Bosch Uni 3000 F Owner Manual


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Bosch Uni 3000 F Owner Manual | Manualzz

Oil/gas boiler

Uni 3000 F

Output range 420 to 1850 kW

Installation and maintenance instructions for the contractor

2 | Contents

Contents

1 Key to symbols and safety instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

1.1

Key to symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

1.2

Safety instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

2

3

Product information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.1

2.2

2.3

Standards, regulations and directives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Intended use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Safety equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

2.4

Gas supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.5

EU Declaration of Conformity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.6

Type overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.7

Operating conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.8

Overview of possible fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.9

Heating water quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

2.10

Using antifreeze . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.11

Pressure maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.12

Data plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.13

Tools, materials and assembly aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.14

Description of appliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

2.15

Standard delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

2.15.1 Required accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

2.15.2 Optional accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

2.16

Specifications, dimensions and values for the flue gas calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

3.1

3.2

3.3

Transporting the boiler with a forklift truck . . . . . . . . . 13

Transporting the boiler on rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Lifting the boiler with a crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

5 Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

5.1

Commissioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

5.2

5.3

Flushing the heating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Filling the heating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

5.4

5.5

Preparing the heating system for operation . . . . . . . . . 24

Commissioning the control unit and burner . . . . . . . . . 24

5.5.1

Setting control unit parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

5.6

Raising the flue gas temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

5.7

Commissioning report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

6 Shutting down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

6.1

6.2

Shutting down the heating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Shutting down the heating system in an emergency . . 27

7 Inspection and maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

7.1

7.2

7.3

General notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Preparing the boiler for inspection and maintenance . 27

Cleaning the boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

7.3.1

Cleaning heating surfaces and turbulators with a cleaning brush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

7.3.2

Cleaning the flue gas collector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

7.3.3

Inserting turbulators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

7.3.4

Fitting the cleaning cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

7.3.5

Wet-cleaning the boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

7.4

Checking and correcting the water pressure . . . . . . . . 30

7.4.1

When should you check the water pressure in the heating system? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

7.4.2

Sealed unvented systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

7.4.3

Open vented systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

7.5

Inspection and maintenance reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

4 Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

4.1

Installing the boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

4.2

Levelling the boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

4.3

Fitting sound insulation strips (accessory) . . . . . . . . . 15

4.4

Flue gas and water connections for heating system . . 16

4.4.1

General requirements of the flue system . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4.4.2

Fitting a sealing collar (accessory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4.4.3

Connecting the boiler to the pipework . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

4.4.4

Filling the boiler and checking connections for leaks . 17

4.5

Opening and closing the burner door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

4.5.1

Opening the burner door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

4.5.2

Closing the burner door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

4.6

Fitting the burner (accessory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

4.6.1

Fitting the burner plate (accessory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

4.6.2

Fitting the burner to the burner plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

4.7

Fitting the control unit (accessory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

4.7.1

For boiler sizes 420 kW to 820 kW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

4.7.2

For boiler sizes 1040 kW to 1850 kW . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

4.7.3

Making the electrical connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

4.8

Installing temperature sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

4.9

Control unit settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

8

9

Correcting burner faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Environment / disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

10 Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

10.1

Arrangement of safety equipment to EN 12953-6; shutdown temperature (high limit safety cut-out)

> 110 °C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

1 Key to symbols and safety instructions

1.1

Key to symbols

Warnings

Warnings in this document are identified by a warning triangle printed against a grey background.

Keywords at the start of a warning indicate the type and seriousness of the ensuing risk if measures to prevent the risk are not taken.

The following keywords are defined and can be used in this document:

NOTICE indicates a situation that could result in damage to property or equipment.

CAUTION indicates a situation that could result in minor to medium injury.

WARNING indicates a situation that could result in severe injury or death.

DANGER indicates a situation that will result in severe injury or death.

Important information

This symbol indicates important information where there is no risk to people or property.

Additional symbols

Symbol Explanation

Step in an action sequence

Cross-reference to another part of the document

List entry

List entry (second level)

Table 1

Key to symbols and safety instructions | 3

1.2

Safety instructions

General safety instructions

Failure to observe the safety instructions can result in serious personal and possibly life-threatening injuries as well as physical damage and damage to the environment.

▶ Read the safety instructions carefully prior to commissioning the system.

Risk of damage due to operator error

Operator errors can result in personal injury and material damage.

▶ Ensure that only personnel who can operate this appliance correctly have access to it.

▶ Installation and commissioning as well as servicing and maintenance must be carried out only by a qualified contractor.

Installation, conversion and operation

Insufficient ventilation can lead to dangerous flue gas leaks.

▶ Ensure that the plant room remains free from the risk of frost.

▶ The heating system must be installed and operated in accordance with the current: Statutory Instrument Laws, Gas Safety Regulations,

IEE Regulations, Building Regulations, Local Water By-Laws, Health &

Safety document 635 (The Electricity at Work Regulations) and any other local requirements. Observe all European and local installation standards, building regulations and the latest edition of the wiring regulations. Chemically aggressive substances, can corrode the appliance and invalidate any warranty.

▶ Have the appliance installed by a suitably qualified contractor only.

▶ Never modify any parts in contact with flue gas.

▶ Do not operate the device without sufficient water volume.

▶ Always keep equipment openings (doors, maintenance cover) closed during operation.

▶ Only use approved fuels according to the rating plate.

▶ Ensure that the required ventilation cannot be blocked or hindered in any way.

Combustion/room air

▶ Keep the combustion/ambient air free of corrosive substances

(e.g. halogenated hydrocarbons that contain chlorine or fluorine compounds). This will help to prevent corrosion.

▶ Keep combustion air free of dust.

Danger through failure to consider your own safety in an emergency such as a fire

▶ Never put your life at risk. Your own safety is paramount.

Risk through oil leaks

▶ If using oil as fuel, country-specific regulations hold the operator responsible for asking a contractor to correct any oil leaks the moment they are discovered.

If you smell fuel:

▶ Close the fuel isolation valve.

▶ Open windows.

▶ Never operate electrical switches.

▶ Extinguish all naked flames.

▶ Never smoke

Warn all occupants in the building, but do not ring doorbells.

From outside the building: call fuel supplier and authorised heating contractor.

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

4 | Product information

If you suspect the smell of flue gas:

▶ Switch off the appliance.

▶ Isolate the fuel supply and guarded against unintentional reconnection.

▶ Open windows and doors.

▶ Notify an authorised contractor.

Electric shock hazard

▶ Before carrying out any work on the heating system, disconnect all poles of the heating system. For example, activate the emergency stop switch outside the boiler room.

▶ It is not enough to switch off the control unit.

▶ Safeguard the heating system against unintentional reconnection.

▶ Adhere to country-specific rules and regulations when making the electrical connection, commissioning, servicing and carrying out of maintenance.

Thermal disinfection

Risk of scalding!

Monitor any operation with temperatures in excess of 60 °C.

Inspection and maintenance

Recommendation for customers: Arrange a maintenance and inspection contract with an authorised contractor, covering an annual inspection and demand-dependent maintenance.

▶ The user is responsible for the general and environmental safety of the heating system.

▶ Immediately correct all faults to prevent system damage!

▶ Use only original spare parts and accessories from the manufacturer.

Damage caused by the use of spare parts and accessories not supplied by the manufacturer are excluded from our warranty.

Explosive and highly flammable material

▶ Never use or store highly flammable materials (paper, thinners, paints etc.) near the boiler.

Handover instructions to the customer

▶ Explain to the customer how the appliance works and how to operate it.

▶ Advise the customer that he/she must not make any modifications to the appliance or carry out any repairs on it.

Disposal

▶ Dispose of packaging in an environmentally responsible manner.

2 Product information

2.1

Standards, regulations and directives

Observe the following local regulations and standards during installation and operation:

• local building codes concerning the installation conditions,

• local building codes regarding the ventilation facilities and the chimney connection,

• the requirements of BG01 for hot water boilers where applicable.

• regulations regarding connection to the power supply

• the technical rules of the gas supply utility concerning the connection of the gas burner to the public gas mains

• regulations and standards regarding the safety equipment of heating systems.

The level of safety equipment must comply with at least EN 12828.

Also observe country-specific regulations if these specify further requirements.

Standards requiring compliance, for instance, include:

• General requirements relating to flue systems in and on buildings -

EN 1443

• Free-standing chimneys - EN 13084-1

• Fluid dynamic calculation methods - EN 13384

• Flue systems in and on buildings and free-standing chimneys -

EN 13084-1

• Electrical connection to EN 50165/EN 60 335-2-102

• Protection of potable water against contamination - EN 1717

2.2

Intended use

The oil/gas-fired Uni 3000 F floor-standing high efficiency boiler has been designed for hot water heating systems, e. g. for apartment buildings or industrial units.

The boiler is only approved for open flue operation.

Any oil or gas burner to EN 676 and EN 267 can be used if its operating range matches the boiler specification.

Only burners that have been tested and approved for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) may be used.

Control units from the CFB 9xx controller series are used with these boilers.

For further detail on correct use, see

 Chapters 2.8 and 2.9, page 5.

2.3

Safety equipment

To ensure safe operation, the boilers must be equipped with the following safety equipment:

▶ For safety temperatures (HLSC)

 110 °C the safety equipment must, at least, meet the requirements of EN 12828.

▶ For safety temperatures (HLSC) > 110 °C, the safety equipment must, at least, meet the requirements of EN 12953, part 6.

▶ Also observe local regulations, if these specify further requirements.

▶ Observe local limits if these specify an alternative temperature limit

(HLSC 110 °C)

1)

.

Equipment examples are included in the appendix (

 page 34).

The components comprising the safety equipment are available as accessories.

1) HLSC refers to High-level safety cut-out.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Product information | 5

2.4

Gas supply

The gas supply must be installed and maintained by a Gas Safe registered installer with the necessary experience and ACS elements to complete the work.

▶ Please note that, depending on the region, approvals for the flue system and condensate connection to the public sewage system may be required. Before starting installation, notify the responsible agencies as specified by local regulations.

2.5

EU Declaration of Conformity

The design and operation of this product conform to the applicable

European directives and, when necessary, supplementary national requirements. Conformity has been demonstrated.

You can ask for a copy of the declaration of conformity for this product.

For this see the contact address on the back cover of these instructions.

2.6

Type overview

Type

Uni 3000 F

Table 2 Type overview

2.7

Operating conditions

Output

420 kW to 1850 kW

Observe all standards and guidelines applicable to the installation of this system in your country!

Ensure compliance with the information on the data plate. These are definitive and must be observed.

Operating conditions and time constants

Maximum permissible temperature, highlimit safety cut-out

Maximum operating pressure

Temperature control unit

Monitor/limiter

Table 3 Operating conditions and time constants

°C bar s s

110

1)

(120

2)

6

40

40

)

1) High limit safety cut-out setting if the boiler is operated to heat DHW.

2) You may also operate the boiler as a hot water boiler with a high limit safety cutout set to 120 °C. In this case, contact your supplier. Hot water boilers with a maximum temperature in excess of 110 °C are covered by the Pressure

Equipment Directive 97/23/EC. If boilers are to be operated at temperatures above 110 °C they must have the necessary equipment level and be operated in accordance with BG01.

