Broadcasting m
FCC suffers setback in order curbing indecency
Speciai report: winding up for NAB Washington
Broadcasting m ar
The newsweekly of broadcasting and allied arts
Our 46th Year 1977
THE BIGGEST EVENT IN
TELEVISION HISTORY...
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W\RNER BROS.TELEVISION DISTRIBUTION
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PAGES 16 -17
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In these weekly offbeat olympics,
two teams of today's most popular
entertainment stars compete in
the wildest, zaniest sports events
ever brought to television.
There's excitement, suspense and
uproarious fun from start to finish
in every half hour.
When ABC aired a similar series,
"Almost Anything Goes," without
stars in Summer '75, the show
jumped to a time -period- winning
35%
share in just four weeks.
And in November '76, ABC's
two -hour "Battle of the Network
Stars" special zonked all prime time competition with a 24.2 rating
and a 40% share while handily
winning almost every demographic
breakout.
That's proof positive! Viewers
love this kind of programming,
and even more so when stars
These stations are
ready to play:
WBRZ Baton Rouge
WSAZ -TV Charleston Huntington
WSOC -TV Charlotte
WCPO -TV Cincinnati
WEWS Cleveland
WBNS -TV Columbus, O.
WDTN Dayton
WJBK -TV Detroit
WLUK -TV Green
Bay
WFMY -TV Greensboro W. Salem -H. Pt.
KHON -TV Honolulu
KNXT Los Angeles
KMSP -TV Minneapolis St. Paul
WCBS -TV New York
WAVY -TV Norfolk
KCRA -TV Sacramento -
Stockton
KUTV Salt Lake City
KMOL -TV San Antonio
KMOX -TV St. Louis
WFLA -TV Tampa St. Petersburg
WSPD -TV Toledo
WPTV West Palm Beach
WDAU-TV Wilkes
Barre -
Scranton
are involved!
Now, Viacom s going to do it
better than ever before with the
all -new
"All-Star
Almost Anything
Goes"
Source: NTI /NAC, II Aug. 1975 and II Nov.1976.
Audience estimates are subject to qualifications available on request.
Viacom
M2
GRASS VALLEY GROUP
AA
A new, low-cost, standardized approach
to television switching automation employing
microcomputer technology.
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THE GRASS VALLEY GROUP, INC.
A
Station Plaza East
GREAT NECK, NY 11021
(516) 4871311
TEKTRONIX COMPANY
4419 Van Nuys Blvd, Ste 307
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1644 Tullie Cu, NE
P.O. Box 482
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(213) 990 -6172
(404) 6340521
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(219) 264-0931
Broadcasting Mar21
The Week in Brief
FCC PUT DOWN AGAIN
Washington appeals court, in
overturning WBAI ruling, says commission efforts against
indecency on the air are contrary to Communications Act.
regulation meet with the FCC to decide what to do about
the issue, but nothing much seems to have been
accomplished.
PAGE 44.
PAGE 27.
Actress Farrah Fawcett -Majors's
planned defection from ABC-TV's Charlie's Angels
results in a law suit from Spelling -Goldberg Productions.
FALLEN 'ANGEL'
President Carter puts
distance between himself and his UN ambassador's
feelings on coverage of terrorist acts. CBS's Who's Who
examines the professional problems involved in reporting stories such as the Hanafi sieges in Washington,
AFTERMATH FOR THE MEDIA
PAGE 50.
Irving Kahn of Broadband
Communications says that lasers with a life of more than
100,000 hours will be on the market later this year.
FUTURE FIBER
PAGE 53.
BETTER THAN SPEED READING
Robert Grass, manager
of communications research for duPont, tells the
Association of National Advertisers that TV gets the
commercial message across much better than print.
PAGE 55.
General Motors, after getting
complaints from religious groups, backs out on its
sponsorship of a made -for -TV movie on the life of Jesus
that will be presented on NBC -TV. PAGE 5a.
WASHING ITS HANDS
The FTC says advertising offering
premiums to children should not be banned outright but
should be considered on a case -by-case basis. PAGE 57.
ADDED INCENTIVE
specifically
WTOP -TV
newsman Max Robinson's intimate
role in that story. PAGE 28.
The National Association of
Broadcasters convention starts next Sunday in
Washington and it's shaping up as a record -breaker.
Advance registrations are 1,000 ahead of last year and
exhibit space sales will be an all -time high. PAGE 58.
Here's the official convention agenda along with related
meetings and activities. PAGE so. The line -up of
hospitality suites in Washington. PAGE 68. Abstracts of the
technical papers offer a preview of the Broadcast
Engineering Conference that will run concurrently with
management sessions. PAGE 71. A complete directory of
equipment makers' booths and what they'll show. PAGE
76. A detailed list of the programers, station
representatives, brokers and others who also will be on
CONVENTION COUNTDOWN
NAB's TV code people
meet again with Hollywood producers, who indicate
willingness to tone down violence. PAGE 29.
CONFERENCE ON THE COAST
PETITION-TO -DENY SURVIVORS
The FCC spends a
day -its last meeting before the Sunshine Act went into
effect -considering the renewal applications of 13 radio
and TV stations; all but two get the nod. PAGE 31.
The three major television
networks argue against Group W's petition to require
more previewing time of programs for affiliates. PAGE 34.
ON THE FIRING RANGE
hand. PAGE 94.
RADIO RULES
A new radio network policy statement
issued by the FCC repeals much of the 1941 rules. At the
heart of the new policy is the obligation licensees have in
serving their communities. PAGE 34.
A fitting climax to the long
CAPSTONE FOR DAN SMITH
career of the just- retired vice president of Capital Cities
Communications will come March 29 when he receives
the NAB's 1977 Engineering Achievement Award.
CABLE CHATTER
Several groups interested in cable
Index to departments
Broadcast Advertising... 55
Broadcast Journalism... 58
Changing Hands
Closed Circuit
Datebook
Business Briefly
Cablecasting
Editorials
8
44
Equip 8 Engineering
PAGE
38
7
22
122
53
1
21
.
Fates 8 Fortune*
For the Record
Media
Monday Memo
Open Mike
100
103
31
18
24
Playlist
Profile
Programing
Stock Index
Top of the Week
99
121
50
119
27
Broadcasting is published 51 Mondays a year (combined issue at yearend) by Broadcasting Publications Inc.. 1735 DeSales Street. N.W. Washington. O.C. 20036. Second -class postage paid at
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Pßÿ
A place of their own.
Nearly five years ago, concerned citizens and governmental agencies in the area called Siouxland
(where Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota meet)
created a badly needed recreation facility for the aged,
the Siouxland Senior Center. By early 1974, however, the Center had become bogged down by
inactivity, lack of money and inadequate facilities.
KMEG -TV's community service committee worked
closely with the Center staff and officers to line up
donations of labor and materials to remodel the
Center. And then the station helped stage an entertainment benefit featuring actor Will Geer of
"The Waltons."
The result is a new card room, kitchen and library,
new air conditioning, and continuous remodeling. In
addition, KMEG -TV's involvement has increased
awareness of senior citizens' needs and stimulated
more and more contributions to benefit all the members of the Center.
Supporting community projects like the Siouxland
Senior Center is all part of the Fetzer tradition of
total community involvement.
Ste eiearh iafii,4
WKZO
Kalamazoo
WWTV
Cadillac
WKZO-TV
Kalamazoo
WWUP -TV
WJFM
Sault Ste Marie Grand Rapids
KOLN -TV
Lincoln
KGIN -TV
Grand Island
WKJF(FM)
WWAM
Cadillac
Cadillac
KMEG -TV
Sioux City
ClosedECircuit
R
Insider report 'behind the scene before the fact
Wiley way
Tit for tat
Although his successor seems nowhere in
If House Communications Subcommittee
sight, Chairman Richard Wiley is
regretfully contemplating departure from
FCC when his term expires June 30. It's
no secret he relishes public life, having
been FCC's most vigorous chairman since
original members of Federal Radio
Commission took office 50 years ago. Mr.
Wiley, at President's pleasure, can serve as
chairman'until his successor qualifies, but
it's likely new Democratic chairman as
well as Democratic successor to
Commissioner Ben L. Hooks will be
named by then. (Mr. Hooks, however,
does not take over his new post as head of
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People until
Aug. 1.)
There's speculation not only on
incoming commissioners but also on Mr.
Wiley's future. Foreclosed from making
any commitment in private sector before
his term expires or is otherwise
terminated, Mr. Wiley presumably could
always return to Chicago law firm he left
and perhaps open Washington offices
where he could specialize in
communications. Moreover, his
demonstrated administrative talents could
entice invitations from corporate entities
within and outside communications (to
which he would not be averse). Whatever
he does, he would hope to leave way open
for eventual return tp'public life, to either
elective or appointive office in federal
government.
acts on proposed pole- attachment
legislation (see page 50), look for
Piece by piece
Although Senate Communications
Subcommittee's ambitions are less clearly
defined than those of counterpart panel in
House, they are nevertheless sizable -as
evidenced by Senate Chairman Ernest F.
Hollings's (D -S.C.) intention to hire three
or four more staff people, or "whatever
Magnuson [Warren Magnuson (DWash.), chairman of Commerce
Committee] will let us have" Mr. Hollings
would like "little bit of expertise" in new
people, but that's not as important to him
as "good minds" with "good judgment"
Senate subcommittee plans extensive
hearings in same general subject areas that
make up outline for House
subcommittee's rewrite of
Communications Act. But Senator
Hollings is sticking with remark he made
to broadcasters last year, that he doesn't
think there is need to rewrite entire law.
(BROADCASTING, Oct. 25, 1976). He
prefers to handle communications
problems segmentally and "without doing
damage to the general fabric of
communications."
broadcasters to step up pressure for like
treatment of license - renewal bill.
Argument will be that if subcommittee
does that for cable industry, despite
subcommittee Chairman Lionel Van
Deerlin's (D- Calif.) saying there will be
no piecemeal legislative work while
subcommittee is working on rewrite of
whole Communications Act, then it
should do something for broadcasters too.
Subcommittee members' comments
about proposed pole- attachment bill aren't
in yet. At least one, Timothy Wirth (DColo.), will argue that bill deserves
separate action because it comes under
heading of unfinished business from last
year.
broadcast properties, and who quit as
president of Star presumably because of
disagreements with front office. There's
reported talk of swap of Combined
Communications Corp.'s KOCO -TV
Oklahoma City plus "bundle" for WMALTv. In today's market, brokers regard
WMAL -TV in $50- million class. CCC
bought xoco -Tv for $6.5 million in 1970,
Among others, LIN Broadcasting, group
owner, has had conversations with Allbritton representatives.
Deceleration
National representatives are disappointed
that spot radio activity in January and
February has not maintained accelerated
pace of fourth quarter of 1976, though
most reps arc topping January- February
1976. One bright note in national radio is
continued increased use of reps' nonwired
networks by advertisers.
Hot line
Viewers of recent late -night movie on
woRA -TV Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, got
more than they bargained for. Continuity
was suddenly interrupted, and screen was
filled with skin flick. Porno footage ran
anywhere from 15 seconds to five
minutes, depending on which source is
accepted, before scheduled film returned.
Explanation that station lost no time in
giving FCC recalled similar incident
involving Palm Springs, Calif., cable
system several years ago. Employe was
running porno film in control room for his
own entertainment when he hit wrong
switch and sent blue material out over air.
He switched back as soon as he realized
what had happened. But, station told FCC,
he wasn't fast enough to save his job.
Allbritton courted
Major media's newest entrepreneur -Joe
L. Allbritton, Texas banker who took over
still ailing but vastly improved Washington
Star and its profitable station enterprises
early last year -is enlarging reputation as
wheeler -dealer. Having turned over WMALAM-FM Washington to ABC for $16 million
cash, Mr. Allbritton still has WMAL -Tv
(which is to be renamed WJLA), highly
rated ABC -TV affiliate, which would fetch
fancy price, plus WLVA- AM -FM -TV
Lynchburg, Va., wclv(Tv) Charleston,
S.C., and Star itself. (He must sell one of
two remaining Washington properties as
well as either radio or TV in Lynchburg by
January 1979 under FCC mandate.)
Mr. Allbritton's image hasn't been
entirely benign, what with departure
earlier this year of Richard S. Stakes, who
was largely responsible for building
Broadcasting Mar
7
21
1977
Into space
Highest live -action series budget in history
of Saturday- morning children's television
is claimed by CBS's new Space Academy.
CBS will pay Filmation, production
company, $117,000 for Academy, which
kicks off next September (10:30 -10:56
a.m., NYT). To be done on tape in
Hollywood, Academy will use elaborate
sets, with "a floating city in space" filling
up one huge soundstage.
Not so special
Special- events coverage by Public
Broadcasting Service is likely to take on
new look with upcoming season. WETA -Tv
Washington, major producing station, has
been forced to withdraw $1- million plan
from Station Program Cooperative
(auction process whereby licensees pick
national programs) after 68 (at most) of
155 licensees offered to share in cost.
Licensees want more coverage outside
Washington and more advance warning
for rescheduling (live coverage of cabinet
confirmation hearings was bumped by
many PBS members that had instructional
programing commitments).
PBS staff, WETA -TV, representative
licensees and Corporation for Public
Broadcasting will revamp plan, hope to reenter it in next June's "minimarket"
Public relations effort also will get under
way to convince licensees that it's
impossible to plan special- events coverage
far enough in advance to avoid scheduling
conflicts, and furthermore that it's worth
aggravation to have programs.
Business Briefly
Hilton Hotels
Hotel chain is mapping
one -to -two week spot -radio flight
beginning in May. Robert Towers
Advertising, New York, will place spots in
about eight markets to reach adults,
25 -64.
American Motors
Car company is
readying six-week spot -radio buy for early
April. Mace Advertising, Southfield, Mich.,
will place spots in 70 markets, aiming for
men, 18 -49.
Chesebrough -Pond's
Company is
mapping 13 -week spot -TV flight for its
Ragu spaghetti sauce starting in early
April. Waring & LaRosa, New York, will
place spots in 18 markets during fringe
time peaks, gearing them to women,
25 -54.
starting later this month. AdCom,
Chicago, will place TV spots during
children's viewing. Demographic target is
children, 6 -11.
& Johnson
Tampons will get
14 -week spot -radio flight beginning in
early May. Compton Advertising, New
York, will schedule spots in 15 markets,
zeroing in on female teen -agers.
Chevrolet
Car company has four-week
spot -radio buy ready for April start.
Campbell -Ewald, Detroit, will seek spots
in New York to reach men, 18 -49.
Wella
Hair care products company is
planning three -week spot -TV buy
beginning in early May. James Neal
Harvey, New York, will place spots in
about 40 markets during fringe viewing
periods, attracting women, 18 -49.
Company is
arranging seven -week spot -TV drive
starting in late April. Grey Advertising, Los
Angeles, will place spots in 11 markets
during fringe, prime and weekend
periods, aiming spots to adults, 18 -34.
Colgate
Michigan Bell
Dental cream gets 13 -week
spot -TV drive beginning in late March. Ted
Bates, New York, will place spots in about
30 markets during daytime and fringe,
periods, attracting women, 18 -49.
Company is
scheduling 10 -week spot -radio
campaign for late March. Wells, Rich &
Green, New York, will pick spots in about
15 markets, gearing them to men, 18 -49.
Underwood
Food manufacturer will
launch four-week spot -TV drive for its
meat spreads starting in early April.
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Boston, will place
spots in fringe and prime hours in about
37 markets. Target audience is women,
25 -49.
Noxell
Company will feature Lestoil
cleaner in six -week spot -TV buy
beginning in late March. Foote, Cone &
Belding, New York, will clear spots in 48
markets in daytime and fringe viewing
hours to reach women, 18 -49.
Kroger Supermarket chain has 12week spot -TV promotion slated for late
March. Campbell -Mithun, Chicago, will
Quaker
Captain Crunch cereal is
preparing 12 -week spot -TV campaign
BAR reports television- network sales as of Feb. 27
ABC 3184,949.900 (33.8 %)
Day parts
u
Total
minutes
dollars
week
week
ended
1977 total
Feb. 27
minutes
148
Monday- Friday
10 a.m.-6 p.m.
NBC S184.155.600 (33.6 %)
1977 total
dollars
year to date
1976 total
change
dollars
from
1976
year to date
5.898.200
+11.9
116,313,600
100.288,700
16.0
2,897
74,243.000
60.302.000
+23.1
3.786.500
831
31,397,200
25.219,000
+24.5
17
844.400
196
10.636.400
9,549,400
11.4
418
35.690,900
3,450
274,935.500
226,238.400
+21.5
202
3,921,000
567,989,300
1,638
33,885,500
S548,014,100
29,615,900
$457,111,600
+14.4
18,070
889,200
1,145
985
15,093.200
7,913
Saturday- Sunday
Sign -on -6 p.m.
332
7.764.100
Monday- Saturday
6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
100
S
S
6.602,900
S
p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Monday- Sunday
7:30 p.m.-11 p.m.
Monday-Sunday
11 p.m.-Sign-off
Total
Marine Midland Bank Bank has 13week spot -TV campaign ready to start in
late March. Benton & Bowles, New York,
will gear TV spots in about seven markets
during fringe, prime and news periods,
seeking to reach adults.
Jeno's Food products manufacturer is
readying two -week spot -TV buy for its
frozen pizza starting in early April.
Independent Media Services, New York,
will place spots during fringe and prime
periods to reach women, 18 -49.
Air Wick
E -Z Clor pool chemicals
launches five -week spot -TV promotion in
mid -April. Stolz Advertising, St. Louis, will
schedule spots in five markets at news,
prime and late fringe periods to reach
adults, 35 and over.
Brandywine Mushrooms Company is
planning five -week spot -TV test for its
mushrooms beginning in early April. J.M.
Korn & Sons, Philadelphia, will arrange
spots during daytime, prime, early and
late fringe periods in Phoenix, seeking
women, 18 -49.
Safflower
oil will get nine -week spot -TV drive late in
March. Chiat /Day, Los Angeles, will place
spots in about four markets during all day
parts. Demographic target is women,
25 -49.
Krazy Glue
Sunday
6
Telephone company is
planning 16 -week spot -radio drive
featuring its long distance phone calls
beginning in mid -April. Ross Roy, Detroit,
will place spots in about 43 markets,
looking for adults, 18 and over.
Hollywood Health Foods
1t
ended
27
Feb.
Monday-Friday
Sign -on -10 a.m.
o
CBS 5178.908.600 (32.6 %)
Total
Bank of America
Porche and Audi cars will
get three -week spot -TV push starting in
late March. Doyle Dane Bernbach, New
York, will place spots in fringe and special
programing, gearing spots to men, 18 -49.
Volkswagen
Midas Mufflers
Johnson
place spots in daytime access, prime,
early and late fringe viewing periods,
targeted to women, 18 -49.
2,202
19.9
Glue will be featured in
three one -week spot -TV flights beginning
in late March, April and May. Furman Roth,
New York, will place spots in at least 200
markets during daytime, fringe, access,
news and special periods to reach men,
18 -49.
Gardner
Baking company will place
four -week spot -TV buy for its Soft Twist
white bread starting in early April. W.E.
Long Advertising, Chicago, will schedule
spots in four markets during daytime
periods to reach women, 18 -49.
Rust -Oleum
Source: Broadcast Advertisers Reports
Broadcasting Mar
8
21
1977
Rust preventive gets
"If I don't tell WNEW-T V,
and you don't tell WNEW -T V,
who's to know ?"
C.1
8----.
L
WNEW -TV watches NewYorkers
We watch them all the time.
And one thing we've learned is that
they like to be given a choice.
So, instead of putting on a half hour
of news at 11 o'clock like all the network stations, we give them a full hour
of news at 10 o'clock. An hour ahead
of every other major late -news show.
While the stories are still fresh.
Our speciality is local stories. Nobody does them better than we do.
While many of the network- station
reporters are relative newcomers, our
reporters have an average of ten years
of covering the New York area.
So, okay, we watch the people of
New York. And New Jersey. And
Connecticut.
But does that mean they watch us?
Fact: More homes watchCiiheCe
WNEW -TV than two out of the
three network stations.
Source: Nielsen 1976. All Reports, Station Total Net
Weekly Circulation. Audience data are estimates,
subject to qualifications on request.
W NE
TV
Metromedia
New York
WNEW -TV is represented by Metro TV Sales.
Rep appointment
WYNY(FM) New York:
Selcom, New
York.
March. Stimpson Associates, Seattle, will
place spots in five markets during
daytime, prime, access, news, weekend
and early fringe periods, seeking women,
35 and over.
Collins & Alkman .Fabric manufacturer
I
seven -week spot -radio push beginning in
mid -April. D'Arcy- MacManus & Masius,
Chicago, will place radio spot in 44
markets to reach men, 25 -49.
Hollywood Brands o Division of
Consolidated Food is planning four-week
spot-TV campaign in late April. Kelly
Nason, New York, will place spots in
fringe periods to reach women, 18 -49,
children, 6 -11, and teen -agers.
Conwood
Company has 13 -week
spot -TV promotion set for its Hot Shot
insecticide beginning in late April. Tucker
Wayne & Co., Atlanta, will place spots
during prime viewing hours in 88 markets.
Women, 18 -34, are target audience.
Toy Chest Toy store has 10 -week spot TV campaign slated for early April.
Chase -Ehrenberg & Associates, Chicago,
will buy spots in St. Louis in fringe,
daytime and prime viewing hours to reach
children.
Vicks Chemical
Company will feature
Oil of Olay skin softener in five -week
spot -TV promotion beginning in late
March. Norman, Craig & Kummel, New
York, will,slate spots in three markets in
fringe, prime and special hours, zeroing in
on women, 25 and over.
International House of Pancakes
Restaurants has three -week spot -TV drive
slated for early April. Brooks Advertising,
Oak Lawn, Ill., will place spots in early and
late fringe viewing hours in about five
markets including Dallas and Chicago, to
reach adults, 25-49.
City Loan and Savings
Subsidiary of
Commercial Credit company is planning
two spot -TV flights starting in late April
and late May, running for five weeks each
W.B. Doner & Co., Baltimore, will place
spots in seven markets during prime,
early and late fringe periods, gearing
them to men, 18 -49.
Amstar
Company is arranging four week spot -TV buy for its Domino sugar
starting in early April. Lewis & Gilman,
Philadelphia, will place spots in Dallas Fort Worth markets, zeroing in on women,
25 -54.
Church's Chicken
Fast food chain is
planning 11 -week spot -TV campaign
starting in late March. William B. Tanner,
Memphis, will select TV spots in
approximately 50 markets during fringe,
daytime and prime periods, zeroing in on
adults, 15 -49.
Mr. Steak
Restaurant chain is mapping
five -week spot -TV buy beginning in late
BROADCASTING PUBLICATIONS INC.
Sol Taisholl. chairman.
Lawrence B. Taishoff, president.
Edwin H. James, vice president.
Joanne T. Cowan, secretary
Irving C. Miller, treasurer
Lee Telsholl, assistant treasurer
roadcastingo
has spot -radio and TV drive scheduled for
April. Gaynor & Ducas, New York, will
place spots in about five markets,
searching for men, 25 -64.
The newsweekly of broadcasting and allied arts
California Strawberry
Executive and publication headquarters
Advisory
board for strawberries has six-week spot TV promotion set to begin in early April.
Botsford Ketchum, Los Angeles, will buy
spots in 60 markets in daytime and fringe
periods to reach women, 25 -49.
Schenley
Distiller /importer is
arranging five -week spot-radio and TV
drive slated to start in early April. Leo
Burnett, Chicago, will set radio spots in
27 markets and TV spots in four markets
to reach adults, 18 -49.
Jet -X
Manufacturers of pressure car
washers is arranging six -week spot -TV
promotion beginning in April. Frye -Sills,
Denver, will map spots during daytime
and fringe periods in 39 markets,
searching for adults, 18 -49.
Blue Star
Ointment will get eight week spot -TV campaing starting in April.
Ritchie, Hopson & Associates, Houston,
will gear spots to adults, 35 and over,
placing them in daytime and fringe
viewing hours in 33 markets.
Spin Trim
Garden tool gets six -toseven -week spot -radio push starting in
early May. Kelly Scott &Madison,
Chicago, will place spots in about 49
markets to reach men, 25 -49.
L.R. Nelson Lawn sprinkler launches
one to three -week spot -radio campaign
starting in May. Richardson, Myers &
Donofrio, Baltimore, will seek spots in at
least five markets, looking for men, 25 -49.
Manley & James
Sea & Ski suntan
products is planning six -to -nine week
spot -radio flight for mid -May. Ogilvy &
Mather, New York, is gearing spots to
teen -agers.
Sanyo
Company is planning three week spot -TV campaign for its microwave
ovens beginning in mid -April. Keyes,
Martin & Co., Springfield, N.J., will select
sprits in fringe and prime periods, looking
for adults, 25 -34.
French Pan Rich gravy will get six week spot -TV flight beginning in early
April. J. Walter Thompson, New York, will
buy spots during prime viewing periods in
two markets, seeking to reach women,
25 -54.
R.T.
Lehn & Fink Lysol toilet bowl cleaner
arranges 13 -week spot -TV drive starting
early next month. SSC &B, New York, will
clear spots in 16 markets at daytime and
fringe periods to reach women, 18 -49.
Broadcasting Mar
10
21
1977
TELEVISION®
Broadcasting -Telecasting building
1735 DeSales Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036.
Phone: 202.638-1022.
Sol Telsholl, editor.
Lawrence B. Telsholl, publisher
EDITORIAL
Edwin H. James, executive editor
Donald West, managing editor.
Rufus Crater (New York). Chief correspondent.
Leonard Zeldenberg, senior correspondent.
J. Daniel Rudy, assistant to the managing editor
Frederick M. Fitzgerald, senior editor
Randall Moakop, associate editor
Gary H. Huffman, assistant editor.
Barbara Chase, Mark Miller, Jay Rubin,
stall writers.
David Crook, Kira Greene, John Webster,
editorial assistants.
Pat Vance, secretary tq the editor
YEARBOOK o SOURCEBOOK
John Mercurio, manager
Joseph A. Esser, assistant editor.
ADVERTISING
David Whitcombe, director of sales and marketing.
Winfield R. Levi, general sales manager (New York).
John Andre, Sales manager -equipment and
engineering (Washington).
David Berlyn, Eastern sales manager (New York).
Ruth Lindstrom, account supervisor (New York).
Bill Merritt,. Western sales manager (Hollywood)
Peter V. O'Reilly, Southern sales manager (Washington).
Ian C. Bowen, sales assistant.
Doris Kelly, secretary
CIRCULATION
Bill Crigec circulation manager
Kwentin Keenan, subscription manager.
Sheila Chamberlain, Denise Ehdaivand,
Patricia Johnson, Bruce Weller.
PRODUCTION
Harry Stevens, production manager
K Storck, production assistant.
ADMINISTRATION
Irving C. Miller, business manager.
Philippe E. Boucher.
BUREAUS
New York: 75 Rockefeller Plaza, 10019.
Phone: 212- 757 -3260.
Rufus Crater, chief correspondent.
Rocco Famighettl, senior editor
John M. Dempsey, assistant editor.
Douglas Hill, staff writer.
Diane Burstein, editorial assistant.
-
Winfield R. Levi, general sales manager
David Berlyn, Eastern sales manager
R ith Lindstrom. account supervisor
Harriette Weinberg, advertising assistant
Hollywood: 1680 North Vine Street, 90028.
Phone: 213 -463 -3148.
Bill Merritt, Western sales manager
Sandra Klausner, editorial -advertising assistant.
Founded in 1931 as Broadcasting*- The Neue Magazine of the
Fifth Estate. O Broadcast Advertising was acquired in 1932,
Broadcast Reporterin 1933, 7blecastin 1953 and TLleuision
in 1961. Broadcasting.7kiecaating was introduced in 1946.
Microfilms of Broadcasting are available from University
Microfilms, 300 North Zeeb Road, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48103.0
'Reg. U.S. Patent Office. 0 Copyright 1977 by Broadcasting
Publications Inc.
The realityof
footcandies.
Unretouched filmstrips of the Eastman Ektachrome video news film 7240 (tungsten)
Y
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LA
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IMINI
ASA 125
Normal studio lighting
160 footcandles, f/4
Standard process
ASA 1000
ASA 500
6 footcandles, f11.4
Forced 2 stops
100 -watt bulb 6 ft.
over model's head.
footcandles, f11.4
Forced 3 stops
5
Real life isn't always bright sunlight or floodlight. Sometimes, when you're on a
terrific assignment, the light situation may be not -so- terrific.
Eastman Ektachrome video news film is capable of providing broadcast quality
images down to 5 footcandles (with forced processing). And this can make the
having no story at all.
difference between picking up a good story beautifully
EASTMAN EKTACHROME Video News Film 7240 (tungsten), 7239 (daylight).
-or
ASA 1000
candles
(not footcandles)
fIl.4
Forced 3 stops
2
Film is good news.
THE FIRST FAMILY OF RADIO
GATHERS AT THE NAB
Once again, we're inviting everyone
in our large family of 1,561 *ABC Radio
Network affiliates to meet with us at
the National Association of Broadcasters convention.
It's our chance to have a yearly
get-together and find out what we
can do for each other.
Come meet your representatives
at the Sheraton Park Hotel, Suite B 220
starting Saturday, March 26. You're
also invited to attend the affiliates'
business meetings on Sunday, March
27 at the Washington Hilton.
We're looking forward to seeing
you. Isn't that what family gatherings
are for?
*#O
The Four Demographic Radio Networks.
Divisions of ABC Radio Network
RADIO
As
of March 4,
1977.
THE FIRST FAMILY OF RADIO
CONTEMPORARY
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(FM)
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KFBC-FM
A David L. Wolper Production
Based on Alex Haley's No.1 Best Selling Book
ROOTS
200 years to unfold
ROOTS
12
ROOTS
2
ROOTS
years of research to discover
years to create
8 nights
to make television history
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Rating
Share
40.5
61
pm
44.1
10 -11 pm
10 -11 pm
10 -11 pm
44.8
43.8
45.7
45.9
42.3
62
68
66
N.Y. Time
9 -11 pm
9 -11
9 -11
10 -11
9 -11
pm
pm
pm
51
.1
71
66
65
71
W\RNER BROS.TELEVISION DISTRIBUTION
THE "TOP
20"
TELEVISION AUDIENCES OF ALL TIME
NTI HOUSEHOLD AUDIENCE
RANK
PROGRAM
ESTIMATES (AVG. AU D.)
1.
ROOTS(Sun., Jan. 30)
36,380,000
2.
33,960,000
3.
Gone With the Wind-Pt. 1
Gone With The Wind -Pt. 2
4.
ROOTS(Fri., Jan. 28)
32,680,000
5.
ROOTS(Thur., Jan. 27)
32,540,000
6.
ROOTS(Tues., Jan. 25)
31,900,000
7.
Super Bowl
31,610,000
8.
ROOTS(Mon., Jan. 24)
31, 400,000
9.
ROOTS(Wed., Jan. 26)
31,190,000
10.
ROOTS(Sat., Jan. 29)
30,120,000
11.
Super Bowl X (1976)
Super Bowl IX (1975)
-M'(Sun.,Jan. 23)
29,440,000
28,000,000
15.
Airport (Nov. 11,1973)
Super Bowl VII (1973)
16.
World Series -Game
17.
27,540,000
27,450,000
19.
Super Bowl VIII (1974)
Super Bowl VI (1972)
Love Story (Oct. 1, 1972)
20.
All In The Family (Jan. 5, 1976)
27,350,000
12.
13.
14.
18.
XI (1977)
Source
Nielsen Television Index (NTIl. 2nd January 1977 and
1st
29,040,000
28,840,000
27,670,000
7
(1975)
Febnrory 1977 Reports_
OA WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY
33,750,000
27,560,000
27,410,000
MondayEMemoR
A
broadcast advertising commentary from Marvin Honig executive VP and Creative Director Doyle Dane Bernbach Inc. New York
Is there a middle ground
for 30- and 60- second
television commercials?
The feelings of creative people toward
media people always have been based on a
simple, direct, maybe unfair premise:
Have I seen my commercial enough on
TV? If I've seen it, the media guys are
great. If I haven't they're duds.
You would think this would always put
media people on the defensive and at a disadvantage. Wrong. Nature compensates.
The media people have something called
charts.
Charts, an overwhelming weapon. Now
maybe they should be outlawed, but at
least there should be a bilateral agreement
to limit and control them.
Media charts are unlike any others.
They're always exact and precise. They can
mesmerize a person with numerical logic,
and convince you that you've seen your
commercial when you were sure you
hadn't. When a media chart is flashed in
front of me, without warning, and I don't
have time to press thumbtacks onto my
palms, it's only a matter of time until my
feet go cold, my eyes stop blinking and I'll
agree to anything.
I think the business of media may have
become too precise and exact for its own
good.
The 30- second commercial is my
foremost example. It continues on unquestioned. Ninety percent of all television commercials are 30 seconds. Why?
Because of its efficiency, and that can be
proved.
So from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. the American
public watches our advertising in a com-
fortable, melodic rhythm. Thirty- second
commercial after 30- second commercial.
The viewer not only watches in this
rhythm, he thinks in this rhythm and probably goes to the bathroom in this rhythm.
Reason enough to question the 30- second
rut all television advertising is in today.
But more important, we have clients
who need more than 281/2 seconds to
deliver their messages completely and understandably. They make cars and cameras
and sell services that often take longer
than 28 1/2 seconds to explain.
I've heard it said that a 30- second commerical is 80% as effective as a 60. That
seems to make it extremely efficient, but I
don't understand 80%. If a Broadway show
is 80% a hit, it's not a hit. If a movie is 80%
enjoyable it probably won't make money.
And if a salesman is only 80% convincing
in trying to get you to buy something, you
probably won't buy it.
I'm in no way saying that we should go
back to the 60- second standard that we had
10 years ago. In many cases that would be
a waste of time and money. But this
Marvin Honig, 39, became creative director of
Doyle Dane Bernbach in 1974, 10 years after
joining the agency as a copywriter. It took him
just two years to become creative director of
one of DDB'S major operations -DDB -Los
Angeles. Mr. Honig went to the West Coast in
that capacity in 1966. But he preferred New
York and returned at the end of 1967. He soon
became a senior vice president- creative
management supervisor. Last September he
was elevated to creative director. He is also an
executive vice president and member of the
board of directors. Among the accounts he has
worked on are American Airlines, Procter &
Gamble, Volkswagen and Sony. Perhaps his
most famous single commercial was AlkaSeltzer's "Poached Oysters"
religious dedication to 30 seconds has to
be just as wrong.
Time should not dictate the selling
message. The selling message should dictate the time.
Efficient alternatives are the answer. So
I'd like to recommend -ready or not -the
45- second commercial.
Why not? Most of the movies shown on
television have breaks, two minutes long,
for the commercials. Two 45's and a 30. It
works.
The prime -time half -hour network
shows have three breaks, one minute each.
Why couldn't they have three breaks
minute and a half, one minute, and 30 seconds? So one of the breaks would offer
two 45- second commercials.
I'm sure the planning, scheduling and
cost evaluation Of a 45- second commercial
would be difficult. In the beginning anyway. There are problems that I couldn't
even imagine. But I don't think there are
problems that media people couldn't imagine. Or couldn't handle.
For instance, the main problem is that
-a
Broadcasting Mar
18
21
1977
there probably can't be a first 45- second
commercial. There have to be two 45 -second commercials. Otherwise there are
going to be an extra 15 seconds dangling
somewhere, because all network time
seems to be sold in blocks of 30's.
So, I guess, one agency would have to
have one client who had two products that
could each use a 45- second commercial
and could each use the same media buy.
Or something like that.
And who commits first? The network or
the advertiser?
But on the other hand where is it written
that all network time has to be sold in
blocks of 30's? It all seems so overwhelming, is it really worth it? If you've ever sat
down to write a television commercial you
might agree that it is. Imagine if you were
writing a movie and you had to choose between an hour and a half or three hours.
Or a book, and your only choice was 400
pages or 800.
The commercial is the same thing in
miniature. That's why to me most of the
benefits of a 45- second commercial are
obvious. First of all we wouldn't have to
choose between two extremes. The 30 or
the 60. Or have to pull a 30 out of a 60 or
stretch a 30 into a 60. When done this way
one of the lengths always suffers.
Forty-fives would give us room to
breathe and develop advertising ideas.
Tonight, watch a two- minute break during
a network movie. There will be four commercials and wall -to -wall copy. The copy
always starts at the second -and -a -half pull up. Chances are two of the four commercials will be stand-ups. The great writers
and art directors can do stand -ups, but
they also learned to sell using charm,
warmth and even humor. And for perfect
timing, the one thing you need is a little
time.
Forty-fives should also be a benefit to
advertisers introducing new products. A
few extra seconds for the new advantages
and the new reasons why.
And there are advertisers who are interested in public service messages. This is
bound to happen more and more in the
future. Large corporations disseminating
helpful information. Energy conservation,
recycling, health tips. In years past the
general store was a responsible and depended -upon member of the community.
In years to come I believe it will be the
giant corporation. And what better way to
get important messages to each citizen
than using a portion of the media budget.
Perhaps the last 15 seconds of a 45- second
commercial.
The 45- second commercial. Why not?
If for no other reason, wouldn't it just
be kind of nice never again to see a 60 -second commercial that's too long, or a 30second commercial that's too short?
tO
Soccessio
Po6eoce
StN014S
ard
Most
Gete
Pat0p2SON
100)S
S1041
Pd
%ONO
O1
0.13010500 S
001
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DatebookN
March 23-26 -Alpha Epsilon Rho, National Honorary Broadcasting Society 35th annual convention.
This week
March 20 -23 -1977 BIAS (Broadcast Industry Automation System) seminar, sponsored by Data Communications Corp., Memphis. Hilton hotel, Memphis.
March 21- Mutual Broadcasting System's agency advertiser luncheon presentation, "The Feeling Is
Mutual" Hilton of Philadelphia, Philadelphia.
21.22- Conference on "The Copyright Act of
1976: Dealing with the New Realities :' sponsored by
the Copyright Society of the U.S.A. and the New York
Law Journal. Barbara Ringer, register of copyrights,
Library of Congress, will be keynote speaker. Bonavenlure hotel, Los Angeles.
March 21 -23 -First of series of hearings before
Senate Communications Subcommittee on telecom-
munications policy issues, subject of this being common carriers. Room 235, Russell Senate Office building, Washington.
March 21- 23- California Community Television
Association's third annual congressional -FCC conference. Mayflower hotel, Washington.
March
22- Mutual
Broadcasting System's agency-
advertiser luncheon presentation, "The Feeling
Mutual" Baltimore Hilton, Baltimore.
Is
March 22- Fifteenth annual advertising research
conference of New York chapter of American Marketing Association. Among topics. will be TV clutter and
violence. Hotel Biltmore, New York.
Mayflower hotel, Washington. Contact: AER President
Andy Orgel, CBS Radio Network. 51 West 52nd Street,
New York 10019.
March 24 -25- American Forces Broadcasting conference. Twin Bridges Marriott hotel, Arlington, Va,
March 26.27 -New York state second annual video
conference. Rochester Institute of Technology,
Rochester. Information: Student Television Systems,
Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester.
March 27- Annual membership meeting
Association of Maximum Service Telecasters.
the
of
1
1
p.m.,
Delaware suite, Sheraton -Park hotel, Washington.
(Special meeting of the present board of directors of
AMST will be held March 26, 2 p.m., in Map room of
Washington Hilton hotel. Newly elected AMST board
will meet March 28, 2 p.m.. Map room of Washington
Hilton. to elect officers.)
March 27- 30- National Association of Broadcasters annual convention. Shoreham Americana.
Sheraton Park and Washington Hilton hotels, Washington.
March 27 -30 -Ninth annual international conference of The International Industrial Teleuision
Association. Statler- Hilton hotel, Washington.
Also in March
March 28- Colorado
Broadcasters Assocation
legislator reception. Shoreham hotel, Washington.
March 23 -New Jersey CATV Association winter
general membership meeting. William J. Hamilton Jr.,
speaker of the New Jersey General Assembly, will be
guest speaker. Robert L. Schmidt, president of the Naional Cable Television Association, will participate in
roundtable discussion on lobbying. The Trenton Inn,
March
29- Tennessee Association of Broadcasters
legislative breakfast. Rayburn building, Washington.
March
Trenton.
indicates new or revised listing
March
R
28- Louisiana
Association of Broadcasters
legislative reception. Hotel Washington. Washington.
March 29 -Ohio Association of Broadcasters'
"Salute to Congress" dinner. Hyatt Regency, Washington.
March 29 -New York State Broadcasters Association congressional reception. The Gold Room, Capitol,
Washington.
March 29- Daytime Broadcasters Association
meeting. Dover Room, Sheraton Park hotel, Washington.
31- FCC's new deadline for replies to amendment to noncommercial FM broadcast rules (Docket
20735). FCC, Washington.
March
March 31 -April 2- Region 12 conference of The
Society of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi
for Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Western Tennessee. Memphis State University, Memphis.
April
April 1 -2- Region three conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for
Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Florida and East
Tennessee. Knoxville, Tenn.
April 1-2-Region four conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for
Michigan, Ohio, Western Pennsylvania and
Virginia. Huntington, W. Va.
West
April 1 -2- Region live conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for Illinois,
Indiana and Kentucky. Chicago.
April 1 -2- Region seven conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi. for South
Dakota, Missouri, Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa. Columbia. Mo.
April
1
-2- Region
nine conference
of Society of
for Wyom-
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi,
ing, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico Albuquerque, N.
M.
Major meetings
March 27- 30- National Association of Broadcasters annual convention. Washington.
April 17 -20- National Cable Television Association annual convention. Conrad Hilton, Chicago.
April 22- 27- MIP -TV '77, 13th annual international marketplace for producers and distributors
of television programing. Palais des Festivals,
Cannes, France.
April 27 -May 1- American Women in Radio
and Television 26th annual convention. Radisson
Downtown hotel, Minneapolis.
May 8- 12- Annual meeting, ABC -TV affiliates.
Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
May 15 -18- Annual meeting, NBC -TV affiliates.
Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
May 18-21- American Association of Advertising Agencies annual meeting. Greenbrier, White
Sulphur Springs, W. Va.
May 24 -25- Annual meeting, CBS -TV affiliates.
Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
June 2- 4- Associated Press Broadcasters annual
meeting. Chase-Park Plaza, St. Louis.
June 11- 15- American Advertising Federation
April
Williamsburg Lodge and Williamsburg Inn.
Williamsburg, Va.
Sept. 15 -17 -Radio Television News Directors
Association international conference. Hyatt
Regency hotel, San Francisco. 1978 conference
will be at Atlanta Hilton hotel, Sept. 12 -16; 1979
conference will be at New Marriott hotel, Chicago,
Sept 11 -14.
Sept. 18- 21- Institute of Broadcasting Financial Management 17th annual conference. Hyatt
Regency, Chicago. 1978 conference will be held
Sept. 17 -20 in Las Vegas; 1979 conference will be
in New York Sept. 16-19.
April
N.Y.;
-3-
1
Women in Communications Inc region
two meeting. Speakers will include Marlene Sanders,
ABC vice president, and Helen Thomas, UPI correspondent. Ohio University, Athens.
April 3- 8- International 7hpe Association's seventh
annual seminar, "Audio /Video Update" Keynote
speakers will be NBC's David Brinkley and syndicated
columnist Art Buchwald. Hilton Head Island, S.C.
April
Mutual Broadcasting System's agency-advertiser luncheon presentation, "The Feeling Is
Mutual" Capital Hilton, Washington.
5-
Orleans.
April
7-
Association convention. New Orleans Hilton, New
Oct 23- 26- Annual meeting of Association of
National Advertisers. The Homestead, Hot
Springs, Va.
13.18- National Association of Educational Broadcasters convention. Sheraton Park
Nov.
hotel. Washington.
Nov. 14-16- Television Bureau of Advertising
annual meeting. Hyatt Regency hotel, San Francisco.
Nov. 18- 20- National convention of The Society
June 13- 15- Broadcast Promotion Associa-
Renaissance Center, Detroit. Birmingham. Ala., will
be site of 1978 convention.
Radisson Downtown, Minneapolis; 1979 convention will be June 9 -14, Queen Elizabeth hotel,
Montreal.
June 27 -30- Meeting of the National Association of Broadcasters joint, radio and TV boards.
ington. Information: Rick Askof1, IBS, Veils Gate,
(914) 565-6710.
Oct. 9 -12- National Radio Broadcasters
annual convention and public affairs conference.
Hyatt Regency hotel, Washington.
tion 22d annual seminar. Beverly Hilton hotel, Los
Angeles. 1978 convention will be June 17 -20,
I.3-
National convention of the Intercollegiate
Broadcasting System. Hyatt Regency hotel, -Wash-
of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi
-
March 4 -8, 1978 National Association of
Television Program Executives conference. Bonaventure hotel, Los Angeles. Future conferences:
March 10-14, 1979, MGM Grand hotel, Las Vegas;
March 8-12, 1980, Nob Hill complex, San Francisco.
Washington telecommunications roundtable on "Satellite Communications: Current and Near Future Issues;' sponsored by Public -Cable Inc. National Education Association headquarters, 1201 16th
Street, N.W., Washington.
11 -12- Television Bureau of Advertising communications seminar for sales and management personnel. NB headquarters, New York.
April
April 12- 14- Klieg! "Lighting for Television" seminar. Site to be determined, Littfe Rock, Ark. Contact:
Wheeler Baird, Kliegl Brothers, New York; (212)
786 -7474.
April 13 -New England Cable Teleuision Association
spring meeting. The Country Kitchen, Route
Brattleboro, Vt.
9,
West
April 14- 15- Institute of Broadcasting Financial
Management/Broadcast Credit Association quarterly
board of directors meeting. Hyatt Regency, Chicago.
April 15 -16- Region six conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for North
Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Marquette Univer-
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
22
city, Milwaukee.
casters Association annual meeting and awards pre-
April 15 -18- Women in Communications Inc. region
sentation. Host Town Inn, Lancaster.
seven meeting. Sheraton- Century hotel, Oklahoma
April
City
April 15-18- Nebraska Associated Press Broadcasters convention. Ramada Inn, Kearney.
April 15-17- Women in Communications Inc. region
six meeting. Speakers will be Tom Brokaw, NBC, and
Leslie Stahl, CBS. Twin Bridges Marriott, Washington.
April 18- California Associated Press 7eleuisionRadio Association 30th annual meeting. Hotel del Coronado, Coronado.
April 18 -17- Women in Communications Inc.
region one meeting. First day at Washington State University, Pullman. Second day at University of Idaho,
Moscow.
April 17- 19- Canadian Association of Broadcasters
annual meeting. Winnipeg Inn, Winnipeg, Man.
April
17.20- National
Cable Television Association
annual convention. Conrad Hilton hotel, Chicago.
April 18 -19- Television Bureau of Advertising communications seminar for sales and management personnel. NB headquarters. New York.
April 18 -21 -Ninth annual conference of Southern
Educational Communications Association. Host will
be the Alabama ETV Network. Gulf State Park Resort
and Convention Center, Pleasure Island, Ala.
April 19- 21- Electrol77 electronics convention
and
30- White House Correspondents Association
63rd annual dinner and reception to honor the President. Washington Hilton hotel. Washington.
May 1- Deadline for entries in Howard W. Blakeslee
Awards in recognition of reporting on heart and blood
vessel diseases. Winners will be chosen in radio and
television as well as in other media and will deal with
material presented in the year prior to Feb. 28, 1977.
Entry information and blanks: American Heart
Association, 7320 Greenville Avenue, Dallas 76231.
May 1 -3- Chamber of Commerce of the US. 65th national annual meeting. Washington.
2-
May
FCC's deadline for comments on inquiry into
network programing practices and policies (Docket
21049). Replies are due June 1. FCC, Washington.
-7-
May 3
Seventh annual Public Radio Conference
and Equipment Exhibit, sponsored by the Association
of Public Radio Stations, Corporation for Public
Broadcasting and National Public Radio. Hyatt
Regency hotel, New Orleans.
May 4 -8- Washington State Association of Broadcasters spring meeting. Rosario Resort hotel, Orcas Island.
5.9- Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters
exposition, sponsored by regional elements of the In-
annual convention. Castle Harbor, Bermuda.
stitute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers and the
Electronic Represenlatiues Association. New York Col-
May 7 -Iowa Broadcast News Association 1977
seminar. Adventureland Inn, near Des Moines.
iseum, New York.
April 20-21 -Spring convention of Kentucky Broadcasters Association. Stouffer's Inn, Louisville.
April 20 -21 Television Bureau of Advertising retail
-
workshop. Biltmore hotel, New York.
April 20- 22- Spring meeting of Indiana Broadcasters Association. Brown County Inn, Nashville, Ind.
April 21 -23- Louisiana Association of Broadcasters
spring convention. Sheraton hotel, Baton Rouge.
April 22- 23- Region one conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for New
York, central and eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey.
Delaware and New England slates. Boston.
April 22-23- Region eight conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for
Oklahoma and Texas. Dallas.
April 22 -23- Region 10 conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, for Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska. Otter
Crest, Ore.
April 22- 24- National Association of Farm Broad,
casters South Central regional meeting. Hilton Inn,
Amarillo, Tex.
7.8- Kansas Associated Press
Broadcasters,
Association of News Broadcasters of Kansas and UPI
May
joint meeting, Royal Inn, Hutchinson, Kan.
May 8- 12- Annual meeting, ABC -TV affiliates. Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
12.15- Annual
May 15-18-National Retail Merchants Association
annual sales promotion conference. Hilton hotel,
Atlanta.
May 15- 18- Annual meeting, NBC -TV affiliates.
Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
May 18 -21
1- American Wonlen in Radio and
Television 26th annual convention. Speakers will include FCC Commissioner Margita White, ABC Inc.
President Elton Rule and Belo Broadcasting Corp.
President Mike Shapiro. Radisson Downtown hotel,
Minneapolis.
April 28- 29- Minnesota Broadcasters Association
spring meeting. Registry hotel, Bloomington.
April 29 -30 -Sigma Delta
Chi Distinguished Service in Journalism Awards ceremonies. To be held in
conjunction with region 11 conference of Society of
Professional Journalists, SDX for California, Nevada,
Arizona and Hawaii. San Diego.
April 29 -30- Women in Communications Inc. region
five meeting. Press Club. San Francisco.
April
30- Pennsylvania
Associated Press Broad-
June 3-10-International Television Symposium
and Technical Exhibit Montreaux, Switzerland. Information: Directorate, 10th annual Television Symposium, P.O. Box 97. CH -1820 Montreux.
7-11- Texas Association of Broadcasters summer convention. Hilton Paladio del Rio, San Antonio.
June
June 8- 9- Advertising Research Foundation
midyear conference. Featured luncheon speaker June
9 will be Gerald Rafshoon, Rafshoon Advertising Inc.,
Atlanta. Keynote speech will be by James Button,
senior vice president, Sears, Roebuck & Co. Hyatt Regency O'Hare. Chicago.
June 11 -15- American Advertising Federation annual convention and public affairs conference. Hyatt
Regency hotel, Washington.
June 13- 15- Broadcast Promotion Association
seminar.
Beverly
Hilton
hotel, Los
June 14.18 -Iowa Broadcasters Association convention. The New Inn. Lake Okoboji.
June 15.17- Kanman Science's Corp. /BCS user's
conference for BCS customer stations. Antkers Plaza
hotel, Colorado Springs.
June 17.18 -North Dakota Broadcasters Association summer meeting. Kirkwood motor inn, Bismarck.
June 17- 18- Western regional meeting of Na-
our
NAB
-American Association of Advertising
Agencies annual meeting. Greenbrier, White Sulphur
Springs,
HOTEL
W. Va.
19-21- Kansas Association of Broadcasters an-
May 23 -24- Virginia State Cable Television
Association. convention. Harrisonburg Sheraton, Har-
April 27 -May
-5-
June 2
Mississippi Broadcasters Association
annual convention. Sheraton Biloxi, Biloxi.
Monica Civic Auditorium, Hollywood. On NBC -TV, 9:30
p.m. NYT to conclusion.
April 24 -29 -San Francisco State University's 27th
new deadline for replies in clear
channel broadcasting inquiry (Docket 20642). FCC,
Washington.
meeting. Rock Lane Lodge, Table Rock Lake.
May 15 -Emmy awards presentation of National
Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Santa
nual convention. Ramada Inn, Topeka.
April 25 -FCC's
Louis.
June 2- 5- Missouri Broadcasters Association spring
meeting of Western States Ad.
uertising Agencies Association. Canyon hotel. Palm
Springs. Calif.
May
'77, 13th annual international
marketplace for producers and distributors of television programing. Palais des Festivals, Cannes, France.
U.S. contact: John Nathan, suite 4535.30 Rockefeller
Plaza, New York 10020; (212) 489.1300.
annual Broadcast Industry Conference. San Francisco
State University, San Francisco.
June 2- 4- Associated Press Broadcasters annual
22nd annual
Angeles.
May 7 -8- Illinois News Broadcasters Association
spring convention. Forum 30 hotel, Springfield.
May
April 22- 27- MIP-TV
June
meeting. Edwin Newman, NBC News correspondent
will be keynote speaker. FCC Chairman Richard E.
Wiley will be featured speaker. Chase -Park Plaza, St.
May
May
ing on pay television. Ottawa.
May 20 -22- Northeast regional meeting of National
Association of Farm Broadcasters. Site
nounced. Cincinnati. Contact:
WLW(AM) Cincinnati.
to be anDavonna Oskarson,
risonburg. Contact: Staunton Video Corp. Stauton, Va.;
(703) 667 -2224.
May 23- 25- Central Educational Network instructional, television utilization /awareness workshop.
Faucett Center for Tomorrow, Columbus, Ohio. Contact: Ted Lucas, CEN, Chicago 60625; (312)
463-3040.
is The Washington Hilton,
Saturday
afCon26th.
ternoon, March
tact us for an appointment.
The hotel number is: (202)
483 -3000.
effective
May 23- 25- National Association of Broadcasters
annual meeting for state association presidents and
executive directors. Hyatt Regency Washington,
Washington.
CORE
May 23 -28- Canadian Cable Television Association
annual convention and trade show. Four Seasons hotel,
Calgary, Alberta.
AN
May 24- 25- Annual meeting, CBS -TV affiliates.
Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.
May 25 -27 -Ohio Association of Broadcasters
spring workshops. Kings Island Inn, Ohio.
May 30- Revised starting date for Canadian Radio
Tèleuision and Telecommunication Commission hear-
Broadcasting Mar
23
21
1977
DASSOCIATES
MEDIA BROKERS AND APPRAISERS
6116
N
CENTRAL EXPRESSWAY
DALLAS. TEXAS 7520¢
SUITE 712
214,361-8970
'
tional Association of Farm Broadcasters. Howard
Johnson motor lodge, Salt Lake City.
August
June 19- 21- National Association of Broadcasters communications seminar for broadcast man-
Association convention Sun Valley, Idaho.
agers. Airlie House, Airlie, Va.
June 19 -22- The Business /Professional Advertising
Association 55th annual conference. Holiday Inn,
Rochester,
N.Y.
June 22- 24- Florida Association of Broadcasters
annual convention. Ponte Vedra Club.
June 22- 24- Maryland -District of Columbia -
Aug. 4 -7 -Rocky Mountain Broadcasters
Aug. 18- 19- Arkansas Broadcasters Association
summer convention. Indian Rock Resort, Fairfield
Bay.
Aug. 28 -Sept. 4- International Radio and TV
Exhibition 1977 Berlin. Berlin Exhibition Grounds,
Berlin. Contact: Bodo
D -1000, Berlin 19.
H.
Kettelhack,
P.O.
Box 19 17 40,
June 27 -30- Meeting of the National Association of
Broadcasters joint, radio and TV boards, Williamsburg
Lodge and Williamsburg Inn, Williamsburg, Va.
Oct. 13 -14- National Association of Broadcasters
Sept. 14 -15 -Ohio Association of Broadcasters fall
executives. Hyatt Regency hotel, Chicago.
convention. Columbus Sheraton, Columbus.
Sept. 11- 13- Illinois Broadcasters Association
July 10- 13- National Association of Farm Broadcasters summer meeting. LEnfant Plaza hotel, Wash-
Sept. 15 -17 -Radio Television News Directors
York State Broadcasters Associa-
tion executive conference. Gideon Putnam, Saratoga
Springs.
July 13- 18- Coloradio Broadcasters Association
summer convention. Steamboat Springs.
July 17- 19- California Broadcasters Association
general membership meeting. Speakers will include
FCC Commissioner Margin White and ABC Inc. President Elton 'Rule. Del Monte Hyatt House. Monterey.
July 21- 22- Institute of Broadcasting Financial
Management/Broadcast Credit Association quarterly
board of directors meeting. Fairmont hotel, Dallas.
Broadcasters Association fall
September
fall convention. Marriott Lincolnshire Resort, Chicago.
July 10 -13 -New
October
Oct. 2- 5- Missouri
Oct. 9- 12- National Radio Broadcasters Association convention. New Orleans Hilton, New Orleans.
July
ington.
MM1!1
meeting. Holiday Inn, Hannibal.
Delaware Broadcasters Association annual convention. Sheraton Fountainebleau Inn and Spa, Ocean
City, Md.
munications, radio and television equipment exhibition. Participation will be limited to 45 U.S. companies.
Caracas. Venezuela. Information: Hans J. Amrhein,
Room 4036, Office of International Marketing. Department of Commerce, Washington 20230; (202)
377 -2332.
Association international conference. Hyatt Regency
fall regional meetings for radio, TV and engineering
Oct. 14 -18 -Fall convention of Illinois News Broadcasters Association. Champaign- Urbana. Program
coordinator: Ron Williams, WDWS(AM) Champaign
61820.
Oct. 17- 18- National Association of Broadcasters
hotel, San Francisco.
fall regional meetings for radio, TV and engineering
executives. Hyatt Regency Cambridge. Cambridge.
Sept. 18- 20- Nebraska Broadcasters Association
Mass.
convention. Scottsbluff.
Oct.
Sept. 18- 21- Institute of Broadcasting Financial
Management 17th annual conference. Hyatt Regency,
House, Chattanooga.
Chicago.
Sept. 19- 21- Western Electronic Show and Convention, organized and managed by nonprofit Electrical and Electronics Exhibitions Inc Brooks Hall and
San Francisco Civic Auditorium.
Sept. 26 -Oct.
1
-"Tetectronica '7r
telecom-
19-21- Tennessee Association of Broadcasters
annual convention and business meeting. Read
Oct. 20-21-National Association of Broadcasters
fall regional meetings for radio, TV and engineering
executives. Peachtree Plaza hotel, Atlanta.
Oct. 23 -24 -North Dakota Broadcasters Association fall meeting. Holiday Inn, Fargo.
Oct. 23- 28- Annual meeting of Association of National Advertisers. The Homestead, Hot Springs, Va.
Open5MikeR
some cases tripled the number of broadcasting stations in a given market. More
EDITOR: Thank you for the "Profile" on and more the public views AM and FM as
Gene Accas [BROADCASTING, March 7]. A simply "radio." Adding more radio facilnumber of us in the academic areas of ities to an already over- crowded marketbroadcasting owe Gene Accas far more place would be disastrous both for AM and
than we can calculate for the fine instruc- FM operators: Just who is the NAB worktion we received in the International Radio ing for ? Norman Wain, Metroplex Comand Television Society faculty /industry munications, Cleveland.
seminars. Gene Accas is indeed an
unusual man.- Wesley II. Wallace,
professor and acting chairman, depart- Pro -am
ment of radio, television and motion pictures, University of North Carolina at EDtroR: As part of the continuing
dialogue in your magazine concerning uniChapel Hill.
versity education for broadcasting, and the
reaction of commercial broadcasters to the
Whose side?
preparation received,
thought your
EDITOR: It is with utter disbelief that I read readers would be interested in this.
in the Feb. 14 issue of BROADCASTING that
On Feb. 26, TVS was scheduled to feed
the National Association of Broadcasters is a television basketball game to an NBC
joining the movement for additional AM regional network. The game was between
Southern Illinois University in Carbondale
radio space.
How in the world can an organization and Drake University in the SIU-C arena.
that is supposedly devoted to the best inAlthough the equipment and the TVS
terests of broadcasters be in favor of creat- director arrived on time, the crew was
ing additional channels for AM transmis- weathered in in Indianapolis, leaving no
sion? Either the NAB is completely out of one to set up and operate the cameras and
touch with the realities of the broadcast other equipment. TVS Director Bob-Kyle
world or they are working for some other got in touch with WSIU -TV Program Maninterests; otherwise, they could not be in ager Virginia Mampre, and she lined up a
favor of such a stand.
volunteer crew for TVS /NBC consisting of
Within the past 10 years, we all have some professional staffers from the uniseen how FM has literally doubled or in versity station and six students of the SIU
Thanks to us, thanks to him
-
department of radio -television. The students operated the three cameras, the
audio gear, video -tape equipment and
assisted in the technical direction. The
origination of the game went off without a
hitch, and after the game the students
took down and packed the gear.
I think this indicated that our students
are not only oriented toward the theoretical (which they are), but also the practical
(which they also are). We think some
broadcasters will benefit when these people, and others equally qualified, graduate
into the job market. Charles T. Lynch,
chairman, radio -television department
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
-
1
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
24
Not at KGW -TV
I'm obliged to comment on your
article reporting on the National
Association of Television Program Executives panel, "Local Strip Programing,
Trend or End ?" your reporter made a
comment which mystifies me. I don't
recall anyone on the panel making
reference to "studio material ... talking
heads, to cut down on costs" I assure you
I did not, and our show, Evening, does
not, as the story implies.- Robert L.
Lewis, director of programing, KGW-TV
EDITOR:
Feb. 21
Portland, Ore.
now
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How effective is television in getting across messages of social value to young viewers?
To find out, we went to experts. For the past five
years, educators and specialists in child develop-
ment have helped us create programs that skillfully incorporate simple lessons in living within
the framework of popular entertainment.
Does it work?
The CBS Office of Social Research, in collaboration with research firms specializing in the
study of children, performed a series of five surveys, involving a total of more than 4,000 children,
to find out what messages they received from the
programs. Most of the children were aged 7 and 8
and 10 and 11; two surveys also included young
teenagers.
The results may surprise you. And they're
le They
yours for tie asking. Write: "Learning
Laugh," CBS Television Network, 51 West 52 Street,
New York, NY, 10019, and ask for your free copy.
We think it's an eye -opener.
WHAT WE LEARNED
ABOUT CHILDREN'S
TELEVISION
WOULD FILL
A BOOK
CBS TELEVISION NETWORK
0
CC
co
Vol. 92 No. 12
Top of the Week
FCC thrown out
of censorship
business by
D.C. court
Commission ruling in WBAI case
involving George Carlin album cut
is overturned in Tamm- authored
decision as violation of
Communications Act; Bazelon would
go further; Leventhal dissents
At the time the FCC issued its anti -indecency ruling in a case involving a George
Carlin comedy record dealing with the
"seven dirty words you can never say on
television"
(BROADCASTING. Feb. 17,
1975), commission officials said that if the
sion's ruling was a "good -faith effort" to
implement the federal statute prohibiting
the airing of obscene or indecent material.
"1 guess we did not do it right," he said.
But he also said the commission was left
without guidance as to how it might proceed properly.
Accordingly, it seemed likely the commission would seek review of the panel's
decision by the full nine -member bench of
the District of Columbia circuit. At a minimum, the court might provide clarification.
The record album at issue- George
Carlin, Occupation: Foole- was broadcast
by Pacifica Foundation's WBAI(FM) New
York on the afternoon of Oct. 30, 1973.
The album was featured in a broadcast on
the use of language in society.
But the Carlin monologue came to the
commission's attention in a complaint
from a man who said he had heard it on
the car radio while driving with his young
son. And the commission -under
pressure from Congress and the public to
police the airwaves for allegedly offensive
material- seized on it as a means of
prohibits it from doing: interfere with
licensee discretion in programing. Despite
the effort to "channel" the allegedly
offensive material into late- evening hours,
he said, the commission is still engaging in
censorship.
As drafted, the commission ruling,
Judge Tamm said, would prohibit the
broadcast of Shakespeare's "The Tempest" or "Two Gentlemen of Verona,"
some passages of the Bible, as well as the
works of a number of authors, including
Ernest Hemingway and James Joyce. The
Nixon Watergate tapes would also be forbidden, he said.
Having declared the ruling in violation
of Section 326, Judge Tamm said it was
not necessary to decide the First Amendment question. But he also said the ruling
does not meet the "rigorous demands"
the Supreme Court has laid down for
defining obscenity -even assuming the
commission has the power to ban non obscene speech from the air. He said the
ruling is "overbroad" (it "sweepingly forbids any broadcast of the seven words irrespective of context or however innocent
ruling did not survive judicial review, there
was probably no language that could not
be aired at any time. The question of
whether that fear was warranted may soon
be answered. Last week, a panel of the
U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington
overturned the commission's action,
which attempted to distinguish broadcasting from other media for First Amendment purposes and which was designed to
protect children from the broadcast of
allegedly offensive material. Judge Edward
A. Tamm, who wrote the court's opinion,
said the commission's ruling was "overbroad and vague" and carried the commission into the "forbidden realm of censorship."
The panel, reflecting the uncertainty
over government authority in the area of
regulation of speech, was split. Judge
Tamm said the commission's ruling constituted a violation of the Communications Act provision that prohibits the com-
mission from censoring broadcast
material. Chief Judge David Bazelon, who
concurred, went further; he said the ruling
also violated the First Amendment, and
he appeared to reject the commission's
view that material protected in other media
could be barred from broadcasting. Judge
Harold Leventhal, the third member, dissented, with an opinion generally supporting the commission's position.
The effect of the opinion was to place
the commission in a quandary -or, as
Chairman Richard E. Wiley put it, "a
never-never land." He said the commis-
should continue to trust the licensee to exercise
judgment, responsibility and sensitivity to the community's
needs, interests and tastes. To whatever extent
we err, or the commission errs in balancing its duties,
it must be in favor of preserving the values of
free expression and freedom from governmental
interference in matters of taste.
-Tamm
GG We
i/
they may be)"
clarifying its definition of the kind of indecent material that it would ban under the
or educational
obscenity and indecency statute.
The definition referred to language that
describes "sexual or excretory activities
and organs" in a manner considered "patently offensive" by community standards
for the broadcast medium and that is
broadcast at a time of day when children
would be expected to be in the audience.
The commission said such material might
be aired late at night, provided it had
serious literary, artistic, political or scientific value. And the commission, citing its
authority under the obscenity- indecency
statute, held the words, "as broadcast," to
be "indecent" and prohibited from the air.
To Judge Tamm, the statement does exactly what the Communication Act's Section 326 -the no- censorship provision-
Judge Tamm's solution to the problem
trust broadcasters to exercise good
taste and judgment. "To whatever extent
we err, or the commission errs in balancing its duties;' he said, `it must be in favor
of preserving the values of free expression
and freedom from governmental interference in matters of taste."
Judge Bazelon held that regulation of
indecency must be subjected to the same
restraints as those applied to the regulation
of obscenity; he said the Supreme Court
has always treated indecency in terms of
obscenity. And, like Judge Tamm, he
found the commission's definition of the
Broadcasting Mar
27
21
1977
and
"vague" ( "it fails to define children ").
is to
term "massively overbroad." Furthermore, he said, the commission had failed
to demonstrate radio and television are
different -why offensive speech that
would be protected in other media may be
regulated when broadcast over radio or
television. Judge Bazelon rejected each of
the commission's arguments for that proposition, including the principal one -that
the ban is designed to prevent the exposure of children to words their parents
would not want them to hear. The commission, he said, "incorrectly assumes
that material regulatable for children can
be banned from broadcast." If the commission had such power, Judge Bazelon
said, it could ban the airing of political or
religious programs from which parents
might want to shield their children. The
Constitution, he added, "limits the government's power to select programs for
children."
Judge Leventhal, who appended a
transcript of the Carlin monologue to his
opinion to make clear the nature of the
problem that confronted the commission,
said he "cannot fault" the commission's
action.
"TV-radio broadcasting has special access to the home, and home audiences are
a primary target of the industry," he said.
Carter takes noninterventionist stance
in debate over coverage of terrorists
Carter keeps his distance
as UN ambassador says that
light of power of media,
First Amendment needs rethinking
in
bassador was urging self- restraint.
Later, however, he issued a written
statement indicating that the President had
no interest in requiring any change in the
way the media cover terrorist acts: "After
talking with the President, I can give you a
more direct response to the question of
coverage of hostage situations....
"He recognizes the complexity of the
problem and frankly has no easy solution
in mind. He sees this as a problem that
should be addressed by the news media as
a powerful and responsible institution in
our society. He has no desire to seek
legislation or to otherwise impose a solution, and hopes those who make news
The "to be or not to be" dilemma posed
for journalists by terrorist actions involving the media (BROADCASTING, March 14)
was propelled to the highest policy levels
last week. Andrew Young, the ambassador
to the United Nations, fueled the fire with
a suggestion that the First Amendment
might be "clarified" in light of the problems he says mass media create in covering
terrorist acts. But his boss, the President,
cooled off some of the heat with an official
statement saying the problem is for the decisions will themselves determine the
media, and not for the government, to definable boundaries of legitimate
solve.
coverage"
Ambassador Young, a former Democratic congressman from Atlanta who was
one of President Carter's earliest suppor- `Who's Who' looks into
ters in his campaign for the White House, the ethical questions of
offered his views on the malleability of the covering
acts
First Amendment in an interview with
UPI in Sacramento, Calif., following the The problem that confronts newsmen in
peaceful end of the Hanafi Muslim covering acts of terrorism into which they
takeover of three buildings in Washington are drawn as participants as well as re(BROADCASTING, March 14).
porters was highlighted on CBS News's
The takeover received heavy coverage Who's Who last week in a report on the
from the press and broadcasting. And Am- preceding week's Hanafi Muslim siege in
bassador Young said "a lot of these Washington.
phenomena" are the result of publicity
"This whole subject scares the hell out
they are given. "In a sense, we're advertis- of me," correspondent Dan Rather said in
ing to neurotic people" that the way to get winding up an interview with anchorman
attention is "to do something suicidal and Walter Cronkite at the end of the report
ridiculous."
