
■
Direction in which data is sent and receive from the host
ENDPOINT ZERO REQUIREMENT
Endpoint zero (also known as Default Endpoint) is a bi-directional endpoint used by the
USB host system to get information, and configure the device via standard requests. All
devices must implement an endpoint zero configured for control transfers (see section
“Control Transfers” on page 11 for more information).
10
Chapter 1
1-2-2 PIPES
A USB pipe is a logical association between an endpoint and a software structure in the USB
host software system. USB pipes are used to send data from the host software to the
device’s endpoints. A USB pipe is associated to a unique endpoint address, type of transfer,
maximum packet size, and interval for transfers.
The USB specification defines two types of pipes based on the communication mode:
■
Stream Pipes: Data carried over the pipe is unstructured.
■
Message Pipes: Data carried over the pipe has a defined structure.
The USB specification requires a default control pipe for each device. A default control pipe
uses endpoint zero. The default control pipe is a bi-directional message pipe.
1-2-3 TRANSFER TYPES
The USB specification defines four transfer types that match the bandwidth and services
requirements of the host and the device application using a specific pipe. Each USB transfer
encompasses one or more transactions that send data to and from the endpoint. The notion
of transactions is related to the maximum payload size defined by each endpoint type, that
is when a transfer is greater than this maximum, it will be split into one or more transactions
to fulfill the action.
CONTROL TRANSFERS
Control transfers are used to configure and retrieve information about the device
capabilities. They are used by the host to send standard requests during and after
enumeration. Standard requests allow the host to learn about the device capabilities; for
example, how many and which functions the device contains. Control transfers are also
used for class-specific and vendor-specific requests.
A control transfer contains three stages: Setup, Data, and Status. These stages are listed in
Table 1-1.
11
Data Flow Model
Stage
Description
Setup
The Setup stage includes information about the request. This SETUP stage represents
one transaction.
Data
The Data stage contains data associated with request. Some standard and
class-specific request may not require a Data stage. This stage is an IN or OUT
directional transfer and the complete Data stage represents one ore more transactions.
Status
The Status stage, representing one transaction, is used to report the success or failure
of the transfer. The direction of the Status stage is opposite to the direction of the Data
stage. If the control transfer has no Data stage, the Status stage always is from the
device (IN).
Table 1-1 Control Transfer Stages
BULK TRANSFERS
Bulk transfers are intended for devices that exchange large amounts of data where the
transfer can take all of the available bus bandwidth. Bulk transfers are reliable, as error
detection and retransmission mechanisms are implemented in hardware to guarantee data
integrity. However, bulk transfers offer no guarantee on timing. Printers and mass storage
devices are examples of devices that use bulk transfers.
INTERRUPT TRANSFERS
Interrupt transfers are designed to support devices with latency constrains. Devices using
interrupt transfers can schedule data at any time. Devices using interrupt transfer provide a
polling interval which determines when the scheduled data is transferred over the bus.
Interrupt transfers are typically used for event notifications.
ISOCHRONOUS TRANSFERS
Isochronous transfers are used by devices that require data delivery at a constant rate with a
certain degree of error-tolerance. Retransmission is not supported by isochronous transfers.
Audio and video devices use isochronous transfers.
USB DATA FLOW MODEL
Table 1-2 shows a graphical representation of the data flow model.
12
Chapter 1
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Figure 1-2 USB data flow
F1-2(1)
The host software uses standard requests to query and configure the device
using the default pipe. The default pipe uses endpoint zero (EP0).
F1-2(2)
USB pipes allow associations between the host application and the device’s
endpoints. Host applications send and receive data through USB pipes.
F1-2(3)
The host controller is responsible for the transmission, reception, packing and
unpacking of data over the bus.
F1-2(4)
Data is transmitted via the physical media.
F1-2(5)
The device controller is responsible for the transmission, reception, packing
and unpacking of data over the bus. The USB controller informs the USB
device software layer about several events such as bus events and transfer
events.
F1-2(6)
The device software layer responds to the standard request, and implements
one or more USB functions as specified in the USB class document.
13
Physical Interface and Power Management
TRANSFER COMPLETION
The notion of transfer completion is only relevant for control, bulk and interrupt transfers as
isochronous transfers occur continuously and periodically by nature. In general, control,
bulk and interrupt endpoints must transmit data payload sizes that are less than or equal to
the endpoint’s maximum data payload size. When a transfer’s data payload is greater than
the maximum data payload size, the transfer is split into several transactions whose payload
is maximum-sized except the last transaction which contains the remaining data. A transfer
is deemed complete when:
■
The endpoint transfers exactly the amount of data expected.
■
The endpoint transfers a short packet, that is a packet with a payload size less than the
maximum.
■
The endpoint transfers a zero-length packet.
1-3 PHYSICAL INTERFACE AND POWER MANAGEMENT
USB transfers data and provides power using four-wire cables. The four wires are: Vbus, D+,
D- and Ground. Signaling occurs on the D+ and D- wires.
1-3-1 SPEED
The USB 2.0 specification defines three different speeds.
■
Low Speed: 1.5 Mb/s
■
Full Speed: 12 Mb/s
■
High Speed: 480 Mb/s
14
Chapter 1
1-3-2 POWER DISTRIBUTION
The host can supply power to USB devices that are directly connected to the host. USB
devices may also have their own power supplies. USB devices that use power from the
cable are called bus-powered devices. Bus-powered devices can draw a maximum of 500
mA from the host. USB devices that have an alternative source of power are called
self-powered devices.
1-4 DEVICE STRUCTURE AND ENUMERATION
Before the host application can communicate with a device, the host needs to understand
the capabilities of the device. This process takes place during device enumeration. After
enumeration, the host can assign and load a specific driver to allow communication
between the application and the device.
During enumeration, the host assigns an address to the device, reads descriptors from the
device, and selects a configuration that specifies power and interface requirements. In order
for the host to learn about the device’s capabilities, the device must provide information
about itself in the form of descriptors.
This section describes the device’s logical organization from the USB host’s point of view.
1-4-1 USB DEVICE STRUCTURE
From the host’s point of view, USB devices are internally organized as a collection of
configurations, interfaces and endpoints.
CONFIGURATION
A USB configuration specifies the capabilities of a device. A configuration consists of a
collection of USB interfaces that implement one or more USB functions. Typically only one
configuration is required for a given device. However, the USB specification allows up to
255 different configurations. During enumeration, the host selects a configuration. Only one
configuration can be active at a time. The device uses a configuration descriptor to inform
the host about a specific configuration’s capabilities.
15
Device Structure and Enumeration
INTERFACE
A USB interface or a group of interfaces provides information about a function or class
implemented by the device. An interface can contain multiple mutually exclusive settings
called alternate settings. The device uses an interface descriptor to inform the host about a
specific interface’s capabilities. Each interface descriptor contains a class, subclass, and
protocol codes defined by the USB-IF, and the number of endpoints required for a
particular class implementation.
ALTERNATE SETTINGS
Alternate settings are used by the device to specify mutually exclusive settings for each
interface. The default alternate settings contain the default settings of the device. The device
also uses an interface descriptor to inform the host about an interface’s alternate settings.
ENDPOINT
An interface requires a set of endpoints to communicate with the host. Each interface has
different requirements in terms of the number of endpoints, transfer type, direction,
maximum packet size, and maximum polling interval. The device sends an endpoint
descriptor to notify the host about endpoint capabilities.
Figure 1-3 shows the hierarchical organization of a USB device. Configurations are grouped
based on the device’s speed. A high-speed device might have a particular configuration in
both high-speed and low/full speed.
16
Chapter 1
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Figure 1-3 USB device structure
1-4-2 DEVICE STATES
The USB 2.0 specification defines six different states and are listed in Table 1-2.
Device States
Description
Attached
The device is in the Attached state when it is connected to the host or a hub port. The
hub must be connected to the host or to another hub.
Powered
A device is considered in the Powered state when it starts consuming power from the
bus. Only bus-powered devices use power from the host. Self-powered devices are in
the Powered state after port attachment.
Default
After the device has been powered, it should not respond to any request or
transactions until it receives a reset signal from the host. The device enters in the
Default state when it receives a reset signal from the host. In the Default state, the
device responds to standard requests at the default address 0.
Address
17
During enumeration, the host assigns a unique address to the device. When this
occurs, the device moves from the Default state to the Address state.
Device Structure and Enumeration
Device States
Description
Configured
After the host assigns an address to the device, the host must select a configuration.
After the host selects a configuration, the device enters the Configured state. In this
state, the device is ready to communicate with the host applications.
Suspended
The device enters into Suspended state when no traffic has been seen over the bus for
a specific period of time. The device retains the address assigned by the host in the
Suspended state. The device returns to the previous state after traffic is present in the
bus.
Table 1-2 USB Device States
1-4-3 ENUMERATION
Enumeration is the process where the host configures the device and learns about the
device’s capabilities. The host starts enumeration after the device is attached to one of the
root or external hub ports. The host learns about the device’s manufacturer, vendor/product
IDs and release versions by sending a Get Descriptor request to obtain the device descriptor
and the maximum packet size of the default pipe (control endpoint 0). Once that is done,
the host assigns a unique address to the device which will tell the device to only answer
requests at this unique address. Next, the host gets the capabilities of the device by a series
of Get Descriptor requests. The host iterates through all the available configurations to
retrieve information about number of interfaces in each configuration, interfaces classes,
and endpoint parameters for each interface and will lastly finish the enumeration process by
selecting the most suitable configuration.
18
Chapter 1
19
Chapter
2
Getting Started
This chapter gives you some insight into how to install and use the μC/USB-Host stack. The
following topics are explained in this chapter:
■
Prerequisites
■
Downloading the source code files
■
Installing the files
■
Building the sample application
■
Running the sample application
After the completion of this chapter, you should be able to build and run your first USB host
application using the μC/USB-Host stack.
20
Chapter 2
2-1 PREREQUISITES
Before running your first USB host application, you must ensure that you have a minimal set
of required tools and components:
■
A toolchain/IDE for your specific microcontroller
■
A development board
■
The μC/USB-Host stack with at least one of its USB class
■
A Host Controller Driver (HCD) that is compatible with your hardware for the
μC/USB-Host stack
■
A Board Support Package (BSP) for your development board
■
Other software products required by μC/USB-Host (μC/OS-II or μC/OS-III, μC/CPU,
μC/LIB, and μC/FS, when the Mass Storage Class is used)
■
An example project
If Micrium does not support your USB host controller or BSP, you will have to write your
own HCD. Refer to Chapter 5, “Host Driver Guide” on page 72 for more information on
writing your own USB HCD. You can also ask Micrium to develop the driver for your
specific host controller.
21
Downloading the Source Code Files
2-2 DOWNLOADING THE SOURCE CODE FILES
μC/USB-Host can be downloaded from the Micrium customer portal. The distribution
package includes the full source code and documentation. You can log into the Micrium
customer portal at the address below to begin your download (you must have a valid
license to gain access to the file):
http://micrium.com/login
μC/USB-Host depends on other modules, and you need to install all the required modules
before building your application. Depending on the availability of support for your
hardware platform, ports and drivers may or may not be available for download from the
customer portal. Table 2-1 shows the module dependency for μC/USB-Host.
Module Name
Required
Note(s)
μC/USB-Host Core
YES
Hardware independent USB Host core stack.
μC/USB-Host Driver
YES
USB Host Controller Driver (HCD). Available only if Micrium
supports your controller, otherwise you have to develop it
yourself or ask Micrium to do it for you. Certain multi-host
configurations might require to have more than one driver.
μC/USB-Host HID Class
Optional
Available only if you purchased the Human Interface Device
(HID) class.
μC/USB-Host MSC Class
Optional
Available only if you purchased the Mass Storage Class (MSC).
μC/USB-Host CDC ACM
Optional
Class
Available only if you purchased the Communication Device
Class (CDC) with the Abstract Control Model (ACM) subclass.
μC/USB-Host FTDI Class
Optional
Available only if you purchased the Future Technology Devices
International (FTDI) class.
μC/CPU Core
YES
Provides CPU specific data types and functions.
μC/CPU Port
YES
Available only if Micrium has support for your target architecture
μC/LIB Core
YES
Micrium run-time library
μC/LIB Port
Optional
Available only if Micrium has support for your target architecture
μC/OS-II Core
Optional
Available only if your application is using μC/OS-II
μC/OS-II Port
Optional
Available only if Micrium has support for your target architecture
μC/OS-III Core
Optional
Available only if your application is using μC/OS-III
μC/OS-III Port
Optional
Available only if Micrium has support for your target architecture
22
Chapter 2
Module Name
Required
Note(s)
μC/FS
Optional
Micrium’s File System (FS). Required only if your application
uses the Mass Storage Class.
μC/FS Driver for MSC device
Optional
Required only if your application uses the Mass Storage Class.
μC/Clk
Optional
Required for μC/FS
Table 2-1 μC/USB-Host Module Dependency
Table 2-1 indicates that all the μC/USB-Host classes are optional because there is no
required class to purchase with the μC/USB-Host Core and Driver. The class to purchase
will depend on your needs. But don’t forget that you need a class to build a complete USB
project. Table 2-1 also indicates that μC/OS-II and -III Core and Port are optional. Indeed,
μC/USB-Host stack does not assume a specific kernel to work with, but it still requires one.
2-3 INSTALLING THE FILES
Once all the distribution packages have been downloaded to your host machine, extract all
the files at the root of your C:\ drive for instance. The package may be extracted to any
location. After extracting all the files, the directory structure should look as illustrated in
Figure 2-1. In the example, all Micrium products sub-folders shown in Figure 2-1 will be
located in C:\Micrium\Software\. Note that the μC/FS and μC/Clk products are shown in
Figure 2-1 but are only required if the Mass Storage Class is used.
23
Installing the files
uC-CPU
<Architecture>
uC-LIB
Ports
<Architecture>
uCOS-II(III)
Ports
<Architecture>
Source
uC-USB-Host-V3
App
Cfg
Class
CDC
FTDI
HID
MSC
HCD
OS
Source
uC-FS
CFG
Dev
MSC
FAT
OS
Source
uC-Clk
OS
Source
Figure 2-1 Directory Tree for μC/USB-Host
24
Chapter 2
2-4 BUILDING THE SAMPLE APPLICATION
This section describes all the steps required to build a USB-based application. The
instructions provided in this section are not intended for any particular toolchain, but
instead are described in a generic way that can be adapted to any toolchain.
The best way to start building a USB-based project is to start from an existing project. If you
are using μC/OS-II or μC/OS-III, Micrium provides example projects for multiple
development boards and compilers. If your target board is not listed on Micrium’s web site,
you can download an example project for a similar board or microcontroller.
The purpose of the sample project is to allow your USB host to enumerate a device and
perform basic communication with HID, MSC, FTDI or CDC ACM devices depending on
which class(es) you purchased. After you have successfully completed and run the sample
project, you can use it as a starting point to run other USB class demos you may have
purchased.
μC/USB-Host requires a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS). The following assumes that
you have a working example project running on μC/OS-II or μC/OS-III.
2-4-1 UNDERSTANDING MICRIUM EXAMPLES
A Micrium example project is usually placed in the following directory structure.
\Micrium
\Software
\EvalBoards
\<manufacturer>
\<board_name>
\<compiler>
\<project name>
\*.*
Note that Micrium does not provide by default an example project with the μC/USB-Host
distribution package. Micrium examples are provided to customers in specific situations. If it
happens that you receive a Micrium example, the directory structure shown above is
generally used by Micrium. You may use a different directory structure to store the
application and toolchain projects files.
25
Building the Sample Application
\Micrium
This is where Micrium places all software components and projects. This directory is
generally located at the root directory.
\Software
This sub-directory contains all software components and projects.
\EvalBoards
This sub-directory contains all projects related to evaluation boards supported by Micrium.
\<manufacturer>
This is the name of the manufacturer of the evaluation board. In some cases this can also be
the name of the microcontroller manufacturer.
\<board name>
This is the name of the evaluation board.
\<compiler>
This is the name of the compiler or compiler manufacturer used to build the code for the
evaluation board.
\<project name>
The name of the project that will be demonstrated. For example a simple μC/USB-Host with
μC/OS-III project might have the project name ‘uCOS-III-USBH’.
\*.*
These are the source files for the project. This directory contains configuration files
app_cfg.h, os_cfg.h, os_cfg_app.h, cpu_cfg.h and other project-required sources files.
os_cfg.h is a configuration file used to configure μC/OS parameters such as the
maximum number of tasks, events, objects, which μC/OS services are enabled
(semaphores, mailboxes, queues), and so on. os_cfg.h is a required file for any μC/OS
application. See the μC/OS-III (or μC/OS-II) documentation and books for further
information.
app.c contains the application code for the example project. As with most C programs,
code execution starts at main(). At a minimum, app.c initializes μC/OS and creates a
startup task that initializes other Micrium modules.
26
Chapter 2
app_cfg.h is a configuration file for your application. This file contains #defines to
configure the priorities and stack sizes of your application and the Micrium modules’ tasks.
app_<module>.c and app_<module>.h These optional files contain the Micrium
modules’ (μC/TCP-IP, μC/FS, μC/USB-Host, etc) initialization code. They may or may
not be present in the example projects.
2-4-2 INCLUDING USB HOST STACK SOURCE CODE
First, include the following files in your project from the μC/USB-Host source code
distribution, as indicated in Figure 2-2.
uC-USB-Host-V3
Class
<class>
usbh_<class>.c
HCD
<controller>
usbh_drv_<controller>.c
BSP
<board name>
usbh_bsp_<controller>.c
OS
<kernel>
usbh_os.c
Source
usbh_class.c
usbh_core.c
usbh_hub.c
Figure 2-2 μC/USB-Host Source Code
Second, add the following include paths to your project’s C compiler settings:
\Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3
\Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3\HCD\<controller>\BSP\<board name>
If you are using the MSC class, you might need to add the following include path as well:
\Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3\Class\MSC
27
Building the Sample Application
2-4-3 COPYING AND MODIFYING TEMPLATE FILES
Copy the files from the application template and configuration folders into your application
as illustrated in Figure 2-3.
uC-USB-Host-V3
App
app_usbh.h/.c
CDC
app_usbh_cdc_acm.h/.c
FTDI
app_usbh_ftdi.h/.c
HID
app_usbh_hid.h/.c
app_usbh_keyboard.h/.c
EvalBoards
<manufacturer>
<board name>
<compiler>
<project name>
app_usbh_mouse.h/.c
MSC
uC-FS-V4
app_usbh_msc.h/.c
Cfg
Template
usbh_cfg.h
usbh_hc_cfg.h/.c
Figure 2-3 Copying Template Files.
app_usbh.h/.c are the master template for USB host application-specific initialization code.
This file contains the function App_USBH_Init(), which initializes the USB host stack and
class-specific demos. Depending on the Kernel used, you might have to modify the
USBH_STK data type for the kernel task‘s stacks.
app_usbh_<class>.c contains a template to initialize and use a certain class. This file
contains the class demo application. In general, the class application initializes the class,
registers the class driver to the core, and performs some communication once a device is
connected. Refer to the chapter(s) of the USB class(es) you purchased for more details
about the class demos.
usbh_cfg.h is a configuration file used to setup μC/USB-Host stack parameters such as the
maximum number of devices, endpoints, or class-related parameters.
usbd_hc_cfg.h/.c are configuration files used to set the Host Controller Driver(s)
parameters such as base address, dedicated memory base address/size and number of
endpoints.
28
Chapter 2
MODIFY HOST CONTROLLER CONFIGURATION
Modify the host controller configuration file (usbh_hc_cfg.c) as needed for your
application and USB Host Controller (HC). Refer to the driver specific readme file located in
the \Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3\HCD\<driver name> folder for more details on
how to fill this structure. Listing 2-1 describes the structure’s content. Note that you should
declare one structure per HC you will use.
USBD_DEV_CFG USBH_HC_TemplateCfg = {
(CPU_ADDR)0x00000000u,
(CPU_ADDR)0x00000000u,
0u,
DEF_ENABLED,
1024u,
2u,
2u,
0u
};
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
Listing 2-1 Host Controller Configuration Template
L2-1(1)
Give your HC configuration a meaningful name by replacing the word
“Template”.
L2-1(2)
Specify the base address of your USB HC.
L2-1(3)
If your target has dedicated memory for the USB HC, you can specify its base
address and size here. Depending on the USB HC, dedicated memory can be
used to allocate driver buffers or DMA descriptors.
L2-1(4)
If the USB HC has direct access to the system memory, specify DEF_ENABLED
here. Otherwise, DEF_DISABLED should be specified.
L2-1(5)
Specify the maximum length of the buffers that will be sent/received by the HC.
L2-1(6)
Specify the maximum of simultaneously opened bulk endpoints.
L2-1(7)
Specify the maximum of simultaneously opened interrupt endpoints.
L2-1(8)
Specify the maximum of simultaneously opened isochronous endpoints.
29
Building the Sample Application
MODIFY USB APPLICATION INITIALIZATION CODE
Listing 2-2 shows the code that you should modify based on your specific configuration done
previously. You should modify the parts that are highlighted by the text in bold. The code
snippet is extracted from the function App_USBH_Init() defined in app_usbh.c. The
complete initialization sequence performed by App_USBH_Init() is presented in Listing 2-4.
#include
<usbh_bsp_template.h>
(1)
CPU_BOOLEAN App_USBH_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
CPU_INT08U hc_nbr;
err = USBH_Init(&AsyncTaskInfo,
&HubTaskInfo);
(2)
....
hc_nbr = USBH_HC_Add(&USBH_HC_TemplateCfg,
&TemplateHCD_DrvAPI,
&TemplateHCD_RH_API,
&TemplateBSP_API,
&err);
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
err = USBH_HC_Start(hc_nbr);
(7)
....
}
Listing 2-2 App_USBH_Init() in app_usbh.c
L2-2(1)
Include the USB driver BSP header file that is specific to your board. This file
can be found in the following folder:
\Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host\HCD\<controller>\BSP\<board name>
L2-2(2)
Initialize the USB host stack’s internal variables, structures and kernel port.
L2-2(3)
Specify the address of the host controller configuration structure that you
modified in section “Modify Host Controller Configuration” on page 29.
30
Chapter 2
L2-2(4)
Specify the address of the host controller driver’s API structure. The driver’s API
structure is defined in the driver’s header file usually named
usbh_hcd_<controller>.h.
L2-2(5)
Specify the address of the host controller driver’s Root Hub (RH) API structure.
The RH API structure is defined in the driver’s header file usually named
usbh_hcd_<controller>.h.
L2-2(6)
Specify the address of the host controller driver’s Board Support Package (BSP)
API structure. The BSP API structure is defined in the BSP header file usually
named usbh_bsp_<board name>.h.
L2-2(7)
Starts the given host controller. If you have more than one host controller, you
should first add them all and then start each of them.
31
Building the Sample Application
2-4-4 MODIFYING THE APPLICATION CONFIGURATION FILE
The USB application initialization code templates assume the presence of app_cfg.h. The
following #defines must be present in app_cfg.h in order to build the sample application.
#define
APP_CFG_USBH_EN
#define
#define
#define
#define
USBH_OS_CFG_ASYNC_TASK_PRIO
USBH_OS_CFG_HUB_TASK_PRIO
USBH_OS_CFG_ASYNC_TASK_STK_SIZE
USBH_OS_CFG_HUB_TASK_STK_SIZE
#define
#define
#define
#define
APP_CFG_USBH_CDC_EN
APP_CFG_USBH_FTDI_EN
APP_CFG_USBH_HID_EN
APP_CFG_USBH_MSC_EN
DEF_ENABLED
DEF_ENABLED
DEF_ENABLED
DEF_ENABLED
(3)
#define
#define
#define
#define
LIB_MEM_CFG_OPTIMIZE_ASM_EN
LIB_MEM_CFG_ARG_CHK_EXT_EN
LIB_MEM_CFG_ALLOC_EN
LIB_MEM_CFG_HEAP_SIZE
DEF_DISABLED
DEF_ENABLED
DEF_ENABLED
4096u
(4)
#define
#define
#define
TRACE_LEVEL_OFF
TRACE_LEVEL_INFO
TRACE_LEVEL_DBG
#define
#define
APP_CFG_TRACE_LEVEL
APP_CFG_TRACE
#define APP_TRACE_INFO(x)
\
((APP_CFG_TRACE_LEVEL >= TRACE_LEVEL_INFO)
#define APP_TRACE_DBG(x)
\
((APP_CFG_TRACE_LEVEL >= TRACE_LEVEL_DBG)
DEF_ENABLED
(1)
4u
3u
512u
512u
(2)
0u
1u
2u
TRACE_LEVEL_DBG
printf
(5)
(6)
(7)
? (void)(APP_CFG_TRACE x) : (void)0)
? (void)(APP_CFG_TRACE x) : (void)0)
Listing 2-3 Application Configuration #defines
L2-3(1)
APP_CFG_USBH_EN enables or disables the USB host application initialization
code.
L2-3(2)
These #defines relate to the μC/USB-Host kernel requirements. The
μC/USB-Host core requires two tasks, one to manage hub requests (device
connection and enumeration) and another to manage asynchronous transfers.
To properly set the priority of the asynchronous and hub tasks, refer to
Appendix 4, “Task Priorities” on page 55.
32
Chapter 2
L2-3(3)
This #define enables the USB host class-specific demo. You can enable one or
more USB host class-specific demos. If you enable several USB host
class-specific demos, you will be able to communicate with more than one type
of devices.
L2-3(4)
Configure the desired size of the heap memory. Heap memory is used by
μC/USB-Host drivers that use internal buffers and DMA descriptors which are
allocated at run-time. It is also used to allocate extra USB Request Blocks (URB)
for each endpoint. Refer to the μC/LIB documentation for more details on the
other μC/LIB constants.