The control unit settings in Chapter 4.9 must be observed!

Prevent load peaks in excess of the stated boiler output.

On average, the burner may not be started more than four times per hour (relative to the actual hours run by the burner).

Uni 3000 F

Boiler operating conditions

Minimum flow rate

Minimum return temperature in °C

Minimum boiler output at the 1st stage (baseload output) when not in use

In conjunction with a CFB 9xx control unit for modulating lowtemperature operation

No demand

2)

with oil as fuel

50

with gas as fuel

1)

60

%

No requirements

The boiler is shut down automatically by the 4000 control unit

In conjunction with a CFB 9xx control unit for constant boiler temperatures, e. g. CFB 810 with CME 930 module or with additional external control

No demand

2)

50 60 No demand

2)

Table 4 Operating conditions

1) Gas quality as per Natural Gas I2H (G20)

2) If it has been ensured that the return temperature sensor FV/FZ is always covered by water from the boiler circuit.

2.8

Overview of possible fuels

Fuels

28-second oil

(Kerosene)

35-second oil

(Gas Oil)

LPG 3P

(G31)

Natural Gas I2H

(G20)

Combustion of biogas/waste gas (quality in line with DVGW

G262

1)

, table 3

Comment: The boiler must only be operated with the specified fuels.

Select a burner intended for the indicated fuels.

Bosch Commercial and Industrial Heating can provide a burner matching service, in addition to supplying a selection of burners.

Table 5 Fuels

1) Proportion of sulphur and sulphur compounds in the gas up to a maximum of

1500 mg/m

3

(approx. 0.1 % by volume)

Proportion of chlorine and chlorine compounds in the gas up to a maximum of

50 mg/m

3

Proportion of fluoride and fluoride compounds in the gas up to a maximum of

25 mg/m

3

▶ Enter the fuel used in the operating instructions, Chapter 10.

2.9

Heating water quality

The quality of the fill and top-up water is an essential factor for increased efficiency, functional reliability, long service life and for maintaining the constant operational condition of a heating system. If the system is filled with water that has a high calcium hardness, this will be deposited on the heat exchanger surfaces and will restrict the transfer of heat to the heating water. As a result, the wall temperatures of the heat exchanger surfaces will rise and the thermal stresses (loads on the boiler body) will increase.

This is why the quality of the fill or top-up water must meet the conditions stipulated in the operator's log provided and be recorded in this log.

The conditions for boilers > 600 kW require general water treatment independent of the water hardness and the volume of fill and top-up water.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

6 | Product information

2.10

Using antifreeze

Chemical additives that are not certified as harmless by the manufacturer must not be used.

Antifreeze based on glycol has been used in heating systems for many years, for example Antifrogen N manufactured by Clariant.

The use of other types of antifreeze should not be a cause for concern if the product is comparable with Antifrogen N.

Observe the antifreeze manufacturer's instructions. Follow the manufacturer's details regarding mixing ratios.

The specific thermal capacity of Antifrogen N antifreeze is lower than the specific thermal capacity of water. To enable the transfer of the required heat output, increase the required flow rate accordingly. This should be taken into account when sizing the system components (e.g. pumps) and the pipework.

As the heat transfer medium has a higher viscosity and density than water, take the higher pressure drop through the pipework and other system components into account.

Check the resistance of all plastic or non-metallic components in the system separately.

2.11

Pressure maintenance

▶ Size the expansion vessels correctly.

▶ Set the pre-charge pressures correctly.

If using pump-controlled pressurisation units, pressure fluctuations will result. They can occur very frequently depending on the design of the system and the appliance settings. Even if these pressure fluctuations appear small, if they occur very frequently they may cause considerable damage to the boiler, as it is designed for a predominantly static pressure load.

To protect against damage:

▶ Ensure that every heat source is equipped with an individual expansion vessel.

▶ Set the pre-charge pressure of the expansion vessel correctly.

Boiler output (kW)

up to 500 up to 1 000 up to 2 000 up to 5 000 up to 10 000

Diaphragm expansion vessel

Capacity in litres

80

140

300

800

1600

Table 6 Minimum expansion vessel sizes

2.12

Data plate

The data plate is located on the rear side of the boiler.

There you will find information such as the serial number, output and approval details.

Please quote these details if you have to contact the manufacturer because of a problem with your heating appliance or accessories.

2.13

Tools, materials and assembly aids

For the installation and maintenance of the boiler, standard tools are required, as used for heating, gas, water and electrical installations.

2.14

Description of appliance

The Uni 3000 F is a stationary floor-standing boiler with dual-flue combustion to EN 303/ EN 14394 for use with oil and gas as fuel. It is referred to in this manual as the floor-standing boiler or the boiler. The boiler must be fitted with a burner suitable for the boiler output. The boiler is supplied with the boiler casing mounted.

For optional accessories, contact your local Bosch Commercial and

Industrial Heating representative.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from incorrect burner matching.

▶ Only use burners that meet the technical requirements of the boiler and match the boiler output (

 Chapter 2.16, page 8).

The boiler consists of the following main components:

• The boiler shell transfers the heat generated by the burner to the heating water.

• Boiler casing and thermal insulation [2].

The boiler jacket and thermal insulation reduce heat losses.

• Control unit (accessory [1]).

The control unit monitors and controls all electrical boiler components.

1

2

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

4

3

6 720 806 032-01.1ITL

Fig. 1 Uni 3000 F oil/gas floor-standing boiler 420 kW-1200 kW

(1040 kW-1200 kW control unit placed on side of boiler)

[1] Control unit (accessory)

[2] Boiler jacket

[3] Base frame

[4] Burner door

Uni 3000 F

Product information | 7

1

2

4

3

6 720 806 032-02.1ITL

Fig. 2 Uni 3000 F oil/gas floor-standing boiler 1400 kW-1850 kW

[1] Control unit (accessory)

[2] Boiler jacket

[3] Base frame

[4] Burner door

2.15

Standard delivery

▶ On delivery, check that all packaging is in good condition.

▶ Check the delivery is complete.

• Boiler with turbulators and an undrilled burner plate

• Control unit retainer and cable conduit

• Insulating rings for blast tube

• Technical documentation

• Cleaning brush

• Burner cable for first burner stage

2.15.1 Required accessories

The following accessories are not part of the standard delivery, but are required to operate the boiler:

• Burner suitable for the boiler output

• Control unit with burner cable for second burner stage

• Safety equipment

• Boiler safety assembly

• Burner plate suitable for the burner

2.15.2 Optional accessories

• Sound insulation strips

For additional accessories, please contact your local Bosch Commercial and Industrial Heating representative.

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

8 | Product information

2.16

Specifications, dimensions and values for the flue gas calculation

B

G

L

G

A

1

RK

A

2

A

VK VSL

3

R

A

D

EL

AA

6 720 806 032-18.2ITL

B

GR

Fig. 3 Dimensions, Uni 3000 F 420 kW to 820 kW

T

L

GR

L

BR

D

MB

D

FR

L

FR

6 720 806 032-42.2ITL

Fig. 4 Dimensions, burner door and burner, Uni 3000 F

1)

Measurements

Boiler size

Boiler length

Boiler width (overall)

Base frame length

Swivelling range of the burner door

Base frame width

Overall height (with control unit)

Boiler height

Flue outlet diameter

Flue outlet height

Combustion chamber length

Combustion chamber diameter

Minimum blast tube diameter

Table 7 Dimensions for Uni 3000 F (

Fig. 3)

H

HK

D

AA

H

AA

L

FR

D

FR

D

MB

L

G

B

G

L

GR

B

T

BGR mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm

1) The blast tube must protrude beyond the lining in the burner door.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

1320

1100

250

632

1460

488

290

420

2142

955

1573

860

480

1430

1210

300

662

1390

548

290

500

2075

1040

1503

950

570

1430

1210

300

662

1640

548

290

Uni 3000 F

600

2320

1040

1753

950

570

1430

1320

350

727

1585

624

350

730

2270

1040

1700

1060

650

1430

1320

350

727

1785

624

350

820

2469

1040

1900

1060

650

Uni 3000 F

Product information | 9

Measurements

Boiler size

Minimum blast tube length

Burner door depth

Installed burner height

Boiler flow connection

1)

Boiler return connection

2)

Flow safety line connection

2)

Boiler safety assembly connection

Flange height VK/VSL/RK

Clearance

Clearance

Clearance

Drain (DFV) connection

Drain (DFV) height

Cleaning seq

Table 7 Dimensions for Uni 3000 F (

Fig. 3)

1) Flange to DIN 2633 (PN16)

L

BR

T

H

B

VK

RK

VSL

SG

H

F

A

1

A

2

A

3

D

EL

HEL

R

A mm mm mm

DN

(mm)

DN

(mm)

420

1)

260

477

80

80

DN (mm) 50

Inches 1 mm mm

1165

540 mm mm

Inches mm

Inches

225

637

100

G 3/8

500

1)

260

507

100

100

50

1

1255

450

365

516

100

G 3/8

Technical data

Boiler size

Rated output

Rated heat input

Transport weight

Boiler water content

Gas content

Pressure loss on the hot gas side

Draught required

Maximum temperature of high limit safety cut-out

Maximum permissible operating pressure (boiler) l l kW kW kg mbar

Pa

°C bar

420

420

459

900

367

350

3.9

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

Table 8 Specifications for Uni 3000 F (certified with modulating burner output)

500

500

546

1040

434

420

4.7

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

Values for calculating the flue gas Uni 3000 F

Boiler size

Flue gas temperature, partial load 60 %

1)

Flue gas temperature, full load

1)

Flue gas mass flow rate, oil, partial load 60 %

2)

Flue gas mass flow rate, oil, full load

2)

Flue gas mass flow rate, gas, partial load 60 %

3)

Flue gas mass flow rate, gas, full load

3)

CO

2

content, oil

CO

2

content, gas

°C

°C kg/s kg/s kg/s kg/s

%

%

420

150

200

0.1085

0.1809

0.1068

0.178

13

10

500

150

200

0.1277

0.1301

0.1396

0.2168

13

10

Table 9 Values for the flue gas calculation for the Uni 3000 F (certified with modulating burner output)

600

150

200

0.1668

0.278

0.1674

0.279

13

10

1) Relative to average boiler temperature 70 °C

2) Relative to fuel oil (up to 1000 mg/kWh (ppm) sulphur content), Hi = 11.86 kWh/kg

3) Relative to Natural Gas I2H (G20), Hi = 9.03 - 10.03 kWh/m³

Uni 3000 F

600

600

655

1150

502

495

5.59

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

730

730

795

1360

607

618

6.1

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

730

150

198

0.1868

0.3113

0.1869

0.3116

13

10

100

50

1

1255

450

365

766

100

G 3/8

Uni 3000 F

600

1)

260

507

100

730

1)

260

547

125

125

65

1

1255

620

350

541

100

G 3/8

820

150

198

0.2088

0.348

0.2102

0.3503

13

10

820

820

893

1460

675

693

6.47

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

820

1)