(CBS -TV, Tuesday, 8 -9 p.m. NYT). Mr.
Then he said that the First Amendment Cronkite said it scared him too: "It's a
should be "clarified by the Supreme Court very, very serious problem for all of us."
in the light of the power of the mass
In the interview they examined the
media." But he also said he would prefer problem as typified earlier in the broadcast
that the news media censor themselves in by Hanafi Muslim leader Hamaas Abdul
covering such crimes.
Khaalis's choice of Max Robinson, WTOP"1 don't know if it protects the right of Tv Washington anchorman, as the prinpeople literally to destroy the things we cipal channel for making public his debelieve in," Mr. Young said, adding, "This mands while his forces, having killed one
kind of crime would not have been known reporter, held 134 people hostage (BROADabout [in California] at all when the First CASTING, March 14). It is a growing probAmendment was written. It would have lem, Mr. Rather noted.
died in Washington, D.C."
"Last week in Washington it was Max
White House News Secretary Jody Robinson," he said. "Next week it could
Powell was asked about the Young be ... some other reporter, anywhere."
remarks during a news briefing on MonMr. Robinson, it had been noted, was
day, and said he understood that the am- threatened with kidnaping and put under
terrorist
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
28
"In the home, special considerations apply, with freedom from unwanted intrusion both by the government ... and by
others presenting unwanted materials."
Judge Leventhal noted that the "abhorrence of censorship is a vital part of our
society." But he indicated he is not an absolutist on the First Amendment, at least
where children are concerned. He said he
would permit regulation of programing if
the aim is "to assist parents in their protection of young children" during the time
of their development
state interest."
- "a
compelling
police protection. But the threat, Mr.
Rather said, "didn't change his approach
to the story -he went back to his anchor
position without visibly missing a beat ?'
On a broader scale, Mr. Rather asked,
"since the terrorists seem to be getting
better at handling us, are we getting any
better at handling them ?" Mr. Cronkite
wasn't sure -or that it mattered.
"It seems to me," he said, "that we cannot control the events that need to be reported. All we can do is be responsible in
reporting the events that occur."
Andrew Young, ambassador to the
United Nations, had said he wished there
could be a law to restrict publication of information about violent crime. Mr. Rather
wanted to know if the First Amendment
could stand such a law.
"No," Mr. Cronkite replied.
couldn't at all. In no way. The First
Amendment says: 'There shall be no law
which infringes on the freedom of speech
"It
"'
and press.
But what can newsmen say, Mr. Rather
asked, when people tell them: "Listen, we
cannot allow this to happen and keep happening and escalate each time. Those of
you in the media have to do something."
"I don't know how the society got so
media- oriented in blaming the messenger
for everything that transpires in our
society and for all of its ills," Mr. Cronkite
said. "We are only the messenger."
Do reporters and editors in instantaneous journalism have time "to contemplate the consequences of what we
do ?"
Mr. Cronkite wasn't sure they should be
concerned with the consequences. "When
we start worrying about the consequences
we're beginning to play another role other
than that of reporters," he said. "We're
beginning to play a judgmental role. We're
beginning to play God. And I don't think
I'm equipped to do that. I'm not sure I
know any journalist who is ?'
He was adamant against blackouts:
"That's not serving the public's best interest at all. All that does is lead to rumor,
speculation, to doubt that the press is telling the whole story under any circumstances. And that's the most important
consideration of all. If we cover up stories
under any circumstance, the public has
every right to believe that we cover them
up under any circumstance. And if we
cover up at all, then the whole belief,
reliance upon the press is gone"
NAB talking up
head the PTA delegation at the meeting.
At the Los Angeles meeting, it was re-
the NAB convention in Washington, with
representatives of the National Citizens
Committee for Broadcasting and of the
The National Association of Broadcasters
continued its dialogues with groups inside
and outside the television industry last
week in advance of its writing more
stringent guidelines for the handling of
violence and sex on television.
On Wednesday, representatives of the
code review board and Tom Swafford,
NAB senior vice president for public
affairs, got together with 11 TV production
executives in Hollywood in what turned
out to be a long (almost six hours) but
cordial meeting, the participants reported.
Then on Friday, NAB President Vincent
Wasilewski and some of the same TV code
board members were to meet in Chicago
with representatives of the National Parent
Teacher Association, which has mounted a
campaign to curtail violence on TV. National PTA President Carol Kimmel was to
ported that neither the broadcasters nor
producers asked or promised anything
specific. "We just sat and talked," Grant
Tinker, president of MTM Enterprises,
said afterward. He and Frank Price, president of Universal Television, said the
point of the discussion was more to make
sure the TV managers and producers have
the same understanding of what is happening outside -specifically about the
pressure being put on the industry by
groups such as the PTA, the American
Medical Association, and about the work
of violence researchers such as Dr. George
Gerbner of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School of Communications.
The important thing about the meeting
last week, Mr. Tinker said, is that "for the
first time the production community and
the other end of the pipeline are talking
together." The uniform concern of the
producers is that they do not find themselves again under an "artificially imposed" restraint such as family viewing,
Mr. Tinker said.
The meeting was the second between
NAB's code board members and producers (BROADCASTING, Feb. 14) and
there was general agreement, said Mr.
Swafford, that there will be more.
NAB representatives have also scheduled a "dialogue" on March 29, during
Robert Rich. Katleman, Shane
Price. Tinker, Conley
Lee Rich, Komack, Kievman
Kievman, Gerber, Swafford
Lear, Swafford, Robert Rich
Salkowitz, Arnold, Conley
its efforts
to talk down
TV violence
It met last week with producers.
PTA; plans to huddle with NCCB
and AMA at convention; meanwhile
ACT wants more in children's code
Getting to know you. Attending the National Association
of Broadcasters' dinner-to- midnight meeting last week were: NAB TV code
review board members Tom Swafford, NAB senior vice president for
public affairs; Robert Rich of KBJR -TV Duluth, Minn., code board chairman; James Conley, Meredith Broadcasting, and Michael Kievman, Cox
Broadcasting, Atlanta. Producers John Mitchell, Columbia Pictures TV;
Also last week, NAB received a request
from Action for Children's Television for
changes in the TV code. Specifically,
ACT's Peggy Charren petitioned NAB
President Wasilewski for two code
reforms. One is to reduce the amount of
physical and "cultural" violence by (1)
eliminating stereotypes from children's
programs, (2) requiring each TV station to
present at least one children's program
after school each week, (3) requiring at
least one children's program for the
preschool audience daily, and (4) requiring
each station to broadcast public service announcements directed to children.
The second reform ACT asked for is to
tighten strictures on children's advertising, specifically to (1) eliminate advertising from preschool programs, (2) eliminate commercials, for heavily sugared
foods aimed at children and (3) reduce
commercial time on children's programs
to six minutes an hour. ACT also urged
that broadcasters be required to present
public affairs programs that discuss TV
violence and children's advertising.
John Summers, NAB executive vice
president and general manager, said Mrs.
Charren's letter will be considered by the
NAB TV code review board at its meeting
April
18
-20.
James Komack, independent; Lee Rich, Lorimar Productions; Norman
Lear, Tandem Productions; Grant Tinker, MTM Enterprises; Danny Arnold, independent; Sy Salkowitz, 20th Century -Fox Television; Harris
Katleman, MGM Television; David Gerber, independent; Allan Shane,
Warner Bros. Television, and Frank Price, Universal,Television met with
the broadcasters at Chasens restaurant.
Broadcasting Mar
29
AMA.
21
1977
Richmond, Va has gone to federal court to fight state law
prohibiting publication of information regarding investigations conducted by Virginia's Judicial Inquiry and Review Commission. Station on Tuesday (March 15) obtained temporary restraining order
from U.S. District Judge Robert R. Merhige Jr. prohibiting state
from prosecuting station for broadcasting story on commision's
alleged investigation of judge for judicial misconduct Few minutes
later, station put story on air. This Thursday (March 24), with American
Civil Liberties Union providing counsel, station will seek preliminary
injunction from U.S. district court. Issuance of injuction would lead to
hearing on constitutionality of law. Station originally sought protection because state supreme court two weeks ago upheld law in case
involving Virginia Pilot of Norfolk.
WXEX-TV
In
Brief
may be brewing between ABC -TV and Group W.
ABC -TV's affiliate relations vice president Robert Fountain said
Hearst -owned wBAL-Tv Baltimore has been asked to make formal application to become ABC's Baltimore affiliate, displacing Group W's
WJZ -TV. (W.rz -r/ is 20 -year ABC affiliate; WEAL -TV has been affiliated
with NBC for 29 years.) Franklin Snyder, head of Hearst Broadcasting, said Friday that wBAL -Tv had not yet decided whether to take ABC
up on its offer to make presentation. In letter to Mr. Fountain, Donald
McGannon, chairman and president of Group W, linked ABC's
Baltimore action with Group W's petition calling on FCC to look into
"the overly dominant position of the networks:' Mr. McGannon also
charged ABC with "favored treatment" of Hearst, alluding to vice
president of Hearst -owned wrAE -TV Pittsburgh John Conomikes' position as chairman of ABC's affiliates' board, and ABC's new affiliation
(as of March 27) with Hearst's wisN -TV Milwaukee. Mr. McGannon
ended by warning ABC that Group W will go to FCC and to court "to
protect our contractual position."
Battle royal
FCC will hold first meeting in sunshine on Thursday (March 24).
Agenda -collection of items staff was able to prepare on relatively
short notice- contains nothing of major interest. Among cable items
is one involving request of National Hockey League and Pittsburgh
Penguins for show cause order directed at Centre Video Corps
systems in Pittsburgh area. One broadcasting matter involves petition for reconsideration of staff renewal of Westinghouse Broadcasting's KYW(AM) Philadelphia. Meeting is scheduled to start at 10:30 in
Room 856 of FCC building, 1919 M St. N.W., Washington.
n
Counsel for Michigan publisher John McGoff said last week that
there has been conversation between Mr. McGoff and representatives of Mutual Broadcasting System concerning possible
purchase of network. Discussion was said to be general and
whether or not talks will continue is not known. Officials at Mutual
had no comment.
FCC Commissioner Joseph Fogarty says problem of sex and
violence on television is continuing one but he also indicates there
Is reason to believe medium is moving toward solution: "i do
believe there is a growing sensitivity and responsiveness to these
humanistic concerns in television" Statement is backed up with
references to activities and attitudes on part of station officials, entertainment community, advertisers. citizen groups and religious
leaders. Commissioner made remarks in speech to luncheon in Los
Angeles given by Timothy Cardinal Manning. And he carried
message calling for "Humanism In Television" to meetings with
station officials, members of creative community, network officials
and cable television representatives on West Coast over three -day
O
House of Representatives launched closed circuit TV broad-
cast of House floor proceedings last Tuesday (March
15). Coverage
(for 90 -day experiment) is being done by three small surveillance
cameras in fixed locations above House floor, and is being carried
live to members' offices in Rayburn building, only one of three House
office buildings wired to carry to signal. House Speaker Thomas P.
(Tip) O'Neill (D- Mass.) said on floor that if system works, he'll offer
resolution to allow proceedings to be broadcast to the public. He told
press he thinks use of TV signal in some form by media is inevitable:'
o
FCC has censured communications attorney Benedict Cottone
and given him symbolic one -day suspension from practice before
commission as result of his actions while representing KUPY(AM) (formerly KAYE) Puyallup, Wash., in license renewal proceeding. But
new wrinkle developed in case Friday when FCC Assistant General
Counsel William Kehoe Jr. asked Department of Justice to investigate possible perjury in connection with controversy that led to commission action -bitter dispute between Mr. Cottone and presently
retired Administrative Law Judge Ernest Nash. Mr. Kehoe and Mr.
Nash had given what Mr. Kehoe says is "contradictory testimony
under oath regarding conversation that, according to Mr. Kehoe's
version, indicates Mr. Nash was biased against Mr. Cottone. Mr.
Kehoe filed request for investigation after commission, in its order in
Cottone case, rejected request it do so.
o
WABC -TV New York reporter John Johnson got exclusive story
Thursday: he was taken hostage inside East Harlem church by 27-
year -old gunman. Charles Butts, described as unemployed ex -drug
addict, look priest and 15- year -old boy hostage, then, at about 12:15
p.m., called Mr. Johnson at station for help. Reporter went to church
and spent nearly two hours talking to hysterical Butts. When Butts
set gun down, Mr. Johnson picked it up, just as police rushed in door.
No one was hurt.
o
period.
n
"Misleading at best, specious at worst" was language being
drafted last week for response from Public Broadcasting Service
President Larry Grossman to CBS Inc. President John Backe,
regarding latter's letter to President Carter on closed captioning
for the hearing Impaired (BROADCASTING, March 14). In letter to be
sent this week, Mr. Grossman calls $250,000 figure for captioning
equipment "plain off the wall :' saying that PBS has developed
systems in $35,000 to $50,000 range. Although Mr. Backe said one hour program captioning costs can be measured against CBS's
$4.000 experiment with Walton episode, Mr. Grossman was expected to call estimate "about 400% too high:' explaining that PBS
expenses have rarely exceeded $1,000. President Carter last month
solicited views from network presidents.
District Judge for Northern District of New York last Friday
(March 18) sustained FCC's preemption of pay cable regulation in summary judgment in suit filed by National Cable Television
Asoociation, New York State Cable Association, Home Box Office
and others against state law requiring pay cable systems to file rates
and other information before starting operation.
U.S.
Anne Cox Chambers, chairman of Atlanta Constitution and member of family that controls Cox broadcasting and cable interests, who
earlier had been reported under consideration as ambassador to
Court of St. James (Great Britain), is now reported to be President
Carter's choice as ambassador to Belgium.
William D. Shaw, 62,
senior VP- general manager of Golden West Broadcasters' KSFOIAM)
San Francisco, retires after 39 years in broadcasting, last 20 with
GWB. Jack Bankson, VP- general manager of group's KvI(AM) Seattle, will succeed Mr. Shaw at KSF0.
Paul Rittenhouse, regional
manager for station relations, NBC, New York, retires after 43 years
with network.
Lou Cloffi, ABC News Paris bureau chief, named
United Nations correspondent, succeeding John MacVane, retiring
after 24 years in that assignment.
John W. Hill, 86, founder of Hill
and Knowlton public relations firm, died Thursday (March 17) in New
York. In restructuring of CBS law department under VP James Scott
Hill, John D. Appel, deputy general counsel, was made responsible
for all Washington- and government affairs -related legal matters for
corporation. Associate general counsel appointments include Ralph
E. Goldberg for CBS /Broadcast Group and Jack B. Purcell for
West Coast.
Broadcasting Mar
30
21
1977
Mecha
employment opportunity reporting requirements and to commission review of
FCC steams down
the outcome of EEO and discrimination
actions pending before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the U.S.
district court in Colorado and other governmental agencies.
Five of the other stations involved in
the commission's actions are Memphis
the Mississippi
before sunshine
bursts through
putlets
-
WREG =TV, WHBQ -AM -TV and
WREC(AM)- wzxR(FM) -whose renewals
Petitions -to -deny cases handled
for stations ranging from
Cairo to Memphis to Shreveport
It was almost like a petition -to -deny day,
what with the FCC staff presenting to the
commission on March 9 five items involving petitions to deny the renewal applications of a total of 13 radio and television
stations. Ít wasn't that, but the meeting
was the last full one the commission
would hold before April -and the last held
before the sunshine law went into effect,
on March 12 -and some of the petitions
had been pending for years. The commission renewed the licenses of all but two of
the stations, at least on a short -term basis.
But a number of the renewals were
granted subject to various conditions.
WKRO(AM) Cairo, Ill., had been awaiting
renewal the longest of the stations involved in the commission's actions. Its tip:
plication had been on the deferred list
since 1970, when the Black United Frbnt,
an umbrella organization, filed its opposition, contending that the station's ascertainment efforts and its performance in
programing and employment was deficient. The petition focused on alleged lack
of service to the black community.
The commission rejected the petition
it said its examination of the charges failed
to reveal a substantial and material question of fact that showed renewal of the station's license would not be in the public
interest -and renewed the license for the
remainder of its regular term, to Dec. 1,
-
1979.
The commission rejected two petitions
to deny that citizen groups had filed
against the renewal of General Electric's
KOA(AM) Denver. One was aimed at the
application filed in 1971. It alleged that the
station had failed to ascertain and meet a
need in the area for agricultural programing. The second was part of a general filing
citizen groups had directed at KOA and its
sister stations, KOAQ(FM) and KOA -TV. It
claimed the licensee had not kept agreements with the groups, had made misleading statements to the commission and had
failed to meet local, regional and minority
interests with its programing.
The commission found no reason to
hold hearings on the applications (it said,
for instance, that although KOA is a clear channel station, it is not required to ascertain and meet the needs of agriculture
communities more than 75 miles from
Denver), and renewed the licenses for the
remainder of the regular license term, to
April 1, 1977. But the AM and FM
renewals were granted subject to equal
were opposed by the Memphis chapter of
People United to Save Humanity. PUSH
charged all five stations with discriminatory employment practices, said the programing of WREG -TV and WHBQ -TV was not
adequate to meet the deeds and interests
of local blacks, and accused those stations,
as well, of fairness doctrine violations.
The commission said PUSH failed to
raise a substantial question of fact showing
prima facie that a grant of the renewal applications would not serve the public interest. So it renewed the licenses of the
television stations and of wéEC and wzxR
for the remainder of their license term, to
Aug. 1, 1979. The commission deferred
action on the WHBQ and WHBQ-TV renewals
because of other matters.
But that wasn't the final commission
word on the PUSH petition. Because of a
disparity noted between the number of
of blacks employed at WHBQ, WREC and
WZYR(FM) and the number of blacks in the
area, the commission directed the station
to submit reports on its EEO efforts over
the next two years.
Furthermore, the commission, after
noting that WREG -TV, WREC and WZXR had
been the targets of various EEO complaints, virtually invited Memphis area
residents to file EEO complaints with the
federal or local agency of their choice. The
commission pointed out that it has held
that the public interest would best be
served by affording individuals the opportunity to select the forum in which to seek
EEO relief.
After it is notified of the final determination by an agency of primary jurisdiction
over any subsequent EEO complaint, the
commission said, it would decide what action it might take. Accordingly, it added
appropriate conditions to the renewals of
the three stations.
The final action involved four Louisiana
stations- KBCL(AM)- KEPT(FM) Shreveport,
WAIL(AM) Baton Rouge and WNOE(AM)
New Orleans. The stations were arming 38
in the state that were investigated by the
commission as a result of complaints. by
women's and minority groups that they
discriminated on the basis of sex, race and
national origin in their employment and
promotion practices. The commission
denied the petition -at, least in part
against the other stations.
The commission renewed the licenses
of KBCL and KEPT for the remainder of the
license term, to June 1, 1979. But the
license of WAIL was renewed for only a
short term -for a period ending April 1,
1978 -and was subjected to EEO reporting conditions. WNOE was subjected to reporting requirements as well, without having its license renewed.
-
Broadcasting Mar
31
21
1977
California fairness
ruling against
stations destined
to languish in file
Petition for reconsideration
is denied, but FCC indicates
no further action will be taken
in case involving PG &E commercials
The FCC is standing by its decision that
eight California radio stations violated the
fairness doctrine in connection with the
broadcast of Pacific Gas and Electric Co.
commercials that proposed the construction of nuclear power plants and the use of
nuclear power.
But in denying petitions for reconsideration filed by five of the stations and by the
National Association of Broadcasters, the
commission is engaging largely in an intellectual exercise. For in view of the circumstances of the case, the commission
said no further action would be taken.
At issue was the complaint several
citizen and environmental groups filed
against 13 stations on Sept. 11, 1974. The
groups said that views contrary to those
expressed in the commercial the stations
carried should have been aired but were
not.
The commission, in a ruling issued on
May 18, 1976, agreed as to eight of the stations, and directed the stations involved to
provide information on how they intended
to fulfill their fairness obligations. The
commission said the issue was still controversial in view of a California primary
to be held on June 8 on the question of
nuclear power.
The commission, in affirming the decision, rejected NAB's contention that it
had exceeded its statutory authority "in
failing to respect the wide latitude" licen
sees are given in exercising their best judgment in such matters. The commission
said its decision was based on principles
stated in its 1974 Fairness Report, which
holds that the doctrine applies to commercials raising one side of a controversial
issue of public importance.
In deciding against any further action
regarding the stations, the commission apparently had the tardiness of its original
decision in mind. It said that, considering
the short period of time between the date
of the ruling, May 18, and the June 8
referendum, and the showing each station
had made regarding a good faith effort to
provide additional programing on the
issue programing the commission did
not evaluate -no further action would be
taken.
The stations that had filed for reconsideration are KFRE(AM) Fresno, KFYV(AM)
Arroyo Grande, KROY(AM) Sacramento,
KSMA(AM) Santa Maria and KRED(AM)
Eureka. The others the commission found
in violation of the fairness doctrine are
-
KFOG(AM)
San Francisco,
KMBY(AM)
Monterey, and Kslto(AM) Santa Rosa. The
commission was unable to reach a conclu-
Only the best
in the business on
the NBC Radio Network.
What's your network
done for you
Our affiliates' air time is valuable. So we
make sure that the NBC people who use
it are the best in the business. That's why
our affiliates air commentary by John
Chancellor, David Brinkley, Jack Perkins,
and Edwin Newman. That's why we
have Bess Myerson with The Consumers
View" and Joe Garagiola with sports.
That's why NBC Radio Network listeners
hear Hugh Downs on "Feeling Fit" and
Gene Shalit on just about anything.
And of course they hear news programming that's produced by the world's
lately?
largest broadcast news organization,
24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
your network doesn't deliver the best
program service in the business, during
NAB come talk to the best affiliate relations staff in the business. We're in Suite
B -720 of the Sheraton Park Hotel.
If
NBC
Radio
Network
sion regarding KUZZ(AM) Bakersfield in the
absence of additional information from
the station.
The commission rejected the groups'
complaint against the remaining four sta-
tions
- KgTY(AM)
San
Stockton,
Luis Obispo,
Chico and
Napa. But that part of the proceeding is not concluded. The groups appealed the commission's action in connection with those stations to the U.S. Court
of Appeals in Washington.
KJOY(AM)
KVON(AM)
KPAY(AM)
Networks take
aim and fire
at Westinghouse
Group W push for favorable
action on previewing proposal
in time for fall season opposed
as being impractical
The three major television networks have
come to the defense of their entertainment program prescreening practices and
have accused Westinghouse Broadcasting
Co. of rearguing an affiliate /network preview plan impractical from the start.
The suggestion, originally offered in
Group W's mammoth petition for aq investigation of alleged network dominance
over affiliates, calls for entertainment 'program previews normally four weeks in advance of network transmissions. The overall Group W petition, also involving affiliate compensation, network scheduling and
the like, seeded an FCC inquiry; a commission report is not expected until early
1978 (BROADCASTING, Jan. 17).
Westinghouse, however, asked the commission to consider the petition's previewing proposal separately. The group broadcaster is pushing for favorable commission
action in time for the fall 1977 television
season. The FCC treated the Group W
motion as a petition for partial reconsideration; comments were due last week.
The "networks, with some exceptions,
do not permit affiliates to preview network
entertainment programs before their
transmission for broadcast" and even
when the opportunity is provided, Group
W charged, it is not afforded "sufficiently
far in advance to permit orderly schedule
changes." (Group W found NBC's new
effort to prescreen 20 hours of entertainment programing a week in advance
"commendable"
[BROADCASTING,. Nov.
29, 1976] but still not enough time.) In its
earlier petition, Group W had asserted that
a lead time of three -to -four weeks was necessary in most cases for TV Guide listings.
"Particularly in view of the marked increase in the amount of crime, cruelty,
violence and other inappropriate matter,"
Group W said in its call for expedited action, a longer previewing advance -time is
necessary. Group W also cited a line from
the so- called family -viewing decision in
which U.S. District Court Judge Warren
Ferguson insisted on "independent deci-
330 worth. President Carter -who
has pledged his support to public television (BROAD.Feb. 14) -put his money where his mouth is earlier this month, with a contribution
to wETV(rvI Atlanta during its annual fundraising drive. Mr. Carter took the station up on its
"$30 for channel 30" request after receiving a behind -the -scenes call from his son Jack, a
guest host for the drive. The younger garter appeared on wery with his mother-in -law and
son Jason and raised $2,500 during 40 minutes of fundraising breaks in special Public
Broadcasting Service programing. Thé over -all "Festival '77;' conducted by 70% of PBS
member stations, had brought in close to $6 million by last Tuesday (March 6), itself a
record -breaking million- dollar night when La Boheme was presented. On -air fund- raising
0 million
began March 6, concluded last night (March 20). PBS set a $13.5 million goal
from call -ins, the remainder from direct mailings and the like.
CASTING,
-St
sion making by local licensees."
To ABC however: "The issue which
the Group W proposal raises is not
whether licensees should be in a position
to exercise their judgment as to what network programs to present; rather it is
whether the commission should mandate
a particular procedure for assisting affiliates in that request"
To CBS: "It is inconsistent with any
notion of orderly procedure; particularly in
a proceeding as far -ranging as this one, for
the commission to begin to `spin off' ancillary proceedings upon request. The
commission has said it intends to act expeditiously in the over -all proceeding..
To NBC: The proposal would be
"harmful to the public interest" since it
would cause an "impairment to the
[television] prqduction process." Further-
more, "so far as NBC is aware,
Westinghouse is the only broadcast
licensee which contends that the present
procedures are inadequate."
ABC, for one, outlined the present procedures it believes are adequate: advance
program advisory bulletins; closed -circuit
previews of nightime shows on a regularly
scheduled, rotational basis; print mailings
to those unable to view the closed circuits;
special review procedures for Group W
and.atfiliate input at annual meetings.
The alleged impracticality of the proposal was cited tly all three networks -as
CBS voiced it: The problem is, rather, that
few network entertainment programs are
as 'in the can' as much as one month prior
to scheduled initial broadcast dates -and
that few network entertainment programs
as likely to be, so long as the creative community is being creative."
On top of that, NBC claimed that its
Broadcast Standards Department would
lose its last minute editing powers if it had
to adhere to a four -week advance. As to
the TV Guide argument, NBC charged
that Westinghouse has its facts wrong and
that the magazine would accept certain
program changes as late as eight or nine
days before its publication date. And even
if changes could not be made in time, NBC
said, "audience confusion" could be
alleviated by newspaper inserts or station
announcements.
Western Broadcasting Co., a MontanaIdaho group owner, was also in the opposition camp, noting that its requests for advance screening prints have been "invariably honored" by the networks and
that its decisions to exclude shows have
never been met with "undue pressure nor
Broadcasting Mar
34
21
1977
intimidation."
In support of the Westinghouse petition, however, was the New Jersey Coal tion for Fair Broadcasting (which said its
membership includes New Jersey Senators Clifford Case [R] and Harrison
Williams [D]). "At the present time," the
coalition claimed, "local .licensees have little discretion regarding programs as the actual workings of affiliate contracts and station program delivery pre -empt control'of
local programing decisions." Morality in
Media of Massachusetts also came out for
the Westinghouse cause, saying that "it is
crucial that enough 'lead time be given to
the affiliates....'
FCC issues new
radio policy
statement
Rules call for licensee's
obligation to serve community,
define the term of network
More than 35 years after they were first
adopted, the FCC has repealed most of its
1941 radio network rules and issued a new
radio policy statement. The action, came
amidst a flurry of commission decisions
earlier this month
(BROADCASTING,
March 14). The new policy takes effect
April 25.
Radio licensees' individual obligations
to serve the programing needs of their
communities provide the basic premise
for the policy statement. The commission,
among other things, said that affiliates and
networks should not enter excessively
long affiliation agreements; affiliates
should always have the option not to
broadcast network offerings; and networks
should not interfere with licensee programing discretion, insist on excessive option time or try to influence nonnetwork
station rates.
The commission defined a network as a
programing source that "entirely or
chiefly" by interconnection is capable of
simultaneous interconnection. Falling into
this category now are Associated Press
Radio and United Press International
Audio.
The FCC retained its rule calling for networks to limit their territorial exclusivity
as much as possible. For example, it said
that a network should attempt to have
uncleared programing aired by other stations, and should review cases where affili-
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
now represented
nationally by
Bernard Howard &Co., Inc.
NEW YORK
ATLANTA
CHICAGO
DALLAS
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
ST. LOUIS
MILLIONS OF
YOUNG AMERICANS
ARE FINDING
THAT LOVE
IS CONTAGIOUS.
Storer Stations are concerned
about VD and are doing
something about it.
The twin specters of gonorrhea
and syphilis are stalking across
America. In the last 20 years,
venereal disease has skyrocketed
400 %.
Gonorrhea, in fact, is now
classified as a national epidemic.
While a million cases were
reported in 1975, health authorities estimate the actual count
nearer 21 to 3 million.
On top of it, a frightening
new strain of gonorrhea has
appeared that resists penicillin.
Syphilis, while lower in the
number of cases, is more deadly.
Untreated, it can cause blindness,
brain damage, heart or bone
disease. Even death.
Worse yet, most people contracting VD are between the ages
of 15 and 29. And in some urban
areas, 10% to 20% of those aged
15 to 25 have gonorrhea!
Storer Stations are appalled
at the way VD is ravaging the
health of young Americans. That's
why stations coast to coast are
devoting important programming
and editorial time to alerting their
communities to the dangers.
In Los Angeles, KTNQ /KGBSRadio, for example, produced a
17- episode mini-documentary on
the spread of the disease in Southern California. Entitled "The New
VD ... and the Old," it explored
the whole gamut of subjects. From
the social causes of VD, its effect
on pregnancy and the unborn
infant, to where and how to get
help. Guests included local health
officials. Broadcasts were aired 6
times daily.
KCST-TV in San Diego
recently presented a one -hour live
phone -in show covering the serious
VD epidemic in San Diego. On
hand to answer questions were
local health authorities. Shown was
a film from Atlanta's Center for
Disease Control. Among other
things, viewers were warned about
the new strain of gonorrhea, and
advised how to obtain local VD
treatment.
Along with heavy program
involvement on VD, WJW -TV in
Cleveland cooperated with the
Cleveland Health Department by
developing and scheduling a concentrated spot campaign against
venereal disease.
In Boston, WSBK-TV held
discussions about VD on talk
shows. And helped prepare and air
announcements for VENUS, a 24hour answering service providing
VD information to the public.
Involvement in the vital
affairs of the communities they
serve is typical of all Storer
Stations. We feel the more effective
we are in our communities, the
more effective we are for our
advertisers, and the more effective
we are for ourselves.
Fifty years of
broadcasting that serves.
,"STORER
STATIONS
STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY
WAGA -TV Atlonto /WSBK-TV Boston /WJW-TV Clevelond /WJBK -TV Detroit /WITI -TV Milwoukee /KCST -TV Son Diego /WSPD -TV Toledo
WJW Clevelond /KTNQ and KGBS Los Angeles /WGBS Miami /WHN New York /WSPD Toledo
of network
programing, stop other stations from gaining access to it.
The action also included the repeal of
the 1969 "small market policy," it is
reflected in the policy statement, as well as
the "dual network" or "simultaneity
rule" that restrict use of programing from
the same network by more than one station in the market. It also rescinded rules
limiting network control over affiliates (because that relationship is also now covered
in the policy statement) and rules regarding network ownership of stations (because regulations are contained in multiple
ownership rules or are best considered on
a case -by -case basis, the commission
ates, using minimal amounts
said.)
Modified was the rule covering filing of
network agreements at the FCC. Now only
those agreements wherein affiliates use
network programing five days a week during eight months of the year need be submitted. APR and UPI Audio agreements
must be filed. Noncommercial educational
stations needn't bother to file. The commission emphasized that copies of termination or cancellation notices, as well as
copies of agreements and amendments
must be turned over.
Media Briefs
Empire shaken, but stands. FCC renewed
license of KXXL(AM) Bozeman, Mont.,
through Dec. 1, but fined licensee, Em-
pire Broadcasting Corp., $9,000 for nine
violations of fraudulent billing rule. Commission granted short -term renewal, but
refused to act on pending transfer of control to Gary Peterson until final "examina-
tion of Empire's performance."
No conflict. FCC ruled that Robert L.
Stone, chief executive and chairman of
Hertz Corp., may join board of John Blair
& Co., sales rep firm and licensee of
WHDH(AM)- WCOZ(FM) Boston. Hertz is
subsidiary of RCA Corp., which is also
parent of NBC. Commission said Mr.
Stone's position would not consitute
"control" within meaning of rules and
that his positions with Hertz and Blair
would not result in violation of cross -interest policy.
No overflow. It was far from standing room -only as Federal Trade Commission
held its first open meeting last Wednesday
morning (March 16) under newly enacted
Government -in- Sunshine Act. Audience
was made up of about 35 FTC staffers,
eight reporters -and as one observer said,
"If three members [from general public]
were there, it may be an exaggeration."
Subject matter under discussion during
half -hour meeting may have contributed
to lack of interest: FTC rescinded five
trade regulation rules considered obsolete
and heard FTC general counsel's report on
congressional activity.
OK but... President Carter has exempted
former Democratic National Chairman
1
AMERICA'S OUTSTANDING MEDIA BROKERS
A COAST TO COAST NETWORK
Robert S. Strauss from his conflict- of-interest guidelines, will allow him to hold
onto his broadcast and banking interests
while (if approved by Senate) serving as
special representative for trade negotiations. Mr. Strauss's 30% interest in family
owned KCEE -AM -FM Tucson, Ariz., and
bank stocks, however, must be placed in
blind trust. He'll also have to disqualify
himself on any actions involving stations
or bank.
No favoritism. There shouldn't be any advocates of copyright interests on
Copyright Royalty Tribunal, Representative Robert Kastenmeier (D -Wis.) has
said in letter to President Carter. Tribunal,
established in copyright revision law Mr.
Kastenmeier's Judiciary subcommittee
helped write last year, will periodically
review copyright fees paid annually by cable TV operators and public broadcasters.
Mr. Kastenmeier said panel's five members should come from "government service, public interest community or
academia." He urged Mr. Carter to make
appointments soon to meet April 19
deadline in law.
'Review' acquired. R. Peter Straus, president of WMCA(AM) New York, and group
of family members and associates headed
by his son -in -law, Carll Tucker, have acquired Saturday Review magazine from
editor Norman Cousins and associates for
undisclosed sum. Mr. Tucker becomes
president, Mr. Straus chairman of executive committee and Mr. Cousins continues
as editor but indicated he plans to turn
editorial control over to Mr. Tucker eventually. Mr. Tucker has been freelance writer and theater and book critic for Village
Voice in New York. His wife, Diane Straus
Tucker, is executive editor of Cranford
(N.J.) Citizen and Chronicle.
During the NAB stop by
Changing Hands
Suite K 800
Sheraton Park Hotel
Announced
The following station sales were an-
(265 -2000)
James W. Blackburn
Jack V. Harvey
Joseph M. Sitrick
James W. Blackburn, Jr.
Clifford
B. Marshall
Robert A. Marshall
Michael F. Starr
Wendal W. "Bud" Doss
Hub Jackson
Richard F. Blackburn
Colin M. Selph
Roy A. Rowan
BLACKBURN& COMPANY,INC4
RADIO
TV
CAN
WASHINGTON, D.C.
20008
1725 K Street, N.W.
(202) 331 -9270
NEWSPAPER BROKERS
NEGOTIATIONS
CHICAGO 80801
333 N. Michigan Ave.
(312) 348 -8480
ATLANTA 30381
BEVERLY HILLS 90212
400 Colony Square
Suite 400
(404) 692 -4655
9485 Wilshire Blvd.
(213) 274 -8151
FINANCING
APPRAISALS
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
38
nounced last week, subject to FCC approval:
KBSA(TV) Guasti, Calif. (Los Angeles):
Sold by Broadcasting Service of America
to Buena Vista Broadcasting Corp. for
$1,800,000. Seller is owned by Berean Bible Ministries, nonprofit, nonstock
religious organization. President is W.K.
Connelly. Buyers are Leon A. Crosby
(72 %), Lee Moseng and Rene DeLaRosa
(10% each) and Lauren A. Colby (3 %).
Mr. Crosby owns KEMO(TV) San Francisco,
where the Messrs. Moseng and DeLaRosa
are employed as business manager and
general manager, respectively. Mr. Colby is
Washington attorney with minority interest in WTHU(AM) Thurmont, Md. KBSA
is on channel 46 with 813 kw visual, 22.4
aural and antenna 2,878 feet above
average terrain.
WJoI(FM) Pittsburgh: Sold by WKOI Inc.
to EZ Communications Inc. for $1 million.
Seller is owned by family of late Agnes
J.R. Greer, who also own WAJR -AM -FM
Morgantown, W.Va. Greer Stations re-
cently sold
Dover -New
WJER -AM -FM
Philadelphia, Ohio, for $475,000. Buyer is
Fairfax, Va. -based group owner of
WEZB(FM)
New Orleans;
WEZC(FM)
Charlotte, N.C.; and WEZR(FM) Manassas
and WEZS(FM) Richmond, both Virginia.
Principals in buyer are Arthur C. Kellar
(50 %) and James L. Draper Jr. (15 %).
W10I is on 93.7 kw with 41 kw and antenna 550 feet above average terrain. Broker:
Cecil L. Richards Inc.
KWYT -AM -FM Salinas, Calif.: Sold separately by Mount Toro Broadcasting Corp.
to Salinas Radio Inc. and Kilibro Broadcasting Corp. for $160,000 and $400,000,
respectively. Seller is wholly owned by
David A. Rodgers, who also owns
KKZZ(AM)- KOTE(FM) Lancaster, Calif., and
has bought, subject to FCC approval,
WBts(AM) Bristol, Conn. Buyer of AM is
principally owned by Ron Smith, Los
Angeles real- estate man with no other
broadcast interests; its president is Jack
Koonce, owner of KXEM(AM) McFarland
and KWIP(AM) Merced, both California.
Buyer of FM, Kilibro, principally owned
by Robert Fenton, also owns KFIV(AM)
Modesto and KTOM(AM) Salinas, both
California. Mr. Fenton also has interests in
KITA(FM) Modesto and KCMX(AM)
Ashland, Ore., and is applicant for FM in
Ashland. KWYT is 250 w daytimer on 1570
khz. KWYT(FM) operates on 100.7 mhz
with 910 watts and antenna 2,420 feet
above average terrain. Brokers: Hogan Feldmann, for buyers; William A. Exline,
for seller.
WNEB(AM) Worcester, Mass.: Sold by
Harold D. Glidden to Harold H. Segal for
$410,000. Seller, has no other broadcast
holdings. Mr. Segal, former media broker,
also owns WKBK(AM) Keene, N.H. WNEB
operates on 1230 khz with
kw day and
250 watts night.
KOFO -AM -FM Ottawa, Kan.: Sold by Ottawa Broadcasting Co. to Mar -Wa -Ka
Broadcasting Co. for $302,000 plus
$70,000 agreement not to compete. Sellers
are Mr. and Mrs. Roderick B. Cupp, who
are retiring from broadcasting. Buyer is
owned by Fred 1. Shaffer Jr. and his family.
Mr. Shaffer owns mineral exploration and
production firms. KoFO is 250 w daytimer
on 1220 khz. KOFO -FM is on 95.7 mhz with
6.7 kw and antenna 340 feet above average
terrain.
WJGA -AM -FM Jackson, Ga.: Sold by Better Radio Inc. to Tarkenton Broadcasting
Co. for $225,000. Seller is principally
owned by B.L. Williamson and Cecil Bray.
Mr. Williamson also owns WLOV -AM -FM
Washington and WBLW(AM) Royston, both
Georgia. Mr. Bray has no other broadcast
interests. Buyer is Dallas M. Tarkenton,
who is regional agent for jewelry firm. He
has no other broadcast interests. WJGA is
kw daytimer on 1540 khz. WJGA -FM is on
92.1 mhz with 3 kw and antenna 275 feet
horizontal and 270 feet vertical above
average terrain. Broker: Chapman Assoc.
WBGC(AM) Chipley, Fla.: Sold by Sunny
Hills of Chipley Corp. to R -4 Radio Corp.
for $200,000. Seller is owned by William
1
A. Masi, who has no other broadcast interests. Buyer is principally owned by
Richard Ringenwald, formerly with music
publishing firm. He has no other broadcast
interests. WBGC operates on 1240 khz with
1
kw day and 250 watts night. Broker:
Doubleday Media.
WADR(AM) Ramsen, N.Y.: Sold by P.H.
Inc. to Larry Manuel for $200,000. Seller
is owned by A. Richard Cohen, who has
no other broadcast interests. Buyer was
formerly vice president and general manager of Arbitron Radio. He has no other
broadcast interests. WADR is 5 kw
daytimer on 1480 khz. Broker: Doubleday
Media.
Other station sales announced by FCC
last week
include: noncommercial
wxxw(TV) Chicago; wcsY(FM) Peru, Ill.,
and KTGA(FM) Fort Dodge, Iowa (see page
104)
.
Approved
The following station sales were approved
last week by the FCC:
WKTQ(AM)- WSHH(FM) Pittsburgh: Sold
by WKTQ Inc. and Heftel Broadcasting Pittsburgh Inc. to Nationwide Communications for $1,240,000 and $2,000,000, respectively. Sellers are owned by
Representative Cecil Heftel (D- Hawaii),
who is disposing of some of his broadcast
holdings. He recently sold KGMB -TV
Honolulu to Lee Enterprises Inc. for
$11,799,000. Representative Heftel also
owns two other Hawaii television stations
Doubleday Media Offers:
MAKE THIS
NAB CONVENTION
WORTHWHILE
There are many things you can do at this year's
NAB Convention that will make it memorable. If,
however, you are planning or involved in the
sale or purchase of a broadcast property, there
is only one session that will feature important
information for this specific interest.
Doubleday Media will feature a major CPA firm to
detail how broadcasters can take advantage of
some of the financial and tax options available in a
property transaction. These presentations will
cover a wide spectrum of related subjects with
specialists from:
COOPERS & LYBRAND
Mr. Alan Vituli, Partner
Mr. H. U. Friedman, Principal - Valuation Group
Mr. David Goodrich, Manager - Taxes
They are well- versed in all phases of
broadcast transactions.
This program will be presented at 9:30 a.m. and
2:00 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday of the
convention in Hospitality Suite D -200,
Sheraton Park, Washington, D.C. Plan to spend
worthwhile time with your Doubleday Media
brokers: Dick Anderson, Dan Hayslett, Bob Magruder
and their financial specialists.
1
el
Doubleday Media
Brokers of Radio, TV, CATV and Newspaper Properties
Broadcasting Mar
39
21
1977
If you think you had problems
getting into our booth last year,
wait until this year.
You remember.
The Sony Broadcast booth, at last
year's NAB Show. Where we proved our
commitment to the broadcast industry.
And the broadcast industry proved how
many people could be crushed into sixteen
hundred feet of exhibit space.
This year, things are going to be
different.
They're going to be worse.
We're showing even more. Which will
attract even bigger crowds. Because of
space limitations at the show, we couldn't
build a bigger booth. But if you're tough
enough to push through the mob, what you
see will make you forget those elbows
in your ribs.
We can't give all our secrets away.
We can, however, let you in on a few of
the reasons why Sony Broadcast is going to
make such an impact.
1. We'll have the production version
of our new 1" high band video recorder,
the BVH -1000. Last year, we introduced
this model in prototype; this year we've
added a lot more features to the production version. And our BVH-1000 is still
the most outstanding development on the
broadcast scene.
2. You might also be interested in
seeing the BVH- 1000's little sister. A fully
compatible, battery operated, portable 1"
high band video recorder for professional
production in the field.
3. Camera buffs will see some eye openers, toó. We plan to exhibit two new
color cameras in addition to our current
field production BVP -100. What makes
the Sony Broadcast approach unique is
that, all three of our cameras utilize
different technologies. So broadcasters
can work within different budgets.
4. If the use of SMPTE code hasn't
been flexible enough to suit you, check out
the Sony Broadcast breakthrough in
this area. It's something really new.
5. And, of course, we plan to hang
onto our preeminent position in the
world of electronic news gathering. If
you're into EJ, ENG, or EFP, you're into
Sony Broadcast. And we've got some very,
very exciting things to show you.
That's all we can reveal for now. At
the Sony Broadcast booth in the Shoreham
Hotel on March 27 -30, we'll give you the
whole story.
If you have to fight your way in, we
apologize.
But that's the price we pay for being
where the action is.
Sony Broadcast
Sony Corporation of America, 9 West 57 Street, New York, New York 10019
Sony is a
registered trade mark of Sony Corporation of America.
and three radios there and on mainland.
Buyer, wholly owned subsidiary of Nationwide Insurance Co., Columbus, Ohio, also
owns WPOC(FM) Baltimore; WGAR(AM)-
Cleveland;
WNCI(FM)
Columbus; WATE -TV Knoxville, Tenn.;
WBAY -TV Green Bay, Wis., and wxEx -TV
Petersburg- wLEE(AM) Richmond, Va.
WKTQ operates full time on 1320 khz with
5 kw. WSHH is on 99.7 mhz with 10.5 kw,
antenna 930 feet above average terrain.
WKSW(FM)
WRMF-AM -FM Titusville, Fla.: Sold by
Fairbanks Broadcasting Co. to Advance
Communications for $575,000. Seller is
station group, principally owned by
Richard M. Fairbanks, that includes
WIBC(AM)- WNAP(FM) Indianapolis;
WKOX(AM) -WVBF(FM) Framingham,
Mass.; KVIL -AM -FM Highland Park, Tex.,
and w1BG(AM) Philadelphia. Buyer principals are Pat Nugent, E. Franklin, J.
Jenkins and A. Rector. Mr. Nugent was
vice president of broadcast division of
Peoria (Ill.) Journal Star Inc. Other buyers
are principals of International Tapetronics
Corp., Bloomington, Ill., manufacturer of
audio cartridge and tape machines.
Buyers, as ITC Communications of
Arizona, recently purchased KJJJ(AM)
Phoenix for $1,550,000 subject to FCC
approval (BROADCASTING, March 7).
WRMF is on 1060 khz with 10 kw day and 5
kw night. WRMF -FM is on 98.3 mhz with 3
kw and antenna 243 feet above average
terrain.
KTRI(FM) Las Vegas: Sold by Bernstein /Rein & Boasberg Advertising Inc. to
Lotus Communications Corp. for
$400,000 plus $148,800 consultant's
agreement. Principals in seller are Robert
A. Bernstein (who will act as consultant to
KTRI), Howard T. Boasberg and Irwin D.
Rein, owners of Kansas City, Mo. -based
advertising firm. Sellers also own
KVEG(AM) Las Vegas. Buyer, principally
owned by Howard A. Kalmenson, also
Owns KENO(AM) Las Vegas; KWKW(AM)
Pasadena, KFSD -FM San Diego and
KOXR(AM) Oxnard, all California;
KONE(AM) Reno; KRUX(AM) Glendale
(Phoenix) and KTKT(AM) Tucson, both
Arizona, and has application pending for
new FM in Pasadena. KTRI is on 92.3 mhz
with 27 kw and antenna 180 feet above
average terrain.
unhappy about the cutback from 17 hours
Other station sales approved last week
by FCC include: WYZE(AM) Atlanta and
of classical music in June. Ten Eighty intends to program 24 hours of popular
wxTA(FM)
104).
Greencastle,
Ind.
(see
Another complaint
on format change
slows station's
control transfer
music.
The Hartford organization's parent organization has had experience in opposing- successfully- broadcasters' plans to
abandon classical music format. Classical
Radio for Connecticut was one of two
groups whose opposition to Starr Broadcasting's plans to drop classical music at
WNCN(FM) New York led to Starr's sale of
the station to GAF Corp., which promised
to retain the classical music format.
Connecticut group protests
the possible loss of classical
music from WTIC -FM Hartford
What started out as a so- called short -form
transfer of control of Ten Eighty Corp.,
licensee of WTIC -AM -FM Hartford, Conn.;
seems headed for trouble. The cause is the
same one that has plagued a number of
outright sales -a proposed change in format. In this case, the format is classical
music.
The commission last month approved a
pro forma transfer of control of the corporation from Leonard J. Patricelli to
David Chase. Under the contract, David
Chase, who now owns slightly less than
45% of the stock, acquires a like amount
from Leonard J. Patricelli, who remains as
president, for $50,000. A 21 -year consulting- retirement agreement is also involved.
But on March 6, a group called WTIC -FM
Listeners Guild, organized by Classical
Radio for Connecticut, ran an advertisement in the Hartford Courant warning
that the city "may lose all classical music"
on WTIC -FM, asking readers to sign petitions and requesting financial assistance to
defray legal expenses in opposing the proposed change.
And the Listeners Guild informed the
commission of plans to petition for reconsideration of the approval of the pro forma
transfer.
The station subsequently issued a news
release announcing plans to drop the six
hours of classical music it carries in the
evening. But officials said plans generally
were known in the city earlier. Classical
music buffs in the area were already
LONG TERM FINANCING
Specialists in the placement of long
term debt with insurance companies
and commercial banks
Call Lee Hague at (312) 693 -6171
or contact at NAB -Shoreham
Americana Hotel (202) 234 -0700
to discuss your requirements
page
Ron Curtis & Company
Investment Banking Division
5725 East River Road
Chicago, Illinois 60631
Broadcasting Mar
42
21
1977
Finance Briefs
CBS buys its own. Board of directors of
Inc. has authorized company to
purchase up to $50 million worth of its
own common stock on open market. Approximately 28,313,000 shares were available at time of announcement. Purchase
was considered by Wall Street analysts to
be predictable means by which company
could reinvest some of cash amassed in
broadcasting's boom year in 1976. Stock
closed at $56.75 per share last Wednesday.
CBS
Refinancing. Communications Properties,
Austin, Tex., has entered new bank
revolving credit and term loan agreement
for $16 million. Deal includes refinancing
of $7.5 million for CPI's existing bank
debt, with remaining $8.5 million available
for new construction, acquisitions and as
general working capital. Interest rate on
notes is prime plus 3/4 and revolving credit converts to term note in February 1979
with five -year escalating repayment schedule ending February 1984. New revolving
credit agreement replaces previous agreement for $12,650,000.
Thank you, Paine Webber. Brokerage firm
of Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis has
changed its views on broadcast network
stock purchasing "from bearish to
bullish," saying that earnings growth of
networks should be substantial next year.
Firm said recent Justice Department recommendation that FCC investigate networks, "as well as various other issues
raised by Westinghouse peti-
tion... probably will linger for
years, but
ultimately will be regarded by investors as
`non- events'."
Financial gain. Ogilvy & Mather International, New York, reports record net income in 1976 of $7,736,000 ($4.18 per
share), up 35% from 1975, as revenues
rose 14.2% to $112,226,000 from
$98,229,000 in 1975.
NH &S banner year. Needham, Harper &
Steers Inc., New York, reports increases in
annual billings, revenues and net income
for 1976: gross billings grew 18.9% to
$231,756,000; revenues climbed 18.7% to
$35,605,000 and net income increased
94.7% to $1,388,000 (equal to $1.67 per
share, as against 85 cents in 1975).
Record sales for Oak. Oak Industries,
Crystal Lake, Ill., had record sales for 1976
of $144,138,398, 27.5% increase over
1975 total sales of $113,013,625.
Introducing a Color Corrector
for Electronic News Gathering.
Electronic News Gathering makes tough demands upon the broadcaster. Color imbalance and colorimetry problems are frequently encountered. Matching remote camera shots to indoor studio programs or
assembling tapes from different locations or cameras is "chancy" at best.
Often that fast -breaking story doesn't allow for camera rebalancing!
Thomson -CSF Laboratories now provides a solution to such difficult
encoded signal color problems. With the Model 5500A Color Convector,
you'll be able to rebalance and match video signals after encoding. It can
be used either after the play-back tape machine or following the microwave receiver during live coverage. In most cases, a noticeably improved
color picture will result. For ease of operation, a Remote Control unit is
induded as standard equipment.
As an added feature, an optional automatic Sensor unit is also available to control the Color Corrector for telecine use.
Whether for Electronic News Gathering, tape production or telecine use, the Thomson-CSF Laboratories Color Corrector System should
be working for you. Interested? Give us a call.
l1
THOMSON -CSF LABORATORIES, INC.
37 Brownhouse Road, Stamford, Connecticut 06902
(203) 327-7700/ TWX (710) 474 -3346
Cablecasting®
Listen
to the
lament of
CHARLES FLYNN,
station engineer,
KIJV, Huron, S.D.
The total system hos worked
so well that I haven't had to
work on it at all. really like
to work on this type of equipment, and haven't hod anyI
I
cable regulation
All -day conference collects
disparate advice from state, local
authorities and cable operators
The FCC last week gathered several dozen
interested parties for another go at the
conumdrum that might be labeled "federal- state /local cable television regulation,
and how it might be resolved." After five
hours of discussion in several sessions
one of them by 14 panelists appearing
before the commission en banc (Commissioners Benjamin Hooks and Joseph
Fogarty were absent) it wasn't clear how
much ground had been gained toward a
resolution.
But the sessions may have provided
what the commission said it hoped would
be the initial framework for an information clearinghouse on issues facing it and
those in state and local governments who
regulate cable. What's more, the officials
of state and local government and representatives of the cable industry and public
interest groups who participated helped remind the commissioners how complicated
the problems of overlapping jurisdictions
and conflicting political and economic in-
-
thing to do."
In
No consensus
found at FCC
on how to divide
January, 1975, KIJV installed
2 IGM Go -Carts bock -to -back
for o total of 84 cartridge positions. Events ore programmed
into on IGM RAM (Random
Access Memory) Control System
with a capacity of 2048 events.
That's the bosic system and it
works like o dream. Right, Mr.
Flynn?
1GM
-
terests are.
Ralph Baruch, of Viacom International,
A Division of NTI
4041 Home Rood
Bellingham, WA 98225
206.733 -4567
Read the whole story about
KIJV's system in the IGM News,
No. -77. Send for it today.
1
Baruch
^-i
Hostetter
F(1fhP_,5
See us at the Shoreham -Booth
538
Broadcasting Mar
44
21
1977
for instance, said the establishment of
federal standards for municipalities to
follow in their regulation of the cable industry "is an absolute necessity." Echoing
a charge other cable industry representatives have made before him, he said that
Viacom has encountered local governments that regulate rates in response to
political pressure.
And Gustave Hauser, of Warner Cable
Corp., said the commision's help was
needed in assuring cable operators of
"stability" of operation. Municipalities,
he said, should be required to hold "due
process" proceedings before deciding on
whether to grant renewals of franchise, as
they do now before granting an original
authorization. Cable system's, he added,
should be permitted "a reasonable expectation of renewal" if they have provided
"good- faith" service, he said.
On the other hand, Morris Tarshis,
director of franchises for New York City
and principal figure in that city's regulation
of cable television, left no doubt he feels
the cable regulatory picture would improve
if the FCC withdrew from it. He seemed to
long for the days when the cable industry
was young and cable systems could deal
with local authorities without FCC involvement. As for commission concern
about franchise fees cutting in cable
revenues, he said, "Does the commission
look at cable television as they look at
broadcasting" and the $40 million profits
he says some stations earn?
Robert Kelly, chairman of the New York
State Commission on Cable Television,
was more politic. The problem of conflicting or overlapping jurisdictions among the
tiers of government would be substantially
WLW
KNOWS EXACTLY
WHAT THEY WANT IN A
50 KW AM TRANSMITTER.
SO DOES CONTINENTAL ELECTRONICS!
Award -winning
power. And then,
we wanted a transmitter that was uncomplicated and easy to
tune. Continental Electronics
has a reputation for building reliable, very efficient high-power
transmitters. So, naturally we
checked their 317C over very
carefully, along with the other
brands. In my opinion, Continental's Screen /Impedance
Modulation is excellent. We've
been very happy with the 317C's
agri- business programs;
commuter traffic reports;
news; live sports broadcasts to the Cincinnati /
Three -State area ..
.
when Radio 7 ... Clear
Channel WLW speaks, America
listens! And it's been this way
from the start.
Innovator and pioneer in
high -power broadcasting (remember
their famous 500,000 watt transmitter built in the 1930's ?) the WLW l
Engineering Staff designed all of
their station's broadcast transmitters
until 1976 when they turned to
another pioneer and leader in
high -power broadcasting for a new
50,000 watt AM transmitter:
Continental Electronics.
Mr. James Hampton, WLW Vice President
Engineering, sums it up this way:
"First of all, we were looking for high reliability.
Dead air is disastrous: when you're off the air, the audience loses confidence in you. Next, we wanted efficiency. Especially in the face of the increasing costs of
Co-_tt.te.i_taL
modulation. And Continental's factory back -up is just first
class. They know their work
o
and are most cooperative. I
think they are `tops'! ".
We congratulate WLW on their entire operation. They
know exactly what they want in a 50 KW AM transmitter
... so does Continental!
For information on
the 317C, write
Continental Electronics
Mfg. Co., Box 270879,
Dallas, Texas 75227.
£lecth.o,ic.
Visit us at the NAB show Booth 220, Sheraton Park Hotel
mission will issue a notice of inquiry and seemed to be seeking shelter from state
rulemaking looking to the deregulation of and local regulation under the arm of the
FCC, Russell Karp, president of
unprofitable systems.
said.
Apart from the political question as to Teleprompter Corp., complained about
As for cable systems' claims of unfair
whether the commission should step in to the commission's leased access -channel
treatment at the hands of franchising auoversee state and local regulation, there is rule. The rule, which requires operators to
thorities, he said, "I don't know of any also the legal one. Shelia Mahony, execu- offer the channel on a first -come, first
operator forced to take a franchise he
tive director of the Cable Television Infor- served, nondiscriminatory basis, is dedidn't want."
mation Center, which provides advice and signed to assure diversity of programing.
But, Mr. Karp said, in denying operators
But Jeffrey Forbes, executive director of
counsel to local governments in regulating
the Massachusetts Cable Television Com- cable systems, said the commission's au- the right to choose among those seekmission, strayed from what is regarded as thority over cable is limited, according to ing the channel, the commission denies
the party line of state regulators. He not
the Supreme Court, to that which is "an- operators the ability to choose suppliers of
only said cable is overregulated, he said cillary" to the regulation of broadcasting. quality merchandise over those of inferior
rate regulation is unwarranted, at least in
And assuring "franchise stability" or set- programs, to bar obscenity from the
Massachusetts, where "some 70 to 80%"
ting standards for franchise fees, she said, system's channel, and, actually, to assure
diversity by rejecting efforts to monopolof the systems are unprofitable. To deal is not consistent with such authority.
with that situation, he said, the state comAlthough cable operators generally ize the leased access channel. In connection with that last point, Mr. Karp said Optical Systems Corp., a pay programing supplier, which describes itself as the largest
lessee of access channels for pay programing, "has attempted to pre -empt programing decisions that would have been made
by dozens of different people."
Chairman Richard E. Wiley observed
that Mr. Karp seemed to be suggesting that
cable operators be given the kind of
"public trustee" role broadcasters play.
And that role, he said, "may bring with it
trappings of regulation cable operators
may not want" Mr. Karp indicated he was
more concerned about the programing cable systems received. "We are more like a
broadcaster;' he said.
The session involving representatives
of the disparate interest had about it, according to Stephen Effros, an attorney for
the Community Antenna Television
Association, the feeling of the beginning
of another advisory committee, such as
the Federal- State /Local Regulatory Relationships Committee that the commission established in 1972 and that a year
later submitted recommendations on
allocating regulatory authority among the
three tiers of government. And the feeling
When we say "Nobody has it like
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Spotmaster," we mean it.
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That brought a relatively mild response
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tioning independent
tries the kind of definite, long -term planElectronics,
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of those systems, he said, were "inferior"
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locals" to negotiate with cable systems, he
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For all of the clashing of opinion, which
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agreement among previously antagonistic
forces. Amos (Bud) Hostetter, of Conti-
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nental Cablevision, and Paul Rodgers,
counsel for the National Association of
Regulatory Utility Commissioners, reported that NCTA and NARUC had
agreed on draft legislation that would provide for government regulation- either by
the federal government or by the state -of
the agreements cable operators and
telephone and utility companies reach for
the use of their poles (see below).
Time Inc. may merge
American Television
Time Inc., New York, and American
Television and Communications Corp.,
Denver, cable TV group owner, said last
week they have started exploratory talks
on a merger.
Time now owns about 10% of American
Television's 3.4 million shares outstanding. Based on the cable company's recent
over- the -counter bid of $26.25 per share,
the transaction has an indicated value of
about $80 million, covering shares not
now held by Time.
Time owns Manhattan Cable in New
York City which has 87,000 subscribers
and Home Box Office, New York, a supplier of pay cable TV programing. American Television owns systems serving
almost 600,000 subscribers in 31 states.
Another round for
pole attachments
The National Cable Television Association
and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners have reached an
agreement on draft legislation regulating
pole attachments.
After what NCTA called "strong urging" by House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Lionel Van Deerlin (DCalif.) and other members of Congress,
representatives from NCTA and NARUC
reached an agreement after Congress
failed to consider a pole attachment bill introduced last year.
The proposed bill says, "The FCC shall
regulate the rates; terms and conditions
for pole attachments in any case where the
same are not regulated by any state authority." It goes on to define the "just and reasonable rate" prescribed by the FCC or
state authorities as assuring "the utility of
recovery of not less than the additional
costs of providing pole attachments nor
more than the actual capital and operating
expenses of the utility attributable to that
portion of the pole, duct or conduit used
by the pole attachment."
State regulation would be permitted by
the bill without review by the FCC.
Representative Van Deerlin, who has
said the subcommittee isn't interested in
separate bills while it's working on the
Communications Act rewrite, nevertheless indicated that he might be willing to
make an exception in this case.
Programing
It's more than just
hair they want from
Farrah Fawcett - Majors
Spelling -Goldberg sues actress
of 'Charlie's Angels' for breach
of five -year contract
Spelling- Goldberg Productions slapped a
law suit on Farrah Fawcett -Majors last
week, charging that she has breached a
five -year contract calling on her to perform as one of the three female stars of
ABC -TV's hit series Charlie's Angels.
A spokesman for Miss Fawcett- Majors
said she never signed a formal contract
with Spelling -Goldberg for Charlie's
Angels. She's thus free, this spokesman
continued, to leave the series to start work
on what he claims is a flood of movie
offers that have come her way since the
series turned her into a major Hollywood
celebrity.
Spelling -Goldberg's lawyer, William
Hayes, said Miss Fawcett-Majors signed
an "acknowledgement of option pickup
for the first season," which in effect binds
her for the full five years of the series, if it
should run that long. By asking for
"declaratory relief in Superior Court of
the County of Los Angeles, where the
civil suit was filed, Mr. Hayes said the
company is asking the court to judge
whether the contract is valid or not.
If the court says the contract is valid,
Mr. Hayes said Spelling -Goldberg will ask
for "injunctive relief," which, if granted,
would prevent Miss Fawcett- Majors from
working as an actress for the next four
years, i.e., until the contract runs out. According to various sources, a judgment
like that would force her to return to the
evil; Search and Rescue, a live- action
series about a family of wild -animal
trainers, produced by NTA and 10/4 Productions; Stormy, another live- action show
whose theme is the love of a little girl for a
black stallion, to be done on location in
the Southwest by Marcum Productions;
The Red Hand Gang, a comedy /mystery
with an urban setting, out of D'AngeloBullock -Allen Productions; and Tyrone
and Gladys /The Little Hobo, a 30- minute
cartoon from DePatie -Freleng Enterprises.
Time periods for these series will be an-
nounced later.
In addition, NBC's Junior Hall of Fame,
a series of 90- second micro -biographies of
children who have done something
noteworthy, will periodically turn up on
the Saturday-morning schedule. Alan
Landsburg Productions will turn them
out.
The eight canceled shows: Woody
Woodpecker, The Pink Panther, Speed
Buggy, Monster Squad, Space Ghosts,
Frankenstein Jr., Big John Little John,
Land of the Lost and Muggsy.
In the season-to-date national Nielsens,
CBS's Saturday- morning schedule leads
with an average rating of 7.3 (for the
period of 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.). ABC is second,
with a 6.9 average rating, and NBC has a
5.8 rating.
'
series, although she could probably
negotiate a healthy increase over the
$5,000-per- episode she pocketed during
the first year of Charlie's Angels.
Eight for the young
due in fall on NBC
NBC -TV has engineered a major overhaul
of its Saturday- morning children's schedule, which has floundered in third place
since last September.
Beginning next September, eight new
series will displace the eight shows in
NBC's current children's line -up. ABC
and CBS will announce their schedules
later.
The eight new ones: I Am the Greatest
(tentative title), an animated half-hour,
with live appearances by Muhammad Ali,
produced by Fred Calvert /Farmhouse Productions; C.B. Bears, a 60- minute cartoon
produced by the Hanna -Barbera Studios;
The New Archies /Sabrina Shoos another
60 minute cartoon, this one from the
Filmation Studios; The Young Sentinels,
an animated series, also from Filmation,
focusing on three teen -agers who fight
Critics award show
will go on, without
some leading critics
Susskind special on CBS -TV
is called corruption of press
The vice president of programing for CBS TV, Bud Grant, said last week the network
would go ahead with its live telecast of The
TV Critics Circle Awards special on April
11 despite the noisy opposition of dropout
members of the circle.
The opponents -there are at least 14 of
them, ranging from John J. O'Connor of
the New York Times and Tom Shales of
the Washington Post to Ron Alridge of the
Charlotte (N.C.) Observer and P.J. Bed narsky of the Dayton (Ohio) Journal
Herald -claim, in effect, that CBS and the
company producing the awards show,
David Susskind's Talent Associates, are
trying to corrupt them.
"We believe the TV Critics Circle
Awards show is an effort to destroy the adversary relationship between the press and
the TV industry," said 10 of the critics in a
paid advertisement in Variety. The text of
the ad was co- authored by the Chicago TFibune's Gary Deeb and the Chicago Daily
News's Frank Sean Swertlow.
The awards don't "need the prodding
and financial funding of an influential production company or a powerful network,"
according to John J. O'Connor, in his column in the March 13 editions of the New
York Times.
One of the critics who is enthusiastic
about the show but who preferred to re-
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AUTOMATIC
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OPERATOR
main anonymous acknowledged that CBS
and Talent Associates paid his travel and
hotel and entertainment bills for a three day session in New York late last January
to choose the nominees but added that the
sessions were hard and exhausting work
and that the only direct benefit the critics
will derive from the telecast is a scholarship in their name at a leading university
specializing in communications.
NBC and FCC sued
over show blamed
for crime idea
Widower of woman murdered by
man who said he got idea from
'Police Story' seeks $10 million
from network and commission
A $10- million damage suit has been filed
against NBC and the FCC over a 1974
episode of Police Story that, the suit
alleged, prompted a triple murder in New
York. The FCC is charged in the suit with
"dereliction of its duty to protect the
safety and well -being of the public."
The suit was filed March 11 in federal
district court in New York by Richard
Kane, a Long Island truck driver whose
wife was one of three persons killed in a
bar robbery on March 11, 1974. The man
who was later convicted for the crimes told
police he had patterned his actions after a
Police Story program aired three weeks
earlier. The show depicted an ex- convict
who robbed, molested and murdered bar
patrons, according to Joseph A. Salvo, attorney for Mr. Kane.
"We are saying that the responsibility
has to lie somewhere when it can be
proved that violence [on TV] can in effect
beget violence of this sort," Mr. Salvo
said.
NBC issued a statement saying, "We
believe the suit has no merit and we will
defend it vigorously." The network later
added to that statement a further corn ment: "We believe that broadcasters as
well as the creative community [writers
and producers] are protected against suits
of this kind by the First Amendment, as
THE
the courts ruled in the Born Innocent
case."
That case involved a Sept. 10, 1974, dra-
okslNC
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matic special on NBC -TV which depicted
the broomstick rape of a young girl in a
juvenile institution. A San Francisco
woman filed an $11- million suit after her
daughter and another girl were subjected
to a similar attack three days after the
broadcast. The suit was dismissed in
California superior court last September
and is now under consideration by the
state court of appeals.
ASCAP draws down wrath
A class action suit on behalf of more than
200 religious broadcasters has been filed
against the American Society of CornBroadcasting Mar
52
21
1977
posers, Authors and Publishers, charging
ASCAP's blanket license violates the First
Amendment because by imposing a fee on
nonmusic programs it amounts to a tax on
the exercise of religion. The suit asks that
ASCAP be required to issue them a
license charging only for music they use.
The suit was filed Feb. 28 in the U.S. district court in Orlando, Fla., by four members of the newly formed Religious Broad-
casters Music License Committee
(BROADCASTING, Jan. 31): WSST(AM)
Largo, Fla.; WTLN(AM) Apopka -Orlando;
WRYT(AM) Boston and KGER(AM) Long
Beach, Calif. A spokesman said the suit
followed an unproductive meeting with
ASCAP representatives and that a meeting
to discuss the same issue with Broadcast
Music Inc. is being arranged. Bernard Korman, ASCAP general counsel, said he
could find "no merit in the claim." If
ASCAP's fee is a tax on religion, he added
what is the much larger fee that such stations charge ministers for air time?