L2-3(5)
Most Micrium examples contain application trace macros to output
human-readable debugging information. Two levels of tracing are enabled:
INFO and DBG. INFO traces high-level operations, and DBG traces high-level
operations and return errors. Application-level tracing is different from
μC/USB-Host tracing (refer to section 4-2 on page 54 for more details).
L2-3(6)
Define the application trace level.
L2-3(7)
Specify which function should be used to redirect the output of
human-readable application tracing. You can select the standard output via
printf(), or another output such as a text terminal using a serial interface.
Note that each class requires its own applications-specific configuration. These
configurations are described in the class chapters.
2-5 RUNNING THE SAMPLE APPLICATION
The first step to integrate the demo application into your application code is to call
App_USBH_Init(). This function is responsible for the following steps:
■
Initializing the USB host stack.
■
Calling USB host class-specific application code.
■
Adding host controller(s) to the stack.
■
Starting the host controller(s).
33
Running the Sample Application
The App_USBH_Init() function is described in Listing 2-4.
#if (APP_CFG_USBH_EN == DEF_ENABLED)
CPU_BOOLEAN App_USBH_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
CPU_INT08U hc_nbr;
err = USBH_Init(&AsyncTaskInfo,
&HubTaskInfo);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
#if (APP_CFG_USBH_<class>_EN == DEF_ENABLED)
err = App_USBH_<class>_Init();
(1)
(2)
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
#endif
hc_nbr = USBH_HC_Add(&USBH_HC_TemplateCfg,
&TemplateHCD_DrvAPI,
&TemplateHCD_RH_API,
&TemplateBSP_API,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(3)
err = USBH_HC_Start(hc_nbr);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(4)
return (DEF_OK);
}
#endif
Listing 2-4 App_USBH_Init() Function
34
Chapter 2
L2-4(1)
USBH_Init() initializes the USB host stack. This must be the first USB host
function called by your application’s initialization code. If μC/USB-Host is used
with μC/OS-II or -III, OSInit() must be called prior to USBH_Init() in order
to initialize the kernel services.
L2-4(2)
Initialize the class-specific application demos by calling the function
App_USBH_<class>_Init() where <class> can be CDC, FTDI, HID or MSC.
Class-specific
demos
are
enabled
and
disabled
using
the
APP_CFG_USBH_<class>_EN #define.
L2-4(3)
USBH_HC_Add() creates and adds a USB host controller to the stack. If your
target supports multiple host controllers, you can add multiple USB host
controllers. The function USBD_HC_Add() returns a host controller number; this
number is used as a parameter for subsequent operations on host controller(s).
L2-4(4)
After all the host controller(s) have been successfully added to the stack and
the class(es) have been initialized, USBH_HC_Start() should be called for each
host controller. This function will enable interrupts on the host controller and
will start listening for device connections. If you have more than one USB host
controller, pay particular attention to the order you start them. For instance,
companion USB host controllers should be started before the main controller.
See Appendix 4, “Host Controller Initialization” on page 58 for more details
about companion USB host controllers.
35
Running the Sample Application
After building and downloading the application to your target, you should be able to
successfully connect a device to it through USB. Once a USB device is connected, the host
stack will detect the connection of a new device and will start the enumeration process. The
stack will then probe each of the classes that have been added in order to find one that can
handle the device. If no driver is found for your device, you will not be able to
communicate with it. Once a class driver is found, the host stack is ready to communicate
with the device. Table 2-2 lists the different section(s) you should refer to for more details
on each USB class demo.
Class
Refer to...
CDC ACM
See “Demo Application” on page 101.
FTDI
See “Demo Application” on page 109.
HID
See “Demo Application” on page 125.
MSC
See “Demo Application” on page 134.
Table 2-2 USB Class Demos References
36
Chapter 2
37
Chapter
3
Architecture
μC/USB-Host has been designed to be modular and adaptable to a variety of Central
Processing Units (CPUs), real-time kernels, USB host controllers, and C compilers.
In this chapter, you will learn how the μC/USB-Host structure and core functionality have
been implemented. It is not required that you read and understand this chapter to be able
to use μC/USB-Host, but it will certainly help you to understand the key concepts.
38
Chapter 3
3-1 USB HOST STACK OVERVIEW
Figure 3-1 shows an overview of the relationships between the different modules and layers
of the μC/USB-Host stack.
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Figure 3-1 Overview of the μC/USB-Host Stack
F3-1(1)
For more information on the application layer, see Table 3-1.
F3-1(2)
For more information on the USB class layer, see Table 3-2.
F3-1(3)
For more information on the class control layer, see Table 3-3.
F3-1(4)
For more information on the core layer, see Table 3-4.
F3-1(5)
For more information on the kernel abstraction layer, see Table 3-5.
F3-1(6)
For more information on the Host Controller Driver layer, see Table 3-6.
39
USB Host Stack Overview
3-1-1 USB HOST STACK MODULES
APPLICATION
Table 3-1 summarizes the application layer characteristics.
Name
Application layer
Description
This is where your USB application is located
Interacts with
Core layer
USB class layer
Class control layer
Files involved
app_cfg.h
usbh_hc_cfg.h/.c
usbh_cfg.h
other files part of your application
Table 3-1 Application Layer Characteristics
Your application interacts with the USB classes, the class control layer, and the core layer via
a set of defined APIs and callbacks. See class chapters and API reference appendices for
more details about the interactions.
USB CLASS LAYER
Table 3-2 summarizes the class layer characteristics.
Name
USB class layer
Description
This is where the class specific implementations are located
Interacts with
Application layer
Core layer
Kernel abstraction layer
Class control layer
Files involved
usbh_hub.h/.c
usbh_<class>.c/.h
Table 3-2 USB Class Layer Characteristics
Each class specific implementation (endpoint communication, specific protocol,
data/messaging format) is located in this layer. Except for the Hub class, your application
will interact with this layer to communicate with devices.
40
Chapter 3
CLASS CONTROL LAYER
Table 3-3 summarizes the class control layer characteristics.
Name
USB class control layer
Description
Manage the device function <-> class driver association
Interacts with
Application layer
USB class layer
Core layer
Files involved
usbh_class.h/.c
Table 3-3 Class Control Layer Characteristics
The class control layer is in charge of the association between a device function and a USB
class driver. Your application registers the class driver(s) it needs to the class control layer
during initialization. Once a device is connected and has been enumerated, the class control
layer will probe each class driver until it finds a class that can handle the device or one of its
functions.
CORE LAYER
Table 3-4 summarizes the core layer characteristics.
Name
USB core layer
Description
Manage devices connection, enumeration and communication
Interacts with
Application layer
Class control layer
USB class layer
Host Controller Driver(s) (HCD)
Kernel abstraction layer
Files involved
usbh_core.h/.c
Table 3-4 Core Layer Characteristics
The core layer is the heart of the μC/USB-Host stack. This is where the device enumeration,
communication and general management is handled. This is also where the general
management of host controllers is handled.
41
USB Host Stack Overview
KERNEL ABSTRACTION LAYER
Table 3-5 summarizes the kernel abstraction layer characteristics.
Name
Kernel abstraction layer
Description
Offers an abstraction between the USB host stack and the real-time kernel.
Interacts with
USB class layer
Host Controller Driver(s) (HCD)
Files involved
usbh_os.h/.c
Table 3-5 Kernel Abstraction Layer Characteristics
The kernel abstraction layer is a module that provides typical kernel services to the stack
(task management, semaphore, mutex, etc...). μC/USB-Host assumes the presence of a
real-time kernel, and this layer allows the USB host stack to be used with nearly any
real-time kernel available. At the very least, the kernel used should provide the following
services:
■
Task creation at run-time
■
Task delay
■
Semaphore
■
Mutex
■
Message queue
Micrium provides a kernel abstraction layer for μC/OS-II and μC/OS-III. For more
information on how to port μC/USB-Host to a real-time kernel, see Chapter 10, “Porting
μC/USB-Host to your Kernel” on page 139.
42
Chapter 3
HOST CONTROLLER DRIVER LAYER
Table 3-4 summarizes the host controller driver layer characteristics.
Name
Host Controller Driver (HCD) layer
Description
Offers an abstraction between the host controller(s) hardware and the core layer.
Interacts with
Core layer
Files involved
usbh_hcd_<controller>.h/.c
usbh_bsp_<controller>.h/.c
Table 3-6 Host Controller Driver Layer Characteristics
The HCD layer is an abstraction between the core layer and the host controller(s) hardware.
It handles all the operations that are specific to the hardware (initialization, device and
endpoints allocation/configuration, reception/transmission of USB packets, events report to
the core, etc.). The USB host controller functions are encapsulated and implemented in the
usbh_hcd_<controller>.c file. In order to have independent configuration for clock
gating, interrupt controller and I/O pins control, specific to your board, another file must be
implemented. This file is named usbh_bsp_<controller>.c, it is called the Board Specific
Package (BSP). It contains everything that is closely related to the hardware on which the
product will be used. Depending on the platform used, a project using μC/USB-Host may
contain more than one HCD. For more information on how to integrate/use multiple host
controllers within μC/USB-Host, see Chapter 4, “Configuration” on page 48. For more
information on how to write a HCD, see Chapter 5, “Host Driver Guide” on page 72.
3-1-2 USB HOST STACK DEPENDENCIES
The USB host stack depends on other Micrium products. Following is a list of them.
LIBRARIES
Given that μC/USB-Host is designed to be used in safety critical applications, some of the
“standard” library functions such as strcpy(), memset(), etc. have been rewritten to
conform to the same quality standards as the rest of the USB Host stack. All these standard
functions are part of a separate Micrium product called μC/LIB. μC/USB-Host depends on
this product. In addition, some data objects in USB controller drivers and core layer are
created at run-time which implies the use of memory allocation from the heap function
Mem_HeapAlloc().
43
Sending and Receiving Data
CPU LAYER
μC/USB-Host can work with either an 8, 16, 32 or even 64-bit CPU, but it must have
information about the CPU used. The CPU layer defines such information as the C data type
corresponding to 16-bit and 32-bit variables, whether the CPU has little or big endian
memory organization, and how interrupts are disabled and enabled on the CPU.
CPU-specific files are found in the \uC-CPU directory and are used to adapt μC/USB-Host to
a different CPU.
3-2 SENDING AND RECEIVING DATA
μC/USB-Host is capable of sending and receiving data in two different ways: synchronously
and asynchronously. In synchronous mode, the class/application blocks until the transfer
operation completes or an error or time-out occurs. In asynchronous mode, the
class/application does not block. An internal task of μC/USB-Host calls a class/application
callback function once the transfer has completed. It will also inform of any error that could
have occurred during the transfer. Note that for control transfers, only the synchronous
mode is available.
3-3 TASK MODEL
For its proper operation, μC/USB-Host core layer requires two tasks called hub and async
task. The following sections describe these two tasks.
3-3-1 HUB TASK
When a hub (root or external) reports a status change on one of its ports to the host, the
host must interrogate it to discover what happened. The hub task is used for that process.
Once a port status change is reported by a hub, a hub event is added to a queue to be
further processed by the hub task. This task also handles the enumeration of any newly
connected devices. The hub task is part of the hub class and is implemented as a state
machine as illustrated in Figure 3-2.
44
Chapter 3
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F3-2(1)
Once the hub task is resumed, it will take the first hub event from the queue
and will execute a series of operations on each of its port(s).
F3-2(2)
The host requests the port status. Port status contains information
connection status, port enable status, reset state, speed of the
device, etc. It also indicates which field changed since the last
report. For more information on port status, see the Universal
specification, revision 2.0, section 11.24.2.7.
45
like device
connected
port status
Serial Bus
Enumeration Process
F3-2(3)
When a device is connected, the first thing to do is to reset it. Once the device
has been properly reset, the hub task will request the port status once again.
The new port status should indicate that the port reset status changed.
F3-2(4)
At this point, the device has been reset and the necessary resources to handle it
have been allocated by the stack. It is now time to inform the core of the
presence of a new device so it can enumerate it. For more information on how
the core enumerates a newly connected device, see section 3-4 “Enumeration
Process” on page 46.
3-3-2 ASYNCHRONOUS TASK
This task manages all the asynchronous transfers that have been initiated by the class or the
application. Once the transfer has completed, the core will be notified of the completion by the
Host Controller Driver (HCD). If the transfer was initiated with an asynchronous API, this task is
resumed and will call the class/application callback function. Note that this task is never used
with control transfers as no asynchronous APIs are available for this type of transfer.
3-4 ENUMERATION PROCESS
Once a device has been connected and recognized/allocated by the hub task (as described in
section 3-3-1 “Hub Task” on page 44), the device will be enumerated by the core. The
enumeration is a process by which the host learns about the device’s capabilities and functions.
Figure 3-3 summarizes the enumeration process as executed by the μC/USB-Host stack.
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Figure 3-3 Enumeration Process as Executed by μC/USB-Host
46
Chapter 3
F3-3(1)
First step consists in reading the first 8 bytes of the device descriptor. At this
point, the maximum packet size of the device control endpoints is unknown to
the core, hence it is impossible to read more than 8 bytes.
F3-3(2)
The core retrieves and updates the maximum packet size of the control
endpoints from the information contained in the first 8 bytes of the device
descriptor.
F3-3(3)
Now that the core knows what is the maximum packet size of the control
endpoints, it can request the full device descriptor.
F3-3(4)
Since the beginning, the device always responded to the default address 0. At
this point, the core gives the device a unique address via a SetAddress request.
F3-3(5)
If the manufacturer and product string index contained in the device descriptor
are non-zero, the core requests their content. This is only useful for tracing and
debugging purposes.
F3-3(6)
At this moment, the core must read the configuration descriptor(s). Since the
total length of the configuration descriptor is unknown, it is necessary to read
the 9 first bytes of the configuration descriptor to retrieve its total length.
F3-3(7)
With the partial configuration descriptor, the core is now aware of the total
length and knows how many bytes should be requested from the device.
F3-3(8)
The core reads the entire configuration descriptor.
F3-3(9)
If another configuration is available on the device, the core will read its
descriptor as well. It will then have to go back to step (6).
F3-3(10)
Once all the configuration descriptors have been read, the core will, by default,
set the first configuration. You are now ready to communicate with the device
via your application.
47
Chapter
4
Configuration
Before running it, μC/USB-Host you must configure it properly. There are three groups of
configuration parameters:
■
Static stack configuration
■
Application specific configuration
■
Host Controller Driver (HCD) configuration
This chapter explains how to setup all these groups of configuration. The last section of this
chapter also provides examples of configuration following examples of typical use.
4-1 STATIC STACK CONFIGURATION
μC/USB-Host is configurable at compile time via approximately 30 #defines in the
application’s copy of usbh_cfg.h. μC/USB-Host uses #defines when possible, because
they allow code and data sizes to be scaled at compile time based on enabled features and
the configured number of USB objects. This allows the Read-Only Memory (ROM) and
Random-Access Memory (RAM) footprints of μC/USB-Host to be adjusted based on
application requirements.
It is recommended that the configuration process begins with the default configuration
values which in the next sections will be shown in bold.
The sections in this chapter are organized following the order in μC/USB-Host’s template
configuration file, usbh_cfg.h.
48
Configuration
4-1-1 USB HOST CONFIGURATION
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS configures the maximum number of devices supported by the
μC/USB-Host stack. USB uses a tiered star topology. Up to five external hubs can connect in
series with a limit of 127 peripherals and hubs including the root hub. There is one root hub
per USB host controller. USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS value should always be less than 127
physical devices. If the host accepts only one single device with no use of external hubs,
the value may be set to 1. Default value is 4.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS sets the maximum number of USB configurations per USB device.
Most of the commercial USB devices support only one configuration. Refer to the Universal
Serial Bus specification, Revision 2.0, section 9.2.3 for more details about USB
configuration. Default value is 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS configures the maximum number of interfaces available per
configuration. This value greatly depends on the USB class(es) used. Most of the supported
classes require at least one interface, while CDC ACM requires two. Refer to the Universal
Serial Bus specification, Revision 2.0, section 9.2.3 for more details about USB interfaces.
Default value is 2. If a composite/compound device is to be attached to the μC/USB-Host
stack, you may need to increase this value to 3 or 4.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS configures the maximum number of allowed endpoints per
interface alternate setting. This value greatly depends on the USB class(es) used. For
information on how many endpoints are needed for each class, refer to the class specific
chapter. In general, an interface needs a pair of non-control endpoints for bidirectional
communication. Default value is 2.
49
Configuration
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS configures the maximum number of class drivers (HID,
MSC, etc.) supported by the μC/USB-Host stack. The value should be greater or equal to 2
because the μC/USB-Host stack always integrates the Hub class counting for one class
driver. Thus the minimum value would be one Hub class + one of the supported classes.
The default value is 4.
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN configures the maximum length of the buffer dedicated to
receive the entire configuration descriptor content sent by the device. The full configuration
descriptor contains the configuration descriptor itself, all Interfaces and their associated
endpoint descriptors and any class-specific descriptors. Default value is 256. This value is
convenient for standard classes such as CDC ACM, HID and MSC.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUBS
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUBS configures the maximum number of hubs supported by the
μC/USB-Host stack. The hubs encompass external hubs and root hub(s). In general, there is
one root hub per host controller (HC). Default value is 2 (1 root hub + 1 external hub).
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS specifies the maximum number of ports that can be active and
managed at the same time per external hub connected to the host. If
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS is set to a value less than the actual number of ports available
on a hub, then the rest of the ports on this hub will be rendered unusable. For instance, if
the value is 4 and the hub has 7 ports, 3 ports are inactive. If you connect a device to one
of these 3 inactive ports, the host stack will not detect the connection. Currently on the
market, the number of ports for external hubs can range from 2 to 7 with the most common
being 4 and 7. Default value is 7.
Figure 4-1 shows two 7-port hubs. One of them has a peculiarity explained below.
50
Configuration
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Figure 4-1 7-Port Hubs
F4-1(1)
This 7-port hub is a normal external hub. The host will identify this hub as one
unique device.
F4-1(2)
For the user, this 7-port hub looks externally the same as the one on the left,
that is one upstream port connecting to the host and 7 downstream ports
connecting to devices. In fact, this hub is composed of two hubs in series.
Internally, the fourth port of Hub 1 is connected to the upstream port of Hub 2.
You may encounter commercial 7-port external hubs that are designed
internally as shown on the right hub. When this hub is connected to
μC/USB-Host, the stack will see two devices. It will enumerate twice the hub:
one enumeration for Hub 1 and one enumeration for Hub 2. Thus, you may
need to increase USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS to avoid reaching the maximum
number of supported devices.
USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN
USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN specifies the maximum buffer length aimed to receive a string
retrieved from the device as part of a GetDescriptor(String) request. If logging is not enabled
(constant USBH_CFG_PRINT_LOG set to DEF_DISABLED), then USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN can
be set to 0. Default value is 256.
51
Configuration
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_TIMEOUT
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_TIMEOUT specifies a timeout expressed in milliseconds used during
control transfers. This timeout defines the time allowed for the device to complete the
standard request initiated by the host. Default value is 5000. Refer to the Universal Serial
Bus specification, Revision 2.0, section 9.2.6.4 for more details about timeouts during
standard device requests.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_RETRY
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_RETRY specifies the maximum number of attempts to get a certain
descriptor. Default value is 3.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC specifies the maximum number of Host Controllers (HC) supported
by the μC/USB-Host stack. Default value is 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC
USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC configures the maximum number of isochronous descriptors
available for all isochronous endpoints. Default value is 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_EXTRA_URB_PER_DEV
USBH_CFG_MAX_EXTRA_URB_PER_DEV configures the maximum number of additional USB
Request Blocks (URB) available to perform streaming communication using asynchronous
mode. Default value is 1.
4-1-2 USB CLASSES CONFIGURATION
Refer to USB class chapters for more details about configuration constants related to each
USB class.
52
Configuration
4-1-3 DEBUG CONFIGURATION
Configurations in this section only need to be set during development/debug stages. Debug
configuration allows you to output useful debug messages on a serial terminal or a
debugger console. A set of debug macros are used in the different layers of μC/USB-Host.
Different levels of debug messages can be chosen.
USBH_CFG_PRINT_LOG
USBH_CFG_PRINT_LOG enables or disables the functions to print messages to debug or trace
the stack's flow of execution. When set to DEF_ENABLED, this configuration constant defines
the following macro: USBH_PRINT_LOG(). This macro is used in different layers of
μC/USB-Host and gives you debug information specific to a certain class, the core and the
driver. Default value is DEF_DISABLED.
USBH_CFG_PRINT_ERR
USBH_CFG_PRINT_ERR enables or disables the debug messages that indicate a specific error
code. When set to DEF_ENABLED, this configuration constant defines the following macro:
USBH_PRINT_ERR(). This macro is used in different layers of μC/USB-Host and gives you
error codes specific to a certain class or the core. Default value is DEF_DISABLED.
USBH_PRINTF
USBH_PRINTF macro allows you to output your debug messages on a debugger console or
serial terminal by mapping USBH_PRINTF to a certain printf() function or equivalent.
USBH_PRINTF is used by the macros USBH_PRINT_LOG() and USBH_PRINT_ERR() as shown
in Code Listing 4-1.
53
Configuration
#include <stdio.h>
#define
USBH_PRINTF
printf
#if (USBH_CFG_PRINT_LOG == DEF_ENABLED)
#define USBH_PRINT_LOG(...)
USBH_PRINTF(__VA_ARGS__)
#endif
(1)
(2)
#if (USBH_CFG_PRINT_ERR == DEF_ENABLED)
(3)
#define USBH_PRINT_ERR(err)
USBH_PRINTF("ERR:%s:%d:err=%d\n", __FUNCTION__, __LINE__, err);
#else
#define USBH_PRINT_ERR(err)
#endif
Listing 4-1 Debug Macros
L4-1(1)
In this example, USBH_PRINTF is mapped to a standard printf() function
defined in the standard I/O library, stdio.h, provided by the toolchain. Debug
messages will be outputted on the debugger’s console window.
L4-1(2)
If USBH_CFG_PRINT_LOG is set to DEF_ENABLED, informative messages will be
outputted to the console using the classic formatting allowed by the printf()
function.
L4-1(3)
If USBH_CFG_PRINT_ERR is set to DEF_ENABLED, any error will be outputted to
the console using a formatting such that the name of the function in which the
error has been flagged, the line number at which the error was detected and
the error code will be displayed.
4-2 APPLICATION SPECIFIC CONFIGURATION
This section defines the configuration constants related to μC/USB-Host but that are
application-specific. All these configuration constants relate to the kernel. For many kernels,
the μC/USB-Host task priorities and stack sizes will need to be explicitly configured for the
particular kernel (consult the specific kernel’s documentation for more information).
These configuration constants should be defined in an application’s app_cfg.h file.
54
Configuration
4-2-1 TASK PRIORITIES
As mentioned in section 3-3 “Task Model” on page 44, μC/USB-Host needs one hub task
and one async task for its proper operation. The priority of μC/USB-Host’s hub and async
task greatly depends on the USB requirements of your application. For some applications, it
might be better to set the hub task at a high priority, especially if your application requires a
lot of tasks and is CPU intensive. The hub task is responsible for the device’s
connection/disconnection detection and enumeration. In that case, if the hub task has a low
priority, the device connection will still be detected and it will be enumerated but the
notification of a device enumeration completed to your application may be delayed. The
μC/USB-Host stack allows the classes or your application tasks to exchange data in
synchronous or asynchronous mode. The μC/USB-Host async task is in charge of the
asynchronous transfers. In the case where the classes use or your application deals with
asynchronous transfers, it is a good idea to set the async task with a higher priority than the
hub task. You may want to be notified about an asynchronous transfer completion before a
new device connection. The async task could have a lower priority than your application
tasks if you know you will have quite a lot of code in your asynchronous callback functions.
For more details about synchronous and asynchronous communication, refer to section 3-2
“Sending and Receiving Data” on page 44.
For the μC/OS-II and μC/OS-III RTOS ports, the following constants must be configured
within app_cfg.h:
■
USBH_OS_CFG_HUB_TASK_PRIO
■
USBH_OS_CFG_ASYNC_TASK_PRIO
4-2-2 TASK STACK SIZES
For the μC/OS-II and μC/OS-III RTOS ports, the following constants must be configured
within app_cfg.h to set the internal task stack sizes:
■
USBH_OS_CFG_HUB_TASK_STK_SIZE
512
■
USBH_OS_CFG_ASYNC_TASK_STK_SIZE
512
The arbitrary stack size of 512 is a good starting point for most applications.
55
Configuration
The only guaranteed method of determining the required task stack sizes is to calculate the
maximum stack usage for each task. Obviously, the maximum stack usage for a task is the
total stack usage along the task’s most-stack-greedy function path. Note that the
most-stack-greedy function path is not necessarily the longest or deepest function path.
The easiest and best method for calculating the maximum stack usage for any task/function
should be performed statically by the compiler or by a static analysis tool since these can
calculate function/task maximum stack usage based on the compiler’s actual code
generation and optimization settings. So for optimal task stack configuration, we
recommend to invest in a task stack calculator tool compatible with your build toolchain.
4-3 HOST CONTROLLER DRIVER CONFIGURATION
During the initialization of the μC/USB-Host stack, you will have to initialize all the host
controllers of your platform. In order to do that, for each host controller, you need to:
1
Declare a configuration structure of type USBH_HC_CFG containing all the characteristics
of the host controller.
2
Add the host controller to the stack using the function USBH_HC_Add().
3
Start the host controller operations by calling the function USBH_HC_Start().