260

547

125

125

65

1

1365

620

350

541

100

G 3/8

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

10 | Product information

B

G

A

1

RK

L

G

A

2

VK

SG

A

3

VSL

B

GR

B

K

Fig. 5 Dimensions, Uni 3000 F 1040 and 1200 kW

B

G

L

GR

A

1

RK

L

G

A

2

VSL

SG

A

3

VK

R

A

D

AA

D

EL

6 720 806 032-46.1ITL

R

A

D

AA

D

EL

B

GR

B

K

Fig. 6 Dimensions, Uni 3000 F 1400 kW and 1850 kW

T

L

GR

6 720 806 032-39.2ITL

L

BR

D

MB

D

FR

L

FR

6 720 806 032-43.2ITL

Fig. 7 Dimensions, burner door and burner, Uni 3000 F

1)

1) The blast tube must protrude beyond the lining in the burner door.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Product information | 11

Measurements

Boiler size

Boiler length

Boiler width (overall)

Boiler width

Swivelling range of the burner door

Base frame length

Base frame width

Overall height

Boiler height

Flue outlet diameter

Flue outlet height

Combustion chamber length

Combustion chamber diameter

Maximum blast tube diameter

Minimum blast tube length

Burner door depth

Burner height

Boiler flow connection

2)

Boiler return connection

2)

Flow safety line connection

2)

Boiler safety assembly connection

Flange height VK/VSL/RK

Clearance

Clearance

Clearance

Drain & fill valve (DFV) connection

Drain & fill valve (DFV) height

Cleaning seq R

A

Table 10 Dimensions for Uni 3000 F (

Fig. 6, page 10)

SG

H

F

A

1

A

2

A

3

D

EL

HEL

H

B

VK

RK

VSL

HK

D

AA

H

AA

L

FR

D

FR

D

MB

L

BR

T

L

G

B

G

B

K

B

T

L

GR

BGR

H

1) The blast tube must protrude beyond the lining in the burner door.

2) Flange to DIN 2633 (PN16) mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm

1340

350

797

1845 mm mm mm mm

710

350

1)

260 mm 592

DN (mm) 125

1040

2600

1470

1250

1170

1960

820

1475

DN (mm) 125

DN (mm) 80

Inches mm

1

1475 mm mm mm

Inches mm

Inches

620

595

569

100

G ½

Uni 3000 F

1400

3050

1610

1390

1280

2316

880

1612

1460

400

1070

2120

780

350

1)

725

725

673

100

G ½

300

635

150

150

80

1

1612

620

595

870

100

G ½

260

592

125

125

80

1

1475

1340

350

797

2145

710

350

1)

1200

2882

1470

1250

1170

2260

820

1475

Technical data

Boiler size

Rated output

Rated heat input

Transport weight

Boiler water content

Gas content

Pressure loss on the hot gas side

Draught required

Maximum temperature of high limit safety cut-out

Maximum permissible operating pressure (boiler) l l kW kW kg mbar

Pa

°C bar

1040

1040

1138

1790

822

934

7.25

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

Table 11 Specifications for Uni 3000 F (certified with modulating burner output)

1200

1200

1313

2070

942

1071

7.74

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

Uni 3000 F

1400

1400

1532

2660

1339

1275

7.13

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

1850

1850

2024

3600

1655

1710

9.17

0

110

1)

(120

2)

)

6

1) High limit safety cut-out setting if the boiler is operated to heat DHW.

2) You may also operate the boiler as a hot water boiler with a high limit safety cut-out set to 120 °C. In this case, contact your supplier. Hot water boilers with a maximum temperature in excess of 110 °C are covered by the Pressure Equipment Directive 97/23/EC. If boilers are to be operated above 110 °C they must have the necessary equipment level and be operated in accordance with BG01.

925

925

670

100

G ½

320

685

200

200

100

1

1732

1545

400

1145

2520

860

350

1)

1850

3340

1730

1510

1385

2720

860

1730

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

12 | Product information

Values for calculating the flue gas Uni 3000 F

Boiler size

Flue gas temperature, partial load 60 %

1)

Flue gas temperature, full load

1)

Flue gas mass flow rate, oil, partial load 60 %

2)

Flue gas mass flow rate, oil, full load

2)

Flue gas mass flow rate. Gas partial load 60 %

3)

Flue gas mass flow rate, gas, full load

3)

CO

2

content, oil

CO

2

content, gas

°C

°C kg/s kg/s kg/s kg/s

%

%

1040

150

198

0.2651

0.4418

0.2671 0.3089 0.36

0.4451

13

10

1200

150

195

0.3049

0.5082

0.5148

13

10

Table 12 Values for the flue gas calculation for Uni 3000 F (certified with modulating burner output)

1400

150

195

0.3571

0.5952

0.5999

13

10

1) Relative to average boiler temperature 70 °C

2) Relative to fuel oil (up to 1000 mg/kWh (ppm) sulphur content), Hi = 11.86 kWh/kg

3) Relative to Natural Gas I2H (G20), Hi = 9.03 -10.03 kWh/m³

1850

150

195

0.4725

0.7875

0.4761

0.7935

13

10

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Handling | 13

3 Handling

DANGER: Risk to life through incorrectly secured boiler.

▶ Use suitable means to transport the boiler (e.g. a forklift truck, crane or heavy-duty rollers).

▶ When transporting, secure the boiler to prevent it falling.

DANGER: Risk to life through falling load.

▶ Secure the boiler with safety straps prior to transportation.

Securing the load

To secure the load during transportation:

▶ Never pull retaining straps (fixing straps, chains) over the boiler casing.

▶ Secure retaining straps only to the locking lugs.

3.1

Transporting the boiler with a forklift truck

You can transport the boiler with a forklift truck. When transporting the boiler, observe the following instructions:

DANGER: Risk to life through falling load.

▶ Distribute the boiler weight evenly across the forklift truck's forks when lifting and transporting the boiler.

▶ Observe the weight of the boiler and that of the means of transport.

▶ When transporting, secure the boiler to prevent it falling.

▶ Use the openings provided for a forklift truck

(

 Fig. 8, [2]).

NOTICE: Risk of boiler damage from a damaged boiler shell.

▶ Lift the boiler only by means of the base frame, not the boiler shell or boiler door.

▶ Transport the boiler with the forks of the forklift truck inserted from the side.

▶ Transport the boiler with the forks inserted into the openings in the base frame (

 Fig. 8, [2]).

3.2

Transporting the boiler on rollers

▶ Insert pipes (

 Fig. 9, [2]).

▶ Lift the boiler with a car jack.

▶ Place pipes underneath.

1

2

3

Fig. 9 Transporting the boiler on rollers

[1] Base frame

[2] Pipes

[3] Car jack (check jack specification for suitability)

6 720 806 032-44.1ITL

3

2

1

Fig. 8 Transporting the boiler with a forklift truck

[1] Base frame

[2] Transport openings for forklift truck

[3] Boiler body

6 720 806 032-22.1ITL

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

14 | Mounting

3.3

Lifting the boiler with a crane

You can lift and transport the boiler with a crane (

 Fig. 10, [1]).

DANGER: Risk to life through falling load.

▶ Only use lifting ropes of the same length.

▶ Only use lifting ropes that are in perfect condition.

▶ Hook lifting tackle only into the lifting eyes provided in the gusset plates on top of the boiler.

Never hook lifting tackle into the locking lugs on

the side of the boiler, or into the connectors.

▶ Lift the boiler with a crane only if you are suitably qualified to operate the crane.

▶ Never lift the boiler with a crane on its side or on end.

Never use the locking lugs for lifting.

▶ Insert the hooks on the transport chain [3] into the holes of the four gusset plates [4] on the boiler body.

▶ Attach the lifting hook of the crane [2] to the lifting rope.

2

4

3

4 Mounting

Regarding installation and operation of your heating system, observe all relevant national standards and guidelines.

The information on the data plate is binding and must be observed.

4.1

Installing the boiler

DANGER: Risk to life through poisoning!

Insufficient ventilation can lead to dangerous flue gas leaks!

▶ Never close off or reduce the size of ventilation and extract air vents.

▶ Never operate the boiler unless faults are rectified immediately.

▶ Inform the operator in writing of any faults and their associated risks.

DANGER: Risk of fire through flammable materials or liquids.

▶ Never store flammable materials or liquids in the immediate vicinity of the heat source.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage through frost.

▶ Position the boiler in a room free from the risk of frost.

1

4

6 720 806 032-23.1ITL

Fig. 10 Lifting the boiler with a crane

[1] Boiler

[2] Crane hooks with safety mechanisms

[3] Hook of lifting rope

[4] Gusset plates (Installation location depends on the boiler size)

Installation room requirements:

• The support surface must provide sufficient load-bearing capacity and solidity.

• The installation room must be dry and free from the risk of frost.

• The size of the installation room must be adequate to ensure correct operation.

Minimum wall clearances

Observe the specified minimum wall clearances for the foundations or installation surface (

 Fig. 11, and Tab. 13). The surface on which the

boiler is to be positioned must be of load-bearing capacity, even and level. The front edge of the boiler should be flush with the edge of the foundation.

Fig. 11 shows an installation example.

The burner door closure can be fitted to the left or right (

 Chapter 4.5 from page 18).

Boiler dimension data can be found in Chapter 2.16, page 8.

Boiler Boiler size

Clearance

A

H

in mm

Uni 3000 F 420 -1850 1000

Table 13 Specified wall clearances

Clearance

A

V

in mm

2500

1)

Clearance

A

S

in mm

250+L

1)

BR

2)

1) Observe dimension L

BR

(burner length) and dimension B

T

(swivelling range of

the burner door, Tab. 7, page 8 and Tab. 10, page 11) in relation to clearances

A

V

and A

S

(on the closure side of the burner door).

2) On the Uni 3000 F, observe the dimension of the particular control unit with regard to the minimum clearance A

S

(on the installation side of the control unit

250+L

BR

). On the side where the burner door is not hinged, only observe

250mm clearance. If the hinge arrangement may change following installation please observe the L

BR

dimension.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Allow extra space if a flue silencer and/or a flue gas heat exchanger is to be installed.

Where a separation between the installation site and the boiler is required to prevent the transfer of structureborne noise, fit these anti-vibration measures (e.g. antivibration supports) prior to boiler installation.

Mounting | 15

▶ Level the boiler [2] both horizontally and vertically using a spirit level [1].

1

2

A

S

A

H

6 720 806 032-24.1ITL

Fig. 12 Levelling the boiler

[1] Spirit levels

[2] Boiler

4.3

Fitting sound insulation strips (accessory)

DANGER: Injury from crushing.

L BR

A

S

Consider additional sound insulation measures before installing the boiler.

A

V

Fig. 11 Boiler room with boiler (dimensions in mm)

6 720 806 032-19.2ITL

4.2

Levelling the boiler

The boiler must be levelled in the lengthwise and crosswise directions to prevent air pockets forming inside.

Use metal shims to level the boiler.

To reduce noise, sound-absorbing strips (optional accessory) can be placed under the base frame, flush with the front and back of the boiler.

▶ Position the boiler at its installation site.

▶ Place sound insulation strips lengthways below the boiler frame at all four corners.

▶ Carefully set the boiler down.