Setting up house
Mutual Black Network moves
to old headquarters so AFTRA
members can get back to work
Mutual Reports Inc., the Mutual Broadcasting Mutual Black Network subsidiary,
moved its operations from the Mutual
headquarters in Arlington, Va., back to
Mutual's old headquarters in downtown
Washington last Monday (March 14).
The move resulted from incidents connected with the strike against Mutual by
the American Federation of Television
and Radio Artists (BROADCASTING, March
7). When AFTRA went on strike (one
minute before Mutual's regularly scheduled 1:30 p.m. NYT newscast) Feb. 26,
AFTRA members at MBN also walked off
the job. The MBN union members were
ordered back to work two days later, however, but were refused entry, "in effect,
locked out," according to AFTRA, and
replaced by nonunion members. AFTRA
members are still on strike.
Mutual Reports is controlled by
Sheridan Broadcasting, which, according
to John Askew, MBN director, owns 49%
of the black network with the option to
buy the remaining 51 %.
With the move back to 918 16th Street,
N.W. (vacated by Mutual in September,
1976), Mutual Black Network's AFTRA
members are now back on the air.
Programing Briefs
Energized. Capital Cities Communications
will present one -hour prime -time TV
special on energy crisis on nationwide interconnected network April 12. It has already cleared markets representing 70% of
U.S. TV homes, expects to get over 85 %.
Bob King, Capcities' executive vice president for television, said We Will Freeze in
the Dark is offered to stations at no charge
and gives them three 60- second positions,
30- second midbreak and 70- second end break for local sale while Capcities retains
three 60's for national sale. It will be fed at
8, 9 and 10 p.m. NYT to give stations
latitude in scheduling. Documentary was
produced for Capcities by Av Westin,
former ABC News executive, and will be
anchored by former NBC and CBS correspondent Nancy Dickerson. Mr. King said
it has already been cleared in 28 of top 30
markets, about 40 of top 50.
Blows whistle again. Satra Corp., which
lost out to NBC -TV in bid for U.S. broadcast rights to 1980 Olympics, has filed
$275- million suit in New York Supreme
Court against International Olympic Committee, alleging "deceit" in negotiations.
"The IOC acted in an unsportsmanlike
manner," said Michael A. Lacher, attorney
for Satra, "and they of all people
shouldn't have." Company's suit against
NBC for same amounts still waiting for
ruling on Satra's request for NBC documents (BROADCASTING, Feb. 28).
Fords in NBC's future. Betty Ford has
signed agreement to appear on two NBC
News special in next two years. She also
will make several appearances on Today in
1977 -78 season. President Ford earlier had
been signed by NBC, as has his secretary
of state, Henry Kissinger (BROADCASTING,
March 7).
Equipment
&
Engineering
New
in AM
from
Harris
Transmitters
with an
AM Audio Processor
built -in audio processing
circuit is now included in the
new MW -1A, all solid state 1 kw
AM transmitter featuring
Progressive Series Modulation
A
(PSM), and the new MW-5A and
MW -50A, 5 and 50 kw AM
transmitters with Pulse
Duration Modulation (PDM).
This circuit is designed to
increase modulation density.
Future for fiber
optics is now
Kahn of BroadBand Communications
tells security analysts that
lasers will enhance the delivery
of signal to the home and will be
available by the end of the year
A laser with a life of more than 100,000
hours -more than 10 years of continuous
operation as the light source in fiber optics
applications -will be available before the
end of this year, Irving B. Kahn, president
of BroadBand Communications, said last
week.
He held out this promise on the basis,
he said, of experiments at Times Fiber
Communications Inc., Meriden, Conn., a
new fiber- optics firm in which he is a
shareholder and a director and to which he
is also a consultant. He spoke on fiber optics developments and their implications
for cable TV at a meeting of New York security analysts specializing in CATV.
"Anyone who has followed the development of lasers," he said, "knows that
when a 10,000 -hour laser was announced,
that was considered a breakthrough. Imagine the quantum leap to 100,000 hours
and you'll have an idea of how fast this
technology is advancing.
"Consider, too, that even if we have to
build our first systems with 10,000-hour
lasers, these will last over
Broadcasting Mar
53
21
a
year, and it will
1977
1
for
Innovations
in
AM, FM, TV
& Audio
see you at our
Sheraton Park
NAB Exhibit
If you are
not planning to attend the
NAB Convention this year, write for full
details of our new AM transmitters, as
well as FM transmitters, TV transmitters and MSP -100 to: Harris Corporation, Broadcast Products Division,
Quincy, Illinois 62301.
BOOTH 205
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be no great technical problem at the end of
that time to replace those lasers with the
more advanced model."
In addition, Mr. Kahn said, the fiber itself is getting better.
"Less than a year ago," he said, "the
first fiber installed for commercial CATV
use had a loss.of 15 decibels or db -and
considering that the loss in conventional
three -quarter -inch coax is about 62 db,
that was pretty good! Today, however, we
(Times Fiber Communications] are
routinely producing fiber of well below 10
db loss, and it works! It's for real, and it's
for sale and being sold right now."
Fiber optics, he said, "will at last open
the gateway to broadband communications" and lead to further new developments and "a mode of communications
which completely changes the characteristics of a cable television plant."
Optical fibers, he said, provide bandwidth capabilities that will produce large
cost savings for cable operators and also
possess "exceptional strength, extraordinary crush resistance and flexibility, a total
insensitivity to temperature variations, a
high resistance to all electrical interference
and a total absence of signal leakage."
Mr. Kahn told the security analysts that
"if I were asking an entrepreneur to consider fiber optics because of its future
capabilities, he would have every right to
hold back and hesitate before making any
investment." But, he continued, "I am
asking, instead, that he consider fiber optics because of its present ability to
enhance the delivery of the signal to the
home, and to do so better, cheaper and
with far less risk of signal loss or system
downtime."
He said Times Fiber Communications
has been so successful that when it eventually goes public "it will be a most pleasant experience to be able to come forward
with a high technology company selling at
a multiple of earnings rather than one of
losses."
Times Fiber is a joint venture of the
Times Wire and Cable Division of Insilco
Corp., Meriden, and Fiber Communications Inc., Orange, N.J.
ITS recommends higher
tariffs on TV imports
Higher tariffs on imported TV sets were
recommended by the U.S. International
Trade Commission in a report that must be
sent to President Carter by tomorrow
(March 22), the deadline date previously
set.
Having determined that TV imports
were seriously damaging the industry
(BROADCASTING, March 14), five of the
six ITC commissioners voted to increase
the present 5% tariff on imported color
sets to 25% over the next two years, lowering it to 20% during the subsequent two
years and to 10% in the fifth year. By a 3to-0 vote, three commissioners did not
vote, an identical tariff increase was recommended for black- and-white sets.
Broadcast Advertising*
New
¡nFM
Advertiser says
TV commercials
capture attention
print can miss
from
That's message du Pont takes
to ANA workshop that also hears
call for nonstop measurement
of local TV audiences, new plan
for fashioning national campaigns
Whether interested in buying the product
or not, the viewer gets more information
about it from a TV commercial than from a
print ad that says the same thing.
This conclusion was reached by researchers for the duPont company in a
study to find out why, a few years back, a
corporate advertising campaign that duPont was running worked all right in
television but got nowhere in print.
Robert Grass, duPont's manager of
communications research, described the
"why" study at a research workshop conducted by the Association of National Advertisers in New York last week.
Other workshop highlights included a
call by Jacqueline Da Costa, vice president
of Ted Bates & Co., for continuous measurements of local TV audiences, and proposals by Larry Light, marketing services
director of BBDO, for new ways of allocating media dollars among markets.
Ms. DaCosta, Bates's vice president and
director of media information and analysis, said a combination of factors -among
them rising TV costs, limited avail abilities, need to make longer -term commitments and less flexibility in canceling
spot buys -make it "imperative" that stations, advertisers and agencies "support
the development of more meaningful audience measurements" at the local level.
Specifically, she called for continuous
52- week -local measurements. These
could be accomplished, she said, without
creating larger samples than those now
used by the Arbitron and Nielsen services.
The present samples, she explained, could
be reallocated over 52 weeks. She did not
go into detail on costs but said later that
because certain savings and other efficiencies could be effected, the net increase
would probably be closer to 5% than to
10% above present costs.
She emphasized that she was not proposing weekly or even monthly reports.
All that would be needed, she said, was
two reports a quarter, or eight a year: A
"buyer" report covering the first four
weeks of each quarter, and a quarterly report afterward.
In his report on the duPont study Mr.
Grass said the research seemed to bear out
the theory that differences inherent in TV
and print affect the attention levels they
generate:
"According to this hypothesis, print
-
Broadcasting Mar
55
21
1977
Harris
DSM
Digitally Synthesized
Modulation
®
Harris introduces a new line of
10 watt to 40 kilowatt FM
transmitters, featuring the
exclusive MS -15 solid -state
exciter employing Digitally
Synthesized Modulation (DSM).
DSM, with overshoot
compensation, allows a 2 to 6
dB increase in loudness with
no signal deterioration. These
new transmitters also provide
40 dB minimum stereo
separation,offering the finest
audio quality in the industry.
for
Innovations
in
AM, FM, TV
& Audio
see you at our
Sheraton Park
NAB Exhibit
If you are not planning to attend the
NAB Convention this year, write for full
details of our new FM transmitters, as
well as new AM transmitters, TV transmitters, and MSP-100 to: Harris Cor-
poration, Broadcast Products Division,
Quincy, Illinois 62301.
BOOTH 205
/
HARRIS
WCOMMUNICATIONS AND
INFORMATION HANDLING
IS
Patents applied for
media depend on the self-selection process to produce ad readers. On the other
hand, a TV viewer who encounters a commercial when he is watching a program
must elect to interrupt his existing state of
attention in order not to watch the commercial. Television, therefore, depends on
the self-selection process to produce commercial nonviewers."
He said duPont collected commercials
for a variety of consumer products and
then created a full -page ad based on each
commercial, using a dominant scene from
the spot and the same basic information.
The commercials were shown to one group
of people within a half-hour program and
the print ads to another group as part of an
editorial package. The commercials, Mr.
Grass said, "consistently taught more
facts than print."
In a practical sense," he said, "[the
findings] may mean that the average magazine reader, when confronted with an ad
for a product which he does not expect to
buy or use, will simply go on to the next
page without reading the ad, whereas his
counterpart, who is watching a TV show
and who is confronted with a commercial
for that product, will pay some attention to
the commercial and in the process learn a
portion of the advertiser's message.
"For an advertiser who is primarily concerned about increasing his market share
by converting nonusers of a product
category to users of his brand, the implication is that TV is likely to be a wiser investment of advertising dollars than print.
"These same data also suggest that at
higher use -purchase probabilities, any advantage accruing to the print ad because its
readers can spend more time with it than
their counterparts who watch a TV commercial is not sufficient in most cases to
overcome the benefits of captive attention
enjoyed by TV commercials generally,
since viewers of TV commercials learned
more than print -ad readers regardless of
use -purchase probability. ".
This does not mean that TV is always a
better buy than print, Mr. Grass said. The
economics of reach and frequency may
also become involved. "Although exposure for exposure, TV appears to do a
better communications job than print
regardless of use -purchase probability," he
said, "this difference must be traded off
against cost -per- thousand exposure
figures appropriate to the particular media
buys contemplated."
BBDO's Larry Light told the workshop
that the high media prices everyone is crying about may prove to be a good thing
they cause buyers to look for and find better ways of spending media dollars in advertising.
He suggested specifically that the conventional approach- starting with the national plan and moving from there to an
evaluation of local market needs -be
turned upside down. On the theory that
"every sale is a local sale," he said, planning should start at the local level and only
when that is set should it proceed to the
regional and finally national level.
-if
GM pulls out of
film on Jesus
Complaints from religious groups
succeed in company defaulting;
NBC plans to preview show
for organizations objecting
General Motors, which invested close to
$5 million in a three -years-in- the -making
miniseries on the life of Jesus, last week
pulled out of the actual telecast, to run
next month on NBC, after religious
pressure groups had launched a campaign
against the program.
NBC -TV's executive vice president
Mike Weinblatt said, however, that NBC
was close to lining up another big advertiser to take on the 36 minutes of commercial time in the six -hour telecast, called
"Jesus of Nazareth" (April 3, and April
10, 8 to 11 p.m. NYT, each night).
The pressure began mounting earlier
this month when a fundamentalist
publication called the Ohio Independent
Baptist urged its readers to boycott General Motors's products. The publication's
compliant centered on the made -for -TV
movie's depicting Christ as a man rather
than a divine person who walked on water,
brought the dead man, Lazarus, back to
life and performed other miracles.
Dr. Bob Jones, a Southern Baptist and
the president of Bob Jones University,
Thousands In Deverly Hills
Are Starving[
Maybe you thought that money and technology
could take care of anything. it doesn't. In Beverly
Hills, New Cannon and even Hillsborough, you will
find thousands of starving people. In fact, sometimes those who appear to have everything are
the very ones who are most "alone" and starving
for friendship.
-
-
Starvation for friendship
real love
is often
worse than physical hunger. With money, you
can buy food. But you can never buy the kind
of love that accepts you as you are and stays
by you whatever happens.
Westbrook Hospital, a TV series by Faith For Today, dramatically portrays solutions to the
searching that takes place in the lives of
thousands of people. For an audition cassette or
more information on Westbrook Hospital, call col-
lect (805) 498 -6661. Ask for Syndication.
Broadcasting Mar
56
21
1977
picked up the charge by putting out a
widely publicized statement calling on
believers in Christ's divinity to "make
their protest known" to GM "both verbally and by spending their automobile
dollars elsewhere."
NBC spokesmen were puzzled by this
response because the network hadn't
shown the movie to the people doing the
complaining.
The NBC spokesmen said the reaction
was probably triggered by an Associated
Press story quoting the director of "Jesus
of Nazareth," Franco Zeffirelli, to the
effect that Christ would be de- mythified.
NBC's press kit on the movie cites by
name a long list of "authorities on the
Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Moslem and
Mormon faiths" who have "commended"
the miniseries. Last week, NBC began setting up a series of screenings for religious
leaders in this country.
The movie was written by the well known British novelist Anthony Burgess
( "The Clockwork Orange "), the Italian
scenarist Suso Cecchi d'Amico and Mr.
Zeffirelli. The cast features, among others,
Laurence Olivier, Anthony Quinn, Anne
Bancroft, Ernest Borgnine, James Mason,
James Earl Jones, Rod Steiger, Peter
vulnerable to television advertising."
(Proponents of the ban, the FTC said, had
argued that premiums were diverting a
child's attention from the merits of the
product and causing purchase of unwanted
or inferior items.)
The FTC said it "is not prepared to conclude at this point that the facts support a
finding of unfairness or deception that
would justify a per se rule against all child directed, televised premium advertising.
The commission is reluctant to conclude
that the probability of consumer dissatisfaction with a product sold with a premium, and truthfully depicted in a child directed television commercial, is so great
that no such television presentations
shoud be permitted under any circumstances."
A case -by -case basis, the commission
said, would allow the presentation of concrete facts, from which specific guidelines
could emerge.
Cited in the decision were several studies regarding premium advertising. One,
attributed to the National Association of
Broadcasters, said that in 1974, 8.1% of all
Saturday morning and early afternoon network programing included premium advertising.
Ustinov and Christopher Plummer.
"We'll let the film speak for itself," concluded one NBC source:
A spokesman for GM said GM with-
drew from "Jesus of Nazareth" because of
the sensitivity of the subject and the conflict inherent in commercial sponsorship
of a program on the life of Christ.
FTC says premium
offers directed
to children
will not be banned
Commission says evidence does not
demonstrate that such advertising
is invariably unfair or deceptive
The Federal Trade Commission has rejected a proposed plan to prohibit offers of
toys, prizes and other promotions in advertising directed at children. It plans to
keep a watchful eye on the practice however, and will evaluate the fairness of such
ads on a case -by-case basis.
After considering a proposed guide
almost three years (BROADCASTING, July
22, 1974) the commission said that evidence does not "demonstrate that all premium advertising televised to child audiences is inherently or invariably unfair
or deceptive."
Noting that it received more than 500
comments on the proposal in general and
another 59 on an experimental study of
the guide and a proposed alternative, the
FTC said: "Rejection of the guide does
not imply that such advertising is not subject to abuse. The comments and studies ... tend to establish that children,
especially young children, are particularly
OTC debate continues
Opponents claim that FTC shouldn't
limit ad claims to FDA regulation
New
in TV
from
Harris
TSB
Transversal SideBand Filter
Harris introduces a new line of
1300 watt to 220 kilowatt TV
transmitters featuring IF
Modulation. These transmitters
now employ the exclusive MCP
solid -state exciter with TSB
(Transversal SideBand) filter,
offering improved color
performance with fewer
adjustments.
Arguments remained generally the same
but proponents and opponents continued
to take the stand last week to fight out the
benefits or consequences of a proposed
Federal Trade Commission regulation to
specify the wording of certain over-thecounter drug advertising claims.
Joining the opposition camp for the advertising world was Leonard Orkin, a
partner in the New York law firm of Davis
& Gilbert, which counsels major advertising agencies; John Crichton, president,
American Association of Advertising
Agencies, New York; John Bowen, president and chief executive officer, Benton &
Bowles Inc., New York, and Dr. Seymour
Banks, vice president in charge of media
research, Leo Burnett U.S.A., Chicago.
As had former FTC Chairman Earl
Kinter and SSC &B Inc. president Alfred J.
Seaman (BROADCASTING, March 7, 14),
these witnesses held that the FTC should
not limit certain indication -for -use claims
to those mandated for labeling by the
Food and Drug Administration.
Among their arguments: that labeling
language would defeat the communications purpose of advertising, infringe on
first amendment rights, economically impair the OTC drug industry.
Most witnesses last week appeared on
behalf of the opposition. However, the
parade of witnesses at the FTC in Washington is to continue until April 1, likely
providing proponents more opportunity to
make their claims that such a rule is necessary to inform and protect the public.
Broadcasting Mar
57
21
1977
for
Innovations
in
AM, FM, TV
& Audio
see you at our
Sheraton Park
NAB Exhibit
If you are not
planning to attend the
NAB Convention this year, write for full
details of our new TV transmitters, as
well as new AM transmitters, FM transmitters and MSP-100 to: Harris Corporation, Broadcast Products Division,
Quincy, Illinois 62301.
BOOTH 205
HARRIS
COMMUNICATIONS AND
INFORMATION HANDLING
Broadcast Journalism'
AP continues shuffles
at top in broadcasting
The creation of three general broadcast executive posts within the broadcast departments of the Associated Press was announced last week by Roy Steinfort, assistant general manager in charge of broadcasting.
Anthony Rizzo, broadcast executive for
Pennsylvania and Virginia, has been
named general broadcast executive for the
East, and George Otwell, broadcast executive for Ohio and Michigan, has been appointed general broadcast executive for
the central states. A supervisor for the
West will be named shortly. Each will have
seven broadcast executives under his
supervision.
Boyd starts news service
Forrest Boyd, communications director for
the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association
and former White House correspondent
for Mutual Broadcasting System, is organizing an audio news service, International Media Service, to "supplement the
conventional news carried by radio stations."
Offering what Mr. Boyd calls "the rest of
the news,"
minutes of
and regular
cast lines of
the service will provide 25
news, correspondent reports
features daily over the broadUPI Audio. Once a week there
will be a 25- minute interview by three
selected reporters. Mr. Boyd said IMS is
designed "to fill a void for religious radio
stations and to provide a new dimension to
the news broadcasts of secular commercial
stations."
IMS will be independent of the Billy
Graham Evangelistic Association but Mr.
Boyd "will maintain a working relationship with Billy Graham as a consultant.
Journalism Briefs
Brenden Byrne, governor of New Jersey and chairman of National Advisory Committee on Criminal
Justice Standards and Goals, has advised
against government control of news
coverage of terrorist activities. "Media is
essential part of terrorist's enterprise,"
governor said in his report on terrorism
and urban disorders. But he recommended
no standards for press or broadcast reporters covering such events.
Broadcast coverage of legislation.
California Senate has voted 32 to to open
all floor sessions to full television and
radio coverage. Under new rule, coverage
may be halted if it interferes with proceedNo restraints waged.
1
ings.
Special Report
Advance sales
betoken biggest
NAB convention
Delegates can keep on the run
with heavy agenda, sidebar events,
exhibits in three hotels;
no word yet on Carter appearance
As has become its custom at the start of a
new U.S. presidential term, the National
Association of Broadcasters takes its annual convention to Washington next
week, running Sunday through Wednesday (March 27 -30).
As a convention site, the town has its
problems, stemming largely from the absence of a central convention facility. Con ventioners will have to contend with traffic
to reach exhibits spread among three
hotels.
But the logistical problems are doing
nothing to scare conventioners away. Advance registration is running ahead of last
year's Chicago convention by 1,000, suggesting to an optimistic NAB staff that the
association may be headed for a new attendance record. About 4,240 broadcasters
had already sent in their money last week;
Let's face it:
Sooner or Later
we'll be
in your office.
Get us in your office soon, at no cost. Let us
do a complete "Station System Analysis ", analyzing
and reporting to you on your procedures, with a full
appraisal of how our BAT Systems might help them.
No obligation. Call or write Jim Lang, Director of
Marketing, PAPERWORK SYSTEMS, INC., P.O. Box
38, 1609 Broadway, Bellingham, Washington 98225.
This is the "year of the computer" for many
broadcasters. Why? Paperwork. Regulations. Reports.
We broadcasters are loaded with them. A computer
solves the problems. Accurate logs. Easy compliance.
No schedule errors. Accurate, complete, fast
management reports and projections. Improved
invoices and statements, speeding cash flow. For
your operations, discipline; for you, control.
PSI is the world leader in sales of computer systems
for broadcasting. We know this business. Our BAT
Systems are now in over 180 stations, from small
market radio to large TV. They are the lowest in cost,
with the best support in the industry. And a PSI
Mini -computer System is yours, in- house. No rentals
forever. No phone lines. It does it all: Billing,
Accounting, Traffic and Payrolls. Even the P&L!
Toll free 800- 426 -8872. Call collect (206) 733-8510
for states of Washington, Alaska, Hawaii, or outside
the U.S. At the NAB, Shoreham Booth 542.
Broadcasting Mar
58
~WWII MINIM /M.
21
19//
NAB executives hope to
see as many as
Bussing. Shuttle bus service will be
6,500 by next week. The previous record,
provided during the NAB convention,
set four years ago in Washington, was
operating daily among, hotels during
about 6,200.
convention hours. Buses will operate
There are those on the NAB staff who
Saturday (March 26) 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sunbelieve that exhibit space sales would set a
day, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. and Monday through
record, too, if only there were space to sell.
Wednesday 8 a.m.-6 p.m. There are
Original estimates of the amount of space
three routes: Route A serves the Washavailable were in the neighborhood of
ington Hilton, Sheraton Park, Shoreham
85,000 square feet (in contrast to 95,000
Americana: route B runs to the Hyatt
sold in Chicago) but the NAB staff
Regency, Quality Inn Capitol Hill, Intersqueezed out another 5,000 for the exhibinational Inn, Mayflower, Capital Hilton,
tors and reported there were still about 10
Washington Hilton, Sheraton Park,
in line for any new availabilities. "If you
Shoreham Americana, and route C will
fellows get up from your seats," one staffer
operate among the Executive House,
said last week, "we might even sell that."
Gramercy Inn, Dupont Plaza, Embassy
The three -hotel configuration further
Row, Washington Hilton, Sheraton Park,
delineates the three rings of the associaShoreham Americana.
tion's circus. The NAB attempted last year
to segregate radio from TV sessions in the
convention program, and this year has response to its invitation to the President
gone so far as to give each discipline its to address the opening session.
The program, as in the past, is speckled
own hotel. Radio will be centered in the
Sheraton Park, TV will be in the Wash- with the names of prominent personages
ington Hilton, and the engineering con- including Lionel Van Deerlin (D- Calif.)
ference, which runs concurrently with the and Ernest E. Hollings (D- S.C.), the chairconvention, will be housed at the men of the House and Senate Communications Subcommittees, respectively;
Shoreham -Americana.
Besides the separation principle, several FCC Chairman Richard Wiley, and
other themes are carried over from previ- pioneer radio commentator Lowell
ous conventions, with the TV program Thomas.
Some other highlights of the Washlaced heavily with government and technology concerns and the radio program ington convention program:
For TV, a panel of former FCC chairemphasizing dollars- and -cents issues.
A major innovation is the First Amend- men telling what they would do `tif I were
ment theme program for both radio and the chairman..." of the FCC.
For TV, a panel of leading programers
TV conventioners Monday afternoon.
CBS News commentator Eric Sevareid will talking about "TV's golden age- yesterkeynote a "First Amendment confronta- day, today or tomorrow ?"
For radio, a preview of radio month
tion," with a panel that includes Senator
William Proxmire (D- Wis.), author of a (May) with the theme this year, "Radio
bill to abolish the fairness doctrine and free as the air."
For radio, question and answer sesequal -time law; FCC Commissioner Abbott Washburn; former FCC Commis- sion with key FCC staff members.
For radio, the presentation of the first
sioner Nicholas Johnson, now head of the
National Citizens Committee for Broad- 14 Radio Hall of Fame awards (BROADcasting, and John Pastore, former Senate CASTING, Jan. 31).
For radio, a look at the Frazier Gross
Communications Subcommittee chairand Clay study of radio's future. (BROADman.
But what really distinguishes this con- CASTING, Jan. 24).
For radio and TV, the presentation of
vention from others is the location. Heavy
nonconvention activities will be carried on the NAB distinguished service award to
by broadcasters themselves in the offices Harold Krelstein, chairman of Plough
of their congressmen, the FCC commis- Broadcasting, Memphis, and former chairsioners and the Federal Trade Commis- man of the NAB radio board.
For radio and TV, a panel session with
sion. The NAB government relations
department reports it has helped set up all seven FCC commissioners.
For radio and TV, the usual array of
about 20 dinners, cocktail receptions and
breakfasts for broadcasters and their nuts -and -bolts workshops on sales,
affirmative action, employe motivation,
states' delegations in Congress.
There is a possibility that the broad- advertising, other subjects. NAB will subcasters will make personal contact with sidize the participation of Radio AdvertisPresident Jimmy Carter. At midweek last ing Bureau and TV Advertising Bureau in
week, however, the association still had no some of the sessions.
For engineers and radio, a demonstration of AM stereo, preceded by a discussion with experts on transmitting and
Elsewhere in this issue
receiving equipment, monitors, audio proNAB management agenda
60
cessing methods and stereo systems.
Agenda of related events
68
For engineers, a technical panel with
Hospitality suites
68
key FCC staff members, the presentation
Engineers' agenda
71
of the annual engineering award to Daniel
Equipment exhibitors and
H. Smith, former senior vice president for
exhibit -hall maps
77
engineering, Capital Cities CommunicaNetworks, programers, reps,
tions, and presentations of technical
brokers and others
94
papers on radio -TV innovations.
-
Broadcasting Mar
59
21
1977
New
in Audio
from
Harris
The
MSP -100
Harris introduces the advanced
MSP -100 (Maximum Signal
Processor) which combines triband Automatic Gain Control
a limiter which
automatically adjusts attack
and release time based on
music content. Incorporated
into a single unit, this system
will increase flexibility for
varying formats and provide the
highest possible modulation
with minimum distortion.
(AGC) and
for
Innovations
in
AM, FM, TV
& Audio
see you at our
Sheraton Park
NAB Exhibit
If you are not planning to attend the
NAB Convention this year, write for full
details of our new MSP -100, as well as
new AM transmitters, FM transmitters
and TV transmitters to: Harris Corporation, Broadcast Products
Quincy, Illinois 62301.
Division,
BOOTH 205
an HARRIS
COMMUNICATIONS AND
INFORMATION HANDLING
,
Who, what, where and when in Washington
Registration. The registration desk will
be located in the Continental
room of the Sheraton Park hotel. The desk will be open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. on Saturday, March 26, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday and Monday
and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday.
Equipment exhibit hours. Displays of broadcast equipment and services will open at 9 a.m. Sunday, March 27, in the exhibit halls of the
Sheraton Park hotel, the Washington Hilton hotel and in the exhibit hall,
Ambassador room and Bird Cage Walk of the Shoreham Americana
hotel. Show hours are from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday and from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Wednesday.
Workshops, assemblies and luncheons. Radio meetings will be held
television meetings will be in the Washington
Hilton hotel and the Engineering Conference meetings will be held in
the Shoreham Americana (full engineering agenda begins on page 71).
in the Sheraton Park hotel,
Sunday, March 27
Opening general assembly (joint meeting of radio and television
management and engineers). Sheraton Park, Sheraton hall. 3:30 -5 p.m.
Music: the Navy Band. Presiding: Kathryn Broman, president, Springfield
TV Broadcasting and convention co- chairman. Welcome: Walter E.
Washington, mayor of Washington. Presentation of NAB Distinguished
Service Award to Harold R. Krelstein, chairman, Plough Broadcasting.
Remarks: Mr. Krelstein. I Hear America Singing, a special musical presentation in honor of broadcasting from Opryland, U.S.A.
Monday, March 28
TELEVISION SESSIONS
Washington Hilton
Opening session. East ballroom 9 a.m. Call to order: Kathryn Broman,
president, Springfield TV Broadcasting, and convention co- chairman.
What's new at the exhibits: Chris Payne, NAB. Introduction of speaker:
Wilson Wearn, president, Multimedia Broadcasting, and chairman, NAB.
Keynote address: Senator Ernest F. Hollings (D- S.C.), Communications
Subcommittee chairman. If I were the chairman now. Moderator: Sol
Taishoff, Broadcasting Publications. Former FCC chairmen: Dean
Burch, Frederick W. Ford, E. William Henry, Rose! H. Hyde, Newton W.
Minow. What's up on the Hill: Donald P. Zeifang, NAB. Report to the industry: Vincent T. Wasilewski, president, NAB. In the box number one:
violence on television. Moderator: Kenneth Harwood, Temple University.
Panelists: Roy Danish, Television Information Office; Ann Kahn, TV
Violence Commission, National Parent Teacher Association. 1977 Roper
survey: Television Information Office.
Five concurrent television workshops. 1:35
1
a.m.
How to fill key executive vacancies. Georgetown East. Moderator: Nancy
McCormick, Broadcast management, NAB. Panelists: Eleanor Brown,
WMAL -TV Washington; Sherlee Barish, Broadcast Personnel Inc.; Carl
Youngs, Ron Curtis & Co.; Joe Sullivan, Joe Sullivan & Associates; Tom
Neff, Spencer Stuart & Associates.
J.
Successful operation in a 100 -plus TV market. Jefferson West. Modera-
RADIO SESSIONS
Sheraton Park
Opening session. Park room.
9 a.m. Presiding: Don Thurston, president, wMNB -AM -FM North Adams, Mass., and NAB radio board chairman.
Keynote address: Vincent T. Wasilewski, president, NAB. Preview of National Radio Month: Charles T. Jones, NAB. What's new at the exhibits:
George W. Bartlett, NAB. What's up on the Hill: Roy Elson, NAB.
Remarks: Representative Lionel Van Deerlin (D- Mass.), House Com-
munications Subcommitee chairman. The NAB future of radio study:
John Dimling, NAB. Specialists discuss the future of radio. Interviewer:
Ted Landphair, wMAUAM) Washington. Specialists: Miles David, president, Radio Advertising Bureau; Al Chismark, Meredith Corp.; Joseph
Fogarty, FCC commissioner; Harry M. Shooshan, counsel, House Communications Subcommittee.
Six concurrent radio workshops. 10:45
How to promote your station for practically nothing. Cotillion South.
Moderator: Lynn Grasz, Broadcast Promotion Association. Panelists:
Carolyn Metheny, KAAY(AM) Little Rock, Ark.; William O'Shaughnessy,
Wvox -AM -FM New Rochelle, N.Y.; Pat Powers, KTPK -FM Topeka, Kan.; Jon
Beacher, Combined Communications.
a.m.
EEO reporting. Richmond -Arlington room. Moderator: Richard Wyckoff,
tors: Bill Bengston, chairman, 100-plus TV Market Committee, and
George J. Gray, NAB. Panelists: Richard Wright, wHNT -ry Huntsville, Ala.;
Robert J. Kizer, Avery -Knodel Television; Herbert A. Elion, Arthur D. Little
Inc.; Jay E. Gardner, Pikes Peak Broadcasting.
What you don't know about EEO can hurt you. Jefferson East. Moderator: Erwin Krasnow, NAB general counsel. Panelists: Arthur Goodkind,
Koteen & Burt; Lionel Monagas, FCC.
Station sales and business predictions -how to make them both. Georgetown West. Moderator: Paul Ramon, WAGA -TV Atlanta. Panelists: Thomas
M. Percer, wHNT-Tv Huntsville, Ala.; William B. Faber, wFLA -Tv Tampa, Fla.;
James E. Rupp, wcco-TV Minneapolis; Jerry Marcus, WTTG -TV Washington.
The cable TV picture today and tomorrow. Thoroughbred room. Moderator: Robert Resor, NAB. Panelists: Warren G. Bender, Telecommunications Sciences Section, Arthur D. Little Inc., Robert Arum, Top Rank Inc.;
Irving Kahn, Broadband Communications; Thomas R. Dargan, KATU -TV
Portland, Ore.; William J. Donnelly, Young & Rubicam, New York.
NAB. Panelists: Frank Mullin, Mullin, Connor & Rhyne; Glenn Wolfe, FCC.
JOINT SESSION
What good are radio ratings? Dover room. Moderator: John Dimling,
NAB. Panelists: Bill Engel, Arbitron; Doug Clemensen, Orion Broadcasting; Sam Paley, Custom Audience Consultants; Robert Williams,
WURL(AM) Winston -Salem, N.C.
Washington Hilton
Radio and television luncheon. Center and West ballrooms.
Speaker: Richard
look at radiolcommunity group negotiations. Alexandria room.
Moderator: Patricia Russell, FCC. Broadcasters: Ernest Fears, Washington Star Stations; Arthur Gilliam, wLOK(AM) Memphis. Community
group representatives: Garnell Stamps, National Association for the Advencement of Colored People; Alvin Chambliss, North Mississippi Rural
Legal Project; Nolan Bowie, Citizens Communications Center.
A
E.
1
p.m.
Wiley, chairman, FCC.
First Amendment confrontation. East ballroom. 2:30
p.m. Keynote
speaker: Eric Sevareid, CBS. The First Amendment and broadcast
regulation, a debate: Lee Loevinger, Hogan & Hartson; Kenneth Cox,
Haley, Bader & Potts. First Amendment panel: Abbott Washburn FCC
commissioner, John O. Pastore, former chairman, Senate Communications Subcommittee.
Pricing and presenting your time -rate cards. Moderator: James Arcata,
Paterson, N.J. Panelists: Peter R. Dreyer, WNOX(AM) Knoxville,
Tenn.; Robert H. Biernacki, wABC(AM) New York; Kurt Drowall, KSOO(AM)
Sioux Falls, S.D.; Ronald L. Sack, KOB -AM -FM Albuquerque, N.M.
WPAT -AM -FM
Tuesday, March 29
Computers come in all sizes. Wilmington room. Moderator: Jonathan Hall,
RADIO SESSIONS
NAB. Panelists: Sandy Alexander, WFLA -AM -FM Tampa, Fla.; Ted Boyd,
WHBC -AM -FM Canton, Ohio; Walter Rubens, KOBE(AM) -KOPE(FM) Las Cruces,
N.M.; Mike Crouch, WIBW -AM -FM Topeka, Kan.
AM stereo workshop (joint session with engineering at the Palladian
room, Shoreham Americana hotel). 8 a.m. Moderator: Chris Payne, NAB.
Broadcasting Mar
80
21
1977
REASONS WHY SOU SHOULD
INSTALL A MARKETRON
TRAFFIC &ACCOUNTING SYSTEM
KNX -AM RADIO
6121 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
WNEW-AM RADIO
565 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10017
KHJ -AM RADIO
5515 Melrose Avenue
KCBS-FM RADIO
One Embarcadero Center
San Francisco, CA 94111
WNIS -FM RADIO
Merchandise Mart Plaza
Chicago, Ill 60654
KAUM -FM RADIO
1602 Fannin Bank Building
Houston, Texas 77025
WEEI -AM RADIO
4450 Prudential Tower
Boston, Mass 02199
KSFX -FM RADIO
277 Golden Gate Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94102
WBBM- FM RADIO
630 North McClurg
Chicago, Ill 60611
WDAI -FM RADIO
360 North Michigan Ave.
KNBR-AM RADIO
Fox Plaza-Civic Center
San Francisco, CA 94102
WCAU- FM RADIO
City Line & Monument
Philadelphia, PA 19131
Chicago,
III
60601
KABC -AM RADIO
3321 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016
WNEW-FM RADIO
565 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10017
WEEI -FM RADIO
WIP -AM RADIO
19th and Walnut Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103
4450 Prudential Tower
Boston, Mass 02199
KNX -FM RADIO
6121 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Los Angeles, CA 90038
WRKO -AM
RKO General Building
Government Center
Boston, MA 02114
WROR -FM
RKO General Building
Government Center
Boston, MA 02114
KMPC -AM
KNAI -FM RADIO
Fox Plaza -Civic Center
5858 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
San Francisco, CA 94102
WBBM -AM RADIO
630 North McClurg
Chicago, III 60611
WXYZ -AM RADIO
20777 West Ten Mile Road
Southfield, Mich 48075
WMAL-AM
WCBS -AM RADIO
51 West 52nd Street
WMAL -FM
New York, New York 10019
KLAC -AM RADIO
5828 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
WABC -AM RADIO
1330 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10019
WMMR-FM RADIO
19th and Walnut Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103
KLOS -FM RADIO
3321 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90016
KSFO -AM RADIO
950 California Street
San Francisco 94108
WCBS -FM RADIO
51 West 52nd Street
New York, New York 10019
WOR-AM RADIO
1440 Broadway
New York, New York 10018
KCBS -AM RADIO
KITS -AM
New York, New York 10020
KLOK-AM RADIO
One Radio Park Drive
San Jose, CA 95122
WLS -AM RADIO
360 North Michigan Ave.
Chicago, III 60601
KVI -AM RADIO
Tower Building -7th
Seattle, Wash. 98101
WPU -FM RADIO
1330 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10019
KIIS -FM RADIO
6255 Sunset Boulevard
KGO -AM RADIO
277 Golden Gate Avenue
KRAK -AM RADIO
WMAQ-AM RADIO
Merchandise Mart Plaza
Chicago, III 60654
KMET-FM RADIO
5828 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
30 Rockefeller Plaza
Room 293
New York, New York 10020
Room 293
WCAU -AM RADIO
City Line & Monument
Philadelphia, PA 19131
20777 West Ten Mile Road
Southfield, Mich 48075
WNBC -AM
30 Rockefeller Plaza
RADIO
6255 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
WRIF -FM RADIO
4400 Jenifer St, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20015
WYNY -FM
One Embarcadero Center
San Francisco, CA 94111
San Francisco, CA 94102
4400 Jenifer St, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20015
&
KEX-AM
2130 S.W. Fifth Ave.
Portland, Oregon 97201
Olive
Los Angeles, CA 90028
3326 El Camino Avenue
Sacramento, CA 95821
KRTH-FM RADIO
5515 Melrose Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90038
KXYZ-AM RADIO
1602 Fannin Bank Building
Houston, Texas 77025
KEWr FM RADIO
3326 El Camino Avenue
Sacramento, CA 95821
In the few weeks since our last ad
eight more stations have installed
the Marketron Minicomputer System
to streamline their traffic,
accounting and management
functions. That's roughly one new
installation a week. Don't you owe it
to your station to find out why?
Start with a four-color illustrated
brochure describing how a
Marketron Minicomputer System
can be tailored to suit your
particular requirement.
INA6MENMarketron
Marketron, Inc.
2180 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025
415 -854 -2767
Kevin O'Connell,
WQXI, Atlanta says:
Av
The
keyboard configuration allows
eyes-off, hands-on "Touch System"
control. And the RECORD key's double
spaced so I won't hit it by mistake:'
"Fastest editing machine I've ever
used! I can use a grease pencil. The
split gate opens for perfect visibility
without lifting the tape:'
"Starts instantaneously! The 850.
And it's super-rugged, with a half inch thick hardened aluminum deck
Warp proof! You just can't damage an 8507
"Differential braking stops reels
smoothly, without slack or risk of tape
damage. And the reels are held gently
so can move reels manually to
locate a final point'
I
"LT.
for me.
9/
/
I
"When I mix reels I just flip a switch to
compensate for the different hub sizes.
And because the calibrated level
FAST, the gate opens
automatically and lilts the tape from
the head. Or, can open the gate
manually. Manual positioning. or'gating'.
lets me monitor the tape in high
speed modes without risking damage
to meter, amplifiers or speakers:'
"Dumping tape in the edit mode is
fast, easy. foolproof. Moving the
tension arm down turns the take -up
reel off. can discard tape. listening
as go:'
"The hinged lid lifts back for access to
"This new high -friction
'When touch
I
I
control 'clicks' when move it out and
back into position can always return
to my calibrated setting. Easily"
I
I
"There's also a fool -proof push button
tape marker. Or, I can crease -mark the
tape against a disc positioned for
this purpose:'
the entire head assembly:
I
I
polyeurethane
roller pulls the tape with less pressure.
Less wow and flutter:'
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800 -447 -0414
In Alaska, Hawaii or Illinois
call collect: (309) 828 -1381
5Ea,ES 850
about our attractive lease purchase and trade -in plans.
Ask
"The Playback/Record Synchronizer
lets me record on one channel and
listen to another, in complete
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The 4- position Meter Mode switch
allows visual comparison of recording
input and playback output so can
create virtually distortion -free
recordings:'
I
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/
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Station
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Dr^uike- Ckenault
Serving over 200 stations with
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To: DRAKE -CHENAULT ENTERPRISES, INC.
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Yes, want to hear it. Send me your AOR -100 demo.
I
Name
Station
Title
City
State
Zip
Signature
Ddäke- Ckenault
Serving over 200 stations with
7
formats
See us at the NAB. Suite A-200. Sheraton Park Hotel.
Participants: Mike Davis, Thomson -CSF; Harold Kassens, A.D. Ring &
Associates; Leonard Kahn, Kahn Communications; Al Kelsch, Magnavox; Arno Meyer, Belar Electronics; Norm Parker, Motorola.
representatives: Kathy Bonk. National Organization for Women; Pluria
Marshall, National Black Media Coalition; Nolan Bowie, Citizens Communications Resource Center.
Radio workshops. 8:30 am.,
The new copyright law and your station. Georgetown East. Moderator:
Jim Popham, NAB. Panelist. Barbara Ringer, register of copyrights.
9 a.m.
a.m. Moderator: Brenda
Fox, NAB. Panelists: Richard Shiben, chief, Renewals and Transfer Divi-
Filing out the short form. Cotillion South. 8:30
sion, FCC; Michael Bader, Haley, Bader
&
Easing TV's compliance headaches. Moderator: Erwin Krasnow. oeneral
counsel, NAB. Panelists: William Ray, chief, complaints and compliance division, FCC; Frank Fletcher, Fletcher, Heald, Kenehan &
Hildreth. Washington; Joel Rosenbloom, Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering,
Washington.
Potts.
9 a.m. Moderator: Robert C. LaBonte, Kaye -Smith Radio. Panelists: Harold Hinson. WNCI(AM) Columbus,
Ohio; Erica Farber, WXLO -FM New York; Doug Auerbach, WBZ(AM) Boston;
Peter M. Schulte, WRBO-FM Tampa, Fla.
Sales promotion ideas. Cotillion North.
General television session. East ballroom. 9:35 a.m. Call to order:
Robert Gordon, chairman. NAB TV board, and cacao -Tv Cincinnati. Introduction of speaker: Vincent T. Wasilewski, president, NAB. Keynote
speaker: Representative Lionel Van Deerlin (D- Mass.), Communications
Subcommittee chairman. In the box number two: Pay cable is in the
debate. Moderator: Don West, Broadcasting Publicapublic interest
tions. Affirmative: Gerald M. Levin, Home Box Office; Negative: Leo
Beranek, Boston Broadcasters. Televisions "golden age " -yesterday, today or tomorrow? Part one: Now what's new in TV, if anything. Moderator: Allen Ludden, Allen Ludden Productions. Panelists: Fred Silverman,
ABC Entertainment; Grant Tinker, MTM Enterprises; Nancy Dockry,
William Morris Agency. Part two: syndication's age. Moderator: Phil
Boyer. wLS -Tv Chicago. Panelists: David B. Fein, 20th Century Fox; Norman Horowitz, Columbia Pictures Television; David E. Salzman, Group
W Productions; Henry A. Gillespie, Viacom Enterprises. Report on
ASCAP negotiations in 1977. Leslie G. Arries Jr, chairman, All Industry
TV Stations Music Licensing Committee.
What's your station worth ?Alexandria room. 9 a.m. Moderator: Ron Irion,
NAB. Panelists: Don Jones, PSB Radio Group; Harold Poole, president,
Institute of Broadcasting Financial Management; Paul H. Chapman,
-a
Chapman Associates.
ASCAP audits and what your rights are. Richmond /Arlington room.
9
a.m. Moderator: Bob Hilker, Suburban Radio Group; Panelists: Gerald
Carrus, Metromedia Radio; Andy Murtha, consultant; Paul Fagan and
Louis Weber, ASCAP.
How to promote your station for practically nothing. Wilmington room.
Moderator: Lynn Grasz, Broadcast Promotion Association. Panelists:
Carolyn Metheny, KAAY(AM) Little Rock, Ark.; William O'Shaughnessy,
Wvox -AM -FM New Rochelle, N.Y.; Pat Powers, KTPK -FM Topeka. Kan. Jon
Beacher, Combined Communications.
Pricing and presenting your time -rate cards. Dover room
9 a.m. ModeraPaterson, N.J. Panelists: Peter R. Dreyer,
WNOX(AM) Knoxville, Tenn.; Robert H. Biernacki, WABC(AM) New York;
Ronald L. Sack, KOB(AM) Albuquerque, N.M.; Kurt Drowall, KSOO(AM) Sioux
Falls, S.D.
tor: James Arcara,
Television luncheon. Center ballroom.
1
p.m. Introduction of speaker:
Kathryn Broman, Springfield TV Broadcasting Corp. and convention cochairman. Speaker: Representative Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. (D- Mass.),
speaker of the House.
WPAT(AM)
No sessions will be held Tuesday afternoon to allow
delegates to visit the equipment exhibits and the offices
General radio session. Park room. 10:15 a.m. Presiding: Don Jones,
PSB Radio Group and NAB radio board vice chairman.
of their congressional representatives.
AU Industry Music License Committee report: Donald Thurston, NAB
radio board chairman. Remarks: Senator Ernest F Hollings (D- S.C.),
chairman. Communications Subcommittee. Small market radio committee -FCC Q & A panel. Introduction: William R. Rollins, wsvM(AM)
Valdese. N.C.; and SMRC chairman. Moderator: Richard E. Wiley, FCC
chairman. Panelists: Wallace E. Johnson, chief, Broadcast Bureau.; Paul
W. Putney, deputy chief, Broadcast Bureau; Richard J. Shiben, chief,
Renewal & Transfer Division; William B. Ray, chief, Complaints and
Compliance Division; Martin I. Levy, chief, Broadcast Facilities Division.
Radio -the greatest salesman. Introduction: Glodean Kent Gates.
KKZZ(AM)- KOTE-FM Lancaster, Calif., and incoming SMRC chairman. Presentation: Miles David, president, RAB; Robert Alter, executive vice
president, RAB.
Radio luncheon. Sheraton room. 12:30 p.m. Presiding: Donald
Wednesday, March 30
RADIO SESSIONS
Sheraton Park hotel
Radio workshops. 8:30,
9 a.m.
Filling out the short form. Cotillion South. 8:30 a.m. Moderator: Erwin
Krasnow, general counsel, NAB. Panelists: Jeff Baumann, chief,
Renewals Branch, FCC; Robert Coll, McKenna, Wilkinson & Kittner.
Selling in the smaller markets. Cotillion North.
9 a.m. Moderator Philip J.
Spencer, wcss(AM) Amsterdam, N.Y. Panelists: Gary H. Voss, WNBF(AM)
Binghamton, N.Y.; William C. Bland, WNCC(AM)- wFMM(FM) Barnesboro, Pa.;
Robert Laird, KsUM(AM) Fairmont. Minn.; Jerry Fitch, KDGO(AM) Durango,
Colo.
A.
Thurston, NAB radio board chairman. Radio Hall of Fame.Awards: Don
Jones, NAB radio board vice chairman. Speaker: Lowell Thomas.
TELEVISION SESSIONS
Washington Hilton
ENG labor relations workshop. East ballroom. 8 a.m. Moderator: Ron
Irion, NAB. Panelists: William Orr, WENS -TV Columbus, Ohio; Kenneth
Tiven, KYw -TV Philadelphia; George Gonyar, WABI -TV Bangor, Me.
Five concurrent television workshops. 8:30 a.m.
Unions -your future partner? Alexandria room. 9 a.m. Moderator: Ron
Irion, NAB. Panelists: Marshall Berman. Dow, Lohnes & Albertson;
James Wesley Jr., KFI(AM) Los Angeles; Abiah Church. Storer Broadcasting.
EEO reporting. Dover room.
9 a.m. Moderator: Richard Wycoff, NAB.
Panelists: Frank Mullin, Mullin, Connor & Rhyne; Glenn Wolfe, FCC.
Computers come in all sizes. Wilmington room.
The cable TV picture today and tomorrow. Moderator: Robert Resor,
NAB. Panelists: Warren G. Bender, Arthur D. Little Inc.; Joseph M. Cohen,
Madison Square Garden Cablevision; David D. Kinley, American Television & Communications; Robert Rice, WRAU -TV Peoria, Ill.; William J. Donnelly, Young & Rubicam.
9 a.m. Moderator:
Jonathan Hall. NAB. Panelists: Sandy Alexander, WFLA -AM -FM Tampa, Fla.;
Ted Boyd, WHBC -AM -FM Canton, Ohio; Walter Rubens, WOBE -AM -FM Las
Cruces, N.M.; Mike Crouch, WIBW -AM-FM Topeka, Kan.
ASCAP audits and what your rights are. Richmond Arlington room.
9
a.m. Moderator: Bob Hilker, Suburban Radio Group. Panelists: Gerald
Carrus, Metromedia Radio; Andy Murtha, consultant; Paul Fagan and
Louis Weber, ASCAP.
Understanding television ratings. Georgetown West. Moderator: John
Dimling. NAB. Panelists: Dave Traylor, A.C. Nielsen; Rip Ridgeway, Arbitron.
A look at television community -group negotiations. Moderator: Lionel
Monagas, chief industry EEO unit, FCC. Broadcasters: James Lynagh,
wroP -TV Washington; Jack Harris, KPRC -TV Houston. Community -group
TELEVISION SESSIONS
Washington Hilton hotel
General television session. East ballroom.
Broadcasting Mar
66
21
1977
8 a.m.
Presiding: Kathryn
DELTA
ELECTRONICS
-
NEW
OIB -3 OPERATING IMPEDANCE BRIDGE
The new OIB -3 features
direct reading of 'R' to 1000 Ohms and 'X' to 900 Ohms. The OIB -3 also
contains an integral rf amplifier.
NEW
TCA -N -EX AND TCA -N -EXR SERIES RF AMMETERS
Equipped with
output provisions for direct attachment of remote reading meters. Complies fully with new FCC regulations for remote metering.
NEW
-
Several new products including the AMC -1 Automatic Modulation Control
Unit for ATS will be on display at the NAB Show
Please drop by.
-
Antenna Monitoring
-
AAM -1 ANALOG ANTENNA MONITOR
FCC type approved. Provides accurate true
ratio and phase readings. Easy to interface with existing control systems. AAMH -1 provides hardwired remote control of AAM -1.
i
-
DAM -1 DIGITAL ANTENNA MONITOR
FCC type approved. Provides digital readout
of amplitude, ratio and phase. Also available: DAMA -1 Base Current Adapter for remote
digital readout of antenna base currents; DAMX -1 to extend capacity of DAM -1 up to
12 towers.
Transmitter /Antenna Remote Control
-
Provides digital
TMCS -1 TRANSMITTER /ANTENNA REMOTE CONTROL SYSTEM
readout and control of the DAM -1 and transmitter over a single voice channel. Other systems available: DAMR -1 /DAML -1 for digital readout and control of the DAM -1 only;
DAMH -1 for use where the remote control point is close enough to the monitor to per-
mit hardwired inter-connection.
Measurement /Test Instruments
-
For antenna system measurements under
OIB -1 OPERATING IMPEDANCE BRIDGE
transmitter power. May also be used as a conventional bridge.
-
Two -watt signal
RG -1B RECEIVER /GENERATOR
generator with a tracking detector. Built -in rechargeable battery power supply for full portability in
making low power impedance measurements. For use
with OIB -1 or other RF bridges.
CPB -1 COMMON POINT IMPEDANCE BRIDGE
-
Monitors common point impedance continuously.
Designed for permanent installation.
Other Products
-
Provides accurate, stable R.F. samples for phase and amplitude measTCT -( ) TOROIDAL CURRENT TRANSFORMER
urements. Available in three sensitivities. Also available: TCTR -1 Compensated Rectifier Circuit to provide DC voltage for
remote current measurement when used with TCT -(
I.
MJ -50 METER JACK
-A
make -before -break in line jack assembly that permits
"hot" insertion of O1B -1
Bridge or Ammeters.
5534 PORT ROYAL ROAD
DELTA ELECTRONICS
i
SPRINGFIELD, VIRGINIA 22151
TELEPHONE: 703/321 -9845 TWX: 710- 831 -0620
1
Broman, Springfield TV Broadcasting and convention co- chairperson.
How now, fourth network? Moderator: Dawson B. Nail, Television Digest.
Panelists: Don Durgin, Dun & Bradstreet; Howard Eaton, Ogilvy &
Mather; Michael Lepiner, Benton & Bowles; Alfred M. Masini, Telerep. In
debate.
the box number three: Is television still underpriced in 1977 ?
Moderator: Richard O'Leary, ABC -TV. Affirmative: Walter Schwartz, Blair
Television. Negative: Walter Reichel, Ted Bates. Television business
right now. Roger D. Rice, Television Bureau of Advertising. Television
business tomorrow. William P Suter, Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner &
Smith. Sales compensation survey results. Roger D. Rice, TVB; and Walter
E Bartlett, Multimedia Inc. and TVB chairman. Premier showing of new
TVB presentation.
-a
JOINT SESSION
Sheraton Park hotel
Bridges hotel. 7:30 a.m.
Broadcast Education Association
hotel 9 a.m.
Broadcast Education Association
Broadcast Education Association
Broadcast Education Association
board of directors meeting. Mayflower
registration. Mayflower hotel. 3 p.m.
meeting. Mayflower hotel. 4 p.m.
reception. Mayflower hotel 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, March 28
Broadcast Education Association meeting. Mayflower hotel. 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m.
Association of Maximum Service Telecasters board of directors meeting.
Washington Hilton hotel, Map room. 2 p.m.
Sunday, March 27
Broadcast Education Association meeting. Mayflower hotel. 8:30 a.m.-12
Closing general assembly. Sheraton hall. 10:30. Presiding: Wilson
Wearn, NAB board chairman. FCC panel. Moderator: Vincent
Wasilewski, NAB president. Commissioner -panelists: Richard E. Wiley,
Robert E. Lee, Benjamin L. Hooks, James H. Quello, Abbott M. Washburn,
Joseph R. Fogarty, Margita White.
Convention adjournment.
Friday, March 25
American Forces Radio and Television workshops. Marriott Twin
noon.
Association of Maximum Service Telecasters membership meeting.
Sheraton Park hotel, Delaware room. -3 p.m.
Society of Broadcast Engineers meeting. Shoreham Americana hotel,
'Empire room. 2 p.m.
1
Monday, March 28
Association of Maximum Service Telecasters board of directors meeting.
Washington Hilton hotel, Map room. 2 p.m.
12 noon.
Related convention activities
Tuesday, March 29
Thursday, March 24
room. 2 p.m.
Armed Forces Radio and Television Workshops. Marriott Twin Bridges
hotel. 7:30 a.m.
Broadcast Education Association board of directors meeting. Mayflower
hotel. 6 p.m.
Association for Broadcast Engineering Standards meeting. Sheraton
Park hotel, Vincent/Taft rooms. 2:30 p.m.
Television All Music Licensing Committee meeting. Washington Hilton
hotel, Georgetown East room. 3 p.m.
Hospitality suites at
a
Daytime Broadcasters Association meeting. Sheraton Park hotel, Dover
glance
Automation Electronics
Autotron Systems
Avery -Knodel
Axiom Market Research
Blackburn & Co.
Networks
ABC Broadcast Operations
and Engineering
International Inn /Mayflower TBA
American Broadcasting Companies, ABC -TV, ABC
Washington Hilton 0 -174
Owned TV Stations
ABC Radio Networks
Sheraton Park 8220
CBS Inc., CBS /Broadcast Group, CBS -TV,
CBS News
Washington Hilton 9101, 9102
CBS Radio
Sheraton Park 8620
Mutual Broadcasting System
Sheraton Park D600
Mutual Radio Sports
Sheraton Park D600
Mutual Black Network
Sheraton Park D400
National Black Network
Sheraton Park A400
National Broadcasting Company, NBC -TV,
NBC Radio
Washington Hilton, Conservatory
Sheraton Park M390
Sheraton Park M390
Washington Hilton 4188, 4189, 4190
TBA
Sheraton Park K800
BMI
Mayflower TBA
John Blair & Co.
Washington Hilton Senate Room, 1174
Bolton /Burchill International
Sheraton Park TBA
Bonneville Broadcast Consultants
Shoreham E430, 431, 432
Rober Bosch
Washington Hilton 0149, 0150
Broadcast Electronics
Sheraton Park E420
Broadcast Programing International
Sheraton Park F740
Broadcasting Magazine
Shoreham C630
Buckley Radio Sales
Shoreham TBA
Burkhart /Abrams & Associates
Shoreham A600, 602
Camera Mart
Shoreham 8720, 722, 724
Capitol Magnetic Products
Sheraton Park F540, 541
Cavox Stereo Productions
Sheraton Park C240
CBS Radio Spot Sales
Sheraton Park B620
CCA Electronics
Sheraton Park F640
Central Dynamics
Sheraton Park C251
Century 21 Productions
Sheraton Park F440
Cetec
Sheraton Park A700, 702
Chapman Associates
Hyatt Regency 1110
Christal Co.
Embassy Row TBA
Claster Television Productions/
Romper Room Enterprises
Washington Hilton 1149,1150
Collins Radio Group,
Rockwell International
Sheraton Park C740, 742
Comark Industries
Shoreham E237, 239
Commercial Electronics
Sheraton Park H320
Communications Technology, Compu /Net
Sheraton Park A111
Computer Image
Washington Hilton 4164, 4165
Concept Productions
Sheraton Park A711
Consolidated Video Systems
Sheraton Park K600
Continental Electronics Manufacturing
Sheraton Park A311
Others
Acrodyne Industries
Sheraton Park K700
Adda Corp.
Shoreham G408
American Data Division, Airpax
Electronics
Sheraton Park 907, 908, 909
American Electronic Laboratories
Sheraton Park C340
Ampex
Audio Video Systems Division
Washington Hilton
Monroe & Lincoln, 4101, 4102, 4217
International Division
Washington Hilton 3174, 3175, 3176
Magnetic Tape Division
Washington Hilton 1171, 1172
Angenieux Corp. of America
Washington Hilton 3164, 3165
Arbitron
Sheraton Park A100
Arvin /Echo Science
Shoreham E630, 631, 632
ASCAP
Capitol Hilton TBA
Associated Press
Sheraton Park F240 -242
Assn. of Maximum Service Telecasters
Washington Hilton 4174
Atwood Richards Telescreen
Washington Hilton 3149, 3150
Audio Designs and Manufacturing Washington Hilton 5171, 5172
Audio Sellers
Shoreham G400, 401, 403
Broadcasting Mar
88
21
1977
RADIOARTS
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music of our time. Enjoy program
control and consistency again,
make your station an "Entertainer".
TM
Radio Arts, Inc.
210 N. Pass Avenue
Burbank, California 91505
In the middle of the country road.
The fresh new sound in radio.
The purest blend of modern
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1
Name
Title
Station
Present Formal
City
1
1
Address
State
Zip
Telephone
Sums 104. 210 North Pass Avenue. Burbank. Calilornla 91505 (213) 841 -0225
See you
1
1
at the NAB Washington, D.C. Sheraton Park Hotel Suite A-600
March 27 -30
'
Washington Hilton 1195, 1196, 1197
Washington Hilton Dupont Park Suite
Sheraton Park H321, Shoreham E357, 359
Sheraton Park M758
Sheraton Park M558
Washington Hilton 4149, 4150
3 -M
Washington Hilton TBA
George Moore & Associates
Shoreham C734, 736
Nagra Magnetic Recorders
Shoreham G100, 101, 103
Rupert Neve
Washington Hilton 2195, 2196, 2197
A.C. Nielsen
Shoreham G707, 709
Nortronics
Sheraton Park H120
Orrox
Shoreham F657
Otari
Pacific Recorders & Engineering
Shoreham E230, 231, 232
Panasonic
Washington Hilton 9163, 9164
Peters, Griffin, Woodward
Washington Hilton 6101, 6102, 6217
Sheraton Park H520, 521
Peters Productions
Sheraton- Carlton TBA
Petry Television
Sheraton Park M690, 694
Philips Audio Video Systems
Meeker
Memorex
Micro Consultants
Microtime
Microwave Associates
On the spot. BROADCASTING magazine will have editorial and sales
headquarters during the NAB convention in suite C -630 at Shoreham
Americdna. Attending will be John Andre, Dave Berlyn, Ian Bowen,
Barbara Chase, Rufe Crater, Bill Criger, David Crook, Fred Fitzgerald,
Douglas Hill, Gary Huffman, Kwentin Keenan, Ed James, Win Levi,
Ruth Lindstrom, Bill Merritt, Mark Miller, Randy Moskop, Peter O'Reilly,
Jay Rubin, Dan Rudy, Larry Taishoff, Sol Taishoff, Don West, Dave
Whitcombe and Len Zeidenberg.
Shoreham G700, 701, 703
Washington Hilton TBA
Washington Hilton 5188, 5190
Cox Data Services
Hyatt Regency TBA
R.C. Crlsler & Co.
Data Communications
Washington Hilton Grant Room
Shoreham TBA
Ron Curtis & Co.
Washington Hilton Grant Room
Data Communications
Sheraton Park R901, 902
DPS Corp.
Drake: Chenault Enterprises
Sheraton Park A200
Shoreham A201
Duca- Richardson
Embassy Row 523, 524, 525
E.I. DuPont de Nemours
Dynasciences
Washington Hilton Farragut Park Suite
Eastman Kodak
Washington Hilton Chevy Chase Park Suite
Eastman Radio
Embassy Row TBA
Mayflower 928
Edutron
Electronics, Missies & Communications Sheraton Park M490, 494
ESE
Shoreham 557
Mayflower TBA
William A. Exline
Filmways Radio
Sheraton Park Hamilton Room
lmerp Fiorentino Associates
Sheraton Park H221
Mayflower 668, 669
FM 100 Plan
Milton Q. Ford & Associates
Mayflower 852, 853
Fuji Photo Film U.S.A.
Shoreham B520, 522, 524
Fujinon Optical
Washington Hilton TBA
H.R. Gardner & Associates
Mayflower 852, 853
Mayflower 368, 369
GBC -CCTV
General Broadcasting
Shoreham E337, 339
Golden West Broadcasters/Market Space
Buy Market
Shoreham G500, 501, 503
Sheraton Park A500
Grass Valley Group
Capital Hilton TBA
Wilt Gunzendorfer & Associates
Harrington, Righter & Parsons Washington Hilton 5101, 5102, 5217
Harris
Sheraton Park 0500, 503, 504
Ted Hepburn Co.
Shoreham G107
Hitachi -Denshi
Sheraton Park A411
Hope, Bennett, Blackburn
Shoreham F457
Keith W. Horton Co.
Guest Quarters 506, 508
Bernard Howard
Washington Hilton TBA
H -R /Stone
Mayflower 452, 453
H -R Television
Shoreham C530
Shoreham C236, 234
IGM
Ikegami Electronics
Shoreham 8220, 221, 224
Image Transform
Shoreham B320, 322, 324
Innovative Television Equipment
Sheraton Park E520, 522
International Video Corp.
Washington Hilton 2101, 2102, 2217
Jefferson Data Systems
Washington Hilton 1164, 1165
JVC Industries
Shoreham A800, 802
Kahn Communications
Shoreham G200, 201, 203
KalaMusic
Shoreham A300, 302
Kaman Sciences
Washington Hilton 3185, 3186, 3187
Katz Agency
Madison TBA
Kline Iron and Steel
Shoreham G507, 509
Landy Associates
Shoreham A801
Larson Walker & Co.
Washington Hilton TBA
Hugh Ben LaRue
Washington Hilton 'IBA
Lenco Electronics
Sheraton Park D300
Listec Television Equipment
Sheraton Park M390
Frank N. Magid Associates
Madison TBA
Major Market Radio
Shoreham C430
McGavern -Guild
Washington Hilton Mt. Vernon Suite
McMartin Industries
Sheraton Park M790, 794
Malrite Broadcasting
Mayflower 352, 353
Reggie Martin
Sheraton Park TBA
Convergence
Neal P. Cortell Television
Pro/Meeker Radio
Shoreham C434, 436
Pulse
Sheraton Park F551
Shoreham F257
QEI Corp.
Sheraton Park A600, 602
Radio Arts
Sheraton Park B420
Radio Programing and Management
Rhodes Productions
Washington Hilton 8101, 8102, 8217
Shoreham TBA
Cecil L. Richards Inc.
Romper Room Enterprises /Claster
Television Productions
Washington Hilton 1149, 1150
Shoreham E437, 439
Savalli /Gates
Hay Adams TBA
Schulke Radio Productipns
Shoreham G208
Scientific -Atlanta
Embassy Row 623, 624, 625
Scully /Division of Dictaphone
Sheraton Park C440
Selcom
Shoreham E330, 331, 332
SESAC
Richard A. Shaheen Inc.
Sheraton Park M789
Shintron
Shoreham C334, 336
Robert Slye Electronics
Sheraton Park E720
Sony
Shoreham C330
Spanish International Network
Mayflower TBA
Spectra Vision
Washington Hilton 4171, 4172
Stainless
Sheraton Park C640
Howard Stark
Washington Hilton TBA
Starlight Communications
Hyatt Regency 1139, 1141
Strand Century
Washington Hilton 4149, 4150
Susquehanna Productions
Sheraton Park M590, 594
System Concepts
Shoreham E701
Systems Marketing, Sono-Mag.
Shoreham E730
William B. Tanner Co.
Sheraton Park K500
Tektronix
Sheraton Park D700
Telcom Associates
Washington Hilton 2174, 2175, 2176
TeleMation
Washington Hilton 9138
Telemet
Washington Hilton Bancroft Room
Telerep
Washington Hilton 2188, 2189, 2190
Television Research International
Sheraton Park H420
Sheraton Park M589
Thomson -CSF Electron Tubes
Thomson -CSF Laboratories
Sheraton Park C540
TM Productions
Sheraton Park B320
Shoreham A601
Top Market Television
Loew's L'Enfant Plaza TBA
Torbet- Lasker
Edwin Tornberg & Co.
Capital Hilton TBA
Tuesday Productions
Sheraton Park H721
UMC Electronics
Shoreham C130
Unarcd-Rohn Division of Unarco
Industries
Shoreham G300, 301, 303
Shoreham 8820, 822, 824
United Press Internnational
Sheraton Park M757
United Telecom
Shoreham G600, 601, 603
Utility Tower
Viacom Enterprises
Washington Hilton 3188, 3189, 3190
Videomagnetic
Washington Hilton 7151, 7152
Vital Industries
Washington Hilton 9145
Webster Group
Shoreham A202
Western Union Telegraph
Sheraton Park E320, 322
Wilkinson Electronics
Shoreham A701
Worldvision Enterprises
Shoreham E830, 831, 832
Adam Young
Washington Hilton 9157
Broadcasting Mar
70
21
1977
Meanwhile, at the
engineers'
conference
Following is the agenda for the 31st annual
NAB Broadcast Engineering conference, which
will be held concurrently with the management
meetings of the NAB convention in Washington. Included here are abstracts of technical papers that will be presented. All engineering meetings will be held in the Shoreham.
MONDAY, MARCH 28
Broadcast program audio processing
techniques workshop. Diplomat room. 9 -10
a.m. Moderator: Emil Torick, director, audio
systems technology, CBS Technology Center,
Stamford, Conn. Participants: Jack Williams,
president, Pacific Recorders & Engineering
Corp., San Diego; Eric Small, Eric Small &
Associates, San Francisco; Dick Schumeyer,
assistant director of engineering, Capital Cities
Communications, Philadelphia; Jim Loupas,
James Loupas Associates, Chesterton, Ind.;
Hans Schmid, ABC, New York; John Bailie,
WMAQ(AM) Chicago.
Radio -television session. Palladian room.