4-3-1 HOST CONTROLLER CONFIGURATION STRUCTURE
The host controller configuration structure is declared in usbh_hc_cfg.h and defined in the
file usbh_hc_cfg.c (refer to section 2-4-3 “Copying and Modifying Template Files” on
page 28 for an example of initializing this structure). These files are distributed as templates,
and you must modify them to have the proper configuration for your USB Host Controller
(HC). A reference to the structure USBH_HC_CFG needs to be passed to the USBH_HC_Add()
function, which allocates a HC. Each host controller driver comes with a specific readme file
located in \Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3\HCD\<driver name> giving more
information about the host controller specificities and limitations. You should refer to it to
help you configure the structure USBH_HC_CFG.
The fields of the following structure presented in Listing 4-2 are the parameters needed to
configure the USB Host Controller Driver (HCD):
56
Configuration
USBH_HC_CFG
USBH_HC_OHCI_Cfg_AT91SAM9M10 = {
(CPU_ADDR)0x00700000,
(CPU_ADDR)0,
0,
DEF_ENABLED,
1024u,
10u,
10u,
0u
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
};
Listing 4-2 USB Host Controller Driver Configuration Structure
L4-2(1)
Base address of the USB HC hardware registers
L4-2(2)
Base address of the USB HC dedicated memory.
L4-2(3)
Size of the USB HC dedicated memory.
L4-2(4)
Flag indicating if the HC can access the system memory from which
application/class/core data buffers have been allocated. If the flag is set to
DEF_DISABLED, buffers will be copied from system memory to the dedicated
memory accessed by the HC. This flag applies to HCs and their associated
drivers that support DMA.
L4-2(5)
Maximum buffer length used to receive and send data. If the field
DataBufFromSysMemEn is set to DEF_ENABLED, the host controller cannot
access the system memory. Thus the HCD will allocate an associated data
buffer from the HC’s dedicated memory and pass the buffer information to the
HC for processing. If the field DataBufFromSysMemEn is set to DEF_DISABLED,
the HCD will directly pass the buffer allocated from the system memory to the
HC.
L4-2(6)
Maximum number of open bulk endpoints.
L4-2(7)
Maximum number of open interrupt endpoints.
L4-2(8)
Maximum number of open isochronous endpoints.
57
Configuration
4-3-2 HOST CONTROLLER INITIALIZATION
Once the Host Controller (HC) configuration structure is ready, you will be able to add your
HC to the μC/USB-Host stack and to start its operations. Figure 4-2 and Figure 4-3 introduce
some typical HC architectures within a microcontroller.
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F4-2(1)
The single HC is the most widespread architecture among embedded USB
hosts. The single HC can be a vendor-specific, an Enhanced Host Controller
Interface (EHCI) or an Open Host Controller Interface (OHCI) controller.
F4-2(2)
Some embedded systems contain several HCs. Here, this multi-host architecture
has two HCs. Each one manages its own root hub composed of two ports.
Figure 4-3 gives another example of a multi-host architecture. Here, a main HC shares a root
hub with one ore more other HCs. The other HCs are called Companion controllers. You
may find this type of architecture with EHCI and OHCI controllers where the main host
controller would be an EHCI controller and companion controllers would be OHCI
controllers. In general, an embedded systems’ microcontroller will have one EHCI
associated with one OHCI. An EHCI controller can only be in charge of high-speed devices.
Low- and full-speed devices are handled by the OHCI controller(s). Refer respectively to
Enhanced Host Controller Interface Specification for Universal Serial Bus, Revision 1.0,
March 12 2002 and OpenHCI Specification for USB, 09/14/99, Release 1.0a for more details
about EHCI and OHCI controllers respectively.
58
Configuration
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Figure 4-3 Multi-Host Architecture
The template file app_usbh.c shows an example of HC initialization in the function
App_USBH_Init(). Listing 4-3 presents the body of this function. The example in this
function corresponds to a single HC architecture as shown in Figure 4-2 (left drawing). The
example can be easily extended to describe the multi-host architecture shown in Figure 4-2
(right drawing).
CPU_BOOLEAN App_USBH_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
CPU_INT08U hc_nbr;
...
hc_nbr = USBH_HC_Add(&USBH_HC_TemplateCfg,
&TemplateHCD_DrvAPI,
&TemplateHCD_RH_API,
&TemplateBSP_API,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
err = USBH_HC_Start(hc_nbr);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
return (DEF_OK);
}
Listing 4-3 Single Host Controller Initialization
59
Configuration
L4-3(1)
Add the unique HC to the stack by calling USBH_HC_Add(). This function will
allocate and initialize certain internal structures associated to the HC and used
by the core layer to manage the HC. It will also initialize the controller itself
and get its speed. Several parameters are passed to USBH_HC_Add().
USBH_HC_Add() will return a HC number. In case of a multi-host architecture
with two HCs, the second controller is added to the stack by calling one more
time USBH_HC_Add(). USBH_HC_Add() will return a HC number unique to this
second HC.
L4-3(2)
USBH_HC_TemplateCfg is the HC configuration structure of type USBH_HC_CFG
previously initialized in usbh_hc_cfg.c.
L4-3(3)
TemplateHCD_DrvAPI is the HC driver’s API structure of type
USBH_HC_DRV_API
defined
in
the
HC
driver
header
file,
usbh_hcd_<controller>.h. It defines the functions of the HC driver enabling
the USB host stack core to talk to the controller. Refer to section “USB
Controller API” on page 73 for more details about the USBH_HC_DRV_API
structures and the associated API.
L4-3(4)
TemplateHCD_RH_API is the HC driver’s Root Hub (RH) API structure of type
USBH_HC_RH_API
defined
in
the
HC
driver
header
file,
usbh_hcd_<controller>.h. It contains some functions permitting the root
hub management. Refer to section “Root Hub API” on page 75 for more details
about the USBH_HC_RH_API structures and the associated API.
L4-3(5)
TemplateBSP_API is the HC driver’s Board Support Package (BSP) API
structure of type USBH_HC_BSP_API defined in the BSP header file,
usbh_bsp_<controller>.h. It contains functions enabling the driver to
configure the BSP part (that is USB clock, USB interrupt handler setup, etc.).
Refer to section 5-6 “CPU and Board Support” on page 81 for more details
about the USBH_HC_BSP_API structures and the associated API.
L4-3(6)
Start the USB operations of the HC. USBH_HC_Start() is called by passing the
HC number previously obtained. This function will basically enable any
interrupts that let the HC know about any root hub port events (for example,
device connection/disconnection). In case of a multi-host architecture with two
HCs, the second controller is started by calling once again USBH_HC_Start()
with the correct HC number.
60
Configuration
Listing 4-4 illustrates a multi-host initialization corresponding to Figure 4-3. In this example,
a multi-host architecture composed of one EHCI and one OHCI is considered.
CPU_BOOLEAN
App_USBH_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
err;
ohci_hc_nbr;
ehci_hc_nbr;
...
ehci_hc_nbr = USBH_HC_Add(&USBH_HC_EHCI_Cfg_Template,
&EHCI_DrvAPI,
&EHCI_RH_API,
&Template_EHCI_BSP_API,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(1)
ohci_hc_nbr = USBH_HC_Add(&USBH_HC_OHCI_Cfg_Template,
&OHCI_DrvAPI,
&OHCI_RH_API,
&Template_OHCI_BSP_API,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(2)
err = USBH_HC_Start(ohci_hc_nbr);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(3)
err = USBH_HC_Start(ehci_hc_nbr);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
return (DEF_FAIL);
}
(4)
return (DEF_OK);
}
Listing 4-4 Multi-Host Controllers Initialization
L4-4(1)
Add the EHCI controller to the μC/USB-Host stack by specifying its characteristics
configuration, its associated driver API, root hub API and BSP API.
61
Configuration
L4-4(2)
Add the OHCI controller to the μC/USB-Host stack by specifying its
characteristics configuration, its associated driver API, root hub API and BSP API.
L4-4(3)
Start the OHCI controller operations.
L4-4(4)
Start the EHCI controller operations.
In the case of multi-host controllers initialization, it is recommended to add first all your
HCs to the μC/USB-Host stack and then to start their operations. It is especially important
for an EHCI controller working with OHCI controllers and sharing the same root hub. By
default, the EHCI controller has the ownership of the root hub’s ports. If the device
connected to a certain port cannot be managed by the EHCI controller, the port ownership
goes to one of the OHCI controllers. As the EHCI controller relies on OHCI controllers,
OHCI controllers should be started before the EHCI controller.
For vendor-specific HCs, you might change the add/start host controller order for: adding
the first controller to the stack and starting it with USBH_HC_Start(), then adding a second
HC and starting it, and so on. In general, a vendor-specific controller will not share the
same root hub with another vendor-specific controller. But adding all your HCs followed by
starting each HC is a good practice.
4-4 CONFIGURATION EXAMPLES
This section provides examples of configuration for μC/USB-Host stack based on some bus
topology configurations. This section will only give examples of static stack configuration,
as the application-specific configuration greatly depends on your application. Also, the host
controller driver configuration depends on the hardware you use.
The following examples are presented:
■
A single host controller and a unique USB device connected to it.
■
A single host controller and multiple USB devices connected to it.
■
Multi-host controllers and multiple USB devices connected to them.
62
Configuration
4-4-1 SINGLE HOST CONTROLLER AND UNIQUE DEVICE
This example is the most simple bus topology you can find in which one USB device is
connected to the only port of the host controller. In our example, the USB device is a Mass
Storage Class (MSC) device. Figure 4-4 introduces the first bus topology example. The
platform has only one host controller whose root hub is composed of 1 port. A MSC device
composed of a pair of bulk endpoints to communicate is connected to this only port.
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Figure 4-4 Single Host Controller and Unique Device Configuration
Table 4-1 shows the values that should be set for the different configuration constants
described earlier in order to support this bus topology.
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS
1
Only one USB device accepted at a time.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS
1
Only one configuration is needed for a MSC device.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS
1
Only one interface is required to describe a MSC function.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS
2
MSC interface requires two bulk endpoints to communicate.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS
2
Hub class always present in the USB Host stack + MSC class
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN
50
Size of a Configuration Descriptor sent by a MSC device must be
less than 50 bytes.
In general, a full MSC Configuration Descriptor =
size(Configuration Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + 2 *
size(Endpoint Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 2 * 7 = 32 bytes. You should
consider adding a safety margin in case the MSC Configuration
Descriptor exceeds 32 bytes (e.g. 50 bytes).
63
Configuration
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUBS
1
Only one hub (root hub) supported.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS
1
The root hub has only one port.
USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN
256
This value ensures that the USB Host stack can get any length of
strings characters sent by the MSC device. This value could be
lower. In general, any string describing the device is less than 50
characters.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_TIMEOUT
5000
The device has 5 seconds to complete a standard request sent
by the host.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_RETRY
3
If a standard request fails, the host attempts up to 3 times to get
a successful request.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC
1
One host controller on this platform.
USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC
1
Even if the MSC device does not use isochronous endpoints but
only control and bulk endpoints, this value must be set to 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_EXTRA_URB_PER_DEV
1
This value should be set at least to 1.
Table 4-1 Constant Values for Single Host Controller and Unique Device Configuration Example
4-4-2 SINGLE HOST CONTROLLER AND MULTIPLE DEVICES
This example adds a bit of complexity to the basic example previously shown in Figure 4-4.
This time, the USB Host stack has to support up to 2 external hubs in series and a certain
number of USB devices. The platform still contains only one host controller with one port.
The bus topology presented in Figure 4-5 is composed of:
■
2 external hubs with 4 ports each. Each external hub is composed of one interrupt
endpoint used for port events notification.
■
3 Mass Storage Class (MSC) devices. Each MSC device is composed of a pair of bulk
endpoints to communicate.
■
2 Human Interface Devices (HID). Each HID is composed of one interrupt endpoint to
communicate.
An embedded host with limited capabilities can support such bus topology with a certain
depth of hubs in series and a few USB devices at the same time.
64
Configuration
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Table 4-2 shows the values that should be set for the different configuration constants
described earlier in order to support this bus topology.
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS
7
2 external hubs + 5 other USB devices (in our example, 3 MSC
and 2 HID). An external hub is also considered as a device.
μC/USB-Host enumerates an external hub as it would do with
any other USB devices. Notice that if the maximum number of
supported devices has been reached, the stack will simply
disregard any other USB devices trying to connect. In that case, a
message could be displayed to the user saying that the
maximum number of devices has been reached.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS
1
Only one configuration is usually needed for an external hub, a
MSC device or a HID device.
65
Configuration
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS
1
Only one interface is required to describe a Hub, a MSC or a HID
function.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS
2
The maximum number of endpoints needed among all the
interfaces in this bus topology is taken. MSC interface requires
two bulk endpoints to communicate. Hub and HID interfaces use
only one endpoint for communication.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS
3
Hub class (always present in the USB Host stack) + MSC class +
HID class.
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN
100
Size of a Configuration Descriptor sent by an external hub, a
MSC or HID device must be less than 100 bytes.
In general:
A full HUB Configuration Descriptor = size(Configuration
Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + size(Hub Descriptor) +
1* size(Endpoint Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 9 + 1 * 7 = 34 bytes.
A full MSC Configuration Descriptor = size(Configuration
Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + 2 * size(Endpoint
Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 2 * 7 = 32 bytes.
A full HID Configuration Descriptor = size(Configuration
Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + size(HID Descriptor) + 1*
size(Endpoint Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 12 + 1 * 7 = 37 bytes.
Among HUB, MSC and HID, HID has the longest configuration
descriptor. The value of USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN should be
at least equal to the longest configuration descriptor size. A
safety margin should be added. It is particularly true here
because the HID descriptor has a size that varies according to
the number of reports contained in the HID device. The HID
descriptor size is given by this formula (9 + (N * 3)) with N =
number of reports.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUBS
3
1 root hub + 2 external hubs in series.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS
4
It should always be set to the maximum of ports on the hub.
USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN
256
This value ensures that the USB Host stack can get any length of
strings of characters sent by any of USB devices. This value
could be lower. In general, any string describing the device is less
than 50 characters.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_TIMEOUT
5000
The device has 5 seconds to complete a standard request sent
by the host.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_RETRY
3
If a standard request fails, the host attempts up to 3 times to get
a successful request.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC
1
One host controller on this platform.
66
Configuration
Configuration
Value
USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC
1
Explanation
Even if external hubs, MSC and HID devices do not use
isochronous endpoints, this value must be set to 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_EXTRA_URB_PER_DEV
1
This value should be set at least to 1.
Table 4-2 Constant Values for Single Host Controller and Multiple Devices Configuration Example
4-4-3 MULTI-HOST CONTROLLERS AND MULTIPLE DEVICES
This example describes a more complex bus topology. Here, the USB Host stack has to
support up to 5 external hubs in series and a certain number of USB devices. The platform
contains 2 host controllers. Each root hub associated to one host controller provides 2 ports.
The bus topology presented in Figure 4-6 is composed of:
■
6 external hubs with 4 ports each. Among the 6 external hubs, up to 5 hubs are in
series which is the maximum allowed by the USB 2.0 specification. Each external hub is
composed of one interrupt endpoint used for port events notification.
■
6 Mass Storage Class (MSC) devices. Each MSC device is composed of a pair of bulk
endpoints to communicate.
■
3 Human Interface Devices (HID). Each HID is composed of one interrupt endpoint to
communicate.
■
2 composite devices composed of one HID function and one MSC function.
This bus topology requires an embedded host with good capabilities to support the
maximum depth of hubs in series and several USB devices connected at the same time to
root hubs and external hubs.
67
Configuration
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68
Configuration
Table 4-3 shows the values that should be set for the different configuration constants
described earlier in order to support this bus topology.
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS
17
6 external hubs + 11 other USB devices (in our example, 6
MSC, 3 HID and 2 composite devices). An external hub is also
considered as a device. μC/USB-Host enumerates an external
hub as it would do with any other USB devices. Notice that if
the maximum number of supported devices has been
reached, the stack will simply disregard any other USB
devices trying to connect. In that case, a message could be
displayed to the user saying that the maximum number of
devices has been reached.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS
1
Only one configuration is usually needed for an external hub, a
MSC device, a HID device or a composite device.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS
2
A single device with a Hub, MSC or HID function requires only
one interface to be described. But the configuration inside the
composite device is composed of two interfaces. Thus, we
take the maximum of required interfaces among all
configurations to be supported.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS
2
The maximum number of endpoints needed among all the
interfaces in this bus topology is taken. MSC interface
requires two bulk endpoints to communicate. Hub and HID
interfaces use only one endpoint for communication.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS
3
Hub class (always present in the USB Host stack) + MSC
class + HID class.
69
Configuration
Configuration
Value
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN
100
Explanation
Size of a Configuration Descriptor sent by an external hub, a
MSC or HID device must be less than 100 bytes.
In general:
A full HUB Configuration Descriptor = size(Configuration
Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + size(Hub Descriptor) +
1* size(Endpoint Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 9 + 1 * 7 = 34 bytes.
A full MSC Configuration Descriptor = size(Configuration
Descriptor) + size(Interface Descriptor) + 2 * size(Endpoint
Descriptor) = 9 + 9 + 2 * 7 = 32 bytes. A full HID Configuration
Descriptor = size(Configuration Descriptor) + size(Interface
Descriptor) + size(HID Descriptor) + 1* size(Endpoint Descriptor)
= 9 + 9 + 12 + 1 * 7 = 37 bytes.
Full Configuration Descriptor for the composite device = full
HID Configuration Descriptor + size( Interface Descriptor for
MSC) + 2 * size(Endpoint Descriptor) = 37 + 9 + 2 * 7 = 60 bytes.
Among HUB, MSC, HID and composite device, the composite
device has the longest configuration descriptor. The value of
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN should be at least equal to the
longest configuration descriptor size. A safety margin should
be added. It is particularly true here because the HID
descriptor has a size that varies according to the number of
reports contained in the HID device. The HID descriptor size is
given by this formula (9 + (N * 3)) with N = number of reports.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUBS
8
2 root hubs + 6 external hubs.
USBH_CFG_MAX_HUB_PORTS
4
The number of active ports per hub is limited to 4. It limits also
the number of other USB devices that the USB host stack can
manage. In case 7-port hubs are used in this bus topology,
only 4 devices will be managed by the USB host stack
because the 3 other ports would be inactive. You may
increase the value of this constant to 7 to allow up to 7 active
ports per hub.
USBH_CFG_MAX_STR_LEN
256
This value ensures that the USB Host stack can get any length
of strings of characters sent by any of USB devices. This value
could be lower. In general, any string describing the device is
less than 50 characters.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_TIMEOUT
5000
The device has 5 seconds to complete a standard request
sent by the host.
USBH_CFG_STD_REQ_RETRY
3
If a standard request fails, the host attempts up to 3 times to
get a successful request.
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC
2
Two host controllers on this platform.
70
Configuration
Configuration
Value
Explanation
USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC
1
Even if external hubs, MSC, HID, FTDI and CDC devices do
not use isochronous endpoints, this value must be set to 1.
USBH_CFG_MAX_EXTRA_URB_PER_DEV
1
This value should be set at least to 1.
Table 4-3 Constant Values for Multi-Host Controllers and Multiple Devices Configuration Example
71
Chapter
5
Host Driver Guide
There are many USB Host Controllers (HC) available on the market and each requires a
driver to work with μC/USB-Host. The amount of code necessary to port a specific USB HC
to μC/USB-Host greatly depends on it’s complexity and features.
If not already available, a driver can be developed, as described in this chapter. However, it
is recommended to modify an already existing host driver with the new host’s specific code
following the Micrium coding convention for consistency. It is also possible to adapt drivers
written for other USB host stacks or examples provided by the chip manufacturer, especially
if the driver is short and it is a matter of simply copying data to and from the HC.
This chapter describes the hardware (host) driver architecture for μC/USB-Host, including:
■
Host Driver API Definition(s)
■
Host Root Hub API Definition(s)
■
Host Configuration
■
Memory Allocation
■
CPU and Board Support
Micrium provides sample configuration code free of charge; however, the sample code will
likely require modifications depending on the combination of processor, evaluation board,
and USB HC(s).
72
Chapter 5
5-1 HOST DRIVER MODEL
No particular memory interface is required by μC/USB-Host's driver model. Therefore, the
USB Host Controller (HC) may use the assistance of a Direct Memory Access (DMA)
controller to transfer data or handle the data transfers directly.
5-2 HOST DRIVER API
USB CONTROLLER API
All Host Controller Drivers (HCD) must declare an instance of the appropriate HCD API
structure as a global variable within the source code. The API structure is an ordered list of
function pointers utilized by μC/USB-Host when Host Controller (HC) hardware services are
required.
A sample HCD API structure is shown in Listing 5-1.
USBH_HC_DRV_API USBH_<controller>_DrvAPI = {
USBH_<controller>_Init,
USBH_<controller>_Start,
USBH_<controller>_Stop,
USBH_<controller>_SpdGet,
USBH_<controller>_Suspend,
USBH_<controller>_Resume,
USBH_<controller>_FrameNbrGet,
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
USBH_<controller>_EP_Open,
USBH_<controller>_EP_Close,
USBH_<controller>_EP_Abort,
USBH_<controller>_EP_IsHalt,
(8)
(9)
(10)
(11)
USBH_<controller>_URB_Submit,
USBH_<controller>_URB_Complete,
USBH_<controller>_URB_Abort,
(12)
(13)
(14)
};
Listing 5-1 HCD Interface API
73
Host Driver API
Note: It is the HCD developers’ responsibility to ensure that all of the functions listed within
the API are properly implemented and that the order of the functions within the API
structure is correct. The different function pointers are:
L5-1(1)
HC initialization/add
L5-1(2)
HC start
L5-1(3)
HC stop
L5-1(4)
Get maximum speed of HC
L5-1(5)
HC suspend
L5-1(6)
HC resume
L5-1(7)
Retrieve frame number
L5-1(8)
Open an endpoint
L5-1(9)
Close an endpoint
L5-1(10)
Abort endpoint and pending URB(s)
L5-1(11)
Retrieve endpoint halt status
L5-1(12)
Submit an URB
L5-1(13)
Complete/free an URB
L5-1(14)
Abort an URB
The details of each API function are described in section F-1 “Host Driver Functions” on
page 260.
74
Chapter 5
ROOT HUB API
All Host Controller Drivers (HCD) must declare an instance of the appropriate Root Hub
(RH) API structure as a global variable within the source code. The RH API structure is an
ordered list of function pointers utilized by μC/USB-Host when RH hardware services are
required.
A sample HCD RH API structure is shown below.
USBH_HC_RH_API USBH_<controller>_RH_API = {
USBH_<controller>_PortStatusGet,
USBH_<controller>_HubDescGet,
(1)
(2)
USBH_<controller>_PortEnSet,
(3)
USBH_<controller>_PortEnClr,
USBH_<controller>_PortEnChngClr,
(4)
(5)
USBH_<controller>_PortPwrSet,
USBH_<controller>_PortPwrClr,
(6)
(7)
USBH_<controller>_PortResetSet,
USBH_<controller>_PortResetChngClr,
(8)
(9)
USBH_<controller>_PortSuspendClr,
USBH_<controller>_PortConnChngClr,
(10)
(11)
USBH_<controller>_RHSC_IntEn,
USBH_<controller>_RHSC_IntDis,
(12)
(13)
};
Listing 5-2 RH Driver Interface API
The different function pointers are:
L5-2(1)
Get port status
L5-2(2)
Get hub descriptor
L5-2(3)
Set port enable
L5-2(4)
Clear port enable
L5-2(5)
Clear port enable change flag
L5-2(6)
Set power on port
75
Host Driver API
L5-2(7)
Clear power on port
L5-2(8)
Set reset state on port
L5-2(9)
Clear port reset change flag
L5-2(10)
Clear port suspend
L5-2(11)
Clear port connection change flag
L5-2(12)
Enable RH interrupts
L5-2(13)
Disable RH interrupts
The details of each RH API function are described in Appendix F, “Root Hub Driver
Functions” on page 278.
Note: μC/USB-Host HCD API function names may not be unique. Name clashes between
HCDs are avoided by never globally prototyping HCD functions and ensuring that all
references to functions within the driver are obtained by pointers within the API structure.
The developer may arbitrarily name the functions within the source file so long as the API
structure is properly declared. The user application should never need to call API functions.
Unless special care is taken, calling HCD functions may lead to unpredictable results due to
reentrancy.
When writing your own HCD, you can assume that each driver API function accepts a
pointer to a structure of the type USBH_HC_DRV as its first parameter. Through this structure,
you will be able to access the following fields:
typedef
struct
usbh_hc_drv
USBH_HC_DRV;
struct usbh_hc_drv {
CPU_INT08U
Nbr;
void
*DataPtr;
USBH_DEV
*RH_DevPtr;
USBH_HC_CFG
*HC_CfgPtr;
USBH_HC_DRV_API *API_Ptr;
USBH_HC_RH_API
*RH_API_Ptr;
USBH_HC_BSP_API *BSP_API_Ptr;
};
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
Listing 5-3 USB HC Driver Data Type
76
Chapter 5
L5-3(1)
Unique index to identify HC.
L5-3(2)
Pointer to HCD specific data.
L5-3(3)
Pointer to RH device structure.
L5-3(4)
Pointer to HCD configuration.
L5-3(5)
Pointer to HCD API structure.
L5-3(6)
Pointer to RH API structure.
L5-3(7)
Pointer to Board Support Package (BSP) API structure.
5-3 INTERRUPT HANDLING
Interrupt handling is accomplished using the following multi-level scheme.
1
Processor level kernel-aware interrupt handler
2
Host Controller Driver (HCD) interrupt handler
During initialization, the HCD registers all necessary interrupt sources with the Board Support
Package (BSP) interrupt management code. You can also accomplish this by plugging an
interrupt vector table during compile time. Once the global interrupt vector sources are
configured and an interrupt occurs, the system will call the first-level interrupt handler. The
first-level interrupt handler is responsible for performing all kernel required steps prior to
calling the USB HCD interrupt handler: USBH_<controller>_ISR_Handler(). Depending
on the platform architecture (that is the way the kernel handles interrupts) and the USB HC
interrupt vectors, the HCD interrupt handler implementation may follow one of the models
described in the next sections.