Uni 3000 F

1

1

1

Fig. 13 Positioning the sound insulation strips

[1] Sound insulation strips

6 720 806 032-38.1ITL

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

16 | Mounting

4.4

Flue gas and water connections for heating system

DANGER: Risk to life through poisoning!

Insufficient ventilation can lead to dangerous flue gas leaks!

▶ Never operate the boiler unless faults are rectified immediately.

▶ Inform the operator in writing of any faults and their associated risks.

4.4.1

General requirements of the flue system

The following recommendations pertaining to the implementation of flue systems should guarantee trouble-free operation of a combustion system.

Failure to observe these rules can result in substantial operating problems during combustion and may even result in explosions. Possible problems frequently include acoustic disturbances, compromised combustion stability or excessive vibrations on assemblies or their components. Low

NOx combustion systems are to be viewed as being more sensitive to operating faults on account of their combustion control. Therefore, engineer and implement the flue system with particular care.

Commonly, the flue system comprises a connection piece between the heat source and the vertical flue system itself (chimney).

When sizing and implementing the flue system, comply with the following requirements:

• Size flue systems in accordance with the respective national and local regulations and applicable standards. For instance, freestanding chimneys, fluid mechanical calculation (for examples of pertinent standards, see

 Chapter 2.1, page 4). The

implementation of the flue system must comply with local Building

Regulations. Observe country-specific regulations.

• When selecting the material for a flue system, take the composition and temperatures of the flue gases into account to prevent damage and contamination of the flue parts that are in contact with flue gas.

• Route flue gases as directly as possible to the chimney considering the best possible flow characteristics (e.g. short and with a gradient and the fewest possible deviations). Provide a separate chimney flue for each boiler. Take the thermal expansion of the system into account.

• Implement deviations in the connection pieces, such as bends or deflectors, so as to minimise flow resistance. Connection pieces with several deviations should be avoided, as they would have a detrimental effect on air-borne and structure-borne noise as well as the start-up pressure hammer. Prevent sharp-edged joints between rectangular connection flanges and the connection pipe. The joint angle should not exceed 30°, the same as for any reducers/ expansions that may be required.

• Where possible, connection pieces should be joined to the chimney to provide optimum flow characteristics and with an incline (at an angle less than 45°). Any terminal pieces at the chimney outlet must ensure the free discharge of flue gas into the open air.

• Any condensate must be able to drain freely over the entire length of its discharge pipework and drained off in accordance with local regulations.

• Inspection apertures should be provided in compliance with local regulations, possibly after discussion with the responsible Local

Authority inspector.

• The chimney must be separated from the boiler system (e.g. with compensators) to interrupt transfer of structure-borne noise.

• Where a flue gas damper is set into a flue system, an “OPEN” safety limit switch must be integrated into the boiler control. Combustion must only be able to start when the feedback from the limit switch confirms that the flue damper is fully open. A temperature drop inside the boiler is possible on account of the time it takes the actuator to move the damper into position. Implement the end position CLOSED at the flue damper so that the flue damper never closes fully. This prevents damage to the fitted burner through heat build up.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

4.4.2

Fitting a sealing collar (accessory)

▶ Fit the sealing collar in accordance with the installation instructions supplied.

4.4.3

Connecting the boiler to the pipework

Observe the following information for connecting the boiler to the pipework. This is important to ensure trouble-free operation.

Boiler contamination on the water side is not permitted.

To prevent contamination on the water side, we recommend the installation of an air/dirt separator in the return.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from leaking connections.

▶ Install all lines free from stress to the boiler connections.

Connecting the heating return

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from too low a return temperature.

▶ Observe the operating conditions (

 Tab. 4, page 5). Back-end Protection must be designed into

the hydraulic arrangement.

▶ Connect the heating system return to the boiler return connection

(

 Fig. 14 and Fig. 15 [3]).

3

1

2

5

4

6 720 806 032-05.1ITL

Fig. 14 Uni 3000 F 420 kW to 1200 kW boiler (left = rear of boiler)

[1] Boiler flow connection (VK)

[2] Safety flow line (VSL - connection for an on-site safety valve)

[3] Boiler return connection (RK)

[4] Test point (sensor well 3/4") for 190 kW to 1200 kW

Uni 3000 F

3

2

5 4

1

6 720 806 032-25.1ITL

Fig. 15 Uni 3000 F 1400 kW to 1850 kW boiler (left = front of boiler)

[1] Boiler flow connection (VK)

[2] Safety flow line (VSL - connection for an on-site safety valve)

[3] Boiler return connection (RK)

[4] Test point (sensor pocket 3/4")

[5] Boiler safety assembly connection (safety devices)

Connecting the heating flow

▶ Connect the heating system flow to the boiler flow connection

(

 Fig. 14 and Fig. 15, [1]).

Connecting the boiler safety assembly (accessory)

• Uni 3000 F 420 kW up to 1200 kW:

Connect the safety valve and the safety equipment to the safety flow line connection (

 fig. 14, [2]).

• Uni 3000 F 1400 kW up to 1850 kW:

Connect the safety valve to the safety line connection (

 fig. 15, [2])

and the safety assembly to the safety flow line connection [5].

Connecting the safety flow line

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from connecting the wrong assemblies to the flow safety line [2].

▶ Never connect a DHW cylinder or other heating circuit to the flow safety connection [2].

▶ Secure the pressure relief valve to the safety line flow connection

(VSL) with bolts (

 Fig. 14 and Fig. 15, [2]).

4.4.4

Filling the boiler and checking connections for leaks

Check the heating system for leaks before commissioning to ensure there are no leaks when the system is in operation.

The test pressure level is subject to the system components and to the heating system.

▶ Observe local standards and regulations.

NOTICE: Personal injury and/or system damage through excess pressure when testing for leaks.

Pressure, control and safety equipment may be damaged through excessive pressure.

▶ When you carry out the leak test, ensure that no pressure, control or safety equipment that cannot be isolated from the boiler water chamber is fitted.

Uni 3000 F

Mounting | 17

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from thermal stress.

▶ Only fill the system when cold (the flow temperature must be no more than 40 °C).

▶ Fill the heating system with water (

 Chapter 5.3, page 24).

Check all connections for leaks.

▶ Pressure test the heating system.

▶ Check flange and boiler connections for leaks.

▶ Check the pipework for leaks.

▶ After the tightness test, reinstate all components that were taken out of operation.

▶ Ensure that all pressure, control and safety equipment is functioning correctly.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

18 | Mounting

4.5

Opening and closing the burner door

Retighten the nuts that secure the burner door 14 days after commissioning.

4.5.1

Opening the burner door

WARNING: Risk of injury from falling parts.

The burner door can fall off when opened.

▶ Loosen the screws only on one side of the burner door.

The burner door can be opened either to the left or right. The following instructions assume opening to the right.

▶ Left side: Loosen two nuts on the burner door [1].

▶ Right side: Loosen two nuts on the burner door [1] 2 to 3 turns.

▶ Left side: Lower hinges by loosening the hinge nut [2] (2 to 3 turns).

The door must no longer be in contact with the pin of the door hinge [4] (

 Fig. 17). Right side: Turn the lock nut [3] 2 to 3 turns

in the direction of the burner door. This pushes the burner door away from the boiler. There must be a gap of at least 5 mm between the burner door and boiler in order not to damage the gaskets.

▶ Left side: The burner door is opened by turning the lock nut [3] in the direction of the burner door. The burner door must no longer be in contact with the pin [4] of the door hinge.

▶ Open the burner door.

2

1

1

4 3

6 720 806 032-49.1ITL

Fig. 17 Positions of burner door and hinge pin

4.5.2

Closing the burner door

▶ Left and right side: turn the lock nut [3] in the direction of the boiler.

▶ Close the burner door.

▶ Screw the nut (

 Fig. 16, [1]) onto the hinge pin [4] and bring the

door to just before the sealing faces.

▶ Left and right side: Align the sealing faces of the burner door and boiler by tightening the hinge nuts [2] alternately.

The burner door must have the same clearance (about 10 mm) from the edge of the closing face of the boiler on all sides.

▶ Left and right side: Tighten the lock nuts [1] until the burner door seals tightly on all sides.

▶ Left and right side: Secure the burner door with lock nut [3].

▶ Check the tightness of the burner door (e. g. with a gas leak detection spray).

1

6 720 806 032-28.1ITL

Fig. 16 Opening the burner door

Key to Fig. 16:

[1] Nuts

[2] Hinge nut

[3] Lock nut

[4] Hinge pin

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

▶ Connect the blower connection for the sight glass with burner [1] to ensure the sight glass remains free from deposits.

▶ Close burner door and tighten nuts (

 Chapter 4.5, page 18).

▶ Connect burner cable to burner [1].

2

3

Mounting | 19

4.6

Fitting the burner (accessory)

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from incorrect burner.

▶ Only use burners that meet the technical requirements of the boiler (

 Chapter 2.16, page 8).

4.6.1

Fitting the burner plate (accessory)

Pre-drilled burner plates are available from the boiler manufacturer (accessory).

The burner plate depends on the burner used.

▶ Secure burner plate [2] with gasket [1] to burner door [3] using hexagon bolts and washers [4].

1

4

1

2

4

3

6 720 806 032-27.1ITL

Fig. 18 Fitting the burner plate

[1] Sealing ring

[2] Burner plate

[3] Burner door

[4] Hexagon bolt and washer

4.6.2

Fitting the burner to the burner plate

Refer to the installation instructions of the particular burner for how to mount and connect it.

The thermal insulation in the burner door comes standard with a

200 mm hole for the blast tube. If the blast tube is larger than this, the diameter of the aperture can be increased to a maximum of 275 mm.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from incorrect or missing insulating rings.

▶ Only use the insulating rings supplied.

The burner door must be opened to allow the burner to be fitted.

▶ Open the burner door (

 Chapter 4.5.1).

▶ Push a gasket (

 Fig. 18, [1]) onto the burner connector.

▶ Screw burner (

 Fig. 19, [1]) to the burner plate [2].

▶ Cut out insulating rings [4] in accordance with the diameter of blast tube [5].

▶ Fill remaining gap between burner door insulation [3] and blast tube

[5] with adapted insulating rings [4].

Uni 3000 F

5

6 720 806 032-29.1ITL

Fig. 19 Fitting the burner

[1] Burner

[2] Burner plate

[3] Burner door insulation

[4] Insulating rings

[5] Blast tube

4.7

Fitting the control unit (accessory)

This chapter explains how to fit the control units of the CFB controller series and a temperature sensor set for the boiler.

Depending on the boiler size, the control unit can be mounted either on top of the boiler or on the side.

4.7.1

For boiler sizes 420 kW to 820 kW

In Fig. 20, (overleaf), the control unit (without rear panel) and the

control unit holder [1] are shown from the rear.

▶ Undo both screws from cover [1]. Lift off the cover.

▶ Place the control unit with the locking tabs [4] into the holes in the front of the control unit holder (mounted on the front of the boiler)

[5].

▶ Pull the control unit forwards and then tip backwards. The flexible hooks [2] must latch Into the openings [3].

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

20 | Mounting

▶ Screw the base of the control unit to the control unit holder with

2 sheet-metal screws.