10:30 -11:45 a.m. Presiding. Leonard A. Spragg,
vice president of engineering, Storer Broadcasting, Miami Beach. Coordinator: R. LaVerne
Pointer, vice president, broadcast engineering,
ABC, New York.
Opening of engineering conference.
10:30 -10:35 a.m. Vincent
dent, NAB.
T.
Wasilewski, presi-
What's new at the exhibits. 10:35 -11:15 a.m.,
Doyle D. Thompson, chairman, Broadcast
Engineering Conference Committee.
KEZL
San Diego
Report of Engineering Advisory Committee activities. 11:20 -11:30 a.m. Robert W. Flanders,
chairman, NAB Engineering Advisory Committee.
Summary of JCIC activities. 11:30 -11:45
a.m.
Roland Zavada, vice president for engineering,
Society of Motion Picture and Television
Engineers.
Engineering conference luncheon. Regency ballroom 12:30 p.m. Presiding: Ellis Feinstein, director of engineering, KMEO- AM-Tv, Medford, Ore. Invocation: the Rev. W. Ronald
Jameson, Archdiocese of Washington. Special
Presentation to: Dana Pratt, RCA, Camden, N.J.
Speaker: Tom Pettit, NBC News, Washington,
"Television and Politics:"
Radio -television session. Palladian room.
2:30 -5 p.m. Presiding: William Winiewski,
KMBR
Kansas City
WEZO
Rochester
Daniel Smith
Capcities
Neal McNaughten
FCC
Dana Pratt
RCA
WQAL
Cleveland
RANKINGS
BASED ON
OCT. -NOV. 1976
ARBITRON RADIO
ESTIMATES,
METRO SNARE,
MON -SUN
6AM -MID
Ellis Feinstein
KMED -AM -TV
LaVerne Pointer
Arno Meyer
Tom Pettit
ABC
Belar
NBC News
William Honeycutt
T.M.
Gluyas
EIA -RCA
Byron W. St. Clair
KDFW -TV
Television Technology
Roland Zavada
SMPTE -Kodak
Broadcasting Mar
71
21
1977
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
201- 567-8800
A Division of Bonneville International Corporation
Phyll Horne
FCC
A.A.
Dennis Williams
Elie Fadel
CBS Technology
FCC
Bayly Engineering
Norm Parker
Motorola
Hersbberger
Harris
R.S.
William Wisneiwski
Mutua'
John Reiser
FCC
A.D Ring
Cornell
Renville McMann
Thomson -CSF
Emil Torick
CBS Technology
Al Kelscn
G.N. Mendenhall
Magnavox
Harris
Goldberg
4
D
Hopkins
RCA
Thomas Hindle
Thomson -CSF
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director of engineering, Mutual Broadcasting
System, Washington. Coordinator: Joseph P.
Gill Jr.. director of engineering. Cosmos Broadcasting. New Orleans.
vated. in the future, such automatic measuring
and logging functions will be indispensable to
the television industry because of the great
amount of time that can be saved when making routine measurements and logging results.
The application of digital techniques for uideo
measurements. 2:30 -2:55 p.m. Charles Rhodes,
Digital studio transmission links.
Tektronix Inc., Beaverton, Ore, Recent developments in high speed analog -to- digital conver-
ters,
semiconductor memories and
microprocessors have made it possible to
measure video baseband signal parameters by
using digital techniques. An automatic measuring system that is being developed can
measure transmission distortions. It can also
measure the timing of sync, blanking and
burst, and SC -H timing. Limits can be programed so that any out-of -limit parameter is
logged and, if desired, an alarm can be actiBroadcasting Mar 21 1977
72
3 -3:35 p.m.
Elie Fadel, design engineer, Bayly Engineering
Ltd., Ajax, Ont. Program Studio Transmitter
Links (STL) have been traditionally assumed
by either physical wire or through frequency
division multiplex techniques or pulse code
modulation (PCM). PCM program links use the
same proven principle as the telephone PCM
channel banks. At transmit end, the digitized
audio signal from the studio is interfaced to a
telephone line, which conveys this information
to the transmission site or any other location.
At the receive end, the digital signal is converted back to its original analog form. The
KF3IG
Wallace Johnson
FCC
Leonard Kahn
Kahn Communications
Eric Small
Eric Small Associates
Los Angeles
Mike Davis
Thomson -CSF
KEEYFM
Minneapolis/St Paul
Leonard Our.,ler
Robert Jones
Christopher Payne
RCA
Consultant
NAB
Eugene Leonard
Systems Resources
KMBR
Kansas City
Hans Schmid
ABC
Joseph Flaherty
CBS -TV
Blair Benson
Teletronics
John Toth
ABC
WQAL
Cleveland
Frank Hemming
NBC -TV
Robert Flanders
McGraw -Hill -EAC
PCM STL parameter specifications meet the
most stringent requirements of today's broadcast industry both for monaural or stereo
systems. Other features include noise mitigation, ease of installation and maintenance,
and audio drop facility.
TV and FM rebroadcast translators after 20
years. 3:30 -3:55 p.m. Dr. B. W. St. Clair, president, Television Technology Corp., Arvada,
Colo. The first translators, were authorized by
the FCC 20 years ago; now their use has
grown to over 3,100 licensed stations owned
by both broadcaster and independent translator licensees in the U.S. Many are found in
other countries. A number of unique installations have been made in the last two or three
years. These include solar-powered installations, retransmission on adjacent channels,
use of vertically polarized transmitting anten-
David Sauer
Charles Rhodes
Tektronix
nas and translators fed by video tape and
satellite relay. This paper will discuss major
translator system design areas: (1) Receiving
problems and how to solve them by the proper
selection and location of receiving antennas;
(2) translator equipment characteristics such
as selectivity and spurious outputs; (3)
transmitting antenna considerations and (4)
multiple outputs.
RCA
FCC technical panel. 4 -5 p.m. Moderator:
Joseph P. Gill Jr., director of engineering, Cosmos Broadcasting, New Orleans. Panel members: Wallace E. Johnson, chief, Broadcast
Bureau; Phyll Horne, chief, Field Operations
Bureau; Charles A. Higginbotham, chief, Safety
and Special Radio Services Bureau; Neal K.
McNaughten, assistant chief, Broadcast
Bureau; Dennis Williams, chief, aural existing
facilities branch, Broadcast Bureau.
Broadcasting Mar
73
21
1077
RANKINGS
BASED ON
OCT. -NOV. 1976
ARBITRON RADIO
ESTIMATES,
METRO SHARE,
MON -SUN
6 AM -MID
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
201- 567-8800
A Division of Bonneville International Corporation
Charles Wright
Delta Electronics
Wally Nelskog
KIXI -AM -FM
TUESDAY, MARCH 29
AM stereo workshop. Diplomat room. 8 -9:15
a.m. Moderator: Christopher Payne, assistant to
the vice president for engineering, NAB. Participants: Mike Davis, Thomson -CSF Laboratories, Stamford, Conn.; Leonard Kahn, Kahn
Communications Inc., Freeport, N.Y.; Harold L.
Kassens, A. D. Ring & Associates, Washington;
Al Kelsch, Magnavox Corp., Ft. Wayne, Ind.;
Arno Meyer, Belar Electronics, Devon, Pa.;
Norm Parker. Motorola Inc., Schaumburg, Ill.
Radio session. Palladian room. 9:30 a.m.-12
noon. Presiding: Paul Willey, chief engineer,
WMNB -AM -FM North Adams, Mass. Coordinator:
William Wisniewski, director of engineering.
Mutual Broadcasting System, Washington.
New concepts in all -solid -state AM broadcast
transmitters. 9:30 -9:55 a.m. Leonard L. Ours ler
and David A. Sauer, Broadcast Systems Division, RCA, Meadow Lands. Pa. This paper
Mitch Derick
Grass Valley
Doyle Thompson
Landmark
describes the latest concepts in the design
and application of completely solid -state AM
broadcast transmitters with particular emphasis on the practical operation of such equipment. Advantages to the broadcaster of solid state designs versus tube -type transmitters
are discussed with emphasis on reliability,
economy and high performance. The common
questions regarding lighting protection, operator adjustments, efficiency and provisions for
unattended (automatic) transmitter operation
are covered in depth. A look at the state- of -theart design is given, along with concepts of
future designs.
Review of automatic transmission systems
rules. 10 -10:25 a.m. John Reiser, policy and
rules division. FCC. For the past several years
the NAB and other industry -related organizations have been diligently working toward the
development and certification of automatic
transmission systems (ATS) for the broadcast
service. Within the past few months the commission has amended its rules to permit the
James Parker
CBS -TV
use of automatic transmission systems for
nondirectional AM and all FM stations. This
paper will discuss the far -reaching ramifications of ATS and what the future holds for such
systems. It will also review in depth the commission's recent action in adopting thé new
rules and how the licensee can implement
such systems.
A new approach to modulation control.
10:30 -10:55 a.m. Charles S. Wright, vice president for engineering, Delta Electronics,
Springfield, Va. In recent years great emphasis
has been given to audio processing in an attempt to maintain a high modulation level in
AM broadcasting. The present equipment successfully maintains the level of the audio feeding the transmitter. It can seriously change the
characteristics of the program material and
cannot compensate for variations in the
transmitter
modulator.
The
equipment
described takes as a source of control the
measured modulation characteristics obtained
There is no future in any job.
The future lies in the man
who holds the job.
-Dr. George W.
CI
i
i
The future of your station lies in the people at the top. Since 1964,
Ron Curtis & Company has helped broadcast organizations find key
individuals for top management level positions. Isn't it time you felt
secure about your station's future? Call: 312 -693 -6171
Ron Curtis & Company
O'Hare Plaza, 5725 East River Road
Chicago, IL 60631
Executive Recruitment Specialists
in Radio, TV and the
Cable Industry
k
Carl Youngs, President
Bill Livek, Consultant
Broadcasting Mar
74
21
1977
Joseph Gill
Cosmos
KBIG
Charles Higginbotham Paul Willey
FCC
WMNB- AM -FM -TV
Leonard Spragg
from an RF output sample. Control is applied to
an attenuator in the audio input to maintain initially prescribed modulation levels. The circuit
operates digitally and contains many interesting features.
tages this technique has over any other previous automation approach thereby permitting
automation systems to be broken down into
building blocks allowing station automation in
steps.
Care and feeding of directional antennas.
11 -11:25 a.m. Robert Jones, consulting
TV frame synchronizer applications.
engineer, La Grange, Ill. With the ever-growing
complexity of directional antennas and the
constant need to maintain existing systems to
meet the FCC's technical criteria and the
terms of the instrument of authorization,
renewed attention is being directed toward this
all- important subject. This paper will discuss
the wide range of problems associated with
the maintenance and operation of directional
antenna systems and provide an insight as to
how such problems may be resolved. This
paper will also introduce steps which can be
taken to implement a maintenance program
that will alleviate future problems.
New techniques for generation of composite
stereo signals. 11:30 -12 noon. David L.
Hershberger, senior engineer; and Geoffrey N.
Mendenhall, MS -15 project engineer, Broadcast Products Division, Harris Corp, Quincy Ill.
New developments now permit optimal generation of the stereo signal without the limitations that formerly were ignored or tolerated by
the broadcaster. Audio lowpass filtering is
shown to be necessary for high dynamic
stereo separation and pilot protection. Over modulation due to filter overshoot is explained.
The performance deficiencies inherent in both
the balanced modulator and switching types of
stereo generators are explained: specifically,
poor high- frequency separation, harmonic
content, modulation nonlinearity and SCA
crosstalk. The dynamic transient response
(DTR) lowpass filter and the digitally synthesized modulator (DSM) stereo generator are
discussed as new techniques which alleviate
the aforementioned problems.
Television session. Diplomat room. 9:45
a.m.-12 noon. Presiding: Joseph P Gill Jr., director of engineering, wosu -Tv New Orleans. Coordinator: James D. Parker, staff consultant,
telecommunications, CBS -TV, New York.
Microcomputers in television broadcast automation. 9:45 -10 a.m. Mitch Derick, The Grass
Valley Group Inc., Grass Valley, Calif. The advent of the microprocessor has made possible
a revolution in television station automation.
The low cost of microprocessors allows them
to be configured into a "distributed processor
network:' For example, one processor will control switcher and machine interfacing; another,
event handling; anóther, bulk event storage,
and yet another, traffic systems interface. This
paper will discuss the many design advan-
Storer
10:15 -10:40 a.m. R. S. Hopkins Jr., Corn munications Systems Division, RCA, Camden,
N.J. A relative newcomer to the broadcast
equipment product line is the frame synchronizer. Aside from the primary function of
synchronizing an input video signal to a
reference timing signal, there are many other
applications of such a device. A few of these
applications have already been exploited with
available equipment -picture freeze, picture
compression and time -base correction. In this
paper the frame synchronizer is treated as a
basic building block for special effects generation. Options that are presently available will
be discussed and some future possibilities will
be commented on.
A monitor alignment color bar test signal
10:45 -11:10 a.m. A. A. Goldberg, CBS Technology Center, Stamford;-Conn. Color monitor
adjustments of chroma gain and phase are
usually done by observing standard color bars
with the red and green guns of the kinescope
extinguished. Ordinary visual adjustment may
result in appreciable errors and accurate adjustment requires that a photometer be used.
This paper will discuss a new test signal incorporating special monitor alignment color bars
permitting visual adjustments to be done accurately so that a photometer is not required.
Chroma gain and phase adjustments can be
done by eye just by making the four blue alignment bars and four blue main bars the same
intensity.
A
Los Angeles
Robert Butler
NBC
KEZL
San Diego
WATA
Ft. Lauderdale
WQAL
Cleveland
RANKINGS
digital noise reducer for encoded NTSC sig-
nals. 11:15 -11:40 a.m. Renville
McMann Jr.,
president, Thomson -CSF Laboratories, Stamford, Conn. The recent advent of practical
digital TV techniques makes it possible to process a TV signal on an element -by- element
basis with mathematical precision. It is,
therefore, now possible to exploit the redundant nature of the TV signal in both the frequency and time domains in order to improve
picture quality. The noise reducer described in
this paper uses a digital frame store operating
as an adaptive recursive filter under the control
of an element -by- element motion detector
employing comb filtering and signal modification. An outstanding characteristic of the
atogorithm employed is that it is equally effective at low frequencies so that the streaky
characteristic of chroma noise often present in
three -quarter -inch tape recorders is effectively
removed.
H.
Broadcaatin9 Mar 21 1977
75
BASED ON
OCT. -NOV. 1976
ARBITRON RADIO
ESTIMATES,
METRO SHARE,
MON -SUN
6AM -MIO
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
201- 567--8800
A Division of Bonneville International Corporatior
A new standard (in preparation) governing the
performance of television broadcast demodula-
tors. 11:40 a.m.-12 noon. T. M. Gluyas, chairman, Electronics Industries Association's
Broadcast Transmission Systems Task Force,
and staff engineer, Broadcast Systems, RCA,
Camden, N.J. Perhaps nowhere in the television system are more subtle considèrations involved than in the transmitter- receiver interface, and these affect the design and standardization of television broadcast demodulators. A task force of the EIA Broadcast Television Systems (BTS) Committee has been
working on demodulator performance standards for the past two years. The results to date
are described. The paper includes discussions
of some of the more interesting electrical performance standards, how these evolved in the
committee work, how conflicting technical requirements were resolved and some practical
considerations for the use of each of the
several modes of a television demodulator.
Engineering conference luncheon. Regency Ballroom. 12:30 -2:30 p.m. Presiding: Doyle
D. Thompson, director of engineering, Broadcast Division, Landmark Communications, and
chairman, 1977 Broadcast Engineering Conference. Invocation: The Rt. Rev. John T. Walker,
bishop, Diocese of Washington. Presentation
of 1977 NAB Engineering Achievement Award:
George W. Bartlett, vice president for engineering, NAB. Acceptance of award: Daniel H.
Smith, former senior vice president
for
engineering, Capital Cities Communications.
Speaker: Dr. Carl Sagan, director, Laboratory
for Planetary Studies and David Duncan
Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences,
Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. "Science and the
Media:'
No sessions are scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, so that conferees
haue the opportunity to visit the exhibits and hospitality suites.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30
Beyond electronic newsgathering (ENG)
workshop. Diplomat room. 8 -9 a.m. Session
chairman: Paul F. Whittlig. Moderator: K. Blair
Benson, Telectronics International Inc., New
York. Participants: Joseph A. Flaherty, CBS -TV,
New York; Frank L. Flemming, NBC -TV, New
York; Richard Monroe, Westinghouse Broadcasting, New York; Isaac Hersley, ABC -TV,
New York; Merle Thomas, Public Broadcasting
Service, Washington.
Television session. Palladian room. 9 -10:25
a.m. Presiding: James D. Parker, staff consultant, telecommunications, CBS -TV, New York.
Coordinator: William B. Honeycutt, director of
engineering, KDFW -TV Dallas.
Portable computer-generator TV titling system.
9 -9:25 a.m. John T. Toth, ABC,
New York. Fix-
Wired for action.
In another new use
of business automation, Broadcast Industry Automated Systems Co. (BIAS)
will help broadcasters locate friends
and business associates at this year's
convention of the National Association
of Broadcasters. Cathode ray tube computer terminals will be placed at various
hotels to provide information on
registrants as information is fed into the
terminal.
ed- installation computer services for control of
titling generators (Vidifonts, Chyrons) and
frame store devices (such as Arvins) in the
broadcasting plant are outlined with examples
of services applicable to political conventions,
elections and sports coverage. The off -premises use of these services in conjunction with
various input /output devices is discussed
along with a review of ABC's experience with a
microcomputer system controlling various
character generators via regular dial -up
telephone circuits using standard Bell System
equipment.
The utilization and application of character
generators- panel. 9:25 -10:25 a.m. Moderator:
For mono, stereo...AM, FM, TV...
ONLY FIDELIPAC® GIVES YOU A CHOICE
&*s1R
MODEL 300
The most popular NAB
r21.-,641011
cartridge... performancO
and price make it.thPNPA
mono brq
a0Yrr's
first ilrcAré.
of a
`ra
ern stereo
caster satisfied
ith nothing less than
the ultimate in
performance.
The hardware
to be seen
at NAB exhibits
MODEL 350
For use in stereo
machines with
inadequate tape
guidance. The
precision is provided by
adjusting the cartridge.
AND, for extended play...Fidelipac's Models 600 and 1200.
For details, contact your Fidelipac Distributor or
FIDELIPAC
109 Gaither Drive
Mt. Laurel, N108057
Robert J. Butler, director, Technical Division
NBC -TV, New York. Participants: Frank
D'Ascenzo, project manager, Video Products, 3
M Co., St. Paul; Thomas Hindle, Southeast
sales manager, Thomson -CSF Laboratories,
Stamford, Conn.; Eugene Leonard, president,
Systems Resources Corp., Plainview, N.Y.;
Thomas Meyer, product specialist, Telemation,
Salt Lake City.
(609) 2353511
C Trademar
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
76
Week- before signs point to
emphasis on TV miniaturization,
automatic gear for radio,
demonstratins of AM stereo
Broadcast equipment manufacturers
would rather talk about their new products
at the convention of the National Association of Broadcasters (when the clients are
on hand) than before it (when the corn petition might be listening). Nevertheless,
there are advance indications of what this
year's equipment market will be like.
Attention again this year seems to be
concentrated on miniature cameras.
Bosch /Fernseh will display its new
handheld lightweight studio camera for
remote telecasting. Ikegami has a studio
camera with minicomputer and triax for
remote telecasting and taping. A self -contained lightweight ENG camera with three
Plumbicon tubes will be shown by JVC.
Philips will show a multiconductor studio
and field camera and various ENG
cameras with new features. RCA has a
camera ready for either studio or field use.
Two new ENG cameras will be shown by
Sony. They are portable, battery- operated
and will incorporate new technology.
Thomson CSF will demonstrate its
Microcam at low -light levels, showing test
results from as low as two foot candles of
light.
In the world of video tape, Fernseh will
exhibit its new portable VTR editing
system and its still framer for its one -inch
BCN 50. RCA will demonstrate its editing
system built into its TR -600 VTR. Sony
will have a battery- operated portable one inch VTR.
One of the highlights of the exhibits will
be demonstration of AM stereo. The NAB
will have its own AM stereo exhibit during
have hospitality suites are listed on page 68
with some hotel suites to be assigned (TBA).
Aerodyne Industries
21
Commerce
18936.
101 PedSS
202 SP
Drive, Montgomeryville,
1011Ft\b
Pa.
Product:
Six kw visual 600 -watt aural VHF externally diplexed transmitter', 100 -watt UHF
translator, 10 -watt VHF translator, 10 -watt UHF
translator, 10 -watt VHF transmitter, 100 -watt
VHF transmitter. Personnel: John Parke,
Marshall Smith, Nat Ostroff, Charles Judson,
KMBOf
Phoenix
Ray Kiesel, Barry Landis, Ruth Hunsberger, Dan
Traynor, Mark Darde, Joe Fuchs.
Alford Manufacturing
212 SP
120 Cross Street Winchester, Mass. 01890.
Product: FM broadcast antennas; TV broadcast antennas; master FM broadcast antennas;
multistation transmitter combiners;
transmission line components; RF measuring
instruments. Personnel: Dr. Andrew Alford, Fred
Abel.
WEZO
Roch ester
308 SP
Amco Engineering
the engineering conference, and Cetec 7333 West Ainslie Street Chicago 60656.
Broadcast Group will air tapes from Product: Broadcast communication cabinets
WKDC(AM) Elmhurst, Ill., that were made
and consoles;
program control desks;
during FCC -approved experimental broad- aluminum casting and extrusion line for procasts using Motorola's exciter system.
gram display applications. Personnel: Floyd
Many companies will display prototypes Johnson, Bob Komarek, Larry White, Bill
of automated transmitting systems and cir- Wotell, Bill Hardtke.
cularly- polarized transmitters.
Two other items of interest are Ampex's American Data Division
101 SP
electronic still -storer, which is computer 401 Wynn Drive N.W., Huntsville, Ala. 35805.
operated and holds up to 1,500 pictures. Product: Fourth generation production
Thomson has a new digital noise reducer system?, master control switcher, distribution
for three- quarter -inch tape that helps to switching systems. Personnel: W.G. Moore,
eliminate noise from tape in use gener- Harold Bjorklund, W.C. Wiseman, Bob Munzner,
ation after gneration.
Jerry Nordsiek, Dwight Wilcox, Bill Powers, Ed
WMEF
Ft
Wayne
Miller, Joe Rosswog, Mel Wode.
Equipment exhibitors
The following companies will have exhibit
booths at the National Association of Broadcasters' Convention at either the Sheraton
Park (SP), Shoreham Americana (SH) and
Washington Hilton (WH). New products are in
dicated by an asterisk ('). Companies that wil
For
Excellence in
Sight and Sound
Visit
AMPEX
Lincoln & Monroe Rooms
Washington Hilton Hotel
American Electronic Laboratories 216 SP
P.O. Box 552, Lansdale, Pa. 19446.
Product: FM transmitters, AM transmitters, exciters, stereo generators. Personnel: R.M.
Newhook, E. Sudol, A. Rosset, T.J. Keifer, B. Bernard, N. Goldich, Dr. L. Riebhan, D.J. Fowler, L.
Proctor.
Ampex
Monroe, Lincoln rooms WH
401 Broadway, Redwood City, Calif 94063.
Product: Video -tape recorders, audio recorders, cameras, associated equipment. Personnel: Richard Elkus, Arthur Hausman, C.P.
Ginsburg, Victor Ragosine, Charles Steinberg,
Vincent Titolo, Michael Ayers, George Boardman, Al Fisher, Bob Schwartz, Donald Kleffman,
Richard Sirinsky, Paul Hansil, Arnold Taylor,
Mark Sanders, Bob Bohunicky, Bill Carpenter,
Charles Crum, Howard Lilley, Charles Anderson, Carlos Kennedy, Len Hase, Frank Nault,
Tom Nielson, Jim Sims, Al Slater, Ron Alsin, Phil
Campbell, Don Carlsen, Dick Coomes, Grant
Easton, Bill Ebell, Russ Ide, Tom Johnston,
Roger Miller, Keith Price, Frank Rush, Tony
Seaton, Dick Smith, Jim Stephenson, Mary
Wachtel, Bart Williams, Russ Williams, Chuck
Wright, John Porter, Ken Herring, Richard Antonio, George Armes, Paul Weber, Bill Park,
Jack Becker, Charles Donahue, Arnold
Schlinke, Max McCollough, Ed Stevenson,
Russ Brown, Carlson Farha, William Hamaker,
Pat Heenan, Holt Johnson, Fred Koehler, Stan
Paris, Rod Stepan, Robert Thacker, Jim Travis,
Broadcasting Mar
77
21
1977
can help
you be tops in your
market.
Call us or write
We
today.
RANKINGS
BASED ON
OCT. -NOV. 1976
KRBITRON RADIO
ESTIMATES,
METRO SHARE,
MON -SUN
6 AM-MID
BONNEVILLE
BROADCAST
©NSULTANTS
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
201 - 567-8800
A Division
of Bonneville International Corporation
C.V.
Anderson, Geoff Woffindin, Jerry Gunnar -
Dumartin, John Wallace, Dick Putnam, Bern
Levy, Claus Zedler, Walt David, Jeff Giordano,
Tang Sum, Pierre Chambon.
son, Weldon Squyres, Ron Ballintine, Brian
Barker, Dave Lambert, Martin Salter, Robert Van
Der Leeden, Erek Jenstad, Jean Louis Major,
Anixter -Mark
589 SH
4711 Golf Road, Skokie, Ill. 60076.
Product: Antennas, microwave, communica-
Wally Bebenek, Jean -Claude Dubuc, Martin
Greenwood, George Kohanyi, John Moreside,
Peter Sara, Claude Vallee, Tom Merson, Ed
Boelart, Mike Hernandez, M. Kazrnierczak, Rey
Lasso, A. Martinez, Juan Nicolau, C. Pessoa,
Don Power, M. Simoes, Joe Williamson, Ray
Smart, Richard Blackett, Ken Inagaki, G. Kanno,
Kris Tamaki, Greg Nixon, Ray Holland.
Ampro
300A SP
850 Pennsylvania Boulevard, Feasterville, Pa.
19047.
tions;
Erhardt, E. Lamarre, J.
nenberg, R. Geraci.
Andrew Corp.
523 SH
10500 West 153d Street Orland Park, Ill.
60462.
Product: HELIAX coaxial cables, rigid line
a
Calif. 94043.
Discassette recorder /reproducer,
special controllers of recorder/reproducer. Personnel: James Baker, Fred Meyer, J. Robert
Burns, Robert Walker, Vince Kasprzak, C.R.
Williams, Lee Stratton, William Nichols, Tony
Grosboll, Mary Alley, Robert Christiansen.
Product:
300TH 536
ENG color cameras, 15x12.5 total zoom lens
components, STL microwave antenna systems,
earth station antennas. Personnel: W. Moore, J.
Pryjma, E. Andrew, J.L Gonzalez, T. Hewlett.
system for portable color cameras, 42x wide
angle continuous zoom lens for large broadcast color cameras, 42x field (telephoto) continuous zoom lens for large broadcast color
cameras, 15x versatile zoom lens with range
extender turret for large broadcast color
402 WH
.1500 Ocean Avenue, Bohemia, N.Y. 11716.
Product: 15x9.5 total zoom lens system for
cameras, 10 x 14.5 E31 extreme wide angle
studio zoom lens for 1 1/4" tube large broadcast color cameras. Personnel: Bernard
Angenieux, Andre Masson, Jean Moret, Serge
Angenieux Corp. of America
350 -2700 mhz, solid
mhz. Personnel: M.
Matz, G, Kowols, J. An-
536 SH
Arvin /Echo Science
485 East Middlefield Road, Mountain View,
Product:
Cartridge tape recorders and
reproducers, audio mixing consoles up to 12
channels, rotary and linear fader consoles,
custom
furniture,
studio
systems and
Momomax matrix phase corrector for cartridge
tape.' Personnel: Alex Meyer, Edward Mullin,
Sam Wentzel, Fred Rosenberg, Bud Yankowski,
William Hicks.
grid parabolic
parabolic 350 -13,250
424 WH
ASACA Corp. of America
1289 Rand Road, Des Plaines, Ill. 60016.
Product: Portable TV camera for ENG, portable
video one -inch recorder, noise meter, envelope
delay measuring instrument, analog to digital
converter, 20 -inch color monitor. Personnel: C.
Miller, T. Shigezaki, S. Takeda, K. Kashitani, K.
Ezoe, J. Miller, K. Kimura.
585 8H
Normal, Ill. 61761.
Product: Modu -cart tape cartridge recorders
Audi -Cord
P.O. Box 611,
and reproducers, 4- transport reproducer and
formatting accessory.' Personnel: Carl Martin,
Richard Anderson.
Audio Designs and Manufacturing
430 WH
16005 Sturgeon, Roseville, Mich. 48066.
Product: Audio Consoles and related components. Personnel: Robert Bloom, Sheridan
Shook, Murray Shields, George De Santis, Larry Mandziuk, Larry Boocker and Jim Pashkot.
Audio Sellers /Money Machine 607A SH
P.O. Box 23355, Nashville, Tenn. 37202.
Product: Money Machine sales /production library, Music Explo music production library',
station ID's, sales promotion, radio cassette
sales training program. Personnel: Jerry
Williams, Jack Jackson, Pat Patrick, C.H. Quick.
A NEW SERVICE
OF
iWILLIAM
®
Auditronics
435WH
207 Summit Street Memphis 38104.
Product: Broadcast consoles, audio; television
B.
4TanneR
COMPANY, INC.
production consoles, audio. Personnel:
Welton Jetton, Bill Brock, Phil Germano, Steve
Sage, Clive Sloss, Ruebel Birchman.
& radio
FIND OUT ABOUT THIS NEW SERVICE WHEN YOU VISIT
SUITE K -500 IN THE SHERATON PARK HOTEL, AND
CHECK THE PRIZE NUMBER BOARD. YOU MAY ALREADY
HAVE WON! IF YOU HAVEN'T RECEIVED YOUR NUMBER
IN THE MAIL MAKE SURE YOU REGISTER IN THE SUITE
FOR YOUR NUMBER. THERE WILL ALSO BE A SPECIAL
PRIZE DRAWING FOR SUITE REGISTRATION.
AS A SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION SEE THE NEW
TANNER MUSICAL SPECTRUM...MUSIC FOR AUTOMATED RADIO STATIONS...ALL FORMATS.
WM. B. TANNER CO., INC.
2714 UNION EXT.
MEMPHIS, TENN. 38112
Automated Processes
517 SH
789 Park Avenue, Huntington, N.Y. 11743.
Product: Audio consoles: convention, D.C. controlled and automated'; audio amplifiers'; intercom systems and audio switchers'; audio
processing amplifiers'; tape machine synchronizers, equalizers; compressor /limiters;
voltage controlled attenuators. Personnel: H.
Charles Riker, Nicholas Balsamo, Michael Consi.
M -390 SP
P.O. Box 1343, Lafayette, Ind. 47902.
Automation Electronics Suite
Product: Autotron broadcast control computer
Broadcasting Mar
78
21
1977
Buy a Compositor I.
Get ahead of the competition.
(These broadcasters did)
/I
"We used the Compositor for the first time on election night. We
were very pleased with the clarity and color. I'm sure we had the
best election show in town that night." -Donald Loose, Manager
WTMJ News Operations
WTMJ TV
000
"The Compositor has excellent fonts -- they're clean, they are sharplook ing, and they are distinctive... we have as much memory storage
as we're ever going to need. You can change directly from any page
to any other page without any problem whatsoever -- you don't have
to stick with the original sequence. The Compositor gives you super
flexibility." -Don LaCombe, KING Production Manager
KING 1V5
"We used our new Compositor system during the election and were very happy with it. It seemed to me
that the character edging made our display easier to
read than the competition's. We moved ahead of the
other stations soon after the election results started
coming in." -Terry Harrison, KTVK -TV Engineer
SAN FRANCISCO
KRON
"The Compositor's on -air display is a marvel...
head and shoulders superior to the competition.
We've virtually discontinued using hotpress for
supers." -Galen Daily, KRON Program Manager
Graphics System offers a superior on -air look.
With graphic-quality fonts and instant access to any page in memory at any time, the software based Compositor
provides the fast on -air operation demanded by production personnel, the
artistic quality demanded by advertisers, and the competitive edge that broadcast management
is looking for.
To find out more about the Compositor I, visit our booth at the NAB Show
(Washington Hilton -No. 421) or call Don Rhodes at (801) 972 -8000.
These broadcasters agree: the new Compositor
I
I
radditional information on
the Compositor I Graphics System.
Please send
Name
Title
Organization
Address
State
Zip
City
Phone
TeleMation
L
P.O. Box 15068, Salt Lake CitV, Utah 84115
Ann: Advertising Dept.
systems for traffic, analysis, billing, bookkeeping, automation control and ATS logging. Personnel: Larry Zaiser, Edwards Reed, Thomas
Broadcast
Financing?
Ransom, Richard Edyvean.
BJA Systems
572 SH
666 Davisville Road, Willow Grove, Pa. 19090.
Bayly Engineering
167 Hunt Street, Ajax, Ont
613 8H
810A SH
Beaveronics
8 Haven Avenue, Port Washington, N.Y. 11050.
Product: Video switching systems, both standard stock and custom models; production,
master control, and routing; with or without
AFV; selected terminal equipment; Favag
master clock systems with compatable secondary clocks. Personnel: John Busharis, Bob
invites you to audition
our SIX formats of
FREE Religious Programs
produced by
OCOT RADIO DIVISION
POST OFFICE BOX 296
WOODLAND HILLS, CALIFORNIA
91
365
Striker.
317 SP
Belar Electronics Laboratory
Lancaster Avenue at Dorset Devon, Pa. 19333.
Product: FM stereo monitoring equipment
featuring value modulation meter with peak
catching circuit displaying complex modulation'. Personnel: Arno Meyer, Joseph Novik,
Manuel Krangel, John Quinn, Dr. Edward Chien,
Joseph Rocci.
Berkey Colortran
507 SH
1015 Chestnut Street, Burbank, Calif. 91502.
Product: High efficiency HMI lighting equipment*, Tungsten -Halogen lighting equipment
for TV studio /field use, Fresnel family dimmer
Helier-Oak knows
the Industry's needs.
Loans
Leases
mer, Jack Leonard, Robert Benson, Mel Rim mer, Jeff Sessler, Jay Bauer, Les Zellan, Tom
Fay, Moe Tawil, Thomas Pincu, Joe Byron, Ken
Acquisitions
Refinancing
Discounting Seller Notes
Vannice.
Heller -Oak
has built its reputation
in communications financing on
these clear-cut principles:
No equity participation
No commitment or
investigation fee
Each transaction is an
"Original" structured to
your specific needs
we would like to see your deal.
If there is a way to put it together,
we would like to work with you
to produce the best financing
possible.
Call or Write:
David M. Robbin or Loren N. Young
DE,
311 SP
Bird Electronic
30303 Aurora Road, Cleveland (Solon), Ohio
44139.
Product: RF directional thruline watt meters,
absorption watt meters, 2 w to 50 kw air cooled, water -cooled and self- contained -heat
'exchanger loads, line terminations, RF power
and VSWR monitors, coaxial filters, couplers,
filter -couplers, high -speed Wattcher monitor
control for remote or on -site supervision of
transmitters'. Personnel: W. L. Yochum, R.
Chakerian, R. Neitzelt, R. Trefney, H.H. Heller,
R.J. Tanczos, L. Wetzel.
RF
KJ
Communications Finance Corp.
105 W. Adams Street
Chicago, Illinois 60690
Telephone: 312 /346 -2300
joint venture of
Walter E. Heller International Corporation
and Oak Industries Inc.
A
504 9H
Beston Electronics
903 South Kansas Avenue, Olathe, Kan. 66061.
Product: Automatic light control for large image film chains, character generator'. Personnel: B.J. Lipari, D.R. MacClymont, R.D. Herring,
D.L. Anderson, D.W. Cartner Jr.
From $200,000 to $20,000,000
I
pack systems, FAR CYC light for unsurpassed
illumination of Cycloramas', Berkey Beam
ellipsoidal reflector framing shutter design,
ellipsoids with field angles of 40 degrees to 5
degrees'. Personnel: Peter Coe, Marion Rim -
413 WH
Robert Bosch /Fernseh
279 Midland Avenue, Saddle Brook, N.J.
07662.
Product: Automatic hands -off studio camera',
handheld camera, portable camera, TCX two thirds inch camera', one -inch tape recorder,
one -inch portable tape recorder, color picture
monitors. Personnel: Stephan Block, Fred Bun desmann, Richard Caine, Herbert Foerster,
Broadcasting Mar21 1977
80
Walter Gayer, Hans Goeller, Hans Grool, Dr.
Hausdoerfer, Fred Hohage, Klaus Horstman,
Peter Loughran, William Love, Karl Kinast, Herman Klein, John Lynch, Dr. Oechsner, Dr. Pohl,
Guenther Salm, Klaus Schilling, Klaus
Schmelz, John Webb, Leonard Wolff, Henry
Zahn, Horst Zappen, Herman Zickbauer, Dietmar Ziegel Harmuth Pernotsky, Herbert
Lechner, William Pizzoli, Jim Schroeder.
.
108 SP
Boston Insulated Wire 8 Cible
65 Bay Street Boston 02125.
Product: TV cable and connectors for color
broadcast cameras. Personnel: Leo Gildea,
John Hathaway, Al Garshick; Steve Adams, Ed
McCusker, Richard Dufresne, Sam Mathews.
Broadcast Electronics
206 SP
8810 Brookville Road, Silver Spring, Md.
20910.
Product: Tape cartridge machines, audio control consoles, AGC amplifiers, limiting
amplifiers, turntables, package studio systems,
multi-deck tape cartridge systems'. Personnel:
L. Cervon, T. Humphrey, J. Burtle, M. Black, R.
Bousman, D. Durst, M. Sirkis, L. Blum, T.
Kitaguchi, D. Bain.
201 SP
CCA Electronics
716 Jersey Avenue, Gloucester City, N.J. 08030.
Product: AM transmitters: 2.5 kw, 10 kw, 50 kw,
10 w educational'; FM transmitters: 4 kw, 12
kw, 25 kw, 55 kw'; and 55 kw UHF TV transmitter; modular consoles', turntables, 10- channel
stereo console, six- channel mono console,
peramplifiers, FM optimod /FM limiter', FM circular polarized antenna', UHF TV antenna,
FMC circularly polarized antenna. Personnel:
Jason Fox, Arthur Silver, Robert Sidwell, Juan
Chiabrando, Bruce Buck, Ed Elinewski, George
Blackmon, Edward Schober, Don Powers, Leroy
Wallace, Carl Hammett, Bill Costroff, Gordon
DuVall, Richard Maitland, Mike G Moseman,
Carlos Caballero, Robert Dunkin, Hugh Anderson, Van Pezirtozoglou, Mary Brumbach, Barbara DeMarino.
CSI Electronics
309 SP
2607 River Road, Cinnaminson, N.J. 08077.
518 SH
Cablewave Systems
60 Dodge Avenue, North Haven, Conn. 06473.
Product: Copper corrugated, wellflex coaxial
antenna feed lines and associated accessories: pressurization equipment, microwave
parabolic antennas, elliptical waveguide and
associated accessories. Personnel: William
(Bill) Meola, Doug Proctor, Ken Robinson.
Copeland, Bud Thomas, Dwight Herbert. Bob J.
Ward, George Pupala, Dick Lamoreaux, Dale
807 SH
Signal
13717 South Normandie Avenue, Gardena,
Christie Electric
Tucker. Jay Cooke, Paul Gregg, Dave Evans.
(made of Lexan) with zoom lens control;
camera accessories. Personnel: Ed DiGiulio,
Peter Waldeck, Gary Gross, Bill Russell. Ed
Clare.
California Switch
&
Calif. 90249.
Product: Jack panels, switches, color
microphone cables. Personnel: Irwin Perlman.
505 SH
Camera Mart
456 West 55th Stree4 New York 10019.
Personnel: Shelly Brown, Ken Seelig, Harold
Rainey, Leo Rosenberg, Herb Browning, Jeff
Wohl, Samuel Hyman, Paul Meistrich.
433 WH
3410 West 67th Stree4 Los Angeles 90043.
Product: Charging system, minute chargers.
seal cylindrical nickel- cadmium battery packs
for ENG. Personnel: Tim Roberti, Fred Ben-
Collins Division, Rockwell Internatibnal
217 SP
P.O. Box 10463, Dallas 75207.
Product: 5 kw AM transmitter*, 25 kw FM
jamin.
transmitter, audio console *, two FM antennas',
other AM and FM transmitters, consoles, audio
equipment. Personnel: H.L. Kirby, D.A. Senter,
J.M. Bixby, L.E. Winter, F.M. Cummings, J.S.
Sellmeyer, K.R. Fox, D.H. Chenoweth, J.E. Bicocchi, C.A. Fosmark, J.H. Ring, K.A. Leach, T.T.
Cauthers, R.C. Evans, R.G. Beattie, D.W. Hill, J.L.
Littlejohn, J.C. Shideler, W.R. Sheffield, M.
Courtright.
303 SP
Chyron Telesystems
223 Newtown Road, Plainview, N.Y. 11803.
Product: Chyron 11 and Chyron 111 B. Personnel: Joseph L. Scheuer, David H. Buckler, John
Starosky, Eugene Leonard, Tim Nicholas,
Larry Pink, Leon Weissman.
D.
Canon
301 SP
10 Nevada Drive, Lake Success, N.Y. 11040.
Product: TV zoom lenses. Personnel: Y Suguri,
M.
K.
Momosawa, M. Miyazaki, T. Sakurai, J. Keyes.
Morishima, H. Hirai.
Capitol Magnetic Products
313 SP
1750 North Vine Stree4 Los Angeles 90028.
Product: A -2 audiopak broadcast cartridge;
433 WH
Cine 80
630 Ninth Avenue, New York 10036.
Product: Accessories for electronic and film
news gathering systems including battery
belts, battery sun -gun lights, camera snaploks,
camera shoulder pods. Personnel: Don F.
Civitillo, Robert Kabo, Paul Wildum.
204 SP
Ceco Communications
2115 Avenue X, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11235.
Product: Electron tubes including transmitting,
klystron, camera. Personnel: David Gilden,
Lewis Levenson, Joel Levine.
Central Dynamics
147 Hymus Boulevard, Montreal.
P.O. Box 928, Boulder, Colo.
80302.
Product:
Slow-scan TV, video color synSouthworth,
thesizers.
Personnel:
Glen
Clarence Elliott, Richard Taylor.
814 SH
Comark Industries
Q-19 backcoated studio mastering tape; Q -15
low-noise and 2 mil -low noise /low print recording tape. Personnel: Ed Khoury, Larry
Hockemeyer, Harry Preston, Bill Clarke, Tony
Sonchirico, Ed Grant, Dick Dunlavy, Gene
Silvestri, Joe Kempler. Jack Sullivan.
437 WH
Colorado Video
Cinema Products Corp.
503 SH
2037 Granville Avenue, Los Angeles 90025.
Product: STEADICAM (Universal model)
camera stabilizing system with video camera;
film
reflex
16
mm news /documentary
models;
non -reflex
cameras;
camera
Cinevid -16 video- assist camera system;
Crystalink wireless systems, CP/Pro -Kit, AeroKit and Cat -Kit quartz location lighting kits;
Sturdy -Lite focusing spot and newslite; fluid
head tripods; 16 mm 400 -foot magazine*
P.O. Box 196, Westfield, Mass.
01085.
Product: Broadcast demodulator, three and
one -eighth inch coaxial switch DPDT, remote
control diplexers*. Personnel: Richard Fiore,
Richard Fiore Jr., Paul Bahlin, William Yorns,
Mark Aìtkin.
Commercial Electronics Inc.
222 SP
880 Maude Avenue, Mountain View, Calif
94043.
Product: Color
TV cameras that convert from
104 SP
Product: Video production switcher, compact
production switchers, audio mixer /switcher.
technical automation system interfaced to
BIAS business system, video -tape editor
systems, downstream keyer, RGB and encoded
chroma keyers, digital sync decoder, distribution amplifiers for pulse, video, equalized video
and broadband digital /analog applications.
Personnel: Earle Wallick, Howard Shephard,
Robert Faulkner. Dick Deberadinis, Dave Spindle, Paul Welcome, Graham Pugh, Buddy
Naeyaert, Ken Davies, Brian Tee, Peter Symes,
Steve Lyman, Robert Mee, Tim McNeil.
Cetec Broadcast Group 417 WH, 227 SP
75 Castilian Drive, Goleta, Calif. 93017.
Product: Jampro equipment, FM antennas,
radomes, Schafer equipment, three -day memory automation system, Audio(ile II multi -cart
playback system', Sparta equipment, 1 kw AM
FM
solid -state
transmitter',
solid -state
transmitter, FM transmitter, audio studio,
remote equipment, Century II tape cart "C"
size *, three -stack record /playback equipment,
circularly polarized TV antenna (at 417 WH
only), Vega equipment, wireless microphone
systems, Cetec audio equipment, audio consoles, AM stereo demonstration tapes from
wKOC(AM) Elmhurst, Ill., in Franklin Room at
Sheraton -Park. Personnel: Peter Onnigian, Jim
Olver, Allan Wegner, Earl Bullock, Hugh Wilcox,
Bob Slutske, Don King, Ken McKenzie, Hugh
Moore, Bob Nelson, Bob M. Ward, Andy McClure, Ron Dagenasi, Jim Chabin, Dave
McDonald, Mike Shafer, Dick Maynard, Tom
BOMIEVILLE
BROADCAST
©NSULTANTS
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
201 -567 -8800
various studio to various portable configura
fions with accessory equipment', color TV
studio camera with seven -inch tiltable viewfinder, 17 -inch color monitors *. Personnel: Bill
Butler, Don Smith, Bob Huseman,
Schneider, Raoul Proctor, Al Jensen,
Kendrick, Andrew Mellows, Don Kline.
Bud
Paul
559 SH
Communications Technology
3070 Leeman Ferry Road, S.W., Huntsville,
Ala. 35801.
Product: Routing switchers', assembly
switchers', production switchers, audio routing
switches Personnel: R. Swan, E. Zimmerman, R.
Wunderlich, D. Perkins, J. Hodo, L. Lawson,
IT I
422 WH
Data Communications
3000 Directors Row, Executive Plaza, Memphis
Electronics, Inc.
Product: Line Conditioning Modules.
Amplifiers, Repeaters, Term
Sets,
Equalizers, Line Transformers and accessories. Webster TLC products with
ITI update and additions. Systems for
audio distribution and conferencing.
Custom wiring service. 100 products in
stock.
Call: (201) 548 -3900 for catalog and
info. or write to: P.O. Box #280, Clifton,
N.J. 07015.
Professional electronic products since
1947.
Computer Image
415A WH
2475 West Second Avenue, Denver 80223.
Product: Video controllers for production, post
224 SP
Consolidated Video Systems
1255 East Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, Calif
production, editing, master control, routing requirements; video animation production via
Scanimate and Caesar systems; live action
video and post production services. Personnel:
Lee Harrison, Dennis Reinhard- Ed Tajchman,
Don Maly, Pete Freyschlag, Hal Abbott, Hal
Wintheiser, Bill Altemus.
Product: Digital time -base correctors, digital
Computer Magnetics
535 SH
125 West Providencia Avenue, Burbank, Calif
91502.
Proudct: Refurbishing quad video heads, refurbishing audio heads, video disks and heads for
slo -mo; auto equalizer, and velocity error corrector. Personnel: Ignatius Tsu, Willard Bell, Tim
Palmer, Ted Emm, Tony Mlinaric, Bob Sexton,
John Luiz, Dave Zimmerman, Victor Fortinski,
Tom Pressley, John Ross.
570 SH
Comrex
P.O. Box
269, Sudbury Mass. 01776.
Product: Wireless microphone systems, cue
systems, TV aural monitors, remote pickup
transmitters and receivers, speech processing
equipment. Personnel: John Cheney, Lynn
Distler, Tim Brown, Erik Thoresen.
Conrac
404 WH
600 North Rimsdale Avenue, Couina, Calif.
91722.
Product:
TV monitors.
Personnel:
W.A. Ems, L.
Eppele, W.A. Fink, R.T. Carson,C.D.
Beintema, F.F. Heyer, D.A. Richmond, R.H. Miller,
B. Turner, J. McClimont, J. Keenan, B. Mitchell,
M. Ryan, K.R.
M Warnick.
94086.
video synchronizer, digital video time -base
corrector, digital video signal corrector', standards converter. Personnel: Nyle McMullin, Jim
Summers, Joe Rodgers, Wayne Lee, Walter
Werdmuller, Ron Frillman, Kong -Win Ho, Jerry
Knight, Jerry Fox, Joe Hanf, Ron Harrison, Bill
Miller, Mike Blang, DeWitt Smith, Duane Tuttle.
Continental Electronics
P.O. Box 270879, Dallas 75227.
220 SP
Product: 5'kw, 10 kw and 50 kw AM transmitters, phasing and coupling equipment, diplexers, filters, combiners, RF equipment. Personnel: J.O. Weldon, M.W. Bullock, W.D. Mitchell,
Vernon Collins,
Dick Floyd, E.L. King, Ray
Tucker.
Convergence Corp.
509 SH
17935 Sky Circle No. D, Irvine, Calif. 92714.
Product: Joystick editing control system', program computer, digital LED tape time',
Joystick search module. Personnel: John
Campbell, Dennis Christensen, Richard Quaid,
Richard Mulliner, Rush Hickman Ill, John Welland, George Bates, Gary Beeson, William
Skinner.
407 WH
Cox Data Services
Suite 100, Prado North, 5600 Roswell Road,
Atlanta 30342.
Product: Turnkey business automation system
for TV sales, traffic and accounting, including
financial package. Personnel: Bill Henderson,
Jim Landon,
Lou Kaib, Frank Crane,
Nemeth, Jack Keating, Glenn Sirkis.
Product: Automatic switching system interface. Personnel: Jim McKee, Skip Sawyer,
Patrick Choate, Bill Boyce, Richard Harper,
Sherri Roberson, James Craig Ziegler, Dewey
Hemphill, Ronnie Wilkes, Carol McInnis.
Datatek
553 SH
1166 West Chestnut Stree4 Union, N.J. 07083
Product: TV transmitter color phase equalizers,
video sweep generators', video /audio switching equipment', video, audio and pulse distribution amplifiers. Personnel: Mervyn Davies,
Bob Rainey, John Baumann, Marty Jackson,
Jim Landy, Herb Didier, Gene Sudduth.
Datatron
531 SH
1562 Reynolds Avenue, Santa Ana, Calif
92711.
Product: Video editing systems. Personnel:
Herbert Perkins,
H.
Primosch, D. Lake, R.J. Ric-
ci.
Delta Electronics
300 SP
5534 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Va. 22151.
Product: Operating impedance bridge, common point impedance bridge, R.F. ammeter
systems, analog antenna monitor, hardwire
remote unit, digital antenna monitor, hardwire
remote unit, remote control unit, transmitter
monitor control system, base current adapter,
toroidal current transformers, compensated
rectifier unit, meter and jack, receiver generator', R.F. ammeter systems for remote applications', automatic modulation controllers',
operating impedance bridge. Personnel:
S.W. Kershner, C.S. Wright, R.E. Geiger, J.
Wright, J. Novak.
109 SP
315 Wyandanch Avenue, North Babylon, N.Y.
DI -Tech
11704.
Product: Video
D.A., pulse D.A, touch -tone
systems, audio follow video routing switchers,
video presence detectors, audio /monitor
amplifier. Personnel: George Petrilak, Anthony
Bolletino.
Dielectric Communications
544 SH
Route 121, Raymond, Me. 04071.
Product: RF loads and wattmeters; waveguide
and accessories; RF switches; strobe guidance systems. Personnel: Howard Acker, Stan
Thomas, Spencer Smith, Weldon Brackett,
Francis Smith, Paul York, Larry Sawyer.
Digital Video Laboratories
513 SH
1051 Clinton Street Buffalo, N.Y. 14206.
NAB CONVENTION
MARCH 26 -30
WASHINGTON HILTON HOTEL
(By Appointment Only)
Media Brokers- Consultants
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10022
Dolby Laboratories
602A SH
731 Sansome Street San Francisco 94111.
Product: Broadcast encoder. Personnel: Ray
Dolby, David Robinson, loan Allen, John Gibb,
Christopher Parker, George Schowerer.
Duca- Richardson
529 SH
11465 West 48th Avenue, Wheat Ridge, Colo.
80033.
Product: Production switching system*. Personnel: Robert Richardson, James Duca, Carl
H WA D E. STARK
445 PARK AVENUE
Mike
38131.
(212) 355-0405
Hedberg, John Labin Jr., Thomas Bonomo,
Thomas Goldberg, Kenneth Stacy, Bruce
Harvey.
Broadcasting Mar
82
21
1977
sonne!: William Raventos, Larry Driskill, Tom
BYRON MOTION PICTURES
65 K Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20002
(202) 783 -2700
Lininger.
We've got a state -of -the art exhibit too big
to take to the NAB. Our complete motion
picture film and video tape laboratory is a
short ride from the convention and Byron
would like to show you our facility. We'll
feature tours, demonstrations, and refreshments. Byron's bus will be leaving at 6:00
P.M. on Tuesday evening in front of the
Washington Hilton Hotel.
14150.
Dynair Electronics
403 WH
5275 Market Street San Diego 92114.
Product: Audio /video distribution switching
equipment with various remote control options,
audio distribution amplifiers *. Personnel: D.
Brown, D. Buterbaugh, E.G. Gramman, J.
Hansen, R. Jacobs, P. Lynch, H. Maynard, A. Sib bald, R. Vendeland.
Dynasciences Video Products
428 WH
Township Line Road, Blue Bell, Pa. 19422.
Product: Image enhancers, video processing
system, downstream chroma keyer, switched
SEG, Dynalens image stabilization system.
Personnel: Erwin Bernstein, Joe Waltrich, Jim
Law.
557 SH
505 1/2 Centinela Avenue, Inglewood, Calif
90302.
Product: Master timing system, remote time
ESE
Electrohome Limited
512 SH
809 Wellington Street North, Kitchener, Ontario; 182 Wales Avenue, Tonawanda, N.Y.
Product: Speaker -amplifier pod, pulse cross
kit, ceiling mounts, wall mount, mobile stand.
Personnel: Bill Ellis, Gord Riggs, Jim Washburn.
Laird Weagant.
Electronics Missiles
Communications
110 SP
P.O. Box 116, White Hauen, Pa. 18661.
Product: 10 -watt MDS transmitter', portable
&
backpack TV transmitter', TV translator with
SAW filtering', UHFNHF transmitters, UHF/
VHF translators, MDS high -power amplifier,
UHF transmitting antennas, ITFS transmitter,
ITFS receiving convertor, high- performance TV
translator'. Personnel: Steve Koppelman, Jim
alignment tools and tapes, other accessories.
Personnel: Arthur Constantine, Frank DiLeo,
Daniel McCloskey, Robert Gosciak, Roger Cappello, Justin Herman, Stephen Blumenthal, Pat
Juckett, Jean Wahl, Jacques Kellner, Gau Per sad.
Flash Technology Corp. of America
554 SH
111 Lock Street Nashua, N.H. 03060.
Product: ElectroFlash beacon system. Personnel: FT Gronberg, W.A. Kearsley, O.J. Rowe.
225 SP
Fuji Photo Film USA
350 Fifth Avenue, New York 10001.
Product: Video tape, two -inch quadruplex,
video cassettes, flame retardant shippers',
mini -cassettes'. Personnel: John Dale, Al
Bedross, Whitie Henderson, John Walsh. Jerry
Lester, Bob Knowles, Jeanne DiGangi, Alan
Ferguson, T. Ushijima, A. Yoneda, J. Chung.
DeStafano, John Saul, Bob Unetich.
Farinon Electric
502 SH
1691 Bayport Avenue, San Carlos, Calif
94070.
Product: Portable and mini -portable microwave equipment for ENG video /audio signal transmission, fixed microwave systems for
SIL, intercity relay. Personnel: Joe Baker, Raul
Cortes, Cliff Fields, Dave Gay, Jim Hurd, Jim
Murray, Ken O'Neil, Warren Popham, Tom
Boyd.
218 SP
Fidellpac
109 Gaither Driue, Mt Laurel, N.J. 08057.
Product: Cartridges', meter', studio on -air light
Fujinon Optical
428 WH
672 White Plains Road, Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583.
Product: Optical splitting systems and prisms,
wide -angle ENG lens, studio/remote lens. Personnel: H. Ito, F. Nakajima, R. Hess, J. Komaki,
M. Sekiya, K. Nakano, M. Sato, T. Sumiya, D.
Bastello, P. Stuart, K. Rice.
GTE Sylvania
302 SP
100 Endicott Street; Danvers, Mass. 01923.
Product: Incandescent and tungsten halogen
lamps for studio lighting. Personnel: Mel
Brickett, Ed Kowalski, Jim O'Keefe, Garry
Altom.
display and impulse clock, 32 -to -96 event ram
time programer, combination digital clock and
thermometer, ATS clock', digital clock/timer for
correct time when used in timer mode', SMPTE
time code reader, hand -held time calculator *,
hand -held digital timer, assorted digital
clocks and timers. Personnel: Jerry Johnson,
Bob Mayers.
Eastman Kodak
343 State Street Rochester,
405 WH
N.
Y.
14650.
Product: Ektachrome video news film highspeed (tungsten)', Ektachrome VN print film',
Ektachrome video news film (tungsten), Ektachrome video news film (daylight), 16mm TV
projector. Personnel: A.D. Bruno, W.A. Koch,
W.H. Low Jr., K.M. Mason,
Steelnack, C.R. Troutner.
J.F.
Schroth, R.A.
583 SH
Eigen Video
P.O. Box 1027, Grass Valley Calif 95945.
Product: Color slow- motion disk recorder with
20- second or 10- second capacity. Personnel:
George Foster, James Hebb,
D.V.
Hebb.
588 SH
Electra impulse
P.O. Box
870, Red Bank, N.J. 07701.
dummy loads; baluns;
attenuators; power meters. Personnel: Mark
Rubin, Judy Rubin.
Product: High power
RF
Traditional
MOR.
548 SH
Electro -Volte
600 Cecil Street Buchanan, Mich. 49107.
Product: Dynamic and condenser
BOINEVIUE
BROADCAST
microphones for all professional applications.
Speakers and speakers systems for moniotoring, playback, and sound reinforcement. Per-
©NSULTANTS
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
A
or.won
o1
201 -567 -8800
eonnempe mre,nonopm co,po,mron
ny Antonellis, Don Bowdish, Tom Sleeman, Bill
Buford.
Washington Hilton exhibit areas
Hammond Industries
221 SP
155 Michael Drive, Syosse4 NY 11791.
Product: Revox production tape recorders,
monitor
power
amp',
Beyer
Revox
microphones and
stands,
infra -red
stereo
transmitter, infra -red stereo receiver, Klark-
Lincoln Room
Teknik graphic equalizers`, Meteor light and
sound mixers'. Personnel: Michael Noakes,
Jack Kelly, Tony Edwards, Duane Fitzpatrick,
Benny Finnigan, Norm Wiland.
MAIN
ENTRANCE
Monroe
Room
401
For What's
NEW
Military
in
R
404
.
401
405
AM, FM, TV
& Audio
406
t
See
409
408
HARRIS
423
A
at the
428
26
424
422
421.
I
425
Sheraton Park
4
A
430
BOOTH 205
428
112MB®ESEEFSE
HARRIS
COMMUNICATIONS AND
INFORMATION ANDLING
M
Ampex
Angenieux Corp. of America
ASACA Corp. of America
Auditronics
Audio Designs & Mfg
Robert Bosch,
Fernseh Group
Cetec
Christie Electric
Colorado Video
Computer Image
Cornac Division, Conrac
Cox Data Services
Data Communications
(Bias)
Dynair Electronics
Dynasciences Video Products
Eastman Kodak
Fujinon Optical
International Video
Jefferson Data Systems
BCS /Kaman Sciences
Klieg) Bros
3 -M
Memorex
Olesen
Lincoln Room
and Monroe Room
402
424
435
430
413
417
433
437
415A
404
407
422
403
426
405
428
401
429
425
401D
411
401A
423B
Garner Industries
616 8H
4200 North 48th Stree4 Lincoln, Neb. 68504.
Product: Bulk tape eraser; high -speed reel -toreel tape duplicator. Personnel: Philip S. Mullin,
Jerry Williams.
Panasonic Video
Systems
Phelps Dodge Communications
0- TV/Telesync
Quick -Set
RCA American Communications
RCA Commercial Communications
Systems Div
RCA Electro Optics & Devices
Rank Precision Industries
Recortec
Society of Motion Picture &
Television Engineers
Storeel
Strand- Century
Tele -Cine
TeleMation
Telemet, a Division of
Geotel
Telescript
Video Tape
Vital Industries
Western Union Telegraph.
Westar Services
World Video
Military Room
439
419
421A
401C
Product:
SEG Telefunken Telcom c4 noise
reduction system *, AEG Telefunken tape recorders, Neumann condenser microphones, NTP
401B
409
423
403A
441
408
423A
421
415
445
428A
406
431
427
video monitor projected peak program meter,
Beyer input transformers, EMT shielded audio
cables, EMT turntable systems, Woelke flutter
meters, Woelke tape recorder alignment
meter, K+H monitor speaker systems, Lyrec
tape timer. Personnel: Eli Passin, Hugh Allen,
Stephen Temmer, Russ Hamm.
Product: Production switcher with digital video
effects', TV automation system', frame synchronizer, sync generators, distribution
amplifiers, processing systems. Personnel:
Robert Cobler, Robert Lynch, Robert Webb,
Don Schlichting, John Spiker, Louis Swift, DanBroadcasting Mar
84
21
1977
205 SP
290, Quincy, Ill. 62301.
Product: AM radio equipment: kw solid -state
AM transmitter with progressive
series.
modulation', 5 and 50 kw AM transmitters with
pulse duration modulation', AM monitoring
equipment. FM radio equipment: 20 kw FM
transmitters with solid -state exciter, FM high power antenna scale model *, FM monitoring
equipment. TV equipment: 25 kw high -band
VHF color TV transmitter with solid -state exciter with transversal side -band filter, TC -80
live color camera with Triax, TC -50A live color
camera, automatic color film camera in film
chain configuration, scale models of Harris circularly polarized, batwing, helical and zig -zag
antennas. Audio equipment: Audio processor;
P.O. Box
1
400-400A
615 SH
Alan Gordon Enterprises
1430 North Cahuenga Boulevard, Hollywood Grass Valley Group
209 SP
90028.
P.O. Box 1114, Grass Valley, Calif 95945.
527 SH
Gotham Audio
741 Washington Streer, New York 10014.
Harris
System 90 program automation; Gatesway 80,
Stereo 80, Mono 5 and Stereo 5 audio consoles; Criterion -III multicart tape system; 12inch
transcription
turntable;
automatic
transmission system'. Personnel:
Gene
Whicker, Eugene Edwards, John Delissio, John
Boatman, Daniel Roberts, Walter Rice, Thomas
Schoonover, E.S. Gagnon, Kenneth Schwenk,
Jose Acosta, Neil Arveschough, James Barry,
Gene Bidun, Will Bone, E.L. Corujo, Ernest
Credgington, Walt Deen, Keith Dundord, Bill
Emery, London England, Dave Evans, Robert
Gauthier, Leo Gilbeau, Robert Gorjance, Robert
Hallenbeck, Galen Hassinger, Vic Hosquet,
Garry Hourie, Kin Jones, Vern Killion, Harold
Kneller, E.R. Lowder, Curtis Lutz, Donald Meier,
Thomas O'Hara, David Orienti, Lew Page,
Charlie Patterson, Fernando Perez, Ivey Raulerson, Vern Russell, Dick Sawicki, Jim Stanley.
228 SP
Hitachi Denshi America
58 -25 Brooklyn -Queens Expressway, Woodside,
International Tapetronics
229 SP
2425 South Main Street Bloomington, III
N.Y. 11377.
Product: Portable three -tube color camera.
single -tube ENG portable camera, studio /portable digital ENG camera, three -tube Saticon
and Plumbicon ENG camera. Personnel: Bernie
Munzelle, Mike D'Amore, Nick Pisciotta, Marvin
Bussey, Mike Monk.
61701.
1r3M
538 SH
4041 Home Road, Bellingham, Wash. 98225.
Product: Cartridge playback units, computer
controlled automation system, random access
programer, live -radio manual assist remote
control. Personnel: Nick Solberg, Carl Peterson,
E.C. Burkhart, Gordon Lund, Darryl Wichers.
508 SH
Ikegami Electronics
29 -19 39th Street Long Island City, N.Y.
11101.
Product: studio camera with minicomputer
and triax for remote telecasting and taping,
ENG color camera with triax, portable color
studio camera full scan with one -inch plumbicons with triax, one -inch plumicon studio
color camera with triax, announcer booth
camera, telecine multiplexer for film and
slides, multiactor rapid set -up color monitor.
Personnel: K. Sakamoto, K. Inoue, N.H. Nishi, M.
Russin, Y. Sato, S. Yanagisawa, J. Stead, Y.
Kawamura, A. Jones.
Industrial Sciences
3521 S.W. 42nd Avenue
552 SH
P.O. Box 1495,
Gainesville, Fla. 32602.
routing
switchers,
Product: Production
switchers, master control switchers, TV audio
processing
keyers,
chroma
consoles,
amplifiers, pulse and distribution amplifiers,
sync generators, VIRS generators, special
effects generators. colorizers, automatic
telecine light control, signal equalization. Personnel: Doug Akers, Chuck Moore, Bill
Coomes, Jimmy Rodgers, Norm Farr, Gil
Product:
Benchmark cartridge recorders/
reproducers, reel -to -reel recorder /reproducer,
eraser /splice locates Benchmark record/
reproduce /delay, multi -deck machines. Personnel: Elmo Franklin, Jack Jenskins, John
Abdnour, Andy Rector, Bob Tria.
International Video Corp.
401 WH
990 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, Calif 94086.
Product: Video -tape recorder, one -inch portable VTR (BNC format and IVC format), studio
and portable cameras. Personnel: Ronald
Fried, Frederick Ramback, Robert Marmiroli,
Paul Fletcher, Andy Vanags, Bob Kuhl, Bob Riddle, Bob Henson, Dave Dever, Chuck Martin,
Dick Rex, Marty McGreevy, Roger Lewis, Perry
Vartanian, Carter Elliott. Gene Warren, Al Paz.
Roger Bailey, Don Diesner, Don Morgan, Chuck
Snider, Dave Edmonds, John Jefferies, Dennis
Sheehy, Jim Kubit, Al VanDyke, Vic Sampson.
JVC Industries
530 SH
58 -75 Queens Midtown Expressway, Maspeth,
N.Y 11378.
Product: Three-quarter inch portable ENG,
three -quarter inch electronic editing machines.
Personnel: S. Hori, H. Hermes, R. O'Brion, H.
Schloss,
E.
Pessara,
R.
Quinlan.
Jefferson Data Systems
radio utilizing micro -processing equipment for
sales, accounts, financial statements. Personnel: Mike Jones, Bill Jennings, John McDonald,
Rana Adamson, Joe Abernathy, John Hutchinson.
Kaman Sciences /BCS
425 WH
P.O. Box 7463, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80933.
Product: Business automation systems for
radio and TV, traffic /accounting system for TV,
automatic
switchers.
Personnel:
Jack
Finlayson, George Beattie, R.E.W. Smith, Larry
Jones, Dick Trapp, Jim Wilson, Lorraine Albin,
Debbie Patton.
Kay Industries
810 SH
604 North Hill Street South Bend,
Ind 46617
Product: Phasemaster® rotary converter; alternate 3 phase power source. Personnel: Aaron
Katz, Jim Buffington.
Kings Electronics
555 SH
40 Marbeldale Road, 7)sckahoe, N.Y. 10707.
Product: Connectors. Personnel: Fred Pack.
Fred Della Iacono.
107 SP, 401D WH
Klieg! Bros.
32 -32 48th Avenue, Long Island City, N.Y.
11101.
Product: Performance memory lighting con1
429 WH
Executive Plaza,
Drive,
501 Archdale
Charlotte, N.C. 28210.
Product: Data processing system for TV and
trol system *; Performance 2 memory lighting
control system'; a -level 2000 lighting control
system; Kliegpac 9 portable dimming system
with interchangeable 2 kw dimmerpac, 6 kw
dimmerpac', 9-channel two-scene preset con-
Jaeger, Homer Masingil, Bob Bachus, Lew Parson, Lloyd Walton, Mike Rustici.
Innovative Television Equipment 310 SP
P.O. Box 681, Woodland Hills, Calif 91634.
Product: TV camera support dollies, tripods,
pedestals, pan /tilt head, accessories and
microwave products for studio and remote application. Personnel: Bert Rosenberg, Stanton
Crosby,
Robert
Hollingsworth,
Richard
Gallagher, John Fitsimones, Keven Rynne, Skip
Dunn.
560 SH
Interand
450 East Ohio Street Chicago 60611.
Product: Telestrator electronic graphic system
with erase and write -through cursor mode and
Mark II symbol control, Star probe systems for
TV programing via cable or video cassette. Personnel: Dr. Leonard Reiffel, William Rickhoff,
Kenneth Feith.
International Microwave
704 SH
33 River Road, Cos Cob, Conn. 06807.
Product: Major product EJ -1013 portable
microwave link designed for electronic journalism; AM and FM intra -city links. Personnel:
Raymond Mahoney, Gus Szvetits, Arthur N. Terwilliger, Nora King, Derek Henry, Dennis
Sullivan.