77
Interrupt Handling
5-3-1 SINGLE USB ISR VECTOR WITH ISR HANDLER
ARGUMENT
If the platform architecture allows parameters to be passed to ISR handlers and the USB HC
has a single interrupt vector for the USB host, the first-level interrupt handler may be
defined as:
PROTOTYPE
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_IntHandler (void *p_arg);
ARGUMENTS
p_arg
Pointer to USB HC driver structure that must be typecast to a pointer to
USBH_HC_DRV.
5-3-2 SINGLE USB ISR VECTOR
If the platform architecture does not allow parameters to be passed to ISR handlers and the
USB HC has a single interrupt vector for the USB host, the first-level interrupt handler may
be defined as:
PROTOTYPE
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_IntHandler (void);
ARGUMENTS
None.
NOTES / WARNINGS
In this configuration, the pointer to the USB HC driver structure must be stored globally in
the BSP. Since the pointer to the USB HC driver structure is never modified, the BSP
initialization function, USBH_<controller>_BSP_Init(), can save its address for later use.
78
Chapter 5
5-3-3 MULTIPLE USB ISR VECTORS WITH ISR HANDLER
ARGUMENTS
If the platform architecture allows parameters to be passed to ISR handlers and the USB HC
has multiple interrupt vectors for the USB host (e.g., USB events, DMA transfers, ...), the
first-level interrupt handler may need to be split into multiple sub-handlers. Each sub-handler
would be responsible for managing the status reported to the different vectors. For example,
the first-level interrupt handlers for a USB HC that redirects USB events to one interrupt vector
and the status of DMA transfers to a second interrupt vector may be defined as:
PROTOTYPE
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_EventIntHandler (void *p_arg);
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_DMA_IntHandler (void *p_arg);
ARGUMENTS
p_arg
Pointer to USB HC driver structure that must be typecast to a pointer to
USBH_HC_DRV.
5-3-4 MULTIPLE USB ISR VECTORS
If the platform architecture does not allow parameters to be passed to ISR handlers and the
USB HC has multiple interrupt vectors for the USB host (e.g., USB events, DMA transfers), the
first-level interrupt handler may need to be split into multiple sub-handlers. Each sub-handler
would be responsible for managing the status reported to the different vectors. For example,
the first-level interrupt handlers for a USB HC that redirects USB events to one interrupt vector
and the status of DMA transfers to a second interrupt vector may be defined as:
PROTOTYPE
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_EventIntHandler (void);
void USBH_<controller>_BSP_DMA_IntHandler (void);
ARGUMENTS
None.
79
Host Controller Driver Configuration
NOTES / WARNINGS
In this configuration, the pointer to the USB HC driver structure must be stored globally in
the BSP. Since the pointer to the USB HC driver structure is never modified, the BSP
initialization function, USBH_<controller>_BSP_Init(), can save its address for later use.
5-4 HOST CONTROLLER DRIVER CONFIGURATION
The USB Host Controller Driver (HCD) characteristics must be shared with the USB host
stack through configuration parameters. All of these parameters are provided through a
global structure of type USBH_HC_CFG. This structure is declared in the file usbh_hc_cfg.h,
and defined in the file usbh_hc_cfg.c (refer to section “Modify Host Controller
Configuration” on page 29 for an example on how to initialize this structure). These files are
distributed as templates, and you should modify them to have the proper configuration for
your USB Host Controller (HC). Refer to section 4-3 “Host Controller Driver Configuration”
on page 56 for further details on HCD configuration.
5-5 MEMORY ALLOCATION
Memory allocation in the driver can be simplified by the use of memory allocation functions
available from Micrium’s μC/LIB module. μC/LIB’s memory allocation functions provide
allocation of memory from dedicated memory space (e.g., USB RAM) or general purpose
heap. The driver may use the pool functionality offered by μC/LIB. Memory pools use
fixed-sized blocks that can be dynamically allocated and freed during application execution.
Memory pools may be convenient to manage objects needed by the driver. The objects
could be for instance data structures mandatory for DMA operations. For more information
on using μC/LIB memory allocation functions, consult the μC/LIB documentation.
80
Chapter 5
5-6 CPU AND BOARD SUPPORT
The USB host stack supports big-endian and little-endian CPU architectures.
In order for HCDs to be platform-independent, it is necessary to provide a layer of code that
abstracts details such as clocks, interrupt controllers, input/output (IO) pins, and other
hardware modules configuration. With this board support package (BSP) code layer, it is
possible for the majority of the USB host stack to be independent of any specific hardware,
and for device drivers to be reused on different architectures and bus configurations without
the need to modify stack or driver source code. These procedures are also referred as the
USB host BSP for a particular development board.
A sample host BSP interface API structure is shown in Listing 5-4.
USBH_HC_BSP_API USBH_<controller>_BSP_API
USBH_<controller>_BSP_Init,
USBH_<controller>_BSP_IntReg,
USBH_<controller>_BSP_IntUnReg
};
= {
(1)
(2)
(3)
Listing 5-4 Host Controller BSP Interface API
L5-4(1)
HC BSP initialization function pointer
L5-4(2)
HC BSP interrupt register function pointer
L5-4(3)
HC BSP interrupt un-register function pointer
The details of each HC BSP API function are described in section F-3 “Host Driver BSP
Functions” on page 292.
81
USB Host Controller Driver Functional Model
5-7 USB HOST CONTROLLER DRIVER FUNCTIONAL MODEL
This section describes the functional model of some typical operations in which the HCD
will be involved. These functional models include:
■
Root Hub interactions
■
Endpoint open
■
URB submit
5-7-1 ROOT HUB INTERACTIONS
Typically, a Root Hub (RH) will be addressed via a (set) of hardware registers. From the
point of view of the core module, the RH is not different from another external hub. It will
be managed by the Hub class through the use of Hub class-specific requests. It must then
provide informations on RH port(s) in the same format as would do an external hub using
the GetPortStatus request. This request returns two fields: wPortStatus and wPortChange.
Some Host Controller (HC) hardware will provide port(s) status in this format via their
hardware registers, but some will not. In case they don’t, the driver should declare the two
following variables for each of its RH port(s) within its internal data structure as shown in
Listing 5-5.
typedef struct usbh_<controller>_data {
...
CPU_INT16U RH_PortStatus[<port number>];
CPU_INT16U RH_PortChng[<port number>];
...
} USBH_<controller>_DATA;
Listing 5-5 Root Hub Port Status Variables
The variable RH_PortStatus[<port_number>] should be filled the same way as the
wPortStatus field of the GetPortStatus request. See Table 11-21 of the Universal Serial Bus
Specification, revision 2.0, at page 427 for more details.
82
Chapter 5
The variable RH_PortChng[<port_number>] should be filled the same way as the
wPortChange field of the GetPortStatus request. See Table 11-22 of the Universal Serial Bus
Specification, revision 2.0, at page 431 for more details.
These
fields
will
be
requested
by
the
core
using
the
USBH_<controller>_PortStatusGet() function. Depending on your Host Controller (HC)
hardware, some of the bits can be updated by reading hardware registers when this
function is invocated or when interrupts are triggered. When your hardware controller
generates an interrupt to inform about a device connect/disconnect, it is also important to
notify the core module after updating the RH_PortStatus and RH_PortChng variables (if
necessary). This is done by calling USBH_HUB_RH_Event(p_hc_drv->RH_DevPtr).
Listing 5-6 shows an example of how the core should be notified of a device
connect/disconnect from the ISR.
if (<device connected>) {
DEF_BIT_SET(p_data->RH_PortChng,
USBH_HUB_STATUS_PORT_CONN);
DEF_BIT_SET(p_data->RH_PortStatus, USBH_HUB_STATUS_PORT_CONN);
USBH_HUB_RH_Event(p_hc_drv->RH_DevPtr);
}
if (<device disconnected>) {
DEF_BIT_SET(p_data->RH_PortChng,
USBH_HUB_STATUS_PORT_CONN);
DEF_BIT_CLR(p_data->RH_PortStatus, USBH_HUB_STATUS_PORT_CONN);
USBH_HUB_RH_Event(p_hc_drv->RH_DevPtr);
}
Listing 5-6 Device Connect/Disconnect Core Notification
5-7-2 ENDPOINT OPENING
LIST-BASED HOST CONTROLLERS
List-based controllers (like OHCI or EHCI controllers) generally have two or more lists of
opened endpoints (async list, periodic list, ...). The lists represent data structures that are
located in a memory region that is shared between the HC and HCD. Depending on the
format of these lists and on the type of endpoint, opening an endpoint generally simply
consist in allocating, initializing and adding a new entry to the list for the endpoint.
Bandwidth usage should also be updated when a new periodic endpoint (interrupt and
isochronous) is added.
83
USB Host Controller Driver Functional Model
NON LIST-BASED HOST CONTROLLERS
Host Controllers (HC) that are not list-based generally have a limited list of pipes used as
endpoints. Moreover, the pipes may also have a defined type (control, bulk, interrupt or
isochronous). It is the responsibility of the USBH_<controller>_EP_Open() function to find
an available pipe of the requested type and mark it as used.
5-7-3 URB SUBMIT
A USB Request Block (URB) is a structure that represents a USB transfer and that contains
important information on that transfer. In μC/USB-Host, an URB is represented using the
USBH_URB structure. Some of the fields of this structure must be set/updated or read by the
driver. Listing 5-7 presents some important fields of the USBH_URB structure.
typedef
struct
usbh_urb
struct usbh_urb {
CPU_REG08
USBH_EP
USBH_ERR
USBH_URB;
State;
*EP_Ptr;
Err;
(1)
(2)
(3)
void
CPU_INT32U
void
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT32U
*UserBufPtr;
UserBufLen;
*DMA_BufPtr;
DMA_BufLen;
XferLen;
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
void
*ArgPtr;
(9)
Token;
(10)
USBH_TOKEN
...
};
Listing 5-7 USBH_URB Structure Important Fields
L5-7(1)
Contains the state of the URB. The driver should not set this field but might
need to read it. The available URB states are described in Table 5-1.
84
Chapter 5
Error code
Description
USBH_URB_STATE_NONE
The URB has been submitted to the core.
USBH_URB_STATE_SCHEDULED
The URB has been scheduled in the HC.
USBH_URB_STATE_QUEUED
The URB has completed.
USBH_URB_STATE_ABORTED
The URB has been aborted by the core or the application.
Table 5-1 URB States
L5-7(2)
Pointer to the endpoint structure to which this URB is attached. Should not be
modified by the driver.
L5-7(3)
Field that should be set by the driver to inform the core of any error during
transfer. Table 5-2 summarizes some error codes that a driver could assign to
this field.
Error code
Description
USBH_ERR_NONE
URB has completed successfully.
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
Input Output (IO) error occurred with the HC.
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Endpoint is in a stall condition.
USBH_ERR_EP_NACK
Device returned a NACK handshake and the HC has no hardware
assistance to re-submit the URB.
Table 5-2 URB Error Codes
L5-7(4)
Pointer to the data buffer that needs to be transferred/filled with received data.
Should not be modified by the driver.
L5-7(5)
Length, in octets, of the data buffer. Should not be modified by the driver.
L5-7(6)
On DMA-based controllers, pointer to the data buffer that will be
transferred/filled with received data by the DMA controller. Especially useful
when the buffer needs to be copied into a USB dedicated memory to be
read/written by the DMA controller.
85
USB Host Controller Driver Functional Model
L5-7(7)
Length, in octets, of the DMA buffer.
L5-7(8)
Contains the length, in octets, of the data transferred. This must be updated by
the driver.
L5-7(9)
Pointer available to set driver specific data related to this URB.
L5-7(10)
Indicate the token of the transfer. Especially useful with control transfers. This
field should not be modified by the driver. Can be one of the following:
■
USBH_TOKEN_SETUP
■
USBH_TOKEN_OUT
■
USBH_TOKEN_IN
LIST-BASED HOST CONTROLLERS WITHOUT DEDICATED MEMORY
On a list-based Host Controller (HC), submitting a new URB generally consists in allocating,
initializing and adding a transfer to the endpoint list. The DMA controller will access the
buffer data directly from the application buffer. Once the HC notifies of the transfer
completion via an interrupt, the driver must update the p_urb->XferLen field accordingly
and call USBH_URB_Done() within its ISR.
LIST-BASED HOST CONTROLLERS WITH DEDICATED MEMORY
Submitting an URB on a list-based controller using dedicated memory for data buffer is
similar to a controller that does not use dedicated memory. For OUT endpoints, the main
difference is that before inserting the transfer to the endpoint list, the driver must copy the
buffer content to the dedicated memory. The field p_urb->DMA_BufPtr should be used by
the driver to point to the buffer in dedicated memory. For IN endpoints, before submitting a
transfer, the driver must set the field p_urb->DMA_BufPtr to make it point to an empty
region of the dedicated memory that can hold up to p_urb->UserBufLen octets of data.
Once the transfer has completed and the function USBH_URB_Done() has been invoked, the
core module will call the function USBH_<controller>_URB_Complete(). The driver must
copy the data to the field p_urb->UserBufPtr at this moment.
86
Chapter 5
NON LIST-BASED HOST CONTROLLERS
Host Controllers (HC) that are not list-based generally use a FIFO for data transfers. FIFOs
generally have a limited depth and are likely to be unable to hold an entire transfer,
especially if it is a large transfer. Figure 5-1 summarizes the operations that must be done by
the driver in this case.
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Figure 5-1 URB Submit when HC is not List-Based
F5-1(1)
87
Driver must write data to FIFO until it is full or the buffer is empty.
USB Host Controller Driver Functional Model
F5-1(2)
The driver can now update the p_urb->XferLen field. It must then determine
if the transfer is completed. It can simply be determined by comparing the total
amount of data transferred with p_urb->UserBufLen.
F5-1(3)
Once the reception has completed, the driver must copy the data from the
FIFO to the buffer at p_urb->UserBufPtr.
F5-1(4)
Many conditions must be considered to evaluate if a reception is complete. The
following list describes the condition where the reception is considered
complete.
■
The last transaction had a length of zero.
■
The last transaction had a length that is less than the maximum packet size of the
endpoint.
■
The total amount of data received is equal to p_urb->UserBufLen.
88
Chapter 5
89
Chapter
6
Communication Device Class
This chapter describes the Communications Device Class (CDC) class and the associated
CDC subclass supported by μC/USB-Host. μC/USB-Host currently supports the Abstract
Control Model (ACM) subclass.
The CDC and the associated subclass implementation complies with the following
specifications:
■
Universal Serial Bus, Class Definitions for Communications Devices, revision 1.2,
November 3 2010.
■
Universal Serial Bus, Communications, Subclass for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2,
February 9, 2007.
CDC includes various telecommunication and networking devices. Telecommunication
devices encompass analog modems, analog and digital telephones, ISDN terminal adapters,
etc. Networking devices contain, for example, ADSL and cable modems, Ethernet adapters
and hubs. CDC defines a framework to encapsulate existing communication services
standards, such as V.250 (for modems over telephone network) and Ethernet (for local area
network devices), using a USB link. A communication device is in charge of device
management, call management when needed and data transmission. CDC defines seven
major groups of devices. Each group belongs to a model of communication which may
include several subclasses. Each group of devices has its own specification document
besides the CDC base class. The seven groups are:
■
Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN), devices including voiceband modems,
telephones and serial emulation devices.
■
Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) devices, including terminal adaptors and
telephones.
90
Communication Device Class
■
Ethernet Control Model (ECM) devices, including devices supporting the IEEE 802
family (for instance cable and ADSL modems, WiFi adaptors).
■
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) devices, including ADLS modems and other
devices connected to ATM networks (workstations, routers, LAN switches).
■
Wireless Mobile Communications (WMC) devices, including multi-function
communications handset devices used to manage voice and data communications.
■
Ethernet Emulation Model (EEM) devices which exchange Ethernet-framed data.
■
Network Control Model (NCM) devices, including high-speed network devices (High
Speed Packet Access modems, Line Terminal Equipment)
6-1 OVERVIEW
A CDC device is composed of several interfaces to implement a certain function. It is
formed by the following interfaces:
■
Communications Class Interface (CCI)
■
Data Class Interface (DCI)
A CCI is responsible for the device management and optionally the call management. The
device management enables the general configuration and control of the device and the
notification of events to the host. The call management enables the establishment and
termination of calls. Call management might be multiplexed through a DCI. A CCI is
mandatory for all CDC devices. It identifies the CDC function by specifying the
communication model supported by the CDC device. The interface(s) following the CCI can
be any defined USB class interface, such as Audio or a vendor-specific interface. The
vendor-specific interface is represented specifically by a DCI.
A DCI is responsible for data transmission. The data transmitted and/or received do not follow
a specific format. Data could be raw data from a communication line, data following a
proprietary format, etc. All the DCIs following the CCI can be seen as subordinate interfaces.
91
Communication Device Class
A CDC device must have at least one CCI and zero or more DCIs. One CCI and any
subordinate DCI together provide a feature to the host. This capability is also referred to as
a function. In a CDC composite device, you could have several functions. And thus, the
device would be composed of several sets of CCI and DCI(s) as shown in Figure 6-1.
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Figure 6-1 CDC Composite Device
A CDC device is likely to use the following combination of endpoints:
■
A pair of control IN and OUT endpoints called the default endpoint.
■
An optional bulk or interrupt IN endpoint.
■
A pair of bulk or isochronous IN and OUT endpoints.
Table 6-1 provides a list of all the different types of endpoints distinguished by their data
flow direction, interface and application.
Endpoint
Direction
Interface
Use for
Control IN
Device-to-host
CCI
Standard requests for enumeration, class-specific
requests, device management and optionally call
management.
Control OUT
Host-to-device
CCI
Standard requests for enumeration, class-specific
requests, device management and optionally call
management.
Interrupt or bulk IN
Device-to-host
CCI
Events notification, such as ring detect, serial line
status, network status.
Bulk or isochronous IN
Device-to-host
DCI
Raw or formatted data communication.
Bulk or isochronous OUT
Host-to-device
DCI
Raw or formatted data communication.
Table 6-1 CDC Endpoint Use
92
Communication Device Class
Most communication devices use an interrupt endpoint to notify the host of any events.
The seven major models of communication encompass several subclasses. A subclass
describes the way the device should use the CCI to handle the device management and call
management. Table 6-2 shows all the possible subclasses and the communication model
they belong to.
Subclass
Communication
model
Example of devices using this subclass
Direct Line Control Model
PSTN
Modem devices directly controlled by the USB host
Abstract Control Model
PSTN
Serial emulation devices, modem devices controlled through
a serial command set
Telephone Control Model
PSTN
Voice telephony devices
Multi-Channel Control Model
ISDN
Basic rate terminal adaptors, primary rate terminal adaptors,
telephones
CAPI Control Model
ISDN
Basic rate terminal adaptors, primary rate terminal adaptors,
telephones
Ethernet Networking Control
ECM
Model
ATM Networking Control
DOC-SIS cable modems, ADSL modems that support
PPPoE emulation, Wi-Fi adaptors (IEEE 802.11-family), IEEE
802.3 adaptors
ATM
ADSL modems
WMC
Mobile terminal equipment connecting to wireless devices
Device Management
WMC
Mobile terminal equipment connecting to wireless devices
Mobile Direct Line Model
WMC
Mobile terminal equipment connecting to wireless devices
OBEX
WMC
Mobile terminal equipment connecting to wireless devices
Ethernet Emulation Model
EEM
Devices using Ethernet frames as the next layer of transport.
Model
Wireless Handset Control
Model
Not intended for routing and Internet connectivity devices
Network Control Model
NCM
IEEE 802.3 adaptors carrying high-speed data bandwidth on
network
Table 6-2 CDC Subclasses
93
Communication Device Class
6-2 CLASS IMPLEMENTATION
μC/USB-Host Communication Device Class (CDC) is designed to allow subclasses to be
built on top of it. It offers an API to the subclasses that allows to communicate using Data
Class Interface (DCI) and Communication Class Interface (CCI). Figure 6-2 shows how CDC
base and subclass(es) interact.
+RVW
$SSOLFDWLRQ
&'&6XEFODVV
&'&%DVH&ODVV
—&86%+RVW&RUHDQG&RQWUROOHU'ULYHU
&'&GHYLFH
Figure 6-2 CDC Implementation
F6-2(1)
CDC base class offers an API to the subclasses that allows to communicate with
a CDC device via DCI and CCI.
F6-2(2)
Your application interacts with the subclass for the communication.
F6-2(3)
Upon device connection, your application must add a reference on the device
and release it on device disconnection.
F6-2(4)
At initialization, your application must register the CDC driver to the core.
94
Communication Device Class
6-3 CONFIGURATION AND INITIALIZATION
6-3-1 GENERAL CONFIGURATION
There is only one configuration constant necessary to customize the CDC host base class.
This constant is located in the usbh_cfg.h file. Table 6-3 shows a description of this
constant.
Constant
Description
USBH_CDC_CFG_MAX_DEV
Configures the maximum number of CDC functions the class can handle.
Table 6-3 CDC Configuration Constant
6-3-2 CLASS INITIALIZATION
In order to be integrated to the core and considered on a device connection, the CDC base
class driver must be added to the core class driver list. This is done by calling
USBH_ClassDrvReg() and is described in Listing 6-1.
USBH_ERR App_USBH_CDC_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
...
err = USBH_ClassDrvReg(
&USBH_CDC_ClassDrv,
App_USBH_CDC_ClassNotify,
(void *)0);
(1)
(2)
(3)
return(err);
}
Listing 6-1 CDC Initialization
L6-1(1)
First parameter is a CDC class driver structure. It is defined in usbh_cdc.h.
L6-1(2)
Second parameter is a pointer to the application’s callback function. This
function will be called upon CDC device connection/disconnection.
L6-1(3)
Last parameter is an optional pointer to application specific data.
95
Communication Device Class
6-3-3 DEVICE CONNECTION AND DISCONNECTION HANDLING
Upon connection/disconnection of a CDC device, your application will be notified via a
callback function. Listing describes the operations that must be performed at that moment.
static
void
App_USBH_CDC_ClassNotify (void
CPU_INT08U
void
*p_class_dev,
is_conn,
*p_ctx)
{
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
err;
*p_cdc_dev;
sub_class;
protocol;
(void)&p_ctx;
p_cdc_dev = (USBH_CDC_DEV *)p_class_dev;
switch (is_conn) {
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_CONN:
err = USBH_CDC_RefAdd(p_cdc_dev);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
(1)
err = USBH_CDC_SubclassGet(p_cdc_dev, &sub_class);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
(2)
err = USBH_CDC_ProtocolGet(p_cdc_dev, &protocol);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
(3)
/* $$$$ Subclass specific operations. */
break;
(4)
96
Communication Device Class
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_DISCONN:
/* $$$$ Subclass specific operations. */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
break;
(5)
(6)
default:
break;
}
}
Listing 6-2 CDC Device Connection/Disconnection
L6-2(1)
Add an application
USBH_CDC_RefAdd().
reference
to
this
CDC
device
by
calling
L6-2(2)
At this point, your application is not aware of what is the CDC subclass used by
the device. A call to this function will let you retrieve the subclass code.
L6-2(3)
Your application can optionally need to retrieve the protocol code of the CDC
device.
L6-2(4)
Subclass specific initialization must be performed here. Refer to your specific
subclass section of this chapter for more details.
L6-2(5)
Subclass specific de-initialization must be performed here. Refer to your
specific subclass section of this chapter for more details.
L6-2(6)
On a CDC device disconnection, your application must release its reference.
97
Communication Device Class
6-4 ABSTRACT CONTROL MODEL (ACM) SUBCLASS
The ACM subclass is used by two types of communication devices:
■
Devices supporting AT commands (for instance, voiceband modems).
■
Serial emulation devices which are also called Virtual COM port devices.
Micrium’s ACM subclass implementation complies with the following specification:
Universal Serial Bus, Communications, Subclass for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2, February 9,
2007.
6-4-1 CONFIGURATION AND INITIALIZATION
GENERAL CONFIGURATION
There is only one configuration constant necessary to customize the ACM subclass. This
constant is located in the usbh_cfg.h file. Table 6-3 shows a description of this constant.
Constant
USBH_CDC_ACM_CFG_MAX_DEV
Description
Configures the maximum number of CDC ACM functions the class can
handle. Should be <= USBH_CDC_CFG_MAX_DEV.
Table 6-4 CDC ACM Subclass Configuration Constant
SUBCLASS INITIALIZATION
The ACM subclass does not have to be registered to the core, but it must be initialized. This
is done by calling USBH_CDC_ACM_GlobalInit().
98
Communication Device Class
6-4-2 CONNECTION AND DISCONNECTION HANDLING
Upon connection/disconnection of a CDC ACM device, your application will be notified via
a callback function as described in Listing . A few ACM subclass specific steps must be
performed as well at that moment.