3

2

1

2

7 6 5 4 3

6 720 615 362-18.2O

Fig. 20 Fitting the control unit for boiler sizes 420 kW to 820 kW

[1] Cover

[2] Flexible hooks

[3] Rectangular openings in the control unit holder

[4] Locking tabs

[5] Oval holes in the control unit holder

[6] Cable feed in the control unit holder

[7] Holes for self-tapping screws

4.7.2

For boiler sizes 1040 kW to 1850 kW

In Fig. 21, page 20, the control unit is shown from the rear.

▶ Undo both screws from cover [1]. Lift off cover [2] (

 Fig. 20).

▶ Remove both plugs (

 Fig. 21, [2]) from the control unit.

▶ Place the control unit (

 Fig. 21, [4]) on the studs of the control unit

holder on the side of the boiler.

▶ Secure the control unit by screwing screws into the mounting holes [3] on the control unit holder.

1

4.7.3

Making the electrical connections

DANGER: Risk to life through electric shock.

▶ Prior to opening the appliance, isolate all electrical connections and secure against unintentional reconnection.

▶ Carefully route the cables/leads and capillary tubes.

▶ Only carry out electrical work if you are suitably qualified person. If you are not suitably qualified, arrange for a suitably qualified person to make the electrical connections.

▶ Observe all relevant electrical regulations.

DANGER: Risk of fatal injury and fire from hot components.

Hot components can damage the cabling.

▶ Secure cable sufficiently and route in the provided cable holding systems where necessary.

▶ Route cables with a sufficient clearance from hot components.

▶ Knock out or cut out the appropriate parts from back panel [1]

(

 Fig. 22) as required.

▶ Make the plug-in connection in the control unit in accordance with the labelling on the terminal strip.

▶ Route the burner cable to the control unit (

 Chapter 4.8, page 21).

▶ Connect the burner cable to the control unit in accordance with the labelling on the plug-in connector strip.

▶ Route the sensor leads to the control unit (

 Chapter 4.8, page 21).

▶ Connect the sensor leads to the control unit in accordance with the labelling on the plug-in connector strip.

▶ Route the electrical cables relevant to the heating system (for example, sensors, pumps, actuators) to the control unit.

▶ Make the on-site connections on the control unit in accordance with the labelling on the plug-in connector strip.

The positions of the terminal strips on control units are not identical. The terminal strip is easy to identify after the control unit has been opened.

The labelling of the terminal strip in the various control units is identical.

▶ Make on-site electrical connections for the heating system to the appropriate plug-in connectors according to the connection diagram

(

 control unit documentation).

▶ Refit back panel (

 Fig. 22) to the control unit.

4

6 720 806 032-48.1ITL

Fig. 21 Fitting the control unit for boiler sizes 1040 kW to 1850 kW

[1] Screws

[2] Plug

[3] Mounting Holes

[4] Control unit

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

1

Fig. 22 Preparing the cable entry

[1] Control unit back panel

6 720 615 362-19.3T

Uni 3000 F

Mounting | 21

Secure all cables with cable clips (scope of delivery of the control unit).

Carry out the following steps (

 Fig. 23):

▶ Insert the cable clip, with inserted electrical cable in place, from the top into the slot of the clip frame (step 1).

▶ Push cable clip down (step 2).

▶ Push against the clip (step 3).

▶ Flip the toggle up (step 4).

▶ Refit the cover (

 Fig. 20 and Fig. 21, page 20) to the control unit.

▶ Tighten screws (Fig. 20 and Fig. 21, page 20) to secure the control

unit cover hood.

Insert compensating spring [6] between the temperature sensors to ensure a good contact between sensor well [2] and sensor surfaces, and thereby a reliable temperature transfer.

▶ Roll up excess lengths of cables, capillaries (never kink) and sensor leads and position them on the thermal insulation of the boiler body.

4

3

6

5

2

1A

1B

6 720 615 362-20.1SL

Fig. 23 Securing the electrical cable with cable clips

4.8

Installing temperature sensors

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from damaged capillaries or incorrectly fitted temperature sensor!

▶ Ensure that the capillaries are neither kinked nor squashed when uncoiling and routing them.

▶ Always push the temperature sensor right to the bottom of the sensor pocket - ensuring an accurate reading.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from incorrect sensor position!

The sensors of the high limit safety cut-out (STB) and of the temperature controller (TR) must be fitted at the installation location on the top of the boiler (

 Fig. 24,

page 21 and Fig. 25, page 22).

▶ In the case of third party control units, match the sensor immersion sleeve to the diameter of the sensors used.

▶ Do not change the length of the immersion sleeve.

The boiler test point is located at the top of the boiler shell (location of the test point

 Fig. 14, page 16 and Fig. 15, page 17).

The temperature sensor of a temperature controller is marked “TR”.

6 720 812 900-16.1TL

Fig. 24 Installing the temperature sensor set on the Uni 3000 F

(up to 1200 kW)

[1B] Test point (sensor well 3/4") for 420 kW to 1200 kW

[2] Sensor well in the test point

[3] Sensor set

[4] Sensor retainer

[5] Control unit

[6] Compensating spring

Note that installation of the temperature sensor set is different when the CFB 810 control unit with the CME

930 auxiliary module is used.

▶ Insert sensor set (

 Fig. 24, page 21, [3]) into the measuring

point [1] until it bottoms.

▶ Secure sensor set [3] with sensor retainer [4] in the test point.

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

22 | Mounting

4

2

3

6

5

1

6 720 812 900-36.1TL

Fig. 25 Installing the temperature sensor set on the Uni 3000 F

1400 kW to 1850 kW

[1] Test point (sensor pocket 3/4")

[2] Sensor well in the test point

[3] Sensor set

[4] Sensor retainer

[5] Control unit

[6] Compensating spring

When using the CFB 810 control unit with CME 930 auxiliary module:

▶ Fit the temperature sensor of the CME 930 as contact sensor on site to the boiler return using heat conducting paste and a tie.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from incorrect sensor position.

Fitting the temperature sensor elsewhere can result in system damage.

▶ Install the temperature sensor of the CME 930 only in the boiler return as the responsibility of this module is to safeguard against low return temperatures and condensing.

4.9

Control unit settings

We recommend using a control unit from the CFB series.

The purpose of optimum control unit settings is to achieve long burner runtimes and avoid rapid temperature changes in the boiler. Gentle temperature changes result in a longer heating system service life. The control strategy of the control unit must therefore be prevented from becoming ineffective, i.e. through the boiler water controller switching the burner on and off.

▶ Maintain the minimum differential between the selected shutdown temperature of the high limit safety cut-out, the temperature controller, the maximum boiler water temperature and the maximum temperature demand (

 Tab. 14 to 16, page 23).

The maximum boiler water temperature can be selected in the control unit (programmer) in the “Boiler parameters” menu, under menu item “Max. shutdown temperature”.

▶ Select set temperatures for the heating circuits that are as low as possible.

▶ Start heating circuits (e.g. when starting up in the mornings) at

5-minute intervals.

If a CFB 9xx control unit is used, burner modulation in standard mode is not enabled for 3 minutes. Never modulate upwards more quickly than this.

Adjustable parameter

(max. temperature)

High limit safety cut-out (STB)

1)

CFB 910/CFB 930

Temperature controller (TR)

1)

110 °C

 minimum 5 K

105 °C

 minimum 6 K

Max. boiler water temperature 99 °C

 minimum 7 K 

Max. temperature demand

2)

of heating circuit

3)

and DHW

4)

92 °C

Table 14 Adjustable parameter CFB 910/CFB 930

 at least 18 K

1) Set the high limit safety cut-out and temperature controller as high as possible, but ensure the settings are at least 5 K apart.

2) Both temperature demands must always be at least 7 K under the maximum boiler water temperature.

3) The temperature demand of heating circuits equipped with a mixing valve is composed of the set flow temperature and the “Boiler rise” parameter in the heating circuit data menu.

4) The temperature demand of DHW heating is composed of the set DHW temperature and the “Boiler rise” parameter in the DHW menu.

Adjustable parameter

(max. temperature)

High limit safety cut-out (STB)

Temperature controller (TR)

1)

1)2)

Max. boiler water temperature

Max. temperature demand

3) of heating circuit

4)

and DHW

5)

Table 15 Adjustable parameter CFB 940

CFB 940

120 °C

 minimum 5 K

105 °C

 minimum 6 K

112 °C

 minimum 7 K 

105 °C

1) Set the high limit safety cut-out and temperature controller as high as possible, but ensure the settings are at least 5 K apart.

2) The TR does not function on the CFB 940 in automatic mode.

3) Both temperature demands must always be at least 7 K under the maximum boiler water temperature.

4) The temperature demand of heating circuits equipped with an actuator is composed of the set flow temperature and the “Boiler rise” parameter in the heating circuit data menu.

5) The temperature demand of DHW heating is composed of the set DHW temperature and the “Boiler rise” parameter in the DHW menu.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Mounting | 23

Adjustable parameter (max. temperature)

High limit safety cut-out (STB)

1)

CFB 810 with CME 930

120 °C

 minimum 5 K

105 °C Temperature controller (TR)

Table 16 Adjustable parameter CFB 810

1) Set the high limit safety cut-out and temperature controller as high as possible, but ensure the settings are at least 5 K apart.

Settings for boiler water controller and maximum boiler water temperature

The boiler water controller is only designed to provide emergency operation with an adjustable boiler water temperature if the control electronics fail. In standard control mode, the function of the boiler water controller is provided by the maximum boiler water temperature.

The maximum boiler water temperature can be selected in the control unit in the “Boiler parameters” menu, under menu item “Max. shutdown temperature”.

Control unit settings

1 2 3 4 5 6

6 720 806 032-47.1ITL

Fig. 26 Control unit settings, example for CFB 910

[1] High limit safety cut-out

[2] Temperature control unit

[3] F1, F2 Fuse

[4] Programmer

[5] Burner emergency operation switch

[6] Appliance on/off switch

▶ Set temperatures (

 Tab. 14 to 16, and page 22) for high limit

safety cut-out [1] in the control unit and on the temperature controller [2] respectively.

▶ Set the maximum boiler water temperature on the programmer [4].

The maximum temperature demand is not a value that is set directly. The maximum temperature demand is composed of the set temperature and the minimum required rise.

Example DHW demand:

Sum of the set DHW temperature (60 °C) the “Boiler rise” parameter

(20 °C) in the “DHW” menu:

60 °C + 20 °C = Maximum temperature demand 80 °C

Example heating circuits:

Sum of the set temperature of the heating circuit with mixer with the highest temperature required (70 °C) and parameter “Boiler rise” (5 °C) in the “Heating circuit data” menu:

70 °C + 5 °C = Maximum temperature demand 75 °C

All maximum temperature demands must always be 7 K below the maximum selected boiler water temperature.

Notes on setting third party control units

NOTICE: System damage due to incorrect sensor position!

The sensors of the high limit safety cut-out (STB) and of the temperature controller (TR) must be fitted at the appropriate installation location on the top of the boiler.

▶ In the case of third party control units, match the sensor immersion sleeve to the diameter of the sensors used.

▶ Do not change the length of the immersion sleeve.

