M-Audio AXIOM 25-49-61 User guide

Add to My manuals
50 Pages

advertisement

M-Audio AXIOM 25-49-61 User guide | Manualzz

Axiom 25-49-61

Advanced Semi-Weighted USB MIDI Controller

User Guide

Table of Contents

Introduction

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

What’s in the Box?

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Axiom Keyboard Overview

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

About This Manual

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Section 1: Getting Started

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.1 Axiom Keyboards Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

1.2 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.3 Driver Installation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.4 MIDI Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

1.5 Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

2.1 The Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

2.2 MIDI Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

2.3 Program and Bank Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

2.4 MIDI Controller Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Section 3: Advanced Features

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

3.1 MIDI Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

3.2 Recollection and Storage of Your Control Setups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

3.3 How To Avoid Jumping Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

3.4 The Rotary Encoders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

3.5 Pressure Pads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

3.6 Controlling Several Devices at the Same Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

3.7 Group A Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

3.8 Example of Control Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

Section 4: Usage Examples

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

4.1 MIDI Out from USB Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

4.2 Recording Your Performance On A Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

4.3 Controlling a Sound Module from the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Section 5: MIDI Messages Explained

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

5.1 Program & Bank Changes Explained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

5.2 RPN/NRPNs Explained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

5.3 SysEx Explained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Section 6: Troubleshooting

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Section 7: Contact

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Section 8: Technical Info

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Section 9: Warranty Terms and Registration

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Section 10: Appendices

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Appendix A - MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Appendix B – Useful MIDI Data Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Appendix D – Assignable Controller Numbers to Linear Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Appendix F – Assignable Controller Numbers to Rotary Encoders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Appendix G – Assignable Controller Numbers to Pressure Pads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Appendix H - Hexadecimal Conversion Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Appendix I – Factory Presets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

4

Introduction

Axiom Line User Guide

Introduction

Congratulations on the purchase of your M-Audio Axiom MIDI controller keyboard. Your new keyboard provides extensive control of virtual instruments, DAWs, hardware synthesizers, samplers and any other MIDI-compatible device.

The eight fully assignable pads give you the ability to trigger samples and loops separately from the keyboard in real-time. The eight fully assignable endless rotary encoders allow for instant control of your software’s features and can pick up just where you left off.

The versatile and easy-to-use Axiom keyboard is a great controller in the studio and live on stage.

What’s in the Box?

If any of the following items are missing from your package, please contact your retailer.

<

Axiom keyboard

<

Quick Start Guide

<

Keyboard Controller Series CD-ROM

<

Software bundle CD-ROM

<

USB cable

Axiom Keyboard Overview

Here is a rundown of some of the great features the Axiom keyboards have to offer:

<

25-, 49- or 61-note keyboard versions.

<

Eight fully programmable endless rotary encoders.

<

Eight fully programmable sample trigger pads.

<

Nine fully assignable 40mm sliders (Axiom 49 and 61 only).

<

USB 1.1 port to connect the Axiom to a computer. The keyboard can also be powered from the USB port, so no additional power supply is required.

<

MIDI IN and MIDI OUT ports for connecting external MIDI gear.

<

Expression pedal socket (expression pedal not included).

<

Sustain pedal socket (sustain pedal not included).

<

Fully programmable monophonic aftertouch.

<

Null mode – for full parameter recall with each preset.

<

Controller Mute – reposition controllers without affecting your software.

<

Easy to program controls can be assigned to a vast range of MIDI messages including MIDI controller messages, GM/GS/XG

SysEx messages, NRPN/RPN messages, channel aftertouch, program/bank changes, note messages and more.

<

Rotary encoders can be programmed to use any of six popular increment/decrement methods for compatibility with virtually all software with encoder support. The encoders can also function as standard MIDI controllers with a range of 0 to 127.

<

A range of different acceleration curves for the encoders for realistic dial control.

<

Trigger pads respond to velocity or pressure and can be programmed to either send MIDI note data or controller messages, allowing for full control over all your software samplers, for triggering loops and much more.

About This Manual

There are five sections to this manual. Section 1 provides an overview of your new Axiom keyboard and gives you details how to set up the keyboard with your computer. Section 2 explains some of your keyboard’s basic control features to get you started right away.

In section 3, we delve into more advanced functions and programming, and in section 4 we provide examples of your Axiom keyboard in use. Finally, section 5 explains more about MIDI and some often misunderstood MIDI message types.

5

Introduction

Section 1: Getting Started

1.1 Axiom Keyboards Overview

1.1.1 Top Panel Overview

1.1.2 Back Panel Overview

6

1.1.3 Control Definitions

These controls are referred by name throughout this manual.

1: LCD display

2: Sliders (Axiom 49/61 only)

3: Encoders

8: Numeric Keypad (Axiom 49/61 only)

9: Octave buttons

4: Transport buttons

10: Pitch Bend wheel

5: Assignable buttons (Axiom

49/61 only)

11: Modulation wheel

12: Keyboard with Aftertouch

6: Trigger Pads

7: Function buttons

13: Expression pedal socket

14: Sustain Pedal socket

15: MIDI OUT port

16: MIDI IN port

17: USB 1.1 port

18: DC power socket

19: Power switch

20: Kensington Lock Hole

Section 1: Getting Started

Axiom Line User Guide

1.2 Setup

If you intend to connect your Axiom keyboard to a computer, please read sections 1.2 and 1.3 first. If you only intend to use your

Axiom keyboard to control a sound module or synthesizer using the external MIDI OUT you should skip to section 1.4.

1.2.1 Minimum System Requirements

If you are using your Axiom with a computer, the following minimum system requirements apply:

Windows

Pentium 3 800 MHz or higher

(CPU requirement may be higher for laptops)

256 MB RAM

DirectX 9.0b or higher

Windows XP (SP2) or higher

(Windows 98, Me, NT or 2000 not supported)

Mac OS

Macintosh G3* 800/G4* 733 MHz or higher

(CPU requirement may be higher for laptops)

OS X 10.3.9 with 256 MB RAM,

OS X 10.4.2 or greater with 512 MB RAM

*G3/G4 accelerator cards are not supported.

M-Audio suggests you also check the minimum system requirements for your software, as they may be greater than the above.

USB hubs are not supported. M-Audio suggests that you connect directly to one of your computer’s built in USB ports.

1.3 Driver Installation Procedure

Important : Do not connect the USB cable to a computer until you have read and understood the instructions in the Quick Start

Guide. A printed copy of this is included in the box and you will also find this on the Keyboard Controller Series CD-ROM.

1.3.3 Using The Axiom with Your Software

When installed, the Axiom appears as a simple MIDI device with two input ports and one output port. You should select the first listed Axiom input port as the MIDI input device in your software. Once this is set, your software should be able to receive notes and controller data from the Axiom.

If you have connected external MIDI gear like a drum machine or another keyboard to your Axiom’s MIDI IN port, this gear can be interfaced to the computer by selecting the second listed Axiom input port. This way, your Axiom is acting as a MIDI to USB interface.

It is also possible to stream data from your computer to external MIDI gear connected to the MIDI OUT port of your Axiom— effectively a USB to MIDI interface. To do this, you should select the Axiom output device in your software. Note that some other steps are necessary to make this work that will be fully explained later in this manual.

The port names are defined in the table below. Note that the MIDI ports will appear with different names depending on whether you are using Mac or PC, and whether you chose to install the Windows multi-client driver (more information on driver installation and configuration can be found at a later point in this manual):

Mac OS X

Windows Class Driver

Windows Multi-Client Driver

USB Input Port from Axiom

USB Axiom Port 1

USB Audio Device*

USB Axiom In

Input port from external MIDI IN USB Output port to Axiom

USB Axiom Port 2

USB Audio Device*

USB Axiom Out (2)

USB Axiom

USB Audio Device*

USB Axiom Out

* These will appear as a single USB Audio Device in the Device Manager.

1.4 MIDI Connections

The MIDI Out port accepts a standard 5-pin DIN-type MIDI plug (available from most professional audio retailers).

The MIDI Out port can be used to connect the Axiom to a hardware sequencer, an external synthesizer or sound module, for example.

7

Section 1: Getting Started

8

1.5 Power Supply

If you are using your Axiom with a computer via its USB port, there is no need for an external power supply. Your Axiom will draw its power from the computer.

However, if you are intending to use your Axiom without connecting to a computer’s USB port, then you will need to use an external power supply. No power supply is included in the box, so please select one that meets the following requirements:

<

12V DC

<

250mA – 300mA

<

Center positive

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

Your Axiom controller will not make any sound unless it is connected to a computer or other external MIDI gear. This is because the

Axiom sends MIDI data when you play it and does not produce sound on its own. Instead, it is used to control a virtual instrument on your computer or a MIDI sound module to generate sounds.

Programming MIDI data can get complicated at times, so with the Axiom range of keyboards, we have strived to make MIDI programming as simple as possible. In this section we look at the most common MIDI messages and how to program them on your Axiom.

So to begin, you should familiarize yourself with the function button panel.

This is a good place to introduce you to the way we approach the differences between the Axiom 61 and 49 and the Axiom 25. The appearance and functionality of the Axiom 61 and 49 are the same, it’s just the size of the keyboard that is different, thus when we give instructions for these models, they are always grouped together. The Axiom 25 looks different and a number of its functions are accessed in a different way, so for this model we will always give you a separate set of instructions.

2.0.1 Axiom 49 And 61 Functions

Numeric Keypad

Use the numeric keypad to enter values during programming. The LCD display will show the values as you enter them.

2.0.2 Axiom 25 Functions

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

Axiom Line User Guide

Advanced

A number of advanced functions on the Axiom 25 are accessed from the keyboard itself. These functions are listed above the keys on the front panel of the unit.

To use any one of these functions, first press the Advanced button. The button will light indicating that the keyboard is now in Advanced Function mode. The keys can now be used to select the functions shown above them, instead of sending MIDI notes.

Here is a list of the advanced functions that are available on your Axiom 25:

White Keys:

Ctrl Assign

Chan Assign

Vel Lock

Bank LSB

Bank MSB

Mem Dump

MIDI Out (from USB)

Store

Black Keys:

Zone Chan

Ctrl Select

Data 1

Data 2

Data 3

Curve (Velocity curve, Pad curve, Rotary encoder acceleration curve)

Numeric Data Entry Keys

Numbers 0-9 and Enter.

Some of the functions on the Axiom 25 require you to enter numeric values. These functions are used in the following way:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the key of the function (for example, Bank LSB).

<

Enter the data value using the Numeric Data Entry keys 0-9 on the keyboard (printed above the keyboard). In this example type in a value between 0 and 127.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm the value.

Use the -/+ buttons to make small single step adjustments. As you enter data from the keyboard numeric keys or use the -/+ buttons, the current value is displayed on the LCD.

2.0.3 Function Index

Function

Advanced (Axiom 25 only)

-/+

Snapshot

Zone Range

Zone/Group

Recall*

Program*

Mute

Null

Glob. Chan*

Panic

Ctrl Assign

Chan. Assign

Vel. Lock

Bank LSB

Bank MSB

Section

2.0.2

2.0.2

3.3.3

3.6.4

3.6.2

3.2

2.4.2 and 3.6.6

3.3.1

3.3.2

2.2 & 3.6.7.3

2.4.3

2.4.2

3.6.7

3.5.6

2.3 and 3.6.6

2.3 and 3.6.6

Function

Mem. Dump

Dev. ID (Axiom 49, 61 only)

MIDI Out

Store

Zone Chan.

Ctrl Select

Data 1

Data 2

Data 3

Drawbar

Curve (Axiom 25 only)

Accel Curve (Axiom 49, 61 only)

Vel Curve (Axiom 49, 61 only)

Pad Curve (Axiom 49, 61 only)

Numeric Keypad (Axiom 49, 61 only)

Data Entry Keys (Axiom 25 only)

3.2.2

3.6.3

2.4.2

3.1

3.1

Section

3.2.2

3.2.3

4.1

2.1.1

3.5.5

2.0.1

2.0.2

3.1

3.1.2

2.1.1, 3.4.1 and 3.5.5

3.4.1

* The -/+ buttons will remember the last function used from these three: Recall, Program and Global Channel. After using one of these functions, the same function will be called the next time you press the – or + keys. When you press a different one of these function buttons, the -/+ keys will then remember this function as the last one used. To type in a value for one of these functions on the Axiom 25, press Advanced followed by the function button and then use the number keys on the keyboard followed by ENTER. On the Axiom 49 and Axiom 61, simply press the desired function button then enter a value using the numeric keypad.

9

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

10

2.1 The Keyboard

When you play the keyboard, MIDI note messages are sent. These messages are read by your computer software or external MIDI gear and used to generate sound accordingly.

2.1.1 Velocity Curve

Every time you press a key, a MIDI note message is sent with a velocity value between 0 and 127; this value specifies how hard you pressed the key. A velocity value of 0 specifies that the key has been released. Since different people have different playing styles, your Axiom offers a number of different velocity curves. You should experiment with the different velocity curves to find the curve that best suits your playing style.