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
A
Dwkbn
of
201 -567 -8800
Bonney!. infernouonof co,00rouoe
Colman, Gary Stevens, Ken Tiffany.
Sheraton Park exhibits 100, 300
1
310
309
311
313
312
1
_
304
104
305
315
A
s
311
302
303
101
316
319
300
106
I01
111111
102
A
300
110
i
316
301
.-.
is
321
ÌÌÌ11i1
iÌÌÌÌ
ENTRANCE'
Amco Engineering
American Data Div., North
American Phillips
Ampro
Belar Electronics
Laboratory
Bird Electronic
Boston Insulated Wire
& Cable
CSI Electronics
Canon, U.S A
Capitol Magnetic Products
Central Dynamics
Chyron Telesystems
Delta Electronics
Di -Tech
Electronics, Missiles &
Communications
GTE Sylvania
Innovative Television
Equipment
308
101
300A
317
311
108
309
301
313
104
303
300
109
110
302
310
sole and 18- channel two scene preset control
console; 50 portable TV lighting kit, 2 kw
soflite, 4 kw soflite, TV lighting fixtures. Personnel: John H. Klieg) II, Joel Rubin, Mike Connell,
Deborah Butt, Wheeler Baird, Tom Hays, Jeff
Miller, Jack Nettleton, Emily Johnson, Jose
Sanchez, Horst Emmert, Gordon Pearlman,
Steve Carlson.
703 SH
16021 Industrial Drive, Gaithersburg, Md.
Knox
20760.
Product: Graphic arts character generators
and titter. Personnel: Philip Edwards, Stan
Michalski.
LPB
520 SH
520 Lincoln Highway Frozen Pa. 19355.
Product: Audio consoles, preamplifiers, compressor /limiters, distribution amplifiers, turntables, studio systems. Personnel: Richard
Crompton, Harry Larkin, Theodore Davey, Edward Corse, James Malone, Richard Burden.
International
586 SH
6416 Varie/ Avenue, Woodland Hills, Calif
91367.
Product: Athena 4000 TSM, Athena 5000',
L -W
Klieg! Bros.
Lenco Electronics
Listec Television Equipment
Marconi Electronics
McCurdy Radio Industries
Micro Consultants
Microtime
Mole- Richardson
Philips Broadcast Equipment
Power- Optics
Rohde & Schwarz Sales
Scully Instruments
Soll
Television Research
International
Telex Communications
Thomson -CSF Laboratories
United Research Laboratory
Varian Associates
Visual Electronics /Edco
Products Division
107
312A
305
106
315
312
314
102
100
304
321
316
320
307
319
103
318
105
306
television film -chain projectors. Personnel: Bob
Lawrence, Myra Thomas Lawrence.
Laird Telemedia
551 SH
2125 S.W. Temple, Salt Lake City, 84115.
Product: Optical multiplexers, projectors,
character generators, titters, time /date generators. Personnel: Bill Laird, Ron Carling, Ron
Jones, Dave Golding, Sam Kichas, Bob Bacon,
Mike Crosby, Gerald Gregory, Kurt Heaton, Vernon Peterson.
Leitch Video Limited
6138 SH
705 Progress Ave., Unit 46, Scarborough, Ontario
Product: Broadcast equipment. Personnel: Jim
Leitch, Bob Lehtonen, Garry Newhook, Paul
Milazzo, Nancy Leitch, Wendy Leitch, Ursela
Newhook, Bill Jeynes.
Lenco Inc., Electronics Divison 312A SP
319 West Main Street, Jackson, Mo. 63755.
Product: Video terminal equipment including
sync generation and distribution, video test
dignal generators, monichrome video monitors.
Personnel: Paul Leonard, Howard McClure,
Dick Lawrence, Bruce Blair, Larry Brown, Bill
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
86
tional Audio in- cassette duplicator, Inovonics
processor and replacement delectronics for
cartridges,
350/351
Ampex
electronics,
cassettes, software packaging, heads, recording, audio and high speed duplicating, Electro
Sound automatic splicer, quality control
reproducer. Personnel: David Lint, Igor Kozlov,
John Kozin.
622 SH
Lipsner -Smith
6110 Madison Cour4 Morton Grove, Ill. 60053.
Product: CF -2 ultrasonic film cleaning ma-
320
1111111
II
111111
r
314
s
106
MAIN
Product: Scully recorder /reproducer, Interna-
312
I03
100
a
tors to protect low -level lines *, surge eliminators for power mains or lines', lightning warning systems. Personnel: Roy Carpenter, Hal
Proppe, Myron Whitney, Ed Hayden.
571 SH
David Lint Associates
2444 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View,
Calif 94040.
30111
.1
Lightning Elimination Associates 526 SH
12412 Benedict Avenue, Downey, Calif 90242.
Product: Dissipation arrays', transient elimina-
chine; OMEGA film inspection machine with
viewer; RETEC film handling supplies. Personnel: Thomas A. Tisch, Coyle Dillon, Ray L. Short
Jr., Eli Smith, Jerry Lipsner, Thomas W. Boyle.
305 SP
35 Cain Drive, Plainview, N.Y. 11803.
Product: Camera mounting equipment, Vinten
PortaPed',Fluid Head *, PortaSkid'. Personnel:
Listec
Jack Littler, Bruce Ballantyne, Mike Stechle,
Gordon Ballatyne, Alastair MacMath, Mike Martin, Joanne Camarda.
3M
411 WH
Building 224 -BW, 3M Center, Saint Paul, Minn.
55101.
Product: Magnetic AudioNideo Products Division: Scotch High Audio quadruplex video
tape`, quadruplex and helical scan video
tapes, video cartridges, video cassettes, video
accessory products, Scotch Studio Mastering
recording tape, audio recording tapes and accessories. Mincom Division: video character
generators', random access memory storage',
image
encoders *,
enhancers *,
briding
switchers', color bar and sync generators *,
distribution amplifiers*, processing amplifiers',
dropout compensators', outliners', color insert
keyers', data and time/temperature generators'. Personnel: Marsh Hatfield, Bob Brown,
Frank D'Ascenzo, Fred Hodge,
Lynn Wilson, Bob Landingham, Jim Mazzoni,
Tony Mattia, Bill Hahn, Walt Clarke, John
Howard, Pat Ellestad, Joe Stone, Dick Johnson,
Dick Dubbe, Herb Didier, Dave Dolney, Mike
Smith, Bill Weston, Jerry Kerr, John Handley,
Bill Speck, Clark Duffey, Joe Culligan, Jim
Krogseng, Gary Barnum, Charles Germon,
Steve Landsman,
Dick Sudkamp, Ellen
Packard, Larry Choate, Brendon Lusby, Bill
Jones, George Charvez, Jim Hager, Gordon
Menard, Dan Denham, John Povolny, Bill Madden, Joe Leon, Jack Hanks, Gordon Schutte,
Jack Gondus, Jim Holton, Chuck Kendall, Pete
Gavin, Jerry Bauman, Pete Van Deventer, Steve
Taylor, Andy Persoon, F.J. Baguer, Lloyd
Troeltzsch, Jack Watson, Frank Gallagher,
Kevin Fitzgerald, Norm Ritter. Dick Elliott, Dave
Bestman, Mike Kelley Lee Marks, Bob Herman,
Paul Dotray,
Dave Larson, John Fitzpatrick, Bob Devitt, Vicki
Hanson, John Tomsyck, Mike Beetem, Vic
Mohrlant, Joe Williams, Pat Cafferty, Jim
Notoris, Ron Jarman.
582A SH
4007 N.E. 6th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
33334.
Product: Tape recorder /reproducer'. Personnel: Lutz Meyer, Thomas Hay, Steven Armfield.
MCI
Marconi Electronics
108 SP
100 Stonehurst Court Northvale, N.J. 07647.
Product: Mark VIIIB color camera, automatic
color camera, Mark VIII film chain, Mark VIII
portable color camera, transmitters, digital
standards converter, automatic VIT's, analyzer,
measuring equipment. Personnel: T. Mayer
C.F.H. Teed, R.V.
Lunniss,
F.L.
Bones, S.J. Leeson,
N.N. Parker- Smith; K. Elkins, A. Ramsden, B.
Pickstock.
MARTI
Gives You Radio
Power
ENG
phonograph preamplifier, five -channel mixer/
preamplifier, five-channel mixer /amplifier, RPU
equipment'. Personnel: Ray McMartin, Joseph
Engle, Leonard Hedlund, Charles Goodrich,
Bob Anderman, John Grey, Tom Butler, Bob
Switzer, Ed Huber, Dave Kelly, Jerrell Henry, Don
Jones, John Tollefson, John Schneider, Ken
Blake, Joe Krier, Juan Gregorio, Howard West.
401A WH
Memorex
1200 Memorex Drive, Santa Clara, Calif.
95052.
Product: Chroma 90 broadcast video tape;
helical scan broadcast video tape for IVC 9000
recorder'; Quantum helical scan video tape
(500 Oersted) in half inch EIAJ format and
one -inch in Ampex, Sony, IVC and BCN formats; three -quarter inch video cassette; helical scan video tape (300 Oersted); audio training cassettes; audio training reels *. Personnel:
Art Anderson, George Ansier, Alex Argendeli,
Tom Beal, Dave Berry, Dick Bigotti, Mike
Carney, Les Hunt, Hal Jones, Dewaine Miller,
Bob Reetz, Bob Scheper, Mike Skelton, John
Varnell, Steve Walsh, Pete Wodraska.
534 SH
Merlin Engineering Works
1880 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, Calif
94303.
Product: Custom quadruplex video -tape recorders. Personnel: John Streets, Michael Paull,
meter replacement for VU meters, the time
warp audio delay line and effects generator,
and the Supe 'C' series master -room reverberation units for on line or production applications. Personnel: John Saul, William Hall.
312 SP
Micro Consultants
2483 East Bayshore Road, Palo Alto, Calif
94303.
Product: Digital time -base corrector', digital
framestore synchronizer. ADC and DAC converters. Personnel: Gilbert Kesser, George
Grasso, Brian Malley, Herb Quilitzsch, Peter
Michael, Richard Taylor, Bob Graves.
613A SH
Microprobe Electronics
Suite 3201, 875 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago 60611.
Product: Automation system. Personnel: David
Collins.
219 SP
Micro -Trek
620 Race Street Holyoke, Mass. 01040.
Product: Audio consoles, packaged production
systems, newsdesk news production system,
audio control centers, turntables, tone arms,
audio preamplifiers, studio furniture, tape
cartridge racks, automatic antenna heater control systems, portable remote consoles. Personnel: William Stacy, Mal Stacy.
Monies Evans, Wally Heusser.
314 SP
Microtime
547 SH
Micmix Audio Products
9990 Monroe Drive, Dallas 75220.
Product: Demonstrating the master audio
For complete details, phone,
write, or see us at the 1977
NAB SHOW, March 27 -30,
Booth 207, Sheraton Park Hotel,
Washington, D.C.
MARTI
eo, bei
tíUt
N
1280 Blue Hills Avenue, Bloomfield, Conn.
06002.
Product: Signal corrector for video signal not
efeCfroniCJ,
Mnn
aebi,.ne
TX
70031
6111MS4I63
207 SP
Marti Electronics
P.O. Box 661, Cleburne, Tex. 76031.
Product: Automatic repeater for ENG', mobile
repeater for ENG', transmitters for ENG, ATS
compatible digital status unit', studio- transmitter link, digital remote control', Personnel:
George Marti, Roger Bast, Mac McClanahan,
Ken Horton.
528 SH
Matthey Electronics
(Located at same booth as Television Equipment Associates)
Product: Line selector', automatic
equalizer, video filters, delay lines.
video
315 SP
McCurdy Radio Industries
1711 Carmen Drive, Elk Grove Village, Ill
60007.
Product: Audio consoles, switchers, intercoms,
turntables, audio D.A:s. Personnel: George McCurdy, Ron Mitchell,
Rogers, Stan Maruno.
Peter
Buzzard,
Cliff
200A SP
McMartin Industries
4500 South 76th Street Omaha 68127.
Product: AM and FM transmitters, exciter, exciterlSCA demonstration unit, eight -channel
rack mount console, live- channel rack mount
mixer,
remote
four -channel
console,
274 County Road
Tenafly, N.J. 07670
A
201 -567 -8800
Orvn,on o, BOnne Vnlle International Corporation
230 SP
2165 Druid Park Dr., Baltimore 21211.
Product: Superquad ENG /EJ antenna system',
Nurad
Sheraton Park exhibits 200
Goldenrod, Dualrod, Golden -mini rod *, Dualmini rod', Handi -rod dual circularly polarized
antenna', 45 CR3 2/7 ghz dual-band circularly
polarized quad antenna', 45 CR2 2/7 ghz
dual -band dual-polarized antenna *, ENG /EJ
antenna systems, omnidirectional microwave
antennas, helicopter antenna systems. Personnel: Gordon Neuberth, Leslie Lear, Harry Rutstein, Charles Mann, George Fike, Glenn Helme,
Fred Hock, David Rider.
O'Connor Engineering Laboratories
573 SH
100 Kalmus Drive, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92626.
Product: TV camera support equipment including tripods, fluid heads, Hydroped hydraulic camera pedestal. Personnel: Chadwell
O'Connor, Regina O'Connor,
Cary Clayton.
Acrodyne Industries
Alford Manufacturing
American Electronic Laboratories
Broadcast Electronics
CCA Electronics
Ceco Communications
Cetec
Collins Division, Rockwell
Commercial Electronics
Consolidated Video Systems
Continental Electronics Mfg
Fidelipac
Fuji Videotape Division
The Grass Valley Group
Hammond
Harris Corp., Broadcast Products Div
202
212
216
206
201
204
227
217
222
224
220
218
225
209
221
Hitachi Denshi Corp. of America
International Tapetronics
Marti Electronics
McMartin Industries
Micro-Trak
Microwave Associates
Moseley Associates
Nurad
Orrox
Richmond Hill Laboratories. Ltd
228
229
207
200A
219
200
203
230
226
208
Shure Brothers
211
215
Systems Marketing Corp., Sono Mag
Techniques By Panasonic
Tektronix
Utility Tower
223
214
210
205
treated by time -base corrector. Personnel:
John Larkworthy, Dave Acker, Gene Sarra, Neal
Ownes, Dick McLean, Richard Cosme, Dan
Sofie, Phil Dubs, Bill Baird, Ralph Davis, Gary
Johnston, George Mathias.
200 SP
Microwave Associates
63 Third Avenue, Burlington, Mass. 01803.
Product: ENG microwave systems. Personnel:
Curt Kring, Erik Stromsted, Lou Pascarella, D.
DeLancey, Phil Cass, Dan McCarthy, Merl
Knold, Carl Guastaferro, John Fielek, Clyde
McCauley, Rod Gibson, John Van, Dave Erikson, Peter Coyle, Peter Burnage, Telmo Alves,
Don Acher, George Hardy.
Moseley Associates
203 SP
111 Castiliam Drive, Goleta, Calif. 93017.
Product: Telecontrol systems', audit) limiter',
digital control system with computer option',
digital remote system and status subsystem,
remote pickup links, aural STL's, remote control
system, stereo generator, automatic transmission system for AM and FM with local and
remotely located transmitters. Personnel: John
Mole-Richardson
102 SP
937 North Sycamore Avenue, Hollywood
90038.
Product: 575 -watt, 1200 -watt and 2500 -watt
HMI Mole Solar -Arcs. 1800 watt Molequartz
Teenie -Weenie Molekit; 3300 -watt Molequartz
Molekit; Mole focal spot tor Mini -Mole
Solarspot; 200 -watt Molequartz Molelipso pattern light; 1000 -watt Molequartz Molelipso pattern light; focusing Quartz family: 650 watt Teenie Mole, 1000 -watt Mickey Mole, 2000 -watt
Mighty Mole, 4000 -watt Molequartz Baby 4K
Solflite, 200 -watt Molequartz Baby 2K Softlight,
750 -watt Molequartz Baby Softlight. Quartz
Solar Spot family: 100 -watt Baby -Baby, 2000 watt Baby Junior, 5000 -watt Baby Senior;
Solarspots,
molefays,
molepars,
broads,
scoops, nooklites, grip equipment adapters,
hangers and mounting fixtures. Personnel:
Howard Bell.
Johnson,
Olesen
4236 WH
1535 Ivar Avenue, Hollywood 90028.
Product: Scenic projector for front or rear projection', studio curtains, custom walk -along
tracks. Personnel: John Chuck, David Hughes.
Optek
803 SH
5526 East LaPalma Avenue, Anaheim, Calif
92807.
Product: Automatic bulk tape degausser for
video and audio tape, visual transmitter
demodulator. Personnel: John Baumann, Martin
Jackson, Tom Barnes, Steve Irwin, Bill Seidel,
Dardee Seidel, Gary Metz.
Orban Broadcast
539 SH
459 Bryant Stree4 San Francisco 94107.
Product: Optimod -FM. Personnel: Eric Small,
Jesse Maxenichs, John Kean, John Delantoni,
Robert Orban.
Moseley, John Leonard Jr., Howard Ham Jr., K.F.
Zimmerman, William Kleinhofer, Vincent Mercadante.
226 SP
Orrox
3303 Scott Boulevard, Santa Clara, Calif.
95050.
Product: CMX Systems: computer assisted
Motorola Communications Division 811
video -tape editing system, portable SMPTE
time code generator, generator, time code
reader display. Videomax: refurbished video
tape, recording heads. Personnel: William Orr,
Sid McCollum, Murray Bevitz, Darrel Vincent,
Dan Roady, Tom Phillips, Gary Youngs, Bob
Meserve, Rosemary Huza, Mary Campbell,
Cassie Connell, Robert Peters, Allen Behr, Bill
Fitts, Jerry Cudlipp, Frank Benson, Rick Murphy, Bill Laumeister.
8H
.1301
518 SH
Minneapolis Magnetics
8125 Pleasant Avenue South, Minneapolis
55420.
Joel
East Algonquin Road, Schaumberg, IlL
60172.
Nagra Magnetic Recorders
608 SH
19 West 44th Street New York 10036.
NEC America
533 SH
1948B Lehigh Road, Glenview Ill. 60025.
Product:
Frame
synchronizers; one -inch
broadcast video tape recorders; digital video
effects system; digital broadcast time -base
connector. Personnel: K. Kano, R. Dennis
Fraser, K. Mio, K. Kashigi, S. Ariki, M. Imai, M.
Mitsui, H. Ono, A. Sugiyama.
Nortronics
522 SH
8101 10th Avenue, Minneapolis 55427.
Product: Replacement tape heads, tape
recorder accessories. Personnel: Mike
Nystrom, Craig Larson, Mervin Kronfeld, Joe
Dundovic.
550A SH
10105 South Spaulding, Evergreen Park, Ill
60642.
NT1
Broadcasting Mar
88
21
1977
Otani
817 SH
981 Industrial Road, San Carlos, Calif
94070.
Product: Playback -only audio tape, quarterinch two -channel tape, half -inch four -channel
tape, quarter-inch mono tape, quarter -inch
half -track tape, quarter -inch four -channel tape,
half -inch eight -channel tape, one -inch eight channel tape. Personnel: M. Takekawa, Brian
Trankle, Jack Soma, Lew Barett, Ken Ikezawa,
Greg Wintrup, M. Hara, S. Higashino, Dave McClurg.
Pacific Recorders
549, 550 SH
11100 Roselle Stree4 San Diego 92121.
Product: Multilimiter broadcast limiter for AM,
FM and TV audio; Multimax automated gain
control unit for AM audio *; Cuerack random
cart accessor'; Audiotronics production
system featuring four -channel console *; PR &E
on -air console *. Personnel: Jack Williams, Cindy Guzzo, Dave Pollard, Bob Harvey.
Panasonic Video Systems Division
Military Room WH
One Pansonic Way, Secaucus, N.J. 07094.
Product: Broadcast camera, special effects
switchers, and video recorders. Personnel:
Alvin Barshop, Milton Landau, Morris Washington, James Fairbank, Leroy Wright.
Paperwork Systems
542 SH
P.O. Box 38, Bellingham, Wash. 98225.
Product: Computer business systems to radio
and TV, system for cable TV *, Datapoint computer packages', Centronics 104 -200 line per
minute printer *, Personnel: Joe Coons, Lee
Facto, Jim Lang, Warren Middleton, Greg
Yazell, Chris Young, Klover Iverson, Kevin
Beaney, Belane Bell, Gordon English.
Phelps Dodge Communications 439 WH
Route 79, Marlboro, N.J. 07746.
Product: FM antennas, rigid line components.
Personnel: Saul Esocoff, E.F. Boehm, W.B.
Bryson.
Philips Broadcast Equipment
100 SP
91 McKee Drive, Mahwah, N.J. 07430.
Product: Multi- conductor studio and field
camera, triaxial -cable studio and field camera,
protable production color camera, portable
ENG /field production color camera, high sensitivity color camera and production
system,
telecine
camera
chain,
broadcast transmitters. Personnel: W. Anderson, N. LaBate, J. Giove, A. Keil, D. Herring, P
Demming, R. Weisel, L. Staskiewicz, F. Lydon, J.
Safer, P. Gloeggler, W. Amos, G. Nappo, M. Hartt,
J. Nigro, J. Clarine, H. Gladwin, C. Buzzard, D.
Beck, K. Gustafson, J. Kraus, R. Johns, J.
Wilson, G. Brill, H. Schkolnick, F. vanRoessel, P.
Bergquist, H. Hartong, R.King, P. Lance, A. Drury,
F. Klosterman, A. Keizer, L. Germany, I. Waters,
R. Clegg, D. Lewis, S. Moorse, P. Symmes, T.
McGann, D. Burnett, J. Laros, W. Renes, L.
Buren, E. Rosulek, J. Valeton, J. Geensen, H.
Breimer, A. vanDoorn, A. Kuipers, K. Van
Duuren, P. vanZanten, C. deKlerk, G. Dengel, L.
Arpino, G. Masullo, N. Neumann, D. Mittledorf,
K. van der Keyl, R. Utterback, P. Birnstein, R. Raboin, R. Johnson, R. Manahan, M. Arnold, N.V.
Rao, H. Kruger, H. Stevens, E. Prevost, L. Davie,
D. Hunter, A. Hindorff, A. Till, C. Collins, L. Alting,
J.Oosting, R. Carlin, F. Lovitz, B. Greene, D. Morris, H. Pillmeyer, A.A. Opstelten, K. Reinsma,
C.M. De Zeeuw, R. Ellis, M. Mackin, A. Laury, A.
Hill, R. Martin, N. Tuxen, Dr. Mooney.
Philips Test
&
Measuring Instruments
605 SH
400 Crossways Park Drive, Woodbury,
N. Y
11797.
Potomac Instruments
524 SH
932 Philadelphia Avenue, Silver Spring, Md.
20910.
Product: Antenna monitoring equipment, AM
field strength meters, VHF field strength
meters, frequency synthesizers and coherent
detectors, automatic audio test system'. Personnel: W.H. Casson, R.H. Ellenberger, C.C. Hall,
D.G. Harry.
Power -Optics
304 SP
1055 West Germantown Pike, Fairview Village,
Pa. 19409.
MARTI
Gives You Radio
Product: Remote camera control systems,
Grafikon optical color comparator, Scene -Sync
pan and tilt system. Personnel: Thomas
Streeter,
Richard Fordham, Richard
M.
Wardrop, Alan Price.
Projection Marketing Systems
558 SH
341 North Foothill Road, Beverly Hills, Calif
90210.
548 SH
OEI
Route 73, Kresson, N.J. 08053.
Product: FM exciter, stereo generator, SCA
generator, ATS control system', composite STL
system, AM modulation monitor, FM modulation monitor, TV modulation monitor, stereo
modulation monitor, AM RF amplifier, FM RF
amplifier, mono average maximizer, mono peak
maximizer, stereo average maximizer, stereo
peak maximizer, AM peak maximizer. Personnel: Charles Haubrich, John Pilman, William
Hoelzel, Edwin Etschman.
419 WH
O- TV /Telesync
33 West 60th Street New York 10023.
Product: VideoPrompTer equipment, console
transport, conveyor transport. Personnel:
George Andros, Hy Sheft, John Maffe.
Quick -Set
421A WH
3650 Woodhead Drive, Northbrook, Ill. 60062.
Product: Support equipment for studio broadcast, ENG /Cine, remote, microwave including
tripods, pedestals, cam heads, friction heads,
fluid heads, dollies. Personnel: M. Stolman, B.
Thomas, J. Andre.
RCA American Communications
401C
WH
N.J.
201 Centennial Avenue, Piscataway,
08354.
Product: Domestic satellite communications.
Personnel:
D. Quinn, L. Donato,
Gaillard, W. Wormington.
A.
Parinello,
P.W.
RCA Commercial Communications
400 WH
Systems Division
Camden, N.J. 08102.
Product: Color TV equipment, cameras, film
systems, video -tape recorders, film and tape
cartridge machines, control switching and
effects equipment, UHF and VHF TV transmitters, transmission line and antennas, audio
equipment, color compact TV', ENG package *,
solid -state radio transmitter', radio transmitters, station automation equipment, TV mobile
equipment, microwave relay equipment, two way mobile radio equipment. Personnel: I.K.
Kessler, N. Vander Dussen, J.E. Hill, A.J. Barrett,
J.H. Cassidy, F.X. Carroll, E.J. Dudley, H.R.
Henken, A.C. Luther, A.M. Miller, M.G. Moon, P.J.
Murrin, L. Slutzky, J.E. Bannister, D.B. Freeman,
J.L. Nickels, J.A. Gimbel, G.M. Lewis, R.E. Harding, W.H. Holroyd, E.N. Luddy, H.T. Magno, T.E.
Newman, C. Gaydos, C.P. Perez, A.W. Power,
J.E. Smith, R.D. Walsh, P. Higginbotham, D.
Forbes, B. Fincher, P.G. Walters, J. Morse, N.
Hudak, R. Tyrrell, B. Laughlin, R. Abbenante,
FA. Timberlake, C. Raasch, C. Fitxh, E.H. Hoff,
R. Edenson, J. Butts, J.L. Preston, O. Bjerke, H.
Dover, J.R. Ayers, E. Ray, C. Koriwachak, W.G.
Eberhar, R. Varda, W. Martin, L. Pinski, D.G.
Smith, R. Newman, J.P. Shipley, R. Emch, C.
Broadcasting Mar
89
21
1977
Power
Power
Power
Power
ENG
ENG
ENG
ENG
*
*
*
*
*
Automatic Repeaters
Mobile Repeaters
Encoders and Decoders
Broadcast -Quality
Hand -Carried Portable
Transmitters
Broadcast -Quality
Portable /Mobile
Transmitters 25, 30, and
40 Watts
*
*
Base Stations
Complete Antenna
Packages
Also...
ATS
COMPATIBLE
Digital Remote Control
and Status System
Also
.
.
For the new generation
of audio processing
ideas ... the
FLEXIBLE
AURAL
STL
For complete details, phone,
write, or see us at the 1977
NAB SHOW, March 27 -30,
Booth 207, Sheraton Park Hotel,
Washington, D.C.
MARTI actronicJ, Jnc.
Bo- 661
1501 N
Main
Cleborne,
TX
76031
B17/645.9163
Koch, T.T. Lewis, W.S. Lynch, R.G.
Neuhauser, C.D. Newcomer, S.H. Nixon, E.
Parker, C.L. Rintz, G.E. Ryan, R.E. Simon, F.B.
Smith, E.J. Triano, A.J. Froio, J.F. Chattin.
D.G.
Shoreham Americana exhibits 500
505
504
503
500
501
502
ENTRANCE
501
509
523
506
508
517
power amplifiers, cart winders, MIC compressors/limiters. Personnel: Ray Kohfeld, Linda Kohfeld, Jack Ducart, Brian Hallstrom, Dean
Taylor, Bill Livingston, Ginny Slicker.
524
1510
515
51
1516
520
519
521:22
584 SH
Ramko Research
11355 A Folsom Boulevard, Rancho Cordova,
Calif 95670.
Product: Audio consoles; audio cross-point
switchers, audio DA's', audio DA's, line
amplifiers and equalizers, turntable preamps,
525
511
526
532
530
531
529
409 WH
Rank Precision Industries
411 East Jarvis Avenue, Des Plaines, In.
60018.
Product: Varotal broadcast lenses, accessories, color separation optics for TV cameras,
flying spot Telecine film chain, Varotal MRL for
standard broadcast cameras', Rank Cintel
16/35 mm, flying spot color telecine with
remote control systems, Ausix sound mixing
system, automatic color corrector slide scanning accessories, Varotal MRL for mounted
portable cameras'. Personnel: Kish Sadhvani,
J.M. Campbell, Neil Kempt.
528
512
527
M
533
513
534
536
537
539
538
s
568I 5691 510
§ 5661 5651 5641 563
511
1513
5481 541
549
562 562 561
I
560
540
546
545
15501
5,5,0
544
550
542
543
-
541
552
551
553
I
557 556
559
5551554
51 5
tl
Andrew
Anixter-Mark
Arvin/Echo Science
Audi -Cord
Automated Processes
Berkey Colortran
Beston Electronics
Cablewave Systems
The Camera Mart
Cinema Products
Communications Technology
Computer Magnetics
Comrex
Convergence
Datatek
Datatron
David Lint Associates
Dielectric Communications
Digital Video Laboratories
Duca- Richardson
523
569
536
565
517
507
504
518
505
503
559
535
570
509
553
Micmix Audio Products
Minneapolis Magnetics
NEC America
531
571
OEI
ESE
557
563
568
546
512
502
Eigen Video
Electro Impulse
Electro -Voice
Electrohome Limited
Farinon Electric
Flash Technology Corp.
of America
Gotham Audio
IGM /A Division of NTI
Ikegami Electronics
Industrial Sciences
Interand Corp. (Telestrator Div.)
JVC Industries
Kings Electronics Co.
LPB
L -W
International
Laird Telemedia
Lightning Elimination Assoc
MCI
Merlin Engineering Works
544
513
529
554
527
538
508
552
560
530
555
520
566
551
526
562A
534
Parkhill, R. Giles, R. Yokes, A.R. Gibbs, J.P. Watson, R. Chalk, J. Chu, P.J. Foody, T.E. Newman,
R. Dongelewicz, P. Borgeaud, S. Konig, J. Gibson, R. Farrell, B. Jones, R. Scally, K. Johnson,
C.P. Perez, A. Nobo, H.T. Magno, O.R. Stamati,
A.J. Villanustre, J.A. Elman, L. Scheiner, J.L.
Grever, H.H. Klerx, D. Newborg, C.H. Musson.
547
516
533
550A
522
NTL
Nortronics Company
O'Connor Engineering
Laboratories
Orban Associates Div.,
Kurt Orban Co
Pacific Recorders &
Engineering Corp
Paperwork Systems
Perry Publications
Potomac Instruments
Projection Marketing Systems
573
539
549 & 550
542
550B
524
558
548
564
Ramko Research
Robins Broadcast & Sound
Equipment
Rosco Laboratories
Rupert Neve
545
556
541
Scientific -Atlanta
Sintronic
Eric Small & Associates
Sony Corporation of America
532
537
540
506
Sound Technology
Stanton Magnetics
Willi Studer America
Taber Manufacturing &
Engineering
Telecommunications Industries
Ltd
Television Equipment Associates
Time & Frequency Technology
Townsend Associates
UMC Electronics
Video Aids of Colorado
Ward -Beck Systems
Wilkinson Electronics
Wolf Coach
561
521
543
524
510
VIDEO TAPE TIMER
Extensively used on all Quads
Bright LED display
Provides faster editing
Installs quickly and easily
RESET and HOLD controls
Remote display available
RECORTEC, INC.
777 Palomar Avenue
Sunnyvale, CA 94086
(408) 735 -8821
Recortec
423 WH
777 Palomar Avenue, Sunnyvale, Calif 94086.
Product: Reel -servo modification kit for quad
VTR's, auto -edit for editing VTR's, video -tape
addressor', tape cleaner, time code enhancer *.
528
501
519
562
511
515
500
575
Richmond Hill Laboratories Ltd. 208 SP
1240 Ellesmere Road, Scarborough, Ont.
Product: Video Production switchers, auxiliary
transition unit, video clamping amplifiers, video
distribution amplifiers, RGB chroma keyer,
quad. split generators. Personnel: F.W. Huffman,
G.J. Thursby, R. Watson, 8. Scott, W. Swing, E.
Da Costa, N. Ashworth.
RCA Electro Optics & Devices 401B WH
Route 202, Somerville, N.J. 08876.
Robins Broadcast & Sound
545 SH
75 Austin Boulevard, Commack, N.Y. 11725.
Product: Camera tubes, power tubes and
Product: Portable consoles; broadcast consoles; custom consoles; reverbertron,
C
cavities for TV broadcast; power tubes and
cavities for FM broadcast. Personnel: C.W.
Bizal, H.F. Boreiko, R.M. Bowes, R.M. Cahill, J.M.
Cleary, E.A. Dymacek, F.J. Haines, J. Hemsley,
Broadcasting Mar
90
21
1977
I
audio modules. attenuators; program
equalizers; compressors; limiters; distribution
amplifiers; automatic sensing devices. Person-
Product: Audio transformers, audio modules',
R -MOD
direct boxes', mic- splitting boxes *, snakes',
microphones', news bridge', mic -line driver,
is an Alternative
Personnel: Franklin Miller.
to New Quads
801 SH
144 Rogers Street Cambridge, Mass. 02142.
Product: Broadcast switcher, switcher/SEG,
video typewriter. Personnel: Shintaro Asano,
Richard Ellis, Eckhard Konkel, Peter Choi.
Shintron
Greatly extends useful Quad life
Faster /smoother shuttle
operation
Reduces head and tape wear
Easy cueing with AutoCue
Faster editing with Auto -Edit
Reliable remote control
RECORTEC, INC.
S.C. Jones, Steven Friedman, Herman D.
Post.
Rohde 8 Schwarz Sales
321 SP
14 Gloria Lane, Fairfield, N.J. 07006.
Product: Broadcast demodulators, color
TV
monitors, modulators, VIT analyzer test system.
off -air monitors, RF sweep test system, FM
analyzer test system. Personnel: U.L. Rohde,
C.E. Barlow, A. Freeland, R. Goebel. T. Mair, C.
Kodymán.
Roscoe Laboratórlos
556 SH
36 Bush Avenue, Port Chester, N.Y. 10573.
Product: Roscolux color media, Cinegel problem solving materials for TV and movie production, Roscoscreen front and rear screen projection materials', lighting equipment. Personnel:
Stan Miller, Glyn Pritchard, Roger Zobel, Ned
Bowman, Mike Niehenke.
Rupert Neve
541 SH
Berkshire Industrial Park, Bethel, Conn.
06801.
Product: Audio console, related products. Personnel: Peter Sidey, Derek Tilsley, Tore Nordahl,
head -worn microphone, unidirectional head worn microphone With monitor, dynamic element leveller microphone, low -noise hand -held
omnidirectional dynamic microphone, line
level unidirectional condenser microphone
with built -in limiter, professional studio phono
cartridge, high fidelity cartridge. Personnel:
Roger Ponto, Ken Reichel, Bob Carr, Lottie
Morgan, John Phelan, Shelley Brown, John
Owens, Bob Ott, Mike Petersen.
Eric Small & Associates
540 SH
Suite 315, 680 Beach Street San Francisco,
94109.
Product: ATS *, tower light monitor *, Personnel:
Eric Small, John Kean; Jesse Maxenchs.
Society of Motion Picture and Television
403A WH
Engineers
862 Scarsdale Avenue, Scarsdale, NY. 10583.
Product: Books on digital video', ENG, color
television; test materials, films, slides. Personnel: Alex Alden, Thomas King, Jeffrey Friedman, Pablo Weinschenk -Tabernero, Peggy
Bangui Electronics
802 SH
333 West Alondra *Boulevard, Gardena, Calif.
Soll
OS decoder,
power amps, turntables, tuners. Personnel: Jerry LeBow, Y. Takeda
Product: Earth station video terminal,
SH
10 and
five -meter diameter antenna earth stations *,
video receivers', video exciter, demodulator.
Personnel: Howard Crispin, Sidney Topol. Don
Crumm, Harry Banks, Ken Leedick, Alex Best,
Peter Pifer, Bob Placek.
Scully Recording Instruments
316 SP
475 Ellis Street Mountain View, Calif. 94040.
Product: Audio recorder /reproducers; reproducers; logging recorders. Personnel: H.
Hull, B. Shute, B. Hamilton. G. Nelson,
Sescom
P.
Flad.
620 SH(A)
PO. Box 590, Gardena, Calif 90247.
Hotel"
Arthur Singer, Peter A. Tyrrell, Jr., Elliott Bard,
Richard Singer, John Hayes, Claude Hill, Fred
Chassey, Jamie Rojas, John Hillman.
Caggiano.
90242
Product: Four -channel equipment,
"See it
at
NAB Booth
#537
Shoreham
Sintronic
537 SH
705 Haverford Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010.
Product: AM and FM transmitters. Personnel:
Barry Roche, Tony Langley, Clary MacDonald.
Scientific- Atlanta
532
3845 Pleasantdale Road, Atlanta 30340.
50KW
FM
Shure Brothers
211 SP
222 Hartrey Avenue, Evanston, Ill. 60204.
Product: Telephone acoustic coupler', permanent sound reinforcement speaker, portable
sound reinforcement speaker, equalization
analyzer systems', audio equalizer, unidirectional dynamic microphone *, unidirectional
777 Palomar Avenue
Sunnyvale, CA 94086
(408) 735 -8821
nel:
AM ....1KW - 5pKW
TAM-1 K-B ALL SOLID STATE
1KW AM TRANSMITTER
Only 16 PA Transistors
Only 8 Modulator Transistors
Plug-in Modular Construction
Synthesized RF Exciter
Color Coded Wiring
Single or 3 Phase Power
Complete Metering
125% Positive Modulation
320 SP
401 East 74th Street New York 10021.
Product: Design, installation and construction
of broadcast facilities; design, fabrication and
installation of RF switching systems; slide presentation of projects. Personnel: J.M. Soll, R.
Soll, E. Haupt, L. Herman, G.A. Olsen.
Sintronic Transmitters have been installed in over 27 countries. For over 10
years, they have performed optimally
under severe environmental conditions.
All Sintronic Transmitters are conservatively designed and constructed. Quality
components are used throughout.
508 SH
line of AM and FM broadcast transmitters to satisfy every broadcast requirement. Detailed information and comprehensive product brochures on request.
Sintronic manufactures
Sony
9 West 57th Street New York 10019.
Product: High -band one -inch recorders', portable one -inch VTR', ENG products *, portable
cameras *. Personnel: H. Schein, R. Steiner, M.
Fink, D. MacDonald, E. Sherry, G. Finley, H.
McAdams,G. Yamagishi, D. Folsom, T. Califano,
I. Segáwd, L. Nanas"sy, C. Severo, T. Scott, I. Barton, L. Benson, G. McGinty, L. Silverman, P. Min dadeo, T. Wada, R. Mueller, J. Crane, P. Hart, W.
Reeves. J. McDonnell, L. Manning, K. Ohi, R.
Daines, G. Currie, C. Felder, P. Warner, M.
Tonaka, J. Pillarella, N. Morris, T. Kitada, S.
Peters, A. Papazian, K. Yamadawa, F. Bon voilour, F. Lam, M. Hebert, J. Tiltman, P. Hess, N.
Nakanishi, M. Tsurumi, A. Demasson, H. Kybett.
Broadcasting Mar
91
21
1977
a
ccmplete
Sintronic Corporation Is a sabsidiary of
Singer Products Co:, Inc.
Integrity and dependability since 1937.
Site
trco
CORPORATION
"c
11
Main Office and Plant:
705 Haverford Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010
(215) 525 -3700
Administrative 8 Export Offices:
One World Trade Center, Suite 2365, N.Y., N.Y.10048
(212) 432-1400
accessories for lenses and cameras. Personnel: Donald Collins, Craig Marcin, Susan Miller,
Kathy
Guaracini,
Joe
Agovino,
Hans
Waegelein, Gunter Hess, Axel Fromel, Dr. Mar-
Shoreham Americana exhibits 600
TO BIRDCAGE
tin Leder.
WALK
T
600
602A
602
604
606
Telecommunications Industries 510 SH
Suite 204, 6335 Homewood Avenue, Los
608
Angeles 90028.
Product: Porta- Pattern line of TV test charts,
601
603
605
601
612
614
616
601A
chart systems, slides, films, transparencies,
transparency illuminators, ENG /EFP test chart
system', BBC flesh tone reference chart', Sine
test chart', electronic cinematography chart
system. Personnel: Ed Ries, Jenny Squire, C.R.
Webster, Jeremy Royle, Bob Toohey.
609
ENTRANCE
610
611
610A
F6-13
1.
Audio Sellers
Bayly Engineering L -mited
Beaveronics
California Switch & Signal
Comark Industries
Dolby Laboratories
Garner Industries
Alan Gordon Enterprise
Kay Industries
Leitch Video
Lipsner -Smith
Microprobe Electronics
Motorola
613A
6138
607A
613
610A
607
614
602A
616
615
610
6138
622
613A
611
581 SH
Sound Technology
1400 Dell Avenue, Campbell, Calif. 95008.
Product: FM alignment generator, ultra -low
distortion oscillator, distortion measurement
systems'. Personnel: Larry Maguire, Mark
Pitkow, Tom Shea, Rosemary Maguire, Mark
Liebman.
Sauppe
800 SH
13034 Saticoy Street North Hollywood, Calif
91605.
Product: Producer 32 color filmchain slide
projector'. Personnel: Vern Schultz, Dick
Spindler
&
Jacobsen, Jim Hulfish.
Stanton Magnetics
521 SH
Terminal Drive, Plainview, N.Y. 11803.
Product: Magnetic cartridges, headphones',
Gyropoise turntable, preamplifier, stylus wear
gauge'. Personnel: Pete Bidwell, Jim Fox, Paul
Torraca, George Alexandrovich, J.N. Trivers.
Storeel
P.Ó. Box
441 WH
80523, Atlanta 30341.
Product: Mobile and space- saving storage
systems, room stretcher and railrider system.
Personnel: Ruth Schaeffer, Carolyn Galvin,
Kellett Goodwin.
Strand -Century
408 WH
20 Bushes Lane, Elmwood Park, N.J. 07407.
618
615
610
622
TelsMation
421 WH
P.O. Box 15068, Salt Lake City 84115.
Product: Multifont graphics system with TED
617
Nagra Magnetic REcorders
Optek
Otari
Phillips Test & Measuring Instruments
Sansui Electric
Sescom
Shintron
Spindler & Sauppe
Technology Service
Tentel
Terracom. Div. of Conic
Trace
Winsted
606
603
617
605
602
620
601
600
618
604
608
609
612
in, Jeff Peterson, Bruce Robertson, Len Zoller.
Systems Marketing, Sono -Mag
215 SP
1005 West Washington Street Bloomington, Ill.
61701.
Product: Radio automation equipment,
cartridge equipment, ATS equipment. Personnel: William Earman, Pete Charlton, Joe Toher,
election display option, video /audio distribution switcher, color film camera, audio-videopulse- subcarrier distribution amplifiers, sync
generators and encoders, Black Burst generators, audio monitor amplifiers, Bar Dot generators. Personnel: Lyle Keys, Paul Warnock,
George Elsaesser, Don Rhodes, Don Dunbar,
Larry Ehnstrom, Tom Meyer, Dave Clayton, Dennis Shelton.
Telemet
415 WH
185 Dixon Avenue, Amityville, N.Y. 11701.
Telescrip
445 WH
20 Insley Street Demarest N.J. 07627.
Product: Telescript monitor prompting system.
Personnel: Bob Swanson, John Lennan,
George Parodi, Blair Julich, Jerry Swanson.
Television Equipment Assbciates 528 SH
Box 260, Boway Road, South Salem, N.Y.
10590.
Bob Popke, William Moulic, Pete Kwitkowski.
Product: Video delays, pulse delays, filters, au-
525 SH
Taber
2081 Edison Avenue, San Leandro, Calif
94577.
Product: Audio head, new and reconditioning
service; VTR audio head, new and recondition-
tomatic video equalizer, chroma corrector, TV
line selector, intercom headsets, sportscaster
headsets, TV /intercom/talkback systems, tape
cleaner /evaluator for three -quarter inch
cassettes, wireless microphone system, quadrophonic wireless microphone system. Personnel: Bill Pegler, Marilyn Pegler, Vince Emmerson, Dave Williams, Barry Reid, George Stowe,
ing service, tape eraser, audio test tapes. Personnel: William Taber, Robert Kearns, Al Tad deo, Polly Taber, Greg Orton.
Technics by Panasonic
223 SP
One Panasonic Way, Secauscus, NJ. 07094.
Technology Service
618 SH
2920 Olympic Boulevard, Santa Monica, Calif.
90404.
Product: Weather radar equipment. Personnel:
Walter Miles, Gerald Ustach, James Sciacero.
Tektronix
214 SP
500, Beaverton, Ore. 97077.
Product: Television demodulator', color Picture
monitor', Personnel: Steve Kerman, Tom Long,
Dave Townsend, Don Dudley, Mike Creer, Gene
Sudduth, Herb Didier, Lyle Bailey, Ken Kaylor,
John Nutting, Dwight Wilcox, Larry White.
Television Research International 307 SP
1003 Elwell Court Palo Alto, Calif 94303.
Product: Helical /quad editing system, video
signal processing system; time code systems;
portable video production console. Personnel:
Robert Wooten, Robert Cezar, Robert Burrows,
Douglas Hurrell, Jerry James, Karol Bialy, David
Harbert, Lee Marvin, Donald Price, Robert Ferdinand, Tom Wise.
P.O. Box
Willi Studer America
543 SH
1819 Broadway, Nashville 37203.
Product: Studer professional broadcast tape
recorders /reproducers, mixing consoles,
microphones. Personnel: Ray Updike, Fred
Charles Rhodes, Charles Banow, Ron Marquez,
Austin Basso, Ted Anderson, Len Garrett,
George Anderson, Forrest Rees.
Tele -Cine
423A
W14
5434 Merrick Road, Massapequa, N. Y. 11758.
Product: Schneider TV zoom lenses including
field', wide angle', standard, ENG', remote pan
and tilt equipment, lens drive systems, optical
Broadcasting Mar
92
21
1977
319 SP
Minneapolis
Product: Headsets, headphones, open reel
audio recorders /reproducers,
machine'.
Layn, Ovie Sparks, Brian Tucker, Doug Beard.
Systems Concepts
701 SH
395 Ironwood Drive, Salt Lake City 84115.
Product: Character generators, production titling systems. Personnel: Ray Unrath, Roy Romi-
Telex Communications
9600 Aldrich Avenue South,
55420.
Personnel:
Don
tape cartridge
Mereen,
Ed
Fitzgerald.
Tentel
804 SH
50 Curtner Avenue, Campbell, Calif. 95008.
Product: Tape tension gauges for maintenance
702 8H
Thomas J. Valentino
151 West 46th Street New York, 10036.
Product: Sound effects and production music
records, Personnel: Thomas J. Valentino, Fran-
Shoreham Americana exhibits 700
TO
cis Valentino, Chris Carrino.
EXHIBIT
HALL
Varian Associates
105 SP
611 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, Calif 94030.
Production: UHF klystrons, Eimac power grid
II
Federal Communications Commission
International Microwave
Knox
Society of Broadcast Engineers
706-7-8
704
703
705
and repair of magnetic tape recording equipment, video recorders'. Personnel: Erwin
Graham, Joan Kaye, Wayne Graham, John
Chavers Jr.
Terra Com
808 8H
902 Balboa Avenue, San Diego 92123.
Product: Standard- setting portable microwave
System Concepts
Uni -Set, Division of Kniff Woodcraft
Thomas J. Valentino
701
700
702
Trace Inc.
809 SH
133 North Fourth Street, Lafayette, Ind. 47901.
Product:
In -house
billing, scheduling, book keping computer system for radio. Personnel:
Geraldine Zimmerman, Herb Tucker, Paul D.
Woidke.
system, miniwave ENG microwave system *,
mobile (airborne) microwave system, satellite
earth station receivers'. Personnel: R.M. Moyes,
Bruce Jennings, Bob Boulio.
UMC Electronics
103 SP
Thomson -CSF Laboratories
37 Brownhouse Road, Stamford, Conn. 06902.
Product: FM Volumax automatic peak controller; AM Volumex; dual audio distribution
Shaftel, Charles Collett, Charles Rockhill,
Preston Weaver, Larry Corey. Edward McHugh,
Rocco Mariano.
amplifier; Audimax automatic level controller;
Dynamic presence equalizer; 950 mhz wireless microphone systems* including single -,
dual- and five -channel systems; Microcam
hand -held c6lor TV camera; Triax color
camera; Telecine equipment;
Vidifont
character generator systems with changeable
fonts, font compose and multiframe Vidifont
systems *, digital noise reducer *, color correction systems for ENG and Telecine applications. Personnel: John Camarda, Harvey
Caplan, Langdon Cook, Mike Davis, Jack
Dawson. Robert Estony, Joe Ewansky, Jean
Gauchereon, Peter Glassberg, Thomas Hindle,
Andrew Ian, William Koskuba, Steve Kreinik,
Lou Mendyk, Gerald Miller, Ren McMann, M.
Montjarret, Joseph O'Hanion, Altaf Rahman,
Bruce Reininger, Don Skulte, Clyde Smith,
James Smith, Ben VanBenthem, R. Anastaze,
A. Bracco, M. Boxberger, A. Goubert, J.
Polonsky, G. Salem, W. Singer.
501 SH
Time & Frequency Technology
3000 Olcott Street Santa Clara, Calif 95051.
Product: Transmitter remote control', FM
tuneable modulation monitor, AM tuneable
582 SH
460 Sackett Point Road, North Hauen, Conn.
06473.
Product: Tape cartridge machines, audio
heads, splice finders, motors. Personnel: Allen
Uni -Set Division
700 SH
of Kniff Woodcraft
449 Avenue A, Rochester, N.Y. 14621.
Product: Modular set system. Personnel:
Ronald Kniffin, Beverly Geer, James Carey,
James Freeman.
United Research Laboratory
318 SP
681 Fifth Avenue, New York 11022.
Product: Auto -tec recorders. Personnel:
George Adams, Anita Adams. Juan Marquez,
Ralph Deliz, Sandy Frazier, Frank Rodriguez.
210 SP
Utility Tower
12027, Oklahoma City 73112.
AM -FM -CATV towers, tower sections',
A/3 lighting kit for towers. Personnel: C.E.
P.O. Box
Product:
Nelson, R.G. Nelson, V.G. Duvall, M.N. Sholar.
tubes, megawatt super tetrode *, zero bias
triodes for radio. TV and ham radio. Personnel:
George Caryotakis, Colin Erridge, Larry Moore,
Bob Schmidt, Paul Thesing, George Badger,
John Quackenbush, Jack Quinn, Hal Runyon.
Bob Sutherland, Tom Yingst.
Video Aids Corp. of Colorado
511 SH
325 East Seventh Street Loveland, Colo. 80537.
Product: Color sync generators, cross -pulse
generators, editor -controllers, H -phase meter,
ENG /EFP color sync generator (battery)',
multi- function
generator
and
NTSC
downstream VITS inserter', Black Burst generators, Party Lines intercom systems, Burst phase meter, video switch to turn monitors on
and off'. Personnel: Walter Skowron, Bill Barton, Jim French, Dick Turchen, Mike Krieter,
Cliff Hand.
Video Tape Co.
428A WH
4212
Boulevard,
North
Lankershim
Hollywood Calif 91602.
Product: Quadruplex video tape, Umatic video
cassettes, tape cleaning and evaluation services, video tape duplication and distribution
services'. Personnel: Keith Austin, Frances Van
Paemel, Don Johnson.
Visual Electronics /Edco Products 306 SP
680 Bissell Drive, Lexington, Ky. 40504.
Product: Audio tape cartridge equipment,
audio cassette equipment *, video switching'.
Personnel: .Ron Eigenmann, Ron DeBry, James
Hisle, James Floyd, Paul Shaw, Don Atwood.
John Feeback, James Tharpe.
406 WH
Vital Industries
3700 NE. 53rd Avenue, Gainesville, Fla.
32601.
Product: Frames synchronizer with four -input
capability', double key per M/E VIX-114
switching system *, production automation
system', on -air total TV automation system,
sync generator system. Personnel: Nubar
Donoyan, Dale Buzan, Eric King, Gordon
R. C. CRISLER & CO., INC.
modulation monitor; TV modulation and fretransmission
quency monitor, automatic
system equipment'. Personnel: Tom Creighton,
Cal Eckels, Frank Stolten, John Webster, Joe
BUSINESS BROKERS FOR C.A.T.V., TV & RADIO PROPERTIES
LICENSED SECURITIES DEALERS
Wu.
CINCINNATI
UNDERWRITING
Product: Solid state
IF modulated exciters for
transmitters, UHF klystron
transmitters, power increase packages for UHF
transmitters. Personnel: George Townsend,
David Baldyga, James F. McMahon, Donald
and
-
FINANCING
Richard C. Crister, Clyde G. Heehnle, Alex Howard
580 Walnut Street, 45202, phone (513) 381-7775
519 SH
Townsend Associates
P.O. Box 484, West Springfield, Mass. 01089.
UHF
-
TUCSON
VHF
-
Edwin O. Richter Jr, Frank Kalil
P08 4008, 85717, phone (6021 795 -1050
Convention Headquarters: Hyatt Regency Hotel
Peters.
Broadcasting Mar
93
21
1977
R.W. Ward, Rodger Beck, Arthur Schubert, Bill
McFadden, Duke McLane, Dave Hill.
IIQYFooM
FROM
VITAL INDUSTRIES, INC,
The
single most exciting
new technology for
television origination.
SEE IT AT SPACE 406
of the
WASHINGTON H/LTON
Peters, Morrell Beavers, Bob McAll, Barry Holland, John Davis, Charles Kunz, Don Langford,
Don Williams, Richard Williams, R. McCoy, Bill
Vice, John Schultz, Charles Schultz, Lee Ruble,
Tom Miller, Nevin Samson.
515 SH
Ward -Beck System
290 Larkin Stree4 Buffalo, N.Y. 14210.
Production: Audio mixing consoles for radio,
television and recording; television intercoms,
monitor and distribution amplifiers. Personnel:
Western Union Telegraph
491 WH
Broadcast Services,
One Lake Stree4 Upper Saddle River, N.J.
07458.
Product: Television and radio transmission services via Western Union's Westar domestic
satellite system. Personnel: R.B. Smith, J.
Tagl laferro.
Wilkinson Electronics
500 SH
701 Chestnut Stree4 71'ainer, Pa. 19013.
Product: 2.5 kw AM transmitter, 5 kw AM
transmitter, 1.5 kw FM transmitter', 20 kw FM
transmitter, FM exciter and stereo generator,
silicon rectifier stacks, AC line surge protecter,
AGC amplifier, limiting amplifier. AM modulation monitor, audio consoles, turntables
preamplifier, FM rebroadcast receiver. Personnel: G.P. Wilkinson, C. Wilkinson, W. Johnson,
W. Shaw, W. Voelker, J. Fitzgerald, J. Forrest, W.
Black, W. McKibben, A. Maclntyre.
Winsted
812 SH
8127 Pleasant Avenue South, Minneapolis
554 20.
Production: Editing consoles`, space saving
video -tape and film storage systems, mobile
cabinets, video -tape trucks. Personnel: C.E.
Johnson, G. R. Hoska, B. Arntson, B. Hutton.
Wolf Coach
575 SH
200 Bartlett Northboro, Mass. 01532.
World Video
427 WH
Box 117, Boyertown, Pa. 19512.
Product: Five -inch portable AC /DC Color monitor of ENG, 17 -inch rack mount color monitor
for studio, 12 -inch color monitors', other monitors. Personnel: Jack Taylor, Ted Dames, Herb
Didier, Steve Cisle4 Carroll Cunningham, Oliver
Berliner, Dwight Wilcox.
P.O.
VIDEO PRODUCTS
SALES
MARKETING
Manager
Well- established & growing
manufacturer of EXPANDING
LINE of VIDEO EQUIPMENT for
the Broadcast, OEM, Industrial
&
Closed Circuit Markets. Must
have experience in direct & dis-
tributor sales plus technical
sales supervision.
The DYNASCIENCES Opera-
tion located in Blue Bell, Pa is
part of a major NYSE -listed
corporation providing competitive salary, incentive & benefits.
To pre- arrange an interview
at
the
NAB
SHOW
or
elsewhere,
please call collect
Mike Eliason or Shirley Heath
213- 475 -2437
OR at the NAB SHOW
Contact: DYNASCIENCES
at the HEADQUARTERS HOTEL
Special phone number:
(202)- 483 -3051
Ask for Mike Eliason or
Joe Waltrich
If busy or out leave message
DYNASCIENCES, Whittaker
Corp.
An Equal Opportunity
Employer M/F
Skiar,
Edward
Joseph
Sherikjian, Rick
McLaughlin, Robert Mahluran, Richard McCauley, Leo Collins, Sam Patterson, Charles
King, Calvin Roach, Walter Sabo, Linda Stern,
Frank Atkinson, Madeleine DeCunzo, John Axten, Thomas O'Brien, Joseph Keating, Peter
Flannery, Richard Dressel, Jeffrey Sprung,
George Phillips, Kent Coughlin, Charles
DeBare, Jeff Woodruff, Alfred Racco, Martin
Greenberg, Charles Fritz, Michael Luckoff, Ben
Hoberman, Nick Trigony, Allen Shaw, Jim
Trohatos, Willard Lockridge, Roger Turn beaugh, Jack Minkow, Don Pratt, Mike Hankins,
Martin Percival, James Smith.
CBS Inc., CBS /Broadcast Group,
CBS Television, CBS News
Washington Hilton 9101 -9102
Personnel: John Schneider, Robert Wussler,
Carl Ward, Bruce Bryant, Ted O'Connell,
Donald Clancy, John Cosgrove, Leonard
DeNooyer, AI Miranda, Robert Pike, Len
Schammel, Tom White, Robert Wood, George
Zurich, Frank M. Smith Jr., Robert Jamieson,
Barrie Richardson, Harry Feeney, Monica
Lahey, Van Gordon Sauter, George Shannon,
David White, Joseph Flaherty, Charles Cadley,
Robert Norvet, Joe DeFranco, Ralph Goldberg,
Eleanor Applewhaite, William Leonard, Peter
Herford, Casey Davidson, Sandy Socolow, D.
Thomas Miller, Tom Battista, Peter Barker, Dave
Nelson, Tom Leahy, Neil Derrough, Bob Hosking, John McKay.
CBS Radio
Sheraton Park B620
Personnel: Sam Cook Digges, George Arkedis,
J. William Grimes, J. Robert Cole, Sherril Taylor,
W. Thomas Dawson, Eric Shcline, Cornelius
Knox Jr., Robert Leeder, Harfield Weedin, David
West, Frank Miller, Jack Stuppler, Ralph Green,
Norman Ginsbúrg, Bernard Krause.
Mutual Broadcasting System
Sheraton Park D600
Personnel: C. Edward Little, Gary J. Worth, Jack
Sabella. Craig Whetstine, Milt Komito, Barry
Turner, Glenn Jackson.
Networks
American Broadcasting Companies,
ABC -TV, ABC Owned TV Stations
Washington Hilton 0 -174
Personnel: Jim Abernathy, Jim MacGregor,
Susan Lack, Tom Tanno, Len Maskin, Marvin
Mord, George Keramidas, Paul Sonkin, Stan
Simon, Jim Donaghy, Arnold Marfóglia, Bob
Kaufman, Julie Hoover, Steve Nenno, Mack
Perryman, Jim Duffy, Mary -Jane Raphael, Dick
Beesemyer, Bert Fainberg, Dick Savage, Joe
Giaquinto, Bob Fountain, Dick Kozak, Joe
Niedzwiecki, Mario Cticinotta, Al Ittleson, Bob
Hingel, Warren Denker, Peter Zobel, Tom Day,
Tim Kearney, Dorothy Botts, Eve Krzyzanowski,
Joe DeGennaro, Tony Vella, Ted Gabbamonte,
Bruce Haggerty, Suzanne Surbeck, Bill Sythes,
Joe Weinflash, Mark Wagenheim, Buzz
Mathesius, Barbara Bree, Carl Dietz, Chris
Budinger, Janice Lederman, Gail Malinoski,
Bob Reich, Stu Ullman, Paul Coss, Ken Mac Queen, John McCreadie, Dick Lorden, Richard
Mennella, Charles Bellomo.
ABC Radio, ABC Radio News,
ABC Owned AM and FM Stations,
ABC Spot Sales
Sheraton Park 8220
Personnel: Harold Neal Jr., Michael Hauptman,
Broadcasting Mar
94
21
1977
Mutuai Radio Sports
'Sheraton Park
D
600
Personnel: Jack Clements, Tom Harmon, Jack
Gregson, Al Wester, Tony Roberts.
Mutual Black Network
Sheraton Park D400
Personnel: Tom McKinney, Ron Davenport, Paul
Yates, John Askew.
National Black Network
Sheraton Park D400
Personnel: Eugene D. Jackson, Sydney
L.
Small, Del Raycee, Vince Sanders, Eddie
Hogan -Bassey, Joan Logue Henry, Adrian
Gaines, Florence Dunbar.
National Broadcasting Company,
NBC -TV, NBC -Radio
Washington Hilton,
The Conservatory
Personnel: Herbert Schlosser, Julian Goodman,
David Adams, Robert Howard, Donald Mercer,
Jack Thayer, Theddore Walworth, Raymond
O'Connell, Anthony Cervini. Ray Diaz, Mort
Dillon, Barry Hillebrandt, William Kelley,
Malcolm Laing, Paul Rittenhouse, Diane
Healey, Jack Kennedy, Frank Flemming, Robert
Galvin, Richard Welsch, Edward Bertero,
Richard Butler, Maurice Corwin, Robert
Daniels, John Dragun, Richard Edmondson,
Ken Erhardt, William Flood, John Frishette,
John Gillen, Ron Gnidziejko, Fred Himelfarb,
Wilfred Howard, Robert Mauster, Martin
Meaney, Miguel Negri, Steven Orland, Oden
Paganuzzi, Wilfred Prather, Garfield Ricketts,
Charles Savais, Reginald Thomas, John Weir,
Oscar Wick, Curt Block, Rick Kelly, Nancy Herbert, James Kitchell, Arthur Watson, George
Lenfest, Neil Van Ells, Robert Walsh, Marion
Stephenson, Robert Mounty, Peter Flynn,
Stephen Lindberg, George Davies, Steve
White, Bob Wogan, Martin Enghauser, Frank
Scott, Godon Peil, John Bailie, Charles Warner,
Robert Pittman, Allan Hotten, William Dwyer,
Perry Bascom, Lou Bruno.
Television programers
Atwood Richards Telescreen
Washington Hilton 3149, 3150
Personnel: Don Quinn, Jack Kaplan, Don Cola
-
pinte
Claster Television Productions/
Romper Room Enterprises
Washington Hilton 1149
Product: Romper Room, and from Claster:
Bowling for Dollars, Fred Flintsone and Friends.
Personnel: John Claster, Ken Gelbard, Jim
Reid.
Henry Gillespie, William Andrews, James
Kellner, Arthur Kane, Mort Slakoff, William
Stynes, George Casteil.
Cavox Stereo Productions
Sherator Park C240
Product: Eight different syndicated -music
radio formats. Personnel: Lee Tate, Bob
Mayfield, Wally Rubin, Paula Tate.
Worldvision Enterprises
Shoreham E830, 831, 832
Product: Doris Day Show, Let's Make a Deal,
Dark Shadows, Prime V features', Prime IV,
Prime Ill, Prime II, Prime I, Casper the Friendly
Ghost, Mod Squad, Come Along, Wonders of
the Wild, FOR, Great Adventure, Wonderful
Stories of Professor Kitzel, Jackson Five,
Discovery, Specially for Kids, And Now the
Bay City Rollers, Is It Christ? Roberta Flack,
Billy Paul and Staple Singers, World of Hugh
Hefner, World of Liberace, Musical Ambassadors -Kenny Rogers and First Edition.
Personnel: Jerry Smith, Scott Towle.
Century 21 Productions
Sheraton Park F440
Product: Two automated radio formats, jingles,
syndicated radio specials, production library.
Personnel: Jim Kerr, Tom McIntyre, Dave Scott,
Carole Starr, Dick Starr, Roy Nilson.
Concept Productions
Sheraton Park A711
P.O. Box 41406, Sacramento, Calif. 95841.
Product: Automation programing for contemporary M.O.R., soft top 40 and album 40. Personnel: Dick Wagner, Mary Wagner.
Radio programers
Drake -Chenault
Sheraton Park A200
Personnel: Gene Chenault, Art Astor, Jim
Bonneville
Kefford, Buddy Scott, Denny Adkins, Burt Klein men, Lee Bayley.
Shoreham E430, 431, 432
Product: Four syndicated formats: beautiful
music, middle of the road, contemporary and
soft rock. Personnel: Marlin Taylor, Loring
Fisher, Frank Murphy, Dick Drury, Bob Henabery.
Fllmways Radio
Sheraton Park Hamilton Room
Product: Adult- contemporary syndicated -radio
format. Personnel: Gary Standard, Steve Epstein, John Price, Rodger Layng.
Kent Burkhart /Abrams and Associates
Shoreham A600, 602
Personnel: Kent Burkhart, Lee Abrams.
Mayflower 668, 689
Product: Two syndicated formats: today's
FM 100
Neal P. Cortell Television
Washington Hilton TBA
Product: TV station promotion material including computer animated video, custom
audiotracks, support graphics, station
LISTEN! Hear again the Golden Age of Radio!
ONE FULL HOUR on Each LP Record, Cassette,
packages titled "We Only Have for You", "Our
Town ", "Let's Get Together ". Movies promotion
and showcase titled "Great Entertainer ".
Custom news programing and promotion
packages. Personnel: Neal Cortell, Donald Hill,
Heather Sholl, Walter Kaplan.
-
mal commer,cals and announcements The Shadow Knows'
THE LONE RANGER. Tne Masked Man and hrs Indian
Companion TOn10 Rode Again, A complete broadcast. with
nets wild md,ans. bad guys. and "Silver" the bery
horse w,Il1 the speed of I,gh1, Plus a second complete western
radio adventure
S8.
-
Rhodes Productions
5.
Washington Hilton, Solar Suite
8.
Product: Hollywood Squares, Second City
Review, The David Steinberg Show, Whatever
Became of ..., Celebrity Concerts' Series Ill.
Personnel: Jack Rhodes, Bill Rhodes, Chris
Remington.
8.
10.
Is.
16.
Catalog
of 1000
20.
s
ore Program
Sent FREE
27.
28.
with Each
32.
Viacom Enterprises
Washington Hilton 3188, 3189, 3190
Product: All Star Almost Anything Goes, Ara
Parseghian's Sports, Incredible Crimes, Family
Feud, Little Vic, Music Hall America, $128,000
Question, Price Is Right, $25,000 Pyramid,
Wildlife in Crisis, Winning Is Everything,
Viacom Features 1- 11- 111 -1V, Viacom Movie
Greats, Andy Griffith Show, Beverly Hillbillies,
Bob Newhart Show, Dick Van Dyke Show,
Family Affiar, Gentle Ben, Gunsmoke, Gomer
Pyle, Hawaii Five -O, Hogan's Heroes, Honeymooners, I Love Lucy, Mary Tyler Moore Show,
Millionaire, My Three Sons, Navy Log, Our Miss
Brooks, Ozzie's Girls, Perry Mason, Petticoat
Junction, Phil Silvers, Rawhide, Rookies,
Trackdówn, True, Twentieth Century, Twilight
Zone, U.S. Border Patrol, Whirlybirds, Wild Wild
West, You Are There, Alvin and Chipmunks,
Terrytoons, Most Important Person. Personnel'
or Cartridge at the Lowest Price Ever!!
53. THE SHADOWI Who Knows What Evil Lurks in Irte Heans
of Men, Two complete programs 01 Ra0,0 s Master of Darkness Irom the 1940's. Murder and Mayhem with all the ong-
40.
55.
Order'
58.
-
-
OTHER SHOWS AVAILABLE
SHERLOCK HOLMES. 11939) with Basa Ralhcone 8
Nigel Bruce
AFTERNOON KID SHOWS Capl Midnight. Jack Armslrong. Buck Rogers. Dock Tracy cl shows)
DOWN IN ALLEN'S ALLEY. with Fred Allen
THE SPIKE JONES SHOW 119491.
VIC a SADE 119467
THE ALDRICH FAMILY (193918 LIFE WITH LUIGI 11948)
INNER SANCTUM 119491. THE HERMIT'S CAVE 119391
THE GREAT GILDERSLEEVE 11949) A OUR MISS
BROOKS 11949)
LIGHTS OUT i 19431 8 THE WITCH'S TALE 119391
GEORGE BURNS 8 GRACIE ALLEN 119481
GUNSMOKE (19521 8 THE ROY ROGERS SHOW 119451.
JUDY GARLAND ON RADIO 11952)
FIBBER MCGEE a MOLLY 11940 8 1941) 2 shows.
GANGBUSTERS 11940 8 19461 2 shows
-
I
.
To order. circle your choices on coupon.
NOT LICENSED FOR REBROADCAST.
The Radlola Company
191 Grand Street Dept. 3
Croton -on- Hudson. N.V. 10520
Please send me the selections Ive checked
and hurry!