Observe the operating conditions in Chapter 2.7, page 5

and observe Chapter 4.8, page 21 – page 22 when

installing sensors.

• The third party control unit (Building Management System or PLC controllers) must ensure a maximum internal boiler water temperature that is sufficiently different from the high limit safety cut-out. It must also be ensured that the control electronics rather than the boiler water controller switch the burner on and off.

• The control unit must ensure that the burner is switched to low load before being shut down. If this is not observed, the safety shut-off valve (SAV) in the gas train may lock out.

• Select control equipment that allows a gentle start-up with a time delay when the system is cold.

• After the burner demand, an automatic timer (for example) should limit the burner to low load for a period of approx. 180 seconds.

A restricted heat demand will prevent uncontrolled starting and stopping of the burner.

• It must be possible to show the number of burner starts on the control unit used (or alternatively on the burner control unit).

Temperature control unit

Monitor/limiter

Minimum difference between burner on and off temperatures

Table 17 Conditions of Use

Unit

s s

K

Value

40

40

7

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

24 | Commissioning

5 Commissioning

NOTICE: Risk of boiler damage from contaminated combustion air.

▶ Never operate the boiler when there is a lot of dust in the boiler room, e.g. due to building work.

▶ Ensure adequate ventilation.

▶ Never use or store chlorinated cleaning agents or halogenated hydrocarbons (as contained in spray cans, solvents or cleaning agents, paints and adhesives, for example) in the boiler room.

▶ A burner contaminated during building work must be cleaned before commissioning.

▶ Complete the commissioning report (

 Chapter 5.7, page 26).

5.1

Commissioning

The burner door is lined inside with insulating and refractory concrete.

On account of its manufacturing technique, residual moisture will be contained in the door lining. This may evaporate during the initial operation, resulting in droplets forming on the door. Any water vapour created must be able to dissipate during the overall heat-up time. This process may take up to one week.

Observe control parameters and specification.

5.3

Filling the heating system

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from thermal stress.

▶ Only fill the heating system when cold (the flow temperature must not exceed 40 °C).

▶ Fill the heating system during operation only by a

WRAS approved filling facility in the return of the pipework for the heating system.

CAUTION: Health risk from contaminated drinking water.

▶ It is essential to observe all country-specific regulations and standards regarding the prevention of drinking water contamination. In Europe, observe standard EN 1717.

The fill and top-up water quality must comply with the specifications in the operator's log supplied.

The pH value of the heating water increases after the heating system has been filled. After 3 – 6 months (initial service) check whether the pH value of the heating water has settled down.

▶ Adjust the pre-charge pressure of the expansion vessel to the required pressure (only for sealed unvented systems).

▶ Open the mixing and shut-off valves on the heating water side.

▶ Fill the heating system with the aid of a filling facility and observe the pressure gauge whilst doing so.

▶ Vent the heating system via the radiator air vent valves.

▶ Top up with water if the water pressure drops as a result of venting the system.

5.4

Preparing the heating system for operation

Concerning tightness on the flue gas side, a leakage rate of 2 % of the flue gas flow rate is permissible.

Cracks may occur during heat-up as a result of shrinkage.

Small shrinkage cracks and some flaking are unavoidable and will not impair the function nor are they considered damage.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from water vapour.

If the boiler heats up too rapidly, the water vapour cannot escape through existing pores in the lining, which may result in flaking of the door insulation. This may result in a total destruction of the lining.

▶ To prevent destruction of the lining, it is essential that the stated heat-up time and maximum heat-up output be observed.

The heat input in the first ten hours run must not exceed 60 %.

This heat-up procedure must be performed.

5.2

Flushing the heating system

Flush the heating system prior to commissioning to prevent contamination that could block or damage the circulation pump.

If the heating system contains several heating circuits, these must be flushed one after the other.

▶ Isolate the heating flow and return at the boiler.

▶ Connect the heating flow to a drinking water connection.

▶ Connect a hose to the heating return of the heating system.

▶ Route hose from the heating return to a drain.

▶ Open connected consumers (e.g. radiators).

▶ Flush the heating system with fresh water through the flow until clear water emerges from the heating return.

▶ Drain the heating system down.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

Observe the following during commissioning:

▶ Before commissioning, vent the heating system via the ventilation facilities provided for this purpose.

▶ Ensure that the inspection aperture on the flue gas collector is closed.

▶ Ensure that the burner door is securely closed.

▶ Ensure that the safety equipment is functioning correctly.

▶ Check that the required operating pressure has been built.

▶ Check the flange connections and other connections for tightness.

5.5

Commissioning the control unit and burner

▶ Use the control unit to commission the boiler.

▶ Set the parameters of the control unit (

 Chapter 5.5.1).

▶ Observe the commissioning times (

 Chapter 5.1)

The settings made in the control unit will affect the burner as well. The burner can then be started by the control unit. For further details, see the technical documents for the particular control unit and/or burner.

You have the opportunity of raising the flue gas temperature if the measurements taken for the commissioning report indicate that the flue gas temperature is too low (risk of condensate forming) for the chimney concerned (

 Chapter 5.6, page 25).

▶ Complete the commissioning report in the technical documentation of the burner.

Uni 3000 F

Commissioning | 25

5.5.1

Setting control unit parameters

The controller settings listed in Tab. 18 apply to the CFB 910 and

CFB 930 control units.

Make settings at the service level of the “Boiler specifications” and

“Special parameters” menus.

The service documentation for the control unit should be used for parameterising the CFB 940 control unit.

To ensure that the control unit operates correctly if burner type “dual fuel burner” is selected, connect a voltfree contact to terminal “ES” to change the fuel type.

Burner

Burner type for fuel

Control unit setting

Burner

Single fuel burner

Dual-fuel burner

Gas

Modulating

2-stage

Modulating

2-stage

Modulating

2-stage

Oil

Modulating

2-stage

Modulating

Modulating

2-stage

2-stage

Burner type to be selected

Modulating

2-stage

Modulating

2-stage

Fuel to be selected

Gas (biogas)

Gas (biogas)

Oil

Oil

Parameter 49 and

50 setting

55

1)

(63

2)

)

60

1)

(68

2)

)

50

3)

55

3)

55

1)4)

(63

2)

)

Modulating Gas (biogas)

Dual-fuel burner

Not applicable

No setting required 55

1)

(63

2)

)

2-stage Gas (biogas)

60

1)

(68

2)

)

Table 18 Controller settings for CFB 910, CFB 930 and CFB 940 control units

1) Corresponds to a return temperature of 60 °C

2) Corresponds to a return temperature of 68 °C for biogas

3) Corresponds to a return temperature of 50 °C

4) Corresponds to a return temperature of 60 °C for gas and 50 °C for oil

Return temperature raising function

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

5.6

Raising the flue gas temperature

▶ Start the heating system using the control unit.

For a new boiler with an average boiler temperature of 80 °C, the flue gas temperature is approx. 205 °C.

You can raise the flue gas temperature again by removing the turbulators.

▶ Shutting down the boiler (

 Chapter 6, page 27).

▶ Open the burner door (

 Chapter 4.5, page 18).

If gas pipes have to be detached from the gas burner, the burner door may only be opened by a qualified contractor.

▶ Remove two or three turbulators [2] from secondary heating pipes [1], starting with the turbulators at the bottom.

▶ Re-check the flue gas temperature.

If the flue gas temperature is still too low:

▶ Remove further turbulators [2] from secondary heating pipes [1].

If the flue gas temperature is too high:

▶ Re-insert turbulators [2] one after the other in secondary heating pipes [1], until the correct flue gas temperature has been reached

(

 also Chapter 7.3.3, page 28)

2

Fig. 27 Removing the turbulators

[1] Secondary heating pipes

[2] Turbulator

1

6 720 806 032-37.1ITL

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

26 | Commissioning

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

5.7

Commissioning report

This boiler can be used with an oil or gas burner. Fill in the commissioning report for the appropriate type of oil or gas burner carefully.

1.

2.

10.

▶ Sign all completed commissioning work and enter the date.

Commissioning steps

Flush the heating system.

Fill the heating system with water. Note the water quality and document the values in the operator's log provided for water.

Vent the heating system.

Carry out tightness test.

Switch on the control unit.

▶ Boiler-specific parameters are set.

Page (individual steps)

Page 24

Page 24

Page 17

See technical documentation on the control unit, specifications and

Chapter 5.5.1, page 25.

Check the fuel line for tightness.

Starting the burner.

Complete the burner test report regarding the individual output stages.

Conduct a tightness test on the hot gas side.

After being in operation for a while, the burner door bolts will have to be retightened in order to avoid leakage around the door as a result of settling of the packing cord.

Check the flange connections and fitting after the boiler has been heated up and retighten.

Check flue path for tightness.

Check the flue gas temperature.

Carry out a function test on all safety equipment and record this.

Instruct the system user and hand over technical documentation.

Enter the fuel used in the table (

 “General” operating instructions).

Confirm professional commissioning.

See technical burner documentation.

Page 25

Notes

Company stamp/signature/date

Table 19 Commissioning report

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Shutting down | 27

6 Shutting down

NOTICE: Risk of system damage through frost.

When there is a frost, your heating system can freeze up if it is shut down, e.g. through a fault shutdown.

▶ When there is a risk of frost, protect your heating system against freezing up.

▶ If your heating system has been shut down for several days due to a fault shutdown and there is a risk of frost, drain the heating water at the drain & fill valve. Also leave the air vent valve at the highest point in the system open.

NOTICE: System damage due to frost.

The heating system can freeze up as a result of a power failure or if the power has been switched off.

▶ Check the “Control unit settings” to ensure the system remains operational (especially when there is a risk of frost).

6.1

Shutting down the heating system

Shut down your heating system via the control unit. This also switches the burner off automatically.

▶ Place the operating mode selector switch on the control unit in the

“0” (Off) position.

▶ Isolate the fuel supply to the burner.

6.2

Shutting down the heating system in an emergency

Only in emergencies, switch OFF the heating system via the boiler room Main Circuit Board/fuse or the heating system emergency stop switch.

▶ Never put your life at risk. Your own safety is paramount.

▶ In dangerous situations, immediately close the main fuel shut-off valve and the power supply of the heating system via the boiler room

Main Circuit Board/fuse or the heating system emergency stop switch.

▶ Isolate the fuel supply to the burner.

▶ Guard against unintentional reconnection.

7 Inspection and maintenance

7.1

General notes

Offer your customer an annual contract covering inspection and responsive service. For the work covered by such a contract see

Chapter 7.5 “Inspection and maintenance reports”, page 31.

NOTICE: System damage due to inadequate cleaning and maintenance.

▶ Carry out cleaning and maintenance at least once a year. Check that the complete heating system operates correctly.

▶ Immediately correct all faults to prevent system damage.

Annual inspection and service are part of the warranty terms.

Use only original spare parts from the manufacturer.

Spare parts can be ordered via spare parts merchants.

A genuine spare parts list is available online (see last page for details).

7.2

Preparing the boiler for inspection and maintenance

▶ Shut down the heating system (

 Chapter 6.1, page 27).

DANGER: Risk to life from electric shock when the heating system is live.