ACM subclass specific operations on device connection and disconnection are described in
Listing 6-3.
static
void
App_USBH_CDC_ClassNotify (USBH_CDC_DEV
CPU_INT08U
void
*p_class_dev,
is_conn,
*p_ctx)
{
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
err;
*p_cdc_acm_dev;
sub_class;
protocol;
(void)&p_ctx;
switch (is_conn) {
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_CONN:
/* $$$$ CDC base class specific operations. */
if (sub_class != USBH_CDC_CONTROL_SUBCLASS_CODE_ACM) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
if ((protocol != USBH_CDC_CONTROL_PROTOCOL_CODE_USB
) &&
(protocol != USBH_CDC_CONTROL_PROTOCOL_CODE_V_25_AT) &&
(protocol != USBH_CDC_CONTROL_PROTOCOL_CODE_VENDOR )) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
(1)
(2)
99
Communication Device Class
p_cdc_acm_dev = USBH_CDC_ACM_Add(p_cdc_dev,
(3)
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
USBH_CDC_ACM_EventRxNotifyReg(p_cdc_acm_dev,
App_USBH_CDC_ACM_SerEventNotify);
(4)
err = USBH_CDC_ACM_LineCodingSet(p_cdc_acm_dev,
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_19200,
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_2,
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_NONE,
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_8);
(5)
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_ACM_Remove(p_cdc_acm_dev);
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
err = USBH_CDC_ACM_LineStateSet(p_cdc_acm_dev,
USBH_CDC_ACM_DTR_SET,
USBH_CDC_ACM_RTS_SET);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
(void)USBH_CDC_ACM_Remove(p_cdc_acm_dev);
(void)USBH_CDC_RefRel(p_cdc_dev);
return;
}
break;
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_DISCONN:
USBH_CDC_ACM_Remove(p_cdc_acm_dev);
(6)
(7)
/* $$$$ CDC base class specific operations. */
break;
default:
break;
}
}
Listing 6-3 CDC ACM Device Connection/Disconnection
100
Communication Device Class
L6-3(1)
Ensure that the connected CDC device uses ACM subclass.
L6-3(2)
Make sure the protocol code used is supported by the subclass/application.
L6-3(3)
Instantiate an ACM device for the connected CDC device.
L6-3(4)
Registers an application callback function that will be called by the subclass on
reception of notification event from the device.
L6-3(5)
Set device’s line coding parameters.
L6-3(6)
Set device line state.
L6-3(7)
Free the instantiated ACM reference on device disconnection.
6-4-3 DEMO APPLICATION
A simple demo application is provided with the host Abstract Control Model (ACM)
subclass. This demo application can be used as a starting point to create your own
application. It is intended to be used with a CDC ACM USB modem that supports AT
commands. For more information on AT commands, visit the following web page:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/164660. Note that the demo application handles only one
CDC ACM device at a time and thus you should not attempt to connect more than one CDC
ACM device at a time.
Upon a CDC ACM device connection, the demo application will initiate a few AT commands
and wait for modem‘s response. Here is the list of the commands that will be issued:
■
ATQ0V1E0
■
ATI0
■
ATI1
■
ATI2
■
ATI3
■
ATI7
101
Communication Device Class
The response received from the device will then be displayed on the output terminal if
application tracing is enabled. Listing 6-4 shows an example of output given by the demo
application with an USRobotics Model 5637 modem.
========== AT CMD ==========
ATQ0V1E0
====== STATUS / DATA =======
ATQ0V1E0
OK
========== AT CMD ==========
ATI0
====== STATUS / DATA =======
5601
OK
========== AT CMD ==========
ATI1
====== STATUS / DATA =======
5588
OK
========== AT CMD ==========
ATI2
====== STATUS / DATA =======
OK
========== AT CMD ==========
ATI3
====== STATUS / DATA =======
U.S. Robotics 56K FAX USB V1.2.23
OK
========== AT CMD ==========
ATI7
====== STATUS / DATA =======
Configuration Profile...
Product Type
...
Canada USB
Listing 6-4 CDC ACM Demo Application Output Example
102
Communication Device Class
DEMO APPLICATION CONFIGURATION
Before running the CDC ACM demo application, you must configure it properly. The
configuration constants that must be set are located in the app_cfg.h file. Table 6-5 lists
the preprocessor constants that must be defined.
Preprocessor Constants
Description
Default Value
APP_CFG_USBH_EN
Enables μC/USB-Host in your application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_CDC_EN
Enables CDC ACM demo application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_CDC_MAIN_TASK_PRIO
CDC ACM application task priority.
21
APP_CFG_USBH_CDC_MAIN_TASK_STK_SIZE
CDC ACM application task stack size.
1000
Table 6-5 Demo Application Configuration Constants
103
Chapter
7
Future Technology Devices International Class
This chapter describes the Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) class supported
by μC/USB-Host. The FTDI implementation complies with the following specification:
■
API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115, 4/04/11, Version 1.1.1
USB-to-serial converters enable USB based systems to access and communicate with serial
devices featuring D-Sub. RS-232 devices are still found mainly in industrial machines or
scientific instruments but the USB standard has replaced the serial port in many
applications. To solve this problem, the FTDI chips offer USB migration by combining
USB-Serial (USB-RS232) and USB-FIFO silicon solutions. The FTDI class implements the
basic vendor requests in order to set the connection and transmit data using bulk endpoints.
μC/USB-Host’s FTDI class implementation supports the following chips:
■
FT8U232AM
■
FT232B/FT232R/FT232H
■
FT2232D/FT2232H
■
FT4232H
1.The reference document can be requested from Future Technology Devices International Ltd. after signing a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA).
104
Chapter 7
7-1 OVERVIEW
A FTDI device is composed of at least one interface. Each device interface is responsible for
data transmission through a specific port. A FTDI device may have up to four different serial
ports. Data transmission on a specific port is done through a pair of bulk IN/OUT
endpoints. The device will use a Vendor Specific (0xFF) class code but the Vendor ID and
the Product ID may be use instead to detect a FTDI device.
7-1-1 ENDPOINTS
A FTDI device is composed of the following endpoints:
■
A pair of control IN and OUT endpoints called default endpoint.
■
A pair of bulk IN and OUT endpoints by serial port (interface).
Table 7-1 indicates the different uses of the endpoints.
Endpoint
Direction
Used for
Control IN
Device to Host
Enumeration and FTDI class-specific requests
Control OUT
Host to Device
Enumeration and FTDI class-specific requests
Bulk IN
Device to Host
Receive serial status and data
Bulk OUT
Host to Device
Send data
Table 7-1 FTDI Endpoint Use
105
Overview
7-1-2 CLASS REQUESTS
There are numerous control requests used with FTDI chips. These requests and their
descriptions are detailed in Table 7-2.
Requests
Description
Reset
Reset the communication port.
ModemCtrl
Set the modem control register.
SetFlowCtrl
Set flow control options.
SetBaudRate
Set the baud rate.
SetData
Set the data characteristics of the port.
GetModemStat
Retrieve the current value of the modem status register.
SetEventChar
Set the event character.
SetErrorChar
Set the error character.
SetLatTimer
Set the latency timer value.
GetLatTimer
Get the latency timer value.
SetBitMode
Set a special bit mode or turn on a special function.
GetBitMode
Return the current values on the data bus pins.
EEPROM readE2
Read the external EEPROM (if fitted), or the internal EEPROM of the FT232R.
EEPROM writeE2
Write to the external EEPROM (if fitted), or the internal EEPROM of the FT232R.
EEPROM eraseE2
Erase the external EEPROM (if fitted).
Table 7-2 FTDI Class Requests
106
Chapter 7
7-1-3 SERIAL STATUS
The FTDI device generates a two-byte serial status every 16 milliseconds. Thus, the first two
bytes of the data received on the bulk IN endpoint are reserved for this status.
The serial status is defined as shown in Table 7-3.
Offset
Modem Status Description (byte 0)
Line Status Description (byte 1)
B0
Full-speed, 64 bytes max packet size
Reserved
B1
High-speed, 512 bytes max packet size
Overrun Error (OE)
B2
Reserved
Parity Error (PE)
B3
Reserved
Framing Error (FE)
B4
Clear to Send (CTS)
Break Interrupt (BI)
B5
Data Set Ready (DSR)
Transmitter Holding Register (THRE)
B6
Ring Indicator (RI)
Transmitter Empty (TEMT)
B7
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
Reserved
Table 7-3 FTDI Serial Status
7-2 CLASS IMPLEMENTATION
μC/USB-Host Future Technology Devices International (FTDI) class is designed to support
the basic vendor requests and multiple ports/interfaces FTDI Devices. This allows the user
to specify the port on which data should be transmitted.
The FTDI class also handles the serial status generated by the device. The data received
from the device will then be passed to the application in a raw format, letting the
application parse it and handle it as desired. The class can also parse the status to detect
line errors and notify the application.
107
Configuration and Initialization
7-3 CONFIGURATION AND INITIALIZATION
7-3-1 GENERAL CONFIGURATION
There are three configuration constants necessary to customize the FTDI host class. Those
constants are located in the usbh_cfg.h file. Table 7-4 shows a description of the
constants.
Constant
Description
USBH_FTDI_CFG_MAX_DEV
Configures the maximum number of FTDI functions the class can
handle.
USBH_FTDI_CFG_ID_VENDOR_CUSTOM
Some FTDI device can use a custom vendor ID that can be set here.
Default value is 0x0000.
USBH_FTDI_CFG_ID_PRODUCT_CUSTOM
Some FTDI device can use a custom product ID that can be set here.
Default value is 0x0000.
Table 7-4 FTDI Configuration Constants
7-3-2 CLASS INITIALIZATION
In order to be integrated to the core and considered on a device connection, the FTDI class
driver must be added to the core class driver list. This is done by calling
USBH_FTDI_Init(). This function also registers the connection and disconnection callbacks
to notify the application. This is described in Listing .
static USBH_FTDI_CALLBACKS
App_USBH_FTDI_Conn,
App_USBH_FTDI_Disconn
};
App_USBH_FTDI_Callbacks = {
void App_USBH_FTDI_Init (USBH_ERR
{
...
(1)
*p_err)
USBH_FTDI_Init(&APP_USBH_FTDI_Callbacks,
p_err);
(2)
}
108
Chapter 7
static
void
App_USBH_FTDI_Conn (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
ftdi_handle)
(3)
{
...
}
static void
{
...
}
App_USBH_FTDI_Disconn (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
ftdi_handle)
(4)
Listing 7-1 FTDI Class Initialization
L7-1(1)
Set the connection/disconnection callbacks.
L7-1(2)
Register the callbacks and the FTDI class driver.
L7-1(3)
Connection function callback.
L7-1(4)
Disconnection function callback.
7-4 DEMO APPLICATION
A simple demo application is provided with the host Future Technology Devices
International (FTDI) class. This demo application can be used as a starting point to create
your own application.
To properly setup the demo, you must connect the FTDI device to the board. Then, a serial
null-modem cable must be connected between the device and the computer. On the
computer, you may use HyperTerminal (or any similar serial COM port terminal emulator)
to monitor the connection and send data to the demo application.
The demo application creates two tasks at initialization. A task for transmitting data
periodically and one to receive data periodically. Upon connection of a FTDI device, the
demo application will set up the modem connection as shown in Listing 7-3. After, the
reception task will receive data periodically and display the status (if different from last status)
and the received data in the output terminal. Listing 7-2 shows an example of output given by
the demo application when two FTDI device are connected. The transmission task will send
“USB Host - FTDI Class Demo - Handle #x” periodically where x is the FTDI function index.
109
Demo Application
--------- SERIAL STATUS ---------Handle : 1
---------- MODEM STATUS ---------Full-speed
High-speed
Clear to Send
: 1
: 0
: 1
Data Set Ready
Ring Indicator
Receive Line Signal Detect
: 1
: 0
: 0
(1)
----------- LINE STATUS ---------Overrun Error
: 0
Parity Error
: 0
Framing Error
: 0
Break Interrupt
: 0
Transmitter Holding Register : 1
Transmitter Empty
: 1
------------------------------------------ SERIAL STATUS ---------Handle : 2
---------- MODEM STATUS ---------Full-speed
: 1
High-speed
: 0
Clear to Send
: 1
Data Set Ready
: 1
Ring Indicator
: 0
Receive Line Signal Detect
: 0
----------- LINE STATUS ---------Overrun Error
: 0
Parity Error
: 0
Framing Error
: 0
Break Interrupt
: 0
Transmitter Holding Register : 1
Transmitter Empty
: 1
---------------------------------Handle #1: Test: Receive data from device 1.
Handle #2: Test: Receive data from device 2.
(2)
Listing 7-2 FTDI Demo Application Output
L7-2(1)
Modem and line status. This is only displayed when the status changes.
L7-2(2)
Received data. Display the handle number followed by the data received from
the FTDI device.
110
Chapter 7
static void
{
USBH_ERR
App_USBH_FTDI_Conn (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
ftdi_handle)
(1)
err;
...
USBH_FTDI_Reset(ftdi_handle,
USBH_FTDI_RESET_CTRL_SIO,
&err);
(2)
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
APP_TRACE_INFO((“Error in USBH_FTDI_Reset(): %d\r\n”, err));
return;
}
(3)
USBH_FTDI_ModemCtrlSet(ftdi_handle,
(USBH_FTDI_CTRL_DTR_DISABLED | USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_RTS_DISABLED)
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
APP_TRACE_INFO((“Error in USBH_FTDI_ModemCtrlSet(): %d\r\n”, err));
return;
}
(4)
USBH_FTDI_BaudRateSet(ftdi_handle,
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_115200,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
APP_TRACE_INFO((“Error in USBH_FTDI_BaudRateSet(): %d\r\n”, err));
return;
}
(5)
USBH_DFTDI_DataSet(ftdi_handle,
8u,
USBH_FTDI_PARITY_NONE,
USBH_FTDI_STOP_BITS_1,
USBH_FTDI_DATA_BREAK_DISABLED,
&err);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
APP_TRACE_INFO((“Error in USBH_FTDI_DataSet(): %d\r\n”, err));
return;
}
(6)
}
Listing 7-3 FTDI Demo Application
L7-3(1)
This function is called upon device connection.
L7-3(2)
Reset the RX and the TX buffer of the FTDI device.
111
Demo Application Configuration
L7-3(3)
Display the error code on the terminal.
L7-3(4)
Disable both hardware handshaking.
L7-3(5)
Set the baud rate of the connection to 115 200 bits per second.
L7-3(6)
Set the data characteristics. Here we use eight bits of data, no parity, one stop
bit and no data break.
7-5 DEMO APPLICATION CONFIGURATION
Before running the FTDI demo application, you must configure it properly. The
configuration constants that must be set are located in the app_cfg.h file. Table 7-5 lists
the preprocessor constants that must be defined.
Preprocessor Constants
Description
Default Value
APP_CFG_USBH_EN
Enables μC/USB-Host in your application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_FTDI_EN
Enables FTDI demo application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_FTDI_RX_TASK_PRIO
Reception task priority.
10
APP_CFG_USBH_FTDI_TX_TASK_PRIO
Transmission task priority.
11
APP_CFG_USBH_FTDI_RXTX_TASK_STK_SIZE
Reception and transmission task stack size.
1024
Table 7-5 Demo Application Configuration Constants
112
Chapter 7
113
Chapter
8
Human Interface Device Class
This chapter describes the Human Interface Device (HID) class supported by μC/USB-Host.
The HID implementation complies with the following specifications:
■
Device Class Definition for Human Interface Devices (HID), 6/27/01, Version 1.11.
■
Universal Serial Bus HID Usage Tables, 10/28/2004, Version 1.12.
The HID class encompasses devices used by humans to control computer operations.
Keyboards, mice, pointing devices, game devices are some examples of typical HID devices.
The HID class can also be used in a composite device that contains some controls such as
knobs, switches, buttons and sliders. HID data can exchange data for any purpose using
only control and interrupt transfers. The HID class is one of the oldest and most popular
USB classes. This class also includes various types of output directed to the user information
(e.g. LEDs on a keyboard).
114
Human Interface Device Class
8-1 OVERVIEW
A HID device is composed of the following endpoints:
■
A pair of control IN and OUT endpoints called the default endpoint.
■
An interrupt IN endpoint.
■
An optional interrupt OUT endpoint.
Table 8-1 describes the use of the different endpoints:
Endpoint
Direction
Used for
Control IN
Device-to-host
Standard requests for enumeration, class-specific requests, and data
communication (Input, Feature reports sent to the host with GET_REPORT
request).
Control OUT
Host-to-device
Standard requests for enumeration, class-specific requests and data
communication (Output, Feature reports received from the host with
SET_REPORT request).
Interrupt IN
Device-to-host
Data communication (Input and Feature reports).
Interrupt OUT
Host-to-device
Data communication (Output and Feature reports).
Table 8-1 HID Class Endpoints Use
8-1-1 REPORT
A host and a HID device exchange data using reports. A report contains formatted data
giving information about controls and other physical entities of the HID device. A control is
manipulable by the user and operates an aspect of the device. For instance, a control can be
a button on a mouse or a keyboard, a switch, etc. Other entities inform the user about the
state of certain device’s features. For instance, LEDs on a keyboard notify the user about the
caps lock on, the numeric keypad active, etc.
115
Human Interface Device Class
The format and the use of a report data is understood by the host by analyzing the content
of a Report descriptor. Analyzing the content is done by a parser. The Report descriptor
describes the data provided by each control in a device. It is composed of items. An item is
a piece of information about the device and consists of a 1-byte prefix and variable-length
data. Refer to “Device Class Definition for Human Interface Devices (HID) Version 1.11”,
section 5.6 and 6.2.2 for more details about the item format.
There are three principal types of items:
■
Main item defines or groups certain types of data fields.
■
Global item describes data characteristics of a control.
■
Local item describes data characteristics of a control.
Each item type is defined by different functions. An item function can also be called a tag.
An item function can be seen as a sub-item that belongs to one of the three principal item
types. Table 8-2 gives a brief overview of the item’s functions in each item type. For a
complete description of the items in each category, refer to Device Class Definition for
Human Interface Devices (HID) Version 1.11, section 6.2.2.
Item type
Item function
Description
Main
Input
Describes information about the data provided by one or more physical
controls.
Output
Describes data sent to the device.
Feature
Describes device configuration information sent to or received from the
device which influences the overall behavior of the device or one of its
components.
Collection
Group related items (Input, Output or Feature).
End of Collection
Closes a collection.
116
Human Interface Device Class
Item type
Item function
Description
Global
Usage Page
Identifies a function available within the device.
Logical Minimum
Defines the lower limit of the reported values in logical units.
Logical Maximum
Defines the upper limit of the reported values in logical units.
Physical Minimum
Defines the lower limit of the reported values in physical units, that is the
Logical Minimum expressed in physical units.
Physical Maximum
Defines the upper limit of the reported values in physical units, that is the
Logical Maximum expressed in physical units.
Unit Exponent
Indicates the unit exponent in base 10. The exponent ranges from -8 to +7.
Unit
Indicates the unit of the reported values. For instance, length, mass,
temperature units, etc.
Local
Report Size
Indicates the size of the report fields in bits.
Report ID
Indicates the prefix added to a particular report.
Report Count
Indicates the number of data fields for an item.
Push
Places a copy of the global item state table on the CPU stack.
Pop
Replaces the item state table with the last structure from the stack.
Usage
Represents an index to designate a specific Usage within a Usage Page. It
indicates the vendor’s suggested use for a specific control or group of
controls. A usage supplies information to an application developer about
what a control is actually measuring.
Usage Minimum
Defines the starting usage associated with an array or bitmap.
Usage Maximum
Defines the ending usage associated with an array or bitmap.
Designator Index
Determines the body part used for a control. Index points to a designator in
the Physical descriptor.
Designator Minimum
Defines the index of the starting designator associated with an array or bitmap.
Designator Maximum
Defines the index of the ending designator associated with an array or bitmap.
String Index
String index for a String descriptor. It allows a string to be associated with a
particular item or control.
String Minimum
Specifies the first string index when assigning a group of sequential strings
to controls in an array or bitmap.
String Maximum
Specifies the last string index when assigning a group of sequential strings
to controls in an array or bitmap.
Delimiter
Defines the beginning or end of a set of local items.
Table 8-2 Item’s Function Description for each Item Type
117
Human Interface Device Class
A control’s data must define at least the following items:
■
Input, Output or Feature Main items.
■
Usage Local item.
■
Usage Page Global item.
■
Logical Minimum Global item.
■
Logical Maximum Global item.
■
Report Size Global item.
■
Report Count Global item.
Figure 8-1 shows the representation of a Mouse Report descriptor content from a host HID
parser perspective. The mouse has three buttons (left, right and wheel).
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Figure 8-1 Report Descriptor Content from a Host HID Parser View
118
Human Interface Device Class
F8-1(1)
The Usage Page item function specifies the general function of the device. In
this example, the HID device belongs to a generic desktop control.
F8-1(2)
The Collection Application groups Main items that have a common purpose
and may be familiar to applications. In the diagram, the group is composed of
three Input Main items. For this collection, the suggested use for the controls is
a mouse as indicated by the Usage item.
F8-1(3)
Nested collections may be used to give more details about the use of a single
control or group of controls to applications. In this example, the Collection
Physical, nested into the Collection Application, is composed of the same 3
Input items forming the Collection Application. The Collection Physical is used
for a set of data items that represent data points collected at one geometric
point. In the example, the suggested use is a pointer as indicated by the Usage
item. Here the pointer usage refers to the mouse position coordinates and the
system software will translate the mouse coordinates in movement of the
screen cursor.
F8-1(4)
Nested usage pages are also possible and give more details about a certain
aspect within the general function of the device. In this case, two Inputs items
are grouped and correspond to the buttons of the mouse. One Input item
defines the three buttons of the mouse (right, left and wheel) in terms of
number of data fields for the item (Report Count item), size of a data field
(Report Size item) and possible values for each data field (Usage Minimum and
Maximum, Logical Minimum and Maximum items). The other Input item is a
13-bit constant allowing the Input report data to be aligned on a byte
boundary. This Input item is used only for padding purposes.
F8-1(5)
Another nested usage page referring to a generic desktop control is defined for the
mouse position coordinates. For this usage page, the Input item describes the data
fields corresponding to the x- and y-axis as specified by the two Usage items.
119
Human Interface Device Class
After analyzing the previous mouse Report descriptor content, the host’s HID parser is able
to interpret the Input report data sent by the device with an interrupt IN transfer or in
response to a GET_REPORT request. The Input report data corresponding to the mouse
Report descriptor shown in Figure 8-1 is presented in Table 8-3. The total size of the report
data is 4 bytes. Different types of reports may be sent over the same endpoint. For the
purpose of distinguishing the different types of reports, a 1-byte report ID prefix is added to
the data report. If a report ID was used in the example of the mouse report, the total size of
the report data would be 5 bytes.
Bit offset
Bit count
Description
0
1
Button 1 (left button).
1
1
Button 2 (right button).
2
1
Button 3 (wheel button).
3
13
Not used.
16
8
Position on axis X.
24
8
Position on axis Y.
Table 8-3 Input Report Sent to Host and Corresponding to the State of a 3-Buttons Mouse.
A Physical descriptor indicates the part or parts of the body intended to activate a control or
controls. An application may use this information to assign a functionality to the control of a
device. A Physical descriptor is an optional class-specific descriptor and most devices have
little gain for using it. Refer to “Device Class Definition for Human Interface Devices (HID)
Version 1.11” section 6.2.3 for more details about this descriptor.
8-2 CLASS IMPLEMENTATION
μC/USB-Host Human Interface Device (HID) class is designed to support multiple
interfaces/report IDs HID devices. It offers a report descriptor parser that will be able to
determine the usage and the number of report IDs and types of the device. This allows the
application to listen on specific input report IDs and send feature/output reports. The
reports received from the device will be passed to your application in a raw format, letting
the application parse it and handle any specific element(s).
120
Human Interface Device Class
8-3 CONFIGURATION AND INITIALIZATION
8-3-1 GENERAL CONFIGURATION
There are many configuration constants necessary to customize the HID host class. These
constants are located in the usbh_cfg.h file. Table 8-2 shows their description.
Constant
Description
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_DEV
Maximum number of HID functions the class can handle.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_NBR_APP_COLL
Maximum number of application collections per HID function.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_NBR_REPORT_ID
Maximum number of report IDs per HID function.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_NBR_REPORT_FMT
Maximum number of report formats per application collection.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_NBR_USAGE
Maximum number of usages per report format.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_TX_BUF_SIZE
Length in octets of transmission buffer (used with output and feature
reports).
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_RX_BUF_SIZE
Length in octets of reception buffer (must be at least equal to the
length of the longest input report).
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_NBR_RXCB
Maximum number of application callback functions associated to
input report per HID function.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_REPORT_DESC_LEN
Maximum length in octets of the report descriptor.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_ERR_CNT
Maximum number of communication errors that can occur before
the communication is stopped.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_GLOBAL
Maximum number of push/pop items.
USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_COLL
Maximum number of collections.
Figure 8-2 HID Configuration Constants
121
Human Interface Device Class
8-3-2 CLASS INITIALIZATION
In order to be integrated to the core and considered on a device connection, the HID class
driver must be added to the core class driver list. This is done by calling
USBH_ClassDrvReg() and is described in Listing 8-1.
USBH_ERR App_USBH_HID_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
...
err = USBH_ClassDrvReg(
&USBH_HID_ClassDrv,
App_USBH_HID_ClassNotify,
(void *)0);
(1)
(2)
(3)
return(err);
}
Listing 8-1 HID Initialization
L8-1(1)
First parameter is the HID class driver structure. It is defined in usbh_hid.h.
L8-1(2)
Second parameter is a pointer to the application’s callback function. This
function will be called upon HID device connection/disconnection.
L8-1(3)
Last parameter is an optional pointer to application specific data.