It is also possible to send fixed velocities each time you press a key. This is useful when composing drum parts or simple synthesizer tracks. The fixed velocities are selected by assigning curve 10 to 12 as follows:

Curve

F10

F11

F12

Fixed Velocity Value

64

100

127

To change the velocity curve:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Locate the label Vel Curve. Press the two buttons above this label.

<

The LCD will show the currently selected velocity curve, preceded by a ‘C’ if a curve is selected, or ‘F’ if a fixed velocity is selected.

<

Enter the new curve number using the numeric keypad or use the -/+ keys to select a different curve.

25-note version:

<

<

Press the Advanced button. This sets the keyboard to control data entry.

Press the Curve key on the keyboard.

<

The LCD will show the currently selected velocity curve preceded by a ‘C’ if a curve is selected, or ‘F’ if a fixed velocity is selected.

<

Enter the new curve number using the numeric data entry keys or use the -/+ keys to select a different curve..

<

Press the ENTER key to confirm the selected curve.

The velocity curve is saved whenever you power down your Axiom.

2.1.2 Octave

There are 128 possible notes that can be sent as MIDI messages. If you wish to play a note that is out of your keyboard’s range, it is possible to shift the keyboard’s range up or down using the Octave buttons. The Octave buttons shift the range of the keyboard up or down by 12 notes at a time. All of the 128 notes can be accessed via the Octave button.

To access all 11 available octaves from your keyboard:

<

Locate the Octave buttons.

<

Press < to shift down one octave at a time.

Or

<

Press > to shift up one octave at a time.

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

Axiom Line User Guide

2.1.3 Transpose

The Octave buttons can also be used to transpose your keyboard. Some players like to play in a particular key like C or F, for example. Transpose lets you change the pitch you are controlling and continue to play in the key that is most comfortable for you.

It is possible to transpose up or down by as much as 12 MIDI notes (or semitones). This means if you press one of the transpose buttons 12 times, the tone will sound exactly one octave higher or lower.

To transpose the pitch you are playing:

<

Locate the Octave / Transpose buttons and press them both together. The current transpose value will show on the

LCD display.

<

Press either > to transpose up by one half step, or < to transpose down by one half step. The transpose value on the LCD will update accordingly.

<

When you stop pressing the Octave / Transpose buttons, the “Trans” symbol on the LCD display will stop flashing and performance mode will resume.

The maximum transpose value is +12 (up) or -12 (down) semitones.

Once you have set the transpose value, the Octave / Transpose buttons will again control the Octave shift.

Octave and Transpose settings can be saved to any of the 20 memory locations of your Axiom. This process is explained in section 3.2.

2.2 MIDI Channel

MIDI messages can be sent on any of 16 channels. If you are connected to a computer, the MIDI software will be receiving on all channels in most cases. However, when you are connected to external MIDI synthesizers, sound modules and some virtual instruments, you need to match the transmit channel of your keyboard with the receiving channel of the MIDI device for the connection to work properly.

To set the channel of your keyboard:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Glob Chan button. The LCD will show the channel on which the keyboard is currently transmitting.

<

Enter a channel between 1-16 on the numeric keypad. The LCD will update to display the new channel selected as you enter the data.

<

You can also use the -/+ buttons to step through the channels.

25-note version:

<

Press Recall and Program together to access the Glob Chan setting. The LCD will flash the GLOB CHAN symbol.

<

Use the -/+ buttons to select a channel between 1-16. As you press these buttons, you will see the selected channel change on the LCD display.

Or

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press Recall and Program together to access the Glob. Chan setting.

<

Enter a channel between 1-16 on the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm the entered value.

Controlling Percussion Sounds – Setting the transmit channel of your keyboard to channel 10 will allow you to control percussion sounds on any GM, GM2, GS or XG compatible module or synthesizer.

The Global MIDI channel setting can be saved to any of the 20 memory locations of your Axiom. This process is explained in detail in section 3.2.

Note : It is possible to assign the controls of your Axiom to channels on an individual basis. This is explained in section 3.6.7.

11

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

12

2.3 Program and Bank Changes

Program messages (commonly referred to as program changes) are used to select different instrument sounds in a MIDI device.

Program messages cover a range of 128 instruments. These instruments are accessed by sending program numbers 0 to 127.

Some MIDI devices have more than 128 instruments. If this is the case, the instruments tend to be separated into groups of 128, called banks. You can send bank MSB and bank LSB messages to access these different banks. Please consult the user manual of your MIDI device to see how the bank change numbers relate to the sounds on your device.

To send a program change:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Program button.

<

The LCD will flash the program number that was last sent out.

<

Enter the program change in the range 0-127 on the numeric keypad.

<

You can also use the -/+ buttons to step through programs.

25-note version:

<

Press the Program button.

<

The LCD will flash the PROG symbol.

<

Use the -/+ buttons to select a program change in the range 0-127.

Or

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Program button.

<

Enter the program change in the range of 0-127 on the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm the entered value

To send a bank change:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Bank LSB or Bank MSB button.

<

The LCD will flash the bank number that was last sent out.

<

Enter the new bank number in the range of 0-127 on the numeric keypad.

25-note version:

<

<

<

<

<

Press the Advanced button.

Press either the Bank LSB key or Bank MSB key.

The LCD will flash the bank number that was last sent out.

Enter the new bank number in the range 0-127 on the numeric data entry keys.

Press the Enter key to confirm the entered value.

Program and bank settings can be saved to any of the 20 memory locations on your Axiom. This process is explained in detail in section 3.2.

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

Axiom Line User Guide

2.4 MIDI Controller Messages

There are 128 MIDI controller messages that are used for controlling the MIDI-adjustable parameters in your software or on your external MIDI gear. Examples of these controllable parameters include volume, pan, expression, reverb, chorus and portamento.

Each of the controls on your Axiom keyboard is able to send any of the 128 standard MIDI controller messages to control such parameters. Please note that in order for these effects to work, the MIDI device you are sending to must be able to receive these messages. A full list of these control messages is given in Appendix C.

For example, you may want to set the Modulation wheel to control the reverb amount. This is done by assigning controller 91 to the

Modulation wheel (control A10 on Axiom 25, control A19 on Axiom 49 and Axiom 61). .

Examples of other popular effects are listed in the table below. (Please consult Appendix C for the full list.)

Effect

Modulation

Volume

Pan

Expression

Reverb depth

Chorus depth

Control Number

1

7

10

11

91

93

There are many different types of virtual instruments available and most of these respond to MIDI controller messages, allowing you to control a variety of parameters from your Axiom keyboard. Please review the manual that came with your software or external gear to see what these controller numbers are.

2.4.1 Extra Messages – 128 To 131

You may have noticed that although we have stated there are 128 MIDI controller messages (0 – 127), Appendix C shows 132 assignable controller messages. This is because messages 128 – 131 are a different type of MIDI message, defined in the General

MIDI Specification as RPN messages. You can assign these to the controls on your Axiom keyboard in exactly the same way as any other MIDI controller message. The RPN messages control the following:

Controller Number

128

129

130

131

MIDI Message

Pitch Bend Sensitivity

Master Tune (coarse)

Master Tune (fine)

Monophonic Aftertouch*

Use

Alters the range of a pitch bend message

Adjusts the tuning of your sound module or synthesizer in large steps

Adjusts the tuning of your sound module or synthesizer in small steps

Adds a vibrato effect

*Monophonic aftertouch is not an RPN message. However, it is an additional effect message defined in the General MIDI specification and this is why we have included it in Appendix C.

13

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

14

2.4.2 Programming the Controls on Your Axiom

When programming a physical controller on your Axiom, the controller that was last used will be the first one selected for programming. To select a different physical controller for programming, use one of the following two methods:

Method 1:

25-, 49- and 61-note versions:

<

Move the physical controller you wish to program, or press the assignable button or pad.

Method 2:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Chan Assign and Ctrl Assign together to access the Ctrl Select setting.

<

The LCD display will flash the last used control.

<

Use the numeric keypad to enter the number of the physical controller you want to select for programming.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Select key on the keyboard.

<

The LCD display will show the last used control.

<

Use the numeric data entry keys to enter the number of the physical controller you want to select for programming.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm and return to performance mode.

The advantage of method 2 is that you do not have to move a control to select it – so there is no danger of disturbing a parameter on the MIDI device you are controlling.

Programming a control:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the physical controller for programming using method 1 or 2 above.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned MIDI controller number The physical controller you are programming is displayed in the bottom left hand corner of the LCD display for clarity.

<

Use the numeric keypad or the -/+ buttons to enter the MIDI controller number 0-131 as defined in Appendix C.

25-note version:

<

Select the physical controller for programming using method 1 or 2 above.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key on the keyboard.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned MIDI controller number The physical controller you are programming is displayed in the bottom left hand corner of the LCD display for clarity.

<

Use the numeric data entry keys or the -/+ buttons to enter the MIDI controller 0-131 as defined in Appendix C.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm and return to performance mode.

The settings for your controllers can be saved to any of the 20 memory locations on your Axiom. This process is explained in detail in section 3.2.

Note : By default, the LCD display shows transmitted real time controller values between 0 and 127 as a physical control like an encoder or fader is being moved. Alternatively, the LCD can be configured to only show the assigned controller number of the currently used physical controller (e.g. controller number 7 for Volume). The LCD display mode can be changed as follows:

<

Press the Zone Range and Zone/Group buttons together.

<

The LCD will display OFF.

<

Simultaneously press the Zone Range and Zone/Group buttons again to change the LCD back to its default mode.

The LCD will display ON.

Section 2: Basic MIDI Control From Your Axiom

Axiom Line User Guide

2.4.3 Panic

At times you may find that the sound on your sound module or virtual instrument does not seem correct, or that notes get “stuck” and sound continuously. When this happens, press the button combination for Panic which will send ‘reset all controllers’ and ‘all notes off’ commands. This will release stuck notes and reset controller values back to normal. The messages are sent on all 16

MIDI channels. The LCD will show “Panic” while these messages are transmitted.

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Data 1 and Data 2 together.

25-note version:

<

Press Mute and Null together.

2.4.4 Reset

It is possible to completely reset your keyboard at any time. To do this, turn the Axiom off and then press and hold down both of the -/+ buttons as you power up the keyboard.

Important Note: When you perform this reset, all of the factory presets are lost. To restore the factory presets, please use the

Enigma software, available as a free download at www.m-audio.com.

Section 3: Advanced Features

In section 2 we saw how to use the keyboard, send program and bank changes, and assign MIDI controllers to the various controls on your Axiom. These basic skills allow you to perform with many software applications, sound modules and synthesizers. However, the Axiom has some more advanced features that allow you to take your performances even further. In this section we look at these features and how you can make use of them.

(If you have not done so already, please familiarize yourself with the various functions used when programming your Axiom. Details of these functions are given in section 2)

3.1 MIDI Controllers

Appendix C lists all the standard MIDI controller messages and some additional common messages all of which can be assigned to the controls on your Axiom.

Here we introduce an expanded list of MIDI controllers and also different ways that the controls on the Axiom are able to function.

Since these extra controller numbers are specific to different types of controls on the Axiom, please consult the appendices:

Axiom Control

Sliders (Axiom 49/61 only)

Aftertouch strip

Expression pedal

Pitch Bend wheel

Modulation wheel

Sustain pedal

Transport buttons

Assignable buttons (Axiom 49/61 only)

Rotary encoders

Pressure Pads

Controller Definition Table

Appendix D

Appendix D

Appendix D

Appendix D

Appendix D

Appendix E

Appendix E

Appendix E

Appendix F

Appendix G

Each MIDI controller has either two or three extra data parameters associated with it, as shown in the appendices listed above. The function of these extra data parameters depends on what MIDI controller number is assigned to the selected Axiom control. The appendices above show the details of what this functionality may be. The extra data parameters for a controller are accessed using the Data 1, Data 2 and Data 3 buttons on the 49- and 61-note versions, and the Advanced button, followed by the Data 1, Data 2 or

Data 3 keys on the 25-note version.

The useful programming examples given below describe some of the uses for these extra data parameters.

15

Section 3: Advanced Features

16

3.1.1 Limiting the Range of Controllers

It is possible to limit the range of the sliders, aftertouch strip, expression pedal or encoders on your Axiom. This is achieved using the extra data parameters for the controller as follows:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Set the physical controller to transmit a MIDI controller message as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press Data 2 and enter the minimum value for the controller’s range.

<

Press Data 3 and enter the maximum value for the controller’s range.

25-note version:

<

Set the physical controller to transmit a MIDI controller message as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Data 2 key and enter the minimum value for the controller’s range.

<

Press Enter to confirm the change for the minimum value.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Data 3 key and enter the maximum value for the controller’s range.

<

Press Enter to confirm the change for the maximum value.

3.1.2 Drawbar Mode

Drawbar mode is a quick method of reversing the direction of the nine sliders on your Axiom 49 or 61. If you are controlling an instrument that makes use of drawbars rather than faders—the MB-3 electric organ on Key Rig for example—then you should use drawbar mode.

The Drawbar function is not available on the 25-note version.

Press Data 3 and Chan Assign together to enable Drawbar mode. When Drawbar mode is active, this will be indicated by the

Drawbar symbol in the LCD display.

The status of Drawbar mode can be saved in any of the 20 memory locations. It will also be saved when you power down your

Axiom.

NOTE : It is possible to reverse the direction of any control on your Axiom 25, 49 or 61, by switching the minimum and maximum limits for the controller (for example: min=127 and max=0; refer to the previous section for details on how to do this).

3.1.3 Turning Controls OFF

Stop a control from transmitting MIDI data by turning that control OFF. This is done as follows:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the controller as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button and enter “000” on the numeric keypad.

<

While the LCD is still flashing, press the data minus (–) button.

<

The LCD will now display OFF.

25-note version:

<

Select the controller using the method described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key, and enter ‘000’ using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press Enter to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button, followed by the Ctrl Assign key again.

<

Press the data minus (-) button

<

The LCD will now display OFF.

<

Press Enter to confirm.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.2 Recollection and Storage of Your Control Setups

Once you have programmed the controls of your Axiom, you can store your setup into one of the 20 memory locations the Axiom offers.

The 20 locations are accessed using the Store and Recall buttons. Use the Store button to write your control setups to a memory location. Use the Recall button to get your control setups back.

To store all of the current control settings on your Axiom:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Store button.

<

Enter the number of the memory location (1 to 20) using the numeric keypad.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Store key.

<

Enter the number of the memory location (1 to 20) using the numeric data entry keys, or the -/+ buttons.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm and overwrite this preset location.

To recall any memory you have stored:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Recall button.

<

Enter the number of the memory location (1 to 20) using the numeric keypad.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Recall button.

<

Enter the number of the memory location (1 to 20) using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

or

<

Press the Recall button.

<

Use the -/+ buttons to increment, decrement the currently selected memory.

3.2.1 Control Groups

The controls on your Axiom are separated into four groups (three on the 25-note version), labeled A, B, C and D (or A, B and C on the 25-note version). It is possible to recall or store each group individually. The controls are grouped as follows:

Group A:

Keyboard

Pitch Bend wheel

Modulation wheel

Expression pedal

Aftertouch strip

Sustain pedal

Zone settings*

Global Channel setting

MIDI Out from USB setting

Program, Bank LSB, MSB settings

Group B:

Eight encoders

Six transport controls

Group C:

Eight trigger pads

Group D (49 note and 61 note versions only):

Nine sliders

Nine assignable buttons

Drawbar mode setting

* For more details on Zone settings, please see section 3.6.

The active groups during store and recall of memories are indicated on the LCD display. The Zone/Group button is used to select which groups are active. If Zone/Group is active, the LED will light inside the Zone/Group button.

17

Section 3: Advanced Features

18

On the 49- and 61-note versions, when Zone/Group is active, the group buttons A, B, C and D (located below faders D13 through

D16) are used to activate/deactivate Groups A-D, as the LCD screen shows.

On the 25-note version, when Zone/Group is active, the STOP, PLAY and REC buttons are used to activate/deactivate Groups A-C, as the LCD display shows.

You can switch Zones and Groups on and off by pressing the Zone/Group button followed by the chosen Zone or Group buttons.

When you enable a single group, the other two (or three) groups are automatically disabled. To enable multiple groups, press the respective group buttons at the same time.

Whenever you engage the Recall or Store functions, you will notice that Zone/Group select becomes active automatically.

If you press the Store button, all groups will be active by default to prevent any risk of some of the controllers you have set up getting missed. However, if you do not wish to store all controller groups together, you can activate the desired combination of controller groups by simultaneously pressing their respective group buttons immediately after pressing Store.

For example, if you want to store the settings for the trigger pads only:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Store button.

<

Press group button C to activate group C only.

<

The LCD display will now only flash the Group C symbol.

<

Use the numeric keypad to enter the memory location to store the Pad settings.

25-note version:

<

Press Advanced.

<

Press the Store key.

<

Press the REC button to activate group C.

<

The LCD display will now only flash the Group C symbol.

<

Use the numeric data entry keys to enter the memory location.

<

Press Enter to overwrite the selected memory location.

Note : When recalling a preset, only the groups currently active at that time are recalled.

3.2.2 Storing Your Presets on a Computer

It is possible to store the entire memory contents of your Axiom on a Mac, PC or a hardware sequencer. This is done using the

Memory Dump feature which sends a MIDI SysEx dump to the connected device.

You can record the SysEx data to a MIDI track on a sequencer, or we recommend using M-Audio’s Enigma software to store and manage you Axiom controller presets.

To send the entire memory contents of your Axiom to a computer:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Store and Recall together to initiate the Memory Dump feature.

<

The LCD display will flash SYS while the Axiom is transmitting its Memory content.

<

Do not touch your Axiom until the SysEx dump has completed and the LCD display has returned to normal.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Mem Dump key.

<

The LCD display will flash SYS while the Axiom is transmitting its Memory content.

<

Do not touch your Axiom until the SysEx dump has completed and the LCD display has returned to normal.

By sending an externally stored SysEx dump back through the MIDI IN or the USB port on your Axiom, it is possible to reprogram the memory just as it was saved.

Note : The SysEx data will program the 20 memory locations on your Axiom. It does NOT affect the current control settings on your Axiom. All current settings and assignments remain unchanged until you recall one of the 20 memory locations.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.2.3 Device ID

On the 49- and 61-note versions, you can define the device ID of your specific Axiom keyboard when sending a SysEx memory dump. The device ID is used to distinguish between any number of connected Axiom keyboards, if you own more than one.

The 25-note version does not have a device ID feature and so the device ID remains hard coded at 127. (127 is also the default device ID for the 49- and 61-note versions.) With the device ID set to 127, your Axiom responds to any SysEx memory dump that it reads at the MIDI IN or USB port – even if the received memory dump specifies a different device ID.

If you change the device ID to any number other than 127, the device will only respond to SysEx memory dumps which were originally recorded on the same device ID number.

To change the default device ID on Axiom 49 or 61, simultaneously press the Ctrl Assign and Store buttons, then enter the desired device ID using the numeric keypad or the -/+ buttons.

3.3 How To Avoid Jumping Parameters

A common problem with MIDI controllers occurs when you move a physical controller and the receiving parameter on your external

MIDI gear or software jumps from its present setting to the position of the knob or fader that you are using. The result can be a volume spike, a vibrato effect suddenly engaging or a pan position jumping from one side to another. The Axiom is well equipped to avoid this situation.

3.3.1 Mute

The Mute button on your Axiom will turn off the MIDI data output from all controls. This allows you to re-position the knob or faders that you are using to a setting that matches the current value of the parameter you are addressing.

When the controls are all muted, the LCD displays the MUTE symbol. The controls are un-muted by pressing the Mute button a second time.

Note that Mute does not affect the assignable buttons, sustain pedal or the keyboard. This is because these controls send one-shot

MIDI controllers, so there is never a need to match them to the parameter they are controlling. So, Mute mode is disengaged when you play the keyboard, or if you press an assignable button or the sustain pedal.

3.3.2 Null

The Null button engages Null mode which is used to temporarily deactivate the controls on your Axiom when you call up a new memory location. Null mode blocks the controls from outputting MIDI data until they reach the same position at which you left them the last time you used the memory location. When Null mode is active, there is never a worry that a control on your Axiom will cause a parameter to jump.

Turn Null mode on and off at any time simply by pressing the Null button. When Null mode is active, the LED in the Null button will be lit.

When you recall a preset, if Null mode is active moving a control on the Axiom engages a comparison between the current position of the control and its position when you last used this preset. If the control is at a different position than where you last left it before changing presets, the NULL symbol on the LCD display is shown and the numerical value displayed indicates how far away you are from the original position. A negative number indicates that the current value is lower than where you had left it, and a positive number indicates a higher value. As you move the control nearer to its original value, you see the numbers on the LCD display tend towards 0. When 0 is reached, the NULL symbol turns off, and the control starts to output MIDI data again.

The current positions of every control are remembered each time you leave a memory to recall a new one, regardless of whether

Null mode is active or not.

The status of Null mode is stored on powering down your Axiom.

3.3.3 Snapshot

The Snapshot function sends out the current values of the sliders, Expression pedal, Modulation wheel, Pitch Bend wheel and rotary encoders. This will adjust your software or external MIDI gear to the control positions on your Axiom.

Press the - and + buttons together to use the Snapshot function.

Snapshot can be used in conjunction with the Mute function (section 3.3.1) in order to perform a function not available on most hardware synths. Use the Mute function to reposition the controls of your Axiom as you like, and then use the Snapshot function to send all of the new positions at the same time.

19

Section 3: Advanced Features

20

3.4 The Rotary Encoders

As mentioned in section 2 it is possible to assign the rotary encoders to any MIDI controller message listed in Appendix C. When the encoders are assigned to MIDI controllers, they work in the same way as the sliders on the Axiom 49 and 61—when the minimum or maximum limit is reached, no more data is sent until you turn the dial the other way.

It is possible to program the encoders to increment or decrement the current value in the software, rather than sending an actual value. This means that there is never a risk of causing your software parameters to jump if they do not match the position of the control you’re moving.

Please note that not all software supports the use of rotary encoders. Also, those applications that do support them can differ in the way that encoder support is implemented. The Axiom therefore supports several different types of increment/decrement MIDI messages. You should check your software’s manual to see what message type is supported and how to engage endless dial support. To help with this we have listed the names commonly used for each of the relative data methods. We have also provided the data values used to represent data increment and data decrement. Where a range of values is specified for an increment or decrement, the range is in the form “slow movement" to "fast movement”.

The Program change increment/decrement will send out program changes with each step.

In order to program one of these methods to the rotary encoders on your Axiom, you should assign the MIDI controllers given below:

MIDI CC

145

146

147

148

149

150

151

152

Endless Data Method

Program Change Increment/Decrement

2’s Compliment from 64 / Relative (Binary Offset)

2’s Compliment from 0 / Relative (2’s Compliment)

Sign Magnitude / Relative (Signed Bit)

Sign Magnitude / Relative (Signed Bit 2)

Single Value Increment/Decrement

RPN Increment/Decrement Message

NRPN Increment/Decrement Message

Increment

065 to 127

001 to 64

065 to 127

001 to 063

096

096 then 000 to 127

096 then 000 to 127

Decrement

063 to 000

127 to 065

001 to 063

065 to 127

097

097 then 000 to 127

097 then 000 to 127

To Assign the Rotary Encoders:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the rotary encoder as explained in section 2.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button. The LCD shows the encoder’s current controller assignment.

<

Decide which endless data method you want from the table above, and enter its MIDI CC number using the numeric keypad.

<

Press Data 2. The LCD display flashes the encoder’s current data parameter.

<

Enter the MIDI controller number from Appendix C that you want. (Note that the range in this case is 0-127, not

0-131.)

<

The encoder will now transmit increment/decrement messages on the MIDI controller you have set.

25-note version:

<

Select the rotary encoder as explained in section 2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key. The LCD will show the encoder’s current controller assignment.

<

Decide which endless data method you require from the table above, and enter its MIDI CC number using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

Press the Data 2 key. The LCD display will show the encoder’s current data parameter..

<

Enter the MIDI controller number from Appendix C that you want. (Note that the range in this case is 0-127, not

0-131.)

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

The encoder will now transmit increment/decrement messages on the MIDI controller you have set.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.4.1 Acceleration Curves

There are three acceleration curves (C1-3) which define the relationship between how fast you turn the endless encoder and the value increment/decrement that is sent out. It is also possible to turn the acceleration curve OFF so that regardless of how quickly or slowly you turn the dial, the value will only increment/decrement by 1 per step. Turning the acceleration curve off is useful if you are performing adjustments that require fine tuning.

To turn the acceleration curve off, set the curve to 0. Curve settings 1-3 get progressively more sensitive to movements of the dial.

So, if you are going to be performing a lot of large, fast controller sweeps, you should select acceleration curve 3.

The curve selected by default is 2 which we advise for general use, in performing both large and small sweeps.

To select the acceleration curve:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Mute and Program together to access the Accel Curve setting.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned acceleration curve.

<

Use the numeric keypad or the -/+ buttons to select an acceleration curve in the range 0 to 3. The 0 setting will turn the curve off.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Curve key 3 times.

<

The LCD display will show “En” on the small 2-digit display to indicate that you have selected to edit the endless dial’s acceleration curve. The currently assigned acceleration curve will show on the larger, 3-digit display

<

Use the numeric data entry keys, or the -/+ buttons to select an acceleration curve in the range 0 to 3. The

0 setting will turn the curve off.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

3.5 Pressure Pads

The eight pressure pads on your Axiom are unique controls. As you apply more pressure to a pad, a higher value of effect is transmitted. The pads can also be used as triggers for composing drum patterns, or triggering samples and loops. When in this mode, the harder you hit a pad the higher the transmitted value of effect.

You can program the pads to any of the controllers listed in Appendix G.

If you program a controller number from 0 to 144, the pad sends a value according to the pressure you apply.

If you program a controller number from 145 up to 156, the pad works as a trigger, sending a single value when you press the pad, and another value when you release it.

Some useful settings for these pads are:

3.5.1 Sample/Loop Triggers With MIDI Notes

Setting a pad to controller 147 sets the pad to send a MIDI Note On message when you press it, and a MIDI Note Off message when you release it. This is useful when triggering samples on your external MIDI gear or software. When you program a pad to controller 148, the MIDI Note Off message is not sent until you press the pad a second time (toggle effect). This can be useful if you want to keep a loop playing continuously.

To program the pads to send a MIDI note on/off message:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

The LCD display will show the controller number currently assigned to the pad.

<

Enter 147 for Note on/off (press/release), or 148 for Note on/off toggle

<

Press the Data 1 button.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned note for the pad.

<

Enter the note number you want the pad to transmit using the numeric keypad.

<

The Data 2 and Data 3 buttons can be used to specify the note off velocity, and note on velocity respectively.

21

Section 3: Advanced Features

22

25-note version:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

The LCD display will flash the currently assigned controller for the pad.

<

Enter 147 for Note on/off (press/release), or 148 for note on/off toggle

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

Press the Data 1 key.

<

The LCD display will flash the currently assigned note for the pad.

<

Enter the note number you want the pad to transmit using the numeric keypad.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

The Data 2 and Data 3 keys can be used to specify the note off velocity, and note on velocity respectively.

3.5.2 Drum Pattern Composition

When you first turn your Axiom on, you will find that the pressure pads are set up as drum triggers for composing drum patterns in MIDI sequencers.

To set up the drum triggers, you need to program the pads to send specific MIDI note numbers (see previous section). The note numbers you assign depend on the drums that you want to control. Please refer to Appendix B to see which drums are mapped to which MIDI note numbers. Then, using the Data 1 parameter for each pad on your Axiom, assign that note number to the pad, as described above.

3.5.3 Sample/Loop Triggers with MIDI Controller Messages

In some cases,you may wish to send standard MIDI controller messages to trigger samples or loops. To make this work, you need to first assign a MIDI controller to the pad and then set the pad to send just ON and OFF values. This is done as follows:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

The LCD display will flash the currently assigned controller for the pad.

<

Enter 146, which sets the pad to send an ON value when pressed, and OFF value when released.

<

Press the Data 1 button and enter the controller number from Appendix C that you want the pad to send. The range of values here is 0-127.

<

Press the Data 3 button and enter the ON value (this should be 127 in most cases).

<

Press the Data 2 button and enter the OFF value (this should be 0 in most cases).

25-note version:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

The LCD display will flash the currently assigned controller for the pad.

<

Enter 146 to set the pad to send an ON value when pressed, and OFF value when released.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

Press the Data 1 button and enter the controller number from Appendix C that you want the pad to send. The range of values here is 0-127.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

<

The LCD display will flash the currently assigned note for the pad.

<

Enter the note number you want the pad to transmit using the numeric keypad.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

The Data 2 and Data 3 keys can be used in the same fashion to specify the ON value (this should be 127 in most cases) and the OFF value (this should be 0 in most cases).

3.5.4 Pressure Control

Using the pressure control, the pads give you a different type of performance option on your Axiom. You can control parameters on your software in a way that would not be possible on a standard dial or slider. The pressure pads can be used to make some very interesting effects.

As we’ve seen above, each pad can be assigned an individual MIDI controller number. It is also possible to assign minimum and maximum values to the controller. As you apply more and more pressure to the pad, the value of the controller you are sending will increase, until the maximum value you specified is reached. On release, the pad will return to the minimum value you specified.

To set the controller for a pressure pad with a minimum and maximum value:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned controller for the pad.

<

Enter the controller number from Appendix C that you want the pad to send.

<

If you want to specify a minimum value limit, press the Data 2 button and enter the minimum value.

<

If you want to specify a maximum value limit, press the Data 3 button and enter the maximum value.

25-note version:

<

Select the pad as described in section 2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned controller for the pad

<

Enter the controller number from Appendix C that you want the pad to send, using the numeric data entry keys.

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

If you want to specify a minimum value limit, press the Advanced button, followed by the Data 2 key and enter the minimum value. Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

If you want to specify a maximum value limit, press the Advanced button, followed by the Data 3 key and enter the maximum value. Press the Enter key to confirm.

3.5.5 Pad Curve

The Pad Curve setting is used to set the response curve of all eight pads. It is not possible to set the response curve of the pads independently.

There are nine velocity response curves and three fixed curves.

To change the velocity curve for the pads:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press the Bank LSB and Bank MSB buttons together to access the Pad Curve setting.

<

The LCD will show the currently selected pad curve. Proceeded by a ‘C’ if a curve is selected, or ‘F’ if a fixed velocity* is selected.

<

Enter the new curve number using the numeric keypad or use the -/+ keys to step through the options.

23

Section 3: Advanced Features

24

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Curve key twice.

<

The LCD will show “Pd” on the small 2-digit display as well as the currently selected velocity curve on the

3-digit display. The current curve is preceded by a C if a curve is selected, or ‘F’ if a fixed velocity* is selected.

<

Enter the new curve number using the numeric data entry keys or use the -/+ keys to step through the options.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm the Pad Curve setting.

*It is also possible to send fixed velocities each time you press a pad This is useful when composing drum parts, or simple synthesizer tracks. The fixed velocities are selected by assigning Pad Curve 10 to 12 as follows:

Curve

10

11

12

Fixed Velocity Value

64

100

127

3.5.6 Velocity Lock

The Velocity Lock (Vel. Lock) feature allows you to immediately turn off the response curve of the pads, and lock them to a set velocity. You can assign a different Lock velocity to each pad individually.

To turn Vel. Lock mode on and off for Axiom 49 or 61, press the Bank LSB and Glob Chan buttons together.

On the 25-note version, first press the Advanced button and then the Vel Lock key. The display will show “Loc” if you turn Vel Lock on.

Please note that the Vel. Lock feature only applies to pads set up as trigger pads. If a pad is assigned as a pressure pad, the Vel. Lock function has no affect.

The velocities that are locked by this function are set using the Data 2 and Data 3 parameters for each pad.

Setting the Vel. Lock parameters as follows:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the pad for programming as explained in section 2.4.2.

<

Ensure the pad is set up as a note trigger pad as described in section 3.5.1.

<

Press the Data 3 button. Enter the fixed ON velocity.

<

Press the Data 2 button. Enter the fixed OFF velocity.

25-note version:

<

Select the pad for programming as explained in section 2.4.2.

<

Ensure the pad is set up as a note trigger pad as described in section 3.5.1.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Data 3 key. Enter the fixed ON velocity.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press Data 2 key. Enter the fixed OFF velocity.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

3.6 Controlling Several Devices at the Same Time

In a software MIDI environment, it is often desirable to control more than one device at a time. This is done by transmitting on different MIDI channels with each one triggering a different sound. Using the Axiom, you can divide the keyboard into sections, with each section transmitting on a different MIDI channel. Furthermore, you can assign the MIDI channel of each physical controller on your Axiom to individual channels—or even tie controls to the different sections of the keyboard you have set. Dividing the keyboard and assigning different channels is done using the Zone feature.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.6.1 Zones

The Zone feature on your Axiom is used to control several different sound devices at the same time. In doing so, you can create splits, layers, harmony effects and more.

For example, you can split the keyboard on your Axiom so your left hand plays a bass sound and your right hand plays a piano sound. You can create a setting where you hear a chord by playing a single note, or you can set up a way to quickly switch between different instruments. The Zone feature on the Axiom allows you to do all of these things and more.

3.6.2 Activating/Deactivating Zones

There are four zones assignable on the 49- and 61-note versions and three zones assignable on the 25-note version. To activate/ deactivate zones, first press the Zone/Group button which will light.

To enable/disable any zone:

<

Press the Zone/Group button.

<

On 49- and 61-note versions use Zone buttons 1, 2, 3 and 4, located beneath faders D9 through D12 to activate/ deactivate Zones 1-4 respectively.

<

On the 25-note version, press the LOOP, RW and FF buttons to activate/deactivate zones 1-3 respectively.

<

Press the Zone/Group button again to exit.

* When you enable a single zone, the other 2 (or 3) zones are automatically disabled. To enable multiple zones, press the respective zone activate/deactivate buttons at the same time.

The active zones will always be shown on the LCD display

Zones have a number of parameters associated with them and editing these parameters affects all zones that are currently active simultaneously. Editing the various Zone parameters is described below.

The active/inactive status of each zone can be stored to the 20 memory locations. You must ensure Group A is activated when storing this data since the Zone settings are stored within this group. Please see section 3.2.1 for more information on Groups.

3.6.3 Zone Channel

If you want to use the Zone feature to control a number of different instruments, you need to set each of the zones to transmit on different channels.

To assign the channel of a zone:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Glob Chan and Zone Range together to access the Zone Channel setting. The LED in the Zone/Group button lights to indicate that Zone/Group mode is automatically selected.

<

The LCD displays the current transmit channel for the automatically selected zone and flashes its symbol. Use

Zone buttons 1 through 4 to select a different zone if necessary. While multiple zones can be active at the same time, only the zone with the flashing symbol will be affected by this change.

<

Enter the new channel number (00 to 16) using the numeric keypad. (Please note that assigning the zone to channel 00, will set the zone to transmit on the Global Channel (see section 2.2)).

<

Once the channel edit is complete, Zone/Group mode exits automatically.

<

Repeat to edit the channel settings of the remaining zones.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Zone Chan key

<

The LCD displays the current transmit channel for the automatically selected zone and flashes its symbol. Use

Zone buttons 1, 2 or 3 to select a different zone if necessary. While multiple zones can be active at the same time, only the zone with the flashing symbol will be affected by this change. Enter the new channel number

(00 to 16) using the numeric keypad. (Please note that assigning the zone to channel 00, will set the zone to transmit on the Global Channel (see section 2.2).)

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Repeat to edit the channel settings of the remaining zones.

The transmit channel of each zone can be stored to the 20 memory locations. You must ensure that Group A is activated when storing this data since the Zone settings are stored within this group.. Please see section 3.2.1 for more information on Groups.

25

Section 3: Advanced Features

26

3.6.4 Zone Range

The Zone Range defines the upper and lower limits of the keys contained in a zone.

To set the range of a zone:

<

Press the Zone Range button. The LED in the Zone/Group button lights to indicate that Zone/Group mode is automatically selected.

<

The LCD display will flash the symbols representing all zones which are currently active, and will therefore be affected by this range setting. The Range symbol will also appear on the LCD display. Use zone buttons 1 through

4 (1-3 on Axiom 25) to change the selection as necessary.

<

Press a key on the keyboard to select the lower limit of the zone. The note number is displayed in small digits on the LCD display.

<

Press a second key on the keyboard to select the upper limit of the zone. The note number is displayed in large digits of the LCD display.

Once two keys have been pressed, the keyboard will automatically return to normal, and the range of the edited zone will be updated.

Note : If multiple zones are selected while altering the zone range setting then they will all be assigned to the same section of the keyboard. This will cause this section of the keyboard to transmit on multiple MIDI channels—a setting useful to create layered sounds. If you want to split the keyboard into individual sections controlling one sound at a time, then make sure that only one zone is selected while configuring the zone range and that you assign a section of the keyboard that is not shared with any other zone. However, it is possible for zones to overlap partially or fully to create the effect of layered sounds.

The range of each zone can be stored to the 20 memory locations. You must ensure that Group A is activated when storing this data since the Zone settings are stored within this group. Please see section 3.2.1 for more information on Groups.

3.6.5 Octave and Transposition of a Zone

Each zone can be octave shifted or transposed independently.

To set the octave or transposition of a zone:

<

Press the Zone Range button.

<

Select the zone(s) you want to edit using the zone activate/deactivate buttons as described in section 3.6.2.

<

Use the Octave buttons to select the new octave/transpose value, as described in section 2.1.2 and 2.1.3.

If Zone Range mode is not active when you make an octave/transpose change, the change is global, meaning all active zones will be affected.

If Zone Range mode is active when you make an octave/transpose change, only those zones currently active will be affected.

The Octave and Transpose values for each independent zone, as well as the global octave and transpose values can be stored to the

20 memory locations. You must ensure Group A that is activated when storing this data since the Zone settings are stored within this group. Please see section 3.2.1 for more information on Groups.

Note : There are various creative possibilities for the usage of the Octave/Transpose settings in conjunction with individual zones.

For example, assign three zones to the same section of the keyboard, transpose the second zone two half steps down and the third six half steps down. Make sure all three zones are active, then play a single key on the keyboard—a chord will sound. Experiment with the Octave/Transpose and Zone settings to discover the full potential of this feature.

3.6.6 More About Program, Bank LSB And Bank MSB

We saw in section 2.3 how Program and Bank messages can be sent from your Axiom to select different sounds on a connected device(s).

When you send these messages, they apply to whichever zones are active at that time. If two zones are selected and set to transmit on different channels, the Program or Bank message will be sent on BOTH channels.

Note : New Program and Bank messages always override previously sent Program and Bank messages. It is important to ensure that ONLY those zones that you want to send these messages on are active, or you could call up new sounds on a device you don’t intend to.

The last sent Program, Bank LSB and Bank MSB message for each zone is saved when the unit is powered down, and can be stored in each of the 20 memory locations. You must ensure Group A is activated when storing this data since the Zone settings are stored within this group. Please see section 3.2.1 for more information on Groups.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.6.7 Individual Channel Assignments of Controls

Every physical controller on your Axiom can be assigned to its own individual channel, allowing you to control several instruments at the same time. It is also possible to tie a physical controller to a zone or to the Global Channel.

To assign the transmit channel for a control:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the physical controller as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the Chan Assign button.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned MIDI channel.

Use the numeric keypad to enter the new MIDI channel in the range 00 to 20*.

25-note version:

<

Select the physical controller as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Chan Assign key.

<

The LCD display will show the currently assigned MIDI channel.

Use the numeric data entry keys to enter the new MIDI channel in the range 00 to 19*.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

The channel assignment of each physical controller is saved if the group to which that controller belongs is active when you save to any of the 20 memory locations.

* Please see section 3.6.7.1 for an explanation of channels 17-20.

3.6.7.1 Tying Controls to Zones

If you assign a physical controller to channel 17, 18, 19 or 20 the controller is tied to the transmit channel of Zone 1, Zone 2,

Zone 3 or Zone 4 respectively (remember that the 49- and 61-note versions of the Axiom have four possible zones and the

25-note version has three). Therefore, as you alter a zone’s channel, you are also altering the physical controller’s channel at the same time.

Note that although a physical controller may be tied to a zone, if you want to save this assignment to any of the 20 memory locations, it is necessary to ensure you select the group to which the physical controller belongs. Group A does not cover this.

3.6.7.2 About SysEx Messages and Device ID

System Exclusive (SysEx) messages are not channel specific so when transmitting SysEx messages, the individual physical controller channel number does not define a transmit channel, but a device ID instead. This is a difference that is indicated on the LCD display when it DOES NOT show a ‘c’ for channel.

Device ID values range from 00 - 127. In most cases, you should set the device ID to 127, which is a value that allows SysEx messages to be received by all connected devices.

Please note that the device ID assigned to a controller cannot be changed using the Dev ID button. This button is used for setting the global device ID of the Axiom.

For more information on Device ID’s and SysEx messages please see section 5.3.

3.6.7.3 The Global Channel

The Global Channel of the Axiom can be altered easily on the fly and any physical controller or zone that is assigned to channel 00 will transmit on whatever channel the Global Channel is set to.

The Global Channel can be stored to any of the 20 memory locations, as long as Group A is selected.

27

Section 3: Advanced Features

28

3.7 Group A Controls

Note : For information on Group A memory recall, please review section 3.2.1.

The term “Group A controls” refers to the pitch bend wheel, modulation wheel, aftertouch, sustain pedal and expression pedal. Each of these controls differs from other controls on your Axiom because these can be programmed to be active or inactive in each zone independently.

This means for instance, that you can set the sustain pedal to work on Zone 1 but not Zone 2, or the pitch-bend wheel to affect Zone

3 but not Zone 1.

In order for the Group A control to transmit on all zones, the channel assignment must be set to 0. If a Group A control is assigned to any channel other than 0, it will behave in the same way as any other control on your Axiom.

If a Group A control is selected, when you press Ctrl Assign, the MIDI controller message you assign to the Group A control will apply to all the zones that are active at that time. This means the MIDI controller you have assigned to the Group A control will be transmitted on all the channels the selected zones were assigned to.

In order to prevent the Group A control from transmitting on more than one active zone, you can simply assign the Group A control to the desired zone’s channel. This will prevent the Group A control from having an affect on any of the other zones, as long as they are not assigned to the same channel.

Alternatively, you can set the controller message to OFF if you do not want a Group A control to affect certain zones:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the Group A control.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button. The LED in the Zone/Group button lights to confirm your move.

<

Select the zones that you do NOT want the Group A control to affect.

<

Use the numeric keypad to set the value to ‘000’ as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press the minus (-) button to set the control to OFF.

25-note version:

<

Select the Group A control.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key. The LED in the Zone/Group button lights to confirm your move.

<

Select the zones that you do NOT want the Group A control to affect.

<

Enter the value “000” using the number keys as described in section 2.4.2.

<

Press Enter to confirm

<

Press the Advanced button again

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key again

<

Press the minus (-) button to set the control to OFF.

<

Press Enter to confirm.

Note : If a zone is not enabled, the Group A controller will NOT transmit the data that is assigned to that Zone.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.8 Example of Control Functionality

3.8.1 Setting Toggle Values for the Buttons

The assignable buttons and the pedals can each be assigned to toggle between two MIDI controller message values. You may for example want to send out value 15 when you first press the button followed by value 74 when you press the button for a second time.

Setting up a toggle effect:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the button or pedal to edit.

<

Press the Data 2 button.

<

Type in “015” using the numeric keypad. This sets the OFF position value.

<

Press the Data 3 button.

<

Type in “074” using the numeric keypad. This sets ON position value.

25-note version:

<

Select the button or pedal to edit.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Data 2 key.

<

Type in “15” using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm. This sets the OFF position value.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

Press the Data 3 key

<

Type in ‘074’ using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm. This sets ON position value.

If you want the button to send the same value every time you press it, simply set the same value for both Data 2 and

Data 3.

The above method toggles the button each time you press it. It is also possible to set the button to send one value when you press it, and another value when you release it.

Setting up an alternating value effect:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the button or pedal to edit.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

Type in “146” using the numeric keypad. This sets the button up for MIDI CC (On/Off) mode, as shown in

Appendix E.

<

Assign the OFF and ON value using Data 2 (for off value) and Data 3 (for on value) respectively, as detailed in section 3.8.1.

25-note version:

<

Select the button or pedal to edit.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

Type in “146” using the numeric data entry keys

<

Press the Enter key to confirm. This sets the button up for MIDI CC (On/Off) mode, as shown in

Appendix E.

<

Assign the OFF and ON value using Data 2 (for off value) and Data 3 (for on value) respectively, as detailed in section 3.8.1.

29

Section 3: Advanced Features

30

3.8.2 Assigning MMC Messages to a Button

MIDI Machine Control messages are used by some devices and software to control transport functions such as Stop, Play and

Record. The Transport controls on your Axiom keyboard can be setup to send MMC messages, however it is important to note, that not all MIDI devices or software applications respond to MMC messages. Even those that do support MMC often need to be set up manually to respond to these messages. Please consult the documentation relating to your device or software application to check this. The MMC message format is a SysEx message, using a single byte to define the message type. The table below lists the currently defined MMC messages:

08

09

10

11

12

04

05

06

07

Number

01

02

03

MMC Command

STOP

PLAY

DEFERRED PLAY

FORWARD

REWIND

RECORD STROBE

RECORD EXIT

RECORD PAUSE

PAUSE

EJECT

CHASE

COMMAND ERROR RESET

13 MMC RESET

To assign the desired MMC message to an assignable button, pad or sustain pedal:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the button to edit.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

Type in “149” using the numeric keypad. This is the number that corresponds to the MMC instruction

(Appendix E).

<

Press the Chan Assign button. Notice the Dev ID symbol on the LCD display flashes indicating you are entering a Device ID, not a channel value.

<

Type in “127,” using the numeric keypad. This sets the device ID for the SysEx message to 127. (Please see section 3.6.7.2 for more information on Device ID’s.)

<

Press the Data 2 button.

<

Enter a number from the table above to select the message type.

25-note version:

<

Select the button to edit.

<

Press the Advanced button

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

Type in “149” using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button again.

<

Press the Chan Assign key. Notice the Dev ID symbol on the LCD display flashes indicating you are entering a Device ID, not a channel value.

<

Type in “127” using the numeric data entry keys.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm. This sets the device ID for the SysEx message to 127. (Please see section

3.6.7.2 for more information on Device IDs.)

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Data 2 key.

<

Enter a number from the table above to select message type.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

Section 3: Advanced Features

Axiom Line User Guide

3.8.3 Assigning RPN/NRPN Messages to a Fader or Encoder

Many of today’s synthesizers and music applications can receive and process RPN and NRPN MIDI messages to allow control of an array of useful settings and features. However, RPN/NRPN messages are different from most other MIDI data as they consist of two or more MIDI messages that have to be sent in sequence. Traditionally, you would have to send multiple MIDI messages manually and one by one in order to change a single RPN/NRPN setting on your synthesizer or music software. This can turn into a difficult and lengthy procedure with many MIDI controllers.

The Axiom simplifies this procedure by combining commonly used RPN/NRPN messages and making them accessible just as if they were an extended set of standard MIDI controllers. In addition to the common MIDI controllers 0 -127, the Axiom lets you access

RPN/NRPN features through additional controller numbers 128 through 156. The amount of additional MIDI controller numbers depends on the controller type (rotary encoder, fader, pad, etc.). Lists of supported RPN/NRPN messages and the associated extended MIDI controller numbers (sorted by controller type) can be found in Appendices D, E, F and G.

Once assigned to one of your Axiom’s controls, complete multi-part RPN/NRPN messages will be transmitted simply by moving a fader or using an encoder or one of the Axiom’s other controls.

Assigning your Axiom’s faders or encoders to send RPN or NRPN messages is done in the same fashion as assigning a regular

MIDI controller.

To assign RPN or NRPN numbers:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Select the control to edit.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign button.

<

Enter the desired RPN or NRPN number using the numeric keypad.

<

The Data 2 button can be used to define the RPN LSB value, while the RPN MSB can be defined using the

Data 3 button. This process is detailed in section 3.8.1.

25-note version:

<

Select the control to edit.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the Ctrl Assign key.

<

Enter the desired RPN or NRPN number using the numeric keypad.

<

Press the Enter key to confirm.

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

The Data 2 key can be used to define the RPN LSB value, while the RPN MSB can be defined using the Data

3 key. This process is detailed in section 3.8.1.

You will find that most data sheets for those devices that make use of NRPNs give the MSB and LSB values that you should enter with Data 3 and Data 2 (see Appendix B3 for Roland/XG defined NRPN messages). Some manuals however may only give you the hex values. The Axiom requires you to enter the decimal value. You can convert hexadecimal values to decimal using the table in Appendix H.

For a detailed description of RPN/NRPN data see section 5.2.

31

Section 3: Advanced Features

Section 4: Usage Examples

4.1 MIDI Out from USB Function

MIDI Out from USB can be used to switch the source of the MIDI data seen at the MIDI Out port of your Axiom.

On initial power up, MIDI Out from USB mode is off. This means that as you play your Axiom, MIDI data will be sent to the MIDI

Out port.

If you turn MIDI Out From USB mode on, playing your Axiom will no longer send data to the MIDI Out port. The data is instead streamed from the computer. So, as long as you have selected your Axiom as the active output port in your computer’s sequencer, this is the data that will be sent the MIDI Out port.

For example, if you want to control a sound module from your Axiom, you should ensure MIDI Out from USB remains off. If you want the sound module to play data streamed from your computer however, then you should turn MIDI Out from USB on and ensure that the output port for your Axiom is selected as the computer’s MIDI output device (this is done in your computer software).

The following diagrams clarify the routing of MIDI data when MIDI out from USB mode is both off and when it is on:

MIDI Out from USB mode is off.

32

MIDI Out from USB mode is on.

Section 4: Usage Examples

Axiom Line User Guide

To control MIDI out from USB mode:

49- and 61-note versions:

<

Press Data 2 and Data 3 together to change the MIDI Out setting to MIDI Out from USB.

<

You will see a MIDI plug symbol appear on the LCD display.

<

To turn MIDI Out from USB mode back off, press the same button combination again. When you do this, the

MIDI plug symbol disappears.

25-note version:

<

Press the Advanced button.

<

Press the MIDI Out key to activate MIDI Out from USB.

<

You will see a MIDI plug symbol appear on the LCD display.

<

To turn MIDI Out from USB mode back off, repeat these steps. When you do this, the MIDI plug symbol disappears.

4.2 Recording Your Performance On A Sequencer

A MIDI sequencer will allow you to record, play back, store and edit MIDI data. Although hardware sequencers exist, we will focus on the more commonly used software sequencers in this manual. Examples of popular software sequencers are Pro ToolsTM, CubaseTM and LogicTM, although there are many different sequencing applications available for your computer.

In order to use the Axiom with your sequencer, you need to set up the sequencer software so that the Axiom is recognized as the sequencer’s MIDI input device.

You need to choose a MIDI output device that is capable of making sound when MIDI data is sent to it. This may be a soundcard on your computer, a VST instrument or a sound module connected to a MIDI port which is in turn connected to your computer. Please consult your sequencer’s user manual for more information on how this is done. In this manual, section 1.3.3, “Using The Axiom With

Your software” details how the Axiom will appear in the device listing of your sequencer.

With the Axiom set up to communicate with the sequencer, data will go into the sequencer and will be routed to a virtual synth within the sequencer software or sent to an external sound module via a MIDI output port. The virtual synthesizer or external sound module will turn the MIDI data into audible sounds. You can then record the incoming MIDI data and edit your performance using your sequencer.

33

Section 4: Usage Examples

4.3 Controlling a Sound Module from the Computer

34

By turning on MIDI Out from USB mode (section 4.1), the data coming into the Axiom from the computer will go directly out of the

MIDI Out port and trigger the sounds in the external sound module. This means that your Axiom is effectively acting as a USB to

MIDI interface. In order to channel MIDI data from the computer to the MIDI Out port, you should set the MIDI Output device on your computer to be the Axiom.

Alternatively, you may want to merge the MIDI data from your Axiom with the data from the computer. This would allow you to play and record to a sequencer, and play back the entire performance on a sound module connected to the MIDI Out port of your Axiom.

To do this:

<

Set MIDI Out from USB mode on (section 4.1).

<

Select the Axiom as the MIDI Input device in your sequencer.

<

Select the Axiom as the MIDI Output device in your sequencer.

Section 5: MIDI Messages Explained

5.1 Program & Bank Changes Explained

The original GM MIDI Specification was designed to access only 128 different sounds using Program Change messages (0-127).

As MIDI devices grew to be more sophisticated and contain more sounds, Bank Change messages were included in the specification to allow for more than 128 sounds to be accessed. Within each bank there are a possible 128 different sound patches that can be accessed using the standard Program Change command. Using the expanded 14-bit Bank Change command, there are now 16,384 banks available—each with 128 sounds patches. Technically speaking, the first 7 bits of the 14-bit Bank Change message are sent in a single byte known as the Bank LSB. The last 7 bits define another byte known as the Bank MSB. The Bank LSB is the most commonly used. This allows for 128 bank changes, and often there is no need to send a Bank MSB.

You will find almost all MIDI devices respond to Program Change commands and many are organized according to the GM listing. In all General MIDI devices, the different sounds are always organized in the same way from device to device, so the piano sounds are in their particular place, the string sounds are in their place, the drum sounds and so on. All GM devices (both hardware and software sound modules) are clearly labeled as such, so you know that their sounds are organized in the General MIDI structure. So when a GM device receives a MIDI Program Change, it calls up a type of sound that you expect from the GM sound set. All non-GM devices call up unique sounds from their memory upon receiving MIDI Program Changes. Since the sounds in a non-GM device are not arranged in a particular order, you need to take a look at the device itself to see which sound you want and at which location in the memory it resides. Many VST instruments such as Native Instruments’ FM7 or the synth modules in Reason are non-GM devices.

Bank Change messages are useful when calling up sounds from a large library that may exist in a particular sound module or software synth. For example devices that are built with Roland's GS specification or Yamaha's XG specification require you to specify a Bank

Change in order to access the extra voices and effects that these devices provide.

Sending Program, Bank LSB and Bank MSB data is made simple using the Axiom. Please consult section 2.3 to see how this is done.

Section 5: MIDI Messages Explained

Axiom Line User Guide

5.2 RPN/NRPNs Explained

Non-registered parameter numbers (NRPN's) are device specific messages that enable you to control synths and sound modules via

MIDI. The MIDI specification defines open parameter numbers to allow manufacturers to specify their own controllers. The more common of these are registered by the MIDI Manufacturer's Association and are now part of the MIDI specification (hence the term

Registered Parameter Numbers – RPN's). (See Appendix F.) Each NRPN/RPN has an associated 2-byte number. The two bytes allow for 127 values each. (An RPN or NRPN message is made up of two parts. One is called the ‘Most Significant Byte’ or MSB and one is called the ‘Least Significant Byte’ or LSB. Both these messages together constitute an RPN or NRPN command.) This allows for

16,129 values in total!

MIDI controllers 98 and 99 represent the NRPN LSB and MSB respectively, while 100 and 101 represent the RPN LSB and MSB

(see the MIDI controllers list in Appendix D). To transmit an NRPN/RPN, these two controller messages are sent along with their user-specified values. A further controller message and value needs to be sent to specify the (coarse or fine) value adjustment. This is specified by controller number 6 (Data entry) for coarse adjustments or number 38 for fine adjustments.

A list of NRPN's is always given in the user’s manual of any device that receives NRPN messages. It is always necessary that the NRPN

MSB and LSB be sent together. Both will be specified in the device's manual. You may find the manufacturers have specified the numbers in hexadecimal format only. In this case, use Appendix H to translate the value to Decimal.

Your Axiom keyboard makes the process of transmitting NRPN's easy. Please consult section 3.8.3 to see how this is done.

5.3 SysEx Explained

System Exclusive (SysEx) messages were defined in the MIDI specification to allow individual devices to have undefined function control via MIDI. The format of SysEx messages allows for virtually any function to be performed via MIDI—so long as the receiving device is able to translate the message and act accordingly. This allows devices to send audio sample memory data, memory dumps, controller settings and much more. It also allows the controllers of one device to be controlled by another.

It is not possible to program your own specified SysEx message into the Axiom. However, there are some useful SysEx messages preprogrammed into the keyboard that can be accessed by assigning the appropriate MIDI CC to a controller (see Appendices D-G).

It should be noted that a SysEx message is not transmitted on any specified channel. All SysEx messages contain a device ID that is used to identify which of the connected devices should respond to the SysEx message. All other devices are ignored. If you are using a SysEx message on the Axiom, the global channel is ignored. When you press the Chan Assign key, instead of entering a channel for the controller, you will be entering a device ID instead. This is indicated by the fact that the LED displays a 3-digit number, not a 2-digit number preceded by a “c.”

Device ID’s values range from 00 to 127. 127 is the default device number setting on the Axiom. This setting transmits the SysEx message to all devices.

Although it is not possible to program the controllers of the Axiom with your own SysEx messages, there are software applications that can receive a MIDI input signal and transmit a different, user specified message. You can program your SysEx messages into the translator software such as MIDI OX, then translate the incoming data from the keyboard to your own SysEx, depending on the controller you are using.

And finally...

If you are still having trouble with any of the features on the Axiom, please consult the following Troubleshooting Guide, which answers some frequently asked questions. If you are still not able to find the answer you are looking for, please feel free to contact M-Audio technical support for further assistance. Support details are given following the Troubleshooting Guide below.

35

Section 5: MIDI Messages Explained

36

Section 6: Troubleshooting

The Axiom has been designed to give you high performance MIDI control. It has been tested under a wide range of systems and operating conditions. However, there are virtually limitless numbers of operating scenarios, any of which could affect your system’s performance. Though this section cannot cover all possible situations you may encounter, we would like to offer some suggestions for dealing with common problems.

If you are connecting to a computer, we recommend that you avoid connecting too many devices to your computer at the same time.

The more devices you have connected to the computer, the greater the load on the computer’s CPU. Although it is possible in theory to connect multiple USB devices at the same time, doing so may degrade your system’s performance.

My Axiom suddenly stopped working after having performed well since installation on a computer.

<

Switch off the unit and leave it off for 10 seconds. Then restart your computer, power up your Axiom and try again. If the problem persists, you may have to reinstall the drivers for the unit. The latest drivers are available at http://www.m-audio.com.

I have plugged in a Sustain pedal to my Axiom, but it works backwards.

<

The polarity of the Sustain pedal is calculated by the Axiom when it is powered up. On power up, the Sustain pedal is assumed to be in the off position. So, if you want the Sustain pedal to be off when it is not depressed, make sure not to press the pedal when you power up. To reverse the pedal polarity, just press and hold the pedal when you power up.

Note: this will have to be done each time you power up the Axiom.

I have connected the Axiom to my computer. When I press a key, there is a delay before I hear any sound.

<

This delay is known as latency. Latency with MIDI signals is caused at the computer and is not coming from the Axiom.

This may be due to the CPU load of the soft-synth you are using. MIDI data is simply control data. MIDI data is read by the soft synth; the soft synth then completes a large number of complex calculations in order to produce the sound you hear, and all of this processing activity takes time. If you already have adjusted the appropriate parameters relating to latency on your sound card, try re-installing the latest drivers for the sound card, or try reducing the buffer sizes of the sound card. If you are using a host application, check its buffer size settings as most applications allow for user adjustment to improve timing.

<

PC only

: If your soundcard supports ASIO or WDM then you should use these drivers. It is suggested that you avoid using the MME drivers which are older and less efficient in design and will have a much higher latency. In the audio settings for your application please select the ASIO driver if available.

<

For more information on latency reduction please consult the knowledgebase at http://www.m-audio.com.

<

If you feel that you may need to upgrade your soundcard, please visit http://www.m-audio.com.

Section 6: Troubleshooting

Axiom Line User Guide

Section 7: Contact

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions about this or any M-Audio product, we invite you to contact us by using the following information:

M-Audio USA

5795 Martin Rd., Irwindale, CA 91706

Technical Support tel (pro products): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (626) 633-9055 tel (consumer products): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(626) 633-9066 fax (shipping): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(626) 633-9032

Sales e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

tel: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(626) 633-9050 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(626) 633-9070 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.m-audio.com

M-Audio U.K.

Floor 6, Gresham House, 53 Clarenden Road, Watford

WD17 1LA, United Kingdom

Technical Support e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

tel:(Mac support): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +44 (0)1765 650072 tel: (PC support): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .+44 (0)1309 671301

Sales tel: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +44 (0)1923 204010 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +44 (0)1923 204039 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.maudio.co.uk

M-Audio France

Floor 6, Gresham House, 53 Clarenden Road,

Watford-WD17 1LA, Royaume-Uni

Renseignements commerciaux :

0810 001 105 ou [email protected]

Assistance technique :

0820 000 731 (PC) & 0820 391 191 (MAC)

Assistance technique (e-mail) :

[email protected] & [email protected]

Fax : 01 72 72 90 52

Site web : www.m-audio.fr

M-Audio Germany

Kuhallmand 34, D-74613 Ohringen, Germany

Technical Support e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

tel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .+49 (0)7941 - 9870030 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +49 (0)7941 98 70070

Sales e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

tel: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +49 (0)7941 98 7000 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +49 (0)7941 98 70070 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.m-audio.de

M-Audio Canda

1400 St-Jean Baptiste Ave. #150, Quebec City,

Quebec G2E 5B7, Canada

Technical Support phone (PC support): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (418) 872-0444 phone (MAC support): . . . . . . . . . . . . . (418) 872-0444 fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : (418) 872-0034

Sales e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(866) 872-0444 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (514) 396-7102 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.m-audio.ca

M-Audio Latin America

5795 Martin Rd.

Irwindale, CA 91706 USA

Technical Support e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (52 871) 747 90 25

Sales e-mail: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (949) 766-7589 fax: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (949) 766-7590 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.m-audio.com

M-Audio Japan

アビッドテクノロジー株式会社 | エムオーディオ事業部

〒 460-0002  愛知県名古屋市中区丸の内 2-18-10

2-18-10 Marunouchi

Naka-Ku, Nagoya 460-0002

Japan

カスタマーサポート(技術的なお問い合わせ) e-mail : tel :

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

e-mail (Macintosh 環境専用):

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

 [email protected]

[email protected]

052-218-0859(10:00~12:00 / 13:00~17:00)

セールスに関するお問い合わせ

(技術的なお問い合わせはご遠慮下さい) e-mail: tel: fax:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

052-218-3375 (9:30~12:00 / 13:00~18:00)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 052-218-0875

プレス/ メディアに関するお問い合わせ

(技術的なお問い合わせはご遠慮下さい) e-mail: tel: fax:

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . [email protected]

052-218-3375 (9:30~12:00 / 13:00~18:00)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 052-218-0875 web : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . http://www.m-audio.co.jp

37

Section 7: Contact

Section 8: Technical Info

Caution: Electro Static Discharge, Electrical Fast Transient and Conducted RF interference may cause the unit malfunctioning. In such case, unplug the unit and plug it in again to restore normal operation.

Note: Your M-Audio product has been tested to comply with FCC Standards FOR HOME OR OFFICE USE. Modifications not authorized by the manufacturer may void users authority to operate this device.

Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the

FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:

<

<

<

<

Re-orient or relocate the receiving antenna.

Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.

Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.

Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/ TV technician for help.

ASIO is a trademark of Steinberg Soft– und Hardware GmbH.

VST is a trademark of Steinberg Soft– und Hardware GmbH.

Section 9: Warranty Terms and Registration

Warranty Terms

M-Audio warrants products to be free from defects in materials and workmanship, under normal use and provided that the product is owned by the original, registered user. Visit www.m-audio.com/warranty for terms and limitations applying to your specific product.

Warranty Registration

Thank you for registering your new M-Audio product. Doing so immediately both entitles you to full warranty coverage and helps

M-Audio develop and manufacture the finest quality products available. Register online at www.m-audio.com/register to receive

FREE product updates.

38

Axiom Line

Tested to comply with

FCC standards

FOR HOME OR STUDIO USE

Section 8: Technical Info | Section 9: Warranty Terms and Registration

Section 10: Appendices

Appendix A - MIDI IMPLEMENTATION CHART

Function

Basic :Default

Channel:Changed

:Default

Mode :Messages

:Altered

Note

Number:True Voice

Velocity: Note ON

: Note OFF

Aftertouch : Keys

:Ch’s

Pitch Bend

Control 0-119

Change

120-127

Program

Change:True Number

System Exclusive

Song Position

Common:Song Select

System :Clock

Exclusive:Commands

Aux :Local ON/OFF

Messages :All Notes OFF

:Active Sense

:Reset

Notes:

0

0

0

X

X

Transmitted

1-16

1-16

---------

X

*********

0-127

*********

0

X

X

X

Received

X

X

X

X

X

X

0

0-127

*********

GM, GM2, MMC

X

X

X

Memory Dump

X

X

X

0

0

X

0

0

0 = YES X=NO

Axiom Line User Guide

Remarks

39

Section 10: Appendices

40

Appendix B – Useful MIDI Data Tables

B1 - General MIDI Instruments – Program Change Numbers

Piano

0 Acoustic Grand Piano

1 Bright Acoustic Piano

2 Electric grand Piano

3 Honky Tonk Piano

4 Electric Piano 1

5 Electric Piano 2

6 Harpsichord

7 Clavinet

Chromatic Percussion

8 Celesta

9 Glockenspiel

10 Music Box

11 Vibraphone

12 Marimba

13 Xylophone

14 Tubular bells

15 Dulcimer

Organ

16 Drawbar Organ

17 Percussive Organ

18 Rock Organ

19 Church Organ

20 Reed Organ

21 Accordion

22 Harmonica

23 Tango Accordion

Guitar

24 Nylon Acoustic

25 Steel Acoustic

26 Jazz Electric

27 Clean Electric

28 Muted Electric

29 Overdrive

30 Distorted

31 Harmonics

Bass

32 Acoustic Bass

33 Fingered Bass

34 Electric Picked Bass

35 Fretless Bass

36 Slap Bass 1

37 Slap Bass 2

38 Syn Bass 1

39 Syn Bass 2

Strings/Orchestra

40 Violin

41 Viola

42 Cello

43 Contrabass

44 Tremolo Strings

45 Pizzicato Strings

46 Orchestral Harp

47 Timpani

Ensemble

48 String Ensemble 1

49 String Ensemble 2

50 Syn Strings 1

51 Syn Strings 2

52 Choir Aahs

53 Voice Oohs

54 Syn Choir

55 Orchestral Hit

Brass

56 Trumpet

57 Trombone

58 Tuba

59 Muted Trumpet

60 French Horn

61 Brass Section

61 Syn Brass 1

62 Syn Brass 2

Reed

64 Soprano Sax

65 Alto Sax

66 Tenor Sax

67 Baritone Sax

68 Oboe

69 English Horn

70 Bassoon

71 Clarinet

Pipe

72 Piccolo

73 Flute

74 Recorder

75 Pan Flute

76 Bottle Blow

77 Shakuhachi

78 Whistle

79 Ocarina

Synth Lead

80 Syn Square Wave

81 Syn Sawtooth Wave

82 Syn Calliope

83 Syn Chiff

84 Syn Charang

85 Syn Voice

86 Syn Sawtooth Wave

87 Syn Brass & Lead

Synth Pad

88 New Age Syn Pad

89 Warm Syn Pad

90 Polysynth Syn Pad

91 Choir Syn Pad

92 Bowed Syn Pad

93 Metal Syn Pad

94 Halo Syn Pad

95 Sweep Syn Pad

Synth Effects

96 SFX Rain

97 SFX Soundtrack

98 SFX Crystal

99 SFX Atmosphere

100 SFX Brightness

101 SFX Goblins

102 SFX Echoes

103 SFX Sci-Fi

Ethnic

104 Sitar

105 Banjo

106 Shamisen

107 Koto

108 Kalimba

109 Bag Pipe

110 Fiddle

111 Shanai

Percussive

112 Tinkle Bell

113 Agogo

114 Steel Drums

115 Woodblock

116 Taiko Drum

117 Melodic Tom

118 Syn Drum

119 Reverse Cymbal

Sound Effects

120 Guitar Fret Noise

121 Breath Noise

122 Seashore

123 Bird Tweet

124 Telephone Ring

125 Helicopter

126 Applause

127 Gun Shot

Section 10: Appendices

Axiom Line User Guide

B2 - General MIDI Note Numbers

7

8

9

5

6

3

4

1

2

-1

0

Octave

48

60

72

84

96

108

120

Note Numbers

C C# D

0

12

1

13

2

14

24

36

25

37

26

38

49

61

73

85

97

109

121

50

62

74

86

98

110

122

52

64

76

88

100

112

124

E

4

16

28

40

51

63

75

87

99

111

123

D#

3

15

27

39

54

66

78

90

102

114

126

F#

6

18

30

42

53

65

77

89

101

113

125

F

5

17

29

41

55

67

79

91

103

115

127

G

7

19

31

43

57

69

81

93

105

117

A

9

21

33

45

56

68

80

92

104

116

G#

8

20

32

44

59

71

83

95

107

119

B

11

23

35

47

58

70

82

94

106

118

A#

10

22

34

46

B3 - Roland GS And Yamaha XG NRPN Messages

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

NRPN

LSB

CC98

08 00-7F

09 00-7F

0A 00-7F

20 00-7F

21 00-7F

63 00-7F

64 00-7F

66 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

00-7F 00-7F

*16

*17

18

*19

1A

1C

1D

1E

%1F

01

01

01

01

*14

*15

NRPN

MSB

CC99

01

01

01

01 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

Data

MSB

CC06 n/a

Data

LSB

CC38

(-64 - 0 - +63) Vibrato Rate (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Vibrato Depth (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Vibrato Delay (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Filter Cutoff Freq. (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Filter Resonance (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) EG (TVF&TVA) Attack Time (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) EG (TVF&TVA) Decay Time (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) EG (TVF&TVA) Release Time (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum Filter Cutoff Freq. (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum Filter Resonance (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum EG Attack Rate (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum EG Decay Rate (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum Instrument Pitch Coarse (relative change)

(-64 - 0 - +63) Drum Instrument Pitch Fine (relative change)

(0 to Max) Drum Instrument Level (absolute change)

(Random, L>C>R) Drum Instrument Panpot (absolute change)

(0 to Max) Drum Instrument Reverb Send Level (absolute change)

(0 to Max) Drum Instrument Chorus Send Level (absolute change)

(0 to Max) Drum Instrument Variation Send Level (absolute change)

* added by Yamaha XG; % changed from Delay to Variation by Yamaha XG

41

Section 10: Appendices

42

B4 - GM2 Reverb Types

0: Small Room

1: Medium Room

2: Large Room

3: Medium Hall

4: Large Hall

8: Plate

B5 - GM2 Chorus Types

0: Chorus 1

1: Chorus 2

2: Chorus 3

3: Chorus 4

4: FB Chorus

5: Flanger

B4 – General MIDI Drums – Note assignments

49

50

51

52

53

54

55

56

57

58

45

46

47

48

41

42

43

44

MIDI Note

35

36

37

38

39

40

Drum Sound

Acoustic Bass Drum

Bass Drum 1

Side Stick

Acoustic Snare

Hand Clap

Electric Snare

Low Floor Tom

Closed Hi-Hat

High Floor Tom

Pedal Hi-Hat

Low Tom

Open Hi-Hat

Low-Mid Tom

Hi-Mid Tom

Crash Cymbal 1

High Tom

Ride Cymbal 1

Chinese Cymbal

Ride Bell

Tambourine

Splash Cymbal

Cowbell

Crash Cymbal 2

Vibraslap

77

78

79

80

81

73

74

75

76

69

70

71

72

65

66

67

68

MIDI Note

59

60

61

62

63

64

Drum Sound

Ride Cymbal 2

Hi Bongo

Low Bongo

Mute Hi Conga

Open Hi Conga

Low Conga

High Timbale

Low Timbale

High Agogo

Low Agogo

Cabasa

Maracas

Short Whistle

Long Whistle

Short Guiro

Long Guiro

Claves

Hi Wood Block

Low Wood Block

Mute Cuica

Open Cuica

Mute Triangle

Open Triangle

Section 10: Appendices

Axiom Line User Guide

Appendix C - General MIDI Controller Numbers (MIDI CC's)

46

47

48

43

44

45

38

39

40

35

36

37

41

42

30

31

32

27

28

29

33

34

19

20

21

16

17

18

25

26

03

04

05

00

01

02

06

07

Bank Select

Modulation

Breath Control

Controller 3

Foot Control

Porta Time

Data Entry

Channel Volume

11

12

13

08 Balance

09 Controller 9

10 Pan

14

15

Expression

Effects Controller 1

Effects Controller 2

Controller 14

Controller 15

Gen Purpose 1

Gen Purpose 2

Gen Purpose 3

Gen Purpose 4

Controller 20

Controller 21

Controller 25

Controller 26

Controller 27

Controller 28

Controller 29

Controller 30

Controller 31

Bank Select LSB

Modulation LSB

Breath Control LSB

Controller 35

Foot Control LSB

Porta Time LSB

Data Entry LSB

Channel Volume LSB

Balance LSB

Controller 41

Pan LSB

Expression LSB

Controller 44

Controller 45

Controller 46

Controller 47

Gen Purpose 1 LSB

Portamento

Sostenuto

Soft Pedal

Legato Pedal

Hold 2

Sound Variation

Cut-off Frequency

Controller 75

Controller 76

Controller 77

Controller 78

Controller 79

Gen Purpose 5

Gen Purpose 6

Gen Purpose 7

Gen Purpose 8

Gen Purpose 2 LSB

Gen Purpose 3 LSB

Gen Purpose 4 LSB

Controller 52

Controller 53

Controller 54

Controller 55

Controller 56

Controller 57

Controller 58

Controller 59

Controller 60

Controller 61

Controller 62

Controller 63

Sustain Pedal

Portamento Control

Controller 85

Controller 86

Controller 87

Controller 88

Controller 89

Controller 90

Reverb Depth

Tremelo Depth

Chorus Depth

Celeste (De-tune)

Phaser Depth

Data Increment

Data Decrement

79

80

81

76

77

78

82

83

68

69

70

65

66

67

74

75

60

61

62

57

58

59

63

64

52

53

54

49

50

51

55

56

95

96

97

92

93

94

87

88

89

84

85

86

90

91

128

129

130

131

109

110

111

106

107

108

112

113

101

102

103

98

99

100

104

105

117

118

119

114

115

116

Controller 114

Controller 115

Controller 116

Controller 117

Controller 118

Controller 119

Channel Mode Messages

120 All Sound Off

124

125

126

121

122

123

Reset all Controllers

Local Control

All Notes Off

Omni Off

Omni On

Mono On (Poly Off)

127 Poly On (Mono Off)

Additional Messages

Non-Reg Param LSB

Non-Reg Param MSB

Reg Param LSB

Reg Param MSB

Controller 102

Controller 103

Controller 104

Controller 105

Controller 106

Controller 107

Controller 108

Controller 109

Controller 110

Controller 111

Controller 112

Controller 113

Pitch Bend sensitivity

Fine Tune

Coarse Tune

Channel Aftertouch

43

Section 10: Appendices

44

Appendix D – Assignable Controller Numbers to Linear Controllers

This table applies to the following controls on your Axiom:

<

Sliders

<

Aftertouch strip

<

<

Pitch bend wheel

Modulation wheel

<

Expression pedal

140

141

142

143

144

255

135

136

137

138

139

131

132

133

134

MIDI CC

0-119

120-127

128

129

130

Description

Standard MIDI CC's

Channel Mode Messages

Pitch Bend Sensitivity

Channel Fine Tune

Channel Coarse Tune

Channel Pressure

RPN coarse

RPN fine

NRPN coarse

NRPN fine

Master Volume GM*

Master Pan GM*

Master Coarse Tune GM*

Master Fine Tune GM*

Chorus Mod Rate GM2*

Chorus Mod Depth GM2*

Feedback GM2*

Send to Reverb GM2*

Pitch Bend

Controller Off***

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Data 1

-

-

Data 2

MIN

-

MIN

-

RPN LSB

RPN LSB

NRPN LSB

-

-

-

-

NRPN LSB

-

-

-

-

-

Pitch Bend MIN

-

-

Data 3

MAX

-

MAX

-

RPN MSB

RPN MSB

NRPN MSB

-

-

-

-

NRPN MSB

-

-

-

-

-

Pitch Bend MAX

* SysEx messages—for details please see section 3.6.7.2.

** MMC SysEx messages, for details please see section 3.8.2..

*** This value cannot be typed in using the numeric keypad. Type in 0 and then press the ‘-‘ button to set this value.

Section 10: Appendices

Axiom Line User Guide

Appendix E – Assignable Controller Numbers to Non-Linear Controllers

This table applies to the following controls on your Axiom:

<

Assignable buttons (Axiom 49/61 only)

<

<

Transport controls

Sustain pedal

147

148

149

150

151

143

144

145

146

138

139

140

141

142

134

135

136

137

152

153

154

155

156

255

MIDI CC

130

131

132

133

0-119

120-127

128

129

Description

Standard MIDI CC's

Channel Mode Messages

Pitch Bend Range

Channel Fine Tune

Channel Coarse Tune

Channel Pressure

RPN Coarse

RPN Fine

NRPN Coarse

NRPN Fine

Master Volume GM*

Master Pan GM*

Master Coarse Tune GM*

Master Fine Tune GM*

Chorus Mod rate GM2*

Chorus Mod Depth GM2*

Feedback GM2*

Send to Reverb GM2*

Pitch Bend

Program/Bank Preset

MIDI CC (on/off)

Note (on/off)

Note (on/off toggle)

MMC Command**

Reverb type GM2 *

Reverb time GM2 *

Chorus type GM2*

MIDI CC Decrement

MIDI CC Increment

Program decrement

Program increment

Controller Off***

-

-

Program

MIDI CC

-

-

-

Note

Note

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Value

Value

Data 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Value

Value

-

-

-

MIDI CC

-

MIDI CC

Data 2

Toggle Value 2

Toggle Value 2

Sensitivity Value

Tuning Amount

Tuning Amount

Pressure Amount

RPN LSB

RPN LSB

NRPN LSB

NRPN LSB

Volume LSB

Pan LSB

Tuning LSB

Tuning LSB

Mod Rate

Mod Depth

Feedback Level

Reverb Send Level

Pitch Shift LSB

Bank LSB

Button Press Value

Velocity Off

Velocity Off

Command Select

Type

Time

Type

Start Value

Start Value

Start Value

-

Start Value

* SysEx messages—for details please see section 3.6.7.2.

** MMC SysEx messages, for details please see section 3.8.2..

*** This value cannot be typed in using the numeric keypad. Type in 0 and then press the ‘-‘ button to set this value.

Data 3

-

-

Toggle Value 1

Toggle Value 1

-

-

RPN MSB

RPN MSB

NRPN MSB

NRPN MSB

Volume MSB

Pan MSB

-

-

-

Tuning MSB

Tuning MSB

-

Pitch Shift MSB

Bank MSB

Button Release Value

-

-

-

Velocity On

Velocity On

-

End Value

End Value

End Value

-

End Value

45

Section 10: Appendices

46

Appendix F – Assignable Controller Numbers to Rotary Encoders

This table only applies to the Rotary encoders on your Axiom

147

148

149

150

151

143

144

145

146

138

139

140

141

142

134

135

136

137

152

255

MIDI CC

130

131

132

133

0-119

120-127

128

129

Description

Standard MIDI CC's

Channel Mode Messages

Pitch Bend Sensitivity

Channel Fine Tune

Channel Coarse Tune

Channel Pressure

RPN coarse

RPN fine

NRPN coarse

NRPN fine

Master Volume GM*

Master Pan GM*

Master Coarse Tune GM*

Master Fine Tune GM*

Chorus Mod rate GM2*

Chorus Mod Depth GM2*

Feedback GM2*

Send to Reverb GM2*

Pitch Bend

Program Change increment/decrement

2’s comp from 64 / Relative (binary offset) -

-

-

-

2’s comp from 0 / Relative (2’s comp)

Sign Magnitude / Relative (signed bit)

Sign Magnitude / Relative (signed bit 2)

Single Value increment/decrement

RPN increment/decrement message

-

-

-

-

-

NRPN increment/decrement message

Controller Off***

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Data 1 Data 2

-

-

MIN

MIN

-

-

RPN LSB

RPN LSB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NRPN LSB

NRPN LSB

-

Pitch Bend MIN

MIN

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

-

MIDI CC

-

Data 3

-

-

MAX

MAX

-

-

RPN MSB

RPN MSB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NRPN MSB

NRPN MSB

-

-

-

-

-

-

Pitch Bend MAX

-

MAX

* SysEx messages - for details please see section 3.6.7.2.

** MMC SysEx messages, for details please see section 3.8.2.

*** This value cannot be typed in using the numeric keypad. Type in 0 and then press the ‘-‘ button to set this value.

Section 10: Appendices

Axiom Line User Guide

Appendix G – Assignable Controller Numbers to Pressure Pads

This table only applies to the pressure Pads on your Axiom

147

148

149

150

151

143

144

145

146

138

139

140

141

142

134

135

136

137

152

153

154

155

156

255

MIDI CC

130

131

132

133

0-119

120-127

128

129

Description

Standard MIDI CC's

Channel Mode Messages

Pitch Bend Range

Channel Fine Tune

Channel Coarse Tune

Channel Pressure

RPN Coarse

RPN Fine

NRPN Coarse

NRPN Fine

Master Volume GM*

Master Pan GM*

Master Coarse Tune GM*

Master Fine Tune GM*

Chorus Mod Rate GM2*

Chorus Mod Depth GM2*

Feedback GM2*

Send to Reverb GM2*

Pitch Bend

Program Change

MIDI CC (On/Off)

Note (On/Off)

Note (On/Off toggle)

MMC Command**

Reverb Type GM2 *

Reverb Time GM2 *

Chorus Type GM2*

MIDI CC Decrement

MIDI CC Increment

Program Decrement

Program Increment

Controller Off***

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Data 1 Data 2

-

-

MIN

MIN

-

-

RPN LSB

RPN LSB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NRPN LSB

NRPN LSB

-

Pitch bend MIN

Program

MIDI CC

-

-

-

Note

Note

-

MIDI CC

MIDI CC

Start Value

-

Start Value

* SysEx messages - for details please see section 3.6.7.2.

** MMC SysEx messages, for details please see section 3.8.2.

*** This value cannot be typed in using the numeric keypad. Type in 0 and then press the - button to set this value.

Data 3

-

-

MAX

MAX

-

-

RPN MSB

RPN MSB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NRPN MSB

NRPN MSB

-

Pitch bend MAX

-

On Value (Off value is 0)

-

-

-

Locked Velocity

Locked Velocity

-

End Value

End Value

End Value

-

End Value

47

Section 10: Appendices

48

Appendix H - Hexadecimal Conversion Chart

24

25

26

27

28

20

21

22

23

29

2A

1B

1C

1D

1E

1F

17

18

19

1A

12

13

14

15

16

0E

0F

10

11

Hexadecimal value Decimal value

0 0

1

2

1

2

3

4

3

4

9

0A

0B

0C

0D

7

8

5

6

9

10

11

12

13

7

8

5

6

27

28

29

30

31

23

24

25

26

18

19

20

21

22

14

15

16

17

36

37

38

39

40

32

33

34

35

41

42

4F

50

51

52

53

4B

4C

4D

4E

54

55

46

47

48

49

4A

42

43

44

45

3D

3E

3F

40

41

39

3A

3B

3C

Hexadecimal value Decimal value

2B 43

2C

2D

44

45

2E

2F

46

47

34

35

36

37

38

30

31

32

33

52

53

54

55

56

48

49

50

51

70

71

72

73

74

66

67

68

69

61

62

63

64

65

57

58

59

60

79

80

81

82

83

75

76

77

78

84

85

71

72

73

74

75

6D

6E

6F

70

68

69

6A

6B

6C

64

65

66

67

Hexadecimal value Decimal value

56 86

57

58

87

88

59

5A

89

90

5F

60

61

62

63

5B

5C

5D

5E

95

96

97

98

99

91

92

93

94

113

114

115

116

117

109

110

111

112

104

105

106

107

108

100

101

102

103

7A

7B

7C

7D

7E

76

77

78

79

7F

122

123

124

125

126

118

119

120

121

127

Section 10: Appendices

Axiom Line User Guide

Appendix I – Factory Presets

Your M-Audio Axiom keyboard comes with 20 preset setups which allow you to use the keyboard controller with supported software right out of the box.

See section 3.2 for instructions on how to load a factory preset.

8

9

10

6

7

4

5

2

3

Preset

1

Application

General MIDI

GForce Oddity

GForce ImpOSCar

GForce Minimonsta:Melohman

Way Out Ware TimewARP 2600

Wizoo Darbuka/Latigo

Propellerhead Reason Mixer

Propellerhead Reason Subtractor

Propellerhead Reason Malström

Propellerhead Reason Dr.Rex

18

19

20

14

15

16

17

Preset Application

11 Propellerhead Reason NN-19

12

13

Propellerhead Reason Effects

Native Instruments B4

Inc/dec GM set up with 2’s comp data format

GM sequencer mixer set up

GS/XG NRPN set up

Unassigned MIDI controllers (Ableton Live)

Linplug/Doepfer inc/dec method

2’s compliment inc/dec method

Unassigned controllers – binary offset inc/dec

Important Note : When you perform a device reset as described in section 2.4.4, all of the factory presets are lost. To restore the factory presets, please use the Enigma software, available as a free download at www.m-audio.com

With some of these applications it is necessary to set up your Axiom keyboard within the software.

How to use the Axiom with Ableton Live

Ableton Live does not have any default MIDI controller assignments but it is possible to make your own very quickly and easily using the MIDI Learn function. It is best to use Preset 17 with Live, since it is programmed with a selection of unassigned MIDI controllers.

1) Set up your Axiom selected as the remote control device:

<

<

<

Select Preferences from the Options menu (PC) or Live menu (Mac).

Click on the MIDI/Sync tab.

In the Input column, set your Axiom keyboard remote setting to ON.

2) Close the Preferences window.

3) Click on the MIDI button in the top right hand corner.

4) Click on the parameter you want to control.

5) Move the desired control on your Axiom.

6) When you have finished making all your assignments, click on the MIDI button in the top right hand corner to exit

Live’s MIDI Map mode.

We recommend that you use Preset 17 when setting up controls in Ableton Live. If you wish to take advantage of the endless encoder functionality, then use preset 20. The encoders loaded from Preset 20 will send relative (binary offset) increment/ decrement MIDI messages. The pads on both Presets 17 and 20 are assigned to trigger the eight samples in Live’s Impulse module.

Preset 4: GForce Minimonsta

In order to select your Axiom keyboard as the MIDI input device for Minimonsta:

<

Click on the Setup button just above Minimonsta’s keyboard.

<

Select your Oxygen keyboard from the menu that appears (displayed by name or as “USB audio device” on PC and

“CoreMIDI In interface” on Mac.)

49

Section 10: Appendices

50

Preset 5: Way Out Ware TimewARP 2600

To use this preset:

<

Click on the TimewARP 2600 logo.

<

Select Load MIDI map.

<

Select the default map and click OK.

The trigger pads are assigned to send controller data in this preset. The pads on the left will control the filter cut-off and resonance. The other pads can be assigned to any control you choose. To assign the pads, hold down SHIFT (Windows) or

CONTROL (Mac) and click on a control. Make sure “MIDI learn” is ticked in TimewARP’s Global MIDI Map Settings dialog.

Then, press a pad.

Preset 6: Wizoo Darbuka/Latigo

Wizoo’s Darbuka and Latigo are VST/AU/RTAS plug-ins so you must access these applications within a host application. Make sure the MIDI input to the host is set to be your Axiom keyboard. Set one of the tracks in the host to output to Darbuka or

Latigo. Please consult the documentation for the host to see how this is done. To make the most of the Wizoo preset, the host should be set to transmit on all MIDI channels to Darbuka or Latigo.

Presets 7 to 12: Propellerhead Reason

Each Reason module is specifically covered by these presets, except for Redrum. Redrum is always triggered by the trigger pads no matter which Reason preset is selected. To set up your Axiom keyboard to control the desired Reason module:

<

Select the Edit menu (Windows) or Reason menu (Mac), followed by “Preferences.”

<

Select Advanced MIDI from the Page drop-down menu.

<

Select your Axiom keyboard as the Bus A device. Close the Preferences dialog.

<

In the MIDI IN device section at the top of the Reason rack, select the desired module in the Channel 1 box.

<

In the MIDI IN device section, select Redrum in the Channel 10 box.

You may wish to alter the channel settings of presets 7 to 12 so that you can control two Reason modules at once. In the

MIDI IN device section at the top of the Reason rack, simply set the Channel 2 device to a different module from the Channel

1 device , for example. This way there is no need to keep changing the module that Channel 1 is assigned to.

Presets 17 and 20: Ableton Live / Unassigned MIDI controllers

These presets use MIDI controller assignments that are undefined in the General MIDI specification. This means that there is a reduced risk of altering a MIDI control by accident with this preset selected. Many applications do not have their parameters set up with default MIDI controllers. Most of these applications allow you to set up the controllers in the software yourself.

You should consult the documentation for your application to see how this is done. For applications that learn the MIDI controllers for their parameters, you should select this preset.

Preset 20 is similar to preset 17, but the encoders are set up to send increment or decrement messages for the MIDI controllers they are assigned. The encoders will send data in relative (binary offset) format when this preset is selected.

Preset 18, 19 and 20: Unassigned MIDI controllers with increment/decrement

These presets use MIDI controller assignments that are undefined in the General MIDI specification. In addition, the encoders are set up to utilize endless dial data formats. Preset 18 provides an inc/dec data format used by Linplug VST instruments such as daOrgan and CronoX. Preset 20 provides an inc/dec method used by Native Instruments in applications including Reaktor and Absynth. Since most of these applications use a MIDI learn feature for assigning controllers to their various parameters, you will need to consult your application's documentation to see how this is achieved. Preset 19 covers another inc/dec method known as “2’s compliment.”

Note : If Group A is active, all the presets will send a program change when recalled. This is in order to set up the Zone information in a sequencer. If you wish to avoid sending a program change when changing presets, simply turn off group A.

Section 10: Appendices

060120_Axiom_UG_EN01

© 2006 Avid Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Product features, specifications, system requirements and availability are subject to change without notice.

Avid and M-Audio are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Avid Technology, Inc. All other trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

advertisement

Related manuals

advertisement