▶ Prior to opening the heating system: Isolate the heating system from the mains power supply via the heating system emergency stop switch or the corresponding Main Circuit Board/fuse.

▶ Secure the heating system against unintentional reconnection.

DANGER: Risk to life from the explosion of flammable gases.

▶ Work on gas components must only be carried out by qualified and authorised Gas Safe and ACS accredited contractors.

If gas pipes have to be detached from the gas burner, the burner door may only be opened by a qualified contractor.

Before opening the burner door:

▶ Check the general condition of the heating system.

▶ Visual inspection and function check of the heating system.

▶ Check all system parts that carry fuel or water for leaks and visible corrosion.

▶ Open the burner door (

 Chapter 4.5, page 18).

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

28 | Inspection and maintenance

7.3

Cleaning the boiler

CAUTION: Risk of injury through falling parts!

▶ Prior to opening the doors, ensure that the hinge pin is correctly fitted in the burner door and secured with a nut.

7.3.1

Cleaning heating surfaces and turbulators with a cleaning brush

WARNING: Risk of system damage from using incorrect cleaning equipment.

▶ If cleaning with a brush, use only genuine cleaning brushes from the manufacturer. Brush included in scope of delivery.

▶ Remove turbulators [4] from secondary heating pipes [1].

▶ Clean turbulators [4].

▶ Push the bristle part of the cleaning brush [3] right through the secondary heating pipe until the bristles emerge at the other end of the pipe. The internal surface of the pipe must be cleaned thoroughly.

▶ Clean the heating surfaces in combustion chamber [2] and the heating surfaces in secondary heating pipes [1] with cleaning brush [3].

7.3.2

Cleaning the flue gas collector

To be able to remove combustion residues from the flue gas collector, first remove the cleaning cover. The cleaning cover is located on the rear of the boiler [2].

1

1

4

3

2

6 720 806 032-30.1ITL

Fig. 28 Cleaning the heating surfaces

[1] Secondary heating pipes

[2] Combustion chamber (heating surfaces of combustion chamber)

[3] Cleaning brush

[4] Turbulator

2

6 720 806 032-31.1ITL

Fig. 29 Opening the cleaning cover of the flue gas collector

[1] Back panel

[2] Cleaning cover

▶ Remove nuts and washers from the cleaning cover [2].

▶ Remove the cleaning cover of flue gas collector [2].

▶ Remove the loosened combustion residues from the combustion chamber (

 Fig. 28), the hot gas flue and the flue gas collector as

well as the condensate hose.

7.3.3

Inserting turbulators

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from improperly inserted turbulators.

Incorrectly inserted turbulators impede the flow of flue gas and lead to overheating of the boiler front.

Insufficiently secured turbulators will drift out of the secondary heating pipes during operation and burn up.

▶ Align turbulators correctly.

▶ Check that the turbulators are secured in the secondary heating pipes. It must not be possible to pull the turbulators out of the secondary heating pipes easily.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

▶ Insert turbulators (

 Fig. 30, [1]) into secondary heating pipes [2].

Inspection and maintenance | 29

7.3.4

Fitting the cleaning cover

DANGER: Risk of poisoning through escaping gases.

Flue gas can escape if the flue gas collector and cleaning drain are not correctly sealed.

▶ Carefully close the flue gas collector with the cleaning cover, and the cleaning drain with a cap.

▶ Position cleaning cover [3] of the flue gas collector.

▶ Install nuts and washers on the cleaning cover [2].

1

1

2

6 720 806 032-12.1ITL

Fig. 30 Correcting securing of the turbulators

[1] Turbulator

[2] Secondary heating pipes

▶ Align turbulators in such a way that all the ends (

 Fig. 31, [2]) point

towards the middle of the combustion chamber.

1 2

6 720 806 032-33.1ITL

Fig. 31 Aligning the turbulators

[1] Combustion chamber

[2] Turbulator, folded end

If turbulators are no longer secured sufficiently, correct how they are secured.

▶ Pull ¾ of turbulator out of secondary heating pipe.

▶ Bend turbulator by 10° – 15°.

▶ Re-insert turbulator into secondary heating pipe.

▶ Recheck how well the turbulator is secured.

▶ Check the gaskets around the burner door and inspection aperture; replace if necessary.

▶ Check the condition of the insulating rings between the burner door thermal insulation and the blast tube (filling the annular gap

 Fig. 19, page 19).

Suitable packing cord/insulating rings are available via spare parts merchants. A genuine spare parts list is available online (see last page for details).

▶ Close the burner door tightly (

 Chapter 4.5, page 18).

4

2

3

Fig. 32 Fitting the cleaning cover

[1] Flue gas collector

[2] Nuts and washers on the cleaning cover

[3] Cleaning cover of flue gas collector

[4] Cleaning drain

6 720 806 032-34.1ITL

7.3.5

Wet-cleaning the boiler

When wet-cleaning, use a cleaning agent appropriate for the level of contamination.

For wet cleaning, follow the same procedure as for cleaning with brushes

(

 Chapter 7.3, page 28).

DANGER: Risk of poisoning through escaping gases.

Flue gas can escape if the flue gas collector and cleaning drain are not correctly sealed.

▶ Carefully close the flue gas collector with the cleaning cover, and the cleaning drain with a cap.

For wet-cleaning (chemical cleaning), observe the operating instructions of the relevant cleaning equipment and cleaning agent.

It may be necessary to vary the wet-cleaning process from that described here.

Liquid cleaning residues can be drained off through the cleaning drain on the flue gas collector.

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

30 | Inspection and maintenance

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from moisture in the control unit.

An ingress of moisture into the control unit will damage it. Never allow any spray to enter the control unit.

▶ Ensure that you only spray cleaning agent onto the heating surfaces of the hot gas flues and the combustion chamber.

▶ Select a cleaning agent that is appropriate for the type of contamination (soot or encrustation).

▶ Cover the control unit with foil to prevent ingress of the cleaning agent.

▶ Spray cleaning agent evenly into the hot gas flues.

▶ Heat the boiler to a temperature of at least 70 °C.

▶ Feed brushes through the secondary heating pipes.

▶ Remove the dummy cap on cleaning drain [1].

▶ Drain off any fluid that has accumulated.

▶ Put the cap [1] over the cleaning drain again.

1

6 720 806 032-15.1ITL

Fig. 33 Opening/closing the cleaning drain

[1] Dummy cap for cleaning drain

7.4

Checking and correcting the water pressure

Your heating system must contain sufficient water to ensure it functions correctly.

▶ If the water pressure in the heating system is too low, top up with water.

▶ Check the water pressure monthly.

7.4.1

When should you check the water pressure in the heating system?

The fill and top-up water quality must comply with the specifications in the Operating Instructions supplied. Recently added fill or top-up water loses much of its volume in the first few days because it naturally releases gases. With new systems you should therefore initially check the heating water pressure on a daily basis, and then at gradually increasing time intervals.

Air pockets may form in the heating system through the fill or top-up water releasing gases.

▶ Vent the heating system (e.g. bleeding the radiators).

▶ If required, top up with water.

Once the heating system is hardly losing any volume, check the heating water pressure monthly.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

A distinction is generally made between open vented and sealed unvented systems. In practice, open vented systems are rarely installed nowadays. We will therefore be using a sealed unvented heating system to demonstrate how you can check the water pressure. All settings will have already been made by the contractor when the system was first commissioned.

7.4.2

Sealed unvented systems

With closed systems, the system pressure must be adjusted on the basis of the heating system requirements.

▶ Check the water pressure of the heating system.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage due to frequent topping-up.

Subject to the water quality, your heating system can be damaged through corrosion or scaling.

▶ Ensure that the heating system is vented correctly.

▶ Check the heating system for leaks and the expansion vessel for functionality.

▶ Observe the requirements regarding water quality

(see Operating Instructions).

▶ If water loss occurs frequently, locate the cause and rectify the problem without delay.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage from thermal stress.

▶ Only fill the heating system when cold (the flow temperature must not exceed 40 °C).

▶ Fill the heating system during operation only by a

WRAS approved filling facility in the return of the pipework for the heating system.

▶ If the pressure in the heating system drops below the required minimum operating pressure: Add top-up water.

▶ Add top-up water only by means of an approved filling facility in the return of the pipework for the heating system.

▶ Vent the heating system.

▶ Check the water pressure once more.

▶ Enter the operating pressures and water quality in the operating instructions.

7.4.3

Open vented systems

For open vented systems, the hydrometer needle [1] should be within the red band [3].

The operating pressure depends on the static height of the system and the installation height of the expansion vessel.

1

2

3

6 720 615 362-41.2O

Fig. 34 Hydrometer for open vented heating systems

[1] Hydrometer needle

[2] Green needle

[3] Red band

Uni 3000 F

Inspection and maintenance | 31

7.5

Inspection and maintenance reports

The inspection and maintenance reports provide an overview of the required inspection and service steps that should be carried out annually.

Warranty:

Annual inspection and service are part of the warranty terms.

Complete these reports after inspections and service. The report can also be used as a template for future reproduction.

▶ Sign and date the completed inspection work.

Inspection work

1.

Check the general condition of the heating system (visual inspection).

2.

Check the heating system function.

3.

Check the components in contact with fuel and water throughout the system for the following:

Page

(individual steps)

• Tightness

• Visible signs of corrosion

• Signs of ageing

4.

Check the combustion chamber and heating surface for contamination and clean them. For this, shut down the heating system.

Page 27 – page 28

5.

Check gaskets/packing cord on the burner door and replace if necessary.

6.

Check and clean the burner.

Page 28

▶ Visual inspection and remove any contamination.

▶ Check all safety equipment (safety shutdown).

▶ Function check

▶ Flue gas analysis with test report for each output stage.

See technical documentation for burner.

7.

Check that the flue is functioning safely.

See technical documentation for burner.

8.

Check water pressure and pre-charge pressure of the expansion vessel.

Page 30

9.

If necessary, check that the DHW cylinder and the magnesium anode are functioning properly.

See technical documentation for

DHW cylinder.

10.

Check the control unit settings are suitable.

See technical documentation for the control unit.

11.

Test all safety equipment (safety shutdown) and record findings. When doing this, the technical documents for the control unit and accessories should be observed. For example:

Date: _____

▶ High limit safety cut-out

▶ Pressure limiter min.

▶ Pressure limiter max. (if installed)

Table 20 Inspection report

Date: _____ Date: _____

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

32 | Inspection and maintenance

Inspection work

12.

Analyse the boiler water and record findings:

▶ pH value

▶ Residual hardness

▶ Oxygen binder

▶ Phosphate

▶ Electrical conductivity

▶ Appearance

▶ Check water records (e. g. amount of top-up water) in the operator's log.

13.

Final check of the inspection work, take measurements and record values and test results.

14.

Confirm professional inspection

Page

(individual steps) Date: _____ Date: _____ Date: _____

Company stamp/ signature

Company stamp/ signature

Table 20 Inspection report

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Demand-based maintenance

Shutting down the heating system.

Clean the hot gas flues (heating surfaces)

Clean the combustion chamber.

Check gaskets/packing cord on the burner door and replace if necessary.

Start up the heating system.

Final check of the maintenance work, take measurements and record values and test results.

Check the function and operational safety (safety equipment).