122
Human Interface Device Class
8-3-3 DEVICE CONNECTION AND DISCONNECTION HANDLING
Upon connection/disconnection of a HID device, your application will be notified via a
callback function. Listing describes the operations that must be performed at that moment.
static
void
App_USBH_HID_ClassNotify (void
CPU_INT08U
void
*p_class_dev,
is_conn,
*p_ctx)
{
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HID_REPORT_ID
USBH_HID_REPORT_ID
USBH_HID_DEV
USBH_ERR
nbr_report_id;
report_id_cnt;
*p_report_id_array;
*p_report_id;
*p_hid_dev;
err;
(void)&p_ctx;
p_hid_dev = (USBH_HID_DEV *)p_class_dev;
switch (is_conn) {
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_CONN:
err = USBH_HID_RefAdd(p_hid_dev);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
(1)
err = USBH_HID_IdleSet(p_hid_dev, 0u, 0u);
if (err == USBH_ERR_EP_STALL) {
/* $$$$ Handle error. */
} else if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error. */
return;
}
(2)
err = USBH_HID_Init(p_hid_dev);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
(4)
(3)
123
Human Interface Device Class
err = USBH_HID_GetReportIDArray(p_hid_dev,
&p_report_id_array,
(5)
&nbr_report_id);
if (err != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
for (report_id_cnt = 0u; report_id_cnt < nbr_report_id; report_id_cnt++) {
p_report_id = &p_report_id_array[report_id_cnt];
if (p_report_id->Type != 0x08u) {
continue;
}
if (p_hid_dev->Usage == USBH_HID_APP_USAGE_KBD) {
err = USBH_HID_RegRxCB(
p_hid_dev,
p_report_id->ReportID,
(USBH_HID_RXCB_FNCT)App_USBH_KBD_CallBack,
(void
*)p_hid_dev);
} else if (p_hid_dev->Usage == USBH_HID_APP_USAGE_MOUSE) {
err = USBH_HID_RegRxCB(
p_hid_dev,
p_report_id->ReportID,
(USBH_HID_RXCB_FNCT)App_USBH_MouseCallBack,
(void
*)p_hid_dev);
}
(6)
(7)
}
break;
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_DISCONN:
USBH_HID_RefRel(p_hid_dev);
break;
(8)
}
}
Listing 8-2 HID Device Connection/Disconnection
L8-2(1)
First step is to add an application reference to this HID device by calling the
function USBH_HID_RefAdd().
L8-2(2)
You should then immediately call the function USBH_HID_IdleSet(). This will
set the idle time of the HID device. Some devices may fail to respond correctly
if the SetIdle request is not issued at that moment. For more information of the
SetIdle request, see Device Class Definition for Human Interface Devices (HID),
Version 1.11, section 7.2.4.
124
Human Interface Device Class
L8-2(3)
Some HID devices do not support the SetIdle request and thus will reply with a
STALL handshake. This is normal and the function should not return in this
case.
L8-2(4)
The function USBH_HID_Init() should then be called. At this moment, the
report descriptor will be requested and parsed.
L8-2(5)
In order to listen to incoming input reports sent by the device, your application
needs to set callback function(s). In order to retrieve the reports list, the
function USBH_HID_GetReportIDArray() should be called.
L8-2(6)
Skip report IDs that are not of INPUT type.
L8-2(7)
You can set different application callback functions for each report ID
depending on the device usage. The usage defined in p_hid_dev->Usage is
the first usage local item of the report descriptor. Your application callback
function can be set by calling the function USBH_HID_RegRxCB(). Note that this
callback function will receive the rough report and will have to parse it
manually.
L8-2(8)
Release the application‘s reference to the HID device.
8-4 DEMO APPLICATION
A simple demo application is provided with the host Human Interface Device (HID) class.
This demo application can be used as a starting point to create your own application. This
demo application expect a certain report format and is compatible with the majority of the
mice and keyboards using US layout available on the market. However, there might be mice
or keyboards that use slightly different reports and thus you will have to parse the report
differently. Also note that you will have to write your own report parser for other device
types like gamepads.
Depending on the device type (mouse or keyboard), the demo application will output
status on the default output console. If a mouse is connected, the output will look like
Listing 8-3. If the device is a keyboard, the console will display the key pressed.
125
Human Interface Device Class
Pointer at (x, y) = (-202, 308)
Pointer at (x, y) = (-221,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-225,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-228,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-230,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-231,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-232,
Left
button pressed
Left
button released
Pointer at (x, y) = (-243,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-247,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-253,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-256,
Right button pressed
Pointer at (x, y) = (-258,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-260,
Pointer at (x, y) = (-261,
Right button released
307)
306)
305)
304)
303)
302)
296)
295)
294)
293)
292)
291)
290)
Listing 8-3 Demo Application Output when a Mouse is Connected
8-4-1 DEMO APPLICATION CONFIGURATION
Before running the HID demo application, you must configure it properly. The
configuration constants that must be set are located in the app_cfg.h file. Table 8-4 lists
the preprocessor constants that must be defined.
Preprocessor Constants
Description
Default Value
APP_CFG_USBH_EN
Enables μC/USB-Host in your application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_HID_EN
Enables HID demo application.
DEF_ENABLED
Table 8-4 Demo Application Configuration Constants
126
Chapter
9
Mass Storage Class
This section describes the Mass Storage Class (MSC) supported by μC/USB-Host. The MSC
implementation offered by μC/USB-Host is in compliance with the following specifications:
■
Universal Serial Bus Mass Storage Class Specification Overview, Revision 1.3 Sept. 5, 2008.
■
Universal Serial Bus Mass Storage Class Bulk-Only Transport, Revision 1.0 Sept. 31, 1999.
MSC is a protocol that enables the transfer of information between a USB device and a host.
The information is anything that can be stored electronically: executable programs, source
code, documents, images, configuration data, or other text or numeric data. The USB device
appears as an external storage medium to the host.
A file system defines how the files are organized in the storage media. The USB mass
storage class specification does not require any particular file system to be used on
conforming devices. Instead, it provides a simple interface to read and write sectors of data
using the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) transparent command set.
The USB mass storage host class supports two transport protocols:
■
Bulk-Only Transport (BOT)
■
Control/Bulk/Interrupt (CBI) Transport.
The mass storage device class supported by μC/USB-Host implements the SCSI transparent
command set using the BOT protocol only, which signifies that only bulk endpoints will be
used to transmit data and status information. The MSC implementation supports only one
logical unit.
127
Chapter 9
9-1 OVERVIEW
9-1-1 MASS STORAGE CLASS PROTOCOL
The MSC protocol is composed of three phases:
■
The Command Transport
■
The Data Transport
■
The Status Transport
Mass storage commands are sent by the host through a structure called the Command Block
Wrapper (CBW). For commands requiring a data transport stage, the host will attempt to
send or receive the exact number of bytes from the device as specified by the length and
flag fields of the CBW. After the data transport stage, the host attempts to receive a
Command Status Wrapper (CSW) from the device detailing the status of the command as
well as any data residue (if any). For commands that do not include a data transport stage,
the host attempts to receive the CSW directly after CBW is sent. The protocol is detailed in
Figure 9-1.
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Figure 9-1 MSC Protocol
128
Overview
9-1-2 ENDPOINTS
On the host side, in compliance with the BOT specification, a MSC device is composed of
the following endpoints:
■
A pair of control IN and OUT endpoints called default endpoint.
■
A pair of bulk IN and OUT endpoints.
Table 9-1 indicates the different uses of the endpoints.
Endpoint
Direction
Used for
Control IN
Control OUT
Device to Host
Host to Device
Enumeration and MSC class-specific requests
Bulk IN
Bulk OUT
Device to Host
Host to Device
Receive CSW and data
Send CBW and data
Table 9-1 MSC Endpoint Use
9-1-3 MASS STORAGE CLASS REQUESTS
There are two defined control requests for the MSC BOT protocol. These requests and their
descriptions are detailed in Table 9-2.
Class Requests
Description
Bulk-Only Mass Storage Reset
This request is used to reset the mass storage device and its associated
interface. This request readies the device to receive the next command block.
Get Max LUN
This request is used to return the highest logical unit number (LUN) supported
by the device. For example, a device with LUN 0 and LUN 1 will return a value
of 1. A device with a single logical unit will return 0 or stall the request. The
maximum value that can be returned is 15.
Table 9-2 Mass Storage Class Requests
129
Chapter 9
9-1-4 SMALL COMPUTER SYSTEM INTERFACE (SCSI)
SCSI is a set of standards for handling communication between computers and peripheral
devices. These standards include commands, protocols, electrical interfaces and optical
interfaces. Storage devices that use other hardware interfaces such as USB, use SCSI
commands for obtaining device/host information and controlling the device’s operation and
transferring blocks of data in the storage media.
SCSI commands cover a vast range of device types and functions and as such, devices need
a subset of these commands. In general, the following commands are necessary for basic
communication:
■
INQUIRY
■
READ CAPACITY(10)
■
READ(10)
■
REQUEST SENSE
■
TEST UNIT READY
■
WRITE(10)
9-2 CLASS IMPLEMENTATION
μC/USB-Host Mass Storage Class (MSC) requires a File System (FS) to work properly.
Micrium’s μC/FS supports μC/USB-Host MSC and is the recommended FS. Figure 9-2
describes how your application interacts with MSC, the core module, and μC/FS.
130
Class Implementation
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Figure 9-2 MSC Interactions
F9-2(1)
μC/FS sees the USB MSC class as a storage device driver.
F9-2(2)
All the operations on files and folders from your application are done via
μC/FS. Your application cannot access a MSC device using μC/USB-Host MSC
without the use of a file system. For more information on how to perform file
and folder operations, refer to the μC/FS user manual.
F9-2(3)
Upon device connection, your application must add a reference on the device
and release it on device disconnection.
F9-2(4)
At initialization, your application must register the MSC driver to the core.
131
Chapter 9
9-3 CONFIGURATION AND INITIALIZATION
9-3-1 GENERAL CONFIGURATION
There is only one configuration constant necessary to customize the MSC host class. This
constant is located in the usbh_cfg.h file. Table 9-3 shows a description of this constant.
Constant
Description
USBH_MSC_CFG_MAX_DEV
Configures the maximum number of MSC functions the class can
handle.
Figure 9-3 MSC Configuration Constant
9-3-2 CLASS INITIALIZATION
In order to be integrated to the core and considered on a device connection, the MSC class
driver must be added to the core class driver list. This is done by calling
USBH_ClassDrvReg() and is described in Listing 9-1.
USBH_ERR App_USBH_MSC_Init (void)
{
USBH_ERR
err;
...
err = USBH_ClassDrvReg(
&USBH_MSC_ClassDrv,
App_USBH_MSC_ClassNotify,
(void *)0);
(1)
(2)
(3)
return (err);
}
Listing 9-1 MSC Initialization
L9-1(1)
First parameter is MSC class driver structure. It is defined in usbh_msc.h.
L9-1(2)
Second parameter is a pointer to the application’s callback function. This
function will be called upon MSC device connection/disconnection.
L9-1(3)
Last parameter is an optional pointer to application specific data.
132
Configuration and Initialization
9-3-3 DEVICE CONNECTION AND DISCONNECTION HANDLING
Upon connection/disconnection of a MSC device, your application will be notified via a
callback function. Listing 9-2 describes the operations that must be performed at that
moment.
static
void
App_USBH_MSC_ClassNotify (void
CPU_INT08U
void
*p_class_dev,
is_conn,
*p_ctx)
{
USBH_MSC_DEV
USBH_ERR
FS_ERR
CPU_INT32U
*p_msc_dev;
err_usbh;
err_fs;
unit_nbr;
(void)&p_ctx;
p_msc_dev = (USBH_MSC_DEV *)p_class_dev;
switch (is_conn) {
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_CONN:
err_usbh = USBH_MSC_RefAdd(p_msc_dev);
if (err_usbh != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
(1)
unit_nbr = FSDev_MSC_DevOpen(p_msc_dev, &err_fs);
if (err_fs != FS_ERR_NONE) {
FSDev_MSC_DevClose(p_msc_dev);
USBH_MSC_RefRel(p_msc_dev);
/* $$$$ Handle error */
return;
}
break;
(2)
case USBH_CLASS_DEV_STATE_DISCONN:
FSDev_MSC_DevClose(p_msc_dev);
USBH_MSC_RefRel(p_msc_dev);
break;
(3)
default:
break;
}
}
Listing 9-2 MSC Device Connection/Disconnection
133
Chapter 9
L9-2(1)
On a MSC device connection, the first step is to add an application reference to
this MSC device by calling the function USBH_MSC_RefAdd().
L9-2(2)
Second step consists of allocating/opening a MSC device in the File System
(FS). This is done by calling FSDev_MSC_DevOpen(). If this call is successful,
you will now be able to communicate with the device using μC/FS. The
connected MSC device will have the following mounting point:
msc:<unit_nbr>://.
L9-2(3)
On MSC device disconnection, your application must de-allocate/close the MSC
device in the FS and release its reference.
9-4 DEMO APPLICATION
A simple demo application is provided with the host Mass Storage Class (MSC). This demo
application can be used as a starting point to create your own application.
Upon connection of a MSC device, the demo application will open a file, perform a
write/read operation, and close the file. Listing 9-3 describes the file operations that are
performed by the demo application.
134
Demo Application
#define
#define
USBH_MSC_DEMO_FS_EXAMPLE_FILE
APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE
static
CPU_INT08U
static
void
"msc:x:\\MSPrint.txt"
49u
App_USBH_MSC_BufTx[] = "This is USB Mass Storage Demo sample output file.";
App_USBH_MSC_FileTask (void
*p_ctx)
{
...
(void)&p_ctx;
(void)Str_Copy(&name[0u], APP_USBH_MSC_FS_EXAMPLE_FILE);
while (DEF_TRUE) {
unit_nbr = (CPU_INT32U)USBH_OS_MsgQueueGet(App_USBH_MSC_DevQ,
0u,
(1)
&err_usbh);
if (err_usbh != USBH_ERR_NONE) {
continue;
}
name[4u] = ASCII_CHAR_DIGIT_ZERO + (CPU_CHAR)unit_nbr;
p_file = FSFile_Open(name,
(FS_FILE_ACCESS_MODE_CREATE |
FS_FILE_ACCESS_MODE_WR
|
FS_FILE_ACCESS_MODE_RD),
&err_fs);
if (err_fs != FS_ERR_NONE) {
continue;
}
(2)
len_wr = FSFile_Wr(
p_file,
(void *)&App_USBH_MSC_BufTx[0u],
APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE,
&err_fs);
if ((err_fs != FS_ERR_NONE
) ||
(len_wr != APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE)) {
FSFile_Close(p_file, &err_fs);
continue;
}
(3)
FSFile_PosSet(p_file,
0u,
FS_FILE_ORIGIN_START,
&err_fs);
if (err_fs != FS_ERR_NONE) {
FSFile_Close(p_file, &err_fs);
continue;
}
135
Chapter 9
len_rd = FSFile_Rd(
p_file,
(void *)&App_USBH_MSC_BufRx[0u],
APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE,
(4)
&err_fs);
if ((err_fs != FS_ERR_NONE
) ||
(len_rd != APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE)) {
FSFile_Close(p_file, &err_fs);
continue;
}
APP_TRACE_INFO(("Comparing original data and data read from USB drive... "));
cmp = Mem_Cmp((void *)&App_USBH_MSC_BufTx[0u],
(5)
(void *)&App_USBH_MSC_BufRx[0u],
APP_USBH_MSC_FS_BUF_SIZE);
if (cmp == DEF_YES) {
APP_TRACE_INFO(("Passed\n\r"));
} else {
APP_TRACE_INFO(("Failed!\n\r"));
}
FSFile_Close(p_file, &err_fs);
}
}
Listing 9-3 MSC Demo Application
L9-3(1)
The application’s file task pends on a queue. Once a device is connected, the
queue is posted from the application class notification callback with the unit
number of the connected MSC device.
L9-3(2)
The file named MSPrint.txt is opened in the root folder of the MSC device. If
the file is not present, it will be created.
L9-3(3)
The string This is the USB Mass Storage Demo sample output file. is written to
the MSPrint.txt file.
L9-3(4)
The content of the file is read back.
L9-3(5)
The written and read content of the file are compared. If they match, the demo
application indicates a success.
136
Demo Application
9-4-1 DEMO APPLICATION CONFIGURATION
Before running the MSC demo application, you must configure it properly. The
configuration constants that must be set are located in the app_cfg.h file. Table 9-3 lists
the preprocessor constants that must be defined.
Preprocessor Constants
Description
Default Value
APP_CFG_USBH_EN
Enables μC/USB-Host in your application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_MSC_EN
Enables MSC demo application.
DEF_ENABLED
APP_CFG_USBH_MSC_FILE_TASK_PRIO
MSC application task priority.
20
APP_CFG_USBH_MSC_FILE_TASK_STK_SIZE
MSC application task stack size.
1000
Table 9-3 Demo Application Configuration Constants
In order to use the demo application, you must properly configure μC/FS. Refer to the
μC/FS user manual for more information on how to configure, initialize and use this
product.
137
Chapter 9
138
Chapter
10
Porting μC/USB-Host to your Kernel
μC/USB-Host requires a Kernel (also known as a Real-Time Operating System, RTOS). In
order to make it usable with nearly any kernels available on the market, it has been
designed to be easily portable. Micrium provides a port for both μC/OS-II and μC/OS-III
and recommends using one of these kernels. In case you need to use another kernel, this
chapter will explain you how to port μC/USB-Host to your kernel.
10-1 OVERVIEW
In order to be portable to other kernels, μC/USB-Host uses an abstraction layer to
instantiate and use kernel services. Figure 10-1 shows how the different modules of
μC/USB-Host interacts with the kernel via the abstraction layer.
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Figure 10-1 μC/USB-Host Interactions with the Kernel
139
Chapter 10
Each USB class implementation and the core layer interacts with the kernel abstraction layer.
The kernel abstraction layer is shared by all the modules. It offers a unified API to the stack
to access common kernel services such as task creation and semaphore creation/pend/post,
etc. Your application should not use the abstraction layer. It should interact directly with the
kernel. However, for maintenance simplicity, the demo applications provided by Micrium
uses the kernel abstraction layer.
μC/USB-Host requires a kernel that minimally offers the following services:
■
Task creation
■
Semaphores
■
Mutex
Plus, the Mass Storage Class (MSC) demo application provided by Micrium requires message
queuing.
10-2 PORTING THE STACK TO YOUR KERNEL
A template kernel abstraction layer file is provided with μC/USB-Host. It is located in the
following folder:
\Micrium\Software\uC-USB-Host-V3\OS\Template
10-2-1 TASK CREATION
μC/USB-Host requires a few tasks to work properly:
■
One for the async task
■
One for the hub task
■
One for the Communication Device Class (CDC) demo application (optional)
■
One for the Mass Storage Class (MSC) demo application (optional)
To instantiate these tasks, μC/USB-Host will call the USBH_OS_TaskCreate() function
twice. This function must be implemented in your kernel abstraction layer.
140
Porting the Stack to your Kernel
For further details on how to implement this function, refer to Appendix A, “Kernel
Abstraction Functions” on page 160.
10-2-2 SEMAPHORE
μC/USB-Host requires several semaphores to work properly:
■
One for the async task
■
One for the hub task
■
One per endpoint
■
One for the CDC demo application (optional)
Listing 10-1 shows how the number of semaphores required should be computed in your
kernel abstraction layer (if necessary).
#define
USBH_OS_SEM_REQUIRED
(3u + (((USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS * USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS) + 1u) *
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS))
\
Listing 10-1 Semaphore Number Computation
Table 10-1 summarizes the semaphores related functions that must be implemented in your
kernel abstraction layer.
Function
Description
USBH_OS_SemCreate()
Creates/instantiates a semaphore.
USBH_OS_SemDestroy()
Destroys a semaphore.
USBH_OS_SemWait()
Waits/pends on a semaphore.
USBH_OS_SemWaitAbort()
Aborts pend on a semaphore.
USBH_OS_SemPost()
Posts a semaphore.
Table 10-1 Semaphore API
For further details on how to implement these functions, refer to Appendix A, “Kernel
Abstraction Functions” on page 160.
141
Chapter 10
10-2-3 MUTEX
μC/USB-Host requires several mutexes (mutual exclusion) to work properly:
■
One per Host Controller Driver (HCD)
■
One per device
■
One per USB function
■
One per endpoint
Listing 10-2 shows how the number of mutex required should be computed in your kernel
abstraction layer (if necessary).
#define
USBH_OS_MUTEX_REQUIRED
((((USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS * USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS) + 1u) * \
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS) +
\
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS + USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC +
\
USBH_CDC_CFG_MAX_DEV + USBH_HID_CFG_MAX_DEV +
\
USBH_MSC_CFG_MAX_DEV)
Listing 10-2 Mutex Number Computation
Table 10-2 summarizes the mutex related functions that must be implemented in your
kernel abstraction layer.
Function
Description
USBH_OS_MutexCreate()
Creates/instantiates a mutex.
USBH_OS_MutexLock()
Locks a mutex.
USBH_OS_MutexUnlock()
Unlocks a mutex.
USBH_OS_MutexDestroy()
Destroys a mutex.
Table 10-2 Mutex API
For further details on how to implement these functions, refer to Appendix A, “Kernel
Abstraction Functions” on page 160.
142
Porting the Stack to your Kernel
10-2-4 MESSAGE QUEUE
μC/USB-Host’s MSC demo application requires a message queue to work properly.
Table 10-3 summarizes the message queue related functions that must be implemented in
your kernel abstraction layer. If the MSC demo application is not used within your project,
you can leave these functions empty.
Function
Description
USBH_OS_MsgQueueCreate()
Creates/instantiates a message queue.
USBH_OS_MsgQueuePut()
Posts a message to the queue.
USBH_OS_MsgQueueGet()
Pends on the queue and returns the first element.
Table 10-3 Message Queues API
For further details on how to implement these functions, refer to Appendix A, “Kernel
Abstraction Functions” on page 160.
143
Chapter 10
144
Appendix
A
Core API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the μC/USB-Host core layer API. The following
information is provided for each of the services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
145
Appendix A
A-1 HOST FUNCTIONS
A-1-1 USBH_Init()
Allocates and initializes resources required by the USB Host stack.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR USBH_Init (USBH_KERNEL_TASK_INFO
USBH_KERNEL_TASK_INFO
*async_task_info,
*hub_task_info);
ARGUMENTS
async_task_info
Structure that contains information on asynchronous task.
hub_task_info
Structure that contains information on hub task.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
USBH_ERR_OS_TASK_CREATE
CALLERS
Application.
146
NOTES / WARNINGS
USBH_Init() must be called:
■
Only once from a product’s application.
■
After product’s OS has been initialized.
147
Appendix A
A-1-2 USBH_VersionGet()
Get the μC/USB-Host software version.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_VersionGet (void)
ARGUMENTS
None.
RETURNED VALUE
μC/USB-Host version.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The value returned is multiplied by 10000. For example, version 3.40.02, would be returned
as 34002.
148
A-1-3 USBH_Suspend()
Suspends the USB Host stack by calling suspend for every class driver loaded followed by a
call to the suspend function of each host controller.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_Suspend (void)
ARGUMENTS
None.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
Host Controller Driver error code.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This call will move all the connected devices to the suspend state as well.
149
Appendix A
A-1-4 USBH_Resume()
Resumes the USB Host stack by calling every host controller resume function and then
calling resume for every class driver loaded.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_Resume (void)
ARGUMENTS
None.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
Host Controller Driver error code.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
Calling this function will also resume the bus activity with all the devices connected.
150
A-2 HOST CONTROLLER FUNCTIONS
A-2-1 USBH_HC_Add()
Adds a host controller.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HC_Add (USBH_HC_CFG
USBH_HC_DRV_API
USBH_HC_RH_API
USBH_HC_BSP_API
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_cfg,
*p_drv_api,
*p_hc_rh_api,
*p_hc_bsp_api,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_cfg
Pointer to specific USB host controller configuration.
p_drv_api
Pointer to specific USB host controller driver API.
p_hc_rh_api
Pointer to specific USB host controller root hub driver API.
p_hc_bsp_api
Pointer to specific USB host controller board-specific API.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from
this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_HC_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_DEV_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
Host Controller Driver error code
151
Appendix A
RETURNED VALUE
Host Controller index
if host controller successfully added.
USBH_HC_NBR_NONE
Otherwise.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
152
A-2-2 USBH_HC_Start()
Starts the given host controller.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HC_Start (CPU_INT08U
hc_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
hc_nbr
Host controller number.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DESC_INVALID
USBH_ERR_CFG_MAX_CFG_LEN
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
USBH_ERR_DRIVER_NOT_FOUND
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
153
Appendix A
A-2-3 USBH_HC_Stop()
Stops the given host controller.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HC_Stop (CPU_INT08U
hc_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
hc_nbr
Host controller number.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
154
A-2-4 USBH_HC_PortEn()
Enable specified port of given host controller's root hub.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HC_PortEn (CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
hc_nbr,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
hc_nbr
Host controller number.
port_nbr
Port number.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
155
Appendix A
A-2-5 USBH_HC_PortDis()
Disable specified port of given host controller's root hub.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HC_PortDis (CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
hc_nbr,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
hc_nbr
Host controller number.
port_nbr
Port number.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
156
A-2-6 USBH_HC_FrameNbrGet()
Gets current frame number.
FILES
usbh_core.h/usbh_core.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_HC_FrameNbrGet (CPU_INT08U
USBH_ERR
hc_nbr,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
hc_nbr
Host controller number.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function :
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
Host Controller Driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
Curent frame number processed by the Host Controller.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
157
Appendix A
A-3 CLASS MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS
A-3-1 USBH_ClassDrvReg()
Registers a class driver to the USB host stack.
FILES
usbh_class.h/usbh_class.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_ClassDrvReg (USBH_CLASS_DRV
USBH_CLASS_NOTIFY_FNCT
void
*p_class_drv,
class_notify_fnct,
*p_class_notify_ctx);
ARGUMENTS
p_class_drv
Pointer to the class driver.
class_notify_fnct
Class notification function pointer.
p_class_notify_ctx
Class notification function context pointer.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_ALLOC
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
158
A-3-2 USBH_ClassDrvUnreg()
Unregisters a class driver from the USB host stack.