Enclosed is my check or money order for $
(Sorry, no C. 0.D.$). Please add applicable sales tax.
-
Selections
Any Single Selection
Any Three Selections
Any Five Selections
All Filleen Selections
Price
Shpg &
HendIg
8
2.95
75e
S
3.70
S
8.35
S
1.00
S
9.35
$12.50
S
1.50
$14.00
$38.25
S
1.75
538.00
Total
Please check choice:
7LP
EJ Cassette rCartridge
Name
Please circle selections:
5
6
16
20
e
27
40
53
55
Address
10
15
2e
56
32
5e
City
State
Zip
CHARGE orders over S10.00 on most Major Credit
NOT LICENSED FOR REBROADCAST.
Cards! Just give Card Number, Expiration Date,
and Sign Your Name!
Radio rester ear 19n
Broadcasting Mar
95
21
1977
I
J
beautiful music and beautiful country. Personnel: Darrel Peters, Alaine Peters, Ray Miller,
Rod Mitchell.
%luybe,
ours should be
.y(uirs
Our KalaMusic client stations
have shown exciting growth in total
audience, and most important,
in market after market, 68,70, even
77 percent of the KaleMusic adult
audience is under 50! These are numbers
our clients can be proud of and
numbers our plients can sell. If your
audience is too small or too old, or
if you feel your present syndicator isn't
helping you solve your problems,
perhaps KalaMusic can help.
Call Stephen Trivers or Bill Wertz at
(616) 345 -7121 or See us at the
Shoreham in Suite A302 -A300
Sehulke, Bill McClenaghan.
Susquehanna Productions
Sheraton Park M590
Product: Various syndicated radio features of
one -minute duration. Personnel: Art Carlson,
Jack Herr, George Hyde, Carl Loucks, Carl
Crawford, Charles Morgan, Fred Greaves.
William
B.
Tanner
Sheraton Park K500
Product: Tanner total sound library, creative
sales service, CAT stereo audio package, various "custom client concepts." Personnel:
William B. Tanner, Henry Tanner, Herbert Tanner, William Laffey. Zack Hernandez, Keith Lee,
John McFarlane, Kurt Alexander, Johnny Eagle,
Scott Blake, David Tyler, Bruce Miller, Robert
Franklin, Bob Stack, Wilson Northcross, Peter
Pederson, Al Garretz, Jerry Bassett, Bob Costello, Dick Denham, Ron Mourning, Charles
Haile.
TM Productions and TM Programing
Industrial State Bank Bldg.
Kalamazoo, Mich. 49006
Kalamusic
Shoreham A300, 302
Product: Beautiful music package. Personnel:
Stephen Trivers, William Wertz, Howard Karlin,
Jim Duncan Jr.
Peters Productions
Sheraton Park H520, 521
Product: Beautiful music, rock, MOR and country automated formats. Radio jingles, TV music
and image logos for TV and radio stations. Personnel: Edward J. Peters, Redd Gardner, James
T. Butler, Mike Larsen, Jack Merker, Geoff
Williams.
Sheraton Park 8320
Product: Beautiful rock, beautiful music, good
music, stereo rock, country music -all formats;
Master Plan, The Producer and The Source
all sales production packages; I.D. packages,
jingles, actualizers, TV packages and custom
music for commercials and film sources. Personnel: Ernie Winn, Alan Collier, Rusty Gold,
Jim Long, Jim West, Jerry Atchley, Ron Nickell.
-
Shoreham A202
Webster Group
Product: Eastern rep for all of Harry O'Connor's
radio features and commentaries by Ronald
Reagan, William Simon, Eliot Janeway, Jack
Webb and Virginia Knauer; plus customized
sales presentations for radio station. Personnel: Maurie Webster, Jack Ackerman, Susan
Rebentisch.
RPM Radio Programming Management
Sheraton Park 8420
Product: Automated radio formats. Personnel:
Tom Krikorian, Jeff Goldman.
Station representatives
Radio Arts
Sheraton Park A800, 802
Personnel: Larry Vanderveen, Philip Koner,
Avery - Knodel
Washington Hilton 4188, 4189, 4190
Personnel: Robert J. Kizer, J.W. Knodel, F.R.
Tony Rufe, Doug Thompson.
Kalthoff, Rich Bompane.
Schulke Radio Productions
John Blair
Hay Adams TBA
Product: Beautiful music. Personnel: Jim
Kelly, Art Stringer, Bill Breda, Bob Carney, Briggs Palmer, Jim Bloom, Jack Bray, Pat Devlin,
Bill Morris, Joe Rosenberg, Steve Murphy, Pier
Mapes, Steve Lemberg, Gordon Sulcer, Don
Gorman, Dave Herman, Dave Hoxeng, Steve
Losee, John Hubbel, Tom Byrnes, Ken Castelli,
Jack Satterfield, Dick Coveny, Tom Harrison,
John Boden, Bob Lobdell, Jerry Gibson, Bob
Galen, David Klemm, Jack Welford, Dan Follis,
Bob Pates, George Wolfson.
Bolton /Burchill International
Sheraton Park TBA
Personnel: Carmen Bolton, Thomas Burchill.
Buckley Radio Sales
Shoreham TBA
Personnel: Richard D. Buckley, Robert V. Cop pinger, Bob Lurito, Brian Dunbar, Mal Trauner,
Joe Bilotta, Bob Syers, Brooke Taylor.
Embassy Row TBA
Personnel: Robert Duffy, Philbin S. Flanagan,
Christal
John M. Foutes, William Frolich, Bella Werner.
Eastman Radio
Embassy Row TBA
Personnel: Gary Andon, Mike Armstrong, Mike
Bellantoni, Steve Block, Frank Boyle, Bill Burton, Carl Butrum, Steve Clayback, Charlie Colombo, Bill Cunningham, Marty Damin, Michele
Donohue, Jerry Donovan, Mary Downey, Bob
Eastman, Tom Gatti, Dave Gn'eiser, John
Hoffmann, Dan Hudson, Jay Keay, Ellen Der ness, Lee Lahey, Sue Love, Dave MacAllister,
Tony Miraglia, Mike Nicassio, Dan Pro danovich, Dave Recher, Howie Rothenberg,
Jim Schneider, Maddy Schreiber, Jerry
Schubert, Kevin Smith, Steve Sorich, Mark Sutter, Thom Sutton, Alan Tobkes, Craig Vickers,
Dick Walker, Tim Wilson.
Bernard Howard & Co.
Washington Hilton TBA
Personnel: Bernard Howard, Bob Weiss, Rich
Greener, Bob Lazar.
-R /Stone
Mayflower 453, 452
Personnel: Jim Alspaugh, Saul Frischling,
H
Carol! Larkin, Inge Jacobson, Sy Thomas, Marty Stedman.
Washington Hilton Senate Room & 1174
Personnel: Wally Schwartz, Harry Smart, Jim
H -R
Television
Shoreham C530
Personnel: Philip Corber, Gene Mitchell, Jay B.
Weed, Roy Edwards, Jr., Edgar White, M.J.
Rozell, Harry Wise, Jr., Al Ritter, Taylor Elden,
Bob Speilmann, Leon West, Ken Kagan, John
McCorkle, Bill Coldwell, Joan Fitzpatrick,
Dwight Reed, Ed Shurick.
The Ted Hepburn Company
Media Brokerage Specialist
The Katz Agency
Personnel: James
Radio, TV, CATV, & Newspapers
P.O. Box 42401
Cincinnati, Ohio 45242
513/791 -8730
NAB Convention Headquarters- Shoreham -Americana, Suite G107
Major Market Radio
Personnel: George
Broadcasting Mar
98
21
Madison TBA
Greenwald, Oliver T.
Blackwell, David S. Allen, Frank J. McCann, Sal
J. Agovino, Richard A. Goldstein, Edward
Papazian, Ken J. Swetz, David S. Abbey, Victor
R. Ferrante, Larry G. Shrum, Gordon H. Hastings, Barry Lewis, Peter R. Goulazian, Kenneth
A. Mills, Donald F. McCarty, Robert J. Peyton,
William Schrank, Geoffrey G. Hall.
1977
L.
Shoreham C430
E.
Lindman,
J.
Warner Rush.
McGavern -Guild & Broadcast Marketing
Washington Hilton, Mt. Vernon
Personnel: Ralph Guild, Monte Lang, Lew
Richard F. Blackburn, Hub Jackson, Wendell
Doss, Michael F. Starr, Robert A. Marshall,
Clifford W. Marshall, Colin Selph and Roy
Goldberg, Tony Durpetti, Tony Maisano, John
Bitting, Marc Gross, Gary Ahrens, Bob Longwell, Ed Carrell, Jeff Dasher, Dick Sharpe and
Bob Williams, Vincent J. Bellino, Ellen
Hollegerg, Robert Dwyer, Broadcast Marketing.
Rowan.
Meeker
Meet you at
Washington Hilton 1195, 1198,
1197
Peters, Griffin, Woodward
Washington Hilton 8101, 6102, 6217
Personnel: William G. Walter, Theodore Van
Erk, Dennis K. Gillespie, Charles R. Kinney,
Albert Strada, Roy M. Terzi, Thomas R. Will,
James R. Seefort.
CHAPMAN ASSOCIATES'
nationwide service
Ed
Personnel: Sam Brownstein, Tom Hayes.
Personnel: Sullivan Barnes, Jay William Chap-
Savalll /Gates
Shoreham E437 -439
Personnel: Joseph Savalli, Carmine Patti,
man, G. Paul Crowder, Joe Gratz, William Hammond, Alan Jones, John King, Arthur Simmers,
Ray Stanfield, Paul Chapman.
1110
H.R. Gardner.
&
Associates
Capital Hilton TBA
Ted Hepburn Co.
Shoreham Americana G107
Personnel: Ted Hepburn.
Keith W. Horton Co.
Guest Quarters 508 -508
Personnel: Keith W. Horton, Dick Kozacko, Bill
R.C. Crisler á Co.
Hyatt Regency TBA
C. Crisler, Edwin G. Richter
Jr., Frank Kalil and Clyde G. Haehnle.
Personnel: Richard
Selcom
Sheraton Park C440
Personnel: Lou Faust, Herb Hahn, Bill Smither,
Ross McGreath.
Doubleday Media Offers:
Teierep Inc.
Washington Hilton 2188, 2189, 2190
Personnel: Al Masini, Steve Herson, Dick
Professional
Experienced
Broadcast
Brokers
Brown, Tom Belviso, Jim Jordan, Pat Prie.
Top Market Television
VISUALIZE
AND CREATE
QUALITY
Dick Anderson
Dan Hayslett
Bob Magruder
See us at:
Sheraton -Park
Suite: D200
Shoreham A601
Personnel: Jim McCann, Thomas Shannon.
Torbet - Lasker
Loew's L'Enfant Plaza TBA
Personnel: Alan Torbet, Ralph Conner, Peter
Moore, Brock Petersen, Jerry Glynn, Lou
Mahacek, Lynn Sable, Steve Marriott.
Tom Hagner, Andy Coscia, Vincent Young, Jerry Britt.
Associates
Mayflower 852, 853
Personnel: Wilt Gunzendorfer.
Chapman Associates Hyatt Regency
Adam Young
Washington Hilton 9157
Personnel: Adam Young, Michael Membrado,
Q. Ford.
Wilt Gunzendorfer
NAB address: Hyatt Regency
Pro /Meeker Radio
Shoreham C434, 435, 436
Thomas Corano, Thomas Griffin, Michael
Maulano, K.L. Miller, Neil Robbins, Thomas
Saxton, Paula Livingston, Paula Mittelman,
Gladys Swanson.
H.R. Gardner &
Personnel:
Sheraton -Carlton TBA
Karlik, Al Rothstein, Art Scott, George Blinn,
Dick Nagle, John Serrao, Ed May, Rod Sterling,
Denny Van Valkenburgh.
Personnel: Milton
Associates
Mayflower 852, 853
While at the N.A.B. Convention, come visit with
Milton Q. Ford & Associates and H.R. Gardner &
Associates
Media Brokers
Suite 8.52 -853,
Mayflower Hotel
Petry Television
Personnel: Martin Connelly, Bob Muth,
Q. Ford &
NOTICE TO
BROADCASTERS
NAB-
Bill Chapman
Paul Crowder
Joe Gratz
Bill Hammond
Alan Jones
John King
Art Simmers
Ray Stanfield
Personnel: Robert Dudley, Jack Hardingham,
William Bee, Audrey Tenzer, Fred Bauman,
Dick Hughes.
Milton
Doubleday Media
13601 Preston Rd., Suite 417W,
Dallas, 75240
un:s!T now a complete system to form settings
and backgrounds.
FEATURING..
Brokers
Blackburn
Twentysia full sized modules on six castered dollies.
Magruder.
Time and labor savings.
Blackburn, Joseph
Harvey, James W. Blackburn Jr.,
Personnel: James
V.
Precision
r
1'
scale planning model.
Unlimited versatility.
Minimum storage required.
& Co.
Sheraton Park K800
Sitrick, Jack
Doubleday Media
Sheraton Park D200, 205, 206
Personnel: Dick Anderson, Dan Hayslett, Bob
William A. Exiine Inc.
Mayflower TBA
W.
Personnel: William
A. Exline.
Broadcasting Mar
97
21
1977
For further information See us N.A.B Booth 700
P 449 Ave. A. Rochester. New York 14621
(716) 544 3820
un:se
Hugh Ben LaRue
Personnel: Hugh
By appointment only. Personnel: Howard Stark.
Madison TBA
Frank N. Magid
Product: Research and consulting. Personnel:
Edwin Tornberg
Frank Magid, Leigh Stowell, Dallas Miller, Don
O'Connor.
Washington Hilton TBA
Howard Stark
Cook, Ken Chapin and Bob Kimel.
Washington Hilton TBA
Ben LaRue, Joy Thomas.
Larson Walker & Co.
Washington Hilton TBA
Personnel: G. Bennett Larson and Chris Larson.
&
Co.
Capital Hilton TBA
Personnel: Edwin Tornberg.
Washington Hilton 2195, 2196, 2197
Personnel: Roy Anderson, Dave Traylor, Nancy
Cunningham, Bill Hamill, Andy Faller, Ralph
Clausen, Clay Herrick, Paul Beard, Larry Frerk,
Gene McClure, Bill Miller, Dave Woolf son, Karl
Wyler, Carrol Carter, Jóe Matthews.
Others
NAB CONVENTION
HEADQUARTERS
Sheraton Park Hotel
Let's Talk About
Available FLORIDA 8 SE Stations
REGGIE MARTIN
Media Broker
(305) 361 -2181
731 S. Mashla, Key Biscayne, Fla.
33149
ASCAP
Capital Hilton TBA
Personnel: Louis Weber, Larry Sklover, Jack
Zwaska, Paul Fagan (Mayflower).
George Moore & Associates
Washington Hilton TBA
Personnel: George W. Moore, W. James Moore.
Peter Roslow.
SESAC
Trapp, Jay Bowles, Ed DeFontaine, George
Mayo, George Otwell, Tony Rizzo, Jim Smith,
Mark Thayer, Tony Catello, Ben Avery, Jim
Hood, Randy Collier.
Odium, Sidney Gruber, Albert F. Ciancimino,
Charles Scully, Vincent Candilora, Bob Heck,
Hal Fitzgerald, Bob McGarvey, George Chernault, Glenn Ramsey, Ken Ovendun.
Arbitron
Spanish International Network
Mayflower TBA
Personnel: Rene Anselmo, Danny Villanueva,
Sheraton Park A100
Shaker, A.J. Aurichio,
Sherm Brodey, Brian Byrne, William Engel,
F.
John Fawcett, Gerald Flesher, Richard
Glaspell, David Grigsby, Norman Hecht,
Richard Lamb, Ronald Laufer, Michael Levine,
Pierre Megroz, James Mocarski, Bryce
Rathbone, Kathy Seipp, William Shafer, James
Shaughnessy, Kathleen Skelley, Woodruff
Sloan, Richard Weinstein, A.J. Aurichio, John
Cook, Bruce Massey, Meridee Muell.
for
a
Visit our suite in the
Shoreham-Americana
review of the current market
in broadcast properties
Confidential Service to
Owners and Qualified Buyers
A
CECIL L. RICHARDS, INC.
Media Brokers & Appraisers
7700 Leesburg Pike
Falls Church, Va. 22043
(703) 821 -2552
Cecil L. Richards Inc.
Shoreham Americana TBA
Personnel: Cecil Richards, Nora Mundy.
Axiom Market Research Bureau
TBA
Mayflower TBA
BMI
Personnel: Edward Kramer, Edward Molinelli,
Alan Smith, Robert Higgins, Lawrence
Sweeney, Russ Sanjek.
COMPU/NET Broadcast
Business Automation
Service
COME SEE US AT THE N.A.B.!
Suite A -111, Sheraton Park
Hotel
call
Bruce
Massie,
213/642 -2323, or John Cook,
212/262 -5293)
SHERATON PARK HOTEL
Suite M789
MEDIA BROKERS
APPRAISERS
ItICMA1ID
A
312.467.0040
Richard A. Shaheen Inc.
Sheraton Park M789
Personnel: Richard A. Shaheen.
Shoreham E330, 331, 332
Personnel: A.H. Prager, S.B. Candilora, Norman
Emilio Nicolas, Joaquin Blaya, Bill Stiles, Sally
Segal, Bob Porter, Jim Meek, Guy Freeman,
John Pero, Duffy Sasser, Larry Beckman.
Telcom Associates
Washington Hilton 2174, 2175, 2176
Personnel: Herb Jacobs, Grace Jacobs, Dean
McCarthy, Howard Glassroth and Jim Ritter.
United Press International
Shoreham B820, 822, 824
Personnel: Alan Tessier, Avery Gibson, Dwight
Cosner.
(or
NAB HEADQUARTERS
Pulse
Sheraton Park F551
Personnel: Richard Roslow, George Sternberg,
Associated Press, AP Radio
Sheraton Park F240, 242
Personnel: Roy Steinfort, Bob Benson, Jerry
Personnel: Theodore
Reggie Martin
Sheraton Park TBA
Personnel: Reggie Martin, Kurt Martin.
A.C. Nielsen
Compu/Net
Sheraton Park A111
Product: Broadcast business automation service. Personnel: Bruce Massie, John Cooke.
Federal Communications Commission
Booth Nos. 708, 707, 708 SH
1919 M Street, N W, Washington, 20554.
Personnel: FCC will have various staff members and personnel on hand Miring the course
of the convention, including Phyll Home, Jim
McKinney, Wallace Johnson, Paul Putney, Neal
McNaughten, Charles Higginbotham, Dennis
Williams.
Broadcasting Mar
98
21
1977
Public service
Alpha Epsilon Rho
458 WH
University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C.
29208.
American Women in Radio and Television
457 WH
1321 Connecticut Avenue, N.W, Washington
20036.
Call for Action
1785 Massachusetts Avenue,
455
N. W.,
WH
Washington
20036.
Employers Support of the Guard &
Reserve
458 WH
1117 North 19th Stree4 Arlington, Va. 22209.
Federal Energy Administration 454 WH
Washington 20461.
NAB Engineering Handbook
481 WH
1771 N Stree4 NW, Washington 20036.
National Guard Advertising Support
Center
451 WH
P.O. Box 1776, Edgewood, Md. 21040.
U.S. Army Reserve
452 WH
DAAR -PA, Room 1E458, Pentagon, Washington 20310.
U.S. Air Force Audio Visual
450 WH
Randolph AFB, Thx. 78148.
U.S. Coast Guard
453 WH
400 Seventh Stree4 S. W., Washington 20590.
U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of
Census
480 WH
Washington 20233.
U.S. Department of Commerce,
NOOA
459 WH
6010 Executive Avenue, Rockville, Md. 20852.
The Broadcasting
PlaylistßMar21
Contemporary
Over-all-rank
Last This
Title (length)
week week
Artist -label
1
1
11
2
4
3
Playback®
6-
10a 33p
7p
7-
12p
Love Theme from "A Star Is Born"
(Evergreen) (3:03)
Barbra Streisand- Columbia
Things We Do for Love (3:32)
1
1
1
3
2
4
2
Dancing Queen (3:50)
4
3
2
5
10cc- Mercury
Abbe- Atlantic
1
Don't Leave Me This Way (3:35)
Thelma Houston- TamlalMotown
6
6
3
4
5
5
Rich Girl (2:23)
5
4
5
3
2
6
2
5
6
8
6
7
Torn Between Two Lovers (3:40)
Mary MacGregor- Ariola AmericalCapitol
Night Moves (3:20)
12
8
7
6
9
8
Fly Like an Eagle (3:00)
10
7
9
7
3
9
8
9
10
10
12 114
Hall & Oates
-RCA
Bob Seger -Capitol
Steve Miller Band
7
10
17
N11
8
12
13
13
15
14
10
15
27
118
16
17
14
18
19
18
24
20
19
21
32
122
26
23
20
24
- 125
-Capitol
Year of the Cat (4:32)
Al Stewart -Janus
I Like Dreamin' (3:29)
Kenny Nolan -20th Century
Don't Give Up on Us (3:30)
David Soul- Private Stock
Blinded by the Light (3:48)
Manfred Mann -Warner Bros.
Carry on, Wayward Son (3:26)
Kansas-Kirshner/Epic
Go Your Own Way (3:34)
Fleetwood Mac -Warner Bros.
New Kid in Town (5:02)
Eagles- Asylum
I've Got Love on My Mind (4:20)
Natalie Cole -Capitol
Maybe I'm Amazed (3:13)
Wings -Capitol
Weekend In New England (3:38)
Barry Manilow- Arista
Hotel California (6:09)
Eagles -Asylum
So Into You (3:19)
Atlanta Rhythm Section -Polydor
Long Time (3:03)
Boston
-Epic
11
11
8
9
9
13
12
13
7
14
11
15
13
10
13
12
17
12
14
11
14
15
16
16
15
16
17
17
16
17
15
14
18
18
19
20
19
19
18
22
21
20
19
20
20
21
21
Southern Nights (2:58)
21
23
23
25
Lido Shuffle (3:40)
23
22
24
23
24
24
22
24
Glen Campbell -Capitol
Scaggs- Columbia
Enjoy Yourself (3:24)
Leo Sayer -Warner Bros.
25
28
25
Hot Line (2:59)
35
26
26
22
27
Trying to Love Two (3:05)
26
29
27
30
25
28
27
25
32
28
30
33
31
30
32
-
34
31
33
34
35
29
36
-
37
38
38
35
39
-
40
1
1
2
Sylvers -Capitol
William Bell- Mercury
Isn't She Lovely (6:33)
Stevie Wonder -Tamla /Motown
Car Wash (3:18)
Rose Royce -MCA
Crackerbox Palace (3:52)
George Harrison -Dark Horse /Warner Bros.
The First Cut Is the Deepest (3:19)
Rod Stewart -Warner Bros.
Do Ya (3:45)
Electric Light Orchestra United Artists
Say You'll Stay Until Tomorrow (3:30)
Torn Jones -Epic
Your Love (3:30)
Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr. -ABC
I Wish (4:12)
Stevie Wonder -Tamla /Motown
You Make Me Feel Like Dancing (2:48)
Leo Sayer Warner Bros.
Whodunit (3:35)
-
-
34
32
27
36
34
28
31
33
31
30
32
29
33
33
34
28
32
35
36
31
38
31
37
37
34
36
33
36
37
37
38
Boogie Child (330)
Bee Gees- RSO /Polydor
Walk This Way (3:31)
Aerosmith- Columbia
Free (3:25)
Deniece Williams -Columbia
38
38
35
40
'
1
1
1
2
2
2
3
8
3
3
Kenny Rogers- United Artists
Heart Healer (2:31)
4
6
4
4
4
5
She's Just an Old Love... (2:33)
5
3
5
5
6
5
5
6
7
N 7
Don't Throw It all Away (3:09)
Dave & Sugar -RCA
It Couldn't Have Been Any Better (3:00)
Johnny Duncan-Columbia
6
14
7
7
8
6
Paper Boole (3:56)
8
4
7
8
10
fA
8
Mel Tillis -MCA
Charley Pride -RCA
-Capitol
Adios Amigo (3:35)
Marty Robbins -Columbia
Gene Watson
9
5
11
9
12
She's Got You (3:04)
Loretta Lynn -MCA
Desperado (3:16)
Johnny Rodriguez- Mercury
Near You (2:21)
&
Tammy Wynette
-Epic
10
9
9
9
10
10
9
11
11
11
11
17
13
12
13
8
13
Moody Blue (2:48)
13
12
15
17
10
14
If Love Was a Bottle of Wine (3:14)
Tommy Overstreet- ABCIDot
Play Guitar Play (3:20)
12
16
13
15
15
14
16
14
14
18
14
16
18
19
17
12
16
23
18
21
20
17
23
20
N15
16
Elvis Presley ;RCA
Conway Twitty -MCA
There She Goes Again (3:01)
Joe Stampley
12
17
15
18
7
19
- N20
-121
21
22
-
23
25
24
18
25
39
39
1
2
4
-
35
12p
-Capitol
Torn Between Two Lovers (3:40)
Mary MacGregor -Ariola America /Capitol
Lucille (3:39)
George Jones
Tavares -Capitol
1-
--
7p
13
11
29
3p
3
23110
26
30
Southern Nights (2:58)
l0a- 3
17
-
29
30
610a
Glen Campbell
27
26
22
2
13
Jacksons -Epic
When I Need YoU (4:11)
Rank by day parts
Over -all-rank
Title (length)
Last This
week week Artist -label
Boz
28
29
Country
18
23
21
If its not top 40 and not album -oriented
rock, then what is the new format WDGY(AM) Minneapolis -St. Paul
adopted last week? "We're color radio" says program director Chuck
Roberts. Can you tell the difference between black- and -white and
color TV? Well that's the difference between other radio stations and
ours" In an effort to "win the great radio game' in Minneapolis -SI.
Paul, wOGY has concocted what Mr. Roberts says is a new type of format. By playing a larger number of records (cuts from a list of 40
albums), woos( hopes to "bring home some ratings :' since it's behind
other Minneapolis -St. Paul stations such as KDWB(AM). KSTP(AM) and
wCCO(AM). Mr. Roberts considers all other stations in the area competition, no matter what the format: "We want to get more listeners
than anyone else in town ... but were aiming for the 18-49 audience" If wow's innovation takes off, Mr. Roberts expects other stations in the country to test this combination AOR- top -40 format also.
"We realized we ought to pay more attention to the big record with
the little hole in the middle ... playing 20 records over and over again
is a drag ... and the reception to the change has been great."
Somewhere in between.
Rank by day parts
í0a
-Epic
After the Lovin' (3:50)
Engelbert Humperdink -Epic
You're Free to Go (2:40)
Sonny James -Columbia
Say You'll Stay Until Tomorrow (3:30)
Tom Jones
-Epic
I'm Not Easy (3:03)
Billio Jo Spears- United Artists
Mockingbird Hill (2:58)
Donna Fargo
Easy Look
-(2:46)
Warner Bros.
Charlie Rich -Epic
Wrap Your Love All Around Your
Man (2:39)
Lynn Anderson -Columbia
Don't Be Angry (3:02)
Donna Fargo -ABC /Dot
The Movies (2:59)
Statler Bros.- Mercury
21
15
23
21
18
19
23
24
22
24
25
24
19
20
25
19
22
22
20
These are the top songs in air -play popularity as reported by a select group of U.S. stations. Each has been "weighted" in terms of The Pulse Inc. audience ratings for the reporting station on which it is played and for the part of the day at which il appears. A (N) indicates an upward movement of five or more chart positions.
Broadcasting Mar
99
21
1977
Fates &Fortunes
.
of NAB's Employment Clearinghouse, Office of
Community Affairs.
Media
Albert Clark, from Litton Industries, Beverly
Sheldon Cooper, VP/
general manager,
Hills, Calif., joins National Subscription Television (KBsc -Tv) Los Angeles as controller.
television,
WGN
Continental Broadcasting, Chicago, appointed
director of broadcasting. Mr. Cooper is also
director of parent, VP/
director of WGN
Continental ProducCooper
tions and director of
WON of Colorado Inc.,
licensee of KWGN -TV
Denver.
Warren Maus, manager, NBC Radio News and
Information Service, West Coast, appointed
manager, NBC Radio Network, West Coast.
James
W.
Corcoran,
Walla Walla,
Wash.,
sales manager, KHIT(AM)
appointed manager,
KWWW(AM) Wenatchee, Wash.
Jack Ellis, member of Purdue University football coaching staff, West Lafayette, Ind., named
station manager, WEAw(AM) Evanston, Ill.
Oxarart
Schrieber
manager of Group W's WOWO(AM) Fort Wayne,
End., becomes KYW general manager, and
Daniel Friel Jr., wowo general sales manager,
named general manager.
Joe Root, news director,
WAPT(TV) Jackson,
Miss., assumes additional duties as assistant
general manager. Jimmy Hutto named promotion /public service director.
Martha
W.
Williams, license research
assis-
tant, KOMO -TV Seattle, promoted to continuity
director, replacing John Brown, resigned to do
freelance work.
W. Forbes, program director, Concerned
Communications Corp., group station owner,
Yuba City, Calif., promoted to corporate operations manager.
Ross
Dave Smith, news director, WXKE(AM) Fort
Wayne, Ind., appointed operations manager.
Mark DeWitt Young, creative director /writer/
weathercaster, WAVY -TV Portsmouth, Va., joins
WMAR -TV Baltimore as on -air promotion pro-
Art Schrleber, general manager, Group W's
KFWB(AM) Los Angeles, named to same post at
co -owned WINS(AM) New York, succeeded by
Frank Oxarart, general manager, co-owned
KYW(AM) Philadelphia. Warren Maurer, general
ducer.
William
F. Ahlstrom, vice president, corporate
relations, National Public Radio, Washington,
resigns to return to private consulting work.
Friel
Maurer
Edgar
W. Malkin, associate director, contracts,
ABC -TV, East Coast, named director, contracts
there. Charles E. Kent, program attorney,
ABC -TV, East Coast, named associate director,
contracts, East Coast.
Tom Schnurbusch, regional sales manager,
Wisconsin TV Network, Madison, joins KREAM-FM Berkeley, Calif., as general manager.
Wirth Jr., executive VP and general
manager, Foote, Cone & Belding, New York,
and director of parent company, Foote, Cone &
Belding Communications, transferred to
FC &B, Chicago, as executive VP, corporate
operations. Julian Morrison, senior VP and international management supervisor, J. Walter
Thompson, Chicago, joins FC &B International,
there. Len Daykin, grocery merchandising
director, Foote, Cone & Belding, New York,
named director of merchandising.
John L. Marver, station manager /national
Arthur Meranus,
Roland King, general
sales manager, KMSP -Tv
Minneapolis, named station manager.
Jack Baker, general manager,
New York, joins CBS -owned
general manager.
CBS /FM Sales,
WEEI -FM
Boston as
VP /group creative director,
Cunningham & Walsh, New York, elected
joins WYLD -AM -FM New Orleans
senior VP.
as
general man-
Stan C. Smart, general manager, WCER -AM -FM
Charlotte, Mich., named to same post,
Albany and co -owned WELL -FM
Marshall, both Michigan.
WALM(AM)
Broadcast Personnel, Inc.
527 Madison Avenue, NYC 10022
(212)355-2672
W. R.
sales director, WENZ(AM) Hyland Springs, Va.,
ager.
Since 1960, Sherlee Barish has
been supplying stations with
executive personnel and on-air TV
news talent. Over 500 placements.
More than 4,000 active applicants.
A matchmaker with the instinct for
putting the right people together.
Call her.
Broadcast Advertising
John Graham Findlay, program director,
KNWZ(AM) Albuquerque, N.M., named operations VP.
Orlando White, director of special projects,
community affairs department, WGN -AM -TV
Chicago, named manager of urban affairs.
Arthur
C. Boughner, Canadian assistant
deputy postmaster general, joins Canadian
Broadcasting Corp., Ottawa, as finance VP
Nancy J. McCormick, assistant to director of
broadcast management, National Association of
Broadcasters, Washington, named coordinator
Broadcasting Mar
100
21
1977
Jim Carroll, manager of broadcast budget and
cost control, Kenyon & Eckhardt, New York,
named VP /broadcast production manager.
James A. Cannon, controller; Melvin J.
Ciociola, copy supervisor; Michael J. Drake,
media planning group head; Norman R.
Goldstein, senior associate research director;
Richard A. Guilmenot, account supervisor;
Mary Lou Pritchett, account supervisor and
Edward Stein, copy supervisor, named VP's
BBDO, New York.
Gloria Gardner, producer, Grey Advertising,
New York, joins D'Arcy -MacManus & Masius
there as TV producer. Sharon Lalik, DM &M
media planner, promoted to associate media
director. Theodore G. Mack, senior art director, Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago, joins
DM &M St. Louis in same capacity. William H.
Long, graduate assistant, Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville, joins DM &M, St. Louis,
as supervisor of media information and re-
managers of Television One and Television Two
there, respectively.
Frederick
D.
Eppinger, account executive,
KPIX(TV) San Francisco, named local sales manager. Robert S. Bushyhead, head account ex-
search services department.
Mary Meahan, manager, Media Bureau International, Minneapolis, joins Harrington, Right-
Marci Weiner, VP /creative services business
er & Parsons, there as sales manager.
same post.
manager, Norman, Craig & Kummel, New
York, and president of Prix Productions subsidiary, named senior VP
Christopher J. Rohrs, national
Gil R. Rozzo, general manager, WRCP -AM -FM
Philadelphia, named general sales manager,
wwsw(AM) Pittsburgh.
Robert G. McCready, director of account
management, Hoefer, Dieterich & Brown, San
Francisco, named senior VP and director of
agency.
Mike Komives, account group supervisor,
Clinton
Fronk, Chicago, joins J. Walter
Thompson there as management supervisor.
E.
Kenneth M. Konecnik, VP /associate creative
director, Arthur & Wheeler, Chicago, joins
Tatham -Laird & Kudner there as associate creative director. Gail A. Davis, from Arthur
Meterhoff & Associates there, joins TLK as
copy supervisor. Robert Graham, creative
group manager, Marsteller there, named TLK
copywriter.
John M. Sullivan, chief financial officer, Cox &
Co. advertising, New York, joins McDonald &
Little, Atlanta,
as
controller.
Joe Callaway, producer /director,
WHBQ -TV
Memphis, joins Jan Gardner & Associates advertising /public relations there, as account executive.
sales manager,
Albany, N.Y., rejoins Top Market
Television as manager of its new Miami office,
scheduled to open April 4.
Newly elected officers, Atlanta Radio RepreWTEN(TV)
sentatives Association: Mary O'Shields,
Southern Spot Sales, president; Lou Mahacek,
Torbet -Lasker, VP; Bob Jones, Radio Advertising Representatives, secretary, and Dick
Walker, Eastman Radio, treasurer.
Michael J. Rourke, partner in Davies &
Rourke Advertising, Boise, Idaho, named advertising VP, Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co.,
Montvale, N.J.
Carl
Sales,
there.
V.
Carey, account executive, NBC Spot
named manager of Sales, WNBC -Tv
local /regional sales manager,
Minneapolis, appointed general sales
manager. Paul (Ted) Pearse, sales VP, Blair
Television, Detroit, joins KMSP -TV as sales manKMSP -TV
ager.
Zim Berstein, sales promotion manager,
WLIR(FM) Garden City, N.Y., named sales manager.
Programing
Jack R. Crutchfield,
director of develop-
sales manager, WNBC.
Tv New York, named director of sales, WMAQ -Tv
Chicago. Both are NBC O &O's.
ment for Public Broadcasting Service, New
York, named director
of sales and programs
for newly formed Trident Anglia, New York,
owned primarily by Trident Television and
Anglia Television, British producers, with J.
Walter Thompson as
minority stockholder.
Keith Swinehart,
sales manager, wcBS-Tv New
York, named director of Eastern sales, CBS
Television Stations National Sales there.
Michael J. Digennare, wcBS -TV general sales
manager, named director of sales.
Television Sales, Chicago, appointed manager,
Detroit office.
Bill Fallon and Charles Ferguson, salesmen,
Sheila Martin, traffic supervisor,
HR Television, Chicago, promoted to sales
Syracuse, N.Y., appointed sales supervisor.
WTVH(Tv)
KPIX in
Stuart Swartz,
James Zafiros, national
Ben Okulski, owner /operator, Telefilm Sales,
rep firm for film syndication and program distribution companies, joins KBHK -TV San Francisco as general sales manager.
George Carlino, account executive, Storer
ecutive, Blair Television there, joins
Crutchheid
Louis Rudolph, director, motion pictures for
television, ABC Entertainment, Los Angeles,
trWr
SYSterans
the in -house computbr system
iirtrafficanalysis,
logs,
billing,
bookkeeping,
automation control
and
A.T.S. logging.
From $29,950
po box 1343lofoyetta,indiano .47902 (317)423.2572
Broadcasting Mar
101
21
1
977
appointed VR motion pictures and novels for
television there. Ken Gross, program executive, named executive producer, motion pictures for television. Leonard Hill, director,
television movies, NBC, Los Angeles, appointed executive producer, motion pictures for
John Dennis, sports reporter, wDAF -Tv Kansas
public affairs director.
Mo., joins wNAC-Tv Boston in same
capacity. Roy Reiss, wNAC -Tv weekend sports
reporter on freelance basis, named full -time
sports producer.
Jerry Cannady, assistant news director,
City,
television, ABC Entertainment. Dottie
Gagliano, secretary, merchandising, motion
Jack Doniger, reporter, NBC, New York, joins
pictures for television, ABC Entertainment, appointed manager, creative services, motion pictures and novels for television. Eddie Foy Ili,
independent casting director/casting consultant, joins ABC Entertainment, Los Angeles, as
director of casting.
Dave Saline, in
F. Lewine, president and chief executive officer, National Academy of Arts and Sciences, Los Angeles and VP of programing at
various times for all three TV networks, appointed executive producer, NBC -TV, West
Coast.
Robert
Jack Swindell, Southwest division manager,
Group W Productions, Dallas, takes on added
responsibilities for national film sales. Joseph
Goldfarb, central division manager, Chicago,
given added assignments in new business and in
administrative area. Peter Yemen, New York,
director of sales development and in charge of
Eastern division of Group W Productions,
assumes responsibility in sales of commercials
within certain programs and in related agencyclient contracts. Carl Menk, account executive,
Atlanta, named Southeast division manager
there. Jack Foley, Western division manager,
based in Santa Barbara, Calif., has been
assigned additional territory. Robert
Schleimer, supervisor, general accounting,
Group W, New York, named business manager
of Group W Productions's Mike Douglas Show,
Philadelphia.
David V.B. Britt, development
Children's
Television Workshop, New York, named VP for
planning and development.
VP,
Steve Michelson, producer of A Current
Affair in Australia, joins One Pass Productions,
minicam production firm, San Francisco, as
head of production.
NBC's wac(AM) Washington
WQPM(AM) Princeton,
Wenatchee, Wash.,
WCBS -TV
Associates, Providence, R.I., joins
there as community affairs director.
tor. Clifford (Batch) Reeves, continuity acceptance supervisor for syndicated and exchange programing, wcss -TV New York, promoted to manager of film and tape.
Dick Norris, director,
KPHO-Tv
Phoenix,
as
WGN -Tv Chicago, joins
executive producer.
Julian H. (Peter) Booker, from WMGK(AM)
Philadelphia, joins co -owned WHND(AMIwMJc(AM) Monroe -Birmingham, Mich., as pro-
WJAR-TV
Loren Owens, air personality, WPEN(AM)
Philadelphia, named program director,
KIMN(AM) Denver.
Barbara Brozdowski, secretary to VP /gener-
co- anchor, WNAC -TV named investigative reporter. Steve Fentress, executive for McHugh
& Hoffman communications consultants,
McLean, Va., joins WNAC -TV as executive news
producer, succeeding Don Ringe, named director of special projects. Marcie Diehl, news producer, WPLG(rv) Miami, rejoins WNAC -TV as
news editor /producer.
Rick Taylor, reporter /weekend anchor,
wNGErrv) Nashville, joins wPEC(rV) West Palm
Beach, Fla., as anchor.
Julie Wells, reporter,
Malcolm B. -Wall, director of division of pro-
Dennis Holly, reporter /anchor,
graming, Mississippi ETV Network, Jackson,
joins Southern Educational Communications
Association, Columbia, S.C., as director of network programing.
Pittsburgh, joins
Martha S. Carrell, director of training and development, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, named director of program
administration, noncommercial KCET(rv) Los
WMAR -TV
KDKA -TV
as co-
Baltimore
anchor.
Norm Stangland, news editor,
WXKE(FM) Fort
Wayne, Ind., named news director.
John S. Callaghan, from
Cleveland, rejoins WGAR(AM) there
WERE(AMI
reporter.
as
Cynthia Perry, consumer reporter,
KTvu(TV)
Angeles.
Oakland, Calif., joins KGO(AM) San Francisco in
Joan Everett Sassone, production assistant,
noncommercial wxxl(rv) Rochester, N.Y.,
named videographer, responsible for video -tape
same capacity.
production and equipment.
administration,
RCA's Hertz Corp.,
New York, named VR
business affairs and administration, co -owned
NBC News, there.
S. William Scott, VP
of radio news operations for Group W and
general manager of
company's WINS(AM)
New York, relinquishes
duties in latter post and
continues in radio news capacity.
Richard Kuhns, head of his own TV programing and commercial production companies,
named assistant news director, TV /newsfilm,
ABC News, New York, replacing Gideon Fiat
who was promoted to director of electronic
news gathering (BROADCASTING, March 14).
Michael J. Connor, broadcasting /advertising
reporter, Wall Street Journal, New York, and
Richard Rogin, freelance writer, join ABC
News as investigative reporters.
parent, Greater Media Inc., New Brunswick,
N.J.
Bill Lowell, program/news director,
gram director.
WEZE(AM)
Boston, joins WROR(FM) there as news director.
Keith Radford, assistant news director, CKLWAM-FM Windsor, Ont.- Detroit, named news/
Broadcasting Mar
102
21
1977
Frederick, Md., joins KIMN(AM) Denver
newscaster /reporter.
as
Corp., Ottawa, joins CTV Television Network,
Michael J. Sherlock,
VP,
Gregg Jarrett, news director, wzYQ(AM)
Cecilia Walters, from Canadian Broadcasting
Broadcast Journalism
Mike Hutton, operations manager, Oklahoma
News Network, Oklahoma City, named pro-
director.
'
KODL(AM) Fairway, Kan.,
named anchor, KMBR(AM) Kansas City, Mo.
York, named music
gram director, succeeding Thomas J.
Milewski, named adminstrative assistant for
Mark Driscoll, from WNOE(AM) New Orleans,
joins wAPE(AM) Jacksonville, Fla., as program
John Henning, anchorman, wcvB -TV Boston,
WNAC -ry there as co- anchor. Paul Reece,
joins
director.
al manager, WCBS -FM New
Sherlock
New York, named public affairs direc-
same capacity.
program director.
Doris C. Sherry, personnel consultant, Xavier
An-
Norm Peters, anchorman, WFSa -TV Hartford,
Conn., joins wwt.nrvi Springfield, Mass., in
programing, WKPM(AMIMinn., joins KWWW(AM)
as
KENS -Tv San
tonio, Tex., named assistant news director.
sports anchor.
human resources development, Wells Fargo
Bank, San Francisco, joins KJEO-TV Fresno,
Calif., as public affairs director.
Jim Phillips, president of Image Makers production house, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Harry Sanger, general manager, CHAM(AM)
Hamilton, Ont., join M.A. Kempner, film producer- distributor, Fort Lauderdale, as account
Morton Silverstein, executive news producer,
Chris Marrou, anchorman,
Frances M. Reyes, management consultant,
Roy E. Disney, VP /producer, Walt Disney Productions, Burbank, Calif., has retired to produce motion pictures independently. He remains director of company.
executives.
as
WALB-
Tv Albany, Ga., promoted to news director.
Toronto, as Edmonton correspondent. Del
Archer, from cFCF-TV Montreal, joins CTV as
Winnipeg correspondent. Michael Benedict,
Ottawa reporter, Toronto Star, named correspondent, CTV's Ottawa bureau.
Cable
C. Ronald Dorchester, regional manager,
American Television Corp., Orlando, Fla., joins
Communications Properties Inc., Plantsville,
Conn., in same capacity.
Jeri Baker, assistant to president of Motion
Picture Association of America, Washington,
joins Home Box Office, New York, as director,
public relations. Ms. Baker succeeds John R.
Barrington, who has resigned to form his own
public relations company.
L. LeComte, supervisor of accounting
and customer billing, Magnavox CATV,
Manlius, N.Y., named manager of accounting
operations.
Glen
Equipment & Engineering
David J. Gardam, VP, industrial relations,
RCA electronics and diversified businesses,
New York, appointed executive VP, personnel,
labor relations organization planning. Charles
J. Gaydos, RCA sales representative, appointed manager, teleproduction systems sales,
Camden, N.J., succeeding Jesse L. Nickels,
named manager, Midwestern broadcast sales.
Ronald
R.
Ferguson, senior technician, tech-
Tv New York, named manager
of technical
ecutive
Webster Group, broadcast consulSusan Rebentisch, manager,
Lindblad Travel, New York, joins Webster
VP,
nical service department, Telemation, Salt Lake
City, appointed customer service manager. Ernie Freestone and Richard Lyon, technical
services technicians, transferred to customer
services there. Ken Weinreich and Tom
Bushman, technical services technicians in
Glenview, Ill., and Kensington, Md., respectively, also transferred to customer service
department of their respective areas.
operations.
tancy there.
Ed Buterbaugh, director of engineering, CKLWAM-FM Windsor, Ont.- Detroit, appointed
Group
Richard
Glenn H. Lahman, engineering manager for
Edyvean, technical representative,
Trace Inc., Lafayette, Ind., joins Automation
W.
Electronics there
Charles
F.
as
engineering
Rockhill, Western
VP.
sales manager,
McMartin Industries, Monterey, Calif., named
sales manager, Beaucart division of UMC
Electronics, North Haven, Conn.
Richard
F. Priske, sales engineer, Ampex
Corp., Redwood City, Calif., named Midwestern regional manager, video products,
Dynasciences, Blue Bell, Pa.
Herb Van Driel, Midwest regional sales manager, International Video Corp., Chicago, joins
Angenieux Corp., Bohemia, N.Y., as broadcast
optics manager.
Thomas B. Jones Jr., sales engineer,
Multronics Inc., Columbia, Md., promoted to
sales manager.
Vincent J. Larinto, manager of credit and finance, Hughes Helicopters, Hollywood, joins
Deluxe Laboratories there as credit manager.
Joseph Kaspar, maintenance supervisor,
WOR-
administration.
Ray Anderson, president of his own national
engineering
VP.
Michael
Wilson,
R.
as VP,
sales administrator, Pelco
AMVID Communications Services, Manhattan Beach, Calif.,
as account executive.
Sales, Gardena, Calif., joins
promotion consultant firm, rejoins RCA
Records, New York, as division VP, promotion.
Deaths
becoming
KDKA- AM -FM -TV Pittsburgh, who
chief engineer of co -owned wJZ -Tv Baltimore,
George Cooke Stevens, 64, president,
is
Greenwich (Conn.) Broadcasting Corp., and
general manager of its WGCH(AM) there, died
after heart attack March 12 at Yale New Haven
hospital. He had been president of GBC since
1968 and assumed active management of station in 1972. He began broadcast career in 1945
with NBC, where he eventually held executive
positions before moving to Transcontinent
Television Corp., group station owner that was
later sold. Survivors include his wife, Lydia,
and six children.
and John M. Lyons, facilities planning
engineer for Riverside Broadcasting (WWRL
IAMI) New York, named fellows of Society of
Broadcast Engineers.
Allied Fields
Barbara Adago, assistant to executive
VP,
media division, Trendex, New York, named
director of client services.
Michael Nemeth, senior programer, Cox Data
Services, Atlanta, promoted to product support
manager-TV. Patrice Bourgeois, conversion
leader, named customer support manager.
John B. Tupper, consultant to cable television
companies, joins communications brokerage
firm of William Kepper Associates, Evanston,
Ill., as principal of firm, manager of New York
office and head of financial services.
John F. Ackerman, VP, station relations, Radio
Advertising Bureau, New York, appointed ex-
H. Smith, 62, retired chief of FCC
Broadcast Bureau's compliance branch, died of
cancer March 13 at Chevy Chase nursing home,
Silver Spring, Md. He joined FCC in 1964 as
general investigator, complaints and compliance
Merlin
division, subsequently becoming compliance
specialist until Oct. 1973 when he became chief
of that branch. He is survived by his wife,
Angelina, one son, one daughter and brother,
George Smith, one -time chief of FCC Broadcast Bureau and Washington lawyer, now
retired.
For the Records
As compiled by BROADCASTING for the
period March 7 through March 11 and
based on filings, authorizations, petitions
and other actions announced by the FCC.
ALJ- Administrative Law Judge.
ann.- announced. ant.- antenna.
aur.- aural. aux.- auxiliary. CH- critical hours. CPconstruction permit. D -day. DA- directional antenAbbreviations:
alt.- alternate.
na. Doc.- Docket. ERP- effective radiated power.
HAAT- height of antenna above average terrain.
khz -kilohertz. kw- kilowatts. MEOV- maximum
expected operation value. mhz- megahertz. mod.
modification. N- night. PSA- presunrise service authority. SH- specified hours. trans. -transmitter.
TPO- transmitter power output. U- unlimited hours.
vis.- visual. w- watts. ' -noncommercial.
-
New stations
TV application
Salinas, Calif.
35 (596 -602
- Leejon Broadcasting Co. seeks
ch.
mhz); ERP 1525 kw vis., 152.5 kw aur.,
HAAT 2648 ft.; ant. height above ground
237 ft. P.O.
address: Box 1810, Los Gatos, Calif. 95030. Estimated
construction cost $5,000 (applicant intends to use facilities already built); first -year operating cost $86,400;
revenue $180,000. Legal counsel Eaton, Stein &
AM start
do Harold F. Parshall, 2920 S. Dixie Dr.,
Kettering, Ohio 45409. Estimated construction cost
none, donated; first -year operating cost $1,000. Format: Variety. Principal: Applicant is non -profit, educational organization (BPED- 2159). Action Feb. 23.
P.O. address:
WJAL Conway, S.C.- Authorized program operation on 1050 khz, 5 kw-D. Action Feb. 22.
FM Actions
Eureka, Calif., Pauldon Inc.- Broadcast Bureau
granted 92.3 mhz, 100 kw, HAAT 355 ft. P.O. address:
5640 S. Broadway, Eureka 95501. Estimated construction cost $24,600; first -year operating cost. $30,000;
revenue $60,000. Format: MOR. Principal: N.P. Hoff
(100 %) is licensee of KRED(AM) Eureka
(BPH- 10,050). Action Feb. 28.
-
'West Carrolton, Ohio, Broadcast Workshop
Broadcast Bureau granted 88.1 mhz, 10 w, HAAT 35 ft.
NAB
1977
Broadcast Bureau granted following CP modifications to extend completion times to dates shown:
'WCCH Holyoke, Mass. (BMPED -1457), June 23;
'WKKL West Barnstable, Mass. (BMPED -1458), July
6, WVLA Evelith, Minn. (BMPH -15,031), Sept. 8;
WSWC Cottage Grove, Minn. (BMPED -1462), Aug.
15; KMRS -FM Morris, Minn. (BMPH -15,042), Aug.
25; KBMS Billings, Mont. (BMPH -15,036), Aug. 28;
WKKJ Green Cove Springs, Fla. (BMPH- 14,954),
May 28.
EDWIN TORNBERG
& COMPANY, INC.
Efroymson, Washington; consulting engineer Hatfield
& Dawson. Principals: Leonard N. Kesselman, John R.
Dempster (47.5% each) and Benjamin F Dawson III
(5 %). Mr. Kesselman owns KZON(AM) Santa Maria,
Calif., and has interests in KUSP(AM) Santa Cruz,
Calif., KVAN(AM) Vancouver, Wash., and applicant
for new FM at Beverton, Ore. He has recently sold,
Hospitality Suite
CAPITAL HILTON HOTEL
subject to FCC approval, KZEN(AM) Seaside, and
KXFM(FM) Santa Maria, both California. Mr.
Dempster is attorney. Mr. Dawson is consulting
engineer. Ann. March 10.
Broadcasting Mar
103
21
1977
Action Feb. 28.
WYZE(AM) Atlanta (1480 khz, 5 kw-D)- Broadcast Bureau granted assignment of license from WYZE
Ownership changes
Communications Inc. to George H. Buck
Applications
KBSA(TV) Guasti, Calif. (ch. 461 -Seeks assignment of license from Broadcasting Service of America
to Buena Vista Broadcasting Corp. for $1,800,000.
Seller is owned by Berean Bible Ministries (non -profit,
non -stock), religious organization, W.K. Connelly,
president. Buyers are Leon A. Crosby (72%), Lee
Moseng and Rene DeLaRosa (10% each) and Lauren
A. Colby (3 %). Mr. Crosby owns KEMO(TV) San
Francisco, where Messrs. Moseng and DeLaRosa are
employed. Mr. Colby, with his wife, owns 44.5% of
WTHU(AM) Thurmont, Md. Ann March 10.
'WXXW(TV) Chicago (ch. 20) -Seeks assignment
of license from Chicago Educational Television
Association to Chicago Metropolitan Higher Education
Council for $65,000. Seller is nonprofit, public broadcaster, which also operates 'WTTW(TV) and owns
stock of WFMT(FM), both Chicago. Buyer is nonprofit corporation operated by public colleges and universities in Chicago area, David Ainsworth, executive
director. Ann. March 8.
WGSY(FM) Peru, Ill. (100.9 mhz, 3 kw) -Seeks
assignment of license from George W Yazell to Radio
Illinois Ltd. for $85,000. Seller is businessman with no
other broadcast holdings. Buyer is owned by R. Dana
MacVay, stockbroker, and Keith Gensheimer, real estate broker, who also owns WBUK(AM) Portage,
Mich. Buyers have also bought, subject to FCC approval, WKTN -FM Kenton, Ohio (BROADCASTING, Jan. 10). Ann. March II.
KTGA(FM) Fort Dodge, Iowa (92.1 mhz, 2.75
kw) -Seeks assignment of license from Gospel Radio
Inc. to Rainbow Broadcasting Co. for $110,000 including $20,000 covenent not to compete. Seller is nonprofit corporation, Reverend N.S. Beminio, president.
Reverend Beminio is leaving broadcasting for health
reasons. Buyer is James E. Boardman, freelance writer
and photographer with no other broadcast holdings.
Ann. March I1.
KOFO -AM -FM Ottawa, Kan. (AM: 1220 khz, 250
FM: 95.7 mhz, 6.7 kw) -Seeks assignment of
license from Ottawa Broadcasting Co. to Mar -Wa -Ka
Broadcasting Co. for $302,500 plus $70,000 agreement
not to compete. Sellers are Roderick B. and Edwina W.
Cupp. Mr. Cupp is retiring, and they have no other
broadcast interests. Buyer is owned by family of Fred I.
Shaffer Jr., who, with his wife, own 75 %. Remainder is
divided among four children. Mr. Shaffer owns mineral
exploration and production firms. Ann. March II.
w -D;
Actions
-
WDTB -TV Panama City, Fla. (ch. 13) Broadcast
Bureau granted assignment of license from Panhandle
Broadcasting Co. to Octagon Broadcasting Co. for $2.1
million. Principals of seller are Mrs. Eugenia S. Bran nen, Luther Thomas, Dick Arnold and Julian Bennett.
Mrs. Brannen also has interest in KJ1N(AM)KCIL(FM) Houma, La. Buyer is owned by Anthony
C. Kupris, owner of Atlanta fertilizer firm, with no
other broadcast interests (BALCT-620, BAPTS -6).
Jr.
for $400,-
000. Seller is owned equally by George Johnston III,
George Barber Jr. and Lathrop W. Smith Jr. Mr.
Johnston also owns 40% of WJLD(AM) -WZZK(FM)
Ala. Buyer owns WHVN(AM)
Charlotte, N.C.; WCOS -AM -FM Columbia, S.C.;
WMGY(AM) Montgomery, Ala., and has sold, subject to FCC approval, WQAK(AM) Decatur, Ala. He
also owns Columbia, S.C. -based Jazzology Documentary Record Co. (BAL- 8860). Action Feb. 28.
WSAV(AM) Savannah, Ga., (630 khz, 5 kw)Broadcast Bureau granted assignment of license from
WSAV Inc. to Beasley Broadcast Group of Savannah
Inc. for $575,000. Seller also has sold WSAV -TV for
$5,250,000 (BROADCASTING, Oct. 4, 1976). Its
principals are Harben Daniel, W.K. Jenkins estate and
Arthur Lucas estate. Buyer is owned by George C.
Birmingham,
Beasley, who also owns
WFMC(AM) -WOKN(FM)
Goldsboro, N.C.; WM00(AM)- WBLX(FM) Mobile,
Ala.; WFAI(AM) Fayetteville, N.C.; WGAC(AM)
Augusta, Ga.; WDMT(FM) Cleveland; WJNC(AM)-
WRCM(FM) Jacksonville, N.C.; WHNC(AM)WXNC(FM) Henderson, N.C., and WKGX(AM)
Lenoir, N.C., which Mr. Beasley has sold (see below)
(BAL- 8873). Action Feb. 24.
WXTA(FM) Greencastle, Ind. (94.3 mhz, 3 kw)Broadcast Bureau granted transfer of control of Radio
Greencastle Inc. from Leon Buck to Virginia S.
Bingham for $220,920.24. Mr. Buck is principal in
wv'rL(FM) Monticello, Ind.; WSTL(AM) Eminence, Ky.; WFDT(AM) Columbia City, Ind.;
WVLJ(FM) Monticello, Ill., and, with Miss Bingham,
has recently purchased KBIB(AM) Monette, Ark.,
subject to FCC approval, for $68,000. Miss Bingham
also owns 10% of WVLJ(FM) (BIC- 8239). Action
Feb. 24.
WIIL -TV Terre Haute, Ind. (ch. 38)- Broadcast
Bureau granted assignment of license from Alpha
Broadcasting Corp. to Bahakel Broadcasting Co. for
$649,000. Seller, which has no other broadcast interests, is owned by more than 50 stockholdres with
John M. House (23.35 %) as president. Buyer is owned
by Cy N. Bahakel (100%), who also owns KXEL -AMFM Waterloo, Iowa; WLBJ -AM -FM Bowling Green,
Ky.; WWOD -AM -FM Lynchburg, Va.; WABG -AMTV Greenwood, Miss.; WCCB(TV) Charlotte, N.C.;
WKAB -TV Montgomery, Ala.; WOLO -TV Columbia,
S.C.; WDOD -AM -FM Chattanooga; and WKIN(AM)
Kingsport and WBBJ -TV Jackson, both Tennessee
(BALCT-619, BALTI -180, BALTS -429, BALST-334,
BALTP -489). Action Feb. 28.
-
KTRI(FM) Las Vegas (92.3 mhz, 27 kw) Broadcast Bureau granted assignment of license from Bernstein /Rein & Boasberg Advertising Inc. to Lotus Communications Corp. for $400,000 plus $148,800 consultant's agreement. Principals in seller are Robert A.
Bernstein (who will act as consultant to KTRI),
Howard T Boasberg and Irwin D. Rein, owners of Kansas City, Mo. -based advertising firm. Sellers also own
KVEG(AM) Las Vegas. Buyer is principally owned by
Howard A. Kalmenson. Lotus also owns KENO(AM)
Las Vegas; KWKW(AM) Pasadena (Los Angeles),
KFSD -FM San Diego and KOXR(AM) Oxnard, all
1
Savannah, Ga. and disposed of his interests in WKGX
to conform with FCC ownership rules. Mr. Bush owns
10% of WFAI(AM) Fayetteville, N.C., and
WMOO(AM)- WLBX(FM) Mobile, Ala. Other principals of Bush Inc. are Jeanne N. and Thomas E. Bush,
buyer's wife and brother (BIC- 8208). Action Feb. 24.
WKTQ(AM)- WSHH(FM) Pittsburgh (AM: 1320
khz, 5 kw -U; FM: 99.7 mhz, 10.5 kw)- Broadcast
Bureau granted assignments of licenses from WKTQ
Inc. and Heftel- Broadcasting- Pittsburgh Inc. to Nationwide Communications for $1,240,000 (AM) and
$2,000,000 (FM). Sellers are owned by Representative
Cecil Heftel (D- Hawaii), who is disposing of some of
his broadcast holdings. He recently sold KGMB -TV
Honolulu to Lee Enterprises Inc. for $11,799,000.
Representative Heftel also owns two other Hawaii TV's
and three radio stations there and on mainland. Buyer
is subsidiary of Nationwide Insurance Co. (BAL -8892,
BALRE -3150, BALH -2412, BALST -336). Action Feb.
28.
KDSX -AM -FM Denison-Sherman, Tex. (AM: 950
khz, 500 w; FM: 101.7 mhz, 3 kw) Broadcast Bureau
granted transfer of control from B.V. Hammond and
Lofton L. Hendrick to Grayson County Broadcasters
Inc. for $525,000. Messrs. Hammond and Hendrick,
who are retiring from broadcasting, have no other
broadcast interests. Buyer, owned by John B. Mahaffey,
with his wife, Fredina B., also owns KCIJ(AM)
-
Shreveport, La., KGRT(AM)- KGRD(FM) Las
Cruces, N.M., and KICA(AM) Clovis, N.M.
(BIC- 8229). Action Feb. 24.
Facilities changes
TV action
WHNB-TV New Britain, Conn.- Broadcast Bureau
granted mod. of CP to change ERP to 138 kw; max.
ERP 4470 kw; ant. height 940'
(BMPCT- 7665). Action Feb. 24.
ft.; condition
FM actions
KMAG Ft. Smith, Ark.- Broadcast Bureau granted
CP to redescribe studio location and remote control
location as 421 -23 Garrison, Ft. Smith; install new
trans.; install new ant.; add circular polarization to
ERP 100 kw (H &V); ant. height 2000 ft. (H &V);
remote control permitted (BPH- 10,357). Action Feb.
23.
WLEQ Bonita Springs, Fla.- Broadcast Bureau
granted CP to change trans. location /studio location to
U.S. Rte. 41 opposite Trailside Drive, Bonita Springs;
install new ant.; make change in ant. system; increase
height; ERP 1.1 kw (H &V); ant. height 490 ft. (H &V);
(BPH- 10,324). Action Feb. 23.
WBST Muncie, Ind.- Broadcast Bureau granted
CP to change frequency to 92.1 mhz; change trans.
location to Delaware County Rd. 400 W; 1/2 mile N. of
Jackson St. (88N) Muncie; operate trans. by remote
control from studio location; N. E. corner English Music Bldg. (Communications Center) campus, Muncie; install new trans.; install new ant.; ERP 3 kw
(H &V); ant. height 300ft. (H &V); remote control permitted; condition (BPED-2394). Action Feb. 22.
Hugh Ben LaRue
WWCK Flint, Mich.- Broadcast Bureau granted CP
to install new trans.; install new ant.; ERP 2.35 kw
(H &V); ant. height 330 ft. (H &V); conditions
Will be at the Washington Hilton
Hospitality Suite
Radio
Calif.; KONE(AM) Reno; KRUX(AM) Glendale
(Phoenix) and KTKT(AM) Tucson, both Arizona,
and has application pending for new FM in Pasadena
(BALH -2400). Action March 3.
WKGX(AM) Lenoir, N.C. (1080 khz, kw -D)Broadcast Bureau granted transfer of control of Furniture City Broadcasters Inc. from George C. Beasley
to R.L. Bush Jr. (27.565 %) and Bush Inc. (72.463 %)
for $136,000. Mr. Beasley purchased WSAV(AM)
(BPH10353). Action Feb. 22.
KJSK -FM Columbus, Neb.- Broadcast Bureau
granted CP to install new ant.; ERP 100 kw (H &V);
ant. height 195 ft. (H &V); conditions (BPH- 10,354).
TV
Cable
210 E. 53rd St. 5D
New York, N.Y. 10022
1204 Russ Building
San Francisco, Calif.
212- 265 -3430
415- 673-4474
Action Feb.
23.
In
94104
contest
Case assignment
Glouster, Mass., FM proceeding: Simon Geller
(WVCA-FM) and Grandbanke. Corp. (Does. 21,-
Broadcasting Mar
104
21
1977
-
tors Inc., competing for 100.3 mhz (Doce. 20,611-2)
ALJ James K. Cullen set certain procedural dates and
scheduled hearing for June 7 in San Jose vicinity. Action March 3.
Call letters
Joint agreements
Applications
Call
Dodge City, Kan., FM proceeding: Seward County Broadcasting Co. Inc. and Cattle Country Broadcast-
Sought by
New FM's
KYLO
KAVO
WGEC
'WCHC
Dorf and korrigan, Davis, Calif.
Max L. Burdick Jr.. Fallbrook. Calif.
Effingham Enterprises Inc., Springfield. Ga.
College of Holy Cross. Worcester. Mass.
'WORB
Oakland Community College, Farmington,
Mich.
WBLE-FM
Panola Broadcasting Co.. Batesville, Miss.
'WORP
Broadcast Workshop Inc, West Carrollton.
Ohio
KARG
Eastern Utah Broadcasting Co., Price. Utah
STI Inc.. Walla Walla. Wash.
ing, competing for 93.9 mhz (Dots. 20,979 -80 -Chief
ALI Chester F. Naumowicz Jr. granted joint request by
applicants and approved agreement; dismissed Seward
application; granted application of Cattle Country, and
terminated proceeding. Action March 9.
Dickinson, N.D., AM proceeding: Badlands
Broadcasting Co. and Roughrider Broadcasting Co.,
competing for 1460 khz (Dots. 20,691 -2) -ALJ James
F Tierney granted application of Roughrider and approved agreement between applicants. Ann. March 11.
WCIS
WKKY Moss Point, Miss.
KUFF
KNWZ Albuquerque, N.M.
WBOZ
WRSG San German. PR.
KBGG
KWFA Merkel, Tex.
Chillocothe, Ohio, FM proceeding: Court House
Broadcasting Co. and Frederick F. and Sally S. Stan nard, competing for 94.3 mhz (Dots. 21,013-4)- ALI
Lenore G. Ehrig granted joint request by applicants;
approved dismissal agreement; authorized payment to
Court House of $2,000; dismissed with prejudice Court
House application, and retained Stannard application
in hearing status to resolve issue of financial qualifications. Action March 7.
KSXT
Existing AM's
Existing FM's
Initial decision
WCSJ-FM
WRMI -FM Morns, Ill.
wxvv
WCAO -FM Baltimore
WKKY
WCIS -FM Moss Point. Miss.
WTWV(TV) Tupelo, Miss., renewal proceeding: WTWV Inc. (Doc. 21,021) -ALJ Walter C.
Miller granted application for renewal of license unless
WLWS
WOMS Hamilton. Ohio
WIVO
WKTN-FM Kenton, Ohio
KZKZ
KAFG Oklahoma City
WGIT
WBOZ -FM Hormigueros.
KITE-FM
KEXL San Antonio, Tex.
WOAW
WKYG -FM Parkersburg. WVa.
summary decision is appealed or commission reviews
it on its own motion. Action March 3.
PR.
Assigned to
New TV
KCIK
Missionary Radio Evangelism Inc.,
Allocations
El Paso
KXXL(AM) Bozeman, Mont.- Commission fined
licensee, Empire Broadcasting Corp., $9,000 for violations of fradulent billing rule. In other action, Commission granted short -term renewal of KXXL and dismissed application for assignment of license of KAFFAM-FM Flagstaff, Ariz., at request of Empire. Action
March 10.
New AM's
WRED
Monroe Broadcasting Inc.. Monroe. Ga.
WFJT
Martin County Broadcasting Co.. Inez. Ky
WBIN
Stonewood Communications Corp., Benton.
Other actions
Tenn.
New FM's
KRBU
KSEI Broadcasters Inc., Pocatello. Idaho
WKXK
Pana Broadcasting Corp., Pana. Ill.
'KVCO
Cloud Community Junior College. Concordia.
Kan.
'W?BR-FM
Pittsfield Public Schools. Pittsfield. Mass.
KSAB
SSA Investments Inc.. Liberty Mo.
'WDBK
Camden County College. Blackwood. N.J.
Existing TV's
KRON-TV
KRON San Francisco
WPTD
WOET -TV Kettering. Ohio
WPTO
WMUB -TV Oxford. Ohio
Existing AM's
KMJC
KDEO El Cajon. Calif.
WDDO
WCRY Macon. Ga.
WWIL
WHSL Wilmington, N.C.
KNOI
KPUL Pullman. Wash.
casting Company Inc., KDWB -AM -FM Richfield, St.
Paul, Minn., May 1, 1978 (100%), May I, 1979 (50%);
Hudson -Westchester Radio Inc., WVOX-AM -FM
New Rochelle, N.Y., Nov 1, or when program test authority granted; KLUC Broadcasting Co., KLUC -AMFM Las Vegas, Nev., 30 days after program test authority or 90 days after denial of application becomes final;
James M. Hagerman, KSMA-AM -FM Santa Maria,
Calif., May I, 1979; Leighton Enterprises Inc., KCLDAM-FM St. Cloud, Minn., Nov. I; WBRE Radio Inc.,
WBRE -AM -FM Wilkes Barre, Pa., Aug. I; Stereo
Broadcasting Inc., WAKX -AM -FM Duluth, Minn.,
Superior, Wis. June 1, 1979; Communications Properties Inc., KHAK -AM -FM Cçdar Rapids, Iowa, May I,
1978; Bellevue/Eastside Radio Ltd., KZAM -AM -FM
Bellevue, Wash., Feb. I, 1978; Peterson Broadcasting
Corp., WYLD -AM -FM New Orleans, June I, 1979;
Swanco Broadcasting Co., KFJZ -AM -FM Ft. Worth,
60 day extension of current waiver; Big Chief Broadcasting Co., KTCS -AM -FM Fort Smith, Ark., Sept. I;
Stauffer Publications Inc., KGNC -AM -FM Amarillo,
Tex., Aug. I; Commission also denied request filed by
Fairbanks Broadcasting Co. of Texas, licensee of
KVIL(AM), Highland Park, Tex., and KVIL -FM,
Highland Park -Dallas.