Table 21 Maintenance report

Page

(individual steps) Date: _____

Page 27

Page 28

Page 28

Page 28

Page 24

See technical documentation for burner.

Company stamp/ signature

Company stamp/ signature

Date: _____ Date: _____

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Correcting burner faults | 33

8 Correcting burner faults

The display shows heating system faults. Further information on the fault displays can be found in the service instructions of the relevant control unit. In addition, burner faults are signalled by an indicator on the burner.

NOTICE: Risk of system damage through frost.

When there is a frost, your heating system can freeze up if it is shut down, e.g. through a fault shutdown.

▶ If your heating system has been shut down for several days due to a fault shutdown and there is a risk of frost, drain the heating water at the drain & fill valve. Also leave the air vent valve at the highest point in the system open.

▶ Press burner reset button (see burner operating instructions).

NOTICE: System damage due to the reset button being pressed too frequently.

This can damage the burner ignition transformer.

▶ Press the reset button no more than three times in sequence.

If the burner still fails to start after three attempts, contact a contractor.

9 Environment / disposal

Environmental protection is a key commitment of the Bosch Group.

Quality of products, efficiency and environmental protection are equally important objectives for us. All legislation pertaining to the environment is strictly observed. To protect the environment we use the best possible technology and materials, subject to economic considerations.

Packaging

Where packaging is concerned, we participate in country-specific recycling processes that ensure optimum recycling. All of our packaging materials are environmentally compatible and can be recycled.

Old appliance

Old appliances contain materials that should be recycled.

The relevant assemblies are easy to separate, and all plastics are identified. In this manner the individual components are easily sorted and added into the recycling and disposal systems.

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

34 | Appendix

10 Appendix

12

8

0,5 %

6/7

2

11

5

1)

15

3

1)

4

1)

1

> 300 kW

14

15

13

10

9

P

13

16

17

2

13

VK

RK

Fig. 35 Safety equipment to EN 12828 for boilers > 300 kW with high limit safety cut-out

110 °C (direct heating)

1)

Standard equipment of the boiler control unit: The maximum achievable flow temperature in combination with control units from the CFB 9xx series is approx. 18 K lower than the shutdown temperature (high limit safety cut-out).

Key to Fig. 35:

[RK] Heating return

[VK] Heating flow connection

[1] Heat sources

[2] Shut-off valve, flow/return

[3] Temperature control unit

[4] High limit safety cut-out

[5] Temperature capturing facility

[6] Diaphragm safety valve 2.5 bar/3 bar or

[7] Lift spring safety valve = 2.5 bar

[8] Flash trap in systems > 300 kW; not required if, instead, a high limit safety cut-out with shutdown temperature of

 110 °C and a maximum pressure limiter are provided additionally for each boiler.

[9] Maximum pressure limiter

[10] Pressure gauge

[11] Low water indicator (not in systems

 300 kW). Alternatively one minimum pressure limiter or a replacement measure approved by the manufacturer is provided for each boiler.

[12] Non-return valve

[13] Drain & fill valve (DFV)

[14] Expansion line

[15] Shut-off valve with lockout against unintentional closure

(e.g. by sealed cap valve)

[16] Drain upstream of the expansion vessel

[17] Expansion vessel (to EN 13831)

The figures show the safety equipment to EN 12828 schematically for the system versions listed here - no claim is made as to their completeness.

Practical implementation is subject to currently applicable technical rules.

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

10.1

Arrangement of safety equipment to EN 12953-6; shutdown temperature (high limit safety cut-out)

> 110 °C

Shutdown temperature (high limit safety cut-out) > 110 °C, example 1

Fig. 36 Safety equipment to EN 12953-6 for boilers with high limit safety cut-out > 110 °C, example 1 (direct heating)

Shutdown temperature (high limit safety cut-out) > 110 °C, example 2

Appendix | 35

Key to Fig. 36 and 37:

[RK] Heating return

[VK] Heating flow connection

[1] Hot water boiler

[2] Maximum pressure limiter [PSZ+A+]

[3] Pressure display facility

[4] Water level controller

[5] Flash trap

[6] Pressure relief valve

[7] Minimum water level limiter [LSZ-A-]

[8] Temperature limiter [TZA+A+]

[9] Temperature control unit

[10] Temperature display facility

[11] Fill & sample facility for water level test

[12] Shut-off valve (locked to prevent unintentional closing)

[13] Sealed expansion vessel

[14] Minimum pressure limiter [PSZ-A-]

[15] Non-return valve

[17] Shut-off valve (return)

[18] Line to the sealed expansion vessel

[19] Feed pump

[20] Heating facility

[22] Pressure maintaining pump

[23] Pressure regulator

[24] Automatic shut-off valve (closed at zero volt)

[25] Water level display

[26] Open expansion vessel

[27] Pressure maintaining valve (if N/C or if the actual pressure is lower than the minimum pressure, then (24) may be omitted)

[28] Shut-off valve with optional connection for test pressure gauge

[30] Minimum temperature controller (if required)

[31] Drainage system

The figures show the safety equipment to EN 12953-6 schematically for the system versions listed here - no claim is made as to their completeness.

The figures only show variants where the pressure is maintained via a gas buffer or pressure maintaining pump. Beyond this, refer to EN 12953-6 for other versions of pressure maintenance with different types of safety equipment.

With a high limit safety cut-out > 110 °C, far-reaching requirements (e.g. regular inspections etc.) in accordance with the Health & Safety at Work

Act [Germany] must be satisfied.

Practical implementation is subject to currently applicable technical rules. It is recommended that the system schematics be reviewed by the responsible supervisory authority.

Fig. 37 Safety equipment to EN 12953-6 for boilers with high limit safety cut-out > 110 °C, example 2 (direct heating)

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

36 | Index

Index

A

About the appliance

Data plate

..................................................

7

.........................................................

6

Appliance details

Operating conditions

Assembly aids

..............................................

5

Overview of possible fuels

........................................

5

........................................................

6

C

CE Declaration of Conformity

.........................................

5

Checking and correcting the water pressure

........................

30

Checking and correcting the water pressure in open vented systems

.........................................................

30

Checking and correcting the water pressure in sealed unvented systems

.........................................................

30

Checking connections for leaks

Commissioning

.....................................

17

.....................................................

24

Commissioning

..................................................

24

Commissioning the burner

......................................

24

Commissioning the control unit

Filling the heating system

.................................

24

.......................................

24

Flushing the heating system

.....................................

24

Preparing the heating system for operation

Raising the flue gas temperature

Turbulators

.....................

24

................................

25

......................................................

25

Commissioning report

..............................................

26

Commissioning the burner

..........................................

24

Commissioning the control unit

Correcting burner faults

.....................................

24

Connecting the boiler to the pipework

..............................

16

............................................

33

D

Data plate

.............................................................

6

Description of appliance

Disposal

..............................................

6

............................................................

33

E

Environmental protection

...........................................

33

F

Filling the boiler

.....................................................

17

Filling the heating system

...........................................

24

Fitting

...............................................................

14

Fitting sensors

..................................................

21

Fitting the burner

................................................

19

Fitting the burner door to pivot to the left or right

Fitting the flue pipe sealing collar

Recommended wall clearances

...............

18

...............................

16

.................................

14

Siting the boiler

.................................................

14

Sound insulation mats

...........................................

15

Fitting sensors

......................................................

21

Fitting the burner

...................................................

19

Fitting the burner door to pivot to the left or right

Fitting the burner plate

...................

18

.............................................

19

Fitting the burner to the burner plate

Fitting the control unit

...............................

19

..............................................

19

Fitting the flue pipe sealing collar

...................................

16

Flue gas and water connections for heating system

.................

16

Flushing the heating system

Fuels

........................................

24

..................................................................

5

H

Handling

.............................................................

13

I

Information about the device

CE Declaration of Conformity

Intended use

.....................................

5

......................................................

4

Measurements

....................................................

8

Minimum clearances

..............................................

8

Inspection and maintenance

........................................

27

Checking and correcting the water pressure

.....................

30

Checking and correcting the water pressure in open vented systems

.............................................................................30

Checking and correcting the water pressure in sealed unvented systems

.............................................................................30

Cleaning heating surfaces and turbulators with a cleaning brush

28

Cleaning the boiler

...............................................

28

Cleaning the flue gas collector

...................................

28

........................................

29

Fitting the cleaning cover

General information

.............................................

27

Inserting turbulators

Preparing the boiler

.............................................

28

..............................................

27

Wet-cleaning the boiler

Inspection reports

..........................................

29

...................................................

31

Installaiton

Fitting the control unit

...........................................

19

Installation

Checking connections for leaks

Filling the boiler

..................................

17

Connecting the boiler to the pipework

...........................

16

..................................................

17

Fitting the burner plate

..........................................

19

Fitting the burner to the burner plate

............................

19

Flue gas and water connections for heating system

Levelling the boiler

..............

16

...............................................

15

Making the electrical connection

.................................

20

Intended use

.........................................................

4

L

Levelling the boiler

..................................................

15

M

Maintenance reports

Measurements

Minimum clearances

................................................

31

Making the electrical connection

....................................

20

.......................................................

8

.................................................

8

O

Old appliance

.......................................................

33

Operating conditions

.................................................

5

P

Packaging

...........................................................

33

Preparing the heating system for operation

.........................

24

Product details

Description of appliance

Product information

..........................................

6

..................................................

4

R

Raising the flue gas temperature

Recommended wall clearances

....................................

25

......................................

14

Recycling

............................................................

33

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

S

Safety instructions

...................................................

3

Shutdown

Shutting down the heating system

Shutting down

...............................

27

Shutting down the heating system in emergencies

..............

27

.......................................................

27

Shutting down the heating system

Siting the boiler

..................................

27

Shutting down the heating system in emergencies

..................

27

.....................................................

14

Sound insulation mats

...............................................

15

Standard delivery

....................................................

7

T

Technical data

Uni 3000F

Tools

..................................................

11

12

.................................................................

6

Transport

Lifting with a crane

..............................................

14

Moving the boiler with a forklift truck

............................

13

Moving the boiler with two pallet trucks

Turbulators

.........................

13

..........................................................

25

Type overview

........................................................

5

Index | 37

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

38 |

Notes

6 720 812 900 (2014/10) Uni 3000 F

Notes

| 39

Uni 3000 F 6 720 812 900 (2014/10)

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Key Features

  • Wide output range (420 to 1850 kW)
  • High efficiency ratings
  • Low emissions
  • Easy to install and maintain
  • Durable construction

Related manuals

Frequently Answers and Questions

What is the output range of the Bosch Uni 3000 F?
The output range of the Bosch Uni 3000 F is 420 to 1850 kW.
What are the dimensions of the Bosch Uni 3000 F?
The dimensions of the Bosch Uni 3000 F are not specified in the provided manual.
What type of fuel does the Bosch Uni 3000 F use?
The Bosch Uni 3000 F can use oil or gas as fuel.
What is the efficiency rating of the Bosch Uni 3000 F?
The efficiency rating of the Bosch Uni 3000 F is not specified in the provided manual.
What are the emissions of the Bosch Uni 3000 F?
The emissions of the Bosch Uni 3000 F are not specified in the provided manual.

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