FILES
usbh_class.h/usbh_class.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_ClassDrvUnreg (USBH_CLASS_DRV
*p_class_drv)
ARGUMENTS
p_class_drv
Pointer to the class driver.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_NOT_FOUND
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
159
Appendix A
A-4 KERNEL ABSTRACTION FUNCTIONS
A-4-1 USBH_OS_LayerInit()
Initializes the kernel abstraction layer.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_LayerInit (void)
ARGUMENTS
None.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
CALLERS
USBH_Init().
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
160
A-4-2 USBH_OS_VirToBus()
Converts from virtual address to physical address if the operating system uses virtual
memory.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
void
*USBH_OS_VirToBus (void
*x)
ARGUMENTS
x
Virtual address to convert
RETURNED VALUE
The corresponding physical address
CALLERS
■
OHCI driver
■
EHCI driver
NOTES / WARNINGS
Most of the embedded operating systems don’t use virtual memory addressing. Hence, this
function can be implemented as shown in Listing A-1.
void *USBH_OS_VirToBus (void
{
return (x);
}
*x)
Listing A-1 Typical USBH_OS_VirToBus() Function Implementation
161
Appendix A
A-4-3 USBH_OS_BusToVir()
Converts from physical address to virtual address if the operating system uses virtual
memory.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
void
*USBH_OS_BusToVir (void
*x)
ARGUMENTS
x
Physical address to convert
RETURNED VALUE
The corresponding virtual address
CALLERS
■
OHCI driver
■
EHCI driver
NOTES / WARNINGS
Most of the embedded kernels don’t use virtual memory addressing. Hence, this function
can be implemented as shown in Listing A-2.
void *USBH_OS_BusToVir (void
{
return (x);
}
*x)
Listing A-2 Typical USBH_OS_BusToVir() Function Implementation
162
A-4-4 USBH_OS_TaskCreate()
Creates a task.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_TaskCreate (CPU_CHAR
CPU_INT32U
USBH_TASK_FNCT
void
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT32U
USBH_HTASK
*p_name,
prio,
task_fnct,
*p_data,
*p_stk,
stk_size,
*p_task)
ARGUMENTS
p_name
Pointer to a string that contains a name to assign to the task (can be NULL)
prio
Priority of the task
task_fnct
Pointer to the task’s function body
p_data
Pointer to the data that is passed to the task function
p_stk
Pointer to the beginning of the task’s stack
stk_size
Size of the task’s stack
p_task
Pointer to a variable that will receive the handle of the task
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_TASK_CREATE
163
Appendix A
CALLERS
■
Core layer
■
Micrium’s CDC and MSC demo applications
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
164
A-4-5 USBH_OS_DlyMS()
Delays the current task by the specified delay in milliseconds.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_OS_DlyMS (CPU_INT32U
dly)
ARGUMENTS
dly
Delay, in milliseconds
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
165
Appendix A
A-4-6 USBH_OS_DlyUS()
Delays the current task by the specified delay in microseconds.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_OS_DlyUS (CPU_INT32U
dly)
ARGUMENTS
dly
Delay, in microseconds
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Host Controller Driver.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
166
A-4-7 USBH_OS_MutexCreate()
Creates a mutex.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_MutexCreate (USBH_HMUTEX
*p_mutex)
ARGUMENTS
p_mutex
Pointer to variable that will receive handle of the mutex.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
167
Appendix A
A-4-8 USBH_OS_MutexLock()
Acquires/locks a mutex.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_MutexLock (USBH_HMUTEX
ARGUMENTS
mutex
Mutex handle.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
168
mutex)
A-4-9 USBH_OS_MutexUnlock()
Releases a mutex.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_MutexUnlock (USBH_HMUTEX
mutex)
ARGUMENTS
mutex
Mutex handle.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
169
Appendix A
A-4-10 USBH_OS_MutexDestroy()
Destroys a mutex.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_MutexDestroy (USBH_HMUTEX
ARGUMENTS
mutex
Mutex handle.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
USBH_ERR_FREE
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
170
mutex)
A-4-11 USBH_OS_SemCreate()
Creates a semaphore initialized with the given count.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_SemCreate (USBH_HSEM
CPU_INT32U
*p_sem,
cnt)
ARGUMENTS
p_sem
Pointer to variable that will receive handle of the semaphore
cnt
Count value with which the semaphore will be initialized
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
171
Appendix A
A-4-12 USBH_OS_SemDestroy()
Destroys a semaphore.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_SemDestroy (USBH_HSEM
ARGUMENTS
sem
Semaphore handle
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
USBH_ERR_FREE
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
172
sem)
A-4-13 USBH_OS_SemWait()
Pends on a semaphore.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_SemWait (USBH_HSEM
CPU_INT32U
sem,
timeout)
ARGUMENTS
sem
Semaphore handle
timeout
Timeout value, expressed in milliseconds
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
173
Appendix A
A-4-14 USBH_OS_SemWaitAbort()
Aborts a semaphore and resumes all tasks pending on it.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_SemWaitAbort (USBH_HSEM
ARGUMENTS
sem
Semaphore handle
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
174
sem)
A-4-15 USBH_OS_SemPost()
Posts a semaphore.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_SemPost (USBH_HSEM
sem)
ARGUMENTS
sem
Semaphore handle
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Various.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
175
Appendix A
A-4-16 USBH_OS_MsgQueueCreate()
Creates a message queue.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_HQUEUE
USBH_OS_MsgQueueCreate (void
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
**p_start,
size,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_start
Pointer to the base address of the message queue storage area
size
Size of the queue
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
RETURNED VALUE
Handle of the message queue.
CALLERS
Micrium’s MSC demo application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function can be left empty if Micrium’s MSC demo application is not used.
176
A-4-17 USBH_OS_MsgQueuePut()
Posts a message to a message queue.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_OS_MsgQueuePut (USBH_HQUEUE
void
msg_q,
*p_msg)
ARGUMENTS
msg_q
Message queue handle
p_msg
Pointer to the message to post
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function:
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Micrium’s MSC demo application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function can be left empty if Micrium’s MSC demo application is not used.
177
Appendix A
A-4-18 USBH_OS_MsgQueueGet()
Pends on a queue and retrieves the first message from it.
FILES
usbh_os.h/usbh_os.c
PROTOTYPE
void
*USBH_OS_MsgQueueGet (USBH_HQUEUE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_ERR
msg_q,
timeout,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
msg_q
Message queue handle
timeout
Pointer to the message to post
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
RETURNED VALUE
Pointer to the first message from the queue.
CALLERS
Micrium’s MSC demo application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function can be left empty if Micrium’s MSC demo application is not used.
178
Appendix
B
CDC API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the μC/USB-Host Communication Device Class
(CDC) and the Abstract Control Model (ACM) subclass API. The following information is
provided for each of the services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
179
Appendix B
B-1 CDC FUNCTIONS
B-1-1 USBH_CDC_RefAdd()
Increments the CDC device's application reference counter.
FILES
usbh_cdc.h/usbh_cdc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_RefAdd (USBH_CDC_DEV
*p_cdc_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_dev
Pointer to the CDC device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
180
B-1-2 USBH_CDC_RefRel()
Decrements the CDC device's application reference counter. Frees the device if there is not
anymore references to it.
FILES
usbh_cdc.h/usbh_cdc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_RefRel (USBH_CDC_DEV
*p_cdc_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_dev
Pointer to the CDC device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_FREE
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
181
Appendix B
B-1-3 USBH_CDC_SubclassGet()
Retrieves CDC device‘s subclass code.
FILES
usbh_cdc.h/usbh_cdc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_SubclassGet(USBH_CDC_DEV
CPU_INT08U
*p_cdc_dev,
*p_subclass)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_dev
Pointer to the CDC device.
p_subclass
Pointer to variable that will receive the subclass code.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
182
B-1-4 USBH_CDC_ProtocolGet()
Retrieves CDC device‘s protocol code.
FILES
usbh_cdc.h/usbh_cdc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ProtocolGet(USBH_CDC_DEV
CPU_INT08U
*p_cdc_dev,
*p_protocol)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_dev
Pointer to the CDC device.
p_protocol
Pointer to variable that will receive the protocol code.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
183
Appendix B
B-2 ACM FUNCTIONS
B-2-1 USBH_CDC_ACM_GlobalInit()
Initializes all the USB CDC ACM structures and global variables.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_GlobalInit (void)
ARGUMENTS
None.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function must be called only once at initialization.
184
B-2-2 USBH_CDC_ACM_Add()
Allocates memory for a CDC ACM device structure, reads ACM descriptor from the interface
and retrieves ACM events and requests supported by the device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
*USBH_CDC_ACM_Add (USBH_CDC_DEV
USBH_ERR
*p_cdc_dev,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_dev
Pointer to the CDC device.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from
this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_DESC_INVALID
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
RETURNED VALUE
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
185
Appendix B
B-2-3 USBH_CDC_ACM_Remove()
Frees CDC ACM device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_Remove (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
*p_cdc_acm_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_FREE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
186
B-2-4 USBH_CDC_ACM_EventRxNotifyReg()
Registers callback function to be called when serial state is received from device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_CDC_ACM_EventRxNotifyReg (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
USBH_CDC_SERIAL_STATE_NOTIFY
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
p_serial_state_notify)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_serial_state_notify
Pointer to callback function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
187
Appendix B
B-2-5 USBH_CDC_ACM_LineCodingSet()
Specifies typical asynchronous line-character formatting properties by sending a
SetLineCoding class request to the device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_LineCodingSet (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
baud_rate,
stop_bits,
parity_val,
data_bits)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
baud_rate
Baud rate in bits per second.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_110
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_300
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_1200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_2400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_4800
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_9600
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_19200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_38400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_56700
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_115200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_230400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_460800
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_921600
188
stop_bits
Stop bits value.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_1
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_1_5
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_2
parity_val
Parity value.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_NONE
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_ODD
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_EVEN
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_MARK
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_SPACE
data_bits
Number of data bits.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_5
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_6
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_7
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_8
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NOT_SUPPORTED
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
189
Appendix B
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SetLineCoding request is described in Universal Serial Bus Communications Class
Subclass Specification for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2 section 6.3.10.
190
B-2-6 USBH_CDC_ACM_LineCodingGet()
Retrieves current device‘s asynchronous line-character formatting properties by sending a
GetLineCoding class request to the device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_LineCodingGet (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_baud_rate,
*p_stop_bits,
*p_parity_val,
*p_data_bits)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_baud_rate
Pointer to variable that will receive the current baud rate in bits
per second.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_110
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_300
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_1200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_2400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_4800
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_9600
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_19200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_38400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_56700
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_115200
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_230400
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_460800
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_BAUDRATE_921600
191
Appendix B
p_stop_bits
Pointer to variable that will receive the current stop bits value.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_1
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_1_5
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_STOP_BIT_2
p_parity_val
Pointer to variable that will receive the current parity value.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_NONE
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_ODD
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_EVEN
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_MARK
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_PARITY_SPACE
p_data_bits
Pointer to variable that will receive the current number of data bits.
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_5
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_6
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_7
USBH_CDC_ACM_LINE_CODING_DATA_BITS_8
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NOT_SUPPORTED
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
192
NOTES / WARNINGS
The GetLineCoding request is described in Universal Serial Bus Communications Class
Subclass Specification for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2, section 6.3.11.
193
Appendix B
B-2-7 USBH_CDC_ACM_LineStateSet()
Generates RS-232/V.24 style control signals by sending a SetControlLineState request to the
device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_LineStateSet (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
dtr_bit,
rts_bit)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
dtr_bit
Indicates to DCE if DTE is present or not. This signal
corresponds to V.24 signal 108/2 and RS-232 signal DTR.
USBH_CDC_ACM_DTR_SET
USBH_CDC_ACM_DTR_CLR
rts_bit
Carrier control for half duplex modems. This signal corresponds
to V.24 signal 105 and RS-232 signal RTS.
USBH_CDC_ACM_RTS_SET
USBH_CDC_ACM_RTS_CLR
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NOT_SUPPORTED
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
194
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SetControlLineState request is described in Universal Serial Bus Communications Class
Subclass Specification for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2, section 6.3.12.
195
Appendix B
B-2-8 USBH_CDC_ACM_BreakSend()
Sends special carrier modulation that generates an RS-232 style break.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_BreakSend (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT16U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
break_time)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
break_time
Duration of the break signal, in milliseconds.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NOT_SUPPORTED
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SendBreak request is described in Universal Serial Bus Communications Class Subclass
Specification for PSTN Devices, revision 1.2, section 6.3.13.
196
B-2-9 USBH_CDC_ACM_CmdSend()
Sends an encapsulated command to the device using a class-specific request.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_CmdSend (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT32U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that contains the command.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SendEncapsulatedCommand request is described in Universal Serial Bus Class
Definitions for Communications Devices, revision 1.2, section 6.2.1.
197
Appendix B
B-2-10 USBH_CDC_ACM_RespRx()
Receives encapsulated response from device.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_RespRx (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT32U
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will receive the response from the device.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The GetEncapsulatedResponse request is described in Universal Serial Bus Class Definitions
for Communications Devices, revision 1.2, section 6.2.2.
198
B-2-11 USBH_CDC_ACM_DataTx()
Sends data to CDC ACM device. This function is blocking.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_CDC_ACM_DataTx (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_ERR
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to transmit buffer.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
p_err
Variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
Host Controller Driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets transmitted.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
199
Appendix B
B-2-12 USBH_CDC_ACM_DataRx()
Receives data from CDC ACM device. This function is blocking.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_CDC_ACM_DataRx (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_ERR
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will contain the received data.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
p_err
Variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
Host Controller Driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets received.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
200
B-2-13 USBH_CDC_ACM_DataTxAsync()
Sends data to CDC ACM device. This function is non-blocking.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_DataTxAsync (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_CDC_DATA_NOTIFY
void
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
tx_cmpl_notify,
*p_tx_cmpl_arg)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that contains data to transmit.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
tx_cmpl_notify
Function that will be invoked upon completion of transmit
operation.
p_tx_cmpl_arg
Pointer to application‘s argument that will be passed as
parameter of tx_cmpl_notify.
201
Appendix B
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
202
B-2-14 USBH_CDC_ACM_DataRxAsync()
Receives data from CDC ACM device. This function is non-blocking.
FILES
usbh_acm.h/usbh_acm.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_CDC_ACM_DataRxAsync (USBH_CDC_ACM_DEV
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_CDC_DATA_NOTIFY
void
*p_cdc_acm_dev,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
rx_cmpl_notify,
*p_rx_cmpl_arg)
ARGUMENTS
p_cdc_acm_dev
Pointer to the CDC ACM device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will contain the received data.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
rx_cmpl_notify
Function that will be invoked upon completion of receive
operation.
p_rx_cmpl_arg
Pointer to application‘s argument that will be passed as
parameter of rx_cmpl_notify.
203
Appendix B
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
Host Controller Driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
204
Appendix
C
FTDI API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the μC/USB-Host Future Technology Devices
International (FTDI) class API. The following information is provided for each of the
services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
205
Appendix C
C-1 FTDI FUNCTIONS
C-1-1 USBH_FTDI_Init()
Initializes all the USB FTDI structures and global variables.This function also registers the
FTDI class driver to the USB Host core.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_Init (USBH_FTDI_CALLBACKS
USBH_ERR
*p_ftdi_callbacks,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_ftdi_callbacks
Pointer to the FTDI callback functions structure to notify the
application when a device is connected/disconnected.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_DEV_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
206
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function must be called only once at initialization.
207
Appendix C
C-1-2 USBH_FTDI_Reset()
Resets the selected communication port.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_Reset (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
reset_ctrl,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
reset_ctrl
Select buffer to reset.
USBH_FTDI_RESET_CTRL_SIO
USBH_FTDI_RESET_CTRL_RX
USBH_FTDI_RESET_CTRL_TX
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
208
NOTES / WARNINGS
The Reset request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115, revision
1.1, section 3.1.
209
Appendix C
C-1-3 USBH_FTDI_ModemCtrlSet()
Sets the modem control register of the communication port.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_ModemCtrlSet (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
modem_ctrl,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
modem_ctrl
Modem control code. This is a bitmap of the following possible
values:
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_DTR_SET
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_DTR_RESET
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_DTR_ENABLED
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_DTR_DISABLED
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_RTS_SET
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_RTS_RESET
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_RTS_ENABLED
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_CTRL_RTS_DISABLED
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
210
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The ModemCtrl request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115,
revision 1.1, section 3.2.
211
Appendix C
C-1-4 USBH_FTDI_FlowCtrlSet()
Sets the flow control handshaking of the communication port.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_FlowCtrlSet (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
protocol,
xon_char,
xoff_char,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
protocol
Protocol code. This is a bitmap of the following possible values:
USBH_FTDI_PROTOCOL_RTS_CTS
USBH_FTDI_PROTOCOL_DTR_RTS
USBH_FTDI_PROTOCOL_XON_XOFF
xon_char
Xon character.
xoff_char
Xoff character.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
212
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SetFlowCtrl request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115,
revision 1.1, section 3.3.
213
Appendix C
C-1-5 USBH_FTDI_BaudRateSet()
Sets the baud rate of the communication port.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_BaudRateSet (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
baud_rate,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
baud_rate
Baud rate value in bits per second.
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_300
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_600
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_1200
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_2400
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_4800
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_9600
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_19200
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_38400
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_57600
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_115200
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_230400
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_460800
USBH_FTDI_BAUD_RATE_921600
214
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SetBaudRate request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115,
revision 1.1, section 3.4.
215
Appendix C
C-1-6 USBH_FTDI_DataSet()
Sets the data characteristics of the communication port.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_DataSet (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT08U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
data_size,
parity,
stop_bits,
break_bit,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
data_size
Number of data bits.
parity
Parity type.
USBH_FTDI_DATA_PARITY_NONE
USBH_FTDI_DATA_PARITY_ODD
USBH_FTDI_DATA_PARITY_EVEN
USBH_FTDI_DATA_PARITY_MARK
USBH_FTDI_DATA_PARITY_SPACE
stop_bits
Number of stop bits.
USBH_FTDI_DATA_STOP_BITS_1
USBH_FTDI_DATA_STOP_BITS_2
break_bit
Break signal activation/deactivation.
USBH_FTDI_DATA_BREAK_ENABLED
USBH_FTDI_DATA_BREAK_DISABLED
216
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The SetData request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115,
revision 1.1, section 3.5.
217
Appendix C
C-1-7 USBH_FTDI_ModemStatusGet()
Gets the current value of the serial status register.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_ModemStatusGet (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
USBH_FTDI_SERIAL_STATUS
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
*p_serial_status,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
p_serial_status
Pointer to variable that will receive the serial status.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The GetModemStat request is described in API for FTxxxx Devices Application Note AN_115,
revision 1.1, section 3.6.
218
The device updates the serial status every 16 milliseconds.
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the modem status is set:
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_FS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_HS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_CLEAR_TO_SEND
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_SET_READY
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_RING_INDICATOR
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_CARRIER_DETECT
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the line status is set:
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_RX_OVERFLOW_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_PARITY_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_FRAMING_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_BREAK_INTERRUPT
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_REGISTER_EMPTY
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_EMPTY
219
Appendix C
C-1-8 USBH_FTDI_Tx()
Sends data to FTDI device.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_FTDI_Tx (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
void
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
timeout,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that contains the data to transfer.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
timeout
Timeout in milliseconds.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
Host controller driver error code
220
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets transmitted.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
221
Appendix C
C-1-9 USBH_FTDI_TxAsync()
Sends data to FTDI device. This function is non-blocking.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_TxAsync (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_FTDI_ASYNC_TX_FNCT
void
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
tx_cmpl_notify,
*p_arg,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that contains the data to transfer.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
tx_cmpl_notify
Function that will be invoked upon completion of transmit
operation.
p_arg
Pointer to application’s argument that will be passed as
parameter of tx_cmpl_notify.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
222
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
223
Appendix C
C-1-10 USBH_FTDI_Rx()
Receives data from FTDI device.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_Rx (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
void
CPU_INT32U
CPU_INT16U
USBH_FTDI_SERIAL_STATUS
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
timeout,
*p_serial_status,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will contain the received data.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
timeout
Timeout in milliseconds.
p_serial_status
Pointer to variable that will receive the serial status.
224
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets received.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The buffer p_buf will be assigned using the following pattern:
Byte 0
Byte 1
Byte 2 to buf_len
Modem Status
Line Status
Raw Data
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the modem status is set:
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_FS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_HS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_CLEAR_TO_SEND
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_SET_READY
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_RING_INDICATOR
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_CARRIER_DETECT
225
Appendix C
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the line status is set:
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_RX_OVERFLOW_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_PARITY_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_FRAMING_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_BREAK_INTERRUPT
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_REGISTER_EMPTY
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_EMPTY
226
C-1-11 USBH_FTDI_RxAsync()
Receives data from FTDI device. This function is non-blocking.
FILES
usbh_ftdi.h/usbh_ftdi.c
PROTOTYPE
void
USBH_FTDI_RxAsync (USBH_FTDI_HANDLE
void
CPU_INT32U
USBH_FTDI_SERIAL_STATUS
USBH_FTDI_ASYNC_RX_FNCT
void
USBH_ERR
ftdi_handle,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
*p_serial_status,
rx_cmpl_notify,
*p_arg,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
ftdi_handle
Handle on FTDI device.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will contain the received data.
buf_len
Buffer length in octets.
p_serial_status
Pointer to variable that will receive the serial status.
rx_cmpl_notify
Function that will be invoked upon completion of receive
operation.
p_arg
Pointer to application’s argument that will be passed as
parameter of rx_cmpl_notify.
227
Appendix C
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code
from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The buffer p_buf will be assigned using the following pattern:
Byte 0
Byte 1
Byte 2 to buf_len
Modem Status
Line Status
Raw Data
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the modem status is set:
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_FS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_HS
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_CLEAR_TO_SEND
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_SET_READY
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_RING_INDICATOR
USBH_FTDI_MODEM_STATUS_DATA_CARRIER_DETECT
228
The following masks may be used to determine if a bit of the line status is set:
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_RX_OVERFLOW_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_PARITY_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_FRAMING_ERROR
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_BREAK_INTERRUPT
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_REGISTER_EMPTY
USBH_FTDI_LINE_STATUS_TX_EMPTY
229
Appendix C
230
Appendix
D
HID API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the μC/USB-Host Human Interface Device (HID)
class API. The following information is provided for each of the services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
231
Appendix D
D-1 HID FUNCTIONS
D-1-1 USBH_HID_Init()
Initializes the HID device, reads & parses the report descriptor and creates the report ID list.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_Init (USBH_HID_DEV
*p_hid_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DESC_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_HID_RD_PARSER_FAIL
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
USBH_ERR_DESC_EXTRA_NOT_FOUND
USBH_ERR_DESC_INVALID
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
Host controller driver error code
232
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
233
Appendix D
D-1-2 USBH_HID_RefAdd()
Increments the HID device's application reference counter.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_RefAdd (USBH_HID_DEV
*p_hid_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
234
D-1-3 USBH_HID_RefRel()
Decrements the HID device's application reference counter. Frees the device if there is not
anymore references to it.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_RefRel (USBH_HID_DEV
*p_hid_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
235
Appendix D
D-1-4 USBH_HID_GetReportIDArray()
Returns the array of Report ID structures and the number of Report ID structures.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_GetReportIDArray (USBH_HID_DEV
USBH_HID_REPORT_ID
CPU_INT08U
*p_hid_dev,
**p_report_id,
*p_nbr_report_id)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
p_report_id
Pointer to variable that will receive the array of report ID
structures.
p_nbr_report_id
Pointer to variable that will receive the number of report ID
structures.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
236
D-1-5 USBH_HID_GetAppCollArray()
Returns application collection structures array and number of application collection
structures.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_GetAppCollArray (USBH_HID_DEV
USBH_HID_APP_COLL
CPU_INT08U
*p_hid_dev,
**p_app_coll,
*p_nbr_app_coll)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
p_app_coll
Pointer to variable that will receive the array of application
collection structures.
p_nbr_app_coll
Pointer to variable that will receive the number of application
collection structures.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
237
Appendix D
D-1-6 USBH_HID_IsBootDev()
Tests whether the HID interface belongs to the boot subclass.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_BOOLEAN
USBH_HID_IsBootDev (USBH_HID_DEV
USBH_ERR
*p_hid_dev,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
p_err
Pointer to the variable that will receive the return error code from this
function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_TRUE
Device belongs to boot subclass.
DEF_FALSE
Otherwise.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
238
D-1-7 USBH_HID_RxReport()
Receives input or feature report from the device. This function is blocking.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HID_RxReport (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
void
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
*p_hid_dev,
report_id,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
timeout_ms,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID.
p_buf
Pointer to buffer that will receive the report.
buf_len
Buffer length, in octets.
timeout_ms Timeout, in milliseconds.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
239
Appendix D
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets received.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
p_buf contains only the report data without the report ID.
240
D-1-8 USBH_HID_TxReport()
Sends report to the device. This function is blocking.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HID_TxReport (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
void
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT16U
USBH_ERR
*p_hid_dev,
report_id,
*p_buf,
buf_len,
timeout_ms,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID.
p_buf
Pointer to the buffer that contains the report.
buf_len
Buffer length, in octets.
timeout_ms Timeout, in milliseconds.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
241
Appendix D
RETURNED VALUE
Number of octets sent.
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
Do not add the report ID to p_buf, it will be added automatically.