Fine
Grants
Call
can Research Bureau. Commission granted following
requests for periods indicated: Wilton E. Hall,
WAIM(AM) -WCAC(FM) Anderson, S.C., Feb. 1,
1978; Tri -State Broadcasting Company Inc., KUPDAM-FM Tempe, Ariz., June I, 1978; Regional Broadcasters of Michigan Inc. WORD-AM-FM Grand
Rapids, Mich. Oct. 1, 1979; Malrite of Wisconsin Inc.,
WZUU -AM -FM Milwaukee, Dec. 1, 1979; KIXI Inc.,
KIXI -AM -FM Seattle, Feb. I, 1978; Doubleday Broad-
-
KVST(TV) Los Angeles Broadcast Bureau dismissed special temporary authority request of June 5,
1976 as moot; canceled outstanding CP; deleted call
letters KVST, and, returned pending license application covering CP for noncommercial educational
television broadcast station. Action Feb. 17.
WFAB(AM) Miami Broadcast Bureau canceled
license for standard broadcast station WFAB, Miami South Miami, dismissed BRC -3764 application and
deleted call letters. Action Feb. 23.
Commission acted on 19 requests for waiver of AMFM nonduplication rule, granting at least partial waiver
in 18 cases. Commission also deferred for one month
dates for compliance with recently revised nonduplication rule. Action was in response to request by Ameri-
-
Petitions
Cairo, Ga. -James E. Palen, Cairo, requests assignment of FM ch. 272A (RM- 2840). Ann. March 8.
Pineville, W. Va.- Wyoming Broadcasting Co.,
licensee of WWYO(AM) Pineville, requests assignment of FM ch. 224A (RM- 2842). Ann. March 8.
Actions
Cody, Wyo.- Broadcast Bureau assigned Class C
FM ch. 250 and deleted unoccupied and unapplied for
ch. 232A. Action was response to request by Shoshone
Communications Corp., licensee of KODI(AM) Cody.
Effective April 21. Action March 8.
Commission proposed four VHF television assignments: ch. 11, Charleston, W.Va.; ch 8, Johnstown, Pa.
(or ch. 12, Altoona, Pa.); ch. 8 Knoxville, Tenn., and
ch. 13 Salt Lake City. Proposal was result of analysis of
96 VHF "drop -ins" initiated by inquiry notice adopted
April 1, 1975. Comments are due May 20; replies June
20 (Doc. 20,418). Action March 7.
Translators
Actions
KO9NM Nulalo, Alaska
- Broadcast Bureau granted
Existing FM's
KEZC
KSML Truckee. Calif.
KOSM
KKOY-FM Chanute, Kan.
WAMZ
WNNS Louisville. Ky.
WXKX
WTAE -FM Baltimore
WRNN-FM
WCRM -FM Clare, Mich.
WMLW
WYON Grand Rapids, Mich.
WHSL
WWIL Wilmington, N.C.
WLVO
WTVN -FM Columbus, Ohio
KZIP-FM
KFRN Amarillo, Tex.
PHONE
TOLL FREE
800 638 -0977
104 -5) -Chief ALI Chester F Naumowicz Jr. designated AU John H. Conlin to serve as presiding judge
and scheduled hearing for June 7. Action March 9.
NET PRICE $450.00
FOB ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND
Procedural ruling
San Jose, Calif.. FM proceeding: United Broadcasting Co. (KBAY San Jose) and Public Communica-
Broadcasting Mar
105
21
1977
CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting pro-
Summary of Broadcasting
grams of KTVA, KENI -TV, KIMO, KAKM
Anchorage; conditions ( BPTTV- 5716). Action Jan. 25.
KO9NO Pilot Point, Alaska- Broadcast Bureau
granted CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KTVA, KENI -TV, KIMO, KAKM
Anchorage; conditions ( BPTTV- 5725). Action Feb. 4.
FCC tabulations as of Dec. 31,1976
-
K081Z BP Alaska Camp, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska
Broadcast Bureau granted CP for new VHF translator
station rebroadcasting programs of KTVA, Anchorage;
conditions ( BPTTV- 5687). Action Jan. 26.
CP's
Licensed
Commercial AM
Commercial FM
-
KO9NL Savoonga, Alaska Broadcast Bureau
granted CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KTVA, KENT -TV, KIMO, KAKM
Anchorage; conditions ( BPTTV- 5715). Action Jan. 25.
-
K021M Whittier, Alaska Broadcast Bureau granted
CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KAKM, Anchorage; KYUK -TV, Bethel,
Alaska, KUAC -TV, Fairbanks; condition (BPTTV- 5708). Action Jan. 4.
K0210 Redstone and Crystal River Rural Area,
Col.- Broadcast Bureau granted CP for new VHF
translator station rebroadcasting programs of KOA -TV,
Denver; conditions (BPTTV -5580). Action Jan. 28.
KIOKK Somerset, Colo.- Broadcast Bureau
granted CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KBTV Denver (BPTTV-5705). Action
Feb. 8.
KS6AU Columbia, Mo.- Broadcast Bureau granted
CP for new UHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KCPT Kansas City, Mo. (BPTT -3038). Action Jan. 25.
Guadalupita, N.M.- Broadcast Bureau
granted CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KGGM -TV Albuquerque, N.M.
( BPTTV- 5696). Action Feb. 11.
K02IP Hillsboro, N.M. Broadcast Bureau granted
CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KVIA -TV El Paso (BPTTV-5692). Action
KIINV
-
Feb. 9.
-
K081X Mescalero Apache Reservation, N.M.
Broadcast Bureau granted CP for new VHF translator
station rebroadcasting programs of KOAT-TV Albuquerque, N.M. (BPTTV-5630). Action Jan. 3.
KO2IN Philip, S.D.- Broadcast Bureau granted CP
for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KEVN -TV Rapid City, S.D. (BPTTV-5713).
Action Jan. 25.
-
K041W East Price, Utah Broadcast Bureau granted
CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KTVX(TV) Salt Lake City ( BPTTV- 5634).
Action Feb. 3.
K041W East Price, Utah- Broadcast Bureau granted
CP for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KTVX Salt Lake City ( BPTTV- 5634). Action
Feb. 16.
K070Q East Price, Utah
Bureau
- Broadcastrebroadcast-
granted CP for new VHF translator station
ing programs of KUED Salt Lake City; condition
(BPTTV- 5635). Action Feb. 16.
WO3AJ Wytheville, Va.- Broadcast Bureau granted
CP to change primary VHF translator station to
WKPT -TV Kingsport, Tenn.; condition (BPTTV-5709A). Action Feb. 8.
KIINT Long Lake -Suncrest, Wash. Broadcast
Bureau granted CP for new VHF translator station
rebroadcasting programs of KXLY -TV Spokane, Wash.
(BPTTV -5651. Action Jan. 19.
-
KIINU Pasadena Park, Spokane county and East
Valley, all Washington Broadcast Bureau granted CP
for new VHF translator station rebroadcasting programs of KXLY-TV Spokane, Wash. (BPTTV-5727).
Action Feb. 9.
-
on
Total
not
Total
STA'
all
on air
on air
authorized"
26
4,497
2,873
870
8,240
39
153
73
7
3
4
728
517
37
211
12
256
31
8
2
6
4.464
7
Educational FM
Total Radio
2,798
844
8.106
I
(:1
Commercial TV
720
513
VHF
UHF
207
Educational TV
VHF
UHF
Total TV
74
8
1
1
Applications
Following operators of cable TV systems requested certificates of compliance, FCC announced March 8 (stations listed. are TV signals proposed for carriage):
Citizens Cable Co., for South Williamsport, Hepburn, Woodward, Fairfield, Lycoming, Susquehanna,
Armstrong, Old Lycoming, Duboistown, Mon toursville, Loyalsock, all Pennsylvania (CAC-
26
126
241
0
3
92
149
2
8
4
961
4
19
1
101
155
984
08127 -37): Requests interim authorization for existing
operations.
Fannon Cable TV Co., Box 165, New Tazell, Tenn.
37825, for Claiborne, Tenn. (CAC- 08138): WATETV, WTVK, WBIR -TV Knoxville, WSJK -TV Sneed ville, WJHL -TV Johnson City, all Tennessee, WLEXTV Lexington, Ky., WCYB -TV Briston, Va., WLOSTV Asheville, N.C.
Cable Corn Walton Corp., for Walton (village and
265
8
45
4,536
3,026
943
8,505
765
523
242
284
103
181
1,029
"Includes off -air licenses
'Special temporary authorization
(CAC -08164,69): WHFT Miami.
Guttenberg TV Cable System, for Guttenberg, Iowa
(CAC -08170): Requests certification of existing operations.
Cape Cable TV Inc., Cove Rd., Orleans, Mass.
02653, for Brewster, Mass. (CAC- 08171): WGBH -TV,
WCVB -TV, WGBX -TV, WBZ -TV, WSBK -TV Boston,
WLV1-TV Cambridge, Mass:, WTEV New Bedford,
Mass., WPRI -TV, WJAR -TV Providence, R.I.
town), both New York (CAC -08139 -40): Requests certification of existing operations.
Sullivan Cable TV, for Jefferson, 111. (CAC- 08141):
WON -TV, WSNS Chicago, WTCG Atlanta, WTTV
Bloomington, Ill.
Clearview Cable Inc, Highway 17 and 18th Ave., S.,
Surfside Beach, S.C. 29577, for Socastee, S.C. (CAC 08142): WCIV, WITV, WCBD -TV, WCSC -TV
Charleston, S.C., WWAY, WECT, WUNJ -TV
Wilmington, N.C., WVAN -TV, WTOC -TV Savannah,
Ga., WBTW, WJPM -TV Florence, S.C., WRET-TV
Charlotte, N.C., WS -TV Columbia, S.C., WRJA -TV
Sumter, S.C., WGGS -TV Greenville, S.C., WTTG
Cable TV Puget Sound, Box 2015, Tacoma, Wash.
98401, for Fort Lewis, Wash. (CAC- 08172): KOMOTV, KIRO -TV, KING -TV, KCTS -TV Seattle, KIPS,
KCPQ, KSTW Tacoma, KPTV Portland, Ore., CBUT
Vancouver, B.C.
Washington.
Range Television Cable Co., for Hibbing, Minn.
(CAC-08181): Requests interim authorization for ex-
Clearview Cable Inc., for Horry, S.C. (CAC- 08143):
Requests interim authorization for existing operations.
Grand Island Multivue TV System Inc., for Grand
Island, Neb. (CAC -08144): WYAH -TV Portsmouth,
Va.
Hastings Multi- Vue -TV System Inc., for Hastings,
Neb. (CAC-08145): WYAH -TV Portsmouth- Va.
Kearney Multi- Vue -TV System Inc., for Kearney,
Neb. (CAC-08146): WYAH -TV Portsmouth, Va.
Teleservice Co. of Wyoming, for Wright, Fairview,
both Pennsylvania (CAC -08147 -8): WNJU -TV
Linden, N.J.
Teleservice Corp. of America, for Winnfield, La.
(CAC -08149): WTCG Atlanta.
Kirchiner TV Co., for Meyersdale, Pa. (CAC08150): WPGH -TV Pittsburgh, WJNL -TV Johnstown, WTAJ -TV Altoona, WPSX -TV Clearfield, all
Pennsylvania, WTRF -TF Wheeling, W. Va., WSTVTV Steubenville, Ohio.
Interstate Cable TV Co., for Fort Campbell, Ky.
(CAC- 0815I): WTCG Atlanta.
Atoka Cablevision Co., for Coalgate, Okla. (CAC08152): KOCO -TV Oklahoma City, KTEW, KOTV,
KTUL -TV Tulsa, Okla., WTCG Atlanta.
Theta Cable of California, for Los Angeles (CAC08153): Requests certification of existing operations.
Clear Vue TV Inc., for Madill, Okla. (CAC -08154):
Requests interim authorization for existing operations.
Cable
CP's
On air
Delaware County Cable TV Co., for Upper Darby,
(CAC -08155): Requests interim authorization for
existing operations.
Pa.
Lincoln Television Systems Inc., for Lincoln City,
Neskowin, Pacific City, Woods, Cloverdale, Nebo,
Beaver, all Oregon (CAC -08156 -62): Requests interim
authorization for existing operations.
Lynch TV Inc., for Lynch, Ky. (CAC -08163): Requests interim authorization for existing operations.
Palm Beach Cable Television Co., for North Palm
Beach, Palm Beach Gardens, Lake Park, Palm Beach
Shores, Juno Beach, Lost Tree Village, all Florida
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
106
Valley Vision Inc., for Placerville, El Dorado,
Jackson, Sutter Creek, Amador, all California (CAC 08174-78): KGSC -TV San Jose, Calif.
Gonzales Cable TV Services Inc., for Gonzales,
Tex. (CAC -08179): KXIX Victoria, Tex.
Norman Cable TV Inc., for Norman, Okla. (CAC 08180): KERA -IV Dallas.
isting operations.
Cable TV, for Fountain City, Wis. (CAC -08182):
Requests certification of existing operations.
Telesystems Corp., for Philadelphia (CAC -08183):
Requests interim authorization for existing operations.
Dale's Electronic Service, for Big Creek, Little
Grave Creek, both W. Va. (CAC -08184 -5): Requests
interim authorization for existing operations.
Bannock TV Co., for Bannock, Inkom, Chubbock,
all Idaho (CAC- 08186 -9): WTCG Atlanta, and to
delete KWGN -TV Denver.
Certification actions
Commission granted Teleprompter Cable Systems
Inc., for Johnstown, Pa., certificate of compliance. Action March B.
CATV Bureau granted following operators of cable
TV systems certificates of compliance: General
Electric Cablevision Corp., for Brownville, Glen Park,
both N.Y. (CAC -06563 -4); Evansville Cable TV Inc.,
for Evansville, Ind. (CAC -06662); Carbondale Cable
Television Co., for Carbondale, Colo. (CAC- 07312);
Leadership Cable Systems of Palm Beach Inc., for Boca
Del Mar, Delray Beach, portions of Palm Beach county,
Gulfstream, all Florida (CAC -07449 -52); Lake
Charlevoix Cable TV Inc., for Gaylord, Mich. (CAC 07453); Johnstown Cable TV, for Geistown borough,
Westmont borough, Upper Yoder township, all Pennsylvania (CAC -07810 -2); Iroquois Cable Company
Inc., for Watseka, Ill. (CAC- 07820); Full V.U. Television, for Vincennes, Washington, both Indiana (CAC 07588-9); South Dakota Cable Inc., for Hot Springs,
S.D. (CAC- 07673); Sammons Communications Inc.,
for Homer, Homer Village, both New York (CAC 07674-5); Community Antenna Inc., for Laurinburg,
N.C. (CAC- 07818).
Other action
Commission directed Texas Community Antenna
Inc., operator of cable system at Nacogdoches, Tex., to
provide nonduplication protection for station KTRETV (NBC /ABC) Texarkana, Tex., within 30 days. Action Feb. 23.
Professional Cards
ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORP.
Jansky & Bailey
Telecommunications Consulting
Member AFCCE
5390 Cherokee Avenue
EDWARD F. LORENTZ
& ASSOCIATES
Consulting Engineers
(formerly Commercial Radio)
1334 G Sr., N.W., Suite 500
T.
mr,ly
JONES ASSOCS.
(+Alt cy g
mr,i
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
2990 Telestar Ct Suite 405
(7031 5606800
Falls Church. Va 22042
Member AFCCE
LOHNES & CULVER
Consulting Engineers
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Radio G Television
CARL
E.
SMITH
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
8200 Snowville Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44141
Phone: 216 -526 -4386
Member AFCCE
JOHN H. MULLANEY
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
9616 Pinkney Court
Potomac, Maryland 20854
301 - 299-3900
Member AFCCE
DAWKINS
ESPY
Consulting Radio Engineers
Applications,' Field Engineering
P. 0
Boa 3127- .Olympic Station 9021?
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.
(213) 272 -3344
International Airport
Francisco, California 94128
Boo 68,
San
(415) 342 -5208
Member AFCCE
VIR
JAMES
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
Applications and Field Engineering
Computerized Frequency Surveys
345 Colorado Blvd. -80206
D.
14th St., N.W.
Republic 7-6646
Washington, D. C. 20005
Member APCCE
JOHN
B.
9208 Wyoming PI.
Hiiand
4
(512)
MATTHEW
).
454 -7014
& ASSOCIATES
Suite 400
1730 M St., N.W., 659.3707
Washington, D. C. 20036
-7010
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 64114
E.
Member AFCCE
Harold Munn, Jr.,
ROSNER TELEVISION
SYSTEMS
& Associates, Inc.
Phone: 517- 278 -7339
Austin, Tesas 78751
JULES COHEN
HEFFELFINGER
Coldwater, Michigan 49036
F.
& KOWALSKI
711
Member AFCCE
5210 Avenue
SILLIMAN, MOFFET
BOX 7004
DALLAS, TEXAS 75209
(214) 631 -8360
Member AFCCE
DENVER, COLORADO
KIRKSEY
Member AFCCE
INWOOD POST OFFICE
Broadcast Engineering Consultante
Box 220
Consulting Engineer
Washington, D.C. 20004
C. 20036
(303) 333.5562
TERRELL W.
527 Munsey Bldg.
(202) 783.0111
296 -2315
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
(202) 296.2722
HAMMETT & EDISON, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
A. EARL CULLUM, JR.
Member AFCCE
2029 K Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008
(301) 827 -8725
(301) 384 -5374
(202) 223.4884
Member AFCCE
COHEN and DIPPELL, P.C.
Member AFCCE
1156 15th St., N.W., Suite 606
Washington, D.C. 20005
STEEL, ANDRUS & ADAIR
St., N.W.
N
WASHINGTON,
Washington, D. C. 20005
Member AFCCE
(703) 354 -3400
F1
1771
347 -1319
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
CARL
A. D. Ring & Associates
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
HATFIELD & DAWSON
Consulting Engineers
Broadcast and Communications
906 - 36th Ave.
Seattle, Washington 98122
(206) 324 -7860
CONSULTING
7601 BURFORD DRIVE
MCLEANVA 2210:
Tel (703) 356.9504
C. P. CROSSNO & ASSOCIATES
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
0. sox 11312
DALLAS. Texas 75310
ENGINEERING
MIDWEST ENGINEERING
ASSOCIATES
0onsutEin9
0331
A
N
UwvERsrr
E 3inaa.,
PFDAIA
iu isms
,nose 692 4233
Member AFCCE
JOHN F.X. BROWNE
ASSOCIATES. INC.
VLISSIDES, P.E.
STRUCTURAL CONSULTANT
TOWERS, ANTENNAS, STRUCTURES
Sludges. Analysis. Design Modifications.
inspe<hons. Supervision of Erection
&
250 West 57th Street
New York, New York 10019
(2121 246-3967
&
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
1901 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
25 West Long Lake Road
P.
121a1
lar 9t40
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48013
Tel
13131
Member AFCCE
642.6226
,Lfr
12021
brr AFCCE
2932020
Service Directory
COMMERCIAL RADIO
MONITORING CO.
PRECISION FREQUENCY
MEASUREMENTS, AM -FM -TV
Monitors Repaired 8 Certified
103 S. Market St.
Lee's Summit, Mo. 64063
Phone (816) 524-3777
CAMBRIDGE CRYSTALS
PRECISION FREQUENCY
MEASURING SERVICE
SWAGER TOWER
SPECIALISTS FOR AM -FM -TV
445 Concord Ave.
Cambridge, Mass. 02138
Phone 1617) 876 -2810
TALL TOWER SPECIALISTS
CORPORATION
Box 656, Fremont, Indiana 46737
219
- 495-5165
BROADCAST TECHNICAL
SERVICE, INC.
AMFM Station Construction
Audio /Skeleton ... Partial Proofs
Signal Sound Improvement
FREE Counsel by Phone
Phone
Box 7343
917- 772 -3371
Waco, Texas
76710
Classified Advertising
CONTINUED
HELP WANTED SALES
CONTINUED
Upstate New York. announcer sales. Need sales
Expanding Weekly Newspaper seeks energetic
HELP WANTED SALES
RADIO
HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT
Sales Manager for established radio station
in ma-
jor Midwestern market. Seeking mature executive to
train, administer and motivate sales staff Good working conditions, fringe benefits, EOE employer. Send
resume, references to Box C-5. BROADCASTING.
Station Manager for long established AM -FM Great
Lakes area. Must be aggressive sales motivator. Community involvement a must. Will hire right person at
once or up to 60 days. Possible opportunity husband wife team. Send resume Box C -85, BROADCASTING.
General Manager for major California black oriented station. Sales, programming. FCC. plus heavy
community involvement a necessity. All replies confidential. Equal Opportunity Employers. Resume and
salary to Box C -124. BROADCASTING.
Growing Young Corporation looking for
a general
manager with strong sales experience to manage
contemporary 100 KW FM. Only experienced pro
need reply. If you're the right man, part ownership
possible. Send resume and salary requirements with
first letter to Box C -133. BROADCASTING.
General Manager needed. Community -minded
sales -builder. Country format. Dynamic Central
Florida market. Box C -144, BROADCASTING.
I
See last page of Classified Section for rates,
closing dates, box numbers and other details.
own an all new FM station that's beyond decription
in healthy radio market. Have growing pains. Willing to
sell stock to a working partner. Perfect time to stop
dreaming and start owning. Box C-149, BROADCASTING.
Group broadcaster seeks General Manager for
ethnic radio station in major southeast market. EOE.
Send resume to Box C -156. BROADCASTING.
r -Small market in Calif. Must be
willing to become involved with community projects.
Full responsibility, all replies confidential and will be
answered. Send resume to Box C -162, BROADCAST-
General M
ING.
ability. Good opportunity for beginner. Salary plus
commission. Box C -137, BROADCASTING.
Successful medium market
AM fulltimer looking
for aggressive, imaginative salesperson who can move
in
the
future. We offer a
up to management position
good salary, plus the best place in New England to
call home. Box C-150, BROADCASTING.
a salesperson
who can do it all -sell, write for selected accounts
that require special attention, do production when
necessary, competent air worker and potential manager. We don't want to kill you with work; we're look
ing for an Instant Key Person. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Send resume,. We're part of a group, so opportunity is part of the deal. Answer Box C -166,
BROADCASTING.
Regional Colorado Station needs
Sunny, warm and exciting south Texas, 5000 watt
AM and soon FM looking for two aggressive self starters who want to work and make money. Half million
pop market, top biller, rated No. 1 seventeen years.
20% commission, draw arranged, health and life ins.,
ga's allowance, live where oranges and grapefruit
grow. KRIO Radio. Box 3097 Mc Allen, TX, 78501.
512- 686 -5454.
Executive sales position available with KXTV
effective immediately. Experienced individual required. Job requires a thorough background at national level either as station national sales manager or
national representative sales manager or sales rep.
Applicant without this experience but with extensive
local TV sales experience would be considered. Working knowledge of BIAS computor is desired but not a
requirement. Equal Opportunity Employer. Contact:
Jack Clifford, KXTV -Channel 10, P.O. Box 10, Sacramento, CA 95801 916 -441 -2345.
Looking for Top Biller for local sales department.
Let's talk money. WBNR,
12508.914- 831 -1260.
Beacon- Newburgh, NY
Experienced Salesperson For No. comtemporary
station in Gainesville, Florida. Must be an aggressive,
self- starter. Contact Elsie Mercer, WGGG, 904376 -1234.
salesperson. Radio and/or newspaper experience, will
train right person. 609 -447 -4311 or write Box 349,
Newport, WA 99156.
Sales Manager for new Country Music
FM
at
beautiful Lake Tahoe. Must be self -starter, well organized, and not afraid of cold calls. Chance for advancement with growing company. Excellent opportunity for ambitious young person or a nice place to
settle down for a hard working old pro. Guarantee:
$700 per month, paid health insurance. E.O.E. Send
resume to Eric Hauenstein, c/o P.O. Box 4227, Mesa,
AZ 85201.
Midwest, FM Soul is looking for experienced
Salesperson to join area's top sales team. Golden opportunity for a self -starting professional to grow with
growing station in Nation's 11th largest city. At least
one year's experience in middle -large market a must.
If you're willing to give 120% you may be the one for
us. Contact GM at 317- 923 -1456.
Custom Jingle House seeks station connections for
mutual sales assistance. Fast ammo for your next
pitch. No clubs. No strings. PMW Box 947 Bryn Mawr,
PA. 19010 215 -525 -9873.
Sales Manager Wanted for Southern New England
radio station. Must be agency experienced. Excellent
opportunity. Liberal benefits ... salary negotiable.
Send resume to P.O. Box 309, Windsor, CT 06095.
Top rated, Country Music combo, AM & FM facility -seeking aggressive sales person. Excellent Account list available. Send resume to Bill Mize, (Sales
Manager), P.O. Box 6978, Jacksonville, FL 32205.
Immediate Opening. Organized Salf- Starter with
management potential. AM -FM combo, strong 25 plus,
progressive MOR AM, Beautiful FM. 20 %, good rates.
good list, challenging ground floor opportunity for
salesperson who can produce. Growing metro
economy. Skip Broussard, Bay Broadcasting, Box
16425, Mobile, AL 36616.
1
General Manager, Public Radio /Television Stations,
KWSU -AM and KWSU -TV, members NPR and PBS.
Master's Degree plus management experience in a
public broadcasting station required. College level
teaching experience desirable. Start June 1, 1977.
Salary competitive. Send resume and names of three
references to: Dr. Wallis Beasley, Executive Vice
President, Washington State University. Pullman, WA
99164. Application deadline: April 15, 1977. Equal
Opportunity/ affirmative action employer.
WIOTWOIX needs aggressive -selling General Manager to head up a currently successful operation. Rush
resume and income requirements to Box 288. Horseheads, NY 14845.
Exprelenced account representative
FM adult
rock station, established account list, fantastic potential! Send resume to Ray Reich, WIBZ, 703 Market St.
Parketsburg, WV 26101.
If you are ready for that first sales job,
let's talk.
Growing agressive young group seeks motivated individual as an addition to our staff. Call Tom Manley at
WKCY 703.-434 -1777. EOE.
Sales Manager for WKWK -FM, Wheeling, West
Florida market. Looking for right experience in management, SALES, and programing. Send resume to
Gables Secretarial. Suite D, 110 Giralda Ave., Coral
Gables, FL. 33134.
Virginia. Beautiful music formal already tremendous
audience success. Sales management experience essential. Salary commensurate with ability. Good
growth opportunity for future station manager. Send
resume to Jim Glassman. Vice President, Community
Service Broadcasting. Box 1209, Mt. Vernon, IL
62864. Please do not call.
HELP WANTED SALES
Salesperson for number 1 station in 12 station
Appleton- Oshkosh, Wisconsin market. Schulke
Attn Management Personnel. Expand small mid -
Major market midwest daytimer needs sales manager. Excellent opportunity for top income. Box C-32,
BROADCASTING.
Looking Person With Record of Sales Management. Combination AM -FM in Eastern North Carolina.
Management team member. EOE. Reasume to Box
C -115, BROADCASTING.
Radio Time Salesperson- Growing tri -state group
needs additional salesperson for its central Pennsylvania outlet. Great earning potential -1st year. You will
be representing area's No.
and No. 2 stations. AMrock; FM-good music. Resume and salary requirements. Opportunities to grow within group. Guaranteed future for right person. An equal opportunity
employer. Box C -129, BROADCASTING.
1
"Beautiful Music" format. Must be able to show strong
past sales record. Contact Jim Bethke, WROE -FM,
PO Box 1024, Neenah, WI 54956 or call 414-
725.5331.
HELP WANTED ANNOUNCERS
4 or more years experience? Handle both country
and rock? Ability to move up to Program Director? We
need you. Box B -194, BROADCASTING.
Classical Music Announcer- Producer for Midwest University -based public FM. Responsibilities include weekday air shifts, program production and
some supervision of students. Requirements: Degree,
FCC third endorsed, two or more years' experience.
good on -air delivery. Available: April, 1977. Salary:
open. Send references with resume. Box C -104,
BROADCASTING.
Country Radio Personalities. People -to- People
Radio. Mid -South. Male or Female Welcomed. Strong
production helpful. Box C -120, BROADCASTING.
Man or woman, local news gathering experience
preferred. For AM -FM 90 miles from New York. Box
C -161, BROADCASTING.
4 or more years experience? Handle both country
and rock? Ability to move up to program director? We
need you. Box C -163, BROADCASTING.
Suburban New York City adult MOR station looking
Aggressive, self starter types needed
to join
group -owned AM /FM Buffalo, New York sales team.
Experience helpful but not essential- contact Mike
Plunstead, General Manager, or Ken Dodd, General
Sales Manager, WWOL, 716 -854 -1120. WWOL, an
equal opportunity employer.
Afraid ?, of competitive selling, then don't waste
our time. Looking for two professional time sales per
sons. Age or sex no consideration; production is!
Good company benefits -room to grow. E.O.E. Send
resume to Robert Boutin, Drawer FF, Edna TX 77957.
512 -782.3515.
Broadcasting Mar 21 1977
108
for air personality to handle nightly telephone talk/
music show. EOE. Send resume to Box C -170,
BROADCASTING.
North Alabama Station seeks announcer. Modern
Country Format. Good pay. Pleasant working conditions. Equal Opportunity Employer. Box C -174,
BROADCASTING.
KIRO (Seattle) Newsradio host. Three years on-air
experience required. Operate audio board; prefer pro duction /news gathering abilities. Bill Wippel, News
Director 206- 624-7077. EOE.
HELP WANTED NEWS
HELP WANTED ANNOUNCERS
CONTINUED
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
Wanted a full time radio announcer to host night
time Rock Show for KNPT AM & FM located at
TV Engineering Supervisor- Immediate opening
in major Northeast market for individual to supervise
technicians assigned to TV production and maintenance. Solid technical background,an FCC First Class
License, and a minimum of 5 years of TV broadcast
experience is required. Previous supervisory experience is desirable. An Affirmative ActioNEqual Opportunity Employer M /F. Please send resume to Box C -16,
BROADCASTING.
Newport in the center of the Beautiful Oregon Coast.
One of Oregon's finest Salmon Fishing and Tourist
Recreational Areas. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume Attn: Bob Spangler, P.O. Box
1028, Zip Code 97365.
Good, morning air personality needed for fast expanding Midwest radio chain. Pay negotiable. Send
resume and tape to J.J. Justin, KCLO Radio. Box 1458,
St. Cloud, MN 56301.
MOR Station has opening for morning personality
who knows music and can entertain. Send tape and
resume to KIJV, Box 1407. Huron, SD. 57350. EOE.
KPOW -AM Powell is now taking applications. First
Tickets only. Write Program Director, KPOW, Box 968,
Powell, WY 82435.
WHUT Anderson needs a creative communicator
We're a contemporary Top 40 station in Indiana's 7th
largest city. EOE. Tape & resume to Mike Kase, WHUT
Box 151, Anderson, IN 46015.
WIRL needs a strong 7- midnight rock personality.
Superior working conditions. If you're creative, bright,
dedicated, and talented, with decent pipes, send tape,
resume, salary: Bill McClugage, WIRL, Box 3335.
Peoria, IL 61614. No Calls! Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Air personality needed
for evenings on 1000 watt
rock stations on Florida's East Coast. Send air check,
resume and salary expectation to Dave Brewer,
WOVV Radio, PO Box 3192, Ft. Pierce, FL 33450.
EOE
San Juan, Puerto Rico. Chief Engineer. Must know
and have work experience in automation and digital
technology, directional antennas. $18,000 plus lull
benefit package. Immediate opening. EOE. Box
C-157, BROADCASTING.
Chief Engineer, experienced, California.
3
power, 2
pattern AM, remote FM stereo, automation, 2 STL -S,
SCA. Perfect climate in the beautiful wine country, 40
miles from San Francisco. T. Young KVON -KVYN,
707 -252 -1440.
Chief Engineer -experienced and qualified
AM/FM
Stereo. Contact Walt Roberts, WNCO, Ashland, OH.
419- 289 -2605. EOE.
Kentucky -AM /FM looking
for engineer. Some announcing. Will help train the right person. Call Jim
Ballard. 606-248-5842.
Chief Engineer for a large, small- market operation
in
Oregon's Cascade Mountains. Must be responsible
and dedicated to quality sound, and motivated to
learn and grow with an expanding operation who expect to construct directional antennas. EOE. For interview, call Mr. Smith, 503 -882 -8833, or Mr. Reese,
916 -926 -2124.
Good competent chief engineer needed for
MOR Personality Station has two immediate openings for experienced communicators, good production
is a must. Be a big fish in our pleasant little pond. We
offer you an excellent future with our chain and good
money. Rush your tape and resume to Paul Wagner,
WRMT, PO Box 283 Rocky Mount, NC 27801.
Wanted
CONTINUED
CONTINUED
... Announcer for
afternoon shift. Strong
on production. Send tape and resume to WYTI Radio,
PO Box 430, Rocky Mount, VA 24151.
Illinois top rated C li W station looking
for female or
male DJ for air shift. Experience preferred. Excellent
opportunity with good Co. benefits. Send tape and
resume to General Manager, 820 Myers Bldg.
Springfield, IL 62701. EOE.
Smooth CW announcer- Virginia small market.
Some production; sales if desired. Ideal rural community to settle, raise family away from big -city hustle.
Excellent benefits and stability with top -rated station.
Call John Fox, weekdays, 10:30 -5, 804 292-4146.
-
Leading New England AM/FM Country Combo
needs a couple of pros. Tight board, Good pipes -Salary open. Call 401 -438 -6110.
Spanish Bilingual part -time instructors needed for
Columbia School of Broadcasting. Resume to Hank
O'Neill, 6290 Sunset, Hollywood, CA 90028 213469 -8321.
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
Georgia AM -FM with excellent living conditions. Good
money and permanency. Call Tom Joyner at 919
734- 1466.EOE.
-
Chief Engineer for AM -FM Iowa station
to handle
all aspects of technical installation, operation and
maintenance. Experience with directional antennas
and automation system's essential. Box 886, Carroll,
IA 51401. EOE
Christian Radio Format oriented broadcast opera-
-
Must have First class license. Experienced
resume needed. Contact David Johnson, Christian
tor.
Broadcasting Association, Inc., 619 Peoples
Merchants Trust Building, Canton, OH 44702. EOE
Immediate -Chief Engineer, WEIR, Weirton, West
Virginia.1 KW DA -2. Station part of a small but growing
group operation. Must be maintenance minded.
$175.00 per week, plus fringe benefits. Phone or write
immediately. Joe Jarrett, Div. CE 814- 943 -1136, PO
Box 2005, Altoona, PA. An Equal Opportunity
Employer.
HELP WANTED NEWS
News person wanted for Midwest AM -FM local
news dept. Box
Z -130,
BROADCASTING.
Our News Department Is No. 1, and we intend to
remain there. An upcoming opening will require a person who won't accept mediocrity, and has a track
record to prove it. Our friendly Midwest city needs
another ace. Can you handle it? Box B -130. BROADCASTING.
Chief engineer. Excellent working conditions,
au-
tomation. Stereo, audio. Creative and willing to handle
the total plant. Midwest. Box Z -161, BROADCASTING.
Chief engineer for Florida station to handle all
aspects of technical installation, operation and maintenance. Experience with directional antennas essential. Good pay and benefits. Send resume to Box
A-185, BROADCASTING.
Asst. Chief Engineer for midwest network affiliate.
Prestigious group broadcaster. Position requires FCC
1st. Experienced with transmitter and studio maintenance. RCA equipment. Capable of administering
technical staff. An Equal Opportunity Employer. Send
resume to Box A -254, BROADCASTING.
Experienced Chief Engineer for three small market
radio stations located in Northwestern Ohio. Position
requires FCC 1st. Some air work or sales helpful. Send
resume to Box B -170, BROADCASTING.
Newsperson wanted. Small central California market. Deluxe AM & FM installation. Must have some experience in radio news reporting with good air per-
sonality. News director position open if qualified. Salary negotiatable depending on qualifications. Write
Box C-146, BROADCASTING.
Newsperson for award -winning New Mexico 50
kw. Experience and ability to gather and deliver local/
regional news. Send tape to Dyan King, KBCO, Box
670, Roswell, NM 88201.
PBP/News position open for experienced person at
leading AM /FM/TV operation in New Mexico. Send
tape to KBIM, Box 910, Roswell, NM 88201. EOE.
Looking for qualified newsperson, preferably
with radio experience for small market station in
Southwest. Address replies with full information to
Russ Beckman, KTAN Box 1566, Sierra Vista, AZ
85635. Equal Opportunity Employer.
Broadcasting Mar
109
21
1977
News Director All News station in top 30 market neds aggressive News Director with strong radio news
background. All News experience a plus. Full credentials and references in first letter. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Mr. William Devine, III, Station Manager,
WEBR, 23 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14202.
Ambitious, Hard -hitting reporter, unending
curiosity, dedication to excel. Not afraid to work or
step on toes. Can tell Joe Lunchbucket what he wants
and needs to know clearly. Advancement opportunity.
RTNDA award -winning news dept. Doug Breisch,
WIZM Z -93, La Crosse, WI. 608 782 -0650. A MidWest Family Station.
-
Entry level opening all -night news and transmitter
watch at 50 kw FM, kw AM. 3rd phone and car required. Leading station in Syracuse market. EOE.
WKFM/WOSO, Radio Park, Fulton, NY 13069. 315695 -2165.
1
WOAI Radio has openings for
2 conversational drive time news anchors. All -news experience preferred.
WOAI is a 50,000 -watt clear -channel news-talksports station. Tapes to John Wheeler Barger, WOAI
Radio, 1031 Navarro, San Antonio TX 78205. EOE.
Newsperson -WOA1 Radio has opening for reporter-editor. Sports background preferred. Tapes to:
John Barger, GM, WOAI Radio, 1031 Navarro, San Antonio, TX. 78205. E.O.E.
Newsperson needed for 3- member
AM -FM depart-
ment. Resumes, non -returnable tapes to News Director, WTRC, Box 699, Elkhart, IN 46514. EOE.
Director of News, public affairs wanted
for central
Virginia AM. Send resume, tape, requirements, Box
5085. Charlottesville, VA 22903.
HELP WANTED PROGRAMING,
PRODUCTION, OTHERS
Bus Mgr /Bkpr. Fine AM /FM, attractive S.F. area. Exceptional growth opportunity. EOE. Box A -60, BROADCASTING.
New England prep school seeks teacher of psychology. psychology -Spanish, or mathematics with
college or commercial radio experience. Begin Fall
1977. Teach regular course load and advise student
FM station. Room, board included. Salary competitive.
Equal opportunity /affirmative action employer.
Resume to Box B -173, BROADCASTING.
Mass Media Department seeks Instructor, Assistant
Professor to teach Broadcast Journalism, Radio Television Production. Should have Ph. D. or near with
professional or teaching experience. Send resume to
Dr. Bernard Russi, Mass Media, Marietta College,
Marietta, OH 45750. An equal opportunity employer.
Senior Professor to develop undergraduate and
graduate programs in mass media management and
teaching in allied academic areas, including communications law. Extensive experience in top management positions with prestige media required.
Begin fall, 1977. USC is Equal Opportunity/Aff irmative
Action Employer. Salary and rank open. Send resume,
references, exhibits to Dean, College of Journalism,
University of SC. Columbia, SC 29208.
Graduate Student teaching assistant- Radio-
Television. Halftime position for M.A. candidate offers
53195 for 9 months. Production experience necessary. Write: Head, Journalism Dept.. Kansas State University, Manhattan. KS 66506.
Producer -our team has won over 200 awards for
radio, TV, photography, AN shows and ad campaigns.
Our clients range from local retailers in 46 states to
Hardee's, Gulf Oil and AT&T. Most of us live 15
minutes from the studios in Virginia Beach, but it's
often long after dark when we finally get home. We're
one of the largest in the East, but still growing. And
we're looking for a totally experienced pro who will
soon take over the audio production department. He'll
be a whiz at directing talent and perform magic with
the equipment. He'll be highly creative and probably
work harder than ever in his life. If this sounds like the
company and challenging career opportunity you've
been looking for, send a tape with ten of your best
radio spots, resume to Warren Miller Studio Center
Corp. 200 West 22nd St., Norfolk, VA 23517. We'll be
in touch. EOE.
You've invested in automation. It takes a different
point -of -view to program, engineer, and sell than does
a DJ operation. Automation specialists are rare. Need
help? Box C -139, BROADCASTING.
Success demands Stability... Reliability ...
De-
pendability! These. and more from 18 year pro, experienced all phases radio, 15 with top chain. Seek management small /medium market. Box C -164, BROADCASTING.
Opportunity knock*. Law student with first phone
and major market experience has ideas for hire. Let s
talk ratings and profits. One week from today at the
NAB or reply Box -171, BROADCASTING.
Twelve years management experience is yours for
GM or GSM post, top 100 markets, solid situation and
opportunity very important. A selling manager, thirties,
a team builder with many success stories. Write for
them Box C -179, BROADCASTING.
Selling OM
SITUATIONS WANTED ANNOUNCERS
CONTINUED
SITUATIONS WANTED ANNOUNCERS
CONTINUED
SITUATIONS WANTED MANAGEMENT
See display ad for winning Exec. VP & GM.
am a hardworking competitor who is
goal oriented with a demonstrated record of leading a
staff to success. Prefer PA, KY., Ind., Ohio. Box C -180,
BROADCASTING.
I
DJ, 24, single, FCC 3rd endorsed, assoc. member
AMS, willing to work and help your station. Will go
anywhere but prefer East. Box C -101, BROADCASTING.
Experienced professional, knows music inside -
Audition Tape Available
We have the right person for your job vacancy; all
have training in on air work, copy, FCC rules, etc. and
have obtained their 3rd endorsed tickets. Call us at
716- 834.4457. No Fee.
D.J. Newscaster. Extensively trained by pro's, some experience. Relocate immediately. Contact: Box C -125, BROADCASTING.
An aggressive announcer wants you! 3rd endorsed, 4 years experience and versatility. Also sports
play by play. Robert Wolf. 806- 353 -0298. Box
C -142.
BROADCASTING.
DJ 4 Years Experience wants to move up. California, Arizona, Texas, Florida. Others considered. 904255 -6950 or Box C -153, BROADCASTING.
Well Trained Broadcast school grad looking for
first job. 3rd endorsed. Box
C -173,
BROADCASTING.
DJ, 25, 3rd endorsed, some commercial experience,
college, seeks adult contemporary, T40 AOR. etc. Will
relocate. Resume, tape, Frank Cavaliere, 31 -38 74th.
St. Jackson Heights, NY 11370. 212- 446-8694.
Northeast Adult Top /40 Personality,
Market, 3rd Endorsed. Norman,
1
year Small
212- 629 -1169.
SITUATIONS WANTED SALES
Jock, PBP, Sales, sales manager, station manager,
general manager. Understanding. Experience. A
proven leader. 20 years know -how. Looking for permanent top spot. Let's talk. Box A -238, BROADCASTING.
Good pipes, looking for placement in small market.
3rd endorsed. College degree. Hard working. Send for
tape and resume. Bob Hamilton. 4826 High Meadows
Terrace, Racine, WI 53406.
Fully skilled jock, 3rd endorsed, 3 years experience,
Need A Seasoned Pro? Could be I'm your man ...
20 years in broadcasting, 15 years owner- manager in
competitive market. Experienced in all phases ... first
phone ... call 606 -549 -5093 or write Box C -34,
seeks free -form, jazz, progressive, or classical in majorlmedium markets. Resume. tape. Cary, 516791 -9349, evenings only.
BROADCASTING.
Looking for employment in S.E.
out, especially rock. Good production, news. Good
voice, no screamer. Steve Scheiber, 427 Morris Street,
Ogdensburg, NY 13669.
Wanted: Position with Southern market station.
Quality, dependability and experienced in all phases
of radio. Dave Tucker. 724 Greymont, Nashville, TN
37217.
Production man -announcer -musicologist. with
third endorsed, six years experience, worked for major
radio network, looking for top forty, contemporary or
country station to base a career -not a one night
stand. Will relocate. Write: Karl Zuk 224 -04
Stronghurst Avenue, Queens Village, NY 11427.
Announcer 12 Year pro seeking position in SF Bay
Area. Ernie Birch 408.-248-9619. 2143 Aza Dr. Nr. 5
Santa Cairo, CA 95050.
Experienced announcer. Top communicator,
mature voice, third phone -three years CW, Rock,
MOR. Strong production. Seeking announcer /produclion or sales -Tape, resume, excellent references
available: B.S. Mass Communications. M. Moffett,
2608 Beltrami, Bemidji, MN. 56601. 218- 751 -7516.
D.J., Music director, 3rd endorsed. BA Degree. college & commercial exp. PD & copy potential. Ken,
712- 325 -0777, after 6. Prefer MO.
Personality Entertainer with
USA. Prefer small
or med. market, MOR progressive rock, Top 40, or out-
No.
ratings and no
close 2nd looking for move up to fame and fortune, but
mostly fortune! Comedy, bits, Top 40. AC. 814948 -9288 afternoons EST. Med /Major markets.
salesman looking for small market operations or station manager position. Box C -44, BROADCASTING.
law country. J. W. Harvey, 32117 Annapolis, Wayne,
MI 48184. Phone: 313 -729 -1279.
SITUATIONS WANTED TECHNICAL
Young woman looking to translate 8 yrs. Sales ex-
1st pnone- Broadcast Grad -Some experience.
Can write talk -sell. Greater Chicago area. 312-
Combo Chief Engineer, program director and
perience with numerous TV guest appearances to
being an 'on air' personality. Expertise: Woman's market. Anxious for opportunity to work hard and be successful. Box C -177, BROADCASTING.
Seeking stations wanting to
run spots on percentage of mail -order sales basis, 40 %. Hours Co. Box
633A Detroit, MI 48232.
Solid pro, experience
all phases radio. Good announcer. BS degree Broadcasting, 3rd endorsed.
ready to move up to management, (OM or better)
creative, thorough, hard working. Box 34254,
Memphis, TN 38134.
Sales Manager desires
better major market opportunity. 26, 5 years major market experience. Call
nights. 717-675-4016.
a
Award Winning Major market and network program
director wants to consult for your station. Reasonable
fee. Paul Mitchell. 215- 638 -9425.
Small Market OM experienced in all phases of radio,
available immediately. Write Bill Sutton, Rt.
Carlisle, MS 39049.
1,
Box 26,
r or salesman, announcer, MD, PD, ND, CE
(1st Phone), Talkmaster (15 yeras progressive experience). Writing awards, PR /community service & U.S.
Senatorial campaign management experience. 39
Kensington, Newark, DE 19713. 302-738-3270.
M
SITUATIONS WANTED ANNOUNCERS
DJ, 3rd phone, tight board, good news and commercials, ready now! Anywhere. Box H -5, BROADCAST-
-
736 -2306. Tom Clark, 4716 W. Byron, Chicago. IL
60641.
DJ Announcer- newscaster -writer. BS in Corn
munications. 2 years experience. Aggressive, bright,
innovative. Will relocate. Rick. 716- 227 -1095.
Experience, first phone, DJ. News, production.
Michael
B. Ryan,
Strong voice, bright personality looking for large or medium market. Experienced PD, MD, country, rock, MOR, production, news,
college PBP. 3rd endorsed. Willing to relocate. 312-
741.4081.
endorsed, announcing, news, production, now
learning 24 -track audio engineering at Criteria
Studios. Call: Bob Perna, 305 595 -6848.
3rd
-
3rd Cales Endorsed, wants radio position
in Ohio,
or western Penn. Resume and lape upon request. Call
anytime.
216- 395 -8581.
Ask for Allen.
Seek small market adult MOR /oldie shift in Ohio,
diana, Kentucky. 3rd endorsed experience. Call
631 -4657 after 7 p.m.
In-
513-
Ex-
BROADCASTING.
Dependable announcer with experience. Looking
for station to grow with in medium market. Personality
oriented but will work any format. Box C -27, BROADCASTING.
Female sports director, MA, 3 yrs. major college
PBP, talk -show host, good production. 3rd endorsed.
Single. Ready to join your sports staff now. Anywhere.
Box A -230, BROADCASTING.
in small market. Need growth opportunity in larger
market. Box A -270, BROADCASTING.
Wonder Woman. One year NYC O &O newscasterwriter; some AP Audio; two years reporting New
Jersey station; two years print; one year cable TV.
Seek media /PR /Advtg spot. Northeast. Box A -275.
BROADCASTING.
News Director of top small to medium market seeks
job as reporter in top 100 market. Prefers the West,
but willing to go anywhere. Looking for a station where
can progress upwards. Created a news department
in a city which previously had no electronic journalism. Will graduate in May Magna Cum Laude with a
degree in Telecommunications. Reply Box B -196.
BROADCASTING.
I
Five years experience. Polished, mature, bright,
communicative D.J. ready to move. Seeking contemporary, MOR. or AOR station in medium or larger mar-
Northern /Central California. Announcer with ex-
B -101,
18 years C.E. thoroughly experienced in AM, directional all powers, FM stereo, automation, proofs, construction. Prefer Southwest. 637 N. Waverly Place, Escondido, CA 92025.
News Director -Digger strong interviews. Cramped
PD /MD /B.A./Law, AM- FM -TV, 7 years
Intelligent midwest announcer looking for new ex-
perienced, Third. Box
305-271-4687.
SITUATIONS WANTED NEWS
Versatile announcer,
ker. Excellent production. Third endorsed. Chuck Tanner. 212- 799 -9190, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Country announcer /music director. Looking.
as chief
medium and major markets. Experienced in directional FM stereo. Studio maintenance. Automation. Ed
Jurich, 11177 N. Kendall, Apt. H206. Miami, FL 33176.
in
4731 Muir St., San Diego Ca 92107
ING.
perience in interview -talk radio. Friendly but not gabby. Entertaining. D.J:Announcer experience. 3rd endorsed. Box A -274, BROADCASTING.
Eight years in broadcasting. Past four years
714-224-2336.
South Florida:
1
perience in news and sales. Relaxed. personal delivery. Good copy and production, references. Medium
market. Leave message at 415 -566 -4597.
Sportscaster- Experienced play -by-play
man & interviewer, also music announcing & production experience. College grad with 3rd ticket looking for break
in small or medium market, willing to relocate. For
tape & resume write: S.K. Jackson 2515 Vista Laguna
Terrace, Pasadena, CA 91103 or call 213- 681 -4165.
Broadcasting Mar
110
21
1977
Young NIS Journalist. Willing to relocate for good
news job. Big buck not necessary. Box C -12, BROADCASTING.
I'm ready to move. Currently audio wire service reporter in Los Angeles. 3 years News Director background. BA Political Science, reported Capitol Hill and
State Capitol. Box C -135, BROADCASTING.
PBP Baseball, Hockey and basketball, will also do
news. Available immediately. 4 yeras experience as
announcer, BA, 3rd endorsed. Will relocate anywhere.
Box C-155, BROADCASTING.
SITUATIONS WANTED NEWS
CONTINUED
Professional anchor /Investigative reporter with
ability and credentials seeks position with established
station. Box C -169, BROADCASTING.
Qualified, experienced, industrious degreed journalist seeking position in medium market. Long term.
Let's talk: 408- 243 -7075.
News writer with 3 years experience, including
public affairs and production. Open to established
and growing markets. 3rd endorsed. Call Stan
Froelich. 212-526-1831, day /night.
Hard -nosed, serious, experienced, literate news
director, commentator, journalism B.A. seeks post.
216- 454 -4150.
Ten yeras in radio has helped develop my approach
and widened my musical knowledge. Mature, good
references, will re- locate. Bob Young; 3021 Newark
St., N.W.; Washington. DC 20008. 202 -362 -3325.
Husband and Wife, 1976 college graduates seeking
immediate employment. Experience in news, reporting, and DJ. Interested in both or either? Call Doug or
Nancy 513-951-1103.
Detroit, Philadelphia or Northeast: Seeking relief
from sunshine and no pay; 13 years experience, radioTV news, seeks reporter- anchor spot call 305667 -8108.
SITUATIONS WANTED PROGRAMING,
PRODUCTION, OTHERS
Aggressive, first phone production person desires
new challenge. Creative producer; commercials,
promos and specials. Added extra -tight on -air
engineer. Excellent references. Prefer Northeast, but
will relocate. Box A -269, BROADCASTING.
Medium market caliber top 40 jock ready to program. Have learned
BROADCASTING.
from the best.
Box
A -280.
radio, wants to teach radio. Box C -43, BROADCASTING.
Attention Mr. Contemporary
GM. Are your ratings
down but you know your sound is good? Maybe your
packaging needs work. Together we can plan anci implement a polished format keyed to your desired audience, complete with promotions and production. If
you're shopping for a PD, I'd like to talk to you. Box
C -92, BROADCASTING.
Professional Program Director
for contemporary
station seeking similar in a competitive market. First
phone, BS Broadcasting, management. We can communicate at Box C-131, BROADCASTING.
Top 100 Markets. Top flight production artist. Campaign development, copy/production, promotion. Solid
air. ContemplTop 40, MOR. Growth opportunity. Box
C -151. BROADCASTING.
Ill-
TV Production Manager West Coast. 5 years experience producer director required /previous manager
preferred. Experience directing live sports programming, studio scheduling. personnel supervision, budgeting. Know FCC/NAB requirements. EOE. Resume
Box C -127, BROADCASTING.
General Manager, Public Radio /Television Stations,
KWSU -AM and KWSU -TV, members NPR and PBS.
Master's Degree plus management experience in a
public broadcasting station required. College level
teaching experience desirable. Start June 1, 1977.
Salary competitive. Send resume and names of three
references to: Dr. Wallis Beasley. Executive Vice
President, Washington State University. Pullman. WA
99164. Application deadline: April 15, 1977, Equal
Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer.
HELP WANTED SALES
Seeking Mature, experienced, television advertising
and marketing executive who would like to associate
with a totally unique business venture in San Diego
market. This business will combine the untapped
commercial potential of cable television with the best
business aspects of broadcasting. This person must
not be afraid of new concepts or insurmountable
tasks. Must be a tireless, organized self- starter who is
willing to roll up his sleeves and start from scratch. Income commensurate with background and productivity: Salary+. Send resumes and photos to: Box
C -46. BROADCASTING.
WANTED. Rewarding Challenge. Creative, dedicated professional. Former ABC. major market and
award winning program director. Paul Mitchell.
638 -9425.
215-
Exp. in all
aspects of radio. Good ideas. If you want a hard
worker, let's talk. Major mkt. preferred. Don Cohen
704 -526 -2102 mornings or 4947 -12 Central,
Charlotte, NC 28205.
Promotion person. Young, bright, ready!
Exp. in all
If you want a hard
worker, let's talk. Major Mkt. preferred. Don Cohen
704 -536 -2102, mornings, or 4947 -12 Central,
Charlotte, NC 28205.
aspects of radio. Good ideas.
University or NPR position preferred. Have MA
Communicating Arts, experienced broadcaster: news,
writing. production, announcing. Jim Ritchie, Box 682,
Feveral Bldg. Duluth, MN 55801.
Maintenance engineer with first class license for
aggressive TV station in major midwest market for
heavy maintenance on TCR -100 and /or Sony recorders in large ENG operation with computerized editors. Also, TV Transmitter Supervisor ready for complete responsibility for outstanding operation of
remote controlled TT3OFL. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Salary excellent. Send resume Box C-18,
BROADCASTING.
Maintenance Engineer for Florida Network affiliate.
First class license and actual maintenance experience on state of the art equipment required. Equal Opportunity Employer. Send resume and salary requirements to Box C -49, BROADCASTING.
Broadcast Engineer- Southeast
UHF. License
years experience in operation and
maintenance of quad VTRs, color cameras, and UHF
transmitters. Competitive salary and benefits. Box
C -117, BROADCASTING.
and minimum
2
Chief Engineer major market
UHF station. All
aspects studio and transmitter operations. EOE. Reply
to Box C -123. BROADCASTING.
Must be 18 years of age or older, hold
a First Class
Radiotelephone License and have six months of
Television Master Control operations. Equal Opportunity Employer. Send resume to Box C -147, BROADCASTING.
Camera Maintenance and tape maintenance
engineers with a minimum of 5 yeras broadcast experience. and FCC First Class, Salary 18 -25K, EOE, M /F.
Box C -152, BROADCASTING.
Chief engineer for major group operated network
affiliated TV in top 50 market eastern US. Supervisory
experience and good educational background necessary. Box C -168. BROADCASTING.
Maintenance engineer for Texas network affiliated
VHF. Experience on TK44B's, Ampex VR1200, 2000,
and other broadcast equipment helpful. Contact
Robert Hardie, C. E., KAMR -TV, 806- 383 -3321.
Experienced TV operations
&
maintenance
engineers. FCC 1st License required. Resume KIRO,
Third & Broad, Seattle, WA 98121 EOE.
Sunshine, Gulf Breezes and Opportunity for
combination operations/maintenance engineer. Experience and 1st a must. New studio -CR. Aged UHF
Xmtr. Resume to Chief Engineer, KORO -TV, 600
Leopard Suite 102, Corpus Christi, TX 78401.
Television Technical Engineer with first class
FCC
Group broadcaster seeks National Sales Coor-
license and minimum 3 years experience. ABC affiliate. RCA equipment. Send complete resume to:
Wayne Semple, WAND -TV, PO Box 631, Decatur, IL
62525. EOE
HELP WANTED ANNOUNCERS
MaIntenance /Installation Eng. Join leading public
broadcast VHF /FM operation. Latest ENG, time code
editing, Quad, helical VTR's plus new studio to install.
Min. 5 years state of the art video electronics Good
salary. Call Dir. of Eng., 904-354-2806. or write
WJCT, 2037 Main Street. Jacksonville, FL 32206. An
Equal Opportunity Employer. M /F.
dinator to be based in NYC and work with rep, agencies and stations to build sales, Agency or research
experience desirable. Experience and salary requirements to Box C -61, BROADCASTING.
Opportunity Knocks.
Law student with first phone
and major market experience has ideas for hire. Let's
ratings
profits.
One week from today at the
talk
and
NAB or reply Box C -171, BROADCASTING.
CONTINUED
ENGINEER
Public Television Network. Ability to
perform difficult duties in maintaining, repairing and
operating electric equipment such as: operating and
making major repairs on video tape recorders. color
cameras, intercom and audio systems and other
equipment associated with the production, distribution and presentation of Public Television Broadcasts.
Assume responsibility for the proper repair and maintenance of equipment and observation of Federal
rules and regulations. Schedule and supervise less
experienced engineers in the repair of the more complex equipment. Evaluating audio and video signals
and filing daily quality reports; perform video and
audio sweep measurements and performance
measurements on studio systems.
Merit Requirements: Certificate in electronics or related course; 2nd Class License as issued by the FCC
for studio work and 2 years of full time paid employment in operating, maintaining and/or repairing complex electronic equipment. Strong background in solid
state and digital electronics.. CONTRACT- RENEWABLE. Contact: Personnel Office, Iowa Public Broadcasting Network, PO Box 1758, 515- 281 -4566, Des
Moines, IA 50306. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
BA Broadcasting Purdue, 1st Phone. 29, six years
Promotion Person. Young, bright, ready!
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
TELEVISION
HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT
Talk show host or hostess for top -rated 50
kilowatt middle market MOR. Must be a knowledgeable, articulate conversationalist. This person should
also have a good voice and a patient personality. College education desirable, experience and broad based background helpful. Applicant must be able to
communicate well and handle controversial issues
fairly. Several hours will be spent on the air daily. Send,
tape and resume to: Talk Show, Eastman Radio. One
Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10020. EOE.
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
Transmitter Supervisor for a new
VHF satellite TV
station operating at full power in Michigan's Upper
Peninsula. Transmitter experience required. Equal Opportunity Employer. Write Box A -281, BROADCASTING.
Director- Experienced directing
fast paced
Newscasts. Also board work, audio and video. Major
southeast market. We are an equal opportunity
employer. Send resume and salary requirement to Box
B -93 BROADCASTING.
Broadcasting Mar
111
21
1977
Studio maintenance supervisor needed at once to
maintain studio equipment. PC 70 VR 1200. CDL
1260 switcher, etc. Must be experienced. EOE. For information call collect Russ Summerville, WNDU -TV,
219 233 -7111.
-
Broadcast (TV) Engineers for employment
in the
Middle East. Five to seven years of heavy maintenance and A.SC. B.SC. or equivalent required. Experience with IVC 7000 cameras and Thomson equipment preferred. Please send copies of resume and
certificates to: Beta Service Intl., Shelard Tower, Suite
1340, Minneapolis. MN 55426.
Studio maintenance engineer. Full -time installation, maintenance and modification of top line studio
and film cameras, videotape machines, switchers, editors, ENG equipment, microwave and transmitter
equipment. First class license and actual maintenance experience required. Contact CE at 517-
755.8191.
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
in
If you're bright, talented, and full of energy and have
New Jersey. Min 5 years experience required. Salary
18-25K. Call station management 201 -325.2925.
at least one year TV News experience, there's a place
for you as a General Assignment Reporter at WKRGTV. ENG experience preferred, but not mandatory.
Send a sample of your work, along with a resume to:
Bob Grip, News Director, WKRG -TV, P.O. Box 2367.
Mobile, AL 36601. EOE.
Chief all phases. Immediate opening, expanding
E.O.E.
Maintenance engineer with first class
FCC license
for equipment maintenance at a Western New York
television station. Experience with RCA television
broadcast equipment required. Call Chief Engineer at
716- 773 -7531. Equal Opportunity Employer.
Video City Inc. needs video engineer to handle location shooting in warm South Florida. Single and multiple camera systems. Phillips experience desirable.
Resume to Larry Krupa, 12100 N.E. 16th Ave., North
Miami, FL 33161.
Broadcast TV Maintenance Engineers for the Middle East, 25K plus housing. 5 years equipment maintenance experience. Tech. School diploma or degree.
Submit resume to: Beta Service International, Suite
1340, 600 South County Rd. 18, Minneapolis. MN
55426.
Assistant Chief Engineer for Oklahoma Educational TV Network. Excellent opportunity for the right
person. Must have strong transmitter, VTR and
Camera maintenance background and demonstrated
engineering management capabilities. Duties will include supervision of transmitter and production
engineering staff, scheduling of engineering department operations and maintenance of equipment. Will
personally perform major maintenance duties and
other duties as assigned by the Chief Engineer. Send
complete resume to: Bill Key, Chief Engineer, OETA,
7403 N. Kelley Ave., P.O. Box 14190, Oklahoma City,
OK 73114; or contact Mr. Key at NAB by checking the
RCA bulletin board for his room number.
Assistant Professor with major responsibilities
in
leaching television and radio production. Nine month
contract, beginning August. 1977. Carrer- oriented
program. Close contact with regional broadcast
professionals. Professional television production experience mandatory. Master's required; Ph.D. preferred. Experience in announcing; management; and /or
sales helpful. Salary dependent on qualifications and
experience. Application deadline: April 15, 1977.
Send letter of application and vita to: James S. Harris,
Chairman, Department of Mass Communications,
Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY 40475.EOE
Broadcast Specialist for top Sunbelt University PR
outfit. Must have audio, film and VTR experience. BA
preferable. Resume to L. C. Falk, P.O. Box 1408, University, AL 35486.
HELP WANTED NEWS
We're tired of losing our News Anchors to larger
markets! Somewhere, there's an experienced anchor/
producer who has it all -and has had it with their
present situation! II that ideal small market is your
dream, you could be the person we're looking for. We
can offer 118th market diversified growth economy
(oil -gas, banking, medical, diverse ag., university),
VHF ABC afil with only CBS competition, a Joie de
Vivre lifestyle in the heart of the Cajun Country in
Southwest Louisiana, ENG, dedicated staff (including
owners and management), and a future that may astound you. We're KATC(TV) in Lafayette, LA. Who are
you and what con you o -fer? Why don't you send
resume, cassette, and salary requirements to ND Joe
Holstead, P.O. Box 3347, Lafayette, LA 70502. He'll
even talk to major market types! EOE.
Person with radio and TV experience to gather,
write, edit news stories pertaining to agriculture and
its impact on consumers. Radio news. film shooting
and editing, and ENG experience. Prefer someone
from Southwest. Audio tape, small snapshot photo,
and resume to Bill Hoover, Information Director, Texas
Farm Bureau, Box 489, Waco, TX 76703. Telephone
817- 772 -3030.
Meteorologist with certification and warm
on -air
delivery for medium market station. Will prepare and
deliver weather for early and late newscasts, some
booth audio, some community involvement. Resume
and tape to Ian Pearson, WANE -TV, 2915 W. State
Blvd., Ft. Wayne, IN 46808.
HELP WANTED PROGRAMING,
PRODUCTION, OTHERS
Promotion Director for medium market Mid -West
E.O.E. number one station in top 50 southeast wants
experienced enterprising reporter who can shoot SOF
and edit; and experienced SOF cameraperson /editor
who can report. Both must be fast moving and turn out
two to three professional stones a day. If you need
training, do not apply. Resume and references required. Salary $175.00. Box A -256, BROADCASTING.
News Director. For Medium Market, network aff
ated radio -television operation. Must have previous
television news director experience. This is a progressive news organization which has enjoyed continued
ratings growth. Film, tape and live field equipment. An
equal opportunity employer. Box C -35. BROADCASTING.
a
weekday anchor -6 & 11. Progressive operation. Salary open. EOE. Reply, Box C -110, BROADCASTING.
WFTV Is looking for a solid, experienced journalist
to anchor on weekends and report during the week. If
you can cut it in a competitive market, send a resume
along with samples of your street and anchor work on
3/4 inch cassette to: Bob Jordan, WFTV, Box 999,
Orlando, FL, 32801. Only experienced applicants will
be considered.
a creative and
innovative individual as junior producer in our advertising department. Job entails producing television
promo's in support of our programming. A background
of three years in television production experience
would be a prime requisite. This individual must also
possess a broad background in copywriting and must
be able to work well without constant supervision, and
often under great pressure. Please send your reel.
resume and salary requirement to: Martin S. Schultz,
Supervisor, On -Air Promotion KRON -TV, P.O. Box
3412 San Francisco, CA. 94119.
I
SITUATIONS WANTED MANAGEMENT
want to anchor) Top Ten market talk-show host
and anchorman desires solid anchor position. Young,
Exciting, Intelligent Box B -29 BROADCASTING.
General, national, regional, local Sales Mgr available in thirty to ninety days. Excellent, reliable, sincere
record. Box B -186, BROADCASTING.
See display ad for quality GM or GSM.
Christian TV Station /General Manager seeks
same. Superior references from current employer. Box
C -145, BROADCASTING.
Sales /Ratings /Supervision, Inquires confidential.
Box C -160, BROADCASTING.
General Manager. Practicing broadcaster 30
years -television 22 years. Thoroughly experienced
all aspects: acquisitions, ownership, administration,
sales, programming, production, promotion, etc. Con .verted 4 long -term losers into winners. Achieved development in sales, PROFITS and prestige years
ahead of most optimistic projections. Accustomed to
formidable challenges, full responsibility and
phenominal SUCCESS. Box C -172, BROADCASTING.
I want to make your station
profitable and exciting. Degree and seven years commercial experience in production, operations, programming, and promotion; recently as Promotion
Manager in top 50 market. 919 -782 -7699 after 3 pm
EST. Box C -175, BROADCASTING.
Young Broadcaster.
Experienced TV Network Executive seeks sales
position, PR placement or station representation
work -willing to relocate. Excellent references Radio TV. Box C -52, BROADCASTING.
Program Director, Film Buyer. Major cable and
See display ad for achievement oriented GSM
Pay cable
firm seeking experienced film buyer.
Should have station program buying background.
NYC location. Replies confidential. Box C -108
BROADCASTING.
Director /Production Manager for large NW market.
Must be experienced in all phases of commercial production plus ability to work closely with agencies. Emphasis ón creativity. EOE. Resume and salary requirements. Box C -114, BROADCASTING.
Producer -Director with minimum
2 years experience in all phases of production. Seeking mature person with growing ability. Send resume and references
to: T.J. Vaughan, Vice President, Programming and
Operations, WAND -TV, P.O. Box 631, Decatur, IL
62525. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
Outstanding Promotion Position. Television Corporation needs a dynamite Promotion Manager. Experience in print, on -air and management. Send resume
and tape to Jack Everette, Midwest Television, 509 So.
Neil St., Peoria, IL 61820.
Writer- producer needed for
SITUATIONS WANTED SALES
&
GM.
SITUATIONS WANTED ANNOUNCERS
15 years top
10 markets. Jock, PO, Manager. TV
Anchor. First phone. Box C -158, BROADCASTING.
SITUATIONS WANTED TECHNICAL
General Sales Manager
in medium market seeking
relocation. Creative, young and an effective quality
competitor. Strong major market experience in sales
and management. Self- starter with proven record of
success in achieving revenue objectives. Box B -50
BROADCASTING.