242
D-1-9 USBH_HID_RegRxCB()
Registers a callback function to receive reports from the device asynchronously. The
callback function will be associated to the given report ID.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_RegRxCB (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HID_RXCB_FNCT
void
*p_hid_dev,
report_id,
async_fnct,
*p_async_arg)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID.
async_fnct
Callback function.
p_async_arg
Pointer to context that will be passed to callback function.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_HID_NOT_IN_REPORT
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORT_ID
243
Appendix D
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
244
D-1-10 USBH_HID_UnregRxCB()
Unregisters the callback function for the given report ID.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_UnregRxCB (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hid_dev,
report_id)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORTID_NOT_REGISTERED
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
245
Appendix D
D-1-11 USBH_HID_ProtocolSet()
Sets protocol (boot/report) of the HID device.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_ProtocolSet (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT16U
*p_hid_dev,
protocol)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
protocol
Protocol to set.
USBH_HID_REQ_PROTOCOL_BOOT
USBH_HID_REQ_PROTOCOL_REPORT
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
246
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
For more information on the Set_Protocol request, see Device Class Definition for Human
Interface Devices (HID), 6/27/01, Version 1.11, section 7.2.6.
247
Appendix D
D-1-12 USBH_HID_ProtocolGet()
Gets protocol (boot/report) of the HID device.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_ProtocolGet (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT16U
*p_hid_dev,
*p_protocol)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
p_protocol
Pointer to variable that will receive the protocol code of the
device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
NOTES / WARNINGS
For more information on the Get_Protocol request, see Device Class Definition for Human
Interface Devices (HID), 6/27/01, Version 1.11, section 7.2.5.
248
D-1-13 USBH_HID_IdleSet()
Sets idle state duration for a given report ID.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_HID_IdleSet (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
CPU_INT32U
*p_hid_dev,
report_id,
dur)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID. If 0, idle state request will apply to all the report IDs.
dur
Duration of the idle state in milliseconds.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
CALLERS
Application.
249
Appendix D
NOTES / WARNINGS
For more information on the Set_Idle request, see Device Class Definition for Human
Interface Devices (HID), 6/27/01, Version 1.11, section 7.2.4.
250
D-1-14 USBH_HID_IdleGet()
Gets idle duration for given report ID.
FILES
usbh_hid.h/usbh_hid.c
PROTOTYPE
CPU_INT32U
USBH_HID_IdleGet (USBH_HID_DEV
CPU_INT08U
USBH_ERR
*p_hid_dev,
report_id,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_hid_dev
Pointer to the HID device.
report_id
Report ID.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Host controller driver error code
RETURNED VALUE
Idle duration in milliseconds.
CALLERS
Application.
251
Appendix D
NOTES / WARNINGS
For more information on the Get_Idle request, see Device Class Definition for Human
Interface Devices (HID), 6/27/01, Version 1.11, section 7.2.3.
252
Appendix
E
MSC API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the μC/USB-Host Mass Storage Class (MSC) API. The
following information is provided for each of the services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
253
Appendix E
E-1 MSC FUNCTIONS
E-1-1 USBH_MSC_RefAdd()
Increments the MSC device's application reference counter.
FILES
usbh_msc.h/usbh_msc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_MSC_RefAdd (USBH_MSC_DEV
*p_msc_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_msc_dev
Pointer to the MSC device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Application’s MSC device connection callback.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
254
E-1-2 USBH_MSC_RefRel()
Decrements the MSC device's application reference counter. Frees the device if there is not
anymore references to it.
FILES
usbh_msc.h/usbh_msc.c
PROTOTYPE
USBH_ERR
USBH_MSC_RefRel (USBH_MSC_DEV
*p_msc_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_msc_dev
Pointer to the MSC device.
RETURNED VALUE
Error code from this function.
USBH_ERR_NONE
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
CALLERS
Application’s MSC device disconnection callback.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
255
Appendix E
E-2 FILE SYSTEM MSC DRIVER FUNCTIONS
The functions described in this section only apply to μC/FS.
E-2-1 FSDev_MSC_DevOpen
Adds a MSC unit.
FILES
fs_dev_msc.h/fs_dev_msc.c
PROTOTYPE
FS_QTY
FSDev_MSC_DevOpen (USBH_MSC_DEV
FS_ERR
*p_msc_dev,
*p_err)
ARGUMENTS
p_msc_dev
Pointer to the MSC device.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from
this function:
FS_ERR_NONE
FS_ERR_NULL_PTR
FS_ERR_DEV_UNIT_NONE_AVAIL
FS_ERR_DEV_IO
FS_ERR_DEV_TIMEOUT
RETURNED VALUE
Unit number to which device has been assigned.
CALLERS
Application’s MSC device connection callback.
256
NOTES / WARNINGS
The return value should be used to form the name of the volume. For example, if the
return value is 4, the volume name is msc:4:. A file name file.txt in the root directory of this
volume would have the full path: msc:4:\\file.txt.
257
Appendix E
E-2-2 FSDev_MSC_DevClose
Closes a MSC unit.
FILES
fs_dev_msc.h/fs_dev_msc.c
PROTOTYPE
void
FSDev_MSC_DevClose (USBH_MSC_DEV
*p_msc_dev)
ARGUMENTS
p_msc_dev
Pointer to the MSC device.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
Application’s MSC device disconnection callback.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
258
Appendix
F
Host Controller Driver API Reference
This appendix provides a reference to the Host Controller Driver (HCD) API. The following
information is provided for each of the services:
■
A brief description
■
The function prototype
■
The filename of the source code
■
A description of the arguments passed to the function
■
A description of returned value(s)
■
Specific notes and warnings regarding use of the service
Note that since every HCD function is accessed only by function pointers via the HCD’s API
structure, they do not need to be globally available and should therefore be declared as
‘static’.
259
Appendix F
F-1 HOST DRIVER FUNCTIONS
F-1-1 USBH_<controller>_Init()
Initializes all internal variables and hardware registers necessary for host controller’s driver
proper operations. This function should not start the host controller or enable interrupts.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_Init (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_HC_Add() via 'p_hc_drv_api->Init()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
This function relies heavily on the implementation of several host board support
package (BSP) functions. See “Host Driver BSP Functions” on page 292 for more
information on device BSP functions.
2
The Init() function generally performs the following operations, however, depending
on the host controller being initialized, functionality may need to be added or removed:
260
■
Configures clock gating to the USB host, configure all necessary I/O pins and ports,
and configure the related hardware interrupts. This is generally performed via the
device’s BSP function pointer, Init(), implemented in usbh_bsp_<controller>.c
(see section F-3-1 on page 292).
■
Resets USB controller or USB controller registers.
■
Disables and clears pending USB and root hub interrupts (should already be
cleared).
■
For DMA hosts: Allocate memory for all necessary descriptors. This is performed via
calls to μC/LIB’s memory module. If memory allocation fails, set p_err to
USBH_ERR_ALLOC and return.
■
Sets p_err to USBH_ERR_NONE if initialization proceeded as expected. Otherwise,
set p_err to an appropriate error code.
261
Appendix F
F-1-2 USBH_<controller>_Start()
Starts the host controller by enabling USB host controller’s interrupts.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_Start (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_HC_Start() via 'p_hc_drv_api->Start()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The Start() function performs the following operations:
1
Registers driver’s ISR to the interrupt vector. This is generally performed via the device’s
BSP function pointer, ISR_Reg(), implemented in usbh_bsp_<controller>.c (see
section F-3-2 on page 293). The host’s BSP ISR_Reg() is also responsible for enabling
the host interrupt controller.
2
Clears all interrupt flags.
3
Enables interrupts on the hardware controller. The host interrupt controller should have
already been configured within the host driver Init() function.
262
4
Enables the controller.
5
Sets p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred. Otherwise, set p_err to
an appropriate error code.
263
Appendix F
F-1-3 USBH_<controller>_Stop()
Stops the host controller by disabling USB host controller’s interrupts.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_Stop (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_HC_Stop() via 'p_hc_drv_api->Stop()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
Typically, the Stop() function performs the following operations:
1
Disables the controller.
2
Clears and disables interrupts on the hardware device.
3
Unregisters the driver’s ISR from the interrupt vector. This is generally performed via the
device’s BSP function pointer, ISR_Unreg(), implemented in usbh_bsp.c (see section
F-3-3 on page 294). The host’s BSP ISR_Unreg() is also responsible for disabling the
host interrupt controller.
4
Sets p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred. Otherwise, set p_err to
an appropriate error code.
264
F-1-4 USBH_<controller>_SpdGet()
Returns the speed of the host controller.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static USBH_DEV_SPD USBH_<controller>_SpdGet (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
Host controller speed.
USBH_DEV_SPD_LOW
USBH_DEV_SPD_FULL
USBH_DEV_SPD_HIGH
CALLERS
USBH_HC_Add() via 'p_hc_drv_api->SpdGet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
265
Appendix F
F-1-5 USBH_<controller>_Suspend()
Suspends all communications on the host controller.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_Suspend (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_Suspend() via 'p_hc_drv_api->Suspend()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
This function should suspend all the transfers on the host controller. The transfers
queues (if any), should not be flushed.
2
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
266
F-1-6 USBH_<controller>_Resume()
Resumes all communications on the host controller.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_Resume (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_Resume() via 'p_hc_drv_api->Resume()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
This function should resume all the transfers on the host controller.
2
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
267
Appendix F
F-1-7 USBH_<controller>_FrameNbrGet()
Returns the USB frame count of the host controller.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_INT32U USBH_<controller>_FrmNbrGet (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
USB frame count.
CALLERS
USBH_HC_FrameNbrGet() via 'p_hc_drv_api->FrameNbrGet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
268
F-1-8 USBH_<controller>_EP_Open()
Opens and configures an endpoint given its characteristics (endpoint type, endpoint
address, maximum packet size, etc).
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static
void
USBH_<controller>_EP_Open (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_EP
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_ep
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_ep
Pointer to a structure describing the endpoint.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
■
USBH_EP_Open() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Open()'
■
USBH_EP_Reset() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Open()'
■
USBH_EP_DevDescRead() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Open()'
■
USBH_EP_DevAddrSet() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Open()'
■
USBH_DfltEP_Open() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Open()'.
269
Appendix F
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
The endpoint open function allocates the resources needed for the endpoint and
endpoint management. It also configures any hardware registers related to the
endpoint.
2
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
270
F-1-9 USBH_<controller>_EP_Close()
Closes an endpoint, and un-initializes/clears endpoint configuration in hardware.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static
void
USBH_<controller>_EP_Close (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_EP
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_ep
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_ep
Pointer to a structure describing the endpoint.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
■
USBH_EP_Close() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Close()'
■
USBH_EP_Reset() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Close()'
■
USBH_EP_DevDescRead() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Close()'
■
USBH_EP_DevAddrSet() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Close()'
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
The endpoint close function frees the resources allocated to the endpoint and endpoint
management. It also un-initializes/clears any hardware registers related to the endpoint.
2
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
271
Appendix F
F-1-10 USBH_<controller>_EP_Abort()
Aborts any pending transfer(s) on endpoint.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static
void
USBH_<controller>_EP_Abort (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_EP
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_ep
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_ep
Pointer to a structure describing the endpoint.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_EP_Reset() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_Abort()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
The endpoint abort function flushes all pending transfers on the endpoint.
2
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
272
F-1-11 USBH_<controller>_EP_IsHalt()
Retrieves endpoint halt (stall) status.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static
CPU_BOOLEAN
USBH_<controller>_EP_IsHalt (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_EP
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_ep
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_ep
Pointer to a structure describing the endpoint.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
Endpoint halt status.
CALLERS
USBH_URB_Submit() via 'p_hc_drv_api->EP_IsHalt()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
273
Appendix F
F-1-12 USBH_<controller>_URB_Submit()
Submits a USB Request Block (URB) on an endpoint.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_URB_Submit (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_URB
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_urb,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_urb
Pointer to a structure that represents the URB.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_URB_Submit() via 'p_hc_drv_api->URB_Submit()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
274
The URB_Submit() function performs the following operations:
■
If host controller supports Direct Memory Access (DMA), prepares DMA descriptor
and adds it to the proper endpoint transfers list.
■
If host controller does not support DMA, depending on your host controller, you
may have to copy data to different hardware registers/buffers depending on the
transfer type.
■
Signals the host controller to start the transfer by writing to the necessary hardware
register(s).
■
Sets p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred. Otherwise, sets
p_err to an appropriate error code.
275
Appendix F
F-1-13 USBH_<controller>_URB_Complete()
Signals URB completion.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_URB_Complete (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_URB
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_urb,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_urb
Pointer to a structure that represents the URB.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_URB_Complete() via 'p_hc_drv_api->URB_Complete()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
276
The URB_Complete() function performs the following operations:
■
If host controller supports DMA, frees any DMA descriptor used for the transfer.
■
If host controller does not support DMA and the transfer is a data reception, copies
URB’s buffer to application’s buffer.
■
Sets the error code p_urb->Err of the URB depending on the transfer result. If no
error occured, sets it to USBH_ERR_NONE.
F-1-14 USBH_<controller>_URB_Abort()
Aborts a URB.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_URB_Abort (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_URB
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_urb,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_urb
Pointer to a structure that represents the URB.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_URB_Complete() via 'p_hc_drv_api->URB_Abort()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
1
The URB_Abort() function performs the following operations:
■
If host controller supports DMA, frees any DMA descriptor used for the transfer.
■
Sets p_urb->Err to USBH_ERR_URB_ABORT.
■
Clears any hardware registers that were set for the transfer.
■
Sets p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred. Otherwise, sets
p_err to an appropriate error code.
277
Appendix F
F-2 ROOT HUB DRIVER FUNCTIONS
These functions are designed to emulate typical requests that the host could make to an
external hub.
F-2-1 USBH_<controller>_PortStatusGet()
Retrieves status of the specified root hub port.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortStatusGet (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
USBH_HUB_PORT_STATUS
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
p_port_status
Port status structure to fill.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortStatusGet()'.
278
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr,
*p_port_status);
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard GetPortStatus control request. p_port_status structure
should be filled as described in Universal Serial Bus Specification, Revision 2.0, section
11.24.2.6. Most of root hubs use hardware registers to describe the state of their port(s).
279
Appendix F
F-2-2 USBH_<controller>_HubDescGet()
Retrieves root hub descriptor.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_HubDescGet (USBH_HC_DRV
void
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
*p_buf,
buf_len);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_buf
Buffer that will contain the root hub descriptor.
buf_len
Length (in octets) of the buffer.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->HubDescGet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard GetHubDescriptor control request. p_buf should be filled
as described in Universal Serial Bus Specification, Revision 2.0, section 11.23.2.1. The
content of the root hub descriptor is usually retrieved by knowing its characteristics (using
hardware data sheets, for example) and by looking at the content of some hardware
registers. Fill p_buf up to buf_len. Do not return DEF_FAIL if buf_len is smaller than the
normal hub descriptor length.
280
F-2-3 USBH_<controller>_PortEnSet()
Sets root hub port enable.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortEnSet (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortEnSet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard SetPortFeature PORT_ENABLE control request. For more
information on that request, see the Universal Serial Bus specification, revision 2.0. section
11.24.2.13 Set Port Feature. Set necessary hardware register(s) to enable specified port.
281
Appendix F
F-2-4 USBH_<controller>_PortEnClr()
Clears root hub port enable.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortEnClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortEnClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature PORT_ENABLE control request. For
more information on that request, see the Universal Serial Bus specification, revision 2.0.
section 11.24.2.2 Clear Port Feature. Set necessary hardware register(s) to disable specified
port.
282
F-2-5 USBH_<controller>_PortEnChngClr()
Clears root hub port enable change notification.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortEnChngClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortEnChngClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature C_PORT_ENABLE control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to disable change notification of specified port enable state.
283
Appendix F
F-2-6 USBH_<controller>_PortPwrSet()
Sets root hub port power.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortPwrSet (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortPwrSet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard SetPortFeature PORT_POWER control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to enable power on specified port.
284
F-2-7 USBH_<controller>_PortPwrClr()
Clears root hub port power.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortPwrClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortPwrClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature PORT_POWER control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to disable power on specified port.
285
Appendix F
F-2-8 USBH_<controller>_PortResetSet()
Sets root hub port reset state.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortResetSet (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortResetSet()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard SetPortFeature PORT_RESET control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to put specified port in the reset state.
286
F-2-9 USBH_<controller>_PortResetChngClr()
Clears port reset state notification.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortResetChngClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortResetChngClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature C_PORT_RESET control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to disable reset state change notification on specified port.
287
Appendix F
F-2-10 USBH_<controller>_PortSuspendClr()
Clears root hub port suspend state.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortSuspendClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortSuspendClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature PORT_SUSPEND control request. Set
necessary hardware register(s) to disable port suspend state on specified port.
288
F-2-11 USBH_<controller>_PortConnChngClr()
Clears root hub port connection change notification.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_PortConnChngClr (USBH_HC_DRV
CPU_INT08U
*p_hc_drv,
port_nbr);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
port_nbr
Root hub’s port number.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHCtrlReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->PortConnChngClr()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
This function emulates a standard ClearPortFeature C_PORT_CONNECTION control request.
Set necessary hardware register(s) to disable port connection change notification on
specified port.
289
Appendix F
F-2-12 USBH_<controller>_IntEn()
Enables root hub interrupts.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_IntEn (USBH_HC_DRV
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_EventReq() via 'p_hc_rh_api->IntEn()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
290
*p_hc_drv);
F-2-13 USBH_<controller>_IntDis()
Disables root hub interrupts.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_hcd_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static CPU_BOOLEAN USBH_<controller>_IntDis (USBH_HC_DRV
*p_hc_drv);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
RETURNED VALUE
DEF_OK
If operation is successful.
DEF_FAIL
If any error occurred.
CALLERS
USBH_HUB_RHEvent() via 'p_hc_rh_api->IntDis()'.
NOTES / WARNINGS
None.
291
Appendix F
F-3 HOST DRIVER BSP FUNCTIONS
F-3-1 USBH_<controller>_BSP_Init()
Initializes board-specific USB controller dependencies.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_bsp_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_BSP_Init (USBH_HC_DRV
USBH_ERR
*p_hc_drv,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_hc_drv
Pointer to USB host driver structure.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_<controller>_Init().
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
292
F-3-2 USBH_<controller>_BSP_ISR_Reg()
Registers USB driver’s ISR to interrupt vector.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_bsp_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_BSP_ISR_Reg (CPU_FNCT_PTR
USBH_ERR
isr_fnct,
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
isr_fnct
Pointer to driver’s ISR handler.
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_<controller>_Start().
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
293
Appendix F
F-3-3 USBH_<controller>_BSP_ISR_Unreg()
Unregisters USB driver’s ISR to interrupt vector.
FILES
Every host controller driver’s usbh_bsp_<controller>.c
PROTOTYPE
static void USBH_<controller>_BSP_ISR_Unreg (USBH_ERR
*p_err);
ARGUMENTS
p_err
Pointer to variable that will receive the return error code from this function.
RETURNED VALUE
None.
CALLERS
USBH_<controller>_Stop().
NOTES / WARNINGS
The function must set p_err equal to USBH_ERR_NONE if no errors have occurred.
Otherwise, it must set p_err to an appropriate error code.
294
Appendix
G
Error Codes
This appendix provides a brief explanation of μC/USB-Host error codes defined in
usbh_err.h. Any error codes not listed here may be searched in usbh_err.h for both their
numerical value and use. This appendix also contains class-specific error codes.
Each error has a numerical value. The error codes are grouped. The definition of the
groups are:
Error code group
Numbering series
GENERIC
0
DEVICE
100
CONFIGURATION
200
INTERFACE
300
ENDPOINT
400
USB REQUEST BLOCK (URB)
500
DESCRIPTOR
600
HOST CONTROLLER (HC)
700
KERNEL LAYER
800
CLASS
1000
HUB CLASS
1200
HUMAN INTERFACE DEVICE (HID) CLASS
1300
MASS STORAGE CLASS (MSC)
1400
FUTURE TECHNOLOGY DEVICES INTERNATIONAL (FTDI) CLASS
1500
295
Appendix G
G-1 GENERIC ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
0
USBH_ERR_NONE
No error.
1
USBH_ERR_FAIL
Hardware error occurred.
2
USBH_ERR_ALLOC
Object/memory allocation failed.
3
USBH_ERR_FREE
Object/memory de-allocation failed.
4
USBH_ERR_INVALID_ARG
Invalid argument(s).
5
USBH_ERR_NULL_PTR
Pointer argument(s) passed NULL pointer(s).
6
USBH_ERR_BW_NOT_AVAIL
Bandwidth not available for endpoint.
7
USBH_ERR_NOT_SUPPORTED
Feature or request not supported.
8
USBH_ERR_UNKNOWN
Unknown error occurred.
G-2 DEVICE ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
100
USBH_ERR_DEV_ALLOC
Device allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_DEVS constant.
101
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_READY
Device is not ready.
102
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_RESPONDING
Device is not responding.
103
USBH_ERR_DEV_NOT_HS
Device is not High-Speed.
G-3 CONFIGURATION ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
200
USBH_ERR_CFG_ALLOC
Configuration allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CFGS constant.
201
USBH_ERR_CFG_MAX_CFG_LEN
Configuration descriptor too long. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_CFG_DATA_LEN constant.
296
G-4 INTERFACE ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
300
USBH_ERR_IF_ALLOC
Interface allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_IFS constant.
G-5 ENDPOINT ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
400
USBH_ERR_EP_ALLOC
Endpoint allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_EPS constant.
401
USBH_ERR_EP_FREE
Endpoint de-allocation failed.
402
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_STATE
Endpoint is in an invalid state.
403
USBH_ERR_EP_INVALID_TYPE
Endpoint type is invalid.
404
USBH_ERR_EP_STALL
Endpoint is in a stall condition.
405
USBH_ERR_EP_NACK
Endpoint transaction returned a NAK handshake.
406
USBH_ERR_EP_NOT_FOUND
Endpoint not found.
G-6 URB ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
500
USBH_ERR_URB_ABORT
URB has been aborted.
297
Appendix G
G-7 DESCRIPTOR ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
600
USBH_ERR_DESC_ALLOC
Isochronous descriptor allocation failed. Consider
increasing USBH_CFG_MAX_ISOC_DESC constant.
601
USBH_ERR_DESC_INVALID
Descriptor contains at least one invalid field.
602
USBH_ERR_DESC_LANG_ID_NOT_SUPPORTED
Language ID is not supported.
603
USBH_ERR_DESC_EXTRA_NOT_FOUND
Extra descriptor not found.
G-8 HOST CONTROLLER ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
700
USBH_ERR_HC_ALLOC
Host Controller allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_HC constant.
701
USBH_ERR_HC_INIT
Host Controller initialization failed.
702
USBH_ERR_HC_START
Host Controller start failed.
703
USBH_ERR_HC_IO
Host Controller general Input/Output error.
704
USBH_ERR_HC_HALTED
Host Controller in halted state.
705
USBH_ERR_HC_PORT_RESET
Host Controller port reset error.
G-9 KERNEL LAYER ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
800
USBH_ERR_OS_TASK_CREATE
Task creation failed.
801
USBH_ERR_OS_SIGNAL_CREATE
Signal creation failed
802
USBH_ERR_OS_DEL
Service close failed.
803
USBH_ERR_OS_TIMEOUT
Signal pend timed-out.
804
USBH_ERR_OS_ABORT
Signal pend aborted.
805
USBH_ERR_OS_FAIL
Operation failed.
298
G-10 CLASS ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
1000
USBH_ERR_CLASS_PROBE_FAIL
Class probing failed.
1001
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_NOT_FOUND
Class driver not found.
1002
USBH_ERR_CLASS_DRV_ALLOC
Class driver allocation failed. Consider increasing
USBH_CFG_MAX_NBR_CLASS_DRVS constant.
G-11 HUB CLASS ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
1200
USBH_ERR_HUB_INVALID_PORT_NBR
Invalid port number.
1201
USBH_ERR_HUB_PORT
Port error.
G-12 HUMAN INTERFACE DEVICE (HID) CLASS ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
1300
USBH_ERR_HID_ITEM_LONG
Long items not supported.
1301
USBH_ERR_HID_ITEM_UNKNOWN
Unknown item type.
1302
USBH_ERR_HID_MISMATCH_COLL
Collection mismatch.
1303
USBH_ERR_HID_NOT_APP_COLL
Not an application collection.
1304
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORT_OUTSIDE_COLL
Report not part of a collection.
1305
USBH_ERR_HID_MISMATCH_PUSH_POP
Push/pop items mismatch.
1306
USBH_ERR_HID_USAGE_PAGE_INVALID
Invalid usage page.
1307
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORT_ID
Invalid report ID.
1308
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORT_CNT
Invalid report count.
1309
USBH_ERR_HID_PUSH_SIZE
Invalid push size.
1310
USBH_ERR_HID_POP_SIZE
Invalid pop size.
1311
USBH_ERR_HID_REPORT_INVALID_VAL
Report format contains invalid value(s).
1312
USBH_ERR_HID_RD_PARSER_FAIL
Report descriptor parsing failed.
299
Appendix G
Number
Code name
Description
1313
USBH_ERR_HID_NOT_IN_REPORT
No IN report.
G-13 MASS STORAGE CLASS (MSC) ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
1400
USBH_ERR_MSC_CMD_FAILED
CSW command error status.
1401
USBH_ERR_MSC_CMD_PHASE
CSW phase error status.
1402
USBH_ERR_MSC_IO
MSC Input/Output error.
1403
USBH_ERR_MSC_LUN_ALLOC
Logical unit allocation failed.
G-14 FUTURE TECHNOLOGY DEVICES INTERNATIONAL (FTDI)
CLASS ERROR CODES
Number
Code name
Description
1500
USBH_ERR_FTDI_LINE
Error detected on line status.
300
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