-
1st Phone Major Market experience -Family man
Ambitious Self Starter. Experience: Master Control to
Vt Editing, Box B -68, BROADCASTING.
Dir. of Eng. seeks growth opportunities with group or
large facility. 18 years TV /AM /FM, college, Ch. Eng.,
Group Executive exp. Southeast prefered, any location
considered. Available for interview NAB. Box C -86.
BROADCASTING.
Radio Engineer /DJ 1st phone wants work in TV. Try
-I'll
VHF public TV station
Midwest university town. College degree plus two
years experience required. $9,360 to start with excellent fringe benefits, Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer. Job description and further information available. Write: Don Swift, 52 E. Gregory
Drive, Champaign, IL 61820.
me
Producer /Director with heavy commercial produc
CASTING.
Lion and news
Experienced Reporter, Dynamic, creative, strong
in
Have opening for Meterologist. Must have clear
and personable delivery of weather. TV experience required. 100+ Southeast market. Salary open. EOE.
Reply Box C -111, BROADCASTING.
Producer, Junior. We are looking for
Network Affiliate. This will be a one -person operation.
Ideal position for current assistant Promotion Director.
Capable of creating on -the -air promotion, radio and
newspaper campaigns. Station currently expanding
coverage. Promotion minded group ownership. An
Equal Opportunity Employer. Send resume with salary
requirements to Box C -83, BROADCASTING.
Experienced Highly Creative TV Production
Top rated Southeast 100- market looking for
HELP WANTED PROGRAMING,
PRODUCTION, OTHERS CONTINUED
HELP WANTED NEWS
CONTINUED
CONTINUED
experience. Do your own switching and
must know and do lighting. No. production station in
market. Send complete resume, salary history and
sample reel to: Dennis Czechanski, KAKE -TV, PO Box
10, Wichita, KS 67201. An EOE. No phone calls.
1
Broadcasting Mar
112
21
1977
learn. Box 63 Wadena, MN 56537.
SITUATIONS WANTED NEWS
TV News Director immediately available for
medium market in the East or number two slot in major market. Mature, dependable, results oriented and
sensitive to community issues. Box A -244, BROAD-
journalism background including Masters Degree
cand. Seeks position as TV reporter, will consider
anchor. Top references, VTR & resume. Box C -79,
BROADCASTING.
SITUATIONS WANTED NEWS
CONTINUED
TV Sports Director In top 40 market with extensive
film production background and major college play by
play experience. Desires move up. Tape and resume
on request Box C -84, BROADCASTING.
Field Reporter /Photographer. Solid professional
with 7 years experience in medium market. Visually
oriented self- starter with news savvy and production
skills. Box C -148, BROADCASTING.
Reporter -Anchor. Strong journalist with excellent
camera appearance and presence. 6 yeras experience, last 4 in very well -paid position for market size,
now seeking significant advancement, happiest doing
street work and morning or midday anchor. Knows
how to combine responsible reporting with reports
that look good. 27 degree. Present and previous
employers for references. Box C -154, BROADCASTING.
Anchor, Sports, Weather.
No.
1
in top five markets
FOR SALE EQUIPMENT
FOR SALE EQUIPMENT
CONTINUED
CONTINUED
2 -Akai VTS -1508 complete ENG systems, excellent
condition $4500 each. -Akai spare camera for
VTS -150B system also excellent $2200. We can supply the TBC and put you on the street with ENG for
less than $25,000. Call us now. GRV Systems Inc.,
1
2370 Vinton
525-2633.
St.,
Huntington, WV 25701.
304-
Eastman Model 285 no. 1766, only 52 hours since
$5900.00 will lake part trade. International
13843 NW 19th Avenue Miami, FL 33054. -305681.3733.
new.
1
PCP -90 Camera, base station and Ampex 3000
recorder. In daily operation for major station, being
replaced. Call 202- 686 -5895.
Jameson Compac 18/8 Processor, MacBeth
TD -504 Densitometer, Oscar Fisher 30 Gallon Jet Mixer, other equipment. Production Supervisor, WXXI -TV.
Box 21, Rochester, NY 14601. 716- 325 -7500.
Box C -159. BROADCASTING.
News photographer: Aggressive and experienced in filming, editing 16mm. Seek to learn ENG.
Strong electronics interest. Film and VTR available.
Call 616 538-7744. J.L. Keener. 642 SW 36th,
Wyoming, MI 49509.
-
Wanted: Entry Into TV newel I'm 23, 7 years radio
and CAN, 3 years ND, BA Economics. l'il trade years
-
-
for right position. Will relocate prefer Eastern U.S.
Gary Scott, 7 Bennington Rd., Havertown, PA 19083;
215- 446 -8823.
I'm not Just a plain Jaynel Enthusiastic young
woman seeking broadcast opportunity. BA, radio and
TV; major market AM /FM/TV experience. VTR available. Dependable, talented, willing to relocate. Excellent references. Jayne Jeffery, 535 E. Laverne
Drive, Oak Creek, WI 53154. 414- 762 -8836.
News Director: Nightly Anchor/Street
Reporter,
young attractive, polished. Looking for growing or established quality news operation. Preferable Calilor
nia or Florida. Very impressive resume. Call: 915333.4004 mornings.
SITUATIONS WANTED PROGRAMING,
PRODUCTION, OTHERS
Producer /Director:
BA Radio/TV/Film. Over 3 years
cable experience, studio and remote, switching, audio,
lighting, etc. Assist in department management. Also
broadcast camera experience. Seeks entry into broadcasting, willing to work up from production assistant
or similar position. Will relocate for right opportunity
Box C-87, BROADCASTING.
Gates FM -10H transmitter. stereo generator not
needed. Frank C. Carman, KLUB, Box 389, Salt Lake
City, UT 84110.
Versatile producer -director with
7 years extensive professional production experience looking to expand my creative talents at your station. Graham Brinton, 215- 664 -3346.
WANTED TO BUY
EQUIPMENT
Wanted RCA 44 -BX ribbon microphones, any condition. Polaroid /details to Ken Mitchell, 1023 Hancock,
Los Angeles, CA, 90069.
Gates Executive Console wanted. Will consider
any condition or price WNOE, New Orleans. 504523 -4753.
FOR SALE EQUIPMENT
TV tower and line for sale: stainless G -4, 400 foot
tower now supporting 7,000 pound RCA antenna. Guy
cables and saddles included. Fully galvanized and
painted and less than seven (7) years old. Also, 25
sections of RCA 6 -inch transmission line, bullets and
hangars, $22.500. Contact M.D. Smith, IV, Manager,
WAAY -N, 1000 Monte Sano Boulevard, Huntsville, AL
35801 or phone 205 539 -1783.
-
Build your own TV and radio production equipment.
Easy, inexpensive plans covering audio consoles to
chroma key and time base correctors. $1.00 brings
our catalog listing over 100 projects. Don Britton Enterprises, PO Box G. Waikiki, HI 96815.
Gates "President" 8 channel console, good condition. $2,300. Maze Corporation. 205 -956 -5800.
Collins 5KW transmitter, 830 -E.
Stereo. Perfect.
Tuned and tested your frequency. $8.900. 601362 -2790 after 5. J. Boyd Ingran, PO Box 2154.
Jackson, MS 39205.
UHF TV Transmitter -12 KW by GE. Call
964.4191 or 815- 965 -9600.
815-
Switcher- American Data ADC 556 with Chroma
Key. Call 815- 965 -9600 or 815- 964 -4191.
Spare Color Tubes for TK -26 film chain camera (no
optics) and TK -26 CCU. Best offer. Call
964 -4191 or 815- 965-9600.
815-
RCA Switchers -two Custom RCA PMS 10
Switchers for both production and operations use, incl.
rack equipment and cable. call 815- 964 -4191 or
815- 965 -9600.
Audio -Ampex 801
2 -track
with two amp /speakers.
Four SHURE 565 dual -impedance mies, mic stands,
500' mit cable RCA studio monitor- speaker. Call
815- 965 -9600.
VTR Machines -one 879C, one 760, with TRI
815- 964 -4191 or 815965 -9600.
IVC
1
Editor. Low hours. Call
An Oldie but a Goodie. Collins 21B transmitter 5/1
KW. Complete. Recently removed from service. Call
503 -882 -2551.
O'Conner Hydro-ped, model 102 -8 with case and
wheels. Good condition. KCET. 4400 Sunset Drive, Los
Angeles, CA 90027 213-666-6500.
1 kw FM Transmitter, 3 kw FM Transmitter. Electrosound 2 track stereo (never used -half price). MCI 2
Track Stereo. CBS Audimax (like new). McMartin
4500A. Marti
876 -7123.
Color Remote Van- 2- IVC500A cameras.
chines, with Monitors, rack equipment, manuals. Call
815-964-4191 or 815- 965 -9600
(22) Motorola MV30 Transmitters; (33) Motorola
MV30 Receivers; (10) Motorola MV20 Transmitters'
(19) Motorola MV20 Receivers. These units are in excellent condition and can be purchased as complete
system or as individual components. American
Microwave & Communications, Inc., 105 Kent Street,
Iron Mountain, MI 49801
(3) RCA TK -42 Color Cameras, with cam heads.
cafe remotes,
racks, approx. 600' camera cable. Two
have RCA /Houston Fearless TD -9B -C motorized
pedestals. one with RCA/Fearless tripod and dolly
With RCA color monitor, manuals. Call 815964 -4191 or 815- 965 -9600.
CBS dynamic presence equalizer, Model 4500
New. Improve your sound $495 312- 956 -1548.
404-
RHL
switcher, Conrac & Tek monitoring. Self contained
power. Ready to roll or install equipment in studio.
Phone Bob Schmitt, 918 -663 -8330, Ext. 43.
Bankrupt Radio Station equipment for sale by bid.
Most near new. Call 503- 232 -2999 for details. Bids
close on April 10, 1977.
5 -10 kw 1 93A Federal FM transmitter, new final
tubes. $1,200.00 best offer. Chris 916- 885 -9500,
916 -885 -0166. F.O.B. Corvallis, OR.
Late model Grass Valley Switcher. Dual Mix Effects Amps w(Pgm -Pvw mixer w /auto fade. Dual
Chroma Key. Downstream Keyer with Border /Shadow/
Outline and colorizers. Quad Split. Twenty inputs with
four aux. busses timed for full reentry. Model 1400 -9
loaded with extras. For details call 213 -655 -8134 or
write Pacific Video Industries, 8721 Sunset Blvd., Los
Angeles, CA 90069.
Gates SP -10 with logging, new decks and more
priced below $10,000.00. Contact Broadcast
Specialties,
206- 577 -1681,
Longview, WA.
Eastman Model 275 16mm Chain Projector Perfect
$3995.00 Eastman 350 Chain Projector $1500.00,
GPL- Teleprompter Large Screen TV Projector
$595.00 RCA TRT Quad VTR Updated & Operational
$1950.00 Ampex VR1000 C AS IS $995.00. Other
Video Equipment. International, 13843 NW 19th
Avenue, Miami FL 33054. 305-681-3733.
2 IOM 500 one dual -MOS 3 voice, 3 music, new
reels, fully guaranteed. Great buy! Contact Broadcast
Specialties,
206- 577 -1681.
1500 Fldelipac
Nr.
300 Carts. Various Lengths. Call
713- 795 -4820.
UHF Transmitter -30 KW GE television transmitter
call 815- 964 -4191 or 815- 965-9600.
(2) RCA TR -22 Quads, high band Color VTR ma-
Compressor /Limiters. Call:
COMEDY
Deejays: New, sure -fire comedy! 11,000 classified
one liners. $10. Catalog free! Edmund Orrin, 2786 -B
West Roberts, Fresno, CA 93711.
Original comedy for radio entertainers.
Free sample! OBITS. 366 -C West Bullard, Fresno, CA 93704.
Prizes! Prizes, Prizes! National brands for promo-
tions, contests, programing. No barter or trade ... better! For fantastic deal, write or phone: Television &
Radio Features, Inc., 166 E. Superior St., Chicago, IL
60611. call collect 312- 944 -3700.
Knockers)
show.
A
great set of funny recorded bits for your
Fuller, 44304 Olina Kaneohe, HI
Sample.
96744.
Amateur singers wanted for new record company.
Call 212 -247 -8500. Demo fee required.
-
Latest Gags $2. Back
Issues SI each. Gagwriting Lesson $3. Robert Makin son, 417 State, Brooklyn NY 11217.
Joey Adams recommends
Two Schafer 1200, Schafer 800, Two IGM 500,
CDC Sequential. All reconditioned, new reels, new
carousels, and more. Contact Broadcast Specialties,
206 -577 -1681. Longview, WA.
Schafer Automation Systems. 800 Stereo.
3
Ampex AG- 445B2, stereo carousel, mono single play
cart, racks $8,000. 902 w/96 position. interface cards,
cables for 5 Ampexes, 7 cart/carousel. Price new
$13,000. Yours for $6,500. Schafer International 5801
Soledad Mtn. Rd. La Jolla, CA 92037. Tel: 714-
454.1154.
TR -4, Hi- banded, 2 heads. TR -22. 3 heads.
Bernie Sasek, KMEG -TV, 712 277 -3554.
-
Broadcasting Mar
113
21
1977
2
new.
INSTRUCTION
teaches electronics for the FCC first class
license. Over 90% of our students pass their exams.
Classes begin Feb 14. Student
REI
Our 40th year) Complete radio production and announcing training, Don Martin School of Communications! Six fully equipped, modern radio studios. Full
time resident studio & classroom instruction by media
experienced professionals. Classes monthly, VA approved. 7080 Hollywood Blvd., 5th Floor. Hollywood,
CA 90028. 213- 462-3281. Not a "workshop" or
"seminar", but fully qualified and approved school.
INSTRUCTION CONTINUED
First Class
FCC license in 6 weeks. Veterans approved. Day and evening classes. Ervin Institute, 8010
Blue Ash Road, Cincinnati, OH 45326. Telephone
513-791-1770.
Omega State Instituts, FCC first class license and
studio training. 90% placement success! 237 East
Grand, Chicago. 312-321-9400.
r
Help Wanted Management
Help Wanted Sales
Continued
SALESMAN WANTED
FM MANAGER
Southwest market station of group owner
needs direction from an agressive, experienced radio professional Successful candidate will have the ability and desire to make
this FM station a leader in the community.
Compensation plan will include a percentage
No: tuition, rent! Memorize, study- Commands
"Test-Answers" for FCC first class license -plus "Self
Study Ability Test" Proven! $9.95. Moneyback
guarantee. Command Productions, Box 26348, San
Francisco, CA 94126. (Since 1967).
of the profit. Please send resume to Box
C -143, BROADCASTING.
1/4
1st class FCC, 6 wks, $450 or money back
guarantee. VA appvd. Nat'l. Inst. Communications,
11488 Oxnard St., N. Hollywood, CA 91606.
A.T.S. 152 W. 42 St, NYC. 212- 221 -3700. Vets ben efits. A 16 -year track record of success.
Bumper Stickers, $86.00 per 1000. Flourescent.
Save on larger quantities. Write for samples.
RuleAForm, Box 355, Sea Girt, NJ 08750.
RADIO
Help Wanted Management
-JOB
OPENING
Help Wanted News
PACIFICA RADIO STATION
KPFK -FM
LOS ANGELES, CA
Resumes should be sent to L.P. Skotnes,
KPFK -FM, P.O. Box 8639, Universal City, Ca.
91608.
Deadline for filing application is April 15.
1977, with hiring decision by May 15, 1977.
Third World and Women Candidates are encouraged to apply.
WOAI Radio has openings for 2 conversa tonal drive-time news anchors. All -news experience preferred. WOAI is a 50,000 -watt
clear-channel news -talk -sports station. Tapes
to John Wheeler Barger, WOAI Radio, 1031
Navarro. San Antonio, TX 78205. EOE.
i
in West /Southwest needs two salespersons with management potential. Can be men or
women at these Equal Opportunity
Employment stations. Hurry resume.
photo and tape with first reply to 5865
Camino Escalante, Tucson, AZ 85718.
WE'RE LOOKING FOR THE
WORLD'S GREATEST
MORNING
DISC JOCKEY PERSON
Bright, exciting, warm, friendly, involved,
Metropolitan-New York Radio Station
seeks experienced newscaster/writer for part time and vacation relief employment. Please
send tape with resume including a 5 minute
newscast and two live commercials. Tapes
will not be returned. All inquiries held confidential. Respond to P.O. Box 2727, Grand
Central Station, New York, New York. An equal
adult contemporary, smart, creative,
quick, humorous, clever, professional,
witty, topical, believable, wonderful
morning entertainer.
Send your aircheck and resume to:
Peter Mokover
WPEN Radio
2212 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
opportunity employer.
EOE
-M /F
Help Wanted Technical
We need
SALES MANAGER
WOIO -AM, fulltimer, 20 miles south of
Philadelphia, needs a local sales manager. Applicant must have a good billing
history and brain full of local promotions. Area has over 600,000 people and
retail sales over $1 Billion. 2 station
market. Good benefits, percentage
override, top pay for right person.
Resumes with billing history to Mr. John
Haggard, P.O. Box 2070, Aston, Pa.,
19014. EOE. M /F.
Small market chain
Help Wanted Announcers
-
GENERAL MANAGER
Illinois only. Strong self- starter for
medium -market, top -rated 50kw FM
Send all information first letter. Box
C -63, BROADCASTING.
YOU...if you're
a
FIELD SERVICE TECHNICIAN or ELECTRICAL
ENGINEER!
- Happily, we've got growing pains -
IGM, al the forefront in manufacture of automation components and systems for radio and
other fields, can offer you a challenging and interesting opportunity, with a good future.
Submit resumes at our booth, NAB Show, Washington, Shoreham 538.
Or mail to:
IGM
division of Nil, Inc.
4041 Home Road
Bellingham, WA 98225
a
1
Situations Wanted Management
DISTRICT MANAGER
RADIO EQUIPMENT /SYSTEMS SALES
The Cetec Broadcast Group, one of the industry's largest producers of equipment/systems for radio is interested in appointing a District Manager to sell
products directly to radio broadcasters in lientucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and
Alabama.
The person we are looking for should have a strong background in radio station
management, sales, and equipment operation.
Expenses, compensation, and benefit plans will be discussed with qualified can-
didates.
Send your resume to Andy McClure, National Sales Manager
Cetec Schafer Automation
Cetec Jampro Antenna
Cetec Sparta Audio/Transmitters
Cetec Broadcast Group
For Extraordinary Yield
Transplant To Larger Pot
10 years experience -all size markets & formats. Bachelor's degree, Radio -TV. Now
owner /manager, community leader. Looking
for opportunity with outstanding organization
in top markets. All inquires answered in strict
confidence. Meet at NAB? Box C -165,
BROADCASTING.
Humorous Personality DJ
Entertainer
MOR or Rock
C
The Broadcast Divisions of Cetec Corporation
75 Castilian Drive
Goleta, California 93017
Telephone: (805) 968 -1561
Broadcasting Mar
114
21
1977
Never less than number one in different time
slots for the last 17 years! Major medium market now. Would like to move up. if you're interested in a veteran who is willing to work
hard to make you number one, would appreciate a reply. Box C-141, BROADCASTING.
Help Wanted Management
Situations Wanted Management
Continued
VICE PRESIDENT
OF BROADCASTING
Exec. VP & GM
Top 40 Market Contemporary currently employed.. Heavy sales &
Our multi -media corporation has need for a top flight executive for full responsibility of our broadcasting group. Reports to President -CEO. Requires ability to
continue highly successful operations and build broadcasting organization not
only within present scope of activities but in other areas. We believe this requires a conceptual thinker with strong imagination, high level of intelligence, articulate and a person with strong managerial skills. Must be able to relate well tc
a strong peer group of officers.
Successes in planning, group administration, acquisitions and management development seem to us to be essential. In order to be considered, please send us
your career record to the attention of the President, Box C -176, BROADCAST-
program background. Positive
"people guy" who wins in Arbitron &
bottom line. Last 10 years with major group. Under 40, Family, BBA.
Available at NAB
Call 1- 800 -824 -5120, Oper. 34
(Calif. call 1- 800 852 -7711, Oper.
34)
Box C -132, BROADCASTING
-
ING.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
Confidential
Help Wanted News
REWARD!
to the Professional Broadcasters who
locate the four outstanding Graduate
Students from the University of
Cincinnati Division of Broadcasting.
They will be attending the NAB
Convention.
NEWS DIRECTOR
Situations Wanted Technical
VHF CBS -TV affiliate in major Soutneast
growth market is seeking a seasoned
professional to lead our news operation.
Number rated news in the market with
heavy commitment to ENG on the way.
Resumes to:
Gus Bailéy, Jr.
VP, GM
WCSC -TV
Box 186
Director of Engineering -Chief Engineer,
An equal opportunity employer M/F
1
Charleston, S.C. 29402
major facility -Technical /Sales position with
major equipment manufacturer. 15 years experience. All phases AM -FM engineering, design, installation, antennas, proofs, studio,
transmitters to 50 kw, AM, FM, Stereo, SCA. Ex
cellent troubleshooter, meticulous workman,
stable family man. SBE senior engineer certification, currently earning 20K. Excellent
references. Available at NAB for interview. Box
C -80, BROADCASTING.
Sportscaster
Major Group Station in Top 30 mar -
ket'looking for aggressive,
energetic personality to write &
anchor early & late 'evening sports.
Box C -130, BROADCASTING
An EOE M/F
TELEVISION
Help Wanted Announcers
HOST/
ASSISTANT
HOST
WCVB -TV seeks mature articulate Host
and Assistant Host for the Massachusetts lottery daily games.
Preliminary selection will be made on
the basis of experience and an audition
using a simulated game show format.
Final selection will be made by the Massachusetts lottery as stated in their con
tract terms' with WCVB-TV. Individuals
working for this program will be subject
to the Massachusetts State Morals
Clause.
Qualified applicants should send
resume (no telephone calls please) to
Executive Producer, Programming
Department, Boston Broadcasters, Inc.,
5 TV Place, Needham, MA 02192.
Help Wanted Sales
Up to $18,000 for professional TV
sports director at midwest medium
market affiliate located 'in major
university city. Anchor daily TV
sportscast plus radio sportscasts
and PBP. Minimum five years experience. Extensive knowledge of pro,
college and high school 'sports réquired. Equal opportunity employer,
M/F. Send job history to Box C -128,
BROADCASTING.
News Director. For Medium Market. network and,
ated radio -telewsion operation. Must have previous
television news director experience. This is a progres
sive news organrzation which has enjoyed continued
ratings growth. Film, tape and live held equipment. An
equal opportunity employer. Boa C -35. BROADCASTING.
DIRECTOR OF
RESEARCH, SALES
PROMOTION, AND
SALES RESEARCH
WCVB -TV BOSTON is looking for
an experienced research and sales
professional to work with its sales
department in all areas of direct account development.
To qualify for this unusual position,
You'll need a complete understanding of all research functions, including analysis and trend of rating reports, use of the bar, and sales presentation work in the creation and
development of successful sales
materials.
In addition to direct contact sales
experience and at least a working
knowledge of production, the successful applicant will have superior
organizational skills as they relate
to sales functions and one -on -one
meetings with agencies, as well as
the ability to generate new ideas
and materials in the sales and research areas.
computer
terminology and its use in sales
submissions/avails, input of salés
research data, and the setting up of
trends and materials for program
A thorough knowledge of
and sales use is, of course, essential.
If you're a self -motivated professional with at least four years of
proven experience in this or a related field, send a resume (no
telephone calls please) to the Per -
sonnel Department, Boston Broadcasters Inc., 5 TV Place, Needham,
MA 02192.
An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F
an equal opportunity employer MIF
Broadcasting Mar
115
21
1977
Help Wanted Sales Continued
Help Wanted Technical
Continued
Engineers
MANAGER SALES DEVELOPMENT
Medium size California Market network affiliate TV station is expanding sales efforts to include Sales Development Manager. To qualify must have television sales experience. Will
work directly with Management, and assignments will have top priority. Presentations will be
to clients and agencies direct. Should be familiar with TvB and related research material from
rating books as well as market studies. Successful completion of initial assignments could
lead to further promotion within two TV station owned company. Starting salary -draw
S15,000 per year plus expenses and multiple fringe benefit plan. If qualified and interested,
send complete resume to Box C -116, BROADCASTING.
Exceptionally good opportunities for TV
systems design and development
professionals are now available in one
of our expanding out-of -state divisions.
SENIOR APPLICATIONS
ENGINEER
Must have BSEE or equivalent, plus 5
years experience in TV systems design
including thorough knowledge of TV
systems equipment and good
understanding of the cameras, camera
systems and circuitry involved.
Knowledge of infrared systems and
associates components would be highly
desirable. Must be willing to travel.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F
SALES
TV Shows
We are an independent producer and distributor of TV specials and variety
shows with outstanding production equipment and expertise. Our shows are
aired throughout the country. We have immediate openings in Atlanta and
Philadelphia /Pittsburgh plus a Sales Manager's position in Chicago.
The successful candidate will have had several years experience involving
direct contact with network affiliates, independent stations, and ad agencies.
This is truly an excellent opportunity for aggressive, hardworking sales people
who thrive on results.
We offer a fine salary and commission program. Send a confidential letter or
resume to:
Box G -178, BROADCASTING
An Equal Opportunity Employer
DEVELOPMENT
ENGINEER
Degree in Engineering, Physics or
Physical Chemistry required, plus good
mechanical engineering background
and minimum of 5 years experience in
development of camera tubes
emphasizing electron gun and
construction.
-
We offer excellent salaries and
complete benefits. For confidential
consideration, send resume with salary
history and requirement, to:
H. C. ANDERSON
Help Wanted Technical
VIDEO TAPE ENGINEERS
- (PART -TIME)
National CCTV programmer has immediate availabilities, NATIONWIDE, ALL MARKETS, for Part-Time VIDEO TAPE ENGINEERS. Hours
flexible to your schedule. Good pay & fringe benefits. Must have hands on experience with ENG type VCR equipment, possess, or have access
to, test gear and desire Part -Time work in an exciting medium. For
further details send resume to:
NORTH AMERKAN PHILIPS CORPORATION
100 East 42nd Street, New York,
N.Y. 10017
An equal opportenity employer Mlr
VIDEO ENGINEER
SUPERVISOR
Engineer for closed circuit color television, video tape and film facility in major
Chicago Advertising Agency. Will be
responsible for electronic equipment
functioning properly..Wlll also supervise
daily operation and staff. Salary commensurate with background. Excellent
benefits.
Send resume to Box C -140, BROADCASTING
Bob Skidmore, Technical Board
First Cine -Tel Communications Corp.
919 Third Avenue Dept.
New York, New York, 10022
All replies kept strictly confidential
SAN DIEGO NEEDS
STUDIO MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR
KCST -TV, San Diego, a Storer Station, is looking for an aggressive Studio Maintenance Supervisor with 3 -5 years recent "hands on" experience. We will consider
a heavy maintenance type that's ready to "move up ". Qualified applicant must
have ability to organize day -to -day activities of a staff of dedicated people and
maintenance of our equipment, which includes: GE cameras, Ampex Tape,
Grass Valley and Cohu Switching. This is a "Golden" opportunity to grow with a
top broadcast group and to live and work in the dream spot of Southern California.
Send complete resume and salary requirements to: Bill Yordy, Chief Engineer,
KCST-TV, PO Box 11039, San Diego, CA 92111.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Broadcasting Mar
116
21
1977
Help Wanted Programing,
Production, Others
PROGRAM DIRECTOR/
FILM BUYER
Major cable and Pay cable firm
seeking experienced film buyer.
Should have station program buying background. N.Y.C. location.
Replies confidential.
Box C -108, BROADCASTING
Situations Wanted Management
Public Notice
GM & GSM
Heavy sales background, currently
Exec. VP & GM. 10 years of
HELP!
achievement with major group.
Thrives on sales management.
Motivates winners. 35 -ish, Family,
BBA. Longsuits: Sales, Profits,
Community & Commission.
Available at NAB
Call 1- 800 824 -5120, Oper. 34
(Calif. call 1- 800 -852 -7711, Oper.
Help us find anyone and everyone who ever worked at WEAW, WEAWFM, WOJO, Evanston.
We are celebrating our 30th Anniversary and would like to know what
happened to everybody.
If you will write to us briefly and bring us up -to -date on your career, we
in return will send you a small gift as part of our birthday celebration.
May we hear from you?
34)
Box C -132, BROADCASTING
Please Write:
Ed Wheeler
Broadcast Communications, Inc.
2008 State Bank Plaza
Evanston, Illinois 60204
We had some good times. We had some tough times. Help us recall
them.
Thank you'
-
Confidential
Situations Wanted News
Street reporter - anchor spot sought
by well qualified reporter with 13 years
radio and TV news; seeking solid good
potential opportunity; call 305-
Situations Wanted Technical
Television Technician
position wanted. Has First
Class License and five yrs.
experience as an Engineer.
Seek tech. position as
switcher, camera, audio,
and VTR operations. Also
possess Associate Degree
in Electronics. Interested in
working in Washington
Will relocate. Box
D.C.
C -136,
Principal looking for Midwest
or
For Sale Stations
MW
Fulltime
Power
Fulltime
Daytime
Profitable
Small
Metro
SE
NE
Fla.
Mai
Metro
Sub
W
Atlanta
4.
S217K
S500K
S650K
S750K
5475K
S17K
$240K
$189K
5205K
$138K
- Boston -Chicago - DI as
l
New York
EN-G
Continued
Sunbelt station priced at $850,000
or less. Contact Bayard M. Grant,
127 W. 10th St., Kansas City, Mo.
64105.
BROADCASTING.
News Service
For Sale Stations
Wanted To Buy Stations
667 -8108.
-San Francisco
AM/FM within 25 miles of Meridian. Miss. $225.000
Small down payment.
Class "C" stereo in Miss. 1.182.000 population In
.05 MV /M coverage area. Terms.
AM/FM in Miss. Small town. Sales about $120.000
$168.000 cash.
Fulltime AM within 60 miles of Washington, D.0
Small town. $400.000. 29% down. Billing about
$200.000
3.000 Watt FM in small West Tenn. town. The only
station in county. $55.000. $5.000 down to
Qualified buyer.
AM/FM in central Tenn. $280.000. Terms.
Great daytime, within 40 miles of Charlotte, N.0
Good real estate. $300.000. Terms.
Black programmed dayhmer in small town. Northern North Carolina.
All stations listed every week until sold. Let us lost
your station. Inquiries and details confidential.
BUSINESS BROKER ASSOCIATES
24 HOURS
615- 894 -7511
CHAPMAN ASSOCIATES'
nationwide service
Planning
Finance
Equipment
Plant
Labor
Systems
1835 Savoy Drive,
Atlanta, Georgia 30341
Design
NEWSCOM
617 2661388
102 Charles St. Boston, MA.02114
Miscellaneous
RESULTS GUARANTEED
TO INCREASE YOUR SALES
We have 26 years of proven radio sales experience
Your station can benefit from this experience as have
numerous other stations throughout the United States
If you are interested in using our professional services
to revieve your stations sales write to PBC. Suite 8L.
3440 Olentangy River Rd., Columbus, Ohio 43202 or
call 614 -261 -8404 for consultation
Smith,
(oo oer Assooates
CABLE TELEVISION PAY TV
Management Marketing Engineering
Financial Studies System Analysis
Division of Associated Utley Services. Inc.
510 Kings Highway North P.O. Box 3220
AM -FM. West Michigan location
gross over $315,000.
Priced under 2 1/2 times gross with
terms and balance on 8 1/2%. Call
Don Jones, 616 -723 -6534 or
723 -6484 evenings
Cherry Hill NJ 08034 (609)482-0051
Buy -Sell -Trade
CHARGE -A -TRADE
Top 50 market stations! Trade
advertising time (smaller stations trade other due bills or
merchandise) for merchandise.
travel and hundreds of business
Çomm.mui Blvd F,
iAU0in0ALF uit.o.S o,LL.DO
3011
sr
-
needs.
FREE BOOKLET
AVAILABLECALL TOLL FREE
800.327.55561except Florida)
1.
E
r,
,. r1 33308 1305)491 7700.
Art.drA410011/. t1T'.t0r0AIM
WASHINGTON, DC
LARSON /WALKER 8 COMPANY
Brokers, Consultants 8 Appraisers
Los Angeles
Washington
Contact:
W llllem L. Walker
Suite 508, 1725 DeSaies St., N.W
Washington, D.C. 20038
202-223.1553
Broadcasting Mar 2' 1977
117
close to this growing suburban market. FM
stereo station -class A -well equipped. A
is
steal because signal can be up- graded to
cover more of the Metropolitan Area. S295.000
includes Real Estate. Additional information
only to those providing financial qualifications
initially.
Box C -1, BROADCASTING
i
For Sales Stations
Books for Broadcasters
Continued
1,200 FOOT TOWER FOR SALE
Stainless
G -10
403.
with aluminum
guys, many 25kv and 50kv insulators, base insulator, lights, phones,
elevator, never erected.
E.
404.
NAB HEADQUARTERS
405.
406.
A
CwCA0O606ir
xJSNORTHMICHIGAN
411.
THE ANATOMY OF LOCAL RADIO -TV COPY
by William A Peck. Leading station executives
have called the book the one that sets the standard for radio -TV copy at the local level. Loaded
with hundreds of ways to increase station billing
NMI sales -proven copy 146 pages.
35.95
in
THE BUSINESS OF RADIO BROADCASTING
by Edd Rout). How to operate a station as a probtable business and serve the public interest as
well. This is the first text to deal with broadcast
station operation from beginning to end. Clearly
explains proven techniques to follow, and cautions to observe. 400 pages. illustrated 312.95
COMMERCIAL FCC LICENSE HANDBOOK
reference manual. combining theory and applications with up -to-dale questions and answers for
1st. 2nd and 3rd Class Radiotelephone license
exams plus broadcast and radar endorsements.
Complete detailed answers to questions on virtually any sublect you may be asked when you
take your exam plus sample questions on each
Florida.
Outstanding growth record ...
bright future. Owners moving to
larger market. 5250,000.00 firm.
Box C -180, BROADCASTING.
E.
MEADOR
Media Broker
AM - FM - TV - Appraisals
P.O. Box 36
Lexington, Mo. 64067
Phone B16- 259 -2544
NAB WASHINGTON HILTON
or money order only
When placing an ad indicate the EXACT category
BROADCASTING Book Division
1735 DeSales St., NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
Name _-
Address
City
State
Zip
-Situations Wanted. 40c per word -5.00 weekly minimum.
other
-All
classifications.
80C
-Stations
Copy: Deadline
is
MONDAY for the following Monday's
a box
number should be addressed to
Box Number, uo BROADCASTING. 1735 DeSales St.. N.W.
Washington. D.C. 20036.
No telephone copy accepted.
Audio tapes,
transcriptions, films or VTR's are not forwardable,
but are returned to the sender. Replies addressed to
box numbers must not contain reference to audio
tapes, transcriptions, films or tapes.
Rates, classified listings ads'.
-Help Wanted 70C per word -$10.00 weekly minimum
weekly minimum.
-Add $2.00 for
- Situations Wanted (Personal ads)
-All
per
$30.00 per inch.
other S60.00 per inch.
for Sale. Wanted to Buy Stations. Employment
Agencies, Business Opportunities, and Public Notice
advertising requires display space.
Publisher reserves the right to alter Classified copy
to conform with the provisions of Title VII of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, as amended.
Agency Commission only
on display space.
Word Count: Include name and address. Name of city
(Des Moines) or of stale (New York) counts as Iwo words.
Zip Code or phone number including area code counts as
one word. (Publisher reserves the right to omit Zip code
and/or abbreviale words if space does not permit.) Count
each abbreviation, initial, single ligure or group of figures
or letters as a word. Symbols such as 35mm. COD, PD, GM,
etc. count as one word. Hyphenated words count as two
words.
Name (Print)
Signature
Address
Phone
City
State
801 New Hampshire (at H)
Insert
Rooms 506 -508
Display
Brokers & Consultants
to the
Communications Industry
time(s). Starting date
Copy:
THE KEITH W. HORTON COMPANY, INC.
1
Zip
Box No
(number of inches).
Indicate desired category.
705 Lake Street
Elmira, New York 14902
PO. Box 948
(807) 733 -7138
Broadcasting Mar
118
21
1977
word -310.00
Box Number per issue.
785 -2000
Guest Quarters
T
Please send me book(s) numbered
Payment for the full amount
is enclosed.
The Publisher is not responsible for errors m printing due to
illegible copy -All copy must be clearly typed or printed.
(Billing charge to stations and firms: S1.00).
Number in Washington
MOTION by Jack Macdonald. This handbook is a
virtual promotion encyclopedia- includes over
250.000 words, over 1500 on-air promo themes
adaptable to any format; and over 350 contests.
stunts. station and personality promos! One idea
alone of the hundreds offered can be worth many
times the small cost of this indispensable source book. 372 pages. SF. x 11" bound in long -life 3ring binder
$29.95
Rates, classified display ads:
Replies to ads with
Our N.A.B. Convention
HANDBOOK OF RADIO PUBLICITY 8 PRO-
desired. Television or Radio. Help Wanted or Situations
Wanted. Management, Sales, Etc. If this information is
omitted we will determine, according to the copy enclosed.
where the ad should be placed. No make goods will be run
if all information is not included.
issue. Copy must be submitted in writing.
Have you ever wanted to own one of Americas
top small market radio stations? Yes. eventually you can be the one to stand up at the
R.A.B. and tell how you bill over 5500,000.00
annually in a small market. Midwest, AM and
FM. S525.000.00 cash. No calls. John Mitchell
and Associates. Box 21108, Shreveport. Lour Siana 71120.
$9.95
lustrated.
418.
BROADCASTING'S CLASSIFIED RATES
Payable In advance. Check
RALPH
GUIDE TO PROFESSIONAL RADIO 8 TV
NEWSCASTING Robert C. Silier A practical, self
study guide for those who want to get started or
get ahead in broadcast Íournalism. 224 pages, il-
BROADCAST STATION OPERATING GUIDE
by Harvey F Swearer A unique study guide and
312.467.0040
Profitable class IV
417.
by Sol Robinson. This comprehensive reference
encompasses every level of broadcasting. The
secret to success in broadcasting as m any other
business. Is knowing what to do and how to do it.
This book tells it like it is 256 pages. $12.95
SHERATON PARK HOTEL
Suite M789
MEDIA BROKERS
APPRAISERS
element with answers in the back of the book)
Also for practical reference in your profession
444 pages, 150 illustrations.
$9.95
$12.95
D.
Baydush (804) 857 -7421.
AICNAAO
AM -FM BROADCAST STATION PLANNING
GUIDE by Harry A. Elkin. A comprehensive guide
to planning, budding, and operating a radio broadcast facility -AM, FM, or combined operation.
Based on a lifetime of experience and intimate
association in broadcasting. 82 x 11". illustrated.
Stock. Index
Stock
symbol
Exch.
Closing
Closing
Wed.
Wed.
March
16
Approx.
snares
I change
in week
Net change
in week
March 9
1976 -77
High
Low
PIE
Out
ratio
(0001
Total market
capitalization
(000)
Broadcasting
ABC
ABC
CAPITAL CITIES
CBS
COX
GROSS TELECASTING
KINGSTIP COMMUN.
LIN
MOONEY
RAHALL
SCRIPPS -HOWARD
STARR
STORER
TAFT
CCB
CBS
COX
GGG
KTVV
LING
MOON
RAHL
SCRP
SAG
42 1/8
50 1/4
58 7/8
29
15
3/8
7/8
4
1/2
49
3/8
56 3/4
28
14 3/4
+
+
2
2
1
+
1
5/8
7/8
1/8
3/8
1/8
+
+
+
+
4
20
2
SBK
TFB
39
14
34
1/2
1/2
4
5/8
25
1/2
30
18 3/4
2
1/8
14 3/4
+
1
-
-
33
1
4 1/2
24
1/2
+
+
29
1/4
1/4
1/4
1/2
1/8
+
+
+
1
+
1
6.64
1.77
3.74
4.91
7.62
.00
6.66
5.88
1.69
4.54
2.77
4.OB
3.44
42 1/8
55 3/4
60 I/2
37 3/4
15 7/8
4 7/8
20
3 7/8
33
12
3/4
11
9
17,625
7,739
28,313
5.872
9
7
800
461
2,615
425
5/8
3/4
9
1
1/2
22
1/2
20
1/2
A
3/8
3/8
1/4
2
12 3/4
23 1/4
1,281
2.589
1.202
7
8
4,876
4,070
77,868
3,398,339
1.265
23.792
2.407
4,395
6.644
3,969
26,544
5.708
8.844
21.62:
22,258
2,783
475
4,383
24,079
28,11:
1.716
8.305
5,010
6,762
24,626
7,292
3.067
6.745
4,390
11.206
1.440
878
2.376
13.404
2.291
2.509
54,047
1.096
1.344
33.911
9,019
8,623
6,325
347,958
39.113
21.975
151.981
51,597
779,730
56.366
88.440
767,829
609,312
10,436
4,987
123,81:
704,310
5
26
17
1/4
4
17
34
7/8
742,453
388,884
1,666,927
172,490
12,700
1,844
52,300
850
18.574
8:.320
5,559
124.338
122,100
19
42
46
28
10
2
1/4
9
3
TOTAL
Broadcasting with other major interests
ADAMS- RUSSELL
AVCO
JOHN BLAIR
CHRIS -CRAFT
COMBINED COMM.
COWLES
DUN
BRADSTREET
FAIRCHILD IND.
FUQUA
GANNETT CO.
GENERAL TIRE
GLOBE BROADCASTING **
GRAU COMMUN.
HARTE -HANKS
JEFFERSON -PILOT
KAISER INDUSTRIES
KANSAS STATE NET.
KNIGHT-RIDDER
LEE ENTERPRISES
LIRERTY
MCGRAW -HILL
MEDIA GENERAL
MEREDITH
METROMEDÌA
MULTIMEDIA
NEW YORK TIMES CO.
OUTLET CO.
POST CORP.
REEVES TELECOM **
AAR
AV
ROLLILAS
ROL
N
RUST CRAFT
SAN JUAN RACING
SCHERING- PLOUGH
SONDERLING
TECH OPERATIONS **
TIMES MIRROR CO.
WASHINGTON POST CO.
WOMETCO
RUS
A
SJR
SGP
508
N
TO
A
TMC
N
WPO
MOM
A
F.
BJ
CCN
CCA
CWL
DNB
FEN
FOA
GCI
GV
GLBTA
JP
KI
1/4
-
22 7/8
13
29 3/8
22 1/4
13
27 1/8
+
5
N
N
N
N
14
16
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
0
HHN
4 1/2
14 7/8
15 7/8
+
5/8
1/4
A
N
N
A
5
9
5
7/8
10
35
1/2
27 3/8
3
3/4
10 1/2
28 1/4
29 1/4
16 3/4
KSN
KRN
LNT
0
LC
N
19
MHP
MEG
MOP
MET
N
17 5/8
18 3/8
18 5/8
MMED
NYKA
OTU
POST
RBT
N
A
A
N
N
0
A
N
1/2
7/8
24 1/2
5
34
29
23
16
23
0
1R
A
2
N
A
N
9
10
3/4
3/4
3/8
1/8
1/2
1/2
1/4
12 3/8
8 3/4
40 1/4
10 1/4
2
3/4
20 1/2
22 3/8
11
1/2
19
7/8
3/8
35
26 3/8
+
+
7
+
+
3/2
1/4
3/8
1/4
5/8
+
1/4
+
3/8
1/2
-
5/e
3/4
LR
17
18
18
29
24
16
23
7/B
+
1/2
*
3/4
3/8
-
1/8
+
1/2
-
3/4
1/8
+
1/4
1/A
18
1/2
1/2
+
-
16 1/4
5 5/A
34 1/4
24 3/4
2
8
+
+
-
+
18 7/8
12 1/8
+
+
+
1
1/8
3/4
1/4
3/4
1/2
1/8
5/ß
1/4
1/8
1/8
3/8
1/4
5/8
3
9
28
30
-
3/8
1/4
+
+
.00
3.61
1.42
3.79
3.44
7.69
+
.89
+
2.50
3.07
2.22
1.82
+
-
1.01
.66
1
*
3/4
20 1/8
1/8
1/4
3/8
3/8
3/8
1/8
+
7
22 7/8
13 1/4
33 3/4
11 1/2
12 3/8
41
28 3/8
7/8
1/2
7/8
32 1/8
18 3/4
3
10
28
6
.71
19
17
19
+
1.36
19
+
2.14
3.06
29
24
18
23 1/8
+
+
+
1.55
.54
.00
.00
1.98
2.06
+
+
+
2.87
2.50
.00
1.96
1.70
1.09
2
9
4 1/2
J
5
8
4 1/2
12 5/8
6
6 1/8
24 5/8
6 1/8
4 1/2
32 7/8
17 5/8
1/2
1
16
5/8
7/8
7/8
7/8
1/2
1/2
19
1/4
2
7/8
27 3/8
12 3/8
10 1/4
59 3/4
lO
4
23 3/4
44 1/4
13 1/4
9
16
10
7
17
6
6
17
25
5
1/8
5/8
13
11
11
11
8
3
39
26 7/8
2.00
2
22
1/2
1/4
-
.00
+
5
16
16
+
+
3/4
39 1/8
30
11
11.11
1.68
2.36
4.76
2.80
.00
8.29
2A 7/8
l3
9 1/2
11
3/4
14 1/4
10 1/4
11
12
12
7
8
5
15
14
1/4
12
11
1/2
13
8
12 7/8
8
7
8
1
l/8
7/8
5 5/8
7 1/4
38 5/8
9 7/8
2
1/8
18 1/4
21 3/4
8 7/8
18
11
9
6
14
5
11
11
7
TOTAL
47(1,993
9,438
288.636
122.745
12B.47Á
434,033
133.990
57,122
200,663
104.262
183.498
33.300
16,243
5,940
258.027
28,351
21.953
2,175.391
11.234
3,696
695.175
201,800
9 :.164
397.351
9.449.310
2,676
1.672
1,200
3,369
2.125
8,319
2,562
11.038
6.270
600
88,436
Cablecasting
ACTON CORP.
AEL INDUSTRIES **
AMECO **
AMERICAN TV E COMM.
ATHENA COMM.** *
BURNUP E SIMS
CARLECOM- GENERAL
CABLE INFO.
COMCAST
COMMUN. PROPERTIES
COX CABLE
ENTRON
GENERAL INSTRUMENT
GENEVE CORP.
/ELF- COMMUNICATION **
TELEPROMPTER**
TIME INC.
TOCOM
UA- COLUMBIA CARLE
UNITED CABLE TV **
VIACOM
ATN
AELBA
ACO
AMTV
BSIM
CCG
4
3
26
3
9
1/8
3/4
1/2
1/4
1/8
1/2
3/4
1/2
4
COMU
CXC
ENT
GRL
4
22
3
22
3
9
1/8
5/8
3/4
4
+
6.45
3.44
3/4
+
16.66
+
3
-
1/8
-
3.44
-
1/4
-
33.33
.00
.00
.00
1/8
+
8
3/4
1/4
7
37
1/2
35
1
3/4
+
+
2
R
3
1/2
4 1/4
14 1/4
3
1/4
3/4
+
+
2
1/2
1/2
1/2
+
+
3
16
+
4
-
3/8
14 1/2
4
-
1
1/2
1/8
1/4
+
-
-
8.38
.00
10.12
.00
15.38
6.45
7.14
.00
9.37
2.85
1.72
1/2
4
1
26
.00
3/4
19
TP
IL
17
3/4
3/4
1/4
1/B
.00
+
+
8
TOCM
UACC
UCTV
VIA
1/2
1/2
1/8
5/8
+
+
20 7/8
1
3/4
GENV
TCOM
3
7/8
5/8
4
13/4
21
3
3/4
1/4
1/2
1/2
9 7/8
1
1/4
5
4
1/8
1/2
22 5/8
4
1/6
13
3/4
3/8
13 1/2
19
1
1/8
3
1/4
4
1/8
1/4
7/8
7/8
1
1
5
2
9
38
5
3/4
32
21
10
1
3/4
1/4
3/8
3/4
3 1/4
17 1/2
4 5/8
14 1/2
A
6
1
7
2
24
53
54
13
5/8
11
14
9
1
3
11
13
22
13
1/2
1/4
1/2
7/8
2
32
9
5/8
7/8
15
TOTAL
Broadcasting Mar 21
119
1977
265
29,116
24.979
663
1,708
4,761
3,563
970
7,178
1.121
5,281
16,646
20.192
617
1,700
1.879
3.707
6.832
19.639
80,612
1,713
156.121
8,968
19,803
137.329
757.200
1.851
29,750
7.985
52.824
91,918
1,441.662
331
Stock
symbol
Exch.
COLUMBIA PICTURES
DISNEY
FILMWAYS
FOUR STAR
GULF + WESTERN
CPS
DIS
N
FWY
A
GW
MCA
MGM
MCA
MGM
N
N
Closing
Closing
Wed
March /6
Wed.
March
10 5/8
38 7/8
10 1/2
38 1/8
10
Net change
in week
9
PIE
Approx.
shares
out
ratio
(000)
Capitalization
(000)
8
6,748
31,917
2,397
667
45,162
17,974
13,102
837
65,148
7,583
16,752
2,244
71.697
1,240.773
25.168
583
677.430
683,012
242.387
4,603
928.359
80.569
485.808
14.305
210.531
4.454.694
62.825
352,500
35.412
38.016
13.304
82.053
1976-77
change
7
High
in week
Low
Total market
Programing
N
9
7/8
TELETRONICS INTL.
TRANSAMERICA
N
0
20TH CENTURY -FOX
WARNER
WRA THER
TA
TF
MCI
N
N
N
wCD
e
15
38
18 1/2
5 1/2
14 1/4
10 5/8
29
6 3/8
1/2
1/8
3/4
+
1/2
+
1/4
1/4
+
3/4
3/8
5/8
-
11.84
1.96
5.00
.00
1.69
3.40
5.71
12.00
2.70
6.25
1.75
27.50
7/A
14 3/4
36 3/4
1/2
1/4
13 7/8
17
+
6
10
28 1/2
1/2
3/8
5
+
+
+
+
11 1/4
63
10 1/2
1
26 7/8
41 1/2
9
5/8
5/8
15
1/8
18
15
4
1/2
1/8
5 1/4
1/4
14 5/8
38
16
9
9
3
25
7
12 7/8
R
3/4
1/4
3/4
8
1/2
1/R
27
3
8
8
29
1/4
17
6
3/8
3
8
8
16
TOTAL
Service
8800 INC.
COMSAT
DOYLE DANE BERNBACH
FOOTE CONE E BELDING
GREY ADVERTISING
INTERPUBLIC GROUP
MARVIN JOSEPHSON
MCI COMMUNICATIONS
MOVIELAR
MPO VIDEOTRONICS
NEEDHAM. HARPER
A. C. NIELSEN
OGILVY E MATHER
J. WALTER THOMPSON
8800
0
CO
DOYL
FCB
N
0
N
GREY
0
16
18
IPG
N
34
MRVN
MCIC
MOV
MPO
NDHMA
NIELB
OGIL
JWT
0
12
0
2
A
1
25
35
19
A
7
0
0
11
21
0
N
33
17
1/4
1/2
1/2
1/4
3/8
3/4
1/8
5/8
3/4
5/8
3/4
1/4
26
34 3/4
18 1/4
14 7/8
18
33
13
1
1
7
11
20
31
7/8
3/4
1/8
5/8
3/4
1/4
16
-
1
+
1
+
+
1
+
+
3.84
1.43
6.84
10.92
1.38
4.16
1.92
13.33
7.14
8.77
-
1
+
1/2
1/4
+
5/8
1/4
3/8
1/4
1/4
1/8
5/8
+
+
+
+
+
.00
4.81
+
1
+
2
+
+
1
+
6.40
6.25
26
35 1/4
19 1/2
16 1/2
19 1/2
34 3/8
14
3/8
5/8
3/4
11 5/8
24 5/8
33 1/4
17 7/8
16
3/4
7/8
8 7/8
-30 1/4
6 7/8
8
2,513
23
9
8
10000
1816
8
2.304
7
729
16
3/8
8
6
3/4
1/4
43
3/8
4
2,387
1.871
19,985
1.400
520
5/8
16 3/4
6
823
13
10,762
1.805
2.649
234073
59.573
1,005,441
10.885
5.959
897
2,244
1.617
1.428
161,347
4.267
184.581
12.216
480
2.701
1.320
115,265
28.353
12.033
1.639
74,753
32.300
2.690
1.668
172.500
8.671
1,050
6.838
87.508
18,818
95.243
102.792
560
5.049
5.053
35.521
11.919.509
36.260
9.505,921
416.871
1.500
6,077
31,515
6,209,901
1.375.120
409,122
27.453
2.195.869
1.102.237
4.707
28,147
1.768,125
518,092
656
122.229
1.597.021
505.733
TOTAL
954,028
38,026,292
GRAND TOTAL
1.791,260
3
1
2
8
1
2
5
6
7
17
7
8
7/8
8
TOTAL
23855
4246B
2,289
4.030
9.567
60,016
45033
Electronics /Manufacturing
AMPEX
ARVIN INDUSTRIES
CCA ELECTRONICS*
CE TEC
COHU.
INC.
CONRAC
EASTMAN KODAK
FARINON ELECTRIC
GENERAL ELECTRIC
HARRIS CORP.
MARVEL INDUSTRIES*
INTL. VIDEO CORP.**
MICROWAVE ASSOC. INC
3M
MOTOROLA
AMERICAN PHILIPS
OAK INDUSTRIES
N.
RCA
ROCKWELL INTL.
RSC INDUSTRIES
SCIENTIFIC- ATLANTA
SONY CORP.
TEKTRONIX
TELEMATION
VARIAN ASSOCIATES
WESTINGHOUSE
ZENITH
APX
ARV
CCA
CEC
COH
CAX
EASKD
FARN
N
8
171/4
0
5/8
1/4
1/8
7/8
7/8
1/2
1/2
1/8
1/8
1/4
7/8
7/8
1/2
A
2
A
3
N
24
73
N
HRS
HARV
IVCP
0
N
N
34
0
0
3
2
MAI
N
MMM
MOT
NPH
OEN
RCA
ROK
RSC
SFA
SNE
TEK
TIMT
VAR
N
WX
ZE
N
GE
N
N
N
N
N
A
A
N
N
0
N
N
Standard & Poor's Industrial Average
A- American Stock Exchange
M- Midwest Stock Exchange
N -New York Stock Exchange
0 -over the counter (bid price shown)
P- Pacific Stock Exchange
3/4
N
8
51
23
53
48
34
16 3/4
29 3/8
34 1/8
1
3/4
16 7/8
10 1/4
59 3/4
5/8
17 7/8
18 1/4
26 7/8
113.7
7/8
3/4
5/8
2 1/8
3 1/8
24 3/8
73 1/2
7
+
+
7/8
1/2
+
16
+
1/8
+
8 1/2
50 3/4
32 3/8
3 1/8
1
5/8
+
+
+
+
23 1/2
+
+
51
+
46
32
1/8
5/8
1
+
2
2
+
1
1/2
3/8
+
11.11
2.98
.00
5.88
.00
2.05
+
.51
3/4
3/4
+
+
5/8
3/8
7/R
3/8
3/8
3/4
3/8
3/4
+
+
+
+
.00
1.47
5.40
.00
38.46
1.59
5.63
5.14
+
4.2.1
+
+
19.64
+
14
+
2
28
33 3/8
1
3/4
+
1
17
-
1/8
3/8
57 5/8
5/8
+
+
7/8
+
1/8
+
17
17 5/8
+
+
24 3/4
+
9
+
2
2
4.91
2.24
.00
.73
+
7/8
5/8
+
1/8
+
9.33
3.68
.00
5.14
3.54
8.58
+
9
3/4
5/8
5/8
3/4
5/8
1/8
5
3
1
1/4
12
29 1/8
116 3/4
20
72
9 1/4
18 3/8
2
3
11
1/2
58 3/4
37 7/8
23
1/2
1/8
7/8
66
1/2
6
3
57 3/4
35 7/8
16 3/4
30
34 3/8
2 1/2
4
7
3/8
19
46
26 5/8
10
13
13
7
3/4
3/4
8
13 3/4
49 3/8
41 1/4
11
18
2
19
7
18
23
1
10
67
44
7
1
7/8
1/8
38 1/4
28
2
21
10 1/4
18
19
14
7/8
1/4
7/8
3/8
3/8
1/4
1/4
1/4
1/4
12
13
23
19
8
15
13
9
9
11
21
15
1
13
7
5/8
13
57,775,738
+2.3
111.4
Over- the -counter bid prices supplied by
Hornblower & Weeks, Hemphill -Noyes Inc..
Washington.
Yearly high -tows are drawn from trading days
reported by Broadcasting. Actual figures
may vary slightly.
'Stock did not trade on Wednesday, closing
price shown is last traded price.
P/E ratios are based on earnings per -share
figures for the last 12 months as published
"No
by Standard 6 Poor's Corp. or as obtained
through Broadcastings own research. Earnings figures are exclusive of extraordinary
gains or losses.
ratio is
registered net loss.
P/E
"'Stock
Broadcasting Mar
120
21
Split.
1977
computed, company
Profile
in 1939 he was the winner in the American Radio Relay League's international
DX competition. In this endurance test,
an amateur radio operator had to contact
as many foreign stations as he could in
nine days. Mr. Smith lost a lot of sleep but
he managed to log in 377 stations that he
Capstone for Dan Smith's
long career in engineering
Dedicated, knowledgeable and friendly are
words used by friends and professional acquaintances of Dan Smith, who serves as a
consultant to Capital Cities Communications Inc. since he retired three months
ago as the company's senior vice president, engineering. These three traits may
have played a part in his selection by his
peers as the recipient of the National
Association of Broadcasters'
1977
Engineering Achievement Award, but of
course his accomplishments, hard work
and ingenuity in the areas of radio technology, radar operations, radar -guided
missiles and television equipment systems
cannot be overlooked. Mr. Smith will be
presented the award at the Tuesday, March
29, luncheon at the NAB Engineering
Conference.
Mention any phase of broadcasting and
you can be assured that Mr. Smith has had
a hand in it, from amateur radio to teaching broadcast engineering to managing a
television station. Ever since he was 11
years old, he knew radio was for him. Like
many youngsters of his time fascinated by
the new invention of radio, Mr. Smith constructed a home -made crystal set. The
year was 1921 and the only signals he
could receive on his set were from the
nearby Navy station in his hometown of
Norfolk, Va. The Navy communication
system only transmitted in International
Morse Code, so Mr. Smith learned the
code.
Many young people abandoned their
hobbies in radio operations, but not Mr.
Smith. "There never was any doubt in my
mind that radio was the career for me; I
knew there was a future in it, so I decided
to pursue it in full force," Mr. Smith
recalls. This he did by getting a BS in
electrical engineering at Virginia
Polytechnic Institute, where in his senior
year, he took graduate courses in radio
communications. Most people would have
considered these extra studies taxing, but
not Mr. Smith; he was only devoting time
to his main interest and hobby.
After school, he spent four years in the
engineering department at the Virginia
Electric Power Co., but these were four
years of nonradio work, and Mr. Smith
was anxious to devote his energies to his
main interest. So in 1937, he joined
WTAR(AM) Norfolk, Va., as a radio
engineer. At WTAR, he had the opportunity
to work with Dr. Joyce Brown of RCA in
Dr. Brown's project to develop a directional antenna for the station. During his
stint at WTAR, Mr. Smith also taught radio
communications at Norfolk College.
He says he enjoyed teaching young
minds about radio. And as Daniel Burke,
president of Capital Cities Communica-
Daniel Holt Smith -retired senior vice
president, engineering, Capital Cities
Communications. 1,959-76; b. Charlotte, N.C.,
March 8, 1910; BS, electrical engineering,
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1932;
distribution engineer, 1932 -34, and power
sales engineer, 1934 -36, Virginia Electric
Power; radio engineer, WTAR(AM) Norfolk, Va.,
1936 -37; radio engineer. U.S. Navy, Norfolk,
1937 -44; field engineering staff, Western
Electric. New York, 1944-45; sales engineering
staff, Western Electric /Graybar Electric,
1945 -48; technical director, Maine
Broadcasting System, Portland, 1948 -54;
technical director, 1954 -57, and assistant
manager, 1957 -59, WTVT(TV) Tampa, Fla.; m.
Edith Southworth Bartholomew, Dec. 10, 1960;
children- Patricia, 42, Roberta, 36, Daniel Holt
III, 32 (by previous marriage), Holt Hagood 14;
stepchildren: King, 31; Robert, 30; Bruce, 28;
Scott, 23.
tions, says, "Dan Smith has a great
willingness to teach because he is so knowledgeable in his field and has the patience
to explain difficult technical aspects in laymen's terms."
In 1937, friends of his who worked at
the FCC field office in Norfolk told him of
a job opening for assistant radio inspector
in their office, and they thought he would
be a likely candidate for the job. So they
talked him into taking the government's
civil service exam since there were many
jobs opening up in the area of radio and
communications. He took the examination and scored the highest grade in the
nation for that testing period, but even
with the high score, he lost the job he
wanted to a veteran that earned points for
his military stint, edging him above Mr.
Smith. Nevertheless, many job offers
came to him as a result of his high score,
and he accepted a civilian job with the
Navy in Norfolk as assistant radio inspector.
But during this time, he didn't abandon
his favorite pasttime of amateur radio, and
Broadcasting Mar
121
21
1977
had contacted.
As the U.S. war efforts mounted, Mr.
Smith was involved in various military
projects for the Navy. One of them was setting up a radio shop of radar search equipment to scan the waters for enemy submarines. But he wanted to do more for his
country during the war, so he went to the
recruiting office to see if he could offer his
services as a radio engineer. They told
him, "sure, but you have to get permission from your commandant and superiors
at the Navy yard where you now work." He
asked his commandant, who refused to release him, saying it would set a bad precedent. Angered, Mr. Smith went home,
wrote a letter of resignation, packed his
bags and took the train to New York,
where he went to the Western Electric
offices. He didn't know anyone person nally at Western Electric, and didn't have
any job leads, but once the company
officials saw his credits and experience,
they hired him immediately and set him to
work to head their secret military project
on radar -guided missiles. After the project
was completed, he was tired of working
with military projects, so he went to
Graybar Electric, a sales agency of
Western's broadcast equipment. When
Western divested itself of broadcast equipment, Mr. Smith went to the Maine Broadcasting System as technical director, giving
engineering supervision to its stations.
While there, he planned, designed and
constructed facilities for wcsH -TV Portland.
Between 1954 and 1959 he was successively, technical director of WTVT(TV)
Tampa, Fla. -where he planned and designed its facilities and studios, getting the
station on the air in about three months'
time -operations manager of WFLA-TV
Tampa and general manager of noncommercial WEDU(TV) Tampa.
In 1959, he joined Capcities, where he
directed numerous engineering projects.
One he is particularly proud of is the
relocation of WTEN(TV) Albany, N.Y.,
transmitting facilities to a site 22 miles
"short- spaced" to a co-channel station.
This was the first use in the U.S. of a directional antenna on a VHF station, and Mr.
Smith has written articles on the project.
Mr. Smith feels that he has been lucky
in his professional career, not that he
hasn't possessed outstanding technical
knowledge, but that he has "been in the
right places at the right time." And if radio
and TV had not been his career, it would
have been his hobby.
Editorials7
-
How the FCC spells relief
Assuming it stands up in court, the FCC's new policy on license renewal hearings could go a long way toward satisfying the objectives of license -renewal legislation that broadcasters have been
unsuccessfully seeking. As explained in this publication last
week, the commission would give an advantage to the incumbent
in a contest with competing applicants if the incumbent could
show a record of "substantial" performance.
This falls short of the protection offered by the FCC's 1970
policy statement that immunized the licensee against comparative
challenge on a showing of substantial service. But that policy was
overturned by the appellate court on the grounds that challengers
could not legally be denied a hearing. The new one looks more
likely to survive appeals.
Broadcasters would take more comfort in a law, especially one
including the extension of license terms beyond the present
three -year limit. There is slight hope, however, for legislation on
renewal conditions while the House Communications Subcommittee is engaged in revision of the whole Communications Act.
Until the air clears on Capitol Hill, broadcasters must be grateful
for what the FCC has given them.
Keeping things straight
-
tion. Journalists realize that the media especially television
are being used as instruments in the terrorists' design. As more
than a few have noted publicly, journalists are especially troubled
by the feeling that they too can be held in a form of hostage by
clever terrorists.
Maybe too much is being made of all these concerns. What if
the media had ignored the Hanafi Muslims and left the public to
draw its own conclusions and fears from word-of-mouth reports
about barricaded streets, diverted traffic and gunfire in the city
hall? Obviously the media cannot go blind and silent when terrorists strike, if they are to perform the function the public expects of them.
In the Hanafi episode, large numbers of hostages were held in
three widely dispersed locations by fanatics who demonstrated
their inclination toward violence by killing one person and
wounding others at the very outset of the siege. With a less experienced corps of journalists on hand, the story could have easily
developed into hysteria. It turned out to be the textbook example
of journalistic treatment of terrorism, comprehensive details
presented with professional restraint through 39 hours of tension.
And at the end, as critics of the coverage ought to be reminded,
the terrorists surrendered without having realized as much as one
of their original demands. Hardly an incentive to others.
Quello's qualms
Whatever else may be said of his first two months in office, Presi- Is the public interest served with a broadcaster
on the FCC? That
dent Carter has set the White House record for innovation in question was raised three years
ago when James H. Quello was
media exposure. Who would have cast any earlier President as given an incredibly tough time in winning
Senate confirmation,
host of a two -hour talk show on radio?
all because he had been the manager of WJR(AM) Detroit.
Things have come a long way since John F. Kennedy admitted
Now, 30 months later, Commissioner Quello, certainly to the
live cameras and microphones to presidential news conferences
satisfaction of most of his colleagues and of observers, has proved
and was denounced by James Reston, the distinguished colum- he is no automatic vote for juslt
any broadcaster and that he votes
nist of the New York Times, for hatching the "goofiest idea since his conscience and not the
expedient course. Because he knows
the hula hoop." Mr. Reston too has moved along with the passage what it is to meet a payroll
and has dealt with the public and the
of the years. Last Wednesday he wrote a piece about Mr. Carter's politicians at first
hand, he spots the dedicated citizens and the
"open mouth policy" but included no criticism of the President's phonies with equal facility.
choice of vehicles of expression.
Lately, Mr. Quello has taken off on questionable citizen groups
There is a hint of media manipulation in the Carter approach, who, though insignificant
in numbers, are potent by filing or
although the Carter staff keeps insisting that ideas come from the threatening to
file petitions to deny renewals of broadcast
media themselves -as the talk show came from Richard S. licenses. Some
got jobs or other windfalls in what Mr. Quello sees
Salant, CBS News president. All very well as long as radio and as abuse of the license
-challenge process through unfounded
television maintain their journalistic roles in covering the Presi- petitions to deny.
dent. Walter Cronkite's appearance on the call -in show troubled
We applaud Mr. Quello's refusal to knuckle under to pressures
us a little. If he had been there as journalist, instead of kindly that
have encouraged this sort of mischief-making.
presence, he could have sharpened some questions.
An idea that did not originate with media was the exclusion of
journalists from Mr. Carter's UN reception last week. The President can turn things off when caught in embarrassingnompany.
Test case
As was to be expected, the extensive journalistic coverage of terrorist acts, especially the recent seizure of 134 hostages by Hanafi
Muslims in Washington, has precipitated criticism. Coverage of
terrorism breeds more terrorism, the argument goes. Andrew
Young, who has reserved opinion on few subjects since his appointment as ambassador to the UN, has even suggested that
there ought to be a law restraining media.
Well, of course, there cannot be a law unless it is preceded by
repeal of the First Amendment. Still, serious journalists themselves are concerned about disquieting problems that arise
whenever hostages are taken for the purpose of attracting atten-
Drawn for BROADCASTING by Jack Schmidt
"It's a gospel station."
Broadcasting Mar
122
21
1977
THOUSANDS
HAVE SWITCHED TO
KTVI,
CHANNEL 2,
ST. LOUIS
41 %'` have made the switch to KTVI,
Channel 2 and ABC -7:00 am to 1:00 am.
68 %* have made the switch to KTVI,
Channel 2 and ABC Prime-time, 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.
63 %* have made the switch to KTVI,
Channel 2 News.
Why have so many Greater
10:00 pm weekdays and 5:30 and
St. Louis television viewers
10:00 pm on weekends. They
made this switch? Because they
like the great diversity of sports
programming from "Wide World
like the programming we offer.
On the entertainment side,
of Sports" to Channel 2's annual
KTVI has the top 4 prime -time
"Greater St. Louis Tournament of
programs, and 5 out of the top 9
Bowling Champions" with over
150,000 bowlers participating.
They like the way we
Yes, KTVI, CHANNEL 2
are presenting the
IS THE ONE ST. LOUIS
"Channel 2 News" at
HAS TURNED TO.
12:00 noon, 5:00 and
-
i'rvu
S'1: LOUIS, MISSOURI
Represented nationally by MMT, Inc.
Source: *NS! Jan 1976; Jan 1977 ""ARB Jan 1977
the occasion of our
25th Anniversary, we wish to take this
opportunity to commend the
National Association of Broadcasters
for the outstanding efforts they have
made to promote the recognition
of our industry.
On
All of us realize that "Responsibility
p
y
in Broadcasting" is a highly achievable
goal, and we pledge to continue to do our
part to ensure its accomplishment.
Ralph Guild,
